classes ::: keywords, word, media, temp, noun, class, Names of God,
children :::
branches ::: the Word

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:the Word
class:keywords
object:keyphrases
class:word
subject:English
class:media
class:temp
word class:noun
OFF class:class

--- THE WORD
The Divine's words comfort and bless, soo the and illumine, and the Divine's generous hand lifts a fold of the veil which hides the infinite knowledge.

--- QUOTES
The Fire is to be quieted and silenced says the Upanishad. Then we come nearer, to the
immediate vicinity of the Truth; an inner hearing opens, the direct voice of Truth - the Word - reaches us to lead and guide. Even so, however, we have not come to the end of our journey; the Word of revelation is not the ultimate Light. The Word too is a clothing, though a luminous clothing - hiranmayam pair am. When this last veil dissolves and disappears, when utter silence, absolute calm and quietude reign in the entire consciousness, when no other lights trouble or distract our attention, there appears the Atman in its own body ; we stand face to face with the source of all lights, the self of the Light, the light of the Self. We are that Light and we become that Light.
~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, The Approach To Mysticism

see also ::: the Light, the Silence, mantra, poetry, the Book, the Message

--- KEYWORDS AND KEYPHRASES


    singles: (under are un-html-ed singles)
    Truths Principles Powers Processes
    Necessities/necessary/NEEDS MAIN
    Realizations Main
    Accomplishments
    Standards
    Objects - NOUMENON and FAVORITES
    problems, obstacles, difficulties, mistakes, challenges, struggles
    Interests, Ideas (mostly empty), ideals (empty)
    Goals and Projects
    Verbs / Actions / Injunctions
    Wiki
    18000
    Groups:
      The Best~
      The Best thing
        God's Will
      interesting moments and experiences
      computer stuff i want to learn and make
    un-html-ed singles
      Movements
      Stages
      Proofs
      Conditions
      Preliminaries
      Essentials
      Minimums
      Requirements
      Prerequisites
      rules
        rules of human interaction (always answer the phone)
        rules of action ["the first rule of action"] syn
      Instruments
      rewards
      methods
      Sadhana
      Change
    un-html-ed groups
      the importance of
        overcoming the ego
        overcoming desire.
        effort
      next level mind
        BFP
        headstands
      vital training
      resisting the grace
      you must
      one page offering (of Savitri)
      most important
      always the best
      following the breath into dream
      the first thing
      it is easier by
      the one effective way
      the only thing that matters
      is one of the chief methods
      extremely
      the fire of transformation
      the proper course
      only one condition
      in ordinary life
      it is better
      always is the main thing
      make the most
      
  But if we desire to make the most of the opportunity that this life gives us, if we wish to respond adequately to the call we have received and to attain to the goal we have glimpsed, not merely advance a little towards it, it is essential that there should be an entire self-giving. The secret of success in Yoga is to regard it not as one of the aims to be pursued in life, but as the one and only aim, not as an important part of life, but as the whole of life.
  - Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis of Yoga




class:Names of God

see also ::: mantra, poetry, the_Book, the_Light, the_Message, the_Silence

questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
Japa
Logos
repeat
script
SEE ALSO

mantra
poetry
the_Book
the_Light
the_Message
the_Silence

AUTH

BOOKS
A_Guide_to_the_Words_of_My_Perfect_Teacher
City_of_God
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Evolution_II
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Hymn_of_the_Universe
Infinite_Library
Know_Yourself
Let_Me_Explain
Letters_On_Poetry_And_Art
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_I
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Life_without_Death
Meditation__The_First_and_Last_Freedom
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Interpretation
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Poetics
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Savitri
The_Act_of_Creation
The_Archetypes_and_the_Collective_Unconscious
the_Book
The_Categories
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Companion
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Future_of_Man
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Words_of_My_Perfect_Teacher
The_Yoga_Sutras
Three_Books_on_Occult_Philosophy
Toward_the_Future
Vedic_and_Philological_Studies

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
1.07_-_Note_on_the_word_Go
1.1.1.02_-_Creation_by_the_Word
1954-04-07_-_Communication_without_words_-_Uneven_progress_-_Words_and_the_Word
1955-10-26_-_The_Divine_and_the_universal_Teacher_-_The_power_of_the_Word_-_The_Creative_Word,_the_mantra_-_Sound,_music_in_other_worlds_-_The_domains_of_pure_form,_colour_and_ideas
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Belief
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Error
1.jr_-_I_regard_not_the_outside_and_the_words
1.kbr_-_The_Word
1.nmdv_-_The_thundering_resonance_of_the_Word
1.rajh_-_The_Word_Most_Precious

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.00_-_The_Wellspring_of_Reality
0.01f_-_FOREWARD
0.01_-_Letters_from_the_Mother_to_Her_Son
0.02_-_II_-_The_Home_of_the_Guru
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.05_-_Letters_to_a_Child
0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_his_School
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.06_-_Vivekananda
01.07_-_The_Bases_of_Social_Reconstruction
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.13_-_T._S._Eliot:_Four_Quartets
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.13_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0_1956-10-07
0_1958-06-06_-_Supramental_Ship
0_1958-09-16_-_OM_NAMO_BHAGAVATEH
0_1958-10-04
0_1958-10-10
0_1958-11-08
0_1959-01-31
0_1959-04-24
0_1959-05-28
0_1959-10-06_-_Sri_Aurobindos_abode
0_1960-01-28
0_1960-06-04
0_1960-06-11
0_1960-10-02a
0_1960-10-02b
0_1960-10-08
0_1960-10-11
0_1960-10-22
0_1960-10-30
0_1960-11-08
0_1960-12-13
0_1960-12-25
0_1961-01-27
0_1961-01-29
0_1961-01-31
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-02-25
0_1961-03-11
0_1961-03-17
0_1961-04-18
0_1961-04-25
0_1961-05-12
0_1961-05-19
0_1961-07-07
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-10-15
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-07
0_1961-11-12
0_1961-12-23
0_1962-01-12_-_supramental_ship
0_1962-01-15
0_1962-01-27
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-02-06
0_1962-02-27
0_1962-03-03
0_1962-03-11
0_1962-05-15
0_1962-05-22
0_1962-05-24
0_1962-05-31
0_1962-06-06
0_1962-06-09
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-06-27
0_1962-06-30
0_1962-07-14
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-08-25
0_1962-09-08
0_1962-09-26
0_1962-10-12
0_1962-11-27
0_1962-12-12
0_1962-12-15
0_1962-12-19
0_1962-12-25
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-19
0_1963-02-23
0_1963-03-09
0_1963-03-13
0_1963-03-16
0_1963-04-29
0_1963-05-11
0_1963-06-08
0_1963-06-15
0_1963-06-29
0_1963-07-10
0_1963-07-20
0_1963-08-07
0_1963-08-10
0_1963-08-13b
0_1963-08-24
0_1963-08-31
0_1963-09-18
0_1963-09-25
0_1963-11-20
0_1963-11-27
0_1963-11-30
0_1963-12-07_-_supramental_ship
0_1964-01-18
0_1964-01-22
0_1964-01-25
0_1964-02-05
0_1964-02-22
0_1964-03-18
0_1964-03-25
0_1964-04-25
0_1964-07-18
0_1964-07-22
0_1964-08-08
0_1964-08-22
0_1964-08-26
0_1964-09-23
0_1964-09-26
0_1964-10-07
0_1964-10-24a
0_1964-10-30
0_1964-11-04
0_1964-11-12
0_1965-01-12
0_1965-02-19
0_1965-03-06
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-04-17
0_1965-04-21
0_1965-06-09
0_1965-06-14
0_1965-06-23
0_1965-06-26
0_1965-07-14
0_1965-07-17
0_1965-07-21
0_1965-08-21
0_1965-08-25
0_1965-09-15a
0_1965-11-27
0_1965-12-07
0_1965-12-10
0_1966-01-26
0_1966-03-04
0_1966-03-19
0_1966-05-18
0_1966-06-25
0_1966-06-29
0_1966-07-09
0_1966-08-27
0_1966-08-31
0_1966-09-17
0_1966-09-21
0_1966-11-09
0_1966-11-19
0_1966-11-26
0_1966-11-30
0_1966-12-07
0_1966-12-17
0_1967-01-14
0_1967-01-25
0_1967-01-28
0_1967-02-18
0_1967-02-25
0_1967-03-11
0_1967-03-29
0_1967-04-03
0_1967-04-22
0_1967-05-10
0_1967-05-24
0_1967-06-07
0_1967-06-17
0_1967-07-15
0_1967-07-19
0_1967-07-26
0_1967-07-29
0_1967-08-12
0_1967-08-16
0_1967-08-19
0_1967-09-06
0_1967-09-30
0_1967-10-14
0_1967-10-21
0_1968-01-06
0_1968-01-10
0_1968-02-17
0_1968-02-20
0_1968-02-28
0_1968-03-02
0_1968-03-27
0_1968-04-23
0_1968-05-04
0_1968-05-22
0_1968-06-03
0_1968-06-15
0_1968-07-03
0_1968-07-20
0_1968-10-16
0_1968-11-06
0_1968-11-30
0_1968-12-11
0_1969-01-08
0_1969-02-08
0_1969-02-22
0_1969-03-12
0_1969-03-26
0_1969-04-09
0_1969-04-30
0_1969-06-25
0_1969-06-28
0_1969-07-23
0_1969-09-20
0_1969-10-11
0_1969-11-12
0_1969-11-19
0_1969-11-22
0_1969-11-29
0_1969-12-03
0_1969-12-17
0_1969-12-20
0_1969-12-24
0_1970-01-03
0_1970-01-17
0_1970-01-31
0_1970-02-21
0_1970-03-18
0_1970-03-28
0_1970-04-04
0_1970-04-11
0_1970-04-22
0_1970-05-02
0_1970-05-09
0_1970-06-20
0_1970-07-11
0_1970-09-09
0_1970-10-17
0_1971-01-16
0_1971-03-13
0_1971-04-17
0_1971-05-15
0_1971-05-22
0_1971-07-21
0_1971-08-28
0_1971-09-04
0_1971-09-08
0_1971-10-23
0_1971-11-17
0_1971-12-01
0_1971-12-04
0_1972-01-08
0_1972-01-12
0_1972-07-22
0_1972-08-02
0_1972-08-09
0_1972-08-16
0_1972-10-07
0_1972-12-02
0_1972-12-09
0_1973-01-17
0_1973-03-14
0_1973-04-14
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_Rishi_Dirghatama
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.02_-_The_Message_of_the_Atomic_Bomb
02.03_-_The_Shakespearean_Word
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.10_-_Independence_and_its_Sanction
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.12_-_Mysticism_in_Bengali_Poetry
02.13_-_In_the_Self_of_Mind
02.13_-_Rabindranath_and_Sri_Aurobindo
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Body_Human
03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon
03.04_-_Towardsa_New_Ideology
03.05_-_The_World_is_One
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.10_-_The_Mission_of_Buddhism
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.12_-_Communism:_What_does_it_Mean?
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
03.12_-_The_Spirit_of_Tapasya
03.13_-_Dynamic_Fatalism
03.17_-_The_Souls_Odyssey
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.03_-_The_Eternal_East_and_West
04.09_-_Values_Higher_and_Lower
04.12_-_To_the_Heights-XII
05.02_-_Physician,_Heal_Thyself
05.03_-_Bypaths_of_Souls_Journey
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.06_-_Physics_or_philosophy
05.08_-_True_Charity
05.12_-_The_Revealer_and_the_Revelation
05.16_-_A_Modernist_Mentality
05.18_-_Man_to_be_Surpassed
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
06.17_-_Directed_Change
06.27_-_To_Learn_and_to_Understand
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.03_-_This_Expanding_Universe
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness
07.08_-_The_Divine_Truth_Its_Name_and_Form
07.19_-_Bad_Thought-Formation
07.29_-_How_to_Feel_that_we_Belong_to_the_Divine
08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest
08.06_-_A_Sign_and_a_Symbol
08.11_-_The_Work_Here
08.14_-_Poetry_and_Poetic_Inspiration
08.15_-_Divine_Living
08.20_-_Are_Not_The_Ascetic_Means_Helpful_At_Times?
09.01_-_Towards_the_Black_Void
09.12_-_The_True_Teaching
09.13_-_On_Teachers_and_Teaching
100.00_-_Synergy
10.01_-_A_Dream
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
10.02_-_Beyond_Vedanta
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
10.05_-_Mind_and_the_Mental_World
10.09_-_Education_as_the_Growth_of_Consciousness
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00b_-_Introduction
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00f_-_DIVISION_F_-_THE_LAW_OF_ECONOMY
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_PRELUDE_AT_THE_THEATRE
1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga
10.15_-_The_Evolution_of_Language
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_Asana
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle
1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Foreward
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_Historical_Survey
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_'Imitation'_the_common_principle_of_the_Arts_of_Poetry.
1.01_-_Isha_Upanishad
1.01_-_Maitreya_inquires_of_his_teacher_(Parashara)
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_On_renunciation_of_the_world
1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.01_-_Prayer
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Seeing
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Lord_of_hosts
1.01_-_The_Rape_of_the_Lock
1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living
1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
1.02.2.1_-_Brahman_-_Oneness_of_God_and_the_World
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
1.02.4.1_-_The_Worlds_-_Surya
10.24_-_Savitri
10.25_-_How_to_Read_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
1.02_-_Fire_over_the_Earth
1.02_-_Isha_Analysis
1.02_-_Karmayoga
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Of_certain_spiritual_imperfections_which_beginners_have_with_respect_to_the_habit_of_pride.
1.02_-_On_detachment
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga
1.02_-_Prayer_of_Parashara_to_Vishnu
1.02_-_Skillful_Means
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_7_Habits__An_Overview
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Descent._Dante's_Protest_and_Virgil's_Appeal._The_Intercession_of_the_Three_Ladies_Benedight.
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher
1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics
1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law
1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara
1.02_-_The_Pit
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_The_Ultimate_Path_is_Without_Difficulty
1.031_-_Intense_Aspiration
1.032_-_Our_Concept_of_God
1.035_-_The_Recitation_of_Mantra
10.36_-_Cling_to_Truth
1.036_-_The_Rise_of_Obstacles_in_Yoga_Practice
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_Fire_in_the_Earth
1.03_-_Hymns_of_Gritsamada
1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita
1.03_-_Some_Aspects_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_The_Desert
1.03_-_THE_EARTH_IN_ITS_EARLY_STAGES
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple
1.03_-_THE_ORPHAN,_THE_WIDOW,_AND_THE_MOON
1.03_-_The_Phenomenon_of_Man
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_The_Uncreated
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.03_-_YIBHOOTI_PADA
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_Body,_Soul_and_Spirit
1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Of_other_imperfections_which_these_beginners_are_apt_to_have_with_respect_to_the_third_sin,_which_is_luxury.
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_ON_THE_DESPISERS_OF_THE_BODY
1.04_-_Reality_Omnipresent
1.04_-_Te_Shan_Carrying_His_Bundle
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Control_of_Psychic_Prana
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_First_Circle,_Limbo__Virtuous_Pagans_and_the_Unbaptized._The_Four_Poets,_Homer,_Horace,_Ovid,_and_Lucan._The_Noble_Castle_of_Philosophy.
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Qabalah__The_Best_Training_for_Memory
1.04_-_THE_RABBIT_SENDS_IN_A_LITTLE_BILL
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_Wake-Up_Sermon
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.04_-_Wherefore_of_World?
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.056_-_Lack_of_Knowledge_is_the_Cause_of_Suffering
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Definition_of_the_Ludicrous,_and_a_brief_sketch_of_the_rise_of_Comedy.
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_Knowledge_by_Aquaintance_and_Knowledge_by_Description
1.05_-_MORALITY_AS_THE_ENEMY_OF_NATURE
1.05_-_On_painstaking_and_true_repentance_which_constitute_the_life_of_the_holy_convicts;_and_about_the_prison.
1.05_-_On_the_Love_of_God.
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_Ritam
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Creative_Principle
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_THE_MASTER_AND_KESHAB
1.05_-_The_New_Consciousness
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_Vishnu_as_Brahma_creates_the_world
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Yoga_and_Hypnotism
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_Definition_of_Tragedy.
1.06_-_Incarnate_Teachers_and_Incarnation
1.06_-_Magicians_as_Kings
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_gluttony.
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.06_-_Psycho_therapy_and_a_Philosophy_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Desire_to_be
1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah
1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1
1.06_-_The_Transformation_of_Dream_Life
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.070_-_The_Seven_Stages_of_Perfection
1.075_-_Self-Control,_Study_and_Devotion_to_God
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha
1.07_-_Hymn_of_Paruchchhepa
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Medicine_and_Psycho_therapy
1.07_-_Note_on_the_word_Go
1.07_-_On_Our_Knowledge_of_General_Principles
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_Samadhi
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_The_Continuity_of_Consciousness
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_The_Literal_Qabalah_(continued)
1.07_-_The_Mantra_-_OM_-_Word_and_Wisdom
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_2
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.081_-_The_Application_of_Pratyahara
1.089_-_The_Levels_of_Concentration
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Departmental_Kings_of_Nature
1.08_-_Karma,_the_Law_of_Cause_and_Effect
1.08_-_On_freedom_from_anger_and_on_meekness.
1.08_-_Origin_of_Rudra:_his_becoming_eight_Rudras
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_The_Magic_Sword,_Dagger_and_Trident
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Plot_must_be_a_Unity.
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Discovery
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.08_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_3
1.08_-_THINGS_THE_GERMANS_LACK
1.08_-_Wherein_is_expounded_the_first_line_of_the_first_stanza,_and_a_beginning_is_made_of_the_explanation_of_this_dark_night
1.08_-_Worship_of_Substitutes_and_Images
1.096_-_Powers_that_Accrue_in_the_Practice
1.097_-_Sublimation_of_Object-Consciousness
1.098_-_The_Transformation_from_Human_to_Divine
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_A_System_of_Vedic_Psychology
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_FAITH_IN_PEACE
1.09_-_Legend_of_Lakshmi
1.09_-_On_remembrance_of_wrongs.
1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_The_Absolute_Manifestation
1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol
1.09_-_The_Secret_Chiefs
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
1.1.02_-_Sachchidananda
11.07_-_The_Labours_of_the_Gods:_The_five_Purifications
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_The_Absolute_of_the_Being
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Image_of_the_Oceans_and_the_Rivers
1.10_-_The_Methods_and_the_Means
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
1.1.1.02_-_Creation_by_the_Word
11.10_-_The_Test_of_Truth
11.13_-_In_these_Fateful_Days
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Problem
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Legend_of_Dhruva,_the_son_of_Uttanapada
1.11_-_On_Intuitive_Knowledge
1.11_-_Powers
1.1.1_-_Text
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.11_-_The_Seven_Rivers
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution
1.12_-_Independence
1.1.2_-_Intellect_and_the_Intellectual
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Herds_of_the_Dawn
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.12_-_Truth_and_Knowledge
1.13_-_Dawn_and_the_Truth
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.13_-_Knowledge,_Error,_and_Probably_Opinion
1.13_-_Posterity_of_Dhruva
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_The_Kings_of_Rome_and_Alba
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_IMMORTALITY_AND_SURVIVAL
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_On_the_clamorous,_yet_wicked_master-the_stomach.
1.14_-_The_Limits_of_Philosophical_Knowledge
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.14_-_The_Supermind_as_Creator
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_SILENCE
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.15_-_The_Supramental_Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Transformed_Being
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.15_-_Truth
1.16_-_Dianus_and_Diana
1.16_-_On_love_of_money_or_avarice.
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.16_-_The_Season_of_Truth
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_ON_THE_WAY_OF_THE_CREATOR
1.17_-_Religion_as_the_Law_of_Life
1.17_-_SUFFERING
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.17_-_The_Divine_Soul
1.17_-_The_Seven-Headed_Thought,_Swar_and_the_Dashagwas
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_Asceticism
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_Further_rules_for_the_Tragic_Poet.
1.18_-_Hiranyakasipu's_reiterated_attempts_to_destroy_his_son
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_On_insensibility,_that_is,_deadening_of_the_soul_and_the_death_of_the_mind_before_the_death_of_the_body.
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.18_-_The_Human_Fathers
1.18_-_The_Importance_of_our_Conventional_Greetings,_etc.
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_On_sleep,_prayer,_and_psalm-singing_in_chapel.
1.19_-_ON_THE_PROBABLE_EXISTENCE_AHEAD_OF_US_OF_AN_ULTRA-HUMAN
1.19_-_Tabooed_Acts
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.19_-_The_Practice_of_Magical_Evocation
1.19_-_The_Victory_of_the_Fathers
1.19_-_Thought,_or_the_Intellectual_element,_and_Diction_in_Tragedy.
1.200-1.224_Talks
1.201_-_Socrates
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
1.2.03_-_The_Interpretation_of_Scripture
1.2.09_-_Consecration_and_Offering
1.20_-_On_bodily_vigil_and_how_to_use_it_to_attain_spiritual_vigil_and_how_to_practise_it.
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven
1.2.1.03_-_Psychic_and_Esoteric_Poetry
1.2.1.11_-_Mystic_Poetry_and_Spiritual_Poetry
1.21_-_Chih_Men's_Lotus_Flower,_Lotus_Leaves
1.21_-_Families_of_the_Daityas
1.21__-_Poetic_Diction.
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_The_Ascent_of_Life
1.22_-_ADVICE_TO_AN_ACTOR
1.22__-_Dominion_over_different_provinces_of_creation_assigned_to_different_beings
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Describes_how_vocal_prayer_may_be_practised_with_perfection_and_how_closely_allied_it_is_to_mental_prayer
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.2.4_-_Speech_and_Yoga
1.24_-_The_Advent_and_Progress_of_the_Spiritual_Age
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_Critical_Objections_brought_against_Poetry,_and_the_principles_on_which_they_are_to_be_answered.
1.25_-_Describes_the_great_gain_which_comes_to_a_soul_when_it_practises_vocal_prayer_perfectly._Shows_how_God_may_raise_it_thence_to_things_supernatural.
1.25_-_Fascinations,_Invisibility,_Levitation,_Transmutations,_Kinks_in_Time
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.26_-_Mental_Processes_-_Two_Only_are_Possible
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.27_-_Structure_of_Mind_Based_on_that_of_Body
1.28_-_Need_to_Define_God,_Self,_etc.
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.29_-_Concerning_heaven_on_earth,_or_godlike_dispassion_and_perfection,_and_the_resurrection_of_the_soul_before_the_general_resurrection.
1.29_-_What_is_Certainty?
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
13.02_-_A_Review_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Life
13.03_-_A_Programme_for_the_Second_Century_of_the_Divine_Manifestation
1.3.03_-_Quiet_and_Calm
13.04_-_A_Note_on_Supermind
1.3.05_-_Silence
1.30_-_Concerning_the_linking_together_of_the_supreme_trinity_among_the_virtues.
1.30_-_Do_you_Believe_in_God?
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.31_-_Is_Thelema_a_New_Religion?
1.32_-_Expounds_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Fiat_voluntas_tua_sicut_in_coelo_et_in_terra._Describes_how_much_is_accomplished_by_those_who_repeat_these_words_with_full_resolution_and_how_well
1.32_-_The_Ninth_Circle__Traitors._The_Frozen_Lake_of_Cocytus._First_Division,_Caina__Traitors_to_their_Kindred._Camicion_de'_Pazzi._Second_Division,_Antenora__Traitors_to_their_Country._Dante_questions_Bocca_degli
1.3.4.01_-_The_Beginning_and_the_End
1.34_-_Continues_the_same_subject._This_is_very_suitable_for_reading_after_the_reception_of_the_Most_Holy_Sacrament.
1.37_-_Describes_the_excellence_of_this_prayer_called_the_Paternoster,_and_the_many_ways_in_which_we_shall_find_consolation_in_it.
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
1.4.03_-_The_Guru
1.41_-_Isis
1.42_-_This_Self_Introversion
1.42_-_Treats_of_these_last_words_of_the_Paternoster__Sed_libera_nos_a_malo._Amen._But_deliver_us_from_evil._Amen.
1.439
1.43_-_The_Holy_Guardian_Angel_is_not_the_Higher_Self_but_an_Objective_Individual
1.44_-_Serious_Style_of_A.C.,_or_the_Apparent_Frivolity_of_Some_of_my_Remarks
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.45_-_The_Corn-Mother_and_the_Corn-Maiden_in_Northern_Europe
1.46_-_Selfishness
1.47_-_Lityerses
15.06_-_Words,_Words,_Words...
1.50_-_A.C._and_the_Masters;_Why_they_Chose_him,_etc.
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_Mother-Love
1.54_-_On_Meanness
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.55_-_Money
1.55_-_The_Transference_of_Evil
1.56_-_Marriage_-_Property_-_War_-_Politics
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Beings_I_have_Seen_with_my_Physical_Eye
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.61_-_The_Myth_of_Balder
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.67_-_Faith
1.67_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Custom
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
1.69_-_Original_Sin
17.02_-_Hymn_to_the_Sun
17.06_-_Hymn_of_the_Supreme_Goddess
1.70_-_Morality_1
1.72_-_Education
1.73_-_Monsters,_Niggers,_Jews,_etc.
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.82_-_Epistola_Penultima_-_The_Two_Ways_to_Reality
1912_12_11p
1914_03_13p
1914_06_17p
1914_11_08p
1916_12_26p
19.24_-_The_Canto_of_Desire
1929-05-19_-_Mind_and_its_workings,_thought-forms_-_Adverse_conditions_and_Yoga_-_Mental_constructions_-_Illness_and_Yoga
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1929-08-04_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Personality_and_surrender_-_Desire_and_passion_-_Spirituality_and_morality
1936_08_21p
1950-12-21_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams
1951-01-04_-_Transformation_and_reversal_of_consciousness.
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-02-03_-_What_is_Yoga?_for_what?_-_Aspiration,_seeking_the_Divine._-_Process_of_yoga,_renouncing_the_ego.
1951-02-10_-_Liberty_and_license_-_surrender_makes_you_free_-_Men_in_authority_as_representatives_of_the_divine_Truth_-_Work_as_offering_-_total_surrender_needs_time_-_Effort_and_inspiration_-_will_and_patience
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-03-12_-_Mental_forms_-_learning_difficult_subjects_-_Mental_fortress_-_thought_-_Training_the_mind_-_Helping_the_vital_being_after_death_-_ceremonies_-_Human_stupidities
1951-03-19_-_Mental_worlds_and_their_beings_-_Understanding_in_silence_-_Psychic_world-_its_characteristics_-_True_experiences_and_mental_formations_-_twelve_senses
1951-03-29_-_The_Great_Vehicle_and_The_Little_Vehicle_-_Choosing_ones_family,_country_-_The_vital_being_distorted_-_atavism_-_Sincerity_-_changing_ones_character
1951-03-31_-_Physical_ailment_and_mental_disorder_-_Curing_an_illness_spiritually_-_Receptivity_of_the_body_-_The_subtle-physical-_illness_accidents_-_Curing_sunstroke_and_other_disorders
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1951-04-14_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Idea_of_sacrifice_-_Bahaism_-_martyrdom_-_Sleep-_forgetfulness,_exteriorisation,_etc_-_Dreams_and_visions-_explanations_-_Exteriorisation-_incidents_about_cats
1951-04-21_-_Sri_Aurobindos_letter_on_conditions_for_doing_yoga_-_Aspiration,_tapasya,_surrender_-_The_lower_vital_-_old_habits_-_obsession_-_Sri_Aurobindo_on_choice_and_the_double_life_-_The_old_fiasco_-_inner_realisation_and_outer_change
1951-04-26_-_Irrevocable_transformation_-_The_divine_Shakti_-_glad_submission_-_Rejection,_integral_-_Consecration_-_total_self-forgetfulness_-_work
1951-05-05_-_Needs_and_desires_-_Discernment_-_sincerity_and_true_perception_-_Mantra_and_its_effects_-_Object_in_action-_to_serve_-_relying_only_on_the_Divine
1951-05-07_-_A_Hierarchy_-_Transcendent,_universal,_individual_Divine_-_The_Supreme_Shakti_and_Creation_-_Inadequacy_of_words,_language
1951-05-14_-_Chance_-_the_play_of_forces_-_Peace,_given_and_lost_-_Abolishing_the_ego
1953-05-27
1953-06-10
1953-06-24
1953-07-08
1953-07-22
1953-07-29
1953-08-12
1953-09-16
1953-09-30
1953-10-07
1953-10-21
1953-11-18
1954-02-17_-_Experience_expressed_in_different_ways_-_Origin_of_the_psychic_being_-_Progress_in_sports_-Everything_is_not_for_the_best
1954-04-07_-_Communication_without_words_-_Uneven_progress_-_Words_and_the_Word
1954-05-19_-_Affection_and_love_-_Psychic_vision_Divine_-_Love_and_receptivity_-_Get_out_of_the_ego
1954-06-16_-_Influences,_Divine_and_other_-_Adverse_forces_-_The_four_great_Asuras_-_Aspiration_arranges_circumstances_-_Wanting_only_the_Divine
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-07-07_-_The_inner_warrior_-_Grace_and_the_Falsehood_-_Opening_from_below_-_Surrender_and_inertia_-_Exclusive_receptivity_-_Grace_and_receptivity
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-07-28_-_Money_-_Ego_and_individuality_-_The_shadow
1954-08-18_-_Mahalakshmi_-_Maheshwari_-_Mahasaraswati_-_Determinism_and_freedom_-_Suffering_and_knowledge_-_Aspects_of_the_Mother
1954-09-15_-_Parts_of_the_being_-_Thoughts_and_impulses_-_The_subconscient_-_Precise_vocabulary_-_The_Grace_and_difficulties
1954-09-29_-_The_right_spirit_-_The_Divine_comes_first_-_Finding_the_Divine_-_Mistakes_-_Rejecting_impulses_-_Making_the_consciousness_vast_-_Firm_resolution
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-29_-_Difficulties_and_the_world_-_The_experience_the_psychic_being_wants_-_After_death_-Ignorance
1955-02-23_-_On_the_sense_of_taste,_educating_the_senses_-_Fasting_produces_a_state_of_receptivity,_drawing_energy_-_The_body_and_food
1955-03-02_-_Right_spirit,_aspiration_and_desire_-_Sleep_and_yogic_repose,_how_to_sleep_-_Remembering_dreams_-_Concentration_and_outer_activity_-_Mother_opens_the_door_inside_everyone_-_Sleep,_a_school_for_inner_knowledge_-_Source_of_energy
1955-04-06_-_Freuds_psychoanalysis,_the_subliminal_being_-_The_psychic_and_the_subliminal_-_True_psychology_-_Changing_the_lower_nature_-_Faith_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Psychic_contact_established_in_all_in_the_Ashram
1955-06-08_-_Working_for_the_Divine_-_ideal_attitude_-_Divine_manifesting_-_reversal_of_consciousness,_knowing_oneself_-_Integral_progress,_outer,_inner,_facing_difficulties_-_People_in_Ashram_-_doing_Yoga_-_Children_given_freedom,_choosing_yoga
1955-06-22_-_Awakening_the_Yoga-shakti_-_The_thousand-petalled_lotus-_Reading,_how_far_a_help_for_yoga_-_Simple_and_complicated_combinations_in_men
1955-07-20_-_The_Impersonal_Divine_-_Surrender_to_the_Divine_brings_perfect_freedom_-_The_Divine_gives_Himself_-_The_principle_of_the_inner_dimensions_-_The_paths_of_aspiration_and_surrender_-_Linear_and_spherical_paths_and_realisations
1955-08-03_-_Nothing_is_impossible_in_principle_-_Psychic_contact_and_psychic_influence_-_Occult_powers,_adverse_influences;_magic_-_Magic,_occultism_and_Yogic_powers_-Hypnotism_and_its_effects
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1955-10-19_-_The_rhythms_of_time_-_The_lotus_of_knowledge_and_perfection_-_Potential_knowledge_-_The_teguments_of_the_soul_-_Shastra_and_the_Gurus_direct_teaching_-_He_who_chooses_the_Infinite...
1955-10-26_-_The_Divine_and_the_universal_Teacher_-_The_power_of_the_Word_-_The_Creative_Word,_the_mantra_-_Sound,_music_in_other_worlds_-_The_domains_of_pure_form,_colour_and_ideas
1956-01-25_-_The_divine_way_of_life_-_Divine,_Overmind,_Supermind_-_Material_body__for_discovery_of_the_Divine_-_Five_psychological_perfections
1956-02-29_-_Sacrifice,_self-giving_-_Divine_Presence_in_the_heart_of_Matter_-_Divine_Oneness_-_Divine_Consciousness_-_All_is_One_-_Divine_in_the_inconscient_aspires_for_the_Divine
1956-03-07_-_Sacrifice,_Animals,_hostile_forces,_receive_in_proportion_to_consciousness_-_To_be_luminously_open_-_Integral_transformation_-_Pain_of_rejection,_delight_of_progress_-_Spirit_behind_intention_-_Spirit,_matter,_over-simplified
1956-04-11_-_Self-creator_-_Manifestation_of_Time_and_Space_-_Brahman-Maya_and_Ishwara-Shakti_-_Personal_and_Impersonal
1956-05-02_-_Threefold_union_-_Manifestation_of_the_Supramental_-_Profiting_from_the_Divine_-_Recognition_of_the_Supramental_Force_-_Ascent,_descent,_manifestation
1956-05-16_-_Needs_of_the_body,_not_true_in_themselves_-_Spiritual_and_supramental_law_-_Aestheticised_Paganism_-_Morality,_checks_true_spiritual_effort_-_Effect_of_supramental_descent_-_Half-lights_and_false_lights
1956-05-23_-_Yoga_and_religion_-_Story_of_two_clergymen_on_a_boat_-_The_Buddha_and_the_Supramental_-_Hieroglyphs_and_phonetic_alphabets_-_A_vision_of_ancient_Egypt_-_Memory_for_sounds
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-06-20_-_Hearts_mystic_light,_intuition_-_Psychic_being,_contact_-_Secular_ethics_-_True_role_of_mind_-_Realise_the_Divine_by_love_-_Depression,_pleasure,_joy_-_Heart_mixture_-_To_follow_the_soul_-_Physical_process_-_remember_the_Mother
1956-07-11_-_Beauty_restored_to_its_priesthood_-_Occult_worlds,_occult_beings_-_Difficulties_and_the_supramental_force
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-08-22_-_The_heaven_of_the_liberated_mind_-_Trance_or_samadhi_-_Occult_discipline_for_leaving_consecutive_bodies_-_To_be_greater_than_ones_experience_-_Total_self-giving_to_the_Grace_-_The_truth_of_the_being_-_Unique_relation_with_the_Supreme
1956-09-26_-_Soul_of_desire_-_Openness,_harmony_with_Nature_-_Communion_with_divine_Presence_-_Individuality,_difficulties,_soul_of_desire_-_personal_contact_with_the_Mother_-_Inner_receptivity_-_Bad_thoughts_before_the_Mother
1956-10-03_-_The_Mothers_different_ways_of_speaking_-_new_manifestation_-_new_element,_possibilities_-_child_prodigies_-_Laws_of_Nature,_supramental_-_Logic_of_the_unforeseen_-_Creative_writers,_hands_of_musicians_-_Prodigious_children,_men
1956-10-24_-_Taking_a_new_body_-_Different_cases_of_incarnation_-_Departure_of_soul_from_body
1956-11-21_-_Knowings_and_Knowledge_-_Reason,_summit_of_mans_mental_activities_-_Willings_and_the_true_will_-_Personal_effort_-_First_step_to_have_knowledge_-_Relativity_of_medical_knowledge_-_Mental_gymnastics_make_the_mind_supple
1956-11-28_-_Desire,_ego,_animal_nature_-_Consciousness,_a_progressive_state_-_Ananda,_desireless_state_beyond_enjoyings_-_Personal_effort_that_is_mental_-_Reason,_when_to_disregard_it_-_Reason_and_reasons
1956-12-12_-_paradoxes_-_Nothing_impossible_-_unfolding_universe,_the_Eternal_-_Attention,_concentration,_effort_-_growth_capacity_almost_unlimited_-_Why_things_are_not_the_same_-_will_and_willings_-_Suggestions,_formations_-_vital_world
1956-12-26_-_Defeated_victories_-_Change_of_consciousness_-_Experiences_that_indicate_the_road_to_take_-_Choice_and_preference_-_Diversity_of_the_manifestation
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-01-23_-_How_should_we_understand_pure_delight?_-_The_drop_of_honey_-_Action_of_the_Divine_Will_in_the_world
1957-05-29_-_Progressive_transformation
1957-06-05_-_Questions_and_silence_-_Methods_of_meditation
1957-06-19_-_Causes_of_illness_Fear_and_illness_-_Minds_working,_faith_and_illness
1957-06-26_-_Birth_through_direct_transmutation_-_Man_and_woman_-_Judging_others_-_divine_Presence_in_all_-_New_birth
1957-08-28_-_Freedom_and_Divine_Will
1957-09-04_-_Sri_Aurobindo,_an_eternal_birth
1958-03-05_-_Vibrations_and_words_-_Power_of_thought,_the_gift_of_tongues
1958-05-14_-_Intellectual_activity_and_subtle_knowing_-_Understanding_with_the_body
1958-06-18_-_Philosophy,_religion,_occultism,_spirituality
1958-08-27_-_Meditation_and_imagination_-_From_thought_to_idea,_from_idea_to_principle
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958_09_19
1958-09-24_-_Living_the_truth_-_Words_and_experience
1958_09_26
1958_10_10
1958-11-05_-_Knowing_how_to_be_silent
1960_01_05
1960_01_12
1960_01_20
1960_04_20
1961_01_18
1961_03_11_-_58
1961_05_22?
1962_01_12
1962_02_27
1962_10_12
1963_08_11?_-_94
1964_02_05_-_98
1964_02_06?_-_99
1965_12_26?
1966_07_06
1967-05-24.1_-_Defining_the_Divine
1967-05-24.2_-_Defining_God
1969_08_15?_-_133
1969_10_24
1969_11_15
1970_01_01
1970_01_12
1970_03_03
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_Adela
1.ac_-_An_Oath
1.ac_-_Happy_Dust
1.ac_-_The_Interpreter
1.ac_-_The_Twins
1.ami_-_Selfhood_can_demolish_the_magic_of_this_world_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.anon_-_Enuma_Elish_(When_on_high)
1.anon_-_If_this_were_a_world
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_III
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_VII
1.anon_-_The_Seven_Evil_Spirits
1.bni_-_Raga_Ramkali
1.dd_-_As_many_as_are_the_waves_of_the_sea
1.dd_-_So_priceless_is_the_birth,_O_brother
1.dd_-_The_Creator_Plays_His_Cosmic_Instrument_In_Perfect_Harmony
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_From_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_H.P._Lovecrafts
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Green_Meadow
1f.lovecraft_-_The_History_of_the_Necronomicon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Picture_in_the_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1.fs_-_Fridolin_(The_Walk_To_The_Iron_Factory)
1.fs_-_Hope
1.fs_-_The_Cranes_Of_Ibycus
1.fs_-_The_Meeting
1.fs_-_The_Ring_Of_Polycrates_-_A_Ballad
1.fs_-_The_Veiled_Statue_At_Sais
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Belief
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Error
1.gnk_-_Japji_38_-_Discipline_is_the_workshop
1.hs_-_And_if,_my_friend,_you_ask_me_the_way
1.hs_-_It_Is_Time_to_Wake_Up!
1.hs_-_No_tongue_can_tell_Your_secret
1.hs_-_Streaming
1.hs_-_The_Garden
1.hs_-_The_path_consists_of_neither_words_nor_deeds
1.jk_-_Acrostic__-_Georgiana_Augusta_Keats
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lines_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Ode_To_A_Nightingale
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Sonnet._A_Dream,_After_Reading_Dantes_Episode_Of_Paulo_And_Francesca
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_After_Dark_Vapors_Have_Oppressd_Our_Plains
1.jk_-_Sonnet._If_By_Dull_Rhymes_Our_English_Must_Be_Chaind
1.jk_-_Sonnet_II._To_.........
1.jk_-_Sonnet_V._To_A_Friend_Who_Sent_Me_Some_Roses
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Before_Re-Read_King_Lear
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Shakespeares_Poems,_Facing_A_Lovers_Complaint
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Space_At_The_End_Of_Chaucers_Tale_Of_The_Floure_And_The_Lefe
1.jk_-_The_Devon_Maid_-_Stanzas_Sent_In_A_Letter_To_B._R._Haydon
1.jk_-_The_Gadfly
1.jk_-_Translated_From_A_Sonnet_Of_Ronsard
1.jk_-_What_The_Thrush_Said._Lines_From_A_Letter_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jlb_-_Chess
1.jlb_-_History_Of_The_Night
1.jlb_-_The_Golem
1.jm_-_I_Have_forgotten
1.jr_-_If_continually_you_keep_your_hope
1.jr_-_I_regard_not_the_outside_and_the_words
1.jr_-_The_Time_Has_Come_For_Us_To_Become_Madmen_In_Your_Chain
1.jwvg_-_The_Pupil_In_Magic
1.jwvg_-_The_Warning
1.kbr_-_Dohas_(Couplets)_I_(with_translation)
1.kbr_-_I_have_been_thinking
1.kbr_-_Looking_At_The_Grinding_Stones_-_Dohas_(Couplets)_I
1.kbr_-_Poem_2
1.kbr_-_The_Guest_Is_Inside_You,_And_Also_Inside_Me
1.kbr_-_The_Guest_is_inside_you,_and_also_inside_me
1.kbr_-_The_Word
1.lla_-_Intense_cold_makes_water_ice
1.lovecraft_-_Waste_Paper-_A_Poem_Of_Profound_Insignificance
1.mb_-_The_Five-Coloured_Garment
1.nmdv_-_The_thundering_resonance_of_the_Word
1.nmdv_-_When_I_see_His_ways,_I_sing
1.pbs_-_A_Lament
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Mont_Blanc_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Vale_of_Chamouni
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_On_Fanny_Godwin
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VI.
1.pbs_-_Scene_From_Tasso
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_To_Death
1.poe_-_A_Valentine
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_The_Bridal_Ballad
1.poe_-_The_Raven
1.rajh_-_The_Word_Most_Precious
1.rb_-_A_Lovers_Quarrel
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_Fra_Lippo_Lippi
1.rb_-_Holy-Cross_Day
1.rb_-_Master_Hugues_Of_Saxe-Gotha
1.rb_-_Nationality_In_Drinks
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_II_-_Noon
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_The_Glove
1.rt_-_(75)_Thy_gifts_to_us_mortals_fulfil_all_our_needs_(from_Gitanjali)
1.rt_-_Broken_Song
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_LXX_-_Take_Back_Your_Coins
1.rt_-_Song_Unsung
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_21_-_30
1.rt_-_The_Homecoming
1.rt_-_Waiting
1.rwe_-_Boston_Hymn
1.rwe_-_Letters
1.rwe_-_My_Garden
1.rwe_-_The_Problem
1.shvb_-_O_Euchari_in_leta_via_-_Sequence_for_Saint_Eucharius
1.snt_-_As_soon_as_your_mind_has_experienced
1.srmd_-_He_and_I_are_one
1.srmd_-_My_friend,_engage_your_heart_in_his_embrace
1.tc_-_I_built_my_hut_within_where_others_live
1.wb_-_Of_the_Sleep_of_Ulro!_and_of_the_passage_through
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_The_ORahilly
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Tower
1.wby_-_Where_My_Books_go
1.whitman_-_A_Clear_Midnight
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Words
1.whitman_-_Excelsior
1.whitman_-_Faces
1.whitman_-_Inscription
1.whitman_-_Manhattan_Streets_I_Saunterd,_Pondering
1.whitman_-_Mannahatta
1.whitman_-_Ones_Self_I_Sing
1.whitman_-_Out_of_the_Cradle_Endlessly_Rocking
1.whitman_-_Pensive_And_Faltering
1.whitman_-_Says
1.whitman_-_Scented_Herbage_Of_My_Breast
1.whitman_-_Sea-Shore_Memories
1.whitman_-_Shut_Not_Your_Doors
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXIII
1.whitman_-_The_Indications
1.whitman_-_The_Singer_In_The_Prison
1.whitman_-_To_The_Leavend_Soil_They_Trod
1.ww_-_1-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_3-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_A_Complaint
1.ww_-_Alice_Fell,_Or_Poverty
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_Fourteenth_[conclusion]
1.ww_-_Book_Second_[School-Time_Continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_In_The_Pass_Of_Killicranky
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_X._Rob_Roys_Grave
1.ww_-_Ode
1.ww_-_Ode_to_Duty
1.ww_-_On_A_Celebrated_Event_In_Ancient_History
1.ww_-_Simon_Lee-_The_Old_Huntsman
1.ww_-_Song_at_the_Feast_of_Brougham_Castle
1.ww_-_The_Brothers
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IX-_Book_Eighth-_The_Parsonage
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Horn_Of_Egremont_Castle
1.ww_-_The_Idiot_Boy
1.ww_-_The_Prioresss_Tale_[from_Chaucer]
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Second
1.ww_-_To_The_Daisy_(Fourth_Poem)
1.ww_-_Translation_Of_Part_Of_The_First_Book_Of_The_Aeneid
1.ww_-_Vaudracour_And_Julia
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_Isha_Upanishad__All_that_is_world_in_the_Universe
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_On_the_Concept_of_the_Archetype
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_The_Attributes_of_Omega_Point_-_a_Transcendent_God
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.01_-_The_Tavern
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_Indra,_Giver_of_Light
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_THE_SCINTILLA
2.02_-_The_Status_of_Knowledge
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Purified_Understanding
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_Agni,_the_Illumined_Will
2.04_-_Concentration
2.04_-_On_Art
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_Blessings
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_ON_THE_VIRTUOUS
2.05_-_Renunciation
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_The_Cup
2.07_-_The_Knowledge_and_the_Ignorance
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.08_-_ALICE_IN_WONDERLAND
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.09_-_Human_representations_of_the_Divine_Ideal_of_Love
2.09_-_Memory,_Ego_and_Self-Experience
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.09_-_The_Release_from_the_Ego
2.0_-_Reincarnation_and_Karma
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
2.1.02_-_Nature_The_World-Manifestation
2.10_-_On_Vedic_Interpretation
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.11_-_The_Modes_of_the_Self
2.11_-_The_Shattering_And_Fall_of_The_Primordial_Kings
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_ON_SELF-OVERCOMING
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.12_-_The_Origin_of_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_The_Book
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.1.4.3_-_Discipline
2.14_-_On_Movements
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_Selection_of_Sparks_Made_for_The_Purpose_of_The_Emendation
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.2.01_-_The_Outer_Being_and_the_Inner_Being
2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness
2.2.03_-_The_Divine_Force_in_Work
2.2.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
2.2.03_-_The_Science_of_Consciousness
2.20_-_The_Infancy_and_Maturity_of_ZO,_Father_and_Mother,_Israel_The_Ancient_and_Understanding
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.21_-_1940
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.2.1_-_The_Prusna_Upanishads
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.2.2.03_-_Virgil
2.22_-_THE_MASTER_AT_COSSIPORE
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_Mercies_and_Judgements_of_Knowledge
2.26_-_Samadhi
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.27_-_The_Two_Types_of_Unions
2.3.01_-_Concentration_and_Meditation
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.02_-_The_Supermind_or_Supramental
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.04_-_The_Higher_Planes_of_Mind
2.3.05_-_Sadhana_through_Work_for_the_Mother
2.3.05_-_The_Lower_Nature_or_Lower_Hemisphere
2.3.06_-_The_Mind
2.30_-_The_Uniting_of_the_Names_45_and_52
2.3.1.09_-_Inspiration_and_Understanding
2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient
2.32_-_Prophetic_Visions
2.3.3_-_Anger_and_Violence
2.4.02.08_-_Contact_with_the_Divine
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
25.12_-_AGNI
29.03_-_In_Her_Company
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.08_-_Poetry_and_Mantra
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Hymn_To_Pan
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
30.18_-_Boris_Pasternak
3.01_-_Natural_Morality
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_The_Principles_of_Ritual
3.01_-_The_Soul_World
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_SOL
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Formulae_of_the_Elemental_Weapons
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_On_Thought_-_II
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_The_Four_Foundational_Practices
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.04_-_Immersion_in_the_Bath
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.04_-_The_Formula_of_ALHIM
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.05_-_The_Fool
3.05_-_The_Formula_of_I.A.O.
3.06_-_Charity
3.07_-_The_Adept
3.07_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Soul
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_Of_Equilibrium
3.08_-_ON_APOSTATES
3.08_-_The_Thousands
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.09_-_THE_RETURN_HOME
3.0_-_THE_ETERNAL_RECURRENCE
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.02_-_Asceticism_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
3.1.04_-_Transformation_in_the_Integral_Yoga
3.10_-_Of_the_Gestures
3.10_-_Punishment
3.1.17_-_Life_and_Death
3.11_-_Of_Our_Lady_Babalon
3.1.23_-_The_Rishi
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.12_-_ON_OLD_AND_NEW_TABLETS
3.13_-_THE_CONVALESCENT
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.15_-_Of_the_Invocation
3.16.1_-_Of_the_Oath
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.19_-_Of_Dramatic_Rituals
31_Hymns_to_the_Star_Goddess
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
32.08_-_Fit_and_Unfit_(A_Letter)
3.2.09_-_The_Teachings_of_Some_Modern_Indian_Yogis
3.20_-_Of_the_Eucharist
3.2.10_-_Christianity_and_Theosophy
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
3.3.01_-_The_Superman
33.02_-_Subhash,_Oaten:_atlas,_Russell
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.07_-_Alipore_Jail
33.08_-_I_Tried_Sannyas
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.18_-_I_Bow_to_the_Mother
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.4.03_-_Materialism
34.07_-_The_Bride_of_Brahman
3.4.1.01_-_Poetry_and_Sadhana
34.10_-_Hymn_To_Earth
34.11_-_Hymn_to_Peace_and_Power
3-5_Full_Circle
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.08_-_A_Commentary_on_the_First_Six_Suktas_of_Rigveda
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.04_-_The_Story_Of_Rishi_Yajnavalkya
37.05_-_Narada_-_Sanatkumara_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
37.07_-_Ushasti_Chakrayana_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
3.7.1.02_-_The_Reincarnating_Soul
3.7.1.03_-_Rebirth,_Evolution,_Heredity
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.1.06_-_The_Ascending_Unity
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.1.10_-_Karma,_Will_and_Consequence
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
38.06_-_Ravana_Vanquished
3.8.1.02_-_Arya_-_Its_Significance
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_The_Presence_of_God_in_the_World
4.02_-_GOLD_AND_SPIRIT
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.04_-_Conclusion
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.05_-_THE_DARK_SIDE_OF_THE_KING
4.09_-_REGINA
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
4.11_-_The_Perfection_of_Equality
4.1.3_-_Imperfections_and_Periods_of_Arrest
4.13_-_ON_THE_HIGHER_MAN
4.13_-_The_Action_of_Equality
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.03_-_The_Birth_of_Sin
4.21_-_The_Gradations_of_the_supermind
4.22_-_The_supramental_Thought_and_Knowledge
4.23_-_The_supramental_Instruments_--_Thought-process
4.2.3_-_Vigilance,_Resolution,_Will_and_the_Divine_Help
4.2_-_Karma
4.41_-_Chapter_One
4.42_-_Chapter_Two
4.43_-_Chapter_Three
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body
5.02_-_THE_STATUE
5.03_-_ADAM_AS_THE_FIRST_ADEPT
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.6_-_The_Book_of_the_Chieftains
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.01_-_Terminology
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.2.02_-_Aryan_Origins_-_The_Elementary_Roots_of_Language
5.2.03_-_The_An_Family
5.3.04_-_Roots_in_M
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5.4.02_-_Occult_Powers_or_Siddhis
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.05_-_THE_PSYCHOLOGICAL_INTERPRETATION_OF_THE_PROCEDURE
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.08_-_Intellectual_Visions
6.09_-_Imaginary_Visions
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.03_-_Cheerfulness
7.06_-_The_Simple_Life
7.08_-_Sincerity
7.11_-_Building_and_Destroying
7.13_-_The_Conquest_of_Knowledge
7.3.13_-_Ascent
7.5.29_-_The_Universal_Incarnation
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Apology
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
A_Secret_Miracle
Big_Mind_(non-dual)
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
Book_1_-_The_Council_of_the_Gods
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Proverbs
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
CASE_2_-_HYAKUJOS_FOX
CASE_6_-_THE_BUDDHAS_FLOWER
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XI
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Cratylus
Diamond_Sutra_1
DS2
DS3
DS4
ENNEAD_01.02_-_Concerning_Virtue.
ENNEAD_02.01_-_Of_the_Heaven.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.05_-_Of_Love,_or_Eros.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Things.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_03.08a_-_Of_Nature,_Contemplation,_and_of_the_One.
ENNEAD_04.02_-_How_the_Soul_Mediates_Between_Indivisible_and_Divisible_Essence.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_05.05_-_That_Intelligible_Entities_Are_Not_External_to_the_Intelligence_of_the_Good.
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_06.01_-_Of_the_Ten_Aristotelian_and_Four_Stoic_Categories.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_Is_Everywhere_Present_As_a_Whole.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.08_-_Of_the_Will_of_the_One.
ENNEAD_06.09_-_Of_the_Good_and_the_One.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Euthyphro
First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Thessalonians
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
Kafka_and_His_Precursors
Liber
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.06_-_DIVINATION
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
Meno
MMM.02_-_MAGIC
P.11_-_MAGICAL_WEAPONS
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_01_16
r1912_02_08
r1912_07_02
r1912_07_04
r1912_12_03b
r1912_12_05
r1912_12_09
r1912_12_21
r1912_12_25
r1913_01_07
r1913_01_08
r1913_01_09
r1913_07_08
r1913_09_05b
r1913_12_13
r1913_12_16
r1914_03_12
r1914_03_13
r1914_03_25
r1914_03_26
r1914_03_27
r1914_04_19
r1914_05_22
r1914_05_27
r1914_07_16
r1914_07_22
r1914_07_28
r1914_08_01
r1914_09_04
r1914_11_19
r1914_11_20
r1914_11_24
r1914_12_13
r1914_12_19
r1915_01_13
r1915_01_17
r1915_05_22
r1917_01_22
r1917_01_23a
r1917_03_06
r1918_04_30
r1918_05_08
r1918_05_10
r1918_05_13
r1918_05_19
r1918_06_14
r1919_07_07
r1919_07_10
r1919_07_20
r1919_07_31
r1920_02_04
r1920_02_28
r1920_02_29
r1927_01_27
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_001-025
Talks_051-075
Talks_076-099
Talks_100-125
Talks_125-150
Talks_151-175
Talks_176-200
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_Joshua
The_Book_of_Sand
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Micah
The_Circular_Ruins
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_James
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Ephesians
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Philippians
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Fearful_Sphere_of_Pascal
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_Timothy
The_First_Epistle_of_Peter
The_First_Letter_of_John
The_Five,_Ranks_of_The_Apparent_and_the_Real
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Gold_Bug
The_Golden_Sentences_of_Democrates
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Last_Question
The_Letter_to_the_Hebrews
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Monadology
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Poems_of_Cold_Mountain
The_Revelation_of_Jesus_Christ_or_the_Apocalypse
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Second_Epistle_of_Paul_to_Timothy
The_Second_Epistle_of_Peter
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Theologians
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Valery_as_Symbol
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

keywords
media
Names_of_God
temp
word
SIMILAR TITLES
A Guide to the Words of My Perfect Teacher
the Word
The Words of My Perfect Teacher

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

the Word of God.” We know of no angels, fair or foul, inhabiting or frequenting the place. According to Origen,

The word became familiar to Greeks in the 3rd century with Ammonius Saccas and the Alexandrian Neoplatonists or Theurgists, who taught of divine emanations, whereby the entire universe as well as humans and all other beings are shown to be descendants of the highest gods. Theosophist is also applied to mystics in later times such as Eckhart, Boehme, and Paracelsus. It was adopted in 1875 by H. P. Blavatsky and others associated with her at the founding of the Theosophical Society as the name for the modern form of the archaic wisdom-religion which she promulgated. This wisdom-religion “was ever one and being the last word of possible human knowledge, was, therefore, carefully preserved. It preceded by long ages the Alexandrian Theosophists, reached the modern, and will survive every other religion and philosophy” (Key 7-8).

The word can also be translated as pleasure-born, because chhanda often means joy or pleasure, since will and innate desire are different phases of the same fundamental fact.

The word deity, in the sense of beings which are more spiritual than the human being of today, may be applied to the divine rulers of human races before the times of the demigods and heroes; or more generally to an indefinite range of nonphysical beings, spiritual or ethereal in character, including among the latter the so-called “spirits of the elements.” See also GOD; GOD(S)

The word expressing the idea has the same power if it is surcharged with the spiritual force; that is the rationale of the Indian use of the mantra.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21, Page: 941


The word, furthermore, has been loosely used for esoteric, gnostic, theosophical types of "knowledge", not capable of verification. It has been used, too, for the whole area of psychic phenomena and occult happenings, borderland phenomena. The result of this confusion has been that in scientific laboratories the word mysticism often connotes spurious knowledge, occult lore or abnormal phenomena. The Germans use the word Mysticismus for this dubious type of knowledge and Mystik for the loftier types of experience.

The word genius is also applicable to the divine instructors of individuals and races; while with the Gnostics it stood for aeons or angels. Atom, in its original sense and not as denoting a particle, is equivalent to genius, for in this original sense it is equivalent to the theosophical term life-atom.

The word has a particular use in the Gnostic system of Valentinus, where the pairs of aeons successively emanate, the lower from the higher.

The word has been used in theosophy to translate the Sanskrit chakra (wheel, nerve ganglion), but these chakras are better defined as forming centers in the vital-astral constitution of the organism. They are centers or foci of pranic energy, having special qualities which may be correlated to other groupings, such as the seven principles, the seven rays, etc. The seven chakras are: sacral, prostatic, epigastric (solar), cardiac, laryngeal, frontal, and cavernous.

The Word has its seed-sounds—suggesting the eternal syllable of the Veda, AUM.

The Word has its seed-sounds – suggesting the eternal syllable of the Veda, AUM. ::: Sri Aurobindo - A note on the Chhandogya Upanishad *

The word has symbolic uses, as in the white stone with a new name inscribed in it, which is given to him that overcomes in Revelations; the stone that the builders rejected; stones in the Guardian Wall; etc.

The word has the meaning of death and, in this

The word is also familiar in its evil side, in the expression evil genius. Human beings hover between the influence of benign and malign powers which have been personified into guardian angels and besetting demons, or good and evil stars. The good and evil genii of the individual are among the karmic conditions which, interacting with free choice, modify his ruling destiny; they are either the heavenly voice of the invisible spiritual prototype, or the lower astral person.

The word is Middle English (1325-75) and is of Anglo-French provenance. Some dictionaries give the first known use as the 15th century.

The word is used relatively to signify the absence of something, as the absence of physical matter in an evacuated bulb. But another form of matter is still present, for we can transmit light as well as many other forms of radiation. Thus proceeding by successive steps we come to the logical limit in the conception of the cosmic void — which nevertheless from the spiritual viewpoint is a pleroma or utter fullness. The physical vacuum of the laboratory has become confused with the scientific and mystical void of the archaic philosophy.

The word may also mean a treatise on the subject, or a body of doctrine on it.

the word, queried “AE?” Russell adopted the

The word Sabean itself has come down to us mainly through Greek and Latin writers, but so thoroughly imbued were the ancient Hebrews with this idea of the celestial hosts or cosmic spirits that the Bible is full of references where the context even wrongly endows the celestial hosts with the properties of the Most High God, and it has been so understood by Christian theologians; forgetting, however, that manifested deities, however high, are but the manifestations of the infinite and ineffable Mystery or parabrahman, from which all the celestial hosts flow or emanate. Thus not only ancient and modern Judaism, but Christianity itself, is filled with the thought of the ancient Sabeans.

The Word ::: See Logos.

The words supermind and supramental were first used by me, but since then people have taken up and are using the word supramental for anything above mind.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 142


The word was also applied to Bacchus. It is similar to other figures associated with fish symbols, such as Jonas, Oannes, Dagon, Vishnu, etc. See also FISH; PISCES


TERMS ANYWHERE

1. Not real or actual. 2. Imaginary; fanciful; illusory; delusory; fantastic. 3. Lacking in truth; not genuine; false; artificial. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.) unreal"s, unreal-seeming.

1. Not seen; not apprehended by sight; unperceived, invisible. 2. Not seen previously or hitherto; esp. unfamiliar, strange, unknown. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n. and a proper n.)

1. That unfolds, discloses, or develops. 2. Spreading out or laying open to view; revealing; displaying. unfoldings. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

1. THE PROPOSITIONAL CALCULUS formalizes the use of the sentential connectives and, or, not, if . . . then. Various systems of notation are current, of which we here adopt a particular one for purposes of exposition. We use juxtaposition to denote conjunction ("pq" to mean "p and q"), the sign ∨ to denote inclusive disjunction ("p ∨ q" to mean ("p or q or both"), the sign + to denote exclusive disiunction ("p + q" to mean "p or q but not both"), the sign ∼ to denote negation ("∼p" to mean "not p"), the sign ⊃ to denote the conditional ("p ⊃ q" to mean "if p then q," or "not both p and not-q"), the sign ≡ to denote the biconditional ("p ≡ q" to mean "p if and only if q," or "either p and q or not-p and not-q"), and the sign | to denote alternative denial ("p | q" to mean "not both p and q"). -- The word or is ambiguous in ordinary English usage between inclusive disjunction and exclusive disjunction, and distinct notations are accordingly provided for the two meanings of the word, The notations "p ⊃ q" and "p ≡ q" are sometimes read as "p implies q" and "p is equivalent to q" respectively. These readings must, however, be used with caution, since the terms implication and equivalence are often used in a sense which involves some relationship between the logical forms of the propositions (or the sentences) which they connect, whereas the validity of p ⊃ q and of p ≡ q requires no such relationship. The connective ⊃ is also said to stand for "material implication," distinguished from formal implication (§ 3 below) and strict implication (q. v.). Similarly the connective ≡ is said to stand for "material equivalence."

(3) To keep the tone of speech and the wording very quiet and calm and uninsisteat.

abracadabra ::: n. --> A mystical word or collocation of letters written as in the figure. Worn on an amulet it was supposed to ward off fever. At present the word is used chiefly in jest to denote something without meaning; jargon.

Absolute: (Lat. absolvere to release or set free) Of this term Stephanus Chauvin in the Lexicon Philosophicum, 1713, p2 observes: "Because one thing is said to be free from another in many ways, so also the word absolute is taken by the philosophers in many senses." In Medieval Scholasticism this term was variously used, for example: freed or abstracted from material conditions, hence from contingency; hence applicable to all being; without limitations or restrictions; simply; totally; independent; unconditionally; uncaused; free from mental reservation.

ad- ::: --> As a prefix ad- assumes the forms ac-, af-, ag-, al-, an-, ap-, ar-, as-, at-, assimilating the d with the first letter of the word to which ad- is prefixed. It remains unchanged before vowels, and before d, h, j, m, v. Examples: adduce, adhere, adjacent, admit, advent, accord, affect, aggregate, allude, annex, appear, etc. It becomes ac- before qu, as in acquiesce.

adonist ::: n. --> One who maintains that points of the Hebrew word translated "Jehovah" are really the vowel points of the word "Adonai." See Jehovist.

adventurer ::: One who seeks adventures, or who engages in daring enterprises. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) adventurers, Adventurers.

adventurer ::: one who seeks adventures, or who engages in daring enterprises. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) adventurers, Adventurers.

Aesthetics: (Gr. aesthetikos, perceptive) Traditionally, the branch of philosophy dealing with beauty or the beautiful, especially in art, and with taste and standards of value in judging art. Also, a theory or consistent attitude on such matters. The word aesthetics was first used by Baumgarten about 1750, to imply the science of sensuous knowledge, whose aim is beauty, as contrasted with logic, whose aim is truth. Kant used the term transcendental aesthetic in another sense, to imply the a priori principles of sensible experience. Hegel, in the 1820's, established the word in its present sense by his writings on art under the title of Aesthetik.

A form of this paradox due to Jourdain (1913) supposes a card upon the front of which are written the words, "On the other side of this card is written a true statement" -- and nothing else. It seems to be clear that these words constitute a significant statement, since, upon turning the card over one must either find some statements written or not, and, in the former case, either there will be one of them which is true or there will not. However, on turning the card over there appear the words. "On the other side of this card is written a false statement" -- and nothing else. Suppose the statement on the front of the card is true, then the statement on the back must be true, and hence the statement on the front must be false. This is a proof by reductio ad absurdum that the statement on the front of the card is false. But if the statement on the front is false, then the statement on the back must be false, and hence the statement on the front must be true. Thus the paradox.

  A foundation or groundwork. (of something material or immaterial). 2. That which is spread or laid under something else; a stratum or layer lying under another. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

agnus dei ::: --> A figure of a lamb bearing a cross or flag.
A cake of wax stamped with such a figure. It is made from the remains of the paschal candles and blessed by the Pope.
A triple prayer in the sacrifice of the Mass, beginning with the words "Agnus Dei."


agreement ::: a contract or other document delineating an arrangement that is accepted by all parties to a transaction. (Sri Aurobindo capitalizes the word.)

Algebraization: (Ger. Algebraisierung) In Husserl: Substitution of algebraic symbols (indeterminate terms) for the words (determinate terms) in which the material content of an objective sense is expressed. See Formalization. -- D.C.

Algorithm (or, less commonly, but etymologlcally more correctly, algorism): In its original usage, this word referred to the Arabic system of notation for numbers and to the elementary operations of arithmetic as performed in this notation. In mathematics, the word is used for a method or process of calculation with symbols (often, but not necessarily, numerical symbols) according to fixed rules which yields effectively the, solution of any given problem of some class of problems. -- A.C. Al

"All depends on the meaning you attach to words used; it is a matter of nomenclature. Ordinarily, one says a man has intellect if he can think well; the nature and process and field of the thought do not matter. If you take intellect in that sense, then you can say that intellect has different strata, and Ford belongs to one stratum of intellect, Einstein to another — Ford has a practical and executive business intellect, Einstein a scientific discovering and theorising intellect. But Ford too in his own field theorises, invents, discovers. Yet would you call Ford an intellectual or a man of intellect? I would prefer to use for the general faculty of mind the word intelligence. Ford has a great and forceful practical intelligence, keen, quick, successful, dynamic. He has a brain that can deal with thoughts also, but even there his drive is towards practicality. He believes in rebirth (metempsychosis), for instance, not for any philosophic reason, but because it explains life as a school of experience in which one gathers more and more experience and develops by it. Einstein has, on the other hand, a great discovering scientific intellect, not, like Marconi, a powerful practical inventive intelligence for the application of scientific discovery. All men have, of course, an ‘intellect" of a kind; all, for instance, can discuss and debate (for which you say rightly intellect is needed); but it is only when one rises to the realm of ideas and moves freely in it that you say, ‘This man has an intellect".” Letters on Yoga

“All depends on the meaning you attach to words used; it is a matter of nomenclature. Ordinarily, one says a man has intellect if he can think well; the nature and process and field of the thought do not matter. If you take intellect in that sense, then you can say that intellect has different strata, and Ford belongs to one stratum of intellect, Einstein to another—Ford has a practical and executive business intellect, Einstein a scientific discovering and theorising intellect. But Ford too in his own field theorises, invents, discovers. Yet would you call Ford an intellectual or a man of intellect? I would prefer to use for the general faculty of mind the word intelligence. Ford has a great and forceful practical intelligence, keen, quick, successful, dynamic. He has a brain that can deal with thoughts also, but even there his drive is towards practicality. He believes in rebirth (metempsychosis), for instance, not for any philosophic reason, but because it explains life as a school of experience in which one gathers more and more experience and develops by it. Einstein has, on the other hand, a great discovering scientific intellect, not, like Marconi, a powerful practical inventive intelligence for the application of scientific discovery. All men have, of course, an ‘intellect’ of a kind; all, for instance, can discuss and debate (for which you say rightly intellect is needed); but it is only when one rises to the realm of ideas and moves freely in it that you say, ‘This man has an intellect’.” Letters on Yoga

allocatur ::: n. --> "Allowed." The word allocatur expresses the allowance of a proceeding, writ, order, etc., by a court, judge, or judicial officer.

…all our spiritual and psychic experience bears affirmative witness, brings us always a constant and, in its main principles, an invariable evidence of the existence of higher worlds, freer planes of existence. Not having bound ourselves down, like so much of modern thought, to the dogma that only physical experience or experience based upon the physical sense is true, the analysis of physical experience by the reason alone verifiable, and all else only result of physical experience and physical existence and anything beyond this an error, self-delusion and hallucination, we are free to accept this evidence and to admit the reality of these planes.We see that they are, practically, different harmonies from the harmony of the physical universe; they occupy, as the word "plane" suggests, a different level in the scale of being and adopt a different system and ordering of its principles.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 818-19


:::   ". . . all our spiritual and psychic experience bears affirmative witness, brings us always a constant and, in its main principles, an invariable evidence of the existence of higher worlds, freer planes of existence. Not having bound ourselves down, like so much of modern thought, to the dogma that only physical experience or experience based upon the physical sense is true, the analysis of physical experience by the reason alone verifiable, and all else only result of physical experience and physical existence and anything beyond this an error, self-delusion and hallucination, we are free to accept this evidence and to admit the reality of these planes. We see that they are, practically, different harmonies from the harmony of the physical universe; they occupy, as the word ‘plane" suggests, a different level in the scale of being and adopt a different system and ordering of its principles.” The Life Divine

“… all our spiritual and psychic experience bears affirmative witness, brings us always a constant and, in its main principles, an invariable evidence of the existence of higher worlds, freer planes of existence. Not having bound ourselves down, like so much of modern thought, to the dogma that only physical experience or experience based upon the physical sense is true, the analysis of physical experience by the reason alone verifiable, and all else only result of physical experience and physical existence and anything beyond this an error, self-delusion and hallucination, we are free to accept this evidence and to admit the reality of these planes. We see that they are, practically, different harmonies from the harmony of the physical universe; they occupy, as the word ‘plane’ suggests, a different level in the scale of being and adopt a different system and ordering of its principles.” The Life Divine

"All world is expression or manifestation, creation by the Word.” The Secret of the Veda

“All world is expression or manifestation, creation by the Word.” The Secret of the Veda

Al-Mutakabbir ::: The One to whom the word ‘I’ exclusively belongs. Absolute ‘I’ness belongs only to Him. Whoever, with the word ‘I’, accredits a portion of this Absolute ‘I’ness to himself, thereby concealing the ‘I’ness comprising his essence and fortifying his own relative ‘I’ness, will pay its consequence with ‘burning’ (suffering). Majesty (Absolute ‘I’ness) is His attribute alone.

A logistic system need not be given any meaning or interpretation, but may be put forward merely as a formal discipline of interest for its own sake; and in this case the words proof, theorem, valid inference, etc., are to be dissociated from their every-day meanings and taken purely as technical terms. Even when an interpretation of the system is intended, it is a requirement of rigor that no use shall be made of the interpretation (as such) in the determination whether a sequence of symbols is a formula, whether a sequence of formulas is a proof, etc.

Amal: “Along with the word ‘cross’ in the next line, this phrase suggests Jesus Christ who is traditionally called thus. But Sri Aurobindo’s context is wider than Christianity’s—as becomes clear with the slightly later line: ‘I am Prometheus under the vulture’s beak’.”

Amal: “I believe this phrase—like ‘The sun-eyed Guardians and the Golden Sphinx’—refers to the denizens of the Supermind just as do the lines mentioning ‘the belt of the unchanging Truth’ and ‘the presence of the Ineffable’. The earlier words—‘The gold ridge of the world-dream’—point to the overmind. In the same context the words ‘Between the slayer and the saviour fires’ remind us of the closing lines of the sonnet ‘Nirvana’ which ends with lines:

Amal: “On the plane described, we find what is concealed on earth by the form of things. A wonder is revealed.”“By the way, the word ‘Here’ in the line: Here sheltered behind form’s insensible screen does not refer to the plane described but to our earth.”

Amal: “… the word ‘stayed’ means ‘borne’.”

amanyamanah ::: they who have no power to think and mentalise (the word and the truth it contains) . [Ved.]

amethyst ::: A purple or violet quartz; having the clear colour as of the precious stone. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

amethyst ::: a purple or violet quartz; having the clear colour as of the precious stone. Sri Aurobindo uses the word as an adj."for Amethyst (the Mother)she has revealed that it has a power of protection” Huta

amethyst ::: A purple or violet quartz; having the clear colour as of the precious stone. Sri Aurobindo uses the word as an adj.

analysis ::: n. --> A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent or original elements; an examination of the component parts of a subject, each separately, as the words which compose a sentence, the tones of a tune, or the simple propositions which enter into an argument. It is opposed to synthesis.
The separation of a compound substance, by chemical processes, into its constituents, with a view to ascertain either (a) what elements it contains, or (b) how much of each element is present.


anamaya (vijnanamaya; vijnanamay) ::: supra-intellectual; having the nature of vijñana, the principle that links saccidananda to mind, life and matter and is revealed through the faculties of smr.ti, sruti and dr.s.t.i; expressing the principle of vijñana involved in or subordinated to the principle of another plane, such as the physical or mental. The terms ideal, gnostic and supramental are almost interchangeable with vijñanamaya in the Record of Yoga up to 1920; in 1927, the word vijñanamaya does not occur, while "supramental" and "gnostic" refer to planes higher than ideality.

  An animal other than a human, especially a large four-footed mammal. 2. Fig. Animal nature as opposed to intellect or spirit. 3. A large wild animal. 4. A domesticated animal used by man. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

Anarchism: This doctrine advocates the abolition of political control within society: the State, it contends, is man's greatest enemy -- eliminate it and the evils of human life will disappear. Positively, anarchism envisages a homely life devoted to unsophisticated activity and filled with simple pleasures. Thus it belongs in the "primitive tradition" of Western culture and springs from the philosophical concept of the inherent and radical goodness of human nature. Modern anarchism probably owes not a little, in an indirect way, to the influence of the primitivistic strain in the thought of Jean Jacques Rousseau. In a popular sense the word "anarchy" is often used to denote a state of social chaos, but it is obvious that the word can be used in this sense only by one who denies the validity of anarchism. -- M.B.M.

Angiras (Angirasa) ::: the rsi who represents the seer-will, in later times regarded as one of the original sages, progenitor of a clan of rsis that went by his name, however it is clear that the word is used in the Veda not merely as a name of a certain family of rsis, but with a distinct meaning inherent in the word: it must have meant flaming, glowing; used as an epithet, a name of Agni, etc. [Ved.]

anna ::: Food; gross visible matter; in its origin the word meant simply being or substance. ::: annam [nominative]

antilogarithm ::: n. --> The number corresponding to a logarithm. The word has been sometimes, though rarely, used to denote the complement of a given logarithm; also the logarithmic cosine corresponding to a given logarithmic sine.

  A person engaged or experienced in warfare; soldier. 2. One who shows or has shown great vigour, courage, etc. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) warriors.

  A person viewing anything; onlooker; observer. 2. An observer or an event. spectators. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

  A piece of wood or stone placed beneath a door; a doorsill. Also fig. 2. Fig. A level or point at which something would happen, would cease to happen, or would take effect, become true, etc. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

appellation ::: n. --> The act of appealing; appeal.
The act of calling by a name.
The word by which a particular person or thing is called and known; name; title; designation.


aqua ::: n. --> Water; -- a word much used in pharmacy and the old chemistry, in various signification, determined by the word or words annexed.

Arcananas ::: the name of a rsi, "the pilgrim of the Light", he who travels to the illumination created by the word. [Ved.]

A related but different paradox is Grelling's (1908). Let us distinguish adjectives -- ie, words denoting properties -- as autological or i according as they do or do not have the property which they denote (in particular, adjectives denoting properties which cannot belong to words at all will be heterological). Then, e.g., the words polysyllabic, common, significant, prosaic are autological, while new, alive, useless, ambiguous, long are heterological. On their face, these definitions of autological and heterological are unobjectionable (compare the definition of onomatopoetic as similar in sound to that which it denotes). But paradox arises when we ask whether the word heterological is autological or heterological.

a religious official among the Romans, whose duty it was to predict future events and advise upon the course of public business, in accordance with omens derived from the flight, singing, and feeding of birds. Hence extended to: A soothsayer, diviner, or prophet, generally; one that foresees and foretells the future. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adjective.) augured.

A”Remembrancer” is a Bard of the Shshi (termite) people. In the Shshi language the word is”thu’dal’zei|”—literally, one who thinks about the past, thus the keeper of the oral history and myth of this people. When Prf. Kaitrin Oliva deciphered the Shshi language, she translated the term as”Remembrancer.”

Aristotle divides the sciences into the theoretical, the practical and the productive, the aim of the first being disinterested knowledge, of the second the guidance of conduct, and of the third the guidance of the arts. The science now called logic, by him known as "analytic", is a discipline preliminary to all the others, since its purpose is to set forth the conditions that must be observed by all thinking which has truth as its aim. Science, in the strict sense of the word, is demonstrated knowledge of the causes of things. Such demonstrated knowledge is obtained by syllogistic deduction from premises in themselves certain. Thus the procedure of science differs from dialectic, which employs probable premises, and from eristic, which aims not at truth but at victory in disputation. The center, therefore, of Aristotle's logic is the syllogism, or that form of reasoning whereby, given two propositions, a third follows necessarily from them. The basis of syllogistic inference is the presence of a term common to both premises (the middle term) so related as subj ect or predicate to each of the other two terms that a conclusion may be drawn regarding the relation of these two terms to one another. Aristotle was the first to formulate the theory of the syllogism, and his minute analysis of its various forms was definitive, so far as the subject-predicate relation is concerned; so that to this part of deductive logic but little has been added since his day. Alongside of deductive reasoning Aristotle recognizes the necessity of induction, or the process whereby premises, particularly first premises, are established. This involves passing from the particulars of sense experience (the things more knowable to us) to the universal and necessary principles involved in sense experience (the things more knowable in themselves). Aristotle attaches most importance, in this search for premises, to the consideration of prevailing beliefs (endoxa) and the examination of the difficulties (aporiai) that have been encountered in the solution of the problem in hand. At some stage in the survey of the field and the theories previously advanced the universal connection sought for is apprehended; and apprehended, Aristotle eventually says, by the intuitive reason, or nous. Thus knowledge ultimately rests upon an indubitable intellectual apprehension; yet for the proper employment of the intuitive reason a wide empirical acquaintance with the subject-matter is indispensable.

artist ::: 1. One who practises the creative arts; one who seeks to express the beautiful in visible form. 2. A follower of a manual art; an artificer, mechanic, craftsman, artisan. artists. (Sri Aurobindo often employs the word as an adj.)

(A situation often arising in practice is that a word -- or symbol or notation -- which already has a vague meaning is to be given a new exact meaning, which is vaguely, or as nearly as possible, the same as the old. This is done by a nominal or semantical definition rather than a real definition; nevertheless it is usual in such a case to speak either of defining the word or of defining the associated notion.)

aspirate ::: v. t. --> To pronounce with a breathing, an aspirate, or an h sound; as, we aspirate the words horse and house; to aspirate a vowel or a liquid consonant. ::: n. --> A sound consisting of, or characterized by, a breath like the sound of h; the breathing h or a character representing such a

  A spiritual truth that is incomprehensible to reason and knowable only through divine revelation. 2. Something that is not fully understood or that baffles or eludes the understanding; an enigma. 3. A mysterious character or quality. 4. The skills, lore, practices and secret rites that are peculiar to a particular activity or group and are regarded as the special province of initiates. Mystery, mystery’s, Mystery’s, mysteries, mystery-altar’s. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

Assumption: A proposition which is taken or posed in order to draw inferences from it; or the act of so taking, posing, or assuming a proposition. The motive for an assumption may be (but need not necessarily be) a belief in the truth, or possible truth, of the proposition assumed; or the motive may be an attempt to refute the proposition by reductio ad absurdum (q.v.). The word assumption has also sometimes been used as a synonym of axiom, or postulate (see the article Mathematics). -- A.C.

athlete ::: Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj. in the sense of athletic: Of the nature of, or befitting, one who is physically active, powerful, muscular, robust, agile.

Attribute: Commonly, what is proper to a thing (Latm, ad-tribuere, to assign, to ascribe, to bestow). Loosely assimilated to a quality, a property, a characteristic, a peculiarity, a circumstance, a state, a category, a mode or an accident, though there are differences among all these terms. For example, a quality is an inherent property (the qualities of matter), while an attribute refers to the actual properties of a thing only indirectly known (the attributes of God). Another difference between attribute and quality is that the former refers to the characteristics of an infinite being, while the latter is used for the characteristics of a finite being. In metaphysics, an attribute is what is indispensable to a spiritual or material substance; or that which expresses the nature of a thing; or that without which a thing is unthinkable. As such, it implies necessarily a relation to some substance of which it is an aspect or conception. But it cannot be a substance, as it does not exist by itself. The transcendental attributes are those which belong to a being because it is a being: there are three of them, the one, the true and the good, each adding something positive to the idea of being. The word attribute has been and still is used more readily, with various implications, by substantialist systems. In the 17th century, for example, it denoted the actual manifestations of substance. [Thus, Descartes regarded extension and thought as the two ultimate, simple and original attributes of reality, all else being modifications of them. With Spinoza, extension and thought became the only known attributes of Deity, each expressing in a definite manner, though not exclusively, the infinite essence of God as the only substance. The change in the meaning of substance after Hume and Kant is best illustrated by this quotation from Whitehead: "We diverge from Descartes by holding that what he has described as primary attributes of physical bodies, are really the forms of internal relationships between actual occasions and within actual occasions" (Process and Reality, p. 471).] The use of the notion of attribute, however, is still favoured by contemporary thinkers. Thus, John Boodin speaks of the five attributes of reality, namely: Energy (source of activity), Space (extension), Time (change), Consciousness (active awareness), and Form (organization, structure). In theodicy, the term attribute is used for the essential characteristics of God. The divine attributes are the various aspects under which God is viewed, each being treated as a separate perfection. As God is free from composition, we know him only in a mediate and synthetic way thrgugh his attributes. In logic, an attribute is that which is predicated or anything, that which Is affirmed or denied of the subject of a proposition. More specifically, an attribute may be either a category or a predicable; but it cannot be an individual materially. Attributes may be essential or accidental, necessary or contingent. In grammar, an attribute is an adjective, or an adjectival clause, or an equivalent adjunct expressing a characteristic referred to a subject through a verb. Because of this reference, an attribute may also be a substantive, as a class-name, but not a proper name as a rule. An attribute is never a verb, thus differing from a predicate which may consist of a verb often having some object or qualifying words. In natural history, what is permanent and essential in a species, an individual or in its parts. In psychology, it denotes the way (such as intensity, duration or quality) in which sensations, feelings or images can differ from one another. In art, an attribute is a material or a conventional symbol, distinction or decoration.

Aufklärung: In general, this German word and its English equivalent Enlightenment denote the self-emancipation of man from mere authority, prejudice, convention and tradition, with an insistence on freer thinking about problems uncritically referred to these other agencies. According to Kant's famous definition "Enlightenment is the liberation of man from his self-caused state of minority, which is the incapacity of using one's understanding without the direction of another. This state of minority is caused when its source lies not in the lack of understanding, but in the lack of determination and courage to use it without the assistance of another" (Was ist Aufklärung? 1784). In its historical perspective, the Aufklärung refers to the cultural atmosphere and contrlbutions of the 18th century, especially in Germany, France and England [which affected also American thought with B. Franklin, T. Paine and the leaders of the Revolution]. It crystallized tendencies emphasized by the Renaissance, and quickened by modern scepticism and empiricism, and by the great scientific discoveries of the 17th century. This movement, which was represented by men of varying tendencies, gave an impetus to general learning, a more popular philosophy, empirical science, scriptural criticism, social and political thought. More especially, the word Aufklärung is applied to the German contributions to 18th century culture. In philosophy, its principal representatives are G. E. Lessing (1729-81) who believed in free speech and in a methodical criticism of religion, without being a free-thinker; H. S. Reimarus (1694-1768) who expounded a naturalistic philosophy and denied the supernatural origin of Christianity; Moses Mendelssohn (1729-86) who endeavoured to mitigate prejudices and developed a popular common-sense philosophy; Chr. Wolff (1679-1754), J. A. Eberhard (1739-1809) who followed the Leibnizian rationalism and criticized unsuccessfully Kant and Fichte; and J. G. Herder (1744-1803) who was best as an interpreter of others, but whose intuitional suggestions have borne fruit in the organic correlation of the sciences, and in questions of language in relation to human nature and to national character. The works of Kant and Goethe mark the culmination of the German Enlightenment. Cf. J. G. Hibben, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, 1910. --T.G. Augustinianism: The thought of St. Augustine of Hippo, and of his followers. Born in 354 at Tagaste in N. Africa, A. studied rhetoric in Carthage, taught that subject there and in Rome and Milan. Attracted successively to Manicheanism, Scepticism, and Neo-Platontsm, A. eventually found intellectual and moral peace with his conversion to Christianity in his thirty-fourth year. Returning to Africa, he established numerous monasteries, became a priest in 391, Bishop of Hippo in 395. Augustine wrote much: On Free Choice, Confessions, Literal Commentary on Genesis, On the Trinity, and City of God, are his most noted works. He died in 430.   St. Augustine's characteristic method, an inward empiricism which has little in common with later variants, starts from things without, proceeds within to the self, and moves upwards to God. These three poles of the Augustinian dialectic are polarized by his doctrine of moderate illuminism. An ontological illumination is required to explain the metaphysical structure of things. The truth of judgment demands a noetic illumination. A moral illumination is necessary in the order of willing; and so, too, an lllumination of art in the aesthetic order. Other illuminations which transcend the natural order do not come within the scope of philosophy; they provide the wisdoms of theology and mysticism. Every being is illuminated ontologically by number, form, unity and its derivatives, and order. A thing is what it is, in so far as it is more or less flooded by the light of these ontological constituents.   Sensation is necessary in order to know material substances. There is certainly an action of the external object on the body and a corresponding passion of the body, but, as the soul is superior to the body and can suffer nothing from its inferior, sensation must be an action, not a passion, of the soul. Sensation takes place only when the observing soul, dynamically on guard throughout the body, is vitally attentive to the changes suffered by the body. However, an adequate basis for the knowledge of intellectual truth is not found in sensation alone. In order to know, for example, that a body is multiple, the idea of unity must be present already, otherwise its multiplicity could not be recognized. If numbers are not drawn in by the bodily senses which perceive only the contingent and passing, is the mind the source of the unchanging and necessary truth of numbers? The mind of man is also contingent and mutable, and cannot give what it does not possess. As ideas are not innate, nor remembered from a previous existence of the soul, they can be accounted for only by an immutable source higher than the soul. In so far as man is endowed with an intellect, he is a being naturally illuminated by God, Who may be compared to an intelligible sun. The human intellect does not create the laws of thought; it finds them and submits to them. The immediate intuition of these normative rules does not carry any content, thus any trace of ontologism is avoided.   Things have forms because they have numbers, and they have being in so far as they possess form. The sufficient explanation of all formable, and hence changeable, things is an immutable and eternal form which is unrestricted in time and space. The forms or ideas of all things actually existing in the world are in the things themselves (as rationes seminales) and in the Divine Mind (as rationes aeternae). Nothing could exist without unity, for to be is no other than to be one. There is a unity proper to each level of being, a unity of the material individual and species, of the soul, and of that union of souls in the love of the same good, which union constitutes the city. Order, also, is ontologically imbibed by all beings. To tend to being is to tend to order; order secures being, disorder leads to non-being. Order is the distribution which allots things equal and unequal each to its own place and integrates an ensemble of parts in accordance with an end. Hence, peace is defined as the tranquillity of order. Just as things have their being from their forms, the order of parts, and their numerical relations, so too their beauty is not something superadded, but the shining out of all their intelligible co-ingredients.   S. Aurelii Augustini, Opera Omnia, Migne, PL 32-47; (a critical edition of some works will be found in the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Vienna). Gilson, E., Introd. a l'etude de s. Augustin, (Paris, 1931) contains very good bibliography up to 1927, pp. 309-331. Pope, H., St. Augustine of Hippo, (London, 1937). Chapman, E., St. Augustine's Philos. of Beauty, (N. Y., 1939). Figgis, J. N., The Political Aspects of St. Augustine's "City of God", (London, 1921). --E.C. Authenticity: In a general sense, genuineness, truth according to its title. It involves sometimes a direct and personal characteristic (Whitehead speaks of "authentic feelings").   This word also refers to problems of fundamental criticism involving title, tradition, authorship and evidence. These problems are vital in theology, and basic in scholarship with regard to the interpretation of texts and doctrines. --T.G. Authoritarianism: That theory of knowledge which maintains that the truth of any proposition is determined by the fact of its having been asserted by a certain esteemed individual or group of individuals. Cf. H. Newman, Grammar of Assent; C. S. Peirce, "Fixation of Belief," in Chance, Love and Logic, ed. M. R. Cohen. --A.C.B. Autistic thinking: Absorption in fanciful or wishful thinking without proper control by objective or factual material; day dreaming; undisciplined imagination. --A.C.B. Automaton Theory: Theory that a living organism may be considered a mere machine. See Automatism. Automatism: (Gr. automatos, self-moving) (a) In metaphysics: Theory that animal and human organisms are automata, that is to say, are machines governed by the laws of physics and mechanics. Automatism, as propounded by Descartes, considered the lower animals to be pure automata (Letter to Henry More, 1649) and man a machine controlled by a rational soul (Treatise on Man). Pure automatism for man as well as animals is advocated by La Mettrie (Man, a Machine, 1748). During the Nineteenth century, automatism, combined with epiphenomenalism, was advanced by Hodgson, Huxley and Clifford. (Cf. W. James, The Principles of Psychology, Vol. I, ch. V.) Behaviorism, of the extreme sort, is the most recent version of automatism (See Behaviorism).   (b) In psychology: Psychological automatism is the performance of apparently purposeful actions, like automatic writing without the superintendence of the conscious mind. L. C. Rosenfield, From Beast Machine to Man Machine, N. Y., 1941. --L.W. Automatism, Conscious: The automatism of Hodgson, Huxley, and Clifford which considers man a machine to which mind or consciousness is superadded; the mind of man is, however, causally ineffectual. See Automatism; Epiphenomenalism. --L.W. Autonomy: (Gr. autonomia, independence) Freedom consisting in self-determination and independence of all external constraint. See Freedom. Kant defines autonomy of the will as subjection of the will to its own law, the categorical imperative, in contrast to heteronomy, its subjection to a law or end outside the rational will. (Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, § 2.) --L.W. Autonomy of ethics: A doctrine, usually propounded by intuitionists, that ethics is not a part of, and cannot be derived from, either metaphysics or any of the natural or social sciences. See Intuitionism, Metaphysical ethics, Naturalistic ethics. --W.K.F. Autonomy of the will: (in Kant's ethics) The freedom of the rational will to legislate to itself, which constitutes the basis for the autonomy of the moral law. --P.A.S. Autonymy: In the terminology introduced by Carnap, a word (phrase, symbol, expression) is autonymous if it is used as a name for itself --for the geometric shape, sound, etc. which it exemplifies, or for the word as a historical and grammatical unit. Autonymy is thus the same as the Scholastic suppositio matertalis (q. v.), although the viewpoint is different. --A.C. Autotelic: (from Gr. autos, self, and telos, end) Said of any absorbing activity engaged in for its own sake (cf. German Selbstzweck), such as higher mathematics, chess, etc. In aesthetics, applied to creative art and play which lack any conscious reference to the accomplishment of something useful. In the view of some, it may constitute something beneficent in itself of which the person following his art impulse (q.v.) or playing is unaware, thus approaching a heterotelic (q.v.) conception. --K.F.L. Avenarius, Richard: (1843-1896) German philosopher who expressed his thought in an elaborate and novel terminology in the hope of constructing a symbolic language for philosophy, like that of mathematics --the consequence of his Spinoza studies. As the most influential apostle of pure experience, the posltivistic motive reaches in him an extreme position. Insisting on the biologic and economic function of thought, he thought the true method of science is to cure speculative excesses by a return to pure experience devoid of all assumptions. Philosophy is the scientific effort to exclude from knowledge all ideas not included in the given. Its task is to expel all extraneous elements in the given. His uncritical use of the category of the given and the nominalistic view that logical relations are created rather than discovered by thought, leads him to banish not only animism but also all of the categories, substance, causality, etc., as inventions of the mind. Explaining the evolution and devolution of the problematization and deproblematization of numerous ideas, and aiming to give the natural history of problems, Avenarius sought to show physiologically, psychologically and historically under what conditions they emerge, are challenged and are solved. He hypothesized a System C, a bodily and central nervous system upon which consciousness depends. R-values are the stimuli received from the world of objects. E-values are the statements of experience. The brain changes that continually oscillate about an ideal point of balance are termed Vitalerhaltungsmaximum. The E-values are differentiated into elements, to which the sense-perceptions or the content of experience belong, and characters, to which belongs everything which psychology describes as feelings and attitudes. Avenarius describes in symbolic form a series of states from balance to balance, termed vital series, all describing a series of changes in System C. Inequalities in the vital balance give rise to vital differences. According to his theory there are two vital series. It assumes a series of brain changes because parallel series of conscious states can be observed. The independent vital series are physical, and the dependent vital series are psychological. The two together are practically covariants. In the case of a process as a dependent vital series three stages can be noted: first, the appearance of the problem, expressed as strain, restlessness, desire, fear, doubt, pain, repentance, delusion; the second, the continued effort and struggle to solve the problem; and finally, the appearance of the solution, characterized by abating anxiety, a feeling of triumph and enjoyment.   Corresponding to these three stages of the dependent series are three stages of the independent series: the appearance of the vital difference and a departure from balance in the System C, the continuance with an approximate vital difference, and lastly, the reduction of the vital difference to zero, the return to stability. By making room for dependent and independent experiences, he showed that physics regards experience as independent of the experiencing indlvidual, and psychology views experience as dependent upon the individual. He greatly influenced Mach and James (q.v.). See Avenarius, Empirio-criticism, Experience, pure. Main works: Kritik der reinen Erfahrung; Der menschliche Weltbegriff. --H.H. Averroes: (Mohammed ibn Roshd) Known to the Scholastics as The Commentator, and mentioned as the author of il gran commento by Dante (Inf. IV. 68) he was born 1126 at Cordova (Spain), studied theology, law, medicine, mathematics, and philosophy, became after having been judge in Sevilla and Cordova, physician to the khalifah Jaqub Jusuf, and charged with writing a commentary on the works of Aristotle. Al-mansur, Jusuf's successor, deprived him of his place because of accusations of unorthodoxy. He died 1198 in Morocco. Averroes is not so much an original philosopher as the author of a minute commentary on the whole works of Aristotle. His procedure was imitated later by Aquinas. In his interpretation of Aristotelian metaphysics Averroes teaches the coeternity of a universe created ex nihilo. This doctrine formed together with the notion of a numerical unity of the active intellect became one of the controversial points in the discussions between the followers of Albert-Thomas and the Latin Averroists. Averroes assumed that man possesses only a disposition for receiving the intellect coming from without; he identifies this disposition with the possible intellect which thus is not truly intellectual by nature. The notion of one intellect common to all men does away with the doctrine of personal immortality. Another doctrine which probably was emphasized more by the Latin Averroists (and by the adversaries among Averroes' contemporaries) is the famous statement about "two-fold truth", viz. that a proposition may be theologically true and philosophically false and vice versa. Averroes taught that religion expresses the (higher) philosophical truth by means of religious imagery; the "two-truth notion" came apparently into the Latin text through a misinterpretation on the part of the translators. The works of Averroes were one of the main sources of medieval Aristotelianlsm, before and even after the original texts had been translated. The interpretation the Latin Averroists found in their texts of the "Commentator" spread in spite of opposition and condemnation. See Averroism, Latin. Averroes, Opera, Venetiis, 1553. M. Horten, Die Metaphysik des Averroes, 1912. P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin, 2d ed., Louvain, 1911. --R.A. Averroism, Latin: The commentaries on Aristotle written by Averroes (Ibn Roshd) in the 12th century became known to the Western scholars in translations by Michael Scottus, Hermannus Alemannus, and others at the beginning of the 13th century. Many works of Aristotle were also known first by such translations from Arabian texts, though there existed translations from the Greek originals at the same time (Grabmann). The Averroistic interpretation of Aristotle was held to be the true one by many; but already Albert the Great pointed out several notions which he felt to be incompatible with the principles of Christian philosophy, although he relied for the rest on the "Commentator" and apparently hardly used any other text. Aquinas, basing his studies mostly on a translation from the Greek texts, procured for him by William of Moerbecke, criticized the Averroistic interpretation in many points. But the teachings of the Commentator became the foundation for a whole school of philosophers, represented first by the Faculty of Arts at Paris. The most prominent of these scholars was Siger of Brabant. The philosophy of these men was condemned on March 7th, 1277 by Stephen Tempier, Bishop of Paris, after a first condemnation of Aristotelianism in 1210 had gradually come to be neglected. The 219 theses condemned in 1277, however, contain also some of Aquinas which later were generally recognized an orthodox. The Averroistic propositions which aroused the criticism of the ecclesiastic authorities and which had been opposed with great energy by Albert and Thomas refer mostly to the following points: The co-eternity of the created word; the numerical identity of the intellect in all men, the so-called two-fold-truth theory stating that a proposition may be philosophically true although theologically false. Regarding the first point Thomas argued that there is no philosophical proof, either for the co-eternity or against it; creation is an article of faith. The unity of intellect was rejected as incompatible with the true notion of person and with personal immortality. It is doubtful whether Averroes himself held the two-truths theory; it was, however, taught by the Latin Averroists who, notwithstanding the opposition of the Church and the Thomistic philosophers, gained a great influence and soon dominated many universities, especially in Italy. Thomas and his followers were convinced that they interpreted Aristotle correctly and that the Averroists were wrong; one has, however, to admit that certain passages in Aristotle allow for the Averroistic interpretation, especially in regard to the theory of intellect.   Lit.: P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin au XIIIe Siecle, 2d. ed. Louvain, 1911; M. Grabmann, Forschungen über die lateinischen Aristotelesübersetzungen des XIII. Jahrhunderts, Münster 1916 (Beitr. z. Gesch. Phil. d. MA. Vol. 17, H. 5-6). --R.A. Avesta: See Zendavesta. Avicehron: (or Avencebrol, Salomon ibn Gabirol) The first Jewish philosopher in Spain, born in Malaga 1020, died about 1070, poet, philosopher, and moralist. His main work, Fons vitae, became influential and was much quoted by the Scholastics. It has been preserved only in the Latin translation by Gundissalinus. His doctrine of a spiritual substance individualizing also the pure spirits or separate forms was opposed by Aquinas already in his first treatise De ente, but found favor with the medieval Augustinians also later in the 13th century. He also teaches the necessity of a mediator between God and the created world; such a mediator he finds in the Divine Will proceeding from God and creating, conserving, and moving the world. His cosmogony shows a definitely Neo-Platonic shade and assumes a series of emanations. Cl. Baeumker, Avencebrolis Fons vitae. Beitr. z. Gesch. d. Philos. d. MA. 1892-1895, Vol. I. Joh. Wittman, Die Stellung des hl. Thomas von Aquino zu Avencebrol, ibid. 1900. Vol. III. --R.A. Avicenna: (Abu Ali al Hosain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina) Born 980 in the country of Bocchara, began to write in young years, left more than 100 works, taught in Ispahan, was physician to several Persian princes, and died at Hamadan in 1037. His fame as physician survived his influence as philosopher in the Occident. His medical works were printed still in the 17th century. His philosophy is contained in 18 vols. of a comprehensive encyclopedia, following the tradition of Al Kindi and Al Farabi. Logic, Physics, Mathematics and Metaphysics form the parts of this work. His philosophy is Aristotelian with noticeable Neo-Platonic influences. His doctrine of the universal existing ante res in God, in rebus as the universal nature of the particulars, and post res in the human mind by way of abstraction became a fundamental thesis of medieval Aristotelianism. He sharply distinguished between the logical and the ontological universal, denying to the latter the true nature of form in the composite. The principle of individuation is matter, eternally existent. Latin translations attributed to Avicenna the notion that existence is an accident to essence (see e.g. Guilelmus Parisiensis, De Universo). The process adopted by Avicenna was one of paraphrasis of the Aristotelian texts with many original thoughts interspersed. His works were translated into Latin by Dominicus Gundissalinus (Gondisalvi) with the assistance of Avendeath ibn Daud. This translation started, when it became more generally known, the "revival of Aristotle" at the end of the 12th and the beginning of the 13th century. Albert the Great and Aquinas professed, notwithstanding their critical attitude, a great admiration for Avicenna whom the Arabs used to call the "third Aristotle". But in the Orient, Avicenna's influence declined soon, overcome by the opposition of the orthodox theologians. Avicenna, Opera, Venetiis, 1495; l508; 1546. M. Horten, Das Buch der Genesung der Seele, eine philosophische Enzyklopaedie Avicenna's; XIII. Teil: Die Metaphysik. Halle a. S. 1907-1909. R. de Vaux, Notes et textes sur l'Avicennisme Latin, Bibl. Thomiste XX, Paris, 1934. --R.A. Avidya: (Skr.) Nescience; ignorance; the state of mind unaware of true reality; an equivalent of maya (q.v.); also a condition of pure awareness prior to the universal process of evolution through gradual differentiation into the elements and factors of knowledge. --K.F.L. Avyakta: (Skr.) "Unmanifest", descriptive of or standing for brahman (q.v.) in one of its or "his" aspects, symbolizing the superabundance of the creative principle, or designating the condition of the universe not yet become phenomenal (aja, unborn). --K.F.L. Awareness: Consciousness considered in its aspect of act; an act of attentive awareness such as the sensing of a color patch or the feeling of pain is distinguished from the content attended to, the sensed color patch, the felt pain. The psychologlcal theory of intentional act was advanced by F. Brentano (Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte) and received its epistemological development by Meinong, Husserl, Moore, Laird and Broad. See Intentionalism. --L.W. Axiological: (Ger. axiologisch) In Husserl: Of or pertaining to value or theory of value (the latter term understood as including disvalue and value-indifference). --D.C. Axiological ethics: Any ethics which makes the theory of obligation entirely dependent on the theory of value, by making the determination of the rightness of an action wholly dependent on a consideration of the value or goodness of something, e.g. the action itself, its motive, or its consequences, actual or probable. Opposed to deontological ethics. See also teleological ethics. --W.K.F. Axiologic Realism: In metaphysics, theory that value as well as logic, qualities as well as relations, have their being and exist external to the mind and independently of it. Applicable to the philosophy of many though not all realists in the history of philosophy, from Plato to G. E. Moore, A. N. Whitehead, and N, Hartmann. --J.K.F. Axiology: (Gr. axios, of like value, worthy, and logos, account, reason, theory). Modern term for theory of value (the desired, preferred, good), investigation of its nature, criteria, and metaphysical status. Had its rise in Plato's theory of Forms or Ideas (Idea of the Good); was developed in Aristotle's Organon, Ethics, Poetics, and Metaphysics (Book Lambda). Stoics and Epicureans investigated the summum bonum. Christian philosophy (St. Thomas) built on Aristotle's identification of highest value with final cause in God as "a living being, eternal, most good."   In modern thought, apart from scholasticism and the system of Spinoza (Ethica, 1677), in which values are metaphysically grounded, the various values were investigated in separate sciences, until Kant's Critiques, in which the relations of knowledge to moral, aesthetic, and religious values were examined. In Hegel's idealism, morality, art, religion, and philosophy were made the capstone of his dialectic. R. H. Lotze "sought in that which should be the ground of that which is" (Metaphysik, 1879). Nineteenth century evolutionary theory, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and economics subjected value experience to empirical analysis, and stress was again laid on the diversity and relativity of value phenomena rather than on their unity and metaphysical nature. F. Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra (1883-1885) and Zur Genealogie der Moral (1887) aroused new interest in the nature of value. F. Brentano, Vom Ursprung sittlicher Erkenntnis (1889), identified value with love.   In the twentieth century the term axiology was apparently first applied by Paul Lapie (Logique de la volonte, 1902) and E. von Hartmann (Grundriss der Axiologie, 1908). Stimulated by Ehrenfels (System der Werttheorie, 1897), Meinong (Psychologisch-ethische Untersuchungen zur Werttheorie, 1894-1899), and Simmel (Philosophie des Geldes, 1900). W. M. Urban wrote the first systematic treatment of axiology in English (Valuation, 1909), phenomenological in method under J. M. Baldwin's influence. Meanwhile H. Münsterberg wrote a neo-Fichtean system of values (The Eternal Values, 1909).   Among important recent contributions are: B. Bosanquet, The Principle of Individuality and Value (1912), a free reinterpretation of Hegelianism; W. R. Sorley, Moral Values and the Idea of God (1918, 1921), defending a metaphysical theism; S. Alexander, Space, Time, and Deity (1920), realistic and naturalistic; N. Hartmann, Ethik (1926), detailed analysis of types and laws of value; R. B. Perry's magnum opus, General Theory of Value (1926), "its meaning and basic principles construed in terms of interest"; and J. Laird, The Idea of Value (1929), noteworthy for historical exposition. A naturalistic theory has been developed by J. Dewey (Theory of Valuation, 1939), for which "not only is science itself a value . . . but it is the supreme means of the valid determination of all valuations." A. J. Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic (1936) expounds the view of logical positivism that value is "nonsense." J. Hessen, Wertphilosophie (1937), provides an account of recent German axiology from a neo-scholastic standpoint.   The problems of axiology fall into four main groups, namely, those concerning (1) the nature of value, (2) the types of value, (3) the criterion of value, and (4) the metaphysical status of value.   (1) The nature of value experience. Is valuation fulfillment of desire (voluntarism: Spinoza, Ehrenfels), pleasure (hedonism: Epicurus, Bentham, Meinong), interest (Perry), preference (Martineau), pure rational will (formalism: Stoics, Kant, Royce), apprehension of tertiary qualities (Santayana), synoptic experience of the unity of personality (personalism: T. H. Green, Bowne), any experience that contributes to enhanced life (evolutionism: Nietzsche), or "the relation of things as means to the end or consequence actually reached" (pragmatism, instrumentalism: Dewey).   (2) The types of value. Most axiologists distinguish between intrinsic (consummatory) values (ends), prized for their own sake, and instrumental (contributory) values (means), which are causes (whether as economic goods or as natural events) of intrinsic values. Most intrinsic values are also instrumental to further value experience; some instrumental values are neutral or even disvaluable intrinsically. Commonly recognized as intrinsic values are the (morally) good, the true, the beautiful, and the holy. Values of play, of work, of association, and of bodily well-being are also acknowledged. Some (with Montague) question whether the true is properly to be regarded as a value, since some truth is disvaluable, some neutral; but love of truth, regardless of consequences, seems to establish the value of truth. There is disagreement about whether the holy (religious value) is a unique type (Schleiermacher, Otto), or an attitude toward other values (Kant, Höffding), or a combination of the two (Hocking). There is also disagreement about whether the variety of values is irreducible (pluralism) or whether all values are rationally related in a hierarchy or system (Plato, Hegel, Sorley), in which values interpenetrate or coalesce into a total experience.   (3) The criterion of value. The standard for testing values is influenced by both psychological and logical theory. Hedonists find the standard in the quantity of pleasure derived by the individual (Aristippus) or society (Bentham). Intuitionists appeal to an ultimate insight into preference (Martineau, Brentano). Some idealists recognize an objective system of rational norms or ideals as criterion (Plato, Windelband), while others lay more stress on rational wholeness and coherence (Hegel, Bosanquet, Paton) or inclusiveness (T. H. Green). Naturalists find biological survival or adjustment (Dewey) to be the standard. Despite differences, there is much in common in the results of the application of these criteria.   (4) The metaphysical status of value. What is the relation of values to the facts investigated by natural science (Koehler), of Sein to Sollen (Lotze, Rickert), of human experience of value to reality independent of man (Hegel, Pringle-Pattlson, Spaulding)? There are three main answers:   subjectivism (value is entirely dependent on and relative to human experience of it: so most hedonists, naturalists, positivists);   logical objectivism (values are logical essences or subsistences, independent of their being known, yet with no existential status or action in reality);   metaphysical objectivism (values   --or norms or ideals   --are integral, objective, and active constituents of the metaphysically real: so theists, absolutists, and certain realists and naturalists like S. Alexander and Wieman). --E.S.B. Axiom: See Mathematics. Axiomatic method: That method of constructing a deductive system consisting of deducing by specified rules all statements of the system save a given few from those given few, which are regarded as axioms or postulates of the system. See Mathematics. --C.A.B. Ayam atma brahma: (Skr.) "This self is brahman", famous quotation from Brhadaranyaka Upanishad 2.5.19, one of many alluding to the central theme of the Upanishads, i.e., the identity of the human and divine or cosmic. --K.F.L.

auspice-hour ::: an auspice is any divine or prophetic token; a favourable sign or propitious circumstance, esp. an indication of a happy future. Sri Aurobindo combines the word ‘hour" with auspice to emphasize a special moment.

avatara (Avatar) ::: Incarnation; the descent into form; the revelation of the Godhead in humanity; the Divine manifest in a human appearance; the word avatara means a descent; it is the coming down of the Divine below the line which divides the divine from the human world or status.

Avatar ::: Sri Aurobindo: “The word Avatar means a descent; it is a coming down of the Divine below the line which divides the divine from the human world or status.” Essays on the Gita

avatars ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The word Avatar means a descent; it is a coming down of the Divine below the line which divides the divine from the human world or status.” *Essays on the Gita

Avatar ::: “The word Avatar means a descent; it is a coming down of the Divine below the line which divides the divine from the human world or status.” Essays on the Gita

batrachia ::: n. pl. --> The order of amphibians which includes the frogs and toads; the Anura. Sometimes the word is used in a wider sense as equivalent to Amphibia.

beast ::: 1. An animal other than a human, especially a large four-footed mammal. 2. Fig. Animal nature as opposed to intellect or spirit. 3. A large wild animal. 4. A domesticated animal used by man. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) beast"s, Beast"s, beasts, wild-beast. ::: —the Beast. Applied to the devil and evil spirits.

bodiless ::: having no body, form, or substance; incorporeal. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.) Bodiless.

Brahma ::: “Brahma is the nominative; the uninflected form of the word is brahman; it differs from brahman ‘the Eternal’ only in gender.” Glossary of Terms in Sri Aurobindo’s Writings

Brahma (Brahma) ::: [Ved] 1. the Power of the Divine, which creates the worlds by the Word; ::: 2. the priest of the Word. [Later]: the creative Deity [one of the trimurti]; the Eternal's personality of existence. [Brahma is the nominative; the uninflected form of the word is brahman; it differs from brahman "the Eternal" only in gender].

brahmadvisah ::: haters and destroyers of the Word. [Ved.]

Brahmanaspati ::: the lord of the divine word (brahman); the Creator (by the word).

brahma ("s) ::: "Brahma is the nominative; the uninflected form of the word is brahman; it differs from brahman ‘the Eternal" only in gender.” *Glossary of Terms in Sri Aurobindo"s Writings

Brhaspati (Brihaspati) ::: [Ved.]: the Master of the creative Word (the stress in the name falling upon the potency of the Word rather than upon the thought of the general soul-power which is behind it). [Later]: spiritual teacher of the gods; guardian of the planet Jupiter; chief of the high priests of the world.

buddhi ::: intelligence; the thinking mind, the highest normal faculty of the antah.karan.a, also called the manasa buddhi or mental reason, whose three forms are the habitual mind, pragmatic reason and truth-seeking reason. The buddhi as "the discerning intelligence and the enlightened will" is "in its nature thought-power and will-power of the Spirit turned into the lower form of a mental activity" and thus "an intermediary between a much higher Truth-mind not now in our active possession, which is the direct instrument of Spirit, and the physical life of the human mind evolved in body"; its powers of perception, imagination, reasoning and judgment correspond respectively to the higher faculties of revelation, inspiration, intuition and discrimination belonging to vijñana, which may act in the mind to create "a higher form of the buddhi that can be called the intuitive mind" or vijñanabuddhi. In compound expressions, the word buddhi sometimes refers to a particular mentality or state of consciousness and may be translated "sense of", as in dasyabuddhi, "sense of surrender".

But while Peirce thought of pragmatism as akin to the mathematical method, James' motivation and interest was largely moral and religious. Thus in his Will to Believe (New World, 1896) he argues, in line with Pascal's wager, that "we have the right to believe at our own risk any hypothesis that is live enough to tempt our will," i.e. if it is not resolvable intellectually. Speaking of religious scepticism, he says. "We cannot escape the issue by remaining sceptical . . . because, although we do avoid error in that way if religion be untrue, we lose the good, if it be true, just as certainly as if we positively choose to disbelieve". The position of the religious skeptic is: ''Better risk loss of truth than chance of error, . . ." Later, in 1907 in the Lowell Lectures he stated that "on pragmatistic principles, if the hypothesis of God works satisfactorily in the widest sense of the word, it is true", and took a position between absolutism and materialism which he called "pragmatistic or melioristic" theism. In the same lectures he announces that " 'the true', to put it briefly, is only the expedient in the way of thinking, . . ." James also identifies truth with verifiability, thus anticipating both the experimentalism of Dewey and the operationalism of Bridgman and the logical positivists.

by-law ::: n. --> A local or subordinate law; a private law or regulation made by a corporation for its own government.
A law that is less important than a general law or constitutional provision, and subsidiary to it; a rule relating to a matter of detail; as, civic societies often adopt a constitution and by-laws for the government of their members. In this sense the word has probably been influenced by by, meaning secondary or aside.


calumniation ::: n. --> False accusation of crime or offense, or a malicious and false representation of the words or actions of another, with a view to injure his good name.

carrol ::: n. --> A small closet or inclosure built against a window on the inner side, to sit in for study. The word was used as late as the 16th century.
See 4th Carol.


catus.t.aya (chatushtaya; chatusthaya; chatusthay; chatustaya) ::: group catustaya of four, tetrad, quaternary; any of the seven parts of the sapta catus.t.aya, the system received by Sri Aurobindo as a programme for his yoga. The seven catus.t.ayas are: (1) samata catus.t.aya or santi catus.t.aya, (2) sakti catus.t.aya, (3) vijñana catus.t.aya, (4 sarira catus.t.aya, (5) karma catus.t.aya or lilacatus.t.aya, (6) brahma .. catus.t.aya, (7) (saṁ)siddhi catus.t.aya or yoga catus.t.aya. The first four catus.t.ayas are the catus.t.ayas of the adhara-siddhi; the last three are the general catus.t.ayas. The word catus.t.aya may also be applied to other groups of four, such as lipi catus.t.aya. catv catvaro

charade ::: a game in which each syllable of a word, and then the whole word, is acted and the audience has to guess the word.

charade ::: n. --> A verbal or acted enigma based upon a word which has two or more significant syllables or parts, each of which, as well as the word itself, is to be guessed from the descriptions or representations.

charity ::: n. --> Love; universal benevolence; good will.
Liberality in judging of men and their actions; a disposition which inclines men to put the best construction on the words and actions of others.
Liberality to the poor and the suffering, to benevolent institutions, or to worthy causes; generosity.
Whatever is bestowed gratuitously on the needy or suffering for their relief; alms; any act of kindness.


chirograph ::: n. --> A writing which, requiring a counterpart, was engrossed twice on the same piece of parchment, with a space between, in which was written the word chirographum, through which the parchment was cut, and one part given to each party. It answered to what is now called a charter party.
The last part of a fine of land, commonly called the foot of the fine.


Christology: The totality of doctrines constituting that part of theology which treats of the nature and personality of Christ. First of all Christology must concern itself with the promise of a Saviour and Redeemer of the human race. It includes the study of the prophecies foretelling the Messiah, as well as their fulfillment. Further it must inquire into the mystery of the Incarnation, of the Word made flesh, and examine all the circumstances of the birth, passion, and resurrection of Christ. Since He acknowledged that He was God, the Son of God, one with the Father, it becomes necessary to examine His credentials, His own prophecies, miracles, and saintly life, which were to serve as evidence that He was sent by God and really possessed all power in heaven and on earth. Christology must deal with the human and Divine nature, their relation to each other, and the hypostatic union of both in one Divine Person, as well as the relation of that Person to the Father and the Holy Ghost. Moreover, the authentic decisions of the Councils of the Church form an exceedingly important portion of all christological theories and doctrines, and also the interpretations of those decisions by theologians. -- J.J.R.

Chun tu: The superior man, the perfect man, the moral man, the noble man. "There may have been a superior man who is not a true man (jen), but there has never been an inferior man (hsiao jen) who is a true man." The superior man "makes upward progress," "understands profit," and "despises the ordinances of Heaven, great men, and the words of the sages." (Confucius.)   "The superior man's moral order is on the increase, while the inferior man's moral order is on the decrease." "The superior man abides by what is internal, whereas the inferior man abides by what is external." (Ancient Confucianism )   "The superior man makes advance in the moral law, whereas the inferior man makes advance in profit." "The superior man enjoys in the fulfillment of the moral law, whereas the inferior man enjoys in the fulfillment of his desires." (Medieval Confucianism.) The superior man "sees what is great and far" and is interested in "helping things to perfection," whereas the inferior man "sees what is small and near" and is interested in destroying things." (Neo-Confucianism.) A ruler. Husband (as in the Odes).

cipher ::: n. 1. Something having no influence or value; a zero; a nonentity. 2. A secret method of writing, as by transposition or substitution of letters, specially formed symbols, or the like. unintelligible to all but those possessing the key; a cryptograph. ciphers. *v. 3. To put in secret writing; encode. *ciphers. Note: Sri Aurobindo also spelled the word as Cypher, the old English spelling.

cite ::: v. t. --> To call upon officially or authoritatively to appear, as before a court; to summon.
To urge; to enjoin.
To quote; to repeat, as a passage from a book, or the words of another.
To refer to or specify, as for support, proof, illustration, or confirmation.
To bespeak; to indicate.


Class: or set, or aggregate (in most connections the words are used synonymously) can best be described by saying that classes are associated with monadic propositional functions (in intension -- i.e., properties) in such a way that two propositional functions determine the same class if and only if they are formally equivalent. A class thus differs from a propositional function in extension only in that it is not usual to employ the notation of application of function to argument in the case of classes (see the article Propositional function). Instead, if a class a is determined by a propositional function A, we say that x is a member of a (in symbols x∈a) if and only if A(x).

clumps ::: n. --> A game in which questions are asked for the purpose of enabling the questioners to discover a word or thing previously selected by two persons who answer the questions; -- so called because the players take sides in two "clumps" or groups, the "clump" which guesses the word winning the game.

Conceivability: The quality or condition of taking into and holding an idea in mind. It has come to mean any affection of the mind or any apprehension, imagining or opinion of the mind. It is a necessary though not sufficient criterion for the truth of said idea or affection, etc. -- C.K.D Concept: In logic syn. either with propositioned function (q.v.) generally or with monadic propositional function. The terminology associated with the word function is not, however, usually employed in connection with the word concept; and the latter word may serve to avoid ambiguities which have arisen from loose or variant usages of the word function (q.v.); or it may reflect a difference in point of view. -- A.C.

CONCENTRATION ::: Fixing the consciousness in one place or on one object and in a single condition.

A gathering together of the consciousness and either centralising at one point or turning on a single object, e.g. the Divine; there can also be a gathered condition throughout the whole being, not at a point.

Concentration is necessary, first to turn the whole will and mind from the discursive divagation natural to them, following a dispersed movement of the thoughts, running after many-branching desires, led away in the track of the senses and the outward mental response to phenomena; we have to fix the will and the thought on the eternal and real behind all, and this demands an immense effort, a one-pointed concentration. Secondly, it is necessary in order to break down the veil which is erected by our ordinary mentality between ourselves and the truth; for outer knowledge can be picked up by the way, by ordinary attention and reception, but the inner, hidden and higher truth can only be seized by an absolute concentration of the mind on its object, an absolute concentration of the will to attain it and, once attained, to hold it habitually and securely unite oneself with it.

Centre of Concentration: The two main places where one can centre the consciousness for yoga are in the head and in the heart - the mind-centre and the soul-centre.

Brain concentration is always a tapasyā and necessarily brings a strain. It is only if one is lifted out of the brain mind altogether that the strain of mental concentration disappears.

At the top of the head or above it is the right place for yogic concentration in reading or thinking.

In whatever centre the concentration takes place, the yoga force generated extends to the others and produces concentration or workings there.

Modes of Concentration: There is no harm in concentrating sometimes in the heart and sometimes above the head. But concentration in either place does not mean keeping the attention fixed on a particular spot; you have to take your station of consciousness in either place and concentrate there not on the place, but on the Divine. This can be done with eyes shut or with eyes open, according as it best suits.

If one concentrates on a thought or a word, one has to dwell on the essential idea contained in the word with the aspiration to feel the thing which it expresses.

There is no method in this yoga except to concentrate, preferably in the heart, and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force to transform the consciousness; one can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is a beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be.

Powers (three) of Concentration ::: By concentration on anything whatsoever we are able to know that thing, to make it deliver up its concealed secrets; we must use this power to know not things, but the one Thing-in-itself. By concentration again the whole will can be gathered up for the acquisition of that which is still ungrasped, still beyond us; this power, if it is sufficiently trained, sufficiently single-minded, sufficiently sincere, sure of itself, faithful to itself alone, absolute in faith, we can use for the acquisition of any object whatsoever; but we ought to use it not for the acquisition of the many objects which the world offers to us, but to grasp spiritually that one object worthy of pursuit which is also the one subject worthy of knowledge. By concentration of our whole being on one status of itself we can become whatever we choose ; we can become, for instance, even if we were before a mass of weaknesses and fears, a mass instead of strength and courage, or we can become all a great purity, holiness and peace or a single universal soul of Love ; but we ought, it is said, to use this power to become not even these things, high as they may be in comparison with what we now are, but rather to become that which is above all things and free from all action and attributes, the pure and absolute Being. All else, all other concentration can only be valuable for preparation, for previous steps, for a gradual training of the dissolute and self-dissipating thought, will and being towards their grand and unique object.

Stages in Concentration (Rajayogic) ::: that in which the object is seized, that in which it is held, that in which the mind is lost in the status which the object represents or to which the concentration leads.

Concentration and Meditation ::: Concentration means fixing the consciousness in one place or one object and in a single condition Meditation can be diffusive,e.g. thinking about the Divine, receiving impressions and discriminating, watching what goes on in the nature and acting upon it etc. Meditation is when the inner mind is looking at things to get the right knowledge.

vide Dhyāna.


conferva ::: n. --> Any unbranched, slender, green plant of the fresh-water algae. The word is frequently used in a wider sense.

:::   ‘Consecration" generally has a more mystical sense but this is not absolute. A total consecration signifies a total giving of one"s self; hence it is the equivalent of the word ``surrender"", not of the word (soumission} which always gives the impression that one accepts'' passively. You feel a flame in the wordconsecration"", a flame even greater than in the word offering''. To consecrate oneself isto give oneself to an action""; hence, in the yogic sense, it is to give oneself to some divine work with the idea of accomplishing the divine work.” Questions and Answers, MCW Vol. 4*.

‘Consecration’ generally has a more mystical sense but this is not absolute. A total consecration signifies a total giving of one’s self; hence it is the equivalent of the word surrender’’, not of the word (soumission} which always gives the impression that oneaccepts’’ passively. You feel a flame in the word consecration’’, a flame even greater than in the wordoffering’’. To consecrate oneself is ``to give oneself to an action’’; hence, in the yogic sense, it is to give oneself to some divine work with the idea of accomplishing the divine work.” Questions and Answers, MCW Vol. 4.

consequence ::: “ Karma is nothing but the will of the Spirit in action, consequence nothing but the creation of will. What is in the will of being, expresses itself in karma and consequence. When the will is limited in mind, karma appears as a bondage and a limitation, consequence as a reaction or an imposition. But when the will of the being is infinite in the spirit, karma and consequence become instead the joy of the creative spirit, the construction of the eternal mechanist, the word and drama of the eternal poet, the harmony of the eternal musician, the play of the eternal child.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

copula ::: n. --> The word which unites the subject and predicate.
The stop which connects the manuals, or the manuals with the pedals; -- called also coupler.


coronet ::: n. --> An ornamental or honorary headdress, having the shape and character of a crown; particularly, a crown worn as the mark of high rank lower than sovereignty. The word is used by Shakespeare to denote also a kingly crown.
The upper part of a horse&


Creatrix ::: The Divine Mother, the creatress. creatrix. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

creatrix ::: the Divine Mother, the creatress. creatrix. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

crescendo ::: a. & adv. --> With a constantly increasing volume of voice; with gradually increasing strength and fullness of tone; -- a direction for the performance of music, indicated by the mark, or by writing the word on the score. ::: n. --> A gradual increase in the strength and fullness of tone

Culture ::: The pursuit of the mental life for its own sake is what we ordinarily mean by culture; but the word is still a little equivocal and capable of a wider or a narrower sense according to our ideas and predilections.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 25, Page: 84


dataria ::: n. --> Formerly, a part of the Roman chancery; now, a separate office from which are sent graces or favors, cognizable in foro externo, such as appointments to benefices. The name is derived from the word datum, given or dated (with the indications of the time and place of granting the gift or favor).

Deduction: (Lat. deductio, a leading down) Necessary analytical inference. (a) In logic: inference in which a conclusion follows necessarily from one or more given premisses. Definitions given have usually required that the conclusion be of lesser generality than one of the premisses, and have sometimes explicitly excluded immediate inference; but neither restriction fits very well with the ordinary actual use of the word. (b) In psychology, analytical reasoning from general to particular or less general. The mental drawing of conclusions from given postulates. Deduction of the Categories: (In Kant: Deduktion der Kategorien) Transcendental deduction: An exposition of the nature and possibility of a priori forms and the explanation and justification of their use as necessary conditions of experience. Empirical deduction: Factual explanation of how concepts arise in experience and reflection. See Kantianism. -- O.F.K.

defeated or overcome; subdued. half-vanquished. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

dense ::: 1. Having the component parts closely compacted together; crowded or compact. 2. Relatively opaque; transmitting little light. 3. Intense; extreme. 4. Impenetrable. denser, dense-maned. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

descend ::: “The word ‘descend’ has various meanings according to the context—I used it here in the sense of the psychic being coming down into the human consciousness and body ready for it.” Letters on Yoga

dialogical ::: From the word “dialogue.” A descriptor of any approach that acknowledges the importance of culture and intersubjectivity in molding the individual’s perception of phenomena.

dictionary ::: n. --> A book containing the words of a language, arranged alphabetically, with explanations of their meanings; a lexicon; a vocabulary; a wordbook.
Hence, a book containing the words belonging to any system or province of knowledge, arranged alphabetically; as, a dictionary of medicine or of botany; a biographical dictionary.


"Dionysius" used the word to express a type of "Theology" rather than an experience. For him and for many interpreters since his day, Mysticism stands for a religious theory or system, which conceives of God as absolutely transcendent, beyond reason, thought, intellect and all approaches of mind. The way up is a via negativa. It is Agnostia, "unknowing knowing". This type of Mysticism, which emerged from the Neo-Platonic stream of thought might be defined as Belief in the possibility of Union with the Divine by means of ecstatic contemplation.

Divine Presence ::: It is intended by the word Presence to indicate the sense and perception of the Divine as a Being, felt as present in one’s existence and consciousness or in relation with it, without the necessity of any farther qualification or description. Thus of the "ineffable Presence"20 it can only be said that it is there and nothing more can or need be said about it, although at the same time one knows that all is there, personality and impersonality, Power and Light and Ananda and everything else, and that all these flow from that indescribable Presence. The word may be used sometimes in a less absolute sense, but that is always the fundamental significance,—the essential perception of the essential presence supporting everything else.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 106


Dogmatism: (Gr. dogma, opinion) A term used by many and various philosophers to characterize their opponents' view more or less derogatorily since the word cannot rid itself of certain linguistic and other associations. The Skeptics among Greek philosophers, doubting all, called dogmatism every assertion of a positive nature. More discriminately, dogmatism may be applied to presumptuous statements or such that lack a sufficiently rational ground, while in the popular mind the word still has the affiliation with the rigor of church dogma which, having a certain finality about it, appeals to faith rather than reason. Since Kant, dogmatism has a specific connotation in that it refers to metaphysical statements made without previous analysis of their justification on the basis of the nature and aptitudes of reason, exactly what Kant thought to remedy through his criticism. By this animadversion are scored especially all 17th and 18th century metaphysical systems as well as later ones which cling to a priori principles not rationally founded. Now also applied to principles of a generalized character maintained without regard to empirical conditions. -- K.F.L.

domine ::: n. --> A name given to a pastor of the Reformed Church. The word is also applied locally in the United States, in colloquial speech, to any clergyman.
A West Indian fish (Epinula magistralis), of the family Trichiuridae. It is a long-bodied, voracious fish.


dumb ::: Amal: “Sri Aurobindo uses the word ‘dumb’ in the sense of mute but never of stupid or lacking in intelligence. I think the latter usage is more slang than literature.”

dungeon ::: a dark, often underground chamber or cell used to confine prisoners. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adjective.)

eagle ::: Any of several large, soaring birds of prey belonging to the hawk family. The strength, keen vision, graceful and powerful flight of the eagle are proverbial, and have given to him the title of the king of birds. eagle’s, eagles, eagle-peaks, eagle-poised, eagle-winged, she-eagle. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

eagle ::: any of several large, soaring birds of prey belonging to the hawk family. The strength, keen vision, graceful and powerful flight of the eagle are proverbial, and have given to him the title of the king of birds. eagle"s, eagles, eagle-peaks, eagle-poised, eagle-winged, she-eagle. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

east ::: n. --> The point in the heavens where the sun is seen to rise at the equinox, or the corresponding point on the earth; that one of the four cardinal points of the compass which is in a direction at right angles to that of north and south, and which is toward the right hand of one who faces the north; the point directly opposite to the west.
The eastern parts of the earth; the regions or countries which lie east of Europe; the orient. In this indefinite sense, the word is applied to Asia Minor, Syria, Chaldea, Persia, India, China,


eclogue ::: n. --> A pastoral poem, in which shepherds are introduced conversing with each other; a bucolic; an idyl; as, the Ecloques of Virgil, from which the modern usage of the word has been established.

egotism ::: n. --> The practice of too frequently using the word I; hence, a speaking or writing overmuch of one&

elementally ::: adv. --> According to elements; literally; as, the words, "Take, eat; this is my body," elementally understood.

enthusiast ::: ardent; eager; fervent; impassioned. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as a synonym for enthusiastic.)

Equivocation is any fallacy arising from ambiguity of a word, or of a phrase playing the role of a single word in the reasoning in question, the word or phrase being used at different places with different meanings and an inference drawn which is formally correct if the word or phrase is treated as being the same word or phrase throughout. -- A. C.

espionage ::: n. --> The practice or employment of spies; the practice of watching the words and conduct of others, to make discoveries, as spies or secret emissaries; secret watching.

etymology ::: n. --> That branch of philological science which treats of the history of words, tracing out their origin, primitive significance, and changes of form and meaning.
That part of grammar which relates to the changes in the form of the words in a language; inflection.


"Even the words Eternal and Infinite are only symbolic expressions through which the mind feels without grasping some vague impression of this Supreme.” Essays Divine and Human

“Even the words Eternal and Infinite are only symbolic expressions through which the mind feels without grasping some vague impression of this Supreme.” Essays Divine and Human

“Every man is knowingly or unknowingly the instrument of a universal Power and, apart from the inner Presence, there is no such essential difference between one action and another, one kind of instrumentation and another as would warrant the folly of an egoistic pride. The difference between knowledge and ignorance is a grace of the Spirit; the breath of divine Power blows where it lists and fills today one and tomorrow another with the word or the puissance. If the potter shapes one pot more perfectly than another, the merit lies not in the vessel but the maker. The attitude of our mind must not be ‘This is my strength’ or ‘Behold God’s power in me’, but rather ‘A Divine Power works in this mind and body and it is the same that works in all men and in the animal, in the plant and in the metal, in conscious and living things and in things apparently inconscient and inanimate.’” The Synthesis of Yoga

excursion ::: --> A running or going out or forth; an expedition; a sally.
A journey chiefly for recreation; a pleasure trip; a brief tour; as, an excursion into the country.
A wandering from a subject; digression.
Length of stroke, as of a piston; stroke. [An awkward use of the word.]


extra- ::: --> A Latin preposition, denoting beyond, outside of; -- often used in composition as a prefix signifying outside of, beyond, besides, or in addition to what is denoted by the word to which it is prefixed.

fecks ::: n. --> A corruption of the word faith.

fell ::: of an inhumanly cruel nature; fierce; destructive. (All other references to the word are as the past tense of fall.)

flame ::: “The true soul secret in us,—subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil,—this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” The Life Divine

For man to become divine in consciousness and act and to live inwardly and outwardly the divine life is what is meant by spirituality; all lesser meanings given to the word are inadequate fumblings or impostures.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 25, Page: 262-63


formed ::: given form or shape to; fashioned, constructed, framed. Formed (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.).

formless ::: having no definite form; shapeless. Also fig. Formless (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.), formlessness, formlessly.

For Spinoza: Knowledge "of the second kind" (Ethica, II, 40, Schol. 2, cf. also De Em. Int., passim), to be distinguished from opinio or imaginatio and from scientia intuitiva (q.v.). This second type of knowledge is knowledge in the strict sense of the word since, as opposed to opinio, it is certain and true (Ethica, II, 41), and since by means of it, we perceive "under a certain form of eternity" (sub quadam aeternitatis specie, Ibid, II, 42, Cor. 2). Likewise, by means of reason (ratio), we are enabled to distinguish truth from falsity (Ibid, 42), and to master the emotions (Ibid, IV, passim). The objects cognized by reason are (primarily) "common notions" and their derivatives, reason cannot, however, accomplish or bring about the highest virtue of the mind, as can scientia intuitiva by which blessedness and true liberty are conferred (Ibid, V, 36, Schol.). -- W.S.W.

found ::: 1. To set up or establish on a firm basis or for enduring existence; to originate, create, initiate. 2. To establish or set up, especially with provision for continuing existence. Also fig. (All other references are to the word as the pp. or pt. of find. **half-found*.*) founds, founded.**

friend ::: n. --> One who entertains for another such sentiments of esteem, respect, and affection that he seeks his society aud welfare; a wellwisher; an intimate associate; sometimes, an attendant.
One not inimical or hostile; one not a foe or enemy; also, one of the same nation, party, kin, etc., whose friendly feelings may be assumed. The word is some times used as a term of friendly address.
One who looks propitiously on a cause, an institution, a project, and the like; a favorer; a promoter; as, a friend to commerce,


fro ::: adv. --> From; away; back or backward; -- now used only in opposition to the word to, in the phrase to and fro, that is, to and from. See To and fro under To. ::: prep. --> From.

Functional Theory of Mind: See Functional Psychology. Functionalism: See Functional Psychology. Functor: In the terminology of Carnap, a functor is a sign for a (non-propositional) function (q. v.). The word is thus synonymous with (non-proposittonal) function symbol. -- A.C.

galligaskins ::: n. pl. --> Loose hose or breeches; leather leg quards. The word is used loosely and often in a jocose sense.

Genius: Originally the word applied to a demon such as Socrates' inner voice. During the 17th century it was linked to the Plntonic theory of inspiration and was applied to the rejection of too rigid rules in art. It defined the real artist and distinguished his creative imagination from the logical reasoning of the scientist. In Kant (Critique of Judgment), genius creates its own rules. -- L.V.

GHOST. ::: The word ‘ghost’ as used in popular parlance covers an enormous number of distinct phenomena which have no necessary connection with each other. To name a few only :::

ghost ::: “The word ‘ghost’ as used in popular parlance covers an enormous number of distinct phenomena which have no necessary connection with each other. To name a few only:

gih ::: utterance, word, speech; the word as a power of expression. [Ved.] ::: girah [plural]

girvahasah ::: they who uphold the word. [Ved.]

girvanasah ::: they who have joy in the word. [Ved.]

globulin ::: n. --> An albuminous body, insoluble in water, but soluble in dilute solutions of salt. It is present in the red blood corpuscles united with haematin to form haemoglobin. It is also found in the crystalline lens of the eye, and in blood serum, and is sometimes called crystallin. In the plural the word is applied to a group of proteid substances such as vitellin, myosin, fibrinogen, etc., all insoluble in water, but soluble in dilute salt solutions.

Government: This term is used in two senses. Sometimes it is used to indicate the particular administrative institutions or agencies of a society whose function it is to control individual action, safeguard individual and national rights, and, in general, promote the public welfare; all in accordance with the methodological principles and for the sake of the ends decreed to be legitimate by the sovereign. A government is, consequently, purely instrumental, and cannot rightly create sanctions for its own activities. It may, however, persist through change of personnel. In another less common use the word indicates the person or persons who hold office in these institutions, rather than the institutions themselves. This second use is more common in Europe than in America, and corresponds to the American term '"the administration." -- M.B.M.

growth ::: 1. The process of growing in all senses of the word. 2. Something that has grown or developed by or as if by a natural process. growths.

habendum ::: n. --> That part of a deed which follows the part called the premises, and determines the extent of the interest or estate granted; -- so called because it begins with the word Habendum.

halloo ::: n. --> A loud exclamation; a call to invite attention or to incite a person or an animal; a shout.
An exclamation to call attention or to encourage one. ::: v. i. --> To cry out; to exclaim with a loud voice; to call to a person, as by the word halloo.


harmonist ::: one who brings everything into harmony. (Here referring to the Divine) Sri Aurobindo capitalises the word.

hawk ::: n. --> One of numerous species and genera of rapacious birds of the family Falconidae. They differ from the true falcons in lacking the prominent tooth and notch of the bill, and in having shorter and less pointed wings. Many are of large size and grade into the eagles. Some, as the goshawk, were formerly trained like falcons. In a more general sense the word is not infrequently applied, also, to true falcons, as the sparrow hawk, pigeon hawk, duck hawk, and prairie hawk.
An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied


herald ::: Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adjective pertaining to an aspect of heraldry, i.e. a heraldic emblazonment or device; armorial bearings; heraldic symbolism.

herculean ::: requiring tremendous effort, strength, etc. (Sri Aurobindo capitalises the word.)

Here is Yeats’ great poem, Sailing to Byzantium using the word, artifice.

hero ::: 1. One who is distinguished by exceptional courage, nobility, fortitude, etc. 2. A person noted for feats of courage or nobility of purpose, especially one who has risked or sacrificed his or her life (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) hero"s, heroes.

Hilbert and Ackermann use the word predicate for a propositional function of one or more variables, Carnap uses it for the corresponding syntactical entity, the name or designation of such a propositional function (i.e., of a property or relation). -- A.C.

Historically, the notion of a function was of gradual growth in mathematics. The word function is used in approximately its modern sense by John Bernoulli (1698, 1718). The divorce of the notion of a function from that of a particular kind of mathematical expression (analytic or quasi-algebraic) is due to Dirichlet (1837). The general logical notion of a function, and in particular the notion of a propositional function, were introduced by Frege (1879). -- Alonzo Church

  "Human speech is only a secondary expression and at its highest a shadow of the divine Word, of the seed-sounds, the satisfying rhythms, the revealing forms of sound that are the omniscient and omnipotent speech of the eternal Thinker, Harmonist, Creator. The highest inspired speech to which the human mind can attain, the word most unanalysably expressive of supreme truth, the most puissant syllable or mantra can only be its far-off representation.” The Upanishads

“Human speech is only a secondary expression and at its highest a shadow of the divine Word, of the seed-sounds, the satisfying rhythms, the revealing forms of sound that are the omniscient and omnipotent speech of the eternal Thinker, Harmonist, Creator. The highest inspired speech to which the human mind can attain, the word most unanalysably expressive of supreme truth, the most puissant syllable or mantra can only be its far-off representation.” The Upanishads

Huxley, Thomas Henry: (1825-1895) Was a renowned English scientist who devoted his mastery of expository and argumentative prose to the defense of evolutionism. An example of his scintillating style can be found in his famous essay on "A Piece of Chalk." His works touched frequently on ethical problems and bore much of the brunt of the raging controversy between religion and science. He is credited with having invented the word "agnosticism", adopted by Herbert Spencer. See Evolutionism. -- L.E.D.

hypo- ::: --> A prefix signifying a less quantity, or a low state or degree, of that denoted by the word with which it is joined, or position under or beneath.
A prefix denoting that the element to the name of which it is prefixed enters with a low valence, or in a low state of oxidization, usually the lowest, into the compounds indicated; as, hyposulphurous acid.


Hypothesis: In general, an assumption, a supposition, a conjecture, a postulate, a condition, an antecedent, a contingency, a possibility, a probability, a principle, a premiss, a ground or foundation, a tentative explanation, a probable cause, a theoretical situation, an academic question, a specific consideration, a conceded statement, a theory or view for debate or action, a likely relation, the conditioning of one thing by another. In logic, the conditional clause or antecedent in a hypothetical proposition. Also a thesis subordinate to a more general one. In methodology, a principle offered as a conditional explanation of a fact or a group of facts; or again, a provisional assumption about the ground of certain phenomena, used as a guiding norm in making observations and experiments until verified or disproved by subsequent evidence. A hypothesis is conditional or provisional, because it is based on probable and insufficient arguments or elements; yet, it is not an arbitrary opinion, but a justifiable assumption with some foundation in fact, this accounts for the expectation of some measure of agreement between the logical conclusion or implications drawn from a hypothesis, and the phenomena which are known or which may be determined by further tests. A scientific hypothesis must be   proposed after the observations it must explain (a posteriori),   compatible with established theories,   reasonable and relevant,   fruitful in its applications and controllable,   general in terms and more fundamental than the statements it has to explain. A hypothesis is descriptive (forecasting the external circumstances of the event) or explanatory (offering causal accounts of the event). There are two kinds of explanatory hypotheses   the hypothesis of law (or genetic hypothesis) which attempts to determine the manner in which the causes or conditions of a phenomenon operate and   the hypothesis of cause (or causal hypothesis) which attempt to determine the causes or conditions for the production of the phenomenon. A working hypothesis is a preliminary assumption based on few, uncertain or obscure elements, which is used provisionally as a guiding norm in the investigation of certain phenomena. Often, the difference between a working hypothesis and a scientific hypothesis is one of degree; and in any case, a hypothesis is seldom verified completely with all its detailed implications. The Socratic Method of Hypothesis, as developed by Plato in the Phaedo particularly, consists in positing an assumption without questioning its value, for the purpose of determining and analyzing its consequences only when these are clearly debated and judged, the assumption itself is considered for justification or rejection. Usually, a real condition is taken as a ground for inferences, as the aim of the method is to attain knowledge or to favor action. Plato used more specially the word "hypothesis" for the assumptions of geometry (postulates and nominal definitions) Anstotle extended this use to cover the immediate principles of mathematics. It may be observed that the modern hypothetico-deductive method in logical and mathematical theories, is a development of the Socratic method stripped of its ontological implications and purposes.

ideographical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to an ideogram; representing ideas by symbols, independently of sounds; as, 9 represents not the word "nine," but the idea of the number itself.

idioticon ::: n. --> A dictionary of a peculiar dialect, or of the words and phrases peculiar to one part of a country; a glossary.

..if we suppose the unity to be unbroken, we then arrive at the existence of consciousness in all forms of the Force which is at work in the world. Even if there be no conscient or superconscient Purusha inhabiting all forms, yet is there in those forms a conscious force of being of which even their outer parts overtly or inertly partake. Necessarily, in such a view, the word consciousness changes its meaning. It is no longer synonymous with mentality but indicates a self-aware force of existence of which mentality is a middle term; below mentality it sinks into vital and material movements which are for us subconscient; above, it rises into the supramental which is for us the superconscient. But in all it is one and the same thing organising itself differently. This is, once more, the Indian conception of Chit which, as energy, creates the worlds. Essentially, we arrive at that unity which materialistic Science perceives from the other end when it asserts that Mind cannot be another force than Matter, but must be merely development and outcome of material energy. Indian thought at its deepest affirms on the other hand that Mind and Matter are rather different grades of the same energy, different organisations of one conscious Force of Existence.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 95-96 ::: The essence of consciousness is the power to be aware of itself and its objects, and in its true nature this power must be direct, self-fulfilled and complete: if it is in us indirect, incomplete, unfulfilled in its workings, dependent on constructed instruments, it is because consciousness here is emerging from an original veiling Inconscience and is yet burdened and enveloped with the first Nescience proper to the Inconscient.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 1053


ignoramus ::: n. --> We are ignorant; we ignore; -- being the word formerly written on a bill of indictment by a grand jury when there was not sufficient evidence to warrant them in finding it a true bill. The phrase now used is, "No bill," "No true bill," or "Not found," though in some jurisdictions "Ignored" is still used.
A stupid, ignorant person; a vain pretender to knowledge; a dunce.


i ::: --> In our old authors, I was often used for ay (or aye), yes, which is pronounced nearly like it.
As a numeral, I stands for 1, II for 2, etc. ::: object. --> The nominative case of the pronoun of the first person; the word with which a speaker or writer denotes himself.


imaginative ::: a. --> Proceeding from, and characterized by, the imagination, generally in the highest sense of the word.
Given to imagining; full of images, fancies, etc.; having a quick imagination; conceptive; creative.
Unreasonably suspicious; jealous.


immeasurable ::: Incapable of being measured; limitless; immense. Immeasurable. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

imperator ::: n. --> A commander; a leader; an emperor; -- originally an appellation of honor by which Roman soldiers saluted their general after an important victory. Subsequently the title was conferred as a recognition of great military achievements by the senate, whence it carried wiht it some special privileges. After the downfall of the Republic it was assumed by Augustus and his successors, and came to have the meaning now attached to the word emperor.

implicit ::: a. --> Infolded; entangled; complicated; involved.
Tacitly comprised; fairly to be understood, though not expressed in words; implied; as, an implicit contract or agreement.
Resting on another; trusting in the word or authority of another, without doubt or reserve; unquestioning; complete; as, implicit confidence; implicit obedience.


implore ::: v. t. --> To call upon, or for, in supplication; to beseech; to prey to, or for, earnestly; to petition with urency; to entreat; to beg; -- followed directly by the word expressing the thing sought, or the person from whom it is sought. ::: v. i. --> To entreat; to beg; to prey.

In a more outward sense the word Silence is applied to the condition in which there is no movement of thought or feeling etc., only a great stillness of the mind.” Letters on Yoga*;

In a more outward sense the word Silence is applied to the condition in which there is no movement of thought or feeling etc., only a great stillness of the mind.” Letters on Yoga

In articles in this dictionary by the present writer the word proposition is to be understood in sense (b) above. This still leaves an element of ambiguity, since common usage does not always determine of two sentences whether they are strictly synonymous or merely logically equivalent. For a particular language or logistic system, this ambiguity may be resolved in various ways. -- A.C.

incalculable ::: 1. Too great to be calculated or reckoned. 2. Impossible to foresee; unpredictable. Incalculable, incalculable"s. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

incapable of being measured; limitless; immense. Immeasurable. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

inconscient ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Inconscient and the Ignorance may be mere empty abstractions and can be dismissed as irrelevant jargon if one has not come in collision with them or plunged into their dark and bottomless reality. But to me they are realities, concrete powers whose resistance is present everywhere and at all times in its tremendous and boundless mass.” *Letters on Savitri

". . . in its actual cosmic manifestation the Supreme, being the Infinite and not bound by any limitation, can manifest in Itself, in its consciousness of innumerable possibilities, something that seems to be the opposite of itself, something in which there can be Darkness, Inconscience, Inertia, Insensibility, Disharmony and Disintegration. It is this that we see at the basis of the material world and speak of nowadays as the Inconscient — the Inconscient Ocean of the Rigveda in which the One was hidden and arose in the form of this universe — or, as it is sometimes called, the non-being, Asat.” Letters on Yoga

"The Inconscient itself is only an involved state of consciousness which like the Tao or Shunya, though in a different way, contains all things suppressed within it so that under a pressure from above or within all can evolve out of it — ‘an inert Soul with a somnambulist Force".” Letters on Yoga

"The Inconscient is the last resort of the Ignorance.” Letters on Yoga

"The body, we have said, is a creation of the Inconscient and itself inconscient or at least subconscient in parts of itself and much of its hidden action; but what we call the Inconscient is an appearance, a dwelling place, an instrument of a secret Consciousness or a Superconscient which has created the miracle we call the universe.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga :::

"The Inconscient is a sleep or a prison, the conscient a round of strivings without ultimate issue or the wanderings of a dream: we must wake into the superconscious where all darkness of night and half-lights cease in the self-luminous bliss of the Eternal.” The Life Divine

"Men have not learnt yet to recognise the Inconscient on which the whole material world they see is built, or the Ignorance of which their whole nature including their knowledge is built; they think that these words are only abstract metaphysical jargon flung about by the philosophers in their clouds or laboured out in long and wearisome books like The Life Divine. Letters on Savitri :::

   "Is it really a fact that even the ordinary reader would not be able to see any difference between the Inconscient and Ignorance unless the difference is expressly explained to him? This is not a matter of philosophical terminology but of common sense and the understood meaning of English words. One would say ‘even the inconscient stone" but one would not say, as one might of a child, ‘the ignorant stone". One must first be conscious before one can be ignorant. What is true is that the ordinary reader might not be familiar with the philosophical content of the word Inconscient and might not be familiar with the Vedantic idea of the Ignorance as the power behind the manifested world. But I don"t see how I can acquaint him with these things in a single line, even with the most. illuminating image or symbol. He might wonder, if he were Johnsonianly minded, how an Inconscient could be teased or how it could wake Ignorance. I am afraid, in the absence of a miracle of inspired poetical exegesis flashing through my mind, he will have to be left wondering.” Letters on Savitri

  **inconscient, Inconscient"s.**


Individual: In formal logic, the individuals form the first or lowest type of Russell's hierarchy of types. In the Principia Mathematica of Whitehead and Russell, individuals are "defined as whatever is neither a proposition nor a function." It is unnecessary, however, to give the word any such special significance, and for many purposes it is better (as is often done) to take the individuals to be an arbitrary -- or an arbitrary infinite -- domain, or any particular well-defined domain may be taken as the domain of individuals, according to the purpose in hand. When used in this way, the term domain of individuals may be taken as synonymous with the term universe of discourse (in the sense of Boole) which is employed in connection with the algebra of classes. See Logic, formal, §§ 3, 6, 7. -- A.C.

In Germany the first use of the word pcrsonalism seems to have been by Schleiermacher (1768-1834) and later by Hans Dreyer, Troeltsch, and Rudolf Otto. Among German Personalists would be included G. H. Leibniz (1646-1716), Monadism; R. H. Lotze (1817-1881), Teleological Personalism; Rudolf Eucken (1846-1926), Theistic Personalism, Vitalism; Max Schcler (1874-1928), Phenomenological Personalism; William Stern (1871-1939), Critical Personalism, Pantheistic Personalism.

inly ::: The child remembering inly a far home Madhav: “The child remembers inly, not in outer memory; mark the word inly, a typically Sri Aurobindo expression. The child remembers somewhere deep inside, its ‘far home’, her home is there far above.” The Book of the Divine Mother

In mathematics, the word calculus has many specific applications, all conforming more or less closely to the above statement. Sometimes, however, the simple phrase "the calculus" is used in referring to those branches of mathematical analysis (q.v.) which are known more explicitly as the differential calculus and the integral calculus. -- A.C.

In mathematics, the word constant may also be employed to mean simply a number ("Eulers constant"), or, in the physical sciences, to mean a physical quantity ("the gravitational constant," "Planck's constant"). -- A.C.

inscription ::: a marking, such as the wording on a coin, medal, monument, or seal, that is inscribed. inscriptions.

insect ::: n. --> One of the Insecta; esp., one of the Hexapoda. See Insecta.
Any air-breathing arthropod, as a spider or scorpion.
Any small crustacean. In a wider sense, the word is often loosely applied to various small invertebrates.
Fig.: Any small, trivial, or contemptible person or thing. ::: a.


:::   ". . . in such a view, the word consciousness changes its meaning. It is no longer synonymous with mentality but indicates a self-aware force of existence of which mentality is a middle term; below mentality it sinks into vital and material movements which are for us subconscient; above, it rises into the supramental which is for us the superconscient. But in all it is one and the same thing organising itself differently. This is, once more, the Indian conception of Chit which, as energy, creates the worlds.” *The Life Divine

“… in such a view, the word consciousness changes its meaning. It is no longer synonymous with mentality but indicates a self-aware force of existence of which mentality is a middle term; below mentality it sinks into vital and material movements which are for us subconscient; above, it rises into the supramental which is for us the superconscient. But in all it is one and the same thing organising itself differently. This is, once more, the Indian conception of Chit which, as energy, creates the worlds.” The Life Divine

Intelligible: Understandable; comprehensible; knowable; meaningful; Orderly; logical; coherent; rational; Communicable; expressible; Having unity of principle; capable of complete rational explanation or understanding; capable of causal explanation; Clear to natural or pure reason; apprehensible by the intellect (q.v.) only as against apprehensible through the senses; conceptual as against perceptual; conceptually describable or explainable; Capable of being known synoptically or as it is in itself or in essence; capable of being known through itself as against by agency of something else; graspable by in tuition, self-explanatory; Capable of being appreciated or sympathized with; Super-sensible; of the nature of mind, reason, or their higher powers. . -- M.T.K Intension and extension: The intension of a concept consists of the qualities or properties which go to make up the concept. The extension of a concept consists of the things which fall under the concept; or, according to another definition, the extension of a concept consists of the concepts which are subsumed under it (determine subclasses). This is the old distinction between intension and extension, and coincides approximately with the distinction between a monadic proposittonal function (q. v.) in intension and a class (q. v.). The words intension and extension are also used in connection with a number of distinctions related or analogous to this one, the adjective extensional being applied to notions or points of view which in some respect confine attention to truth-values of propositions as opposed to meanings constituting propositions. In the case of (interpreted) calculi of propositions or propositional functions, the adjective intensional may mean that account is taken of modality, extensional that all functions of propositions which appear are truth-functions. The extreme of the extensional point of view does away with propositions altogether and retains only truth-values in their place. -- A.C.

INTERCHANGE. ::: When one is with another for sometime talking etc., there is always some vital interchange, unless one rejects what comes from others instinctively or deliberately. If one is impressionable, there may be a strong impression or influence from the others. Then when one goes to another per- son it is possible to pass it on to the other. That is a thing which is constantly happening. But this happens without the knowledge of the transmitter. When one is conscious, one can prevent it happening.

Every letter means an interchange with the person who writes It ; for something is there behind the words, something of hfs person or of the forces he has put out or had around him while w’riting. Our thougiifs and feeJinp arc also forces and can hav« effects upon others. One has to grow conscious of the movement of these forces and then one can control one's own mental and vital formations and cease to be affected by those of others.


  "In the spiritual sense, however, sacrifice has a different meaning — it does not so much indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one"s being, one"s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘making sacred" and is used as an equivalent of the word yajna. When the Gita speaks of the ‘sacrifice of knowledge", it does not mean a giving up of anything, but a turning of the mind towards the Divine in the search for knowledge and an offering of oneself through it. It is in this sense, too, that one speaks of the offering or sacrifice of works. The Mother has written somewhere that the spiritual sacrifice is joyful and not painful in its nature. On the spiritual path, very commonly, if a seeker still feels the old ties and responsibilities strongly he is not asked to sever or leave them, but to let the call in him grow till all within is ready. Many, indeed, come away earlier because they feel that to cut loose is their only chance, and these have to go sometimes through a struggle. But the pain, the struggle, is not the essential character of this spiritual self-offering.” Letters on Yoga

“In the spiritual sense, however, sacrifice has a different meaning—it does not so much indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one’s being, one’s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘making sacred’ and is used as an equivalent of the word yajna. When the Gita speaks of the ‘sacrifice of knowledge’, it does not mean a giving up of anything, but a turning of the mind towards the Divine in the search for knowledge and an offering of oneself through it. It is in this sense, too, that one speaks of the offering or sacrifice of works. The Mother has written somewhere that the spiritual sacrifice is joyful and not painful in its nature. On the spiritual path, very commonly, if a seeker still feels the old ties and responsibilities strongly he is not asked to sever or leave them, but to let the call in him grow till all within is ready. Many, indeed, come away earlier because they feel that to cut loose is their only chance, and these have to go sometimes through a struggle. But the pain, the struggle, is not the essential character of this spiritual self-offering.” Letters on Yoga

In this article we explore definitions of the words ‘artifice’ and ‘artificer’ from various dictionary sources, their use in two poems, one by Marge Percy, The Bonsai Tree and the other, Sailing to Byzantium by William Butler Yeats, followed by all the brilliant uses by Sri Aurobindo in his magnum opus, Savitri.

In this series we explore the words of other languages and list their definitions given by major dictionaries as well as by other disciples and Sri Aurobindo in his letters on Savitri.

In translation into logical notation, the word nothing is usually to be represented by the negation of an existential quantifier. Thus "nothing has the property F" becomes "∼(Ex)F(x)." -- A.C.

intuition ::: direct perception of truth, fact, etc., independent of any reasoning process. intuition"s, intuitions, half-intuition.

Sri Aurobindo: "Intuition is a power of consciousness nearer and more intimate to the original knowledge by identity; for it is always something that leaps out direct from a concealed identity. It is when the consciousness of the subject meets with the consciousness in the object, penetrates it and sees, feels or vibrates with the truth of what it contacts, that the intuition leaps out like a spark or lightning-flash from the shock of the meeting; or when the consciousness, even without any such meeting, looks into itself and feels directly and intimately the truth or the truths that are there or so contacts the hidden forces behind appearances, then also there is the outbreak of an intuitive light; or, again, when the consciousness meets the Supreme Reality or the spiritual reality of things and beings and has a contactual union with it, then the spark, the flash or the blaze of intimate truth-perception is lit in its depths. This close perception is more than sight, more than conception: it is the result of a penetrating and revealing touch which carries in it sight and conception as part of itself or as its natural consequence. A concealed or slumbering identity, not yet recovering itself, still remembers or conveys by the intuition its own contents and the intimacy of its self-feeling and self-vision of things, its light of truth, its overwhelming and automatic certitude.” *The Life Divine

   "Intuition is always an edge or ray or outleap of a superior light; it is in us a projecting blade, edge or point of a far-off supermind light entering into and modified by some intermediate truth-mind substance above us and, so modified, again entering into and very much blinded by our ordinary or ignorant mind-substance; but on that higher level to which it is native its light is unmixed and therefore entirely and purely veridical, and its rays are not separated but connected or massed together in a play of waves of what might almost be called in the Sanskrit poetic figure a sea or mass of ``stable lightnings"". When this original or native Intuition begins to descend into us in answer to an ascension of our consciousness to its level or as a result of our finding of a clear way of communication with it, it may continue to come as a play of lightning-flashes, isolated or in constant action; but at this stage the judgment of reason becomes quite inapplicable, it can only act as an observer or registrar understanding or recording the more luminous intimations, judgments and discriminations of the higher power. To complete or verify an isolated intuition or discriminate its nature, its application, its limitations, the receiving consciousness must rely on another completing intuition or be able to call down a massed intuition capable of putting all in place. For once the process of the change has begun, a complete transmutation of the stuff and activities of the mind into the substance, form and power of Intuition is imperative; until then, so long as the process of consciousness depends upon the lower intelligence serving or helping out or using the intuition, the result can only be a survival of the mixed Knowledge-Ignorance uplifted or relieved by a higher light and force acting in its parts of Knowledge.” *The Life Divine

  "I use the word ‘intuition" for want of a better. In truth, it is a makeshift and inadequate to the connotation demanded of it. The same has to be said of the word ‘consciousness" and many others which our poverty compels us to extend illegitimately in their significance.” *The Life Divine - Sri Aurobindo"s footnote.

"For intuition is an edge of light thrust out by the secret Supermind. . . .” The Life Divine

". . . intuition is born of a direct awareness while intellect is an indirect action of a knowledge which constructs itself with difficulty out of the unknown from signs and indications and gathered data.” The Life Divine

"Intuition is above illumined Mind which is simply higher Mind raised to a great luminosity and more open to modified forms of intuition and inspiration.” Letters on Yoga

"Intuition sees the truth of things by a direct inner contact, not like the ordinary mental intelligence by seeking and reaching out for indirect contacts through the senses etc. But the limitation of the Intuition as compared with the supermind is that it sees things by flashes, point by point, not as a whole. Also in coming into the mind it gets mixed with the mental movement and forms a kind of intuitive mind activity which is not the pure truth, but something in between the higher Truth and the mental seeking. It can lead the consciousness through a sort of transitional stage and that is practically its function.” Letters on Yoga


“Is it really a fact that even the ordinary reader would not be able to see any difference between the Inconscient and Ignorance unless the difference is expressly explained to him? This is not a matter of philosophical terminology but of common sense and the understood meaning of English words. One would say ‘even the inconscient stone’ but one would not say, as one might of a child, ‘the ignorant stone’. One must first be conscious before one can be ignorant. What is true is that the ordinary reader might not be familiar with the philosophical content of the word Inconscient and might not be familiar with the Vedantic idea of the Ignorance as the power behind the manifested world. But I don’t see how I can acquaint him with these things in a single line, even with the most. illuminating image or symbol. He might wonder, if he were Johnsonianly minded, how an Inconscient could be teased or how it could wake Ignorance. I am afraid, in the absence of a miracle of inspired poetical exegesis flashing through my mind, he will have to be left wondering.” Letters on Savitri

Islam: Name peculiar to the religion founded by Mohammed, embracing all sects found among his followers. Etymologically the term means "to resign oneself". The word means not fatalistic submission to the deity, but striving after righteousness, the practice of the law, obedience to rules and formal performance of outward duties. Meaning the acceptance of the divine will, Islam stresses the legal and external performance of religion. -- H.H.

“It is this essential indeterminability of the Absolute that translates itself into our consciousness through the fundamental negating positives of our spiritual experience, the immobile immutable Self, the Nirguna Brahman, the Eternal without qualities, the pure featureless One Existence, the Impersonal, the Silence void of activities, the Non-being, the Ineffable and the Unknowable. On the other side it is the essence and source of all determinations, and this dynamic essentiality manifests to us through the fundamental affirming positives in which the Absolute equally meets us; for it is the Self that becomes all things, the Saguna Brahman, the Eternal with infinite qualities, the One who is the Many, the infinite Person who is the source and foundation of all persons and personalities, the Lord of creation, the Word, the Master of all works and action; it is that which being known all is known: these affirmatives correspond to those negatives. For it is not possible in a supramental cognition to split asunder the two sides of the One Existence,—even to speak of them as sides is excessive, for they are in each other, their co-existence or one-existence is eternal and their powers sustaining each other found the self-manifestation of the Infinite.” The Life Divine

“I use the word ‘intuition’ for want of a better. In truth, it is a makeshift and inadequate to the connotation demanded of it. The same has to be said of the word ‘consciousness’ and many others which our poverty compels us to extend illegitimately in their significance.” The Life Divine—Sri Aurobindo’s footnote.

jagat ::: world, universe; (the word has the radical sense of motion): the perpetual movement; knot of motion.

jaina. :::a follower of the jain religion which prescribes a path of non-violence towards all living beings and emphasises the necessity of self-effort to move the self towards divine consciousness and liberation: a soul that has conquered its own inner enemies and achieved the state of supreme being &

jehovist ::: n. --> One who maintains that the vowel points of the word Jehovah, in Hebrew, are the proper vowels of that word; -- opposed to adonist.
The writer of the passages of the Old Testament, especially those of the Pentateuch, in which the Supreme Being is styled Jehovah. See Elohist.


jesuitical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the Jesuits, or to their principles and methods.
Designing; cunning; deceitful; crafty; -- an opprobrious use of the word.


Jesuitism: Noun applied rather loosely to the teachings and practices of the Jesuits, a religious order of men of the Roman Catholic Church engaged in missionary and educational work. Originally it was called the Company, but in the Bull of Pope Paul III approving it in 1540, the Society of Jesus. Besides the three usual vows the members take a fourth of special obedience to the Pope, who may send them on missions anywhere in the world. They depend on alms and gifts for support. The word is frequently used in the depreciative and opprobrious sense of craftiness, deceit, duplicity, and equivocation. -- J.J.R.

jesuitism ::: n. --> The principles and practices of the Jesuits.
Cunning; deceit; deceptive practices to effect a purpose; subtle argument; -- an opprobrious use of the word.


Jhumur: “Every ideal is like a kind of guide on a certain path, it helps to make a path clear, defines a line of advance. So to me, the word Angel is associated with a conscious, luminous guide on the way, and here this is the heaven of the ideal so the ideal becomes the angel. A perfect conception, a perfect idea leads man into another higher realm of expression or action.

Jhumur: “I have often wondered if this has anything to do with the passion-play. I feel that. In the root meaning of the word in Latin is there a sense of the word as suffering? In the French you have patir, patir is to suffer. To me it always brings in the holocaust and the coming down of the avatar into the human condition. [Ed. note: ML passiõn—(s. of passiõ) Christ’s sufferings on the cross, any of the Biblical accounts of these. ( late OE passiõn-), special use of LL passiõ suffering, submission, deriv. of L passus , ptp, of patî to suffer, submit.]

Jhumur: “You have the same word in French, capte—like a receiver that catches signals. I believe Sri Aurobindo often uses French words with the French connotation. Particularly I have noticed that sometimes he uses the word amour instead of love. When I asked myself why did he have to use a French word here, perhaps because it was a different kind of love, not the usual, something other. Time’s amour-song he says, and not a love song. There is something different about that song. It is not just a love song. It suggests something other when he uses a word from another language. It is not love that we ordinarily understand, he has added a quality of something special or rare or unusual by utilizing the same word but in another language. It gives it another colour.”

joyous ::: a. --> Glad; gay; merry; joyful; also, affording or inspiring joy; with of before the word or words expressing the cause of joy.

Joy ::: “Pleasure, joy and delight, as man uses the words, are limited and occasional movements which depend on certain habitual causes and emerge, like their opposites pain and grief which are equally limited and occasional movements, from a background other than themselves. Delight of being is universal, illimitable and self-existent, not dependent on particular causes, the background of all backgrounds, from which pleasure, pain and other more neutral experiences emerge. When delight of being seeks to realise itself as delight of becoming, it moves in the movement of force and itself takes different forms of movement of which pleasure and pain are positive and negative currents.” The Life Divine

jubilate ::: n. --> The third Sunday after Easter; -- so called because the introit is the 66th Psalm, which, in the Latin version, begins with the words, "Jubilate Deo."
A name of the 100th Psalm; -- so called from its opening word in the Latin version. ::: v. i.


kamananda ::: a form of sarirananda or physical ananda associkamananda ated with (suddha) kama or purified desire, also referred to as maithunananda (though that term is usually reserved for a high intensity of kamananda); a general term for ananda as experienced on the physical plane: "the joy of Matter released into a spiritual consciousness and thrilled with a constant ecstasy", realised as part of "the total perfection of the spiritualised body". Kamananda manifests both in the sūks.ma deha (subtle body) and the sthūla deha (gross body), and there is a subjective kamananda besides the physical kamananda that is more often meant by the word. The perfection of kamananda, as the "most central" form of physical ananda, depends on a "transformation of the sex-centre and its energy" so that this energy which "is the support in the body of all the mental, vital and physical forces of the nature" is "changed into a mass and a movement of intimate Light, creative Power, pure divine Ananda".

Kami: (Japanese) Originally denoting anything that inspires and overawes man with a sense of holiness, the word assumed a meaning in Japanese equivalent to spirit (also ancestral spirit), divinity, and God. It is a central concept in the pre-Confucian and pre-Buddhistic native religion which holds the sun supreme and still enjoys national support, while it may also take on a more abstract philosophic significance. -- K.F.L.

kavi ::: seer; poet (in classical Sanskrit the word is applied to any maker of verse or even of prose, but in the Veda it meant the poet-seer who saw and found the inspired word of his vision). ::: kavayah [plural] ::: kavibhih [instrumental plural]

Kenotism: The doctrine of Kenosis; literally the Greek term Kenosis means an emptying. The doctrine arose from the discussion of Phil, ii, 7, where we read that Christ "emptied himself, taking the form of a servant." Some have interpreted the text in the sense that the Son of God in becoming man put aside some of His divine attributes, while others, notably the Catholics, maintain that the abasement referred to signifies only the occultation of the Divinity when the Word was made flesh. -- J.J.R.

kirk ::: n. --> A church or the church, in the various senses of the word; esp., the Church of Scotland as distinguished from other reformed churches, or from the Roman Catholic Church.

kyrielle ::: n. --> A litany beginning with the words.

labyrinth ::: An intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one’s way; a maze. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

labyrinth ::: an intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one"s way; a maze. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

lexicon ::: n. --> A vocabulary, or book containing an alphabetical arrangement of the words in a language or of a considerable number of them, with the definition of each; a dictionary; especially, a dictionary of the Greek, Hebrew, or Latin language.

libretto ::: n. --> A book containing the words of an opera or extended piece of music.
The words themselves.


lipic ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or derived from, fat. The word was formerly used specifically to designate a supposed acid obtained by the oxidation of oleic acid, tallow, wax, etc.

literalize ::: v. t. --> To make literal; to interpret or put in practice according to the strict meaning of the words; -- opposed to spiritualize; as, to literalize Scripture.

Logical meaning: See meaning, kinds of, 3. Logical Positivism: See Scientific Empiricism. Logical truth: See Meaning, kinds of, 3; and Truth, semantical. Logistic: The old use of the word logistic to mean the art of calculation, or common arithmetic, is now nearly obsolete. In Seventeenth Century English the corresponding adjective was also sometimes used to mean simply logical. Leibniz occasionally employed logistica (as also logica mathematica) as one of various alternative names for his calculus ratiocinator. The modern use of logistic (French logistique) as a synonym for symbolic logic (q. v.) dates from the International Congress of Philosophy of 1904, where it was proposed independently by Itelson, Lalande, and Couturat. The word logistic has been employed by some with special reference to the Frege-Russell doctrine that mathematics is reducible to logic, but it would seem that the better usage makes it simply a synonym of symbolic logic. -- A. C.

logistics ::: n. --> That branch of the military art which embraces the details of moving and supplying armies. The meaning of the word is by some writers extended to include strategy.
A system of arithmetic, in which numbers are expressed in a scale of 60; logistic arithmetic.


lyric ::: 1. Having the form and musical quality of a song. 2. Characterized by or expressing direct feeling. 3. A high and light singing voice. 4. Often plural, the words of a song.

Machiavellism: A political principle according to which every act of the state (or statesman) is permissible -- especially with reference to foreign relations -- which might be advantageous for one's own country. The word refers to Niccolo di Bernardo Machiavelli, born May 3, 1469 in Florence, died June 22, 1527. Author of Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito Livio (Discourses about the first ten books of Titus Livius), Il Principe (The Prince). -- W.E.

Madhav: “He uses the word moon as a verb here. That is, the whole being, her entire body looks like a moon responding to the waves and seas of bliss.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “Mark the words—‘actor Will’. We think our will is our own, but actually our will is only playing out something which has been determined for it by someone or somebody else. This is true not only of our individual will but also of the Cosmic Will. This will now becomes ineffective and comes to a halt.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “The common word of human speech diminishes an experience, weakens it, but here the Word with a capital W, is a mantric word which ‘ushers divine experience’ it brings out into the field a divine experience.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “the poet uses the word ‘tenant’ to hint that Aswapathi’s presence on earth was only temporary; he was not a permanent resident of the earth; he was someone from above, from elsewhere, tenanting this little plot of earth for a particular purpose.” Sat-Sang Vol. VIII

Madhav: “The Word from above is not uttered as the human word is. It is not articulated by the tongue. Unuttered Word—the silent Word. But the hushed heart—the heart in which all the emotive movements have been hushed, silent for the time being—hears the Word from above though it is not spelt out.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “The word temple is to convey the sense that there is something holy, something sacred. Even in the Inconscient there is the Divine Presence.” Sat-Sang Talk 7/7/91

magnet ::: A thing or person that attracts. Magnet. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

magnet ::: a thing or person that attracts. Magnet. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

Man alive, your proposed emendations are an admirable exposition of the art of bringing a line down the steps till my poor "slow miraculous” above-mind line meant to give or begin the concrete portrayal of an act of some hidden Godhead finally becomes a mere metaphor thrown out from its more facile mint by a brilliantly imaginative poetic intelligence. First of all, you shift my "dimly” out of the way and transfer it to something to which it does not inwardly belongs make it an epithet of the gesture or an adverb qualifying its epithet instead of something that qualifies the atmosphere in which the act of the Godhead takes place. That is a preliminary havoc which destroys what is very important to the action, its atmosphere. I never intended the gesture to be dim, it is a luminous gesture, but forcing its way through the black quietude it comes dimly. Then again the bald phrase "a gesture came” without anything to psychicise it becomes simply something that "happened”, "came” being a poetic equivalent for "happened”, instead of the expression of the slow coming of the gesture. The words "slow” and "dimly” assure this sense of motion and this concreteness to the word"s sense here. Remove one or both whether entirely or elsewhere and you ruin the vision and change altogether its character. That is at least what happens wholly in your penultimate version and as for the last its "came” gets another meaning and one feels that somebody very slowly decided to let out the gesture from himself and it was quite a miracle that it came out at all! "Dimly miraculous” means what precisely or what "miraculously dim” — it was miraculous that it managed to be so dim or there was something vaguely miraculous about it after all? No doubt they try to mean something else — but these interpretations come in their way and trip them over. The only thing that can stand is the first version which is no doubt fine poetry, but the trouble is that it does not give the effect I wanted to give, the effect which is necessary for the dawn"s inner significance. Moreover, what becomes of the slow lingering rhythm of my line which is absolutely indispensable? Letters on Savitri

Man alive, your proposed emendations are an admirable exposition of the art of bringing a line down the steps till my poor”slow miraculous” above-mind line meant to give or begin the concrete portrayal of an act of some hidden Godhead finally becomes a mere metaphor thrown out from its more facile mint by a brilliantly imaginative poetic intelligence. First of all, you shift my”dimly” out of the way and transfer it to something to which it does not inwardly belongs make it an epithet of the gesture or an adverb qualifying its epithet instead of something that qualifies the atmosphere in which the act of the Godhead takes place. That is a preliminary havoc which destroys what is very important to the action, its atmosphere. I never intended the gesture to be dim, it is a luminous gesture, but forcing its way through the black quietude it comes dimly. Then again the bald phrase”a gesture came” without anything to psychicise it becomes simply something that”happened”,”came” being a poetic equivalent for”happened”, instead of the expression of the slow coming of the gesture. The words”slow” and”dimly” assure this sense of motion and this concreteness to the word’s sense here. Remove one or both whether entirely or elsewhere and you ruin the vision and change altogether its character. That is at least what happens wholly in your penultimate version and as for the last its”came” gets another meaning and one feels that somebody very slowly decided to let out the gesture from himself and it was quite a miracle that it came out at all!”Dimly miraculous” means what precisely or what”miraculously dim”—it was miraculous that it managed to be so dim or there was something vaguely miraculous about it after all? No doubt they try to mean something else—but these interpretations come in their way and trip them over. The only thing that can stand is the first version which is no doubt fine poetry, but the trouble is that it does not give the effect I wanted to give, the effect which is necessary for the dawn’s inner significance. Moreover, what becomes of the slow lingering rhythm of my line which is absolutely indispensable? Letters on Savitri

mantra ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The mantra as I have tried to describe it in The Future Poetry is a word of power and light that comes from the Overmind inspiration or from some very high plane of Intuition. Its characteristics are a language that conveys infinitely more than the mere surface sense of the words seems to indicate, a rhythm that means even more than the language and is born out of the Infinite and disappears into it, and the power to convey not merely the mental, vital or physical contents or indications or values of the thing uttered, but its significance and figure in some fundamental and original consciousness which is behind all these and greater.” *The Future Poetry

mantra ::: Sri Aurobindo: “The mantra as I have tried to describe it in The Future Poetry is a word of power and light that comes from the Overmind inspiration or from some very high plane of Intuition. Its characteristics are a language that conveys infinitely more than the mere surface sense of the words seems to indicate, a rhythm that means even more than the language and is born out of the Infinite and disappears into it, and the power to convey not merely the mental, vital or physical contents or indications or values of the thing uttered, but its significance and figure in some fundamental and original consciousness which is behind all these and greater.” The Future Poetry

mantra ::: : “The mantra as I have tried to describe it in The Future Poetry is a word of power and light that comes from the Overmind inspiration or from some very high plane of Intuition. Its characteristics are a language that conveys infinitely more than the mere surface sense of the words seems to indicate, a rhythm that means even more than the language and is born out of the Infinite and disappears into it, and the power to convey not merely the mental, vital or physical contents or indications or values of the thing uttered, but its significance and figure in some fundamental and original consciousness which is behind all these and greater.” The Future Poetry

manyamanah ::: the thinkers of the word. [Ved.]

Maya ::: “Maya in its original sense meant a comprehending and containing consciousness capable of embracing, measuring and limiting and therefore formative; it is that which outlines, measures out, moulds forms in the formless, psychologises and seems to make knowable the Unknowable, geometrises and seems to make measurable the limitless. Later the word came from its original sense of knowledge, skill, intelligence to acquire a pejorative sense of cunning, fraud or illusion, and it is in the figure of an enchantment or illusion that it is used by the philosophical systems.” The Life Divine

Maya ::: Sri Aurobindo: “Maya in its original sense meant a comprehending and containing consciousness capable of embracing, measuring and limiting and therefore formative; it is that which outlines, measures out, moulds forms in the formless, psychologises and seems to make knowable the Unknowable, geometrises and seems to make measurable the limitless. Later the word came from its original sense of knowledge, skill, intelligence to acquire a pejorative sense of cunning, fraud or illusion, and it is in the figure of an enchantment or illusion that it is used by the philosophical systems.” The Life Divine

maya ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Maya in its original sense meant a comprehending and containing consciousness capable of embracing, measuring and limiting and therefore formative; it is that which outlines, measures out, moulds forms in the formless, psychologises and seems to make knowable the Unknowable, geometrises and seems to make measurable the limitless. Later the word came from its original sense of knowledge, skill, intelligence to acquire a pejorative sense of cunning, fraud or illusion, and it is in the figure of an enchantment or illusion that it is used by the philosophical systems.” *The Life Divine

Meaning: A highly ambiguous term, with at least four pivotal senses, involving intention or purpose, designation or reference, definition or translation, causal antecedents or consequences. Each of these provides overlapping families of cases generated by some or all of the following types of systematic ambiguity: -- Arising from a contrast between the standpoints of speaker and interpreter. arising from contrast between the meaning of specific utterances (tokens) and that of the general (type) symbol. arising from attention to one rather than another use of language (e.g., to the expressive rather than the evocative or referential uses). Some of these ambiguities are normally eliminated by attention to the context in which the term 'meaning' occurs. Adequate definition, would, accordingly, involve a detailed analysis of the types of context which are most common. The following is a preliminary outline. "What does X {some event, not necessarily linguistic) mean?" =   "Of what is X an index?"   "Of what is X a sign?" "What does S (a speaker) mean by X (an utterance)?" =   "What are S's interests, intentions, purposes in uttering X?"   "To whom (what) is he referring?"   "What effect does he wish to produce in the hearer?"   "What other utterance could he have used to express the same interest, make the same reference, or produce the same effect?" "What does X (an utterance of a speaker) mean to an interpreter?" =   "What does I take S to have meant by X (in any of the senses listed under B)?" "What does X (a type symbol) mean in language L?"   "What symbols (in L) can be substituted for X (in specified contexts) without appreciable loss of expressive, evocative or referential function?"   In a translation from L into another language M, either of X or of a more complex symbol containing X as part, what portion of the end-product corresponds to X?"   In addition to the above, relatively nontechnical senses, many writers use the word in divergent special ways based upon and implying favored theories about meaning.

Mean: In general, that which in some way mediates or occupies a middle position among various things or between two extremes. Hence (especially in the plural) that through which an end is attained; in mathematics the word is used for any one of various notions of average; in ethics it represents moderation, temperance, prudence, the middle way. In mathematics:   The arithmetic mean of two quantities is half their sum; the arithmetic mean of n quantities is the sum of the n quantities, divided by n. In the case of a function f(x) (say from real numbers to real numbers) the mean value of the function for the values x1, x2, . . . , xn of x is the arithmetic mean of f(x1), f(x2), . . . , f(xn). This notion is extended to the case of infinite sets of values of x by means of integration; thus the mean value of f(x) for values of x between a and b is ∫f(x)dx, with a and b as the limits of integration, divided by the difference between a and b.   The geometric mean of or between, or the mean proportional between, two quantities is the (positive) square root of their product. Thus if b is the geometric mean between a and c, c is as many times greater (or less) than b as b is than a. The geometric mean of n quantities is the nth root of their product.   The harmonic mean of two quantities is defined as the reciprocal of the arithmetic mean of their reciprocals. Hence the harmonic mean of a and b is 2ab/(a + b).   The weighted mean or weighted average of a set of n quantities, each of which is associated with a certain number as weight, is obtained by multiplying each quantity by the associated weight, adding these products together, and then dividing by the sum of the weights. As under A, this may be extended to the case of an infinite set of quantities by means of integration. (The weights have the role of estimates of relative importance of the various quantities, and if all the weights are equal the weighted mean reduces to the simple arithmetic mean.)   In statistics, given a population (i.e., an aggregate of observed or observable quantities) and a variable x having the population as its range, we have:     The mean value of x is the weighted mean of the values of x, with the probability (frequency ratio) of each value taken as its weight. In the case of a finite population this is the same as the simple arithmetic mean of the population, provided that, in calculating the arithmetic mean, each value of x is counted as many times over as it occurs in the set of observations constituting the population.     In like manner, the mean value of a function f(x) of x is the weighted mean of the values of f(x), where the probability of each value of x is taken as the weight of the corresponding value of f(x).     The mode of the population is the most probable (most frequent) value of x, provided there is one such.     The median of the population is so chosen that the probability that x be less than the median (or the probability that x be greater than the median) is ½ (or as near ½ as possible). In the case of a finite population, if the values of x are arranged in order of magnitude     --repeating any one value of x as many times over as it occurs in the set of observations constituting the population     --then the middle term of this series, or the arithmetic mean of the two middle terms, is the median.     --A.C. In cosmology, the fundamental means (arithmetic, geometric, and harmonic) were used by the Greeks in describing or actualizing the process of becoming in nature. The Pythagoreans and the Platonists in particular made considerable use of these means (see the Philebus and the Timaeus more especially). These ratios are among the basic elements used by Plato in his doctrine of the mixtures. With the appearance of the qualitative physics of Aristotle, the means lost their cosmological importance and were thereafter used chiefly in mathematics. The modern mathematical theories of the universe make use of the whole range of means analyzed by the calculus of probability, the theory of errors, the calculus of variations, and the statistical methods. In ethics, the 'Doctrine of the Mean' is the moral theory of moderation, the development of the virtues, the determination of the wise course in action, the practice of temperance and prudence, the choice of the middle way between extreme or conflicting decisions. It has been developed principally by the Chinese, the Indians and the Greeks; it was used with caution by the Christian moralists on account of their rigorous application of the moral law.   In Chinese philosophy, the Doctrine of the Mean or of the Middle Way (the Chung Yung, literally 'Equilibrium and Harmony') involves the absence of immoderate pleasure, anger, sorrow or joy, and a conscious state in which those feelings have been stirred and act in their proper degree. This doctrine has been developed by Tzu Shu (V. C. B.C.), a grandson of Confucius who had already described the virtues of the 'superior man' according to his aphorism "Perfect is the virtue which is according to the mean". In matters of action, the superior man stands erect in the middle and strives to follow a course which does not incline on either side.   In Buddhist philosophy, the System of the Middle Way or Madhyamaka is ascribed more particularly to Nagarjuna (II c. A.D.). The Buddha had given his revelation as a mean or middle way, because he repudiated the two extremes of an exaggerated ascetlsm and of an easy secular life. This principle is also applied to knowledge and action in general, with the purpose of striking a happy medium between contradictory judgments and motives. The final objective is the realization of the nirvana or the complete absence of desire by the gradual destruction of feelings and thoughts. But while orthodox Buddhism teaches the unreality of the individual (who is merely a mass of causes and effects following one another in unbroken succession), the Madhyamaka denies also the existence of these causes and effects in themselves. For this system, "Everything is void", with the legitimate conclusion that "Absolute truth is silence". Thus the perfect mean is realized.   In Greek Ethics, the doctrine of the Right (Mean has been developed by Plato (Philebus) and Aristotle (Nic. Ethics II. 6-8) principally, on the Pythagorean analogy between the sound mind, the healthy body and the tuned string, which has inspired most of the Greek Moralists. Though it is known as the "Aristotelian Principle of the Mean", it is essentially a Platonic doctrine which is preformed in the Republic and the Statesman and expounded in the Philebus, where we are told that all good things in life belong to the class of the mixed (26 D). This doctrine states that in the application of intelligence to any kind of activity, the supreme wisdom is to know just where to stop, and to stop just there and nowhere else. Hence, the "right-mean" does not concern the quantitative measurement of magnitudes, but simply the qualitative comparison of values with respect to a standard which is the appropriate (prepon), the seasonable (kairos), the morally necessary (deon), or generally the moderate (metrion). The difference between these two kinds of metretics (metretike) is that the former is extrinsic and relative, while the latter is intrinsic and absolute. This explains the Platonic division of the sciences into two classes: those involving reference to relative quantities (mathematical or natural), and those requiring absolute values (ethics and aesthetics). The Aristotelian analysis of the "right mean" considers moral goodness as a fixed and habitual proportion in our appetitions and tempers, which can be reached by training them until they exhibit just the balance required by the right rule. This process of becoming good develops certain habits of virtues consisting in reasonable moderation where both excess and defect are avoided: the virtue of temperance (sophrosyne) is a typical example. In this sense, virtue occupies a middle position between extremes, and is said to be a mean; but it is not a static notion, as it leads to the development of a stable being, when man learns not to over-reach himself. This qualitative conception of the mean involves an adaptation of the agent, his conduct and his environment, similar to the harmony displayed in a work of art. Hence the aesthetic aspect of virtue, which is often overstressed by ancient and neo-pagan writers, at the expense of morality proper.   The ethical idea of the mean, stripped of the qualifications added to it by its Christian interpreters, has influenced many positivistic systems of ethics, and especially pragmatism and behaviourism (e.g., A. Huxley's rule of Balanced Excesses). It is maintained that it is also involved in the dialectical systems, such as Hegelianism, where it would have an application in the whole dialectical process as such: thus, it would correspond to the synthetic phase which blends together the thesis and the antithesis by the meeting of the opposites. --T.G. Mean, Doctrine of the: In Aristotle's ethics, the doctrine that each of the moral virtues is an intermediate state between extremes of excess and defect. -- O.R.M.

Medieval: Image and Similitude are frequently used by the medieval scholars. Neither of them needs mean copy. Sometimes the terms are nearly synonymous with sign in general. The alteration of the sense organs when affected by some external object is an image of the latter (species sensibilis); so is the memory image or phantasm. The intelligible species resulting from the operation of the active intellect on the phantasm is not less an image of the universal nature than the concept and the word expressing the latter is. Images in the strict sense of copies or pictures are only a particular case of image or similitude in general. The idea that Scholasticism believed that the mind contains literally "copies" of the objective world is mistaken interpretation due to misunderstanding of the terms. -- R.A.

Mimamsi: Short for Purva-Mimamsa, one of the six major systems of Indian philosophy (q. v.), founded by Jaimini, rationalizing Vedic ritual and upholding the authority of the Vedas by a philosophy of the word (see vac). In metaphysics it professes belief in the reality of the phenomenal, a plurality of eternal souls, but is indifferent to a concept of God though assenting to the superhuman and eternal nature of the Vedas. There is also an elaborate epistemology supporting Vedic truths, an ethics which makes observance of Vedic ritual and practice a condition of a good and blissful life. -- KS.L.

mind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The ‘Mind" in the ordinary use of the word covers indiscriminately the whole consciousness, for man is a mental being and mentalises everything; but in the language of this yoga the words ‘mind" and ‘mental" are used to connote specially the part of the nature which has to do with cognition and intelligence, with ideas, with mental or thought perceptions, the reactions of thought to things, with the truly mental movements and formations, mental vision and will, etc., that are part of his intelligence.” *Letters on Yoga

"Mind in its essence is a consciousness which measures, limits, cuts out forms of things from the indivisible whole and contains them as if each were a separate integer.” The Life Divine

"Mind is an instrument of analysis and synthesis, but not of essential knowledge. Its function is to cut out something vaguely from the unknown Thing in itself and call this measurement or delimitation of it the whole, and again to analyse the whole into its parts which it regards as separate mental objects.” The Life Divine

"The mind proper is divided into three parts — thinking Mind, dynamic Mind, externalising Mind — the former concerned with ideas and knowledge in their own right, the second with the putting out of mental forces for realisation of the idea, the third with the expression of them in life (not only by speech, but by any form it can give).” Letters on Yoga

"The difference between the ordinary mind and the intuitive is that the former, seeking in the darkness or at most by its own unsteady torchlight, first, sees things only as they are presented in that light and, secondly, where it does not know, constructs by imagination, by uncertain inference, by others of its aids and makeshifts things which it readily takes for truth, shadow projections, cloud edifices, unreal prolongations, deceptive anticipations, possibilities and probabilities which do duty for certitudes. The intuitive mind constructs nothing in this artificial fashion, but makes itself a receiver of the light and allows the truth to manifest in it and organise its own constructions.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"He [man] has in him not a single mentality, but a double and a triple, the mind material and nervous, the pure intellectual mind which liberates itself from the illusions of the body and the senses, and a divine mind above intellect which in its turn liberates itself from the imperfect modes of the logically discriminative and imaginative reason.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"Our mind is an observer of actuals, an inventor or discoverer of possibilities, but not a seer of the occult imperatives that necessitate the movements and forms of a creation. . . .” *The Life Divine

"The human mind is an instrument not of truth but of ignorance and error.” Letters on Yoga

"For Mind as we know it is a power of the Ignorance seeking for Truth, groping with difficulty to find it, reaching only mental constructions and representations of it in word and idea, in mind formations, sense formations, — as if bright or shadowy photographs or films of a distant Reality were all that it could achieve.” The Life Divine

The Mother: "The true role of the mind is the formation and organization of action. The mind has a formative and organizing power, and it is that which puts the different elements of inspiration in order for action, for organizing action. And if it would only confine itself to that role, receiving inspirations — whether from above or from the mystic centre of the soul — and simply formulating the plan of action — in broad outline or in minute detail, for the smallest things of life or the great terrestrial organizations — it would amply fulfil its function. It is not an instrument of knowledge. But is can use knowledge for action, to organize action. It is an instrument of organization and formation, very powerful and very capable when it is well developed.” Questions and Answers 1956, MCW Vol. 8.*


mind ::: “The ‘Mind’ in the ordinary use of the word covers indiscriminately the whole consciousness, for man is a mental being and mentalises everything; but in the language of this yoga the words ‘mind’ and ‘mental’ are used to connote specially the part of the nature which has to do with cognition and intelligence, with ideas, with mental or thought perceptions, the reactions of thought to things, with the truly mental movements and formations, mental vision and will, etc., that are part of his intelligence.” Letters on Yoga

mind ::: the words "mind" and "mental" are used to connote specially the part of the nature which has to do with cognition and intelligence, with ideas, with mental or thought perceptions, the reactions of thought to things, with the truly mental movements and formations, mental vision and will etc. that are part of man's intelligence. The ordinary mind has three main parts: mind proper, vital mind, and physical mind.

miserere ::: n. --> The psalm usually appointed for penitential acts, being the 50th psalm in the Latin version. It commences with the word miserere.
A musical composition adapted to the 50th psalm.
A small projecting boss or bracket, on the under side of the hinged seat of a church stall (see Stall). It was intended, the seat being turned up, to give some support to a worshiper when standing. Called also misericordia.


More general kinds of definition by recursion allow sets of recursion equations of various forms, the essential requirement being that the equations specify the value of the function being introduced (or the values of the functions being introduced), for any given set of arguments, either absolutely, or in terms of the value (values) for preceding sets of arguments. The word preceding here may refer to the natural order or order of magnitude of the non-negative integers, or it may refer to some other method of ordering arguments or sets of arguments, but the method of ordering shall be such that infinite descending sequences ot sets of arguments (in which each set of arguments is preceded by the next set) are impossible.

Mutazilite: (Ar. seceders) Member of a Shiite sect of Islam dating from the 8th century, which stood for free will and against divine predestination. Mysticism: Mysticism in its simplest and most essential meaning is a type of religion which puts the emphasis on immediate awareness of relation with God, direct and intimate consciousness of Divine Presence. It is religion in its most acute, intense and living stage. The word owes its origin to the Mystery Religions. The initiate who had the "secret" was called a mystes. Early Christians used the word "Contemplation" for mystical experience. The word "mystical" first came into use in the Western World in the writings ascribed to "Dionysius the Areopagite", which appeared at the end of the fifth century.

mystery ::: 1. A spiritual truth that is incomprehensible to reason and knowable only through divine revelation. 2. Something that is not fully understood or that baffles or eludes the understanding; an enigma. 3. A mysterious character or quality. 4. The skills, lore, practices and secret rites that are peculiar to a particular activity or group and are regarded as the special province of initiates. Mystery, mystery"s, Mystery"s, mysteries, mystery-altar"s. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

mystic ::: “I used the word ‘mystic’ in the sense of a certain kind of inner seeing and feeling of things, a way which to the intellect would seem occult and visionary—for this is something different from imagination and its work with which the intellect is familiar.” On Himself

nama ::: name; the word designating an object, person or deity, "in its nama deeper sense . . . not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound".

Name ::: “Name in its deeper sense is not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound, a knowable name, Nomen. Nomen in this sense, we might say, is Numen; the secret Names of the Gods are their power, quality, character of being caught up by the consciousness and made conceivable. The Infinite is nameless, but in that namelessness all possible names, Numens of the gods, the names and forms of all realities, are already envisaged and prefigured, because they are there latent and inherent in the All-Existence.” The Life Divine

name ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Name in its deeper sense is not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound, a knowable name, Nomen. Nomen in this sense, we might say, is Numen; the secret Names of the Gods are their power, quality, character of being caught up by the consciousness and made conceivable. The Infinite is nameless, but in that namelessness all possible names, Numens of the gods, the names and forms of all realities, are already envisaged and prefigured, because they are there latent and inherent in the All-Existence.” The Life Divine

nazarite ::: n. --> A Jew bound by a vow to lave the hair uncut, to abstain from wine and strong drink, and to practice extraordinary purity of life and devotion, the obligation being for life, or for a certain time. The word is also used adjectively.

nereid ::: n. --> A sea nymph, one of the daughters of Nereus, who were attendants upon Neptune, and were represented as riding on sea horses, sometimes with the human form entire, and sometimes with the tail of a fish.
Any species of Nereis. The word is sometimes used for similar annelids of other families.


Nolini: (The authors gave as an example the word”Vision”). When it is the supreme vision it is capitalized. Nolini also said: “When it is the personality of the thing, not only the quality of it. There is no set rule on capitalization.”

Note: The word Avatar has made its way into English but often with distorted and baseless connotations.

nothing ::: n. --> Not anything; no thing (in the widest sense of the word thing); -- opposed to anything and something.
Nonexistence; nonentity; absence of being; nihility; nothingness.
A thing of no account, value, or note; something irrelevant and impertinent; something of comparative unimportance; utter insignificance; a trifle.
A cipher; naught.


ocean ::: 1. The vast body of salt water that covers three fourths of the surface of the globe. 2. A vast expanse or quantity. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj. in this sense.) Ocean, ocean"s, oceans, ocean-silence, ocean-ecstasy, world-ocean"s. adj. 3. Of or pertaining to the ocean in its natural and physical relations. Also fig. ::: oceans. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a v.)

Often the word function is found used loosely for what would more correctly be called an ambiguous or undetermined value of a function, an expression containing one or more free variables being said, for example, to denote a function. Sometimes also the word function is used in a syntactical sense -- e.g., to mean an expression containing free variables.

Oh, a tremendous power—tremendous. The first time I heard it … The first time I heard it … There was a certain Bernard who had spent a year in India, in the Himalayas, and he was visited by yogis whom he didn’t know (he lived in a hut in the Himalayas, all alone). One yogi came to see him; he didn’t say anything, he just sat by his side and then left. And that yogi simply told him,”Om …” Then he came back to France, recounted his experiences in India, and he said that. Me, I knew absolutely nothing of India at the time, and when he uttered the word OM … (Mother brings her arms down), it came: a Force like this, my whole, entire body, everything vibrated in an extraordinary way! It was like a revelation—everything, but everything started vibrating. Then I said,”At last, here’s the true sound!” Yet I knew nothing, absolutely nothing, neither what it meant nor anything. Mother’s Agenda, Volume 10, 1969.

  Oh, a tremendous power—tremendous. The first time I heard it … The first time I heard it … There was a certain Bernard who had spent a year in India, in the Himalayas, and he was visited by yogis whom he didn"t know (he lived in a hut in the Himalayas, all alone). One yogi came to see him; he didn"t say anything, he just sat by his side and then left. And that yogi simply told him, "Om …” Then he came back to France, recounted his experiences in India, and he said that. Me, I knew absolutely nothing of India at the time, and when he uttered the word OM … (Mother brings her arms down), it came: a Force like this, my whole, entire body, everything vibrated in an extraordinary way! It was like a revelation—everything, but everything started vibrating. Then I said, "At last, here"s the true sound!” Yet I knew nothing, absolutely nothing, neither what it meant nor anything.

On the Word

  One who is distinguished by exceptional courage, nobility, fortitude, etc. 2. A person noted for feats of courage or nobility of purpose, especially one who has risked or sacrificed his or her life (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) hero’s, heroes.

  One who practises the creative arts; one who seeks to express the beautiful in visible form. 2. A follower of a manual art; an artificer, mechanic, craftsman, artisan. artists. (Sri Aurobindo often employs the word as an adj.)

onomatopoeia ::: n. --> The formation of words in imitation of sounds; a figure of speech in which the sound of a word is imitative of the sound of the thing which the word represents; as, the buzz of bees; the hiss of a goose; the crackle of fire.

Or the word negation may be used in a syntactical sense, so that the negation of a sentence (formula) A is the sentence ∼A. -- A. C.

overarching ::: spanning with or like an arch; forming an arch over something. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as a n.)

overmind system ::: a term used on 29 October 1927 (when the word "overmind" first occurs) for what earlier in that year had consisted of a series of planes, divisible into four groups, rising from supramentality to gnostic supermind. In 1933, Sri Aurobindo wrote that the overmind "can for convenience be divided into four planes", which he called mental overmind, intuitive overmind or overmind intuition, true overmind, and supramental overmind or overmind gnosis, "but there are many layers in each and each of these can be regarded as a plane in itself". In the diagram of overmind gradations on page 1360 (c. 1931), mental overmind seems to be missing, but overmind logos is listed between intuitive overmind and formative maya, the latter evidently designating the principal plane of true overmind. Overmind logos may represent mental overmind; its position in the diagram could be explained if its highest level is assumed to be a form of mental overmind taken up into true overmind and constituting a plane of overmind proper, like the supramentalised mind in overmind of 1927-28.P

ox ::: n. --> The male of bovine quadrupeds, especially the domestic animal when castrated and grown to its full size, or nearly so. The word is also applied, as a general name, to any species of bovine animals, male and female.

pactise ::: Sri Aurobindo combines the word pact [an agreement or covenant] with ise, a noun suffix occurring in loanwords from French, indicating quality, condition, or function.

panis ::: dasyus who withhold or steal the cows; the word seems to have originally meant doers, dealers or traffickers, but this significance is sometimes clouded by the farther sense of "misers". [Ved.]

papyrograph ::: n. --> An apparatus for multiplying writings, drawings, etc., in which a paper stencil, formed by writing or drawing with corrosive ink, is used. The word is also used of other means of multiplying copies of writings, drawings, etc. See Copygraph, Hectograph, Manifold.

par ::: n. --> See Parr.
Equal value; equality of nominal and actual value; the value expressed on the face or in the words of a certificate of value, as a bond or other commercial paper.
Equality of condition or circumstances. ::: prep.


perdix ::: n. --> A genus of birds including the common European partridge. Formerly the word was used in a much wider sense to include many allied genera.

Phenomenology: Since the middle of the Eighteenth Century, "Phänomenologie," like its English equivalent, has been a name for several disciplines, an expression for various concepts. Lambert, in his Neue Organon (1764), attached the name "Phänomenologie" to the theory of the appearances fundamental to all empirical knowledge. Kant adopted the word to express a similar though more restricted sense in his Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Naturwissenschaft (1786). On the other hand, in Hegel's Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807) the same word expresses a radically different concept. A precise counterpart of Hegel's title was employed by Hamilton to express yet another meaning. In "The Divisions of Philosophy" (Lectures on Metaphysics, 1858), after stating that "Philosophy properly so called" is "conversant about Mind," he went on to say: "If we consider the mind merely with the view of observing and generalizing the various phaenomena it reveals, . . . we have . . . one department of mental science, and this we may call the Phaenomenology of Mind." Similarly Moritz Lazarus, in his Leben der Seele (1856-57), distinguished Phänomenologie from Psychologie: The former describes the phenomena of mental life; the latter seeks their causal explanation.

piazza ::: n. --> An open square in a European town, especially an Italian town; hence (Arch.), an arcaded and roofed gallery; a portico. In the United States the word is popularly applied to a veranda.

pilgrim ::: someone who journeys to different places in distant lands. (Sri Aurobindo often employs the word as an adjective.) pilgrim"s.

piston ::: a solid cylinder or disk that fits snugly into a hollow cylinder and moves back and forth under the pressure of a fluid (typically a hot gas formed by combustion, as in many engines), or moves or compresses a fluid, as in a pump or compressor. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adjective.)

plagiarist ::: n. --> One who plagiarizes; or purloins the words, writings, or ideas of another, and passes them off as his own; a literary thief; a plagiary.

Possibility: According to distinctions of modality (q. v.), a proposition is possible if its negation is not necessary. The word possible is also used in reference to a state of knowledge rather than to modality, as a speaker might say, "It is possible that 486763 is a prime number," meaning that he had no information to the contrary (although this proposition is impossible in the sense of modality).

Pragmatism: (Gr. pragma, things done) Owes its inception as a movement of philosophy to C. S. Peirce and William James, but approximations to it can be found in many earlier thinkers, including (according to Peirce and James) Socrates and Aristotle, Berkeley and Hume. Concerning a closer precursor, Shadworth Hodgson, James says that he "keeps insisting that realities are only what they are 'known as' ". Kant actually uses the word "pragmatic" to characterize "counsels of prudence" as distinct from "rules of skill" and "commands of morality" (Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals, p. 40). His principle of the primacy of practical reason is also an anticipation of pragmatism. It was reflection on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason which originally led Peirce to formulate the view that the muddles of metaphysics can be cleared up if one attends to the practical consequences of ideas. The pragmatic maxim was first stated by Peirce in 1878 (Popular Science Monthly) "Consider what effects, that might conceivably have practical bearings, we conceive the object of our conception to have. Then, our conception of these effects is the whole of our conception of the object". A clearer formulation by the same author reads: "In order to ascertain the meaning of an intellectual conception one should consider what practical consequences might conceivably result by necessity from the truth of that conception, and the sum of these consequences will constitute the entire meaning of the conception". This is often expressed briefly, viz.: The meaning of a proposition is its logical (or physical) consequences. The principle is not merely logical. It is also admonitory in Baconian style "Pragmatism is the principle that everv theoretical judgment expressible in a sentence in the indicative mood is a confused form of thought whose onlv meaning, if it has any, lies in its tendency to enforce a corresponding practical maxim expressible as a conditional sentence having its apodosis in the impentive mood". (Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, edited by Charles Hartshorne and Paul Weiss, 5.18.) Although Peirce's maxim has been an inspiration not only to later pragmatists, but to operationalists as well, Peirce felt that it might easily be misapplied, so as to eliminate important doctrines of science -- doctrines, presumably, which hive no ascertainable practical consequences.

Prana: (Skr.) Originally meaning "breath", the word figures in early Indian philosophy as "vital air" and "life" itself. Subspecies of it are also recognized, such as apana, udana, etc. -- K.F.L.

predicate ::: v. t. --> To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to predicate whiteness of snow.
To found; to base.
That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. In these propositions, "Paper is white," "Ink is not white," whiteness is the predicate affirmed of paper and denied of ink.
The word or words in a proposition which express what is affirmed of the subject.


Prehistory: That part of history of which we have no written records, documents or oral accounts, but which is reconstructed from material remains by archeologists and anthropologists. Premiss: A proposition, or one of several propositions, from which an inference is drawn, or the sentence expressing such a proposition. Following C. S. Peirce, we here prefer the spelling premiss, to distinguish from the word premise in other senses (in particular to distinguish the plural from the legal term premises). -- A.C.

prepense ::: v. t. --> To weigh or consider beforehand; to premeditate.
Devised, contrived, or planned beforehand; preconceived; premeditated; aforethought; -- usually placed after the word it qualifies; as, malice prepense. ::: v. i. --> To deliberate beforehand.


preposition ::: n. --> A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.
A proposition; an exposition; a discourse.


presence ::: 1. The state or fact of being present; current existence or occurrence. 2. A divine, spiritual, or supernatural spirit or influence felt or conceived as present. 3. The immediate proximity of someone or something.

Sri Aurobindo: "It is intended by the word Presence to indicate the sense and perception of the Divine as a Being, felt as present in one"s existence and consciousness or in relation with it, without the necessity of any further qualification or description. Thus, of the ‘ineffable Presence" it can only be said that it is there and nothing more can or need be said about it, although at the same time one knows that all is there, personality and impersonality, Power and Light and Ananda and everything else, and that all these flow from that indescribable Presence. The word may be used sometimes in a less absolute sense, but that is always the fundamental significance, — the essential perception of the essential Presence supporting everything else.” *Letters on Yoga

"Beyond mind on spiritual and supramental levels dwells the Presence, the Truth, the Power, the Bliss that can alone deliver us from these illusions, display the Light of which our ideals are tarnished disguises and impose the harmony that shall at once transfigure and reconcile all the parts of our nature.” Essays Divine and Human

"But if we learn to live within, we infallibly awaken to this presence within us which is our more real self, a presence profound, calm, joyous and puissant of which the world is not the master — a presence which, if it is not the Lord Himself, is the radiation of the Lord within.” *The Life Divine

"The true soul secret in us, — subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, — this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” *The Life Divine

"If we need any personal and inner witness to this indivisible All-Consciousness behind the ignorance, — all Nature is its external proof, — we can get it with any completeness only in our deeper inner being or larger and higher spiritual state when we draw back behind the veil of our own surface ignorance and come into contact with the divine Idea and Will behind it. Then we see clearly enough that what we have done by ourselves in our ignorance was yet overseen and guided in its result by the invisible Omniscience; we discover a greater working behind our ignorant working and begin to glimpse its purpose in us: then only can we see and know what now we worship in faith, recognise wholly the pure and universal Presence, meet the Lord of all being and all Nature.” *The Life Divine

"The presence of the Spirit is there in every living being, on every level, in all things, and because it is there, the experience of Sachchidananda, of the pure spiritual existence and consciousness, of the delight of a divine presence, closeness, contact can be acquired through the mind or the heart or the life-sense or even through the physical consciousness; if the inner doors are flung sufficiently open, the light from the sanctuary can suffuse the nearest and the farthest chambers of the outer being.” *The Life Divine

"There is a secret divine Will, eternal and infinite, omniscient and omnipotent, that expresses itself in the universality and in each particular of all these apparently temporal and finite inconscient or half-conscient things. This is the Power or Presence meant by the Gita when it speaks of the Lord within the heart of all existences who turns all creatures as if mounted on a machine by the illusion of Nature.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

"For what Yoga searches after is not truth of thought alone or truth of mind alone, but the dynamic truth of a living and revealing spiritual experience. There must awake in us a constant indwelling and enveloping nearness, a vivid perception, a close feeling and communion, a concrete sense and contact of a true and infinite Presence always and everywhere. That Presence must remain with us as the living, pervading Reality in which we and all things exist and move and act, and we must feel it always and everywhere, concrete, visible, inhabiting all things; it must be patent to us as their true Self, tangible as their imperishable Essence, met by us closely as their inmost Spirit. To see, to feel, to sense, to contact in every way and not merely to conceive this Self and Spirit here in all existences and to feel with the same vividness all existences in this Self and Spirit, is the fundamental experience which must englobe all other knowledge.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

"One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time He conceals Himself, and then in His own right time He will reveal His Presence.” *Letters on Yoga

"They [the psychic being and the Divine Presence in the heart] are quite different things. The psychic being is one"s own individual soul-being. It is not the Divine, though it has come from the Divine and develops towards the Divine.” *Letters on Yoga

"For it is quietness and inwardness that enable one to feel the Presence.” *Letters on Yoga

"Beyond mind on spiritual and supramental levels dwells the Presence, the Truth, the Power, the Bliss that can alone deliver us from these illusions, display the Light of which our ideals are tarnished disguises and impose the harmony that shall at once transfigure and reconcile all the parts of our nature.” *Essays Divine and Human

The Mother: "For, in human beings, here is a presence, the most marvellous Presence on earth, and except in a few very rare cases which I need not mention here, this presence lies asleep in the heart — not in the physical heart but the psychic centre — of all beings. And when this Splendour is manifested with enough purity, it will awaken in all beings the echo of his Presence.” Words of the Mother, MCW, Vol. 15.


Presence ::: It is intended by the word Presence to indicate the sense and perception of the Divine as a Being, felt as present in one’s existence and consciousness or in relation with it, without the necessity of any farther qualification or description. Thus of the "ineffable Presence"20 it can only be said that it is there and nothing more can or need be said about it, although at the same time one knows that all is there, personality and impersonality, Power and Light and Ananda and everything else, and that all these flow from that indescribable Presence. The word may be used sometimes in a less absolute sense, but that is always the fundamental significance,—the essential perception of the essential presence supporting everything else.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 106


presence ::: “It is intended by the word Presence to indicate the sense and perception of the Divine as a Being, felt as present in one›s existence and consciousness or in relation with it, without the necessity of any further qualification or description. Thus, of the ‘ineffable Presence’ it can only be said that it is there and nothing more can or need be said about it, although at the same time one knows that all is there, personality and impersonality, Power and Light and Ananda and everything else, and that all these flow from that indescribable Presence. The word may be used sometimes in a less absolute sense, but that is always the fundamental significance,—the essential perception of the essential Presence supporting everything else.” Letters on Yoga

promise ::: a. --> In general, a declaration, written or verbal, made by one person to another, which binds the person who makes it to do, or to forbear to do, a specified act; a declaration which gives to the person to whom it is made a right to expect or to claim the performance or forbearance of a specified act.
An engagement by one person to another, either in words or in writing, but properly not under seal, for the performance or nonperformance of some particular thing. The word promise is used to


prompter ::: n. --> One who, or that which, prompts; one who admonishes or incites to action.
One who reminds another, as an actor or an orator, of the words to be spoken next; specifically, one employed for this purpose in a theater.


prophet ::: 1. A person who speaks by divine inspiration or as the interpreter through whom the will of a god is expressed. 2. A person who predicts the future. prophet"s, prophets. (Sri Aurobindo often employs the word as an adjective.) prophet-passion, prophet-speech.

Proposition: This word has been used to mean a declarative sentence (in some particular language); the content of meaning of a declarative sentence, i e., a postulated abstract object common not only to different occurrences of the same declarative sentence but also to different sentences (whether of the same language or not) which are synonymous or, as we say, mean the same thing; a declarative sentence associated with its content of meaning. Often the word proposition is used ambiguously between two of these meanings, or among all three.

proviso ::: n. --> An article or clause in any statute, agreement, contract, grant, or other writing, by which a condition is introduced, usually beginning with the word provided; a conditional stipulation that affects an agreement, contract, law, grant, or the like; as, the contract was impaired by its proviso.

Psychic ::: Ordinarily, all the more inward and all the abnormal psychological experiences are called psychic. I use the word psychic for the soul as distinguished from the mind and vital. All movements and experiences of the soul would in that sense be called psychic, those which rise from or directly touch the psychic being; where mind and vital predominate, the experience would be called psychological (surface or occult).
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 151


pupilled ::: became like the pupil of an eye. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as a v.)

python ::: Any of various nonvenomous snakes of the family Pythonidae, that coil around and suffocate their prey. Also fig. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

python ::: any of various nonvenomous snakes of the family Pythonidae, that coil around and suffocate their prey. Also fig. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

Question: Is this a positive use of the word ‘Titan?”

quoter ::: n. --> One who quotes the words of another.

quoth ::: v. t. --> Said; spoke; uttered; -- used only in the first and third persons in the past tenses, and always followed by its nominative, the word or words said being the object; as, quoth I. quoth he.

Radha ::: the personification of the absolute love for the Divine (the word means adoration and also delight).

rankle ::: a. --> To become, or be, rank; to grow rank or strong; to be inflamed; to fester; -- used literally and figuratively.
To produce a festering or inflamed effect; to cause a sore; -- used literally and figuratively; as, a splinter rankles in the flesh; the words rankled in his bosom. ::: v. t.


Rebirth ::: In former times the doctrine used to pass in Europe under the grotesque name of transmigration which brought with it to theWestern mind the humorous image of the soul of Pythagoras migrating, a haphazard bird of passage, from the human form divine into the body of a guinea-pig or an ass. The philosophical appreciation of the theory expressed itself in the admirable but rather unmanageable Greek word, metempsychosis, which means the insouling of a new body by the same psychic individual. The Greek tongue is always happy in its marriage of thought and word and a better expression could not be found; but forced into English speech the word becomes merely long and pedantic without any memory of its subtle Greek sense and has to be abandoned. Reincarnation is the now popular term, but the idea in the word leans to the gross or external view of the fact and begs many questions. I
   refer "rebirth", for it renders the sense of the wide, colourless, but sufficient Sanskrit term, punarjanma, "again-birth", and commits us to nothing but the fundamental idea which is the essence and life of the doctrine.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 13, Page: 259


recital ::: n. --> The act of reciting; the repetition of the words of another, or of a document; rehearsal; as, the recital of testimony.
A telling in detail and due order of the particulars of anything, as of a law, an adventure, or a series of events; narration.
That which is recited; a story; a narration.
A vocal or instrumental performance by one person; -- distinguished from concert; as, a song recital; an organ, piano, or violin recital.


recitative ::: n. --> A species of musical recitation in which the words are delivered in a manner resembling that of ordinary declamation; also, a piece of music intended for such recitation; -- opposed to melisma. ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to recitation; intended for musical recitation or declamation; in the style or manner of recitative.

recite ::: v. t. --> To repeat, as something already prepared, written down, committed to memory, or the like; to deliver from a written or printed document, or from recollection; to rehearse; as, to recite the words of an author, or of a deed or covenant.
To tell over; to go over in particulars; to relate; to narrate; as, to recite past events; to recite the particulars of a voyage.
To rehearse, as a lesson to an instructor.


reduplication ::: n. --> The act of doubling, or the state of being doubled.
A figure in which the first word of a verse is the same as the last word of the preceding verse.
The doubling of a stem or syllable (more or less modified), with the effect of changing the time expressed, intensifying the meaning, or making the word more imitative; also, the syllable thus added; as, L. tetuli; poposci.


refugee ::: One who flees in search of refuge, as in times of war, political oppression, or religious persecution. Also fig. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

refugee ::: one who flees in search of refuge, as in times of war, political oppression, or religious persecution. Also fig. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

Reincarnation ::: Reincarnation is the now popular term, but the idea in the word leans to the gross or external view of the fact and begs many questions. I
   refer "rebirth", for it renders the sense of the wide, colourless, but sufficient Sanskrit term, punarjanma, "again-birth", and commits us to nothing but the fundamental idea which is the essence and life of the doctrine.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 13, Page: 259


reis ::: pl. --> of Rei ::: n. --> The word is used as a Portuguese designation of money of account, one hundred reis being about equal in value to eleven cents.
A common title in the East for a person in authority, especially the captain of a ship. html{color:


Relation: The same as dyadic propositional function (q.v.). The distinction between relations in intension and relations in extension is the same as that for propositional functions. -- Sometimes the word relation is used to mean a propositional function of two or more variables, and in this case one distinguishes binary (dyadic) relations, ternary (triadic) relations, etc.

religion ::: Sri Aurobindo: "There is no word so plastic and uncertain in its meaning as the word religion. The word is European and, therefore, it is as well to know first what the Europeans mean by it. In this matter we find them, — when they can be got to think clearly on the matter at all, which is itself unusual, — divided in opinion. Sometimes they use it as equivalent to a set of beliefs, sometimes as equivalent to morality coupled with a belief in God, sometimes as equivalent to a set of pietistic actions and emotions. Faith, works and pious observances, these are the three recognised elements of European religion . . . . ::: Religion in India is a still more plastic term and may mean anything from the heights of Yoga to strangling your fellowman and relieving him of the worldly goods he may happen to be carrying with him. It would therefore take too long to enumerate everything that can be included in Indian religion. Briefly, however, it is Dharma or living religiously, the whole life being governed by religion.” *From an unpublished essay

religion ::: “There is no word so plastic and uncertain in its meaning as the word religion. The word is European and, therefore, it is as well to know first what the Europeans mean by it. In this matter we find them,—when they can be got to think clearly on the matter at all, which is itself unusual,—divided in opinion. Sometimes they use it as equivalent to a set of beliefs, sometimes as equivalent to morality coupled with a belief in God, sometimes as equivalent to a set of pietistic actions and emotions. Faith, works and pious observances, these are the three recognised elements of European religion . . . .

Requiring tremendous effort, strength, etc. (Sri Aurobindo capitalises the word.)

reword ::: v. t. --> To repeat in the same words; to reecho.
To alter the wording of; to restate in other words; as, to reword an idea or a passage.


rhapsodist ::: One who recited epic and other poetry, especially professionally, in ancient Greece. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

rhapsodist ::: one who recited epic and other poetry, especially professionally, in ancient Greece. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

rhyme ::: n. --> An expression of thought in numbers, measure, or verse; a composition in verse; a rhymed tale; poetry; harmony of language.
Correspondence of sound in the terminating words or syllables of two or more verses, one succeeding another immediately or at no great distance. The words or syllables so used must not begin with the same consonant, or if one begins with a vowel the other must begin with a consonant. The vowel sounds and accents must be the same, as also the sounds of the final consonants if there be any.


rishi ("s) ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The spiritual man who can guide human life towards its perfection is typified in the ancient Indian idea of the Rishi, one who has lived fully the life of man and found the word of the supra-intellectual, supramental, spiritual truth.” *Social and Political Thought

Rishi ::: The spiritual man who can guide human life towards its perfection is typified in the ancient Indian idea of the Rishi, one who has lived fully the life of man and found the word of the supra-intellectual, supramental, spiritual truth. He has risen above these lower limitations and can view all things from above, but also he is in sympathy with their effort and can view them from within; he has the complete inner knowledge and the higher surpassing knowledge. Therefore he can guide the world humanly as God guides it divinely, because like the Divine he is in the life of the world and yet above it.” The Human Cycle

rk (Rik) ::: the word of illumination which lights up the mind with the rays of knowledge; [a verse of the Rg-veda].

sabdabrahman (shabdabrahman) ::: the Word; the oral expression of God [brahman]. ::: sabdabrahma [nominative]

samadhana. ::: perfect concentration of the mind on the one Reality; concentration and contemplation upon the vedantic texts and the words of the Guru

saman (Sama) ::: the mantra of the divine ananda, the word of calm and harmonious attainment for the bringing of the divine desire of the spirit. [Ved.]

sap—four lines with the word ‘sap’

Sarasvati (Saraswati) ::: "she of the stream, of the flowing movement"; [Ved.]: the streaming current and the word of inspiration of the Truth; the goddess of the Word; [Puranas]: the Muse and goddess of wisdom, learning and the arts and crafts.

saviour ::: 1. One who or that which delivers or rescues from peril. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adjective.) Saviour"s. 2. One who saves from sin and perdition; as God or Christ.

Savitri ::: Purani: “The word ‘Savitri’ is derived from the word ‘Savitru’ which in its turn is derived from the root ‘su’ = ‘to give birth to’. The word ‘Soma’ which indicates an ‘exhilarating drink’, symbolising spiritual ecstasy or delight, is also derived from the same root ‘su’. It links therefore the creation and the delight of creation. Savitru therefore, means the Divine Creator One who gives birth to or brings forth from himself into existence, the creation. In the Veda, Savita is the God of illumination, the God of Creation. Usually, he is represented by the material sun which also illuminates the solar system and is its creator and sustainer in the material sense. Savitri therefore would mean etymologically ‘some one descended from the Sun’, ‘one belonging to the Sun’, ‘an energy derived from the Sun, the Divine Creator’. In our poem, Savitri is the princess who embodies the Divine Grace descended in human birth to work out with the aspiring soul of humanity his divine destiny.”“Savitri“—An Approach and a Study

scholiast ::: one of the ancient commentators who annotated or wrote explanatory notes on classical authors. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adjective.)

scrawl ::: Something written or drawn in a sprawling, awkward manner; a careless sketch. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

scrawl ::: something written or drawn in a sprawling, awkward manner; a careless sketch. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

segment ::: Any of the parts into which something can be divided. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

segment ::: any of the parts into which something can be divided. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

self-seeking ::: [Ed. note: In this instance the meaning of the word is seeking for itself, rather than the usual definition which is the seeking of one"s own interest or selfish ends.]

sentinel ::: 1. A tower used by the military to watch for the enemy and defend a camp, etc. 2. A person or thing that watches or stands as if watching. 3. A soldier stationed as a guard to challenge all comers and prevent a surprise attack; a sentry. (Sri Aurobindo often employs the word as an adjective.) sentinels.

seraph ::: A member of the highest order of angels, often represented as a child’s head with wings above, below, and on each side. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) seraph’s, seraph-winged.

seraph ::: a member of the highest order of angels, often represented as a child"s head with wings above, below, and on each side. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) seraph"s, seraph-winged.

serpent ::: A snake. Serpent, serpents, serpent-force, serpent-watched. (Sri Aurobindo most often employs the word as an adj.)

serpent ::: a snake. Serpent, serpents, serpent-force, serpent-watched. (Sri Aurobindo most often employs the word as an adj.)

shadow ::: n. 1. A dark figure or image cast on the ground or some surface by a body intercepting light. 2. Shade or comparative darkness, as in an area. 3. Darkness that is caused by the interception of light. 4. A phantom; a ghost. 5. An obscure indication; a symbol, type; a prefiguration, foreshadowing. 6. A hint or faint, indistinct image or idea; intimation. 7. A mere semblance. 8. A mirrored image or reflection. 9. Shelter; protection. 10. A dominant or pervasive threat, influence, or atmosphere, esp. one causing gloom, fear, doubt, or the like. Shadow, shadow"s, shadows. v. 11. To represent faintly, prophetically; to indicate obscurely or in slight outline; to symbolize, typify, prefigure. (Often followed by forth.) shadowed. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) shadowlike, shadow-hung, shadow-self, shadow-soul, shadow-Sphinx.

shadow ::: n. 1. A dark figure or image cast on the ground or some surface by a body intercepting light. 2. Shade or comparative darkness, as in an area. 3. Darkness that is caused by the interception of light. 4. A phantom; a ghost. 5. An obscure indication; a symbol, type; a prefiguration, foreshadowing. 6. A hint or faint, indistinct image or idea; intimation. 7. A mere semblance. 8. A mirrored image or reflection. 9. Shelter; protection. 10. A dominant or pervasive threat, influence, or atmosphere, esp. one causing gloom, fear, doubt, or the like. Shadow, shadow’s, shadows. v. 11. To represent faintly, prophetically; to indicate obscurely or in slight outline; to symbolize, typify, prefigure. (Often followed by forth.) shadowed. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) shadowlike, shadow-hung, shadow-self, shadow-soul, shadow-Sphinx.

shatkasampatti &

shepherd ::: n. 1. In combination, denoting a thing such as is used by or is characteristic of shepherds, as a shepherd"s staff. shepherd"s. 2. One who protects, guides, or watches over a person or group of people. Fig. a spiritual guardian. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word in this sense as an adj.) v. 3. To tend, watch over carefully, guard or guide as a shepherd does his sheep. shepherds.

shepherd ::: n. 1. In combination, denoting a thing such as is used by or is characteristic of shepherds, as a shepherd’s staff. shepherd’s. 2. One who protects, guides, or watches over a person or group of people. Fig. a spiritual guardian. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word in this sense as an adj.) v. 3. To tend, watch over carefully, guard or guide as a shepherd does his sheep. shepherds.

shibboleth ::: n. --> A word which was made the criterion by which to distinguish the Ephraimites from the Gileadites. The Ephraimites, not being able to pronounce sh, called the word sibboleth. See Judges xii.
Also in an extended sense.
Hence, the criterion, test, or watchword of a party; a party cry or pet phrase.


Shruti: “The sanctum sanctorum of the consciousness where the truth resides. It is the representation of the Divine within us, the space we enter when we have left the corridors of time and space, where the leader of the sacrifice, Agni, resides. The words describe the beauty of that space we enter when we leave all else behind.”

siren ::: Classical Mythol. One of several fabulous sea nymphs, part woman, part bird, who were supposed to lure sailors to destruction by their enchanting singing. Fig. One who, or that which, sings sweetly, charms, allures, or deceives, like the Sirens. (Sri Aurobindo uses the word in its adjectival sense: Seductive, tempting.)

siren ::: classical Mythol. One of several fabulous sea nymphs, part woman, part bird, who were supposed to lure sailors to destruction by their enchanting singing. Fig. One who, or that which, sings sweetly, charms, allures, or deceives, like the Sirens. (Sri Aurobindo uses the word in its adjectival sense: Seductive, tempting.)

  Sleep. often poet. 2. A natural and periodic state of rest during which consciousness of the world is suspended. 3. Fig. A dormant or quiescent state. slumber’s. v. 4. To pass time in sleep or drowse. 5. To be in a state of inactivity, negligence, or dormancy. slumbers, slumbered. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

slumber ::: 1. Sleep. often poet. **2. A natural and periodic state of rest during which consciousness of the world is suspended. 3. Fig. A dormant or quiescent state. slumber"s. v. 4. To pass time in sleep or drowse. 5. To be in a state of inactivity, negligence, or dormancy. slumbers, slumbered.* (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.*)

&

soft ::: 1. Mild and pleasant; in a relaxed manner. 2. Smooth and agreeable to the touch; not rough or coarse. 3. Not hard or sharp. 4. Mild and pleasant weather. 5. Not loud, harsh, or irritating to the ear; melodious. 6. Of a gentle disposition; tender. 7. Not burdensome or demanding; borne or done easily and without hardship. 8. Of words, speech, etc.: Smooth, soothing; expressive of what is tender or peaceful. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adv.: Gently, carefully, tenderly; in such a manner as to avoid causing pain or injury; without force or violence; with gentle action.) soft-winged.

somnambulist ::: n. 1. A person who walks in his/her sleep. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) 2. Pertaining to somnambulism, i.e. walking during sleep.)

songster ::: a song-bird. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adjective.)

soul ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The word ‘soul", as also the word ‘psychic", is used very vaguely and in many different senses in the English language. More often than not, in ordinary parlance, no clear distinction is made between mind and soul and often there is an even more serious confusion, for the vital being of desire — the false soul or desire-soul — is intended by the words ‘soul" and ‘psychic" and not the true soul, the psychic being.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The word soul is very vaguely used in English — as it often refers to the whole non-physical consciousness including even the vital with all its desires and passions. That was why the word psychic being has to be used so as to distinguish this divine portion from the instrumental parts of the nature.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The word soul has various meanings according to the context; it may mean the Purusha supporting the formation of Prakriti, which we call a being, though the proper word would be rather a becoming; it may mean, on the other hand, specifically the psychic being in an evolutionary creature like man; it may mean the spark of the Divine which has been put into Matter by the descent of the Divine into the material world and which upholds all evolving formations here.” *Letters on Yoga

  "A distinction has to be made between the soul in its essence and the psychic being. Behind each and all there is the soul which is the spark of the Divine — none could exist without that. But it is quite possible to have a vital and physical being supported by such a soul essence but without a clearly evolved psychic being behind it.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The soul and the psychic being are practically the same, except that even in things which have not developed a psychic being, there is still a spark of the Divine which can be called the soul. The psychic being is called in Sanskrit the Purusha in the heart or the Chaitya Purusha. (The psychic being is the soul developing in the evolution.)” *Letters on Yoga

  "The soul or spark is there before the development of an organised vital and mind. The soul is something of the Divine that descends into the evolution as a divine Principle within it to support the evolution of the individual out of the Ignorance into the Light. It develops in the course of the evolution a psychic individual or soul individuality which grows from life to life, using the evolving mind, vital and body as its instruments. It is the soul that is immortal while the rest disintegrates; it passes from life to life carrying its experience in essence and the continuity of the evolution of the individual.” *Letters on Yoga

  ". . . for the soul is seated within and impervious to the shocks of external events. . . .” *Essays on the Gita

  ". . . the soul is at first but a spark and then a little flame of godhead burning in the midst of a great darkness; for the most part it is veiled in its inner sanctum and to reveal itself it has to call on the mind, the life-force and the physical consciousness and persuade them, as best they can, to express it; ordinarily, it succeeds at most in suffusing their outwardness with its inner light and modifying with its purifying fineness their dark obscurities or their coarser mixture. Even when there is a formed psychic being able to express itself with some directness in life, it is still in all but a few a smaller portion of the being — ‘no bigger in the mass of the body than the thumb of a man" was the image used by the ancient seers — and it is not always able to prevail against the obscurity or ignorant smallness of the physical consciousness, the mistaken surenesses of the mind or the arrogance and vehemence of the vital nature.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

". . . the soul is an eternal portion of the Supreme and not a fraction of Nature.” The Life Divine

"The true soul secret in us, — subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, — this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” The Life Divine

*Soul, soul"s, Soul"s, souls, soulless, soul-bridals, soul-change, soul-force, Soul-Forces, soul-ground, soul-joy, soul-nature, soul-range, soul-ray, soul-scapes, soul-scene, soul-sense, soul-severance, soul-sight, soul-slaying, soul-space,, soul-spaces, soul-strength, soul-stuff, soul-truth, soul-vision, soul-wings, world-soul, World-Soul.



soul ::: “The word ‘soul’, as also the word ‘psychic’, is used very vaguely and in many different senses in the English language. More often than not, in ordinary parlance, no clear distinction is made between mind and soul and often there is an even more serious confusion, for the vital being of desire—the false soul or desire-soul—is intended by the words ‘soul’ and ‘psychic’ and not the true soul, the psychic being.” Letters on Yoga

spectator ::: 1. A person viewing anything; onlooker; observer. 2. An observer or an event. spectators. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

Speech is usually the expression of the superficial nature ; therefore to throw oneself out too much in such speech wastes the energy and prevents the inward listening which brings the word of true knowledge. Not only a truer knowledge, but a greater power comes to one in the quietude and silence of the mind.

spiritual ::: The word “spiritual” has at least four major usages: 1. “Spiritual” refers to the highest levels in any developmental line (e.g., transrational cognition, transpersonal self-identity, etc.). 2. “Spiritual” is a separate developmental line itself (e.g., Fowler’s stages of faith). 3. “Spiritual” refers to a state or peak experience (e.g., nature mysticism). 4. “Spiritual” means a particular attitude or orientation, like openness, wisdom, or compassion, which can be present at virtually any state or stage.

(Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj. See titanic.) Titan’s, titans, Titan-statured, Titan-striding, half-titan, dwarf-Titan.

Sri Aurobindo: "Every man is knowingly or unknowingly the instrument of a universal Power and, apart from the inner Presence, there is no such essential difference between one action and another, one kind of instrumentation and another as would warrant the folly of an egoistic pride. The difference between knowledge and ignorance is a grace of the Spirit; the breath of divine Power blows where it lists and fills today one and tomorrow another with the word or the puissance. If the potter shapes one pot more perfectly than another, the merit lies not in the vessel but the maker. The attitude of our mind must not be ‘This is my strength" or ‘Behold God"s power in me", but rather ‘A Divine Power works in this mind and body and it is the same that works in all men and in the animal, in the plant and in the metal, in conscious and living things and in things apparently inconscient and inanimate."” The Synthesis of Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "I used the word ‘mystic" in the sense of a certain kind of inner seeing and feeling of things, a way which to the intellect would seem occult and visionary — for this is something different from imagination and its work with which the intellect is familiar.” *On Himself

Sri Aurobindo: " Karma is nothing but the will of the Spirit in action, consequence nothing but the creation of will. What is in the will of being, expresses itself in karma and consequence. When the will is limited in mind, karma appears as a bondage and a limitation, consequence as a reaction or an imposition. But when the will of the being is infinite in the spirit, karma and consequence become instead the joy of the creative spirit, the construction of the eternal mechanist, the word and drama of the eternal poet, the harmony of the eternal musician, the play of the eternal child.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

*Sri Aurobindo: "Pleasure, joy and delight, as man uses the words, are limited and occasional movements which depend on certain habitual causes and emerge, like their opposites pain and grief which are equally limited and occasional movements, from a background other than themselves. Delight of being is universal, illimitable and self-existent, not dependent on particular causes, the background of all backgrounds, from which pleasure, pain and other more neutral experiences emerge. When delight of being seeks to realise itself as delight of becoming, it moves in the movement of force and itself takes different forms of movement of which pleasure and pain are positive and negative currents.” The Life Divine*

Sri Aurobindo: “The spiritual man who can guide human life towards its perfection is typified in the ancient Indian idea of the Rishi, one who has lived fully the life of man and found the word of the supra-intellectual, supramental, spiritual truth.” Social and Political Thought

Sri Aurobindo: "The true soul secret in us, — subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, — this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” *The Life Divine

Sri Aurobindo: "The word ‘descend" has various meanings according to the context — I used it here in the sense of the psychic being coming down into the human consciousness and body ready for it.” Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "The word ‘ghost" as used in popular parlance covers an enormous number of distinct phenomena which have no necessary connection with each other. To name a few only: ::: An actual contact with the soul of a human being in its subtle body and transcribed to our mind by the appearance of an image or the hearing of a voice.

Sri Aurobindo: "The word is a sound expression of the idea. In the supra-physical plane when an idea has to be realised, one can by repeating the word-expression of it, produce vibrations which prepare the mind for the realisation of the idea. That is the principle of the Mantras and of Japa. One repeats the name of the Divine and the vibrations created in the consciousness prepare the realisation of the Divine. It is the same idea that is expressed in the Bible: ‘God said, Let there be Light, and there was Light". It is creation by the Word.” *The Future Poetry

Sri Aurobindo uses the word in the sense of the definition for imager.

sruta ::: the thing heard, the Word.

sruti (shruti; sruti; çruti) ::: hearing; inspiration, a faculty of jñana which "is of the nature of truth hearing: it is an immediate reception of the very voice of the truth, it readily brings the word that perfectly embodies it and it carries something more than the light of its idea; there is seized some stream of its inner reality and vivid arriving movement of its substance". It is an element in all the inspirational and interpretative forms of the logistic ideality and is the essence of the srauta vijñana.

stable ::: 1. Resistant to change of position or condition; not easily moved or disturbed 2. Able or likely to continue or last; firmly established; enduring or permanent. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.) stable-seeming, Ever-stable"s.

startled ::: Frightened; surprised greatly; shocked. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

startled ::: frightened; surprised greatly; shocked. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

statuesque ::: like or suggesting a statue, as in massive or majestic dignity, grace, or beauty. statuesques. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as a v.)

stet ::: subj. 3d pers. sing. --> Let it stand; -- a word used by proof readers to signify that something once erased, or marked for omission, is to remain. ::: v. t. --> To cause or direct to remain after having been marked for omission; to mark with the word stet, or with a series of dots below or

stops ::: the closings of the finger-holes or ventages in the tube of a wind instrument so as to alter the pitch; the metal keys used for this purpose. Also, the holes or apertures thus closed. (All other uses of the word are in the sense of halt.)

stubh ::: the rhythm that affirms the gods; the Word considered as a power which affirms and confirms in the settled rhythm of things. [Ved.]

student ::: One who studies, investigates, or examines thoughtfully. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

student ::: one who studies, investigates, or examines thoughtfully. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

subconscient ::: “In our yoga we mean by the subconscient that quite submerged part of our being in which there is no wakingly conscious and coherent thought, will or feeling or organised reaction, but which yet receives obscurely the impressions of all things and stores them up in itself and from it too all sorts of stimuli, of persistent habitual movements, crudely repeated or disguised in strange forms can surge up into dream or into the waking nature. No, subliminal is a general term used for all parts of the being which are not on the waking surface. Subconscient is very often used in the same sense by European psychologists because they do not know the difference. But when I use the word, I mean always what is below the ordinary physical consciousness, not what is behind it. The inner mental, vital, physical, the psychic are not subconscious in this sense, but they can be spoken of as subliminal.” The Synthesis of Yoga.

subconscient ::: Sri Aurobindo: "In our yoga we mean by the subconscient that quite submerged part of our being in which there is no wakingly conscious and coherent thought, will or feeling or organised reaction, but which yet receives obscurely the impressions of all things and stores them up in itself and from it too all sorts of stimuli, of persistent habitual movements, crudely repeated or disguised in strange forms can surge up into dream or into the waking nature. No, subliminal is a general term used for all parts of the being which are not on the waking surface. Subconscient is very often used in the same sense by European psychologists because they do not know the difference. But when I use the word, I mean always what is below the ordinary physical consciousness, not what is behind it. The inner mental, vital, physical, the psychic are not subconscious in this sense, but they can be spoken of as subliminal.” *The Synthesis of Yoga.

"The subconscient is a concealed and unexpressed inarticulate consciousness which works below all our conscious physical activities. Just as what we call the superconscient is really a higher consciousness above from which things descend into the being, so the subconscient is below the body-consciousness and things come up into the physical, the vital and the mind-nature from there.

Just as the higher consciousness is superconscient to us and supports all our spiritual possibilities and nature, so the subconscient is the basis of our material being and supports all that comes up in the physical nature.” Letters on Yoga

  "That part of us which we can strictly call subconscient because it is below the level of mind and conscious life, inferior and obscure, covers the purely physical and vital elements of our constitution of bodily being, unmentalised, unobserved by the mind, uncontrolled by it in their action. It can be held to include the dumb occult consciousness, dynamic but not sensed by us, which operates in the cells and nerves and all the corporeal stuff and adjusts their life process and automatic responses. It covers also those lowest functionings of submerged sense-mind which are more operative in the animal and in plant life.” *The Life Divine

"The subconscient is a thing of habits and memories and repeats persistently or whenever it can old suppressed reactions, reflexes, mental, vital or physical responses. It must be trained by a still more persistent insistence of the higher parts of the being to give up its old responses and take on the new and true ones.” Letters on Yoga

"About the subconscient — it is the sub-mental base of the being and is made up of impressions, instincts, habitual movements that are stored there. Whatever movement is impressed in it, it keeps. If one impresses the right movement in it, it will keep and send up that. That is why it has to be cleared of old movements before there can be a permanent and total change in the nature. When the higher consciousness is once established in the waking parts, it goes down into the subconscient and changes that also, makes a bedrock of itself there also.” Letters on Yoga

"The sub-conscious is the evolutionary basis in us, it is not the whole of our hidden nature, nor is it the whole origin of what we are. But things can rise from the subconscient and take shape in the conscious parts and much of our smaller vital and physical instincts, movements, habits, character-forms has this source.” Letters on Yoga

"The subconscient is the support of habitual action — it can support good habits as well as bad.” Letters on Yoga

"For the subconscient is the Inconscient in the process of becoming conscious; it is a support and even a root of our inferior parts of being and their movements.” The Life Divine *subconscient"s.


"Subliminal is a general term used for all parts of the being which are not on the waking surface. Subconscient is very often used in the same sense by European psychologists because they do not know the difference. But when I use the word, I mean always what is below the ordinary physical consciousness, not what is behind it. The inner mental, vital, physical, the psychic are not subconscious in this sense, but they can be spoken of as subliminal.” Letters on Yoga

“Subliminal is a general term used for all parts of the being which are not on the waking surface. Subconscient is very often used in the same sense by European psychologists because they do not know the difference. But when I use the word, I mean always what is below the ordinary physical consciousness, not what is behind it. The inner mental, vital, physical, the psychic are not subconscious in this sense, but they can be spoken of as subliminal.” Letters on Yoga

substratum ::: 1. A foundation or groundwork. (of something material or immaterial). 2. That which is spread or laid under something else; a stratum or layer lying under another. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

summit ::: 1. The highest point or part, as of a hill, a line of travel, or any object; top; apex. 2. The highest state or degree; acme; zenith. 3. The highest point of attainment or aspiration. summits, summit-glories, crypt-summit, seer-summit. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

sunrta ::: the word of a blissful truth; happy truths. [Ved.] ::: sunrtah [plural], the powers or the voices of Truth and Joy.

supermind ::: %symbol ::: Something that represents something else by association, resemblance, or convention, especially a material object used to represent something invisible. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) symbol’s, symbols, world-symbol, World-symbols.

symbol ::: something that represents something else by association, resemblance, or convention, especially a material object used to represent something invisible. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) **symbol"s, symbols, world-symbol, World-symbols.

tabular ::: a. --> Having the form of, or pertaining to, a table (in any of the uses of the word).
Having a flat surface; as, a tabular rock.
Formed into a succession of flakes; laminated.
Set in squares.
Arranged in a schedule; as, tabular statistics.
Derived from, or computed by, the use of tables; as, tabular right ascension.


Tapasya ::: It may be observed that the usual translation of the word tapasya in English books, "penance", is quite misleading—the idea of penance entered rarely into the austerities practised by Indian ascetics. Nor was mortification of the body the essence even of the most severe and self-afflicting austerities; the aim was rather an overpassing of the hold of the bodily nature on the consciousness or else a supernormal energising of the consciousness and will to gain some spiritual or other object.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22 Page: 591


technical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the useful or mechanic arts, or to any science, business, or the like; specially appropriate to any art, science, or business; as, the words of an indictment must be technical.

Tehmi: “Here Sri Aurobindo uses the word in a unique way, as a verb; to house as in a cathedral.”

tendril ::: A twisting, threadlike structure by which a twining plant grasps an object or a plant for support. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.).

tendril ::: a twisting, threadlike structure by which a twining plant grasps an object or a plant for support. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.).

tenor ::: n. --> A state of holding on in a continuous course; manner of continuity; constant mode; general tendency; course; career.
That course of thought which holds on through a discourse; the general drift or course of thought; purport; intent; meaning; understanding.
Stamp; character; nature.
An exact copy of a writing, set forth in the words and figures of it. It differs from purport, which is only the substance or


tersanctus ::: n. --> An ancient ascription of praise (containing the word "Holy" -- in its Latin form, "Sanctus" -- thrice repeated), used in the Mass of the Roman Catholic Church and before the prayer of consecration in the communion service of the Church of England and the Protestant Episcopal Church. Cf. Trisagion.

that is not seen beforehand; also, not known beforehand. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

(The authors also gave the example of Centaur). When such words are capitalised it refers to a divinity representing the species. Also with the word ‘Circean’ Nolini said: “Not merely a mythological story but a being representing universal forces.

“the basic syllable OM, which is the foundation of all the perfect creative sounds of the revealed word; OM is the one universal formulation of the energy of sound and speech, that which contains and sums up, synthesises and releases, all the spiritual power and all the potentiality of Vak (speech, the goddess Speech) and Shabda (sound, vibration, word). The mantra of the divine consciousness brings its light of revelation, the Mantra of the divine Power, its will of effectuation, the Mantra of the divine Ananda is equal fulfilment of the spiritual delight of existence. All word and thought are an outflowing of he great OM,—OM, the Word, the Eternal Manifest in the forms of sensible objects; manifest in that conscious play of creative self-conception of which forms and objects are the figures, manifest behind in the self-gathered superconscient power of the Infinite, OM is the sovereign source, seed, womb of thing and idea, form and name—it is itself, integrally, the supreme Intangible, the original Unity, the timeless Mystery self—existent above all manifestation in supernal being.” SABCL Volume 13—Page 315

"the basic syllable OM, which is the foundation of all the perfect creative sounds of the revealed word; OM is the one universal formulation of the energy of sound and speech, that which contains and sums up, synthesises and releases, all the spiritual power and all the potentiality of Vak (speech, the goddess Speech) and Shabda (sound, vibration, word). The mantra of the divine consciousness brings its light of revelation, the Mantra of the divine Power, its will of effectuation, the Mantra of the divine Ananda is equal fulfilment of the spiritual delight of existence. All word and thought are an outflowing of he great OM, - OM, the Word, the Eternal Manifest in the forms of sensible objects; manifest in that conscious play of creative self-conception of which forms and objects are the figures, manifest behind in the self-gathered superconscient power of the Infinite, OM is the sovereign source, seed, womb of thing and idea, form and name – it is itself, integrally, the supreme Intangible, the original Unity, the timeless Mystery self- existent above all manifestation in supernal being.” SABCL Volume 13 – Page 315*

“The Chhandogya,… is to be a work in the right and perfect way of devoting oneself to the Brahman; its subject is the Brahman, but the Brahman as symbolised in the OM, the sacred syllable of the Veda, not therefore, the pure state of existence only, but that existence in all its parts… OM is the symbol and the thing symbolised.”the basic syllable OM, which is the foundation of all the perfect creative sounds of the revealed word; OM is the one universal formulation of the energy of sound and speech, that which contains and sums up, synthesises and releases, all the spiritual power and all the potentiality of Vak (speech, the goddess Speech) and Shabda (sound, vibration, word). The mantra of the divine consciousness brings its light of revelation, the Mantra of the divine Power, its will of effectuation, the Mantra of the divine Ananda is equal fulfilment of the spiritual delight of existence. All word and thought are an outflowing of he great OM,—OM, the Word, the Eternal Manifest in the forms of sensible objects; manifest in that conscious play of creative self-conception of which forms and objects are the figures, manifest behind in the self-gathered superconscient power of the Infinite, OM is the sovereign source, seed, womb of thing and idea, form and name—it is itself, integrally, the supreme Intangible, the original Unity, the timeless Mystery self—existent above all manifestation in supernal being.” SABCL Volume 13—Page 315

The diversity of concepts that Husserl himself expressed by the word "phenomenology" has been a source of diverse usages among thinkeis who came under his influence and are often referred to as "the phenomenological school." Husserl himself always meant by "phenomenology" a science of the subjective and its intended objects qua intentional; this core of sense pervades the development of his own concept of phenomenology as eidetic, transcendental, constitutive. Some thinkers, appropriating only the psychological version of this central concept, have developed a descriptive intentional psychology -- sometimes empirical, sometimes eidetic -- under the title "phenomenology." On the other hand, Husserl's broader concept of eidetic science based on seeing essences and essentially necessary relations -- especially his concept of material ontology -- has been not only adopted but made central by others, who define phenomenology accordingly. Not uncommonly, these groups reject Husserl's method of transcendental-phenomenological reduction and profess a realistic metaphysics. Finally, there are those who, emphasizing Husserl's cardinal principle that evidence -- seeing something that is itself presented -- is the only ultimate source of knowledge, conceive their phenomenology more broadly and etymologically, as explication of that which shows itself, whatever may be the latter 's nature and ontologicil status. -- D.C.

The feelings tbemseives are of many kinds. The word feeling is often used for an emotion, and there can be psychic or spiri- tual emotions which are numbered among yogic experiences, such as a wave of Suddha bhakti or the rising of love towards the

"The Gita in later chapters speaks highly of the Veda and the Upanishads. They are divine Scriptures, they are the Word. The Lord himself is the knower of Veda and the author of Vedanta, vedavid vedântakrt; the Lord is the one object of knowledge in all the Vedas, sarvair vedair aham eva vedyah, a language which implies that the word Veda means the book of knowledge and that these Scriptures deserve their appellation.” Essays on the Gita

“The Gita in later chapters speaks highly of the Veda and the Upanishads. They are divine Scriptures, they are the Word. The Lord himself is the knower of Veda and the author of Vedanta, vedavid vedântakrt; the Lord is the one object of knowledge in all the Vedas, sarvair vedair aham eva vedyah, a language which implies that the word Veda means the book of knowledge and that these Scriptures deserve their appellation.” Essays on the Gita

“The Gita in later chapters speaks highly of the Veda and the Upanishads. They are divine Scriptures, they are the Word. The Lord himself is the knower of Veda and the author of Vedanta, vedavidvedântakrt; the Lord is the one object of knowledge in all the Vedas, sarvairvedairahamevavedyah, a language which implies that the word Veda means the book of knowledge and that these Scriptures deserve their appellation.” Essays on the Gita

  The highest point or part, as of a hill, a line of travel, or any object; top; apex. 2. The highest state or degree; acme; zenith. 3. The highest point of attainment or aspiration. summits, summit-glories, crypt-summit, seer-summit. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

The Ineffable: *Sri Aurobindo: "It is this essential indeterminability of the Absolute that translates itself into our consciousness through the fundamental negating positives of our spiritual experience, the immobile immutable Self, the Nirguna Brahman, the Eternal without qualities, the pure featureless One Existence, the Impersonal, the Silence void of activities, the Non-being, the Ineffable and the Unknowable. On the other side it is the essence and source of all determinations, and this dynamic essentiality manifests to us through the fundamental affirming positives in which the Absolute equally meets us; for it is the Self that becomes all things, the Saguna Brahman, the Eternal with infinite qualities, the One who is the Many, the infinite Person who is the source and foundation of all persons and personalities, the Lord of creation, the Word, the Master of all works and action; it is that which being known all is known: these affirmatives correspond to those negatives. For it is not possible in a supramental cognition to split asunder the two sides of the One Existence, — even to speak of them as sides is excessive, for they are in each other, their co-existence or one-existence is eternal and their powers sustaining each other found the self-manifestation of the Infinite.” The Life Divine

The mantra as I have tried to describe it in The Future Poetry is a word of power and light that comes from the Overmind inspiration or from some very high plane of Intuition. Its characteristics are a language that conveys infinitely more than the mere surface sense of the words seems to indicate, a rhythm that means even more than the language and is born out of the Infinite and disappears into it, and the power to convey not merely the mental, vital or physical contents or indications or values of the thing uttered, but its significance and figure in some fundamental and original consciousness which is behind all these and greater.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 27, Page: 26-27


theorised ::: Formed or construct theories about. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

theorised ::: formed or construct theories about. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

"The silent and the active Brahman are not different, opposite and irreconcilable entities, the one denying, the other affirming a cosmic illusion; they are one Brahman in two aspects, positive and negative, and each is necessary to the other. It is out of this Silence that the Word which creates the worlds for ever proceeds; for the Word expresses that which is self-hidden in the Silence.” The Life Divine*

“The silent and the active Brahman are not different, opposite and irreconcilable entities, the one denying, the other affirming a cosmic illusion; they are one Brahman in two aspects, positive and negative, and each is necessary to the other. It is out of this Silence that the Word which creates the worlds for ever proceeds; for the Word expresses that which is self-hidden in the Silence.” The Life Divine

The spiritual man who can guide human life towards its perfection is typified in the ancient Indian idea of the Rishi, one who has lived fully the life of man and found the word of the supra-intellectual, supramental, spiritual truth. He has risen above these lower limitations and can view all things from above, but also he is in sympathy with their effort and can view them from within; he has the complete inner knowledge and the higher surpassing knowledge. Therefore he can guide the world humanly as God guides it divinely, because like the Divine he is in the life of the world and yet above it.” The Human Cycle*

The spiritual man who can guide human life towards its perfection is typified in the ancient Indian idea of the Rishi, one who has lived fully the life of man and found the word of the supra-intellectual, supramental, spiritual truth. He has risen above these lower limitations and can view all things from above, but also he is in sympathy with their effort and can view them from within; he has the complete inner knowledge and the higher surpassing knowledge. Therefore he can guide the world humanly as God guides it divinely, because like the Divine he is in the life of the world and yet above it.” The Human Cycle

The treatment of sets in the Zermelo set theory differs from that of the theory of types in that all sets are "individuals" and the relation ε (of membership in a set) is significant as between any two sets -- in particular, xεx is not forbidden. (We are here using the words set and class as synonymous.)

“The true soul secret in us,—subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil,—this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” The Life Divine

::: "The use of the word Power has already been explained — it can be applied to whatever or whoever exercises a conscious power in the cosmic field and has authority over the world-movement or some movement in it.” Letters on Yoga

“The use of the word Power has already been explained—it can be applied to whatever or whoever exercises a conscious power in the cosmic field and has authority over the world-movement or some movement in it.” Letters on Yoga

  The vast body of salt water that covers three fourths of the surface of the globe. 2. A vast expanse or quantity. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj. in this sense.) Ocean, ocean’s, oceans, ocean-silence, ocean-ecstasy, world-ocean’s. adj. 3. Of or pertaining to the ocean in its natural and physical relations. Also fig.

The word expressing the idea has the same power if it is surcharged with the spiritual force; that is the rationale of the Indian use of the mantra.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21, Page: 941


The word, furthermore, has been loosely used for esoteric, gnostic, theosophical types of "knowledge", not capable of verification. It has been used, too, for the whole area of psychic phenomena and occult happenings, borderland phenomena. The result of this confusion has been that in scientific laboratories the word mysticism often connotes spurious knowledge, occult lore or abnormal phenomena. The Germans use the word Mysticismus for this dubious type of knowledge and Mystik for the loftier types of experience.

"The Word has its seed-sounds — suggesting the eternal syllable of the Veda, A U M, and the seed-sounds of the Tantriks — which carry in them the principles of things; it has its forms which stand behind the revelatory and inspired speech that comes to man"s supreme faculties, and these compel the forms of things in the universe; it has its rhythms, — for it is no disordered vibration, but moves out into great cosmic measures, — and according to the rhythm is the law, arrangement, harmony, processes of the world it builds. Life itself is a rhythm of God.” The Upanishads

“The Word has its seed-sounds—suggesting the eternal syllable of the Veda, A U M, and the seed-sounds of the Tantriks—which carry in them the principles of things; it has its forms which stand behind the revelatory and inspired speech that comes to man’s supreme faculties, and these compel the forms of things in the universe; it has its rhythms,—for it is no disordered vibration, but moves out into great cosmic measures,—and according to the rhythm is the law, arrangement, harmony, processes of the world it builds. Life itself is a rhythm of God.” The Upanishads

The Word has its seed-sounds—suggesting the eternal syllable of the Veda, AUM.

The Word has its seed-sounds – suggesting the eternal syllable of the Veda, AUM. ::: Sri Aurobindo - A note on the Chhandogya Upanishad *

The word is Middle English (1325-75) and is of Anglo-French provenance. Some dictionaries give the first known use as the 15th century.

"The word ‘physical mind" is rather ambiguous, because it can mean this externalising Mind and the mental in the physical taken together.” Letters on Yoga*

“The word ‘physical mind’ is rather ambiguous, because it can mean this externalising Mind and the mental in the physical taken together.” Letters on Yoga

“The word soul has various meanings according to the context; it may mean the Purusha supporting the formation of Prakriti, which we call a being, though the proper word would be rather a becoming; it may mean, on the other hand, specifically the psychic being in an evolutionary creature like man; it may mean the spark of the Divine which has been put into Matter by the descent of the Divine into the material world and which upholds all evolving formations here.” Letters on Yoga

“The word soul is very vaguely used in English—as it often refers to the whole non-physical consciousness including even the vital with all its desires and passions. That was why the word psychic being has to be used so as to distinguish this divine portion from the instrumental parts of the nature.” Letters on Yoga

The words supermind and supramental were first used by me, but since then people have taken up and are using the word supramental for anything above mind.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 142


thicken ::: v. t. --> To make thick (in any sense of the word).
To render dense; to inspissate; as, to thicken paint.
To make close; to fill up interstices in; as, to thicken cloth; to thicken ranks of trees or men.
To strengthen; to confirm.
To make more frequent; as, to thicken blows. ::: v. i.


thinness ::: n. --> The quality or state of being thin (in any of the senses of the word).

th ::: --> In Old English, the article the, when the following word began with a vowel, was often written with elision as if a part of the word. Thus in Chaucer, the forms thabsence, tharray, thegle, thend, thingot, etc., are found for the absence, the array, the eagle, the end, etc.

thirst ::: Madhav: “… all the power, all the knowledge that the world can give us are products of time, products of the movements of time. Truly they cannot satisfy the sacred thirst of the spirit. Mark the words ‘sacred thirst’ (III. 1. 305.). Mother uses the word ‘thirst’ so often; it is an intense aspiration that cannot be satisfied, cannot be fulfilled by the gifts of time; it can be fulfilled only by the gifts of what is beyond time, of what is eternal. The hunger of the soul in us can be satisfied only by a response from the Eternal.” The Book of the Divine Mother

threshold ::: 1. A piece of wood or stone placed beneath a door; a doorsill. Also fig. 2. Fig. A level or point at which something would happen, would cease to happen, or would take effect, become true, etc. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

thrilled ::: Caused to quiver with fear, excitement, etc. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

thrilled ::: caused to quiver with fear, excitement, etc. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

Titan ::: “In Greek mythology, one of a family of gigantic beings, the twelve primordial children of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaea (Earth); also certain of the offspring of these Titans. The names of the twelve Titans, the ancestors of the Olympian gods, were Oceanus, Coeus, Crius, Hyperion, Iapetos, Theia, Rhea, Themis, Mnemosyne, Phoebe, Tethys, and Cronos. Cronos, the youngest of them, ruled the world after overthrowing and castrating Uranus. He swallowed each of his own children at birth but Zeus escaped. Cronos was made to vomit up the others (including Hera, Demeter, Poseidon, and Hades) and, after a protracted struggle, he and the other Titans were vanquished, all of them but Atlas imprisoned in Tartarus, and the reign of Zeus was established. More broadly, the word Titan may be applied to any being of a colossal force or grandiose and lawless self-assertion, or even to whatever is huge or mighty.” Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo’s Works.

titan ::: "In Greek mythology, one of a family of gigantic beings, the twelve primordial children of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaea (Earth); also certain of the offspring of these Titans. The names of the twelve Titans, the ancestors of the Olympian gods, were Oceanus, Coeus, Crius, Hyperion, Iapetos, Theia, Rhea, Themis, Mnemosyne, Phoebe, Tethys, and Cronos. Cronos, the youngest of them, ruled the world after overthrowing and castrating Uranus. He swallowed each of his own children at birth but Zeus escaped. Cronos was made to vomit up the others (including Hera, Demeter, Poseidon, and Hades) and, after a protracted struggle, he and the other Titans were vanquished, all of them but Atlas imprisoned in Tartarus, and the reign of Zeus was established. More broadly, the word Titan may be applied to any being of a colossal force or grandiose and lawless self-assertion, or even to whatever is huge or mighty.” *Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works.

titan. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj. See titanic.) Titan’s, titans, Titan-statured, Titan-striding, half-titan, dwarf-Titan.

titan.** (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj. See* titanic.) Titan"s, titans, Titan-statured, Titan-striding, half-titan, dwarf-Titan.**

To the mind this Unmanifest can present itself as a Self, a supreme Nihil (Tao or Sunyam), a featureless Absolute, an Indeterminate, a blissful Nirvana of manifested existence, a Non-Being out of which Being came or a Being of silence out of which a world-illusion came. But all these are mental formulas expressing the mind"s approach to it, not That but impressions which fall from That upon the receiving consciousness, not e true essence or nature (Swarupa) of the Eternal and Infinite. Even the words Eternal and Infinite are only symbolic expressions through which the mind feels without grasping some vague impression of this Supreme.” The Hour of God

To the mind this Unmanifest can present itself as a Self, a supreme Nihil (Tao or Sunyam), a featureless Absolute, an Indeterminate, a blissful Nirvana of manifested existence, a Non-Being out of which Being came or a Being of silence out of which a world-illusion came. But all these are mental formulas expressing the mind’s approach to it, not That but impressions which fall from That upon the receiving consciousness, not e true essence or nature (Swarupa) of the Eternal and Infinite. Even the words Eternal and Infinite are only symbolic expressions through which the mind feels without grasping some vague impression of this Supreme.” The Hour of God

“‘Transformation’ is a word that I have brought in myself (like ‘supermind’) to express certain spiritual concepts and spiritual facts of the integral yoga. People are now taking them up and using them in senses which have nothing to do with the significance which I put into them. Purification of the nature by the ‘influence’ of the Spirit is not what I mean by transformation; purification is only part of a psychic change or a psycho-spiritual change—the word besides has many senses and is very often given a moral or ethical meaning which is foreign to my purpose.” Letters on Yoga

transformation ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Transformation means that the higher consciousness or nature is brought down into the mind, vital and body and takes the place of the lower. There is a higher consciousness of the true self, which is spiritual, but it is above; if one rises above into it, then one is free as long as one remains there, but if one comes down into or uses mind, vital or body — and if one keeps any connection with life, one has to do so, either to come down and act from the ordinary consciousness or else to be in the self but use mind, life and body, then the imperfections of these instruments have to be faced and mended — they can only be mended by transformation.” *Letters on Yoga

  "‘Transformation" is a word that I have brought in myself (like ‘supermind") to express certain spiritual concepts and spiritual facts of the integral yoga. People are now taking them up and using them in senses which have nothing to do with the significance which I put into them. Purification of the nature by the ‘influence" of the Spirit is not what I mean by transformation; purification is only part of a psychic change or a psycho-spiritual change — the word besides has many senses and is very often given a moral or ethical meaning which is foreign to my purpose.” *Letters on Yoga

"It is indeed as a result of our evolution that we arrive at the possibility of this transformation. As Nature has evolved beyond Matter and manifested Life, beyond Life and manifested Mind, so she must evolve beyond Mind and manifest a consciousness and power of our existence free from the imperfection and limitation of our mental existence, a supramental or truth-consciousness and able to develop the power and perfection of the spirit. Here a slow and tardy change need no longer be the law or manner of our evolution; it will be only so to a greater or less extent so long as a mental ignorance clings and hampers our ascent; but once we have grown into the truth-consciousness its power of spiritual truth of being will determine all. Into that truth we shall be freed and it will transform mind and life and body. Light and bliss and beauty and a perfection of the spontaneous right action of all the being are there as native powers of the supramental truth-consciousness and these will in their very nature transform mind and life and body even here upon earth into a manifestation of the truth-conscious spirit. The obscurations of earth will not prevail against the supramental truth-consciousness, for even into the earth it can bring enough of the omniscient light and omnipotent force of the spirit conquer. All may not open to the fullness of its light and power, but whatever does open must that extent undergo the change. That will be the principle of transformation.” The Supramental Manifestation

The Mother: "Transformation. The change by which all the elements and all the movements of the being become ready to manifest the supramental Truth.”

"One thing you must know and never forget: in the work of transformation all that is true and sincere will always be kept; only what is false and insincere will disappear.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.


translate ::: v. t. --> To bear, carry, or remove, from one place to another; to transfer; as, to translate a tree.
To change to another condition, position, place, or office; to transfer; hence, to remove as by death.
To remove to heaven without a natural death.
To remove, as a bishop, from one see to another.
To render into another language; to express the sense of in the words of another language; to interpret; hence, to explain or


tried ::: thoroughly tested and proved to be good or trustworthy. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as a n.) long-tried.

trope ::: n. --> The use of a word or expression in a different sense from that which properly belongs to it; the use of a word or expression as changed from the original signification to another, for the sake of giving life or emphasis to an idea; a figure of speech.
The word or expression so used.


tropology ::: n. --> A rhetorical mode of speech, including tropes, or changes from the original import of the word.

turiyatita. ::: "transcending the fourth"; beyond Turiya &

tyrant ::: A ruler who exercises power in a harsh, cruel manner. tyrants. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

tyrant ::: a ruler who exercises power in a harsh, cruel manner. tyrants. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

Tzu: (Mo Ti, between 500 and 396 B.C.) Founder of Mohism (Mo chia), studied Confucianism, later repudiated it, especially its doctrines of Fate and elaborate rituals. As a high officer in the state of Sung (in present Honan, most probably his native state) he "skillfully carried out military defense and practiced economy." He vigorously defended religious beliefs and practices, became the chief promoter, if not the only founder, of religion in ancient China. His pupils became an organized religious group, or possibly a society of people who had been punished with branding and had become slaves, which is what the word mo in one sense meant. Mo Tzu (Eng. tr. by Y. P. Mei: The Ethical and Political Works of Motse) contains his teachings recorded by his followers. -- W.T.C.

unborn ::: 1. Existing without birth or beginning. 2. Not yet born; still to be born. Unborn. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

unbound ::: fig. Unconfined, unconstrained; free. Unbound. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

unconceived ::: 1. Not conceived; unimagined; beyond thought. 2. Not brought into being; not properly formed or developed. Unconceived. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

Unmanifest ::: Whatever the manifestation spiritual or material or other may be, it has behind it something that is beyond itself, and even if we reached the highest possible heights of manifested existence there would be still beyond that even an Unmanifested from which it came. The Unmanifested Supreme is beyond all de®nition and description by mind or speech; no de®nition the mind can make, af®rmative or negative, can be at all expressive of it or adequate. To the Mind this Unmanifest can present itself as a Self, a supreme Nihil (Tao or Sunya), a featureless Absolute, an Indeterminate, a blissful Nirvana of manifested existence, a Non-Being out of which Being came or a Being of Silence out of which a world-illusion came. But all these are mental formulas expressing the mind's approach to it, not That itself; impressions which fall from That upon the receiving consciousness, not the true essence or nature (swarupa) of the Eternal and In®nite. Even the words Eternal and In®nite are only symbolic expressions through which the mind feels without grasping some vague impression of this Supreme.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 12, Page: 189-90


vacas ::: the word as a power of expression. [Ved.]

vak-sakti (Vak-Shakti) ::: [the power (sakti) of Speech; the Word].

vak ::: word or words, usually internal, but also (in "indicative vak") vak written words serving as sortilege; speech; subtle (sūks.ma) speech heard in sabdadr.s.t.i; inward speech expressing jñana, a speech "in which the higher knowledge, vision or thought can clothe itself within . us for expression", especially "the word revelatory, inspired or intuitive" that "manifests inwardly with a light, a power, a rhythm of thought and a rhythm of inner sound" by which "it pours into the language, even though the same as that of mental speech, another than the limited intellectual, emotional or sensational significance".

vama ::: [left, the left side (the word is cognate with vana) ].

victor ::: One who defeats an adversary; the winner in a fight, battle, contest, or struggle. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) victor’s.

victor ::: one who defeats an adversary; the winner in a fight, battle, contest, or struggle. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) victor"s.

visa ::: n. --> See Vis/. ::: v. t. --> To indorse, after examination, with the word vise, as a passport; to vise.

warrior ::: 1. A person engaged or experienced in warfare; soldier. 2. One who shows or has shown great vigour, courage, etc. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.) warriors.

"We must, however, consider deeply and clearly what we mean by the understanding and by its purification. We use the word as the nearest equivalent we can get in the English tongue to the Sanskrit philosophical term buddhi.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“We must, however, consider deeply and clearly what we mean by the understanding and by its purification. We use the word as the nearest equivalent we can get in the English tongue to the Sanskrit philosophical term buddhi.” The Synthesis of Yoga

we ::: pl. --> of I ::: obj. --> The plural nominative case of the pronoun of the first person; the word with which a person in speaking or writing denotes a number or company of which he is one, as the subject of an action expressed by a verb.

wisecraft ::: Jhumur: “– Instead of saying witchcraft he says wisecraft. It is an interesting thing because witch, the word comes from ‘wit’ and that I think originally is the same root as wisdom. It has associations of evil and so here he uses the idea of magic but it is something that is magic beyond our comprehension which it is why it is some kind of wisecraft. It is wisdom beyond our understanding which is what we call ‘magic’.”

wise ::: having the power of discerning and judging properly as to what is true or right; possessing discernment, judgement, or discretion. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.) Wise, all-wise, All-Wise, ever-wise, wiser, wisest.

wonderful ::: capable of eliciting wonder; filled with wonder; astonishing. Wonderful, the Wonderful, All-Wonderful, All-Wonderful"s. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a personification of the Deity.)

word ::: n. --> The spoken sign of a conception or an idea; an articulate or vocal sound, or a combination of articulate and vocal sounds, uttered by the human voice, and by custom expressing an idea or ideas; a single component part of human speech or language; a constituent part of a sentence; a term; a vocable.
Hence, the written or printed character, or combination of characters, expressing such a term; as, the words on a page.
Talk; discourse; speech; language.


Word ::: “The word is a sound expression of the idea. In the supra-physical plane when an idea has to be realised, one can by repeating the word-expression of it, produce vibrations which prepare the mind for the realisation of the idea. That is the principle of the Mantras and of Japa. One repeats the name of the Divine and the vibrations created in the consciousness prepare the realisation of the Divine. It is the same idea that is expressed in the Bible: ‘God said, Let there be Light, and there was Light’. It is creation by the Word.” The Future Poetry

word ::: The Word that ushers divine experience

yajus (Yajur) ::: the mantra of divine Power, the word of power for the right ordaining of action; the word which guides the sacrificial action in accordance with the rk. [Ved.]



QUOTES [224 / 224 - 1500 / 10974]


KEYS (10k)

   83 Sri Aurobindo
   10 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   7 Anonymous
   5 Athanasius
   5 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   4 Saint Athanasius
   4 Patrul Rinpoche
   4 Eriugena
   4 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   4 Sri Ramakrishna
   3 Aleister Crowley
   2 SWAMI BRAHMANANDA
   2 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   2 Ramakrishna
   2 Hans Urs von Balthasar GL I
   2 Eusebius of Caesarea
   2 Baha-ulalh
   2 Alfred Korzybski
   1 William S Burroughs
   1 William Desmond
   1 Wikipedia
   1 Werner Heisenberg
   1 Viktor E Frankl
   1 Venerable Bede
   1 T S Eliot
   1 Tolstoi
   1 Thomas Jefferson?
   1 Thomas A Kempis
   1 The Mother
   1 Tertullian of Carthage
   1 SWAMI VIRAJANANDA
   1 Swami Akhandananda
   1 Sutra in 40 articles
   1 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   1 Sri Aurobindo
   1 Seneca
   1 Saint Leo the Great
   1 Saint John of the Cross
   1 Saint John Bosco prophecies
   1 Saint Gregory the Great
   1 Saint Gregory of Nazianzen
   1 Saint Elizabeth of the Trinity
   1 Saint Basil the Great
   1 Saint Augstine
   1 Saint Ambrose
   1 Sadi; Sulistan
   1 Ryonen
   1 Rowan Williams
   1 Robert Anton Wilson
   1 Proverbs XXII. 17
   1 Pope Leo the Great
   1 Pope Benedict XVI
   1 Philo of Alexandria
   1 Owen Barfield
   1 Omraam Mikhael Aivanhov
   1 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   1 Moses Maimonides
   1 Maximus
   1 Martin Buber
   1 Louis C K
   1 Leo Tolstoy
   1 Justin Martyr
   1 John Scotus Eriugena
   1 Jiddu Krishnamurti
   1 Isaac Newton
   1 Irenaeus
   1 Imitation of Christ
   1 Iamblichus "Book on the Mysteries 1"
   1 Hermes
   1 Hazrat Inayat Khan
   1 Guru Nanak
   1 G Santayana
   1 Gregory of Nazianzen
   1 Georg C Lichtenberg
   1 Gary R. Renard
   1 Friedrich Schiller
   1 Epsitle to Diognetus
   1 Emerald Tablet
   1 Deuteronomy XXX. 12-14
   1 Def
   1 Daniel 12:9-10
   1 Cheryl Strayed
   1 Charles Webster Leadbeater
   1 Bede
   1 Augustus De Morgan
   1 Arabian Proverb
   1 Angelius Silesius I. 299
   1 Andrew of Crete
   1 Albert Einstein
   1 The Mother
   1 Kabir
   1 Jorge Luis Borges
   1 Heraclitus
   1 Dogen Zenji
   1 2nd century sermon

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   51 Anonymous
   16 Markus Zusak
   12 Sri Aurobindo
   11 William Shakespeare
   10 Martin Luther
   8 Paulo Coelho
   7 Stephen King
   7 Mitch Albom
   7 John Piper
   6 Toba Beta
   6 Lisa Kleypas
   6 Jeanette Winterson
   6 Charles Spurgeon
   6 Cassandra Clare
   5 Terry Pratchett
   5 Nicola Yoon
   5 Neil Gaiman
   5 David Levithan
   4 Tahereh Mafi
   4 Robert Kiyosaki

1:The word "He" diminishes Him. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
2:In truth there is no difference between the word of God and the world. ~ Baha-ulalh,
3:To be still is not to think.
Know, and not think, is the word. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
4:The word 'innocence' means a mind that is incapable of being hurt." ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
5:The word "He" diminishes Him. ~ Tolstoi, the Eternal Wisdom
6:One must erase the word discouragement from one's dictionary of love. ~ Saint Elizabeth of the Trinity,
7:But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, James, 1:22,
8:So faith comes from hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Romans, 10:17,
9:In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
   ~ Anonymous, The Bible, John, 1:1,
10:The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Isaiah, 40:8,
11:Yearning: It needs to hurt in order to be worthy of the word. Otherwise it is just wanting. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
12:in principio erat Verbum - in the beginning was the Word ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Logos),
13:Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says.
   ~ Anonymous, The Bible, James, 1:22 NIV, [T5],
14:Death is our road to immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
15:Each dawn opens into a larger Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
16:Our sympathies become our torturers. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
17:To know is best, however hard to bear. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
18:Each year a mile upon the heavenly Way, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
19:Man only plays when in the full meaning of the word he is a man, and he is only completely a man when he plays. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
20:Must fire always test the great of soul? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
21:The gods make use of our forgotten deeds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
22:In truth there is no difference between the word of God and the world. ~ Baha-ulalh, the Eternal Wisdom
23:Perhaps the blindness of our will is Fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
24:Out of the darkness we still grow to light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
25:I have a fundamental belief in the Bible as the Word of God, written by those who were inspired. I study the Bible daily.
   ~ Isaac Newton,
26:The Supermind using the Word is the creative Logos. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads, The Supreme Word,
27:The Word expresses that which is self-hidden in the Silence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Reality Omnipresent,
28:I am stronger than death and greater than my fate
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
29:Take delight in questioning; hearken in silence to the word of the saints. ~ Imitation of Christ, the Eternal Wisdom
30:It is the seeing mind that is the master of poetic utterance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Word and the Spirit,
31:Joy that throbs behind
The marvel and the mystery of pain. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
32:Any proposition containing the word "is" creates a linguistic structural confusion which will eventually give birth to serious fallacies. ~ Alfred Korzybski,
33:It is wise to listen, not to me but to the Word, and to confess that all things are one. ~ Heraclitus, On the Universe,1 fragment 1,
34:The poet is a magician who hardly knows the secret of his own spell. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Word and the Spirit,
35:For each his difficult goal
Hewn out of infinite possibility. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
36:Since the beginning of the world, the Word of God has dwelt in all the saints by grace ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 4.34).,
37:The corruption of death no longer holds any power over mankind, thanks to the Word, who has come to dwell among them through his one body. ~ Saint Athanasius,
38:Experience is the word. Knowledge implies subject and object. But experience is non-terminal, eternal. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
39:The Word that ushers divine experience ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
40:If one ponders over the word "I", trying to track it down, one sees that it is only a word which demotes egotism. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
41:'AHAM' is the first name of God. The word ['Aham'] means that which exists, Self-shining and Self-evident. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
42:All world is expression or manifestation, creation by the Word. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda, Brihaspati, Power of the Soul,
43:A person participating in the Word of God becomes god by participation ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on John 10, lect. 35).,
44:God is above all things as Father, for he is principle and source; he is through all things through the Word; and he is in all things in the Holy Spirit. ~ Athanasius,
45:In death the Word made a spotless sacrifice and oblation of the body he had taken. By dying for others, he immediately banished death for all mankind. ~ Saint Athanasius,
46:In him soul and Nature, equal Presences,
Balance and fuse in a wide harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
47:Because of the Word dwelling in that body, it would remain incorruptible, and all would be freed for ever from corruption by the grace of the resurrection. ~ Saint Athanasius,
48:Too heavy falls a Shadow on man's heart;
It dares not be too happy upon earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
49:And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, John, 1:14,
50:A single word lets loose vast agencies;
A casual act determines the world's fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
51:Love dies before the lover in our breast:
Our joys are perfumes in a brittle vase. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
52:Too often here the careless Mother leaves
Her chosen in the envious hands of Fate: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
53:A mighty shuddering coil of ecstasy
   Crept through the deep heart of the universe.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
54:Our Lord's works produce faith in the things that he says: "He confirmed the word through accompanying signs" ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Mk 16:20).,
55:Sign-symbol
It is out of this Silence that the Word which creates the worlds for ever proceeds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Reality Omnipresent,
56:The poetic word is a vehicle of the spirit, the chosen medium of the soul's self-expression. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Word and the Spirit,
57:This cosmic Nature's balance is not ours
Nor the mystic measure of her need and use. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
58:Whether it seem good or evil to men's eyes,
   Only for good the secret Will can work.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
59:Impose not on the mortal's tremulous breast
The dire ordeal that foreknowledge brings; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
60:Here dreadfully entangled love and hate
Meet us blind wanderers mid the perils of Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
61:The world discerned only by the intellect is nothing else than the Word (Logos) of God when He was already engaged in the act of creation. ~ Philo of Alexandria, On the Creation VI.24,
62:For nothing have we learned, but still repeat
Our stark misuse of self and others' souls. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
63:Our mind perhaps deceives us with its words
And gives the name of doom to our own choice; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
64:What help is in prevision to the driven?
Safe doors cry opening near, the doomed pass on. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
65:You have got to cultivate all the three - hands, head and heart. The word 'hands' stands for physical labour; the 'head' for intellect and by 'heart' is meant love. ~ Swami Akhandananda,
66:There is no death, the word mortal has no significance ; death would be destruction and nothing is destroyed in the universe. ~ Hermes, the Eternal Wisdom
67:We call Gabriel an Archangel, because he announced the Incarnation of the Word to the Virgin, for the belief of all ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 3.80).,
68:The intoxication of hemp is not had by repeating the word "hemp". What is the use of loudly crying, "Oh God"? Practice devotion to see God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
69:Those who hear the word of the cross and follow it willingly now, need not fear that they will hear of eternal damnation on the day of judgment. ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
70:As the Magick Wand is the Will, the Wisdom, the Word of the Magician, so is the Magick Cup his Understanding.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, Book 4, Magick,
71:I don't like religion much, and I am glad that in the Bible the word is not to be found." ~ Martin Buber, (1878 - 1965) Austrian philosopher best known for his philosophy of dialogue, Wikipedia.,
72:Nor sought the strength extreme adversity brings
To lives that stand erect and front the World-Power ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
73:Word-Armor
Forward steps are made by giving up old armor because words are built into you - in the soft typewriter of the womb you do not realize the word-armor you carry. ~ William S Burroughs,
74:The word is the Guru, The Guru is the Word, For all nectar is enshrined in the world Blessed is the word which reveal the Lord's name But more is the one who knows by the Guru's grace. ~ Guru Nanak,
75:Those who shall part who have grown one being within?
Death's grip can break our bodies, not our souls; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
76:The word was used as a hieratic means
For the release of the imprisoned spirit
Into communion with its comrade gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 4:2,
77:Gods who know not grief
And look impassive on a suffering world,
Calm they gaze down on the little human scene ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
78:In Mary, Zion passes over into the church; in her, the word passes over and flesh; in her, the head passes over into the body. She is the place of super abundant fruitfulness. ~ Hans Urs von Balthasar GL I, 338,
79:It waited for the fiat of the Word
That comes through the still self from the Supreme. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
80:Our days are links of a disastrous chain,
Necessity avenges casual steps;
Old cruelties come back unrecognised, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
81:In Mary, Zion passes over into the church; in her, the word passes over into flesh; in her, the head passes over into the body. She is the place of super abundant fruitfulness. ~ Hans Urs von Balthasar GL I, 338,
82:The breath of divine Power blows where it lists and fills today one and tomorrow another with the word or the puissance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Master of the Work,
83:John is the voice, but the Lord is the Word who was in the beginning. John is the voice that lasts for a time; from the beginning Christ is the Word who lives for ever. ~ Saint Augstine, Sermo 293.3 (PL 1328-1329),
84:Only on the heart's veiled door the word of flame
Is written, the secret and tremendous Name. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Universal Incarnation,
85:The silence of the Ineffable is a truth of divine being, but the Word which proceeds from that silence is also a truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Perfection of Equality,
86:Then is our life a tranquil pilgrimage,
Each year a mile upon the heavenly Way,
Each dawn opens into a larger Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
87:For man, below the god, above the brute,
Is given the calm reason as his guide;
He is not driven by an unthinking will ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
88:Thy acts are thy helpers, all events are signs,
Waking and sleep are opportunities
Given to thee by an immortal Power. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
89:We have been taught that the food consecrated by the Word of prayer which comes from him, from which our flesh and blood are nourished by transformation, is the flesh and blood of that incarnate Jesus. ~ Justin Martyr,
90:The lotus-heart of love
With all its thousand luminous buds of truth,
Which quivering sleeps veiled by apparent things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
91:A future knowledge is an added pain,
A torturing burden and a fruitless light
On the enormous scene that Fate has built. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
92:The word echoes more profoundly in thyself than from the mouth of others. If thou canst listen for it in silence, thou shalt hear it at once. ~ Angelius Silesius I. 299, the Eternal Wisdom
93:None is for any on this transient globe.
He whom thou lovest now, a stranger came
And into a far strangeness shall depart: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
94:Through Nature's contraries we draw near God;
Out of the darkness we still grow to light.
Death is our road to immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
95:The word ἐκένωσεν (ekénōsen) is used in Philippians 2:7, [Jesus] made himself nothing ...[Phil. 2:7] (NIV) or ...[he] emptied himself...[Phil. 2:7] (NRSV), using the verb form κενόω (kenóō) to empty. ~ Def,
96:In fact, if you look at the last four syllables of the word individuality, you will see that they spell duality. That's not just a semantic accident." ~ Gary R. Renard, from his book "The Disappearance of the Universe," 2004.,
97:Through creation itself the Word reveals God the Creator. Through the world he reveals the Lord who made the world. Through all that is fashioned he reveals the craftsman who fashioned it all. ~ Irenaeus, Against Heresies IV.6,
98:We must be on our guard against giving interpretations which are hazardous or opposed to science, and so exposing the word of God to the ridicule of unbelievers. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
99:Our own minds are the justicers of doom.
For nothing have we learned, but still repeat
Our stark misuse of self and others' souls. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
100:The word, the form, the charm, the glory and grace
Are missioned sparks from a stupendous Fire; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
101:'Is,' 'is,' 'is'-the idiocy of the word haunts me. If it were abolished, human thought might begin to make sense. I don't know what anything 'is'; I only know how it seems to me at this moment.
   ~ Robert Anton Wilson, Nature's God,
102:There is every reason why the standards in our civilization are so low, because we have "poisoned," in a literal sense of the word, our minds with the physico-chemical effects of wrong ideas. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
103:Then from the heights a greater Voice came down,
The Word that touches the heart and finds the soul, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
104:Time's works
The giant's and the Titan's furious march
Climbs to usurp the kingdom of the gods
Or skirts the demon magnitudes of Hell; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
105:Too hard the gods are with man's fragile race;
In their large heavens they dwell exempt from Fate
And they forget the wounded feet of man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
106:In rational creatures, in which we find a procession of the WORD in the intellect, and a procession of LOVE in the will, there exists an image of the uncreated Trinity ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1.93.6).,
107:The words supermind and supramental were first used by me, but since then people have taken up and are using the word supramental for anything above mind.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Himself And The Ashram, 142,
108:God was manifested to man by birth. On the one hand Being, and eternally Being, of the Eternal Being, above cause and word, for there was no word before The Word; and on the other hand for our sakes also Becoming. ~ Saint Gregory of Nazianzen,
109:Mary lived on the Word of God, she was imbued with the Word of God. And the fact that she was immersed in the Word of God and was totally familiar with the Word also endowed her later with the inner enlightenment of wisdom. ~ Pope Benedict XVI,
110:The cause moving to the Incarnation of the Word could be none other than the unmeasured love of God for man whose nature He wished to couple with Himself in unity of person ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 4.46).,
111:It is astonishing how much the word infinitely is misused: everything is infinitely more beautiful, infinitely better, etc. The concept must have something pleasing about it, or its misuse could not have become so general. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
112:World-force outlasts world-disillusion's shock:
Dumb, she is still the Word, inert the Power. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 02.06,
113:He has not assumed a body as proper to His own nature, far from it, for as the Word He is without body. He has been manifested in a human body for this reason only, out of the love and goodness of His Father, for the salvation of us men. ~ Athanasius,
114:Now, Macarius, true lover of Christ, we must take a step further in the faith of our holy religion, and consider the Word's becoming Man and His divine Appearing in our midst. That mystery the Jews traduce, the Greeks deride, but we adore. ~ Athanasius,
115:Hearken to the word of the sage with the ear of the soul, even when his conduct has no similitude to his teachings. Men should listen to good counsel even though it be written on a wall. ~ Sadi; Sulistan, the Eternal Wisdom
116:Our souls, upon the wheel of God
For ever turning, they arrive and go,
Married and sundered in the magic round
Of the great Dancer of the boundless dance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
117:My mind is sundered and torn to pieces by the many and serious things I have to think about. When I try to concentrate and gather all my intellectual resources for preaching, how can I do justice to the sacred ministry of the word? ~ Saint Gregory the Great,
118:If one concentrates on a thought or a word, one has to dwell on the essential idea contained in the word with the aspiration to feel the thing which it expresses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Concentration and Meditation,
119:But in the end he must take his station, or better still, if he can, always and from the beginning he must live in his own soul beyond the limitations of the word that he uses.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Four Aids,
120:Learn the divine words [of Scripture] and understand them in your spirit: there you will recognize the Word . Perceive with the bodily sense the forms and beauties of sensible things: in them you will understand the Word of God. ~ Eriugena, Homilia in Johannem,
121:The Wise men fulfil their desire, and come to the child, the Lord Jesus Christ, the same star going before them. They adore the Word in flesh, the Wisdom in infancy, the Power in weakness, the Lord of majesty in the reality of man. ~ Pope Leo the Great, Sermon 31,
122:The Word who became all things for us is close to us, our Lord Jesus Christ who promises to remain with us always. He cries out, saying: "See, I am with you all the days of this age." He is himself the shepherd, the high priest, the way and the door. ~ Athanasius,
123:This is the Zion, the Jerusalem, that received God's salvation. It stands aloft on the mountain of God, that is, it is raised high on the only-begotten Word of God. It is commanded to climb the high mountain and announce the word of salvation. ~ Eusebius of Caesarea,
124:A light not born of sun or moon nor fire,
A light that dwelt within and saw within
Shedding an intimate visibility,
Made secrecy more revealing than the word: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Finding of the Soul,
125:Only when thou hast climbed above thy mind
And liv'st in the calm vastness of the One
Can love be eternal in the eternal Bliss
And love divine replace the human tie. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
126:The Word of the Father, which is a certain concept of His intellect, is the splendor and wisdom by which He knows Himself. That is why the Apostle calls the Son, the splendor of glory ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Hebrews 1).,
127:Because there is Mind behind the universe, it did not originate itself; because God is infinite, not finite, it was not made from pre-existent matter, but out of nothing and out of non-existence absolute and utter God brought it into being through the Word. ~ Athanasius,
128:Christ, the light of all lights, follows John, the lamp that goes before him. The Word of God follows the voice in the wilderness; the bridegroom follows the bridegroom's friend, who prepares a worthy people for the Lord by cleansing them by water. ~ Gregory of Nazianzen,
129:As the Father speaks Himself and every creature by His begotten Word, inasmuch as the Word "begotten" adequately represents the Father and every creature; so He loves Himself and every creature by the Holy Spirt.... ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae I q 37 a 2 ad 3,
130:The middle path is made for thinking man.
To choose his steps by reason's vigilant light,
To choose his path among the many paths
Is given him, for each his difficult goal ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
131:Although thinking is my act, it is not 'mine' in the sense that understanding uses the word mine. This follows from the very nature of reason, which determines the nature of thought as such. My concept, although it is my act, is thus not my private property. ~ Owen Barfield,
132:For the Word, who created the universe and established the law, is concealed in His manifestation, being invisible according to nature; and He is manifested through concealment, assuring those who are wise that by nature He cannot be apprehended. ~ Maximus, Amb. 10.18.1129C,
133:God is prior to the world by priority of duration. But the word "prior" signifies priority not of time, but of eternity. Or we may say that it signifies the eternity of imaginary time, and not of time really existing. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae I q 46 a 1 ad 2,
134:He sang the Inconscient and its secret self,
Its power omnipotent knowing not what it does,
All-shaping without will or thought or sense,
Its blind unerring occult mystery. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
135:Scripture tells you: You shall speak of these commandments when you sit in your house, and when you walk along the way, and when you lie down, and when you get up. Let us then speak of the Lord Jesus, for he is wisdom, he is the word, the Word indeed of God. ~ Saint Ambrose,
136:The Word of God cries out in the most remote solitude of the divine goodness. His cry is the creation of all natures... because through him God the Father has called, that is, created everything that he wanted to come to be. ~ Eriugena, Commentary on the Gospel of John 1.27,
137:An ancient tale of woe can move us still,
We keep the ache of breasts that breathe no more,
We are shaken by the sight of human pain,
And share the miseries that others feel. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
138:The object of our worship is the one God, who by the word of his command, by the reason of his plan, and by the strength of his power has brought forth from nothing this whole construction of elements, bodies, and spirits for the glory of his majesty. ~ Tertullian of Carthage,
139:As long as I talked unceasingly about the Lord,The Lord stayed away, kept at a distance.But when I silenced my mouth, sat very stillAnd fixed my mind at the doorway of the Lord,I was linked to the music of the Word,And all my talking came to an end. ~ Kabir,
140:If the Father ceased to speak his Word, the effect of the Word, that is, the created universe, would not subsist. For the speaking of the Father, that is, the eternal and unchangeable generation of his Word, is the subsistence and permanence of the created universe. ~ Eriugena,
141:The great Gods use the pain of human hearts
As a sharp axe to hew their cosmic road:
They squander lavishly men's blood and tears
For a moment's purpose in their fateful work. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
142:Every spirit that is either rational or intellectual is by itself formless, but if it turns towards it Cause, that is, to the Word, by Whom all things are made, then it takes on form. Therefore the one Form of all rational and intellectual spirits is the Word of God. ~ Eriugena,
143:And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, so that in this way the Wisdom of God, who consoles us as a mother, may refresh us from that very same bread [of the angels] and lead us through the sacraments of the incarnation to the knowledge and vision of divine splendor. ~ Bede,
144:As the word we speak is an image of the Word who is God's Son, so also is the wisdom implanted in us an image of the Wisdom who is God's Son. It gives us the ability to know and understand and so makes us capable of receiving him who is the all-creative Wisdom. ~ Saint Athanasius,
145:Creation is an original speaking letting be.... The word, speaking, lets being be. A word is not a roar. The roar would be more like the diktat of the depostic divinity... The word is the creative expression of being as agapeic and as communicative transcending. ~ William Desmond,
146:The harp of God falls mute, its call to bliss
Discouraged fails mid earth's unhappy sounds;
The strings of the siren Ecstasy cry not here
Or soon are silenced in the human heart. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
147:The present festival, the birth of the Mother of God, is a prelude, while the final act is the foreordained union of the Word with flesh. Today the Virgin is born, tended and formed and prepared for her role as Mother of God, who is the universal King of the ages ~ Andrew of Crete,
148:now I listen to a greater Word
Born from the mute unseen omniscient Ray:
The Voice that only Silence' ear has heard
Leaps missioned from an eternal glory of Day. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Word of the Silence,
149:The knowledge of the saints is more excellent than the knowledge of the wayfarer, and yet faith is more properly said of the wayfarer's knowledge, because the word "faith" denotes an imperfection of knowledge ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.174.2ad3).,
150:A bare impersonal hush is now my mind,
A world of sight clear and inimitable,
A volume of silence by a Godhead signed,
A greatness pure of thought, virgin of will. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Word of the Silence,
151:And as he sang the demons wept with joy
Foreseeing the end of their long dreadful task
And the defeat for which they hoped in vain,
And glad release from their self-chosen doom
And return into the One. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
152:It hears the Word to which our hearts were deaf,
   It sees through the blaze in which our thoughts grow blind;
   It drinks from the naked breasts of glorious Truth,
   It learns the secrets of eternity.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
153:The many-toned melody
Tirelessly throbbing through the rapturous air
Caught in the song that sways the Apsara's limbs
When she floats gleaming like a cloud of light,
A wave of joy on heaven's moonstone floor. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
154:She knew herself the Beloved of the Supreme:
These Gods and Goddesses were he and she:
The Mother was she of Beauty and Delight,
The Word in Brahma's vast creating clasp,
The World-Puissance on almighty Shiva's lap, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Finding of the Soul,
155:The Master of Wisdom in his first coming to birth in the supreme ether of the great Light, - many his births, seven his mouths of the Word, seven his Rays, - scatters the darknesses with his cry. Rig Veda.3 ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Out of the Sevenfold Ignorance towards the Sevenfold Knowledge,
156:A book is a physical object in a world of physical objects. It is a set of dead symbols. And then the right reader comes along, and the words-or rather the poetry behind the words, for the words themselves are mere symbols-spring to life, and we have a resurrection of the word.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
157:The existing scientific concepts cover always only a very limited part of reality, and the other part that has not yet been understood is infinite. Whenever we proceed from the known into the unknown we may hope to understand, but we may have to learn at the same time a new meaning of the word 'understanding'.
   ~ Werner Heisenberg,
158:I read [in certain Platonic books] that God the Word was born not of flesh nor of blood, nor of the will of man nor of the will of the flesh, but of God (Jn 1.13). But that the Word was made flesh and lived among us (Jn 1.14) I did not read there. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, Confessions 13.9.14,
159:... we must not only cut asunder the snare of the mind and the senses, but flee also beyond the snare of the thinker, the snare of the theologian and the church-builder, the meshes of the Word and the bondage of the Idea. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Himself and the Ashram, Passages from The Synthesis of Yoga,
160:I looked into my own heart and I saw reflected there in its entirety the vast world with all its passions,-pride, hope, fear and the conflagration of the desires. So gazing I understood the word of the ancient sage, "Man is a mirror in which there appears the image of the world." ~ Ryonen, the Eternal Wisdom
161:Then if the tempest be loud and the thunderbolt leaping incessant
Shatters the roof, if the lintels flame at last and each cornice
Shrieks with the pain of the blast, if the very pillars totter,
Keep yet your faith in Zeus, hold fast to the word of ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
162:The word, the form, the charm, the glory and grace
   Are missioned sparks from a stupendous Fire;
   A sample from the laboratory of God
   Of which he holds the patent upon earth,
   Comes to him wrapped in golden coverings
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
163:This witness hush is the Thinker's secret base:
Hidden in silent depths the word is formed,
From hidden silences the act is born
Into the voiceful mind, the labouring world;
In secrecy wraps the seed the Eternal sows
Silence, the mystic birthpla ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, In the Self of Mind,
164:These Gods and Goddesses were he and she:
The Mother was she of Beauty and Delight,
The Word in Brahma's vast creating clasp,
The World-Puissance on almighty Shiva's lap,—
The Master and the Mother of all lives
Watching the worlds their twin reg ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Finding of the Soul,
165:I was a terrible believer in things,but I was also a terrible nonbeliever in things. I was as searching as I was skeptical. I didn't know where to put my faith,or if there was such a place,or even what the word faith meant, in all of it's complexity. Everything seemed to be possibly potent and possibly fake. ~ Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail,
166: 11. O Divine Fire, thou art Aditi, the indivisible Mother to the giver of the sacrifice; thou art Bharati, voice of the offering, and thou growest by the word. Thou art Ila of the hundred winters wise to discern; O Master of the Treasure, thou art Saraswati who slays the python adversary. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, 1.03 - Hymns_of_Gritsamada,
167:...
6-But the one who receives instruction in the word must share in all good things with his instructor.
7-Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked. Whatever a man sows, he will reap in return. 8The one who sows to please his flesh, from the flesh will reap destruction; but the one who sows to please the Spirit, from the Spirit will reap eternal life.... ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Galatians, 6:7, BSB,
168:The law is not in heaven, that thou shouldst say, "Who shall go up for us to heaven and bring it into us that we may hear it and do it?" Neither is it beyond the sea, that thou shouldst say "Who shall go over the sea and bring it into us that we may hear it and do it?" But the word is very nigh unto thee, in thy mouth and in thy heart, that thou mayst do it. ~ Deuteronomy XXX. 12-14, the Eternal Wisdom
169:Apotheosis (from Greek ἀποθέωσις from ἀποθεοῦν, apotheoun to deify; in Latin deificatio making divine; also called divinization and deification) is the glorification of a subject to divine level. The term has meanings in theology, where it refers to a belief, and in art, where it refers to a genre. this seems particularily important relative to define, which seems to be attempt at the highest potential of the word.
   ~ Wikipedia,
170:The 'little word is has its tragedies; it marries and identifies different things with the greatest innocence; and yet no two are ever identical, and if therein lies the charm of wedding them and calling them one, therein too lies the danger. Whenever I use the word is, except in sheer tautology, I deeply misuse it; and when I discover my error, the world seems to fall asunder and the members of my family no longer know one another. (461) ~ G Santayana,
171:As humans, we waste the shit out of our words. It's sad. We use words like "awesome" and "wonderful" like they're candy. It was awesome? Really? It inspired awe? It was wonderful? Are you serious? It was full of wonder? You use the word "amazing" to describe a goddamn sandwich at Wendy's. What's going to happen on your wedding day, or when your first child is born? How will you describe it? You already wasted "amazing" on a fucking sandwich. ~ Louis C K,
172:That man who is without darkness, exempt from evil, absolutely pure, although-of all things which are in the world of the ten regions since unbeginning time till today, he knows none, has seen none, has heard of none, has not in a word any knowledge of them however small, yet has he the high knowledge of omniscience. It is in speaking of him that one can use the word enlightenment. ~ Sutra in 40 articles, the Eternal Wisdom
173:Heaven's Gates
Heaven mocks us with the brilliance of its gifts,
For Death is a cupbearer of the wine
Of too brief joy held up to mortal lips
For a passionate moment by the careless gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate
Heaven's Gifts
A highest flight climbs to a deepest view: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
174:   Its like the word purity - one could lecture endlessly on the difference between divine purity and what people call purity. Divine purity (at the lowest level) is to admit but one influence the divine Influence (but this is at the lowest level, and already terribly distorted). Divine purity means that only the Divine exists - nothing else. It is perfectly pure only the Divine exists, nothing other than He.   And so on. ~ The Mother, Agenda Vol 02, 1961-07-07,
175:I,40: Who calls us Thelemites will do no wrong, if he look but close into the word. For there are therein Three Grades, the Hermit, and the Lover, and the man of Earth. Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

I,41: The word of Sin is Restriction. O man! refuse not thy wife, if she will! O lover, if thou wilt, depart! There is no bond that can unite the divided but love: all else is a curse. Accursed! Accursed be it to the aeons! ~ Aleister Crowley, The Book of the Law,
176:If the lost word is lost, if the spent word is spent
If the unheard, unspoken
Word is unspoken, unheard;
Still is the spoken word, the Word unheard,
The Word without a word, the Word within
The world and for the world;
And the light shone in the darkness and
Against the Word the unstilled world still whirled
About the center of the silent Word.

Oh my people, what have I done unto thee.

Where shall the word be found, where shall the word
Resound? Not here, there is not enough silence ~ T S Eliot,
177:There are some true and ardent aspirants who travel from place to place in search of this pass-word from a divine and perfect instructor which will open for them the doors of the eternal beatitude, and if in their earnest search one of them is so favoured as to meet such a master and receive from him the word so ardently desired which is capable of breaking all chains, he withdraws immediately from society to enter into the profound retreat of his own heart and dwells there till he has succeeded in conquering eternal peace. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
178:The word is derived from the Latin occultus, hidden; so that it is the study of the hidden laws of nature. Since all the great laws of nature are in fact working in the invisible world far more than in the visible, occultism involves the acceptance of a much wider view of nature than that which is ordinarily taken. The occultist, then, is a man who studies all the laws of nature that he can reach or of which he can hear, and as a result of his study he identifies himself with these laws and devotes his life to the service of evolution. ~ Charles Webster Leadbeater, ,
179:There are some true and ardent aspirants who travel from place to place in search of this pass-word from a divine and perfect instructor which will open for them the doors of the eternal beatitude, and if in their earnest search one of them is so favoured as to meet such a master and receive from him the word so ardently desired which is capable of breaking all chains, he withdraws immediately from society to enter into the profound retreat of his own heart and dwells there till he has succeeded in conquering eternal peace. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
180:Savitri", the poem, the word of Sri Aurobindo is the cosmic Answer to the cosmic Question. And Savitri, the person, the Godhead, the Divine Woman is the Divine's response to the human aspiration.
The world is a great question mark. It is a riddle, eternal and ever-recurring. Man has faced the riddle and sought to arrive at a solution since he was given a mind to seek and interrogate.
What is this universe? From where has it come? Whither is it going? What is the purpose of it all? Why is man here? What is the object of his existence? ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, Savitri,
181:Shake off thy bondage, O children,
and walk in the Light of the glorious day.
Never turn thy thoughts to the darkness
and surely ye shall be One with The Light.

Man is only what he believeth,
a brother of darkness or a Child of The Light.
Come though into the Light my Children.
Walk in the pathway that leads to the Sun.

Hark ye now, and list to the Wisdom.
Use thou the word I have given unto thee.
Use it and surely though shalt find
power and wisdom and Light to walk in the way.
Seek thee and find the key I have given
and Ever shalt Thou be a Child of The Light. ~ Emerald Tablet,
182:The word is a sound expressive of the idea. In the supra-physical plane when an idea has to be realised, one can by repeating the word-expression of it, produce vibrations which prepare the mind for the realisation of the idea. That is the principle of the Mantra and of japa. One repeats the name of the Divine and the vibrations created in the consciousness prepare the realisation of the Divine. It is the same idea that is expressed in The Bible, God said, Let there be Light, and there was Light. It is creation by the Word.  6 May 1933 ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art, 1.1.1.02 - Creation by the Word / 2.3.02 - Mantra and Japa,
183:Arjuna and Krishna, this human and this divine, stand together not as seers in the peaceful hermitage of meditation, but as fighter and holder of the reins in the midst of the hurtling shafts, in the chariot of battle. The Teacher of the Gita is therefore not only the God in man who unveils himself in the word of knowledge, but the God in man who moves our whole world of action, by and for whom all our humanity exists and struggles and labours, towards whom all human life travels and progresses. He is the secret Master of works and sacrifice and the Friend of the human peoples.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita,
184:It is intended by the word Presence to indicate the sense and perception of the Divine as a Being, felt as present in one"s existence and consciousness or in relation with it, without the necessity of any further qualification or description. Thus, of the ‘ineffable Presence" it can only be said that it is there and nothing more can or need be said about it, although at the same time one knows that all is there, personality and impersonality, Power and Light and Ananda and everything else, and that all these flow from that indescribable Presence. The word may be used sometimes in a less absolute sense, but that is always the fundamental significance, — the essential perception of the essential Presence supporting everything else. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga
185:It depends on what is meant by the higher buddhi - whether you use the word to mean the higher part of the intellect or the higher Mind. The higher Mind in itself on its own level knows, but when it is involved in the ordinary human intelligence and works under limitations, it often does not know - or it has the idea merely that it must be so but has not the consciousness of its separate existence. The intellect can rise above its ordinary movements and feel itself as a separate power no longer working under the limitations of the vital and physical mind and the senses. It then begins to reflect something of the action of the higher mind but without the full freedom and greater light and truth of the higher mind.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I,
186:It is not one's self, but the band of the spirit's inner enemies that we have to discourage, expel, slay upon the altar of the growth of the spirit; these can be ruthlessly excised, whose names are desire, wrath, inequality, greed, attachment to outward pleasures and pains, the cohort of usurping demons that are the cause of the soul's errors and sufferings. These should be regarded not as part of oneself but as intruders and perverters of our self's real and diviner nature; these have to be sacrificed in the harsher sense of the word, whatever pain in going they may throw by reflection on the consciousness of the seeker.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Works, The Sacrifice, the Triune Path and the Lord of the Sacrifice [108-109],
187:The Fire is to be quieted and silenced says the Upanishad. Then we come nearer, to the immediate vicinity of the Truth; an inner hearing opens, the direct voice of Truth - the Word - reaches us to lead and guide. Even so, however, we have not come to the end of our journey; the Word of revelation is not the ultimate Light. The Word too is a clothing, though a luminous clothing - hiranmayam pair am. When this last veil dissolves and disappears, when utter silence, absolute calm and quietude reign in the entire consciousness, when no other lights trouble or distract our attention, there appears the Atman in its own body ; we stand face to face with the source of all lights, the self of the Light, the light of the Self. We are that Light and we become that Light.
   ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, The Approach To Mysticism,
188:Q: I always had the impression that Lucifer and Satan was one and the same, you know, that Lucifer fell and became Satan. Would you clarify that for me?
A: There is a difference between Lucifer and Satan. The word satan comes from the word Shatan in Hebrew which means 'adversary'. Lucifer is Latin for "the bearer of light," and is the cosmic force that carries the fire. That fire is Kundalini, but when that fire becomes trapped in the ego, that fire is polarized negatively and becomes Satan, the adversary or the opposite of God. As long as that fire is trapped in desire, in ego, it is Satan, it is the devil. It is not outside of us. It is our mind. But when that force is liberated, it is the bearer of light. It is the greatest angel in the hierarchy of our own Consciousness. So it is our best friend.~ Samael Aun Weor,
189:To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them, to use logic against logic, to repudiate morality while laying claim to it, to believe that democracy was impossible and that the Party was the guardian of democracy, to forget whatever it was necessary to forget, then to draw it back into memory again at the moment when it was needed, and then promptly to forget it again: and above all, to apply the same process to the process itself -- that was the ultimate subtlety: consciously to induce unconsciousness, and then, once again, to become unconscious of the act of hypnosis you had just performed. Even to understand the word 'doublethink' involved the use of doublethink. ~ George Orwell, 1984,
190:   There are also female energies; for the Deva is both Male and Female and the gods also are either activising souls or passively executive and methodising energies. Aditi, infinite Mother of the Gods, comes first; and there are besides five powers of the Truthconsciousness, - Mahi or Bharati, the vast Word that brings us all things out of the divine source; Ila, the strong primal word of the Truth who gives us its active vision; Saraswati, its streaming current and the word of its inspiration; Sarama, the Intuition, hound of heaven who descends into the cavern of the subconscient and finds there the concealed illuminations; Dakshina, whose function is to discern rightly, dispose the action and the offering and distri bute in the sacrifice to each godhead its portion. Each god, too, has his female energy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, 1.02 - The Doctrine of the Mystics,
191:He found the vast Thought with seven heads that is born of the Truth; he created some fourth world and became universal. . . .
The Sons of Heaven, the Heroes of the Omnipotent, thinking the straight thought, giving voice to the Truth, founded the plane of illumination and conceived the first abode of the Sacrifice. . . . The Master of Wisdom cast down the stone defences and called to the Herds of Light, . . . the herds that stand in the secrecy on the bridge over the Falsehood between two worlds below and one above; desiring Light in the darkness, he brought upward the Ray-Herds and uncovered from the veil the three worlds; he shattered the city that lies hidden in ambush, and cut the three out of the Ocean, and discovered the Dawn and the Sun and the Light and the Word of Light. Rig Veda.2 ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Out of the Sevenfold Ignorance towards the Sevenfold Knowledge,
192:In medieval times, the learned man, the teacher was a servant of God wholly, and of God only. His freedom was sanctioned by an authority more than human...The academy was regarded almost as a part of the natural and unalterable order of things. ... They were Guardians of the Word, fulfilling a sacred function and so secure in their right. Far from repressing free discussion, this "framework of certain key assumptions of Christian doctrine" encouraged disputation of a heat and intensity almost unknown in universities nowadays. ...They were free from external interference and free from a stifling internal conformity because the whole purpose of the universities was the search after an enduring truth, besides which worldly aggrandizement was as nothing. They were free because they agreed on this one thing if, on nothing else, fear of God is the beginning of wisdom. ~ Russell Kirk, Academic Freedom: An Essay in Definition,
193:Ordinarily, the Word from without, representative of the Divine, is needed as an aid in the work of self-unfolding; andit may be either a word from the past or the more powerful word of the living Guru. In some cases this representative wordis only taken as a sort of excuse for the inner power to awakenand manifest; it is, as it were, a concession of the omnipotent andomniscient Divine to the generality of a law that governs Nature The usual agency of this revealing is the Word, the thing heard (sruta ´ ). The Word may come to us from within; it may come to us from without. But in either case, it is only an agency for setting the hidden knowledge to work. The word within maybe the utterance of the inmost soul in us which is always opento the Divine; or it may be the word of the secret and universal Teacher who is seated in the hearts of all.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Four Aids,
194:This third and unknown, this tertium quid, he names God; and by the word he means somewhat or someone who is the Supreme, the Divine, the Cause, the All, one of these things or all of them at once, the perfection or the totality of all that here is partial or imperfect, the absolute of all these myriad relativities, the Unknown by learning of whom the real secret of the known can become to him more and more intelligible. Man has tried to deny all these categories, - he has tried to deny his own real existence, he has tried to deny the real existence of the cosmos, he has tried to deny the real existence of God. But behind all these denials we see the same constant necessity of his attempt at knowledge; for he feels the need of arriving at a unity of these three terms, even if it can only be done by suppressing two of them or merging them in the other that is left.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine,
195:The true soul secret in us, - subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, - this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine
196:Spirit comes from the Latin word to breathe. What we breathe is air, which is certainly matter, however thin. Despite usage to the contrary, there is no necessary implication in the word spiritual that we are talking of anything other than matter (including the matter of which the brain is made), or anything outside the realm of science. On occasion, I will feel free to use the word. Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality. When we recognize our place in an immensity of light years and in the passage of ages, when we grasp the intricacy, beauty and subtlety of life, then that soaring feeling, that sense of elation and humility combined, is surely spiritual. So are our emotions in the presence of great art or music or literature, or of acts of exemplary selfless courage such as those of Mohandas Gandhi or Martin Luther King Jr. The notion that science and spirituality are somehow mutually exclusive does a disservice to both. ~ Carl Sagan,
197:The Vedic poets regarded their poetry as mantras, they were the vehicles of their own realisations and could become vehicles of realisation for others. Naturally, these mostly would be illuminations, not the settled and permanent realisation that is the goal of Yoga - but they could be steps on the way or at least lights on the way. Many have such illuminations, even initial realisations while meditating on verses of the Upanishads or the Gita. Anything that carries the Word, the Light in it, spoken or written, can light this fire within, open a sky, as it were, bring the effective vision of which the Word is the body. In all ages spiritual seekers have expressed their aspirations or their experiences in poetry or inspired language and it has helped themselves and others. Therefore there is nothing absurd in my assigning to such poetry a spiritual or psychic value and effectiveness to poetry of a psychic or spiritual character.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
198:But what then of that silent Self, inactive, pure, self-existent, self-enjoying, which presented itself to us as the abiding justification of the ascetic? Here also harmony and not irreconcilable opposition must be the illuminative truth. The silent and the active Brahman are not different, opposite and irreconcilable entities, the one denying, the other affirming a cosmic illusion; they are one Brahman in two aspects, positive and negative, and each is necessary to the other. It is out of this Silence that the Word which creates the worlds for ever proceeds; for the Word expresses that which is self-hidden in the Silence. It is an eternal passivity which makes possible the perfect freedom and omnipotence of an eternal divine activity in innumerable cosmic systems. For the becomings of that activity derive their energies and their illimitable potency of variation and harmony from the impartial support of the immutable Being, its consent to this infinite fecundity of its own dynamic Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Reality Omnipresent,
199:Abrahadabra is a word that first publicly appeared in The Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema . Its author, Aleister Crowley, described it as the Word of the Aeon, which signifieth The Great Work accomplished. This is in reference to his belief that the writing of Liber Legis (another name for The Book of the Law) heralded a new Aeon for mankind that was ruled by the godRa-Hoor-Khuit (a form of Horus). Abrahadabra is, therefore, the magical formula of this new age. It is not to be confused with the Word of the Law of the Aeon, which is Thelema, meaning Will. ... Abrahadabra is also referred to as the Word of Double Power. More specifically, it represents the uniting of the Microcosm with the Macrocosm
   represented by the pentagram and the hexagram, the rose and the cross, the circle and the square, the 5 and the 6 (etc.), as also called the attainment of the Knowledge and Conversation of ones Holy Guardian Angel. In Commentaries (1996), Crowley says that the word is a symbol of the establishment of the pillar or phallus of the Macrocosm...in the void of the Microcosm.
   ~ Wikipedia,
200:SHYAM: "What is the distinction between the gross body and the subtle body?"

MASTER: "The body consisting of the five gross elements is called the gross body. The subtle body is made up of the mind, the ego, the discriminating faculty, and the mind-stuff. There is also a causal body, by means of which one enjoys the Bliss of God and holds communion with Him. The Tantra calls it the Bhagavati Tanu, the Divine Body. Beyond all these is the Mahakarana, the Great Cause. That cannot be expressed by words.

"What is the use of merely listening to words? Do something! What will you achieve by merely repeating the word 'siddhi'? Will that intoxicate you? You will not be intoxicated even if you make a paste of siddhi and rub it all over your body. You must eat some of it. How can a man recognize yarns of different counts, such as number forty and number forty-one, unless he is in the trade? Those who trade in yarn do not find it at all difficult to describe a thread of a particular count. Therefore I say, practise a little spiritual discipline; then you will know all these — the gross, the subtle, the causal, and the Great Cause. While praying to God, ask only for love for His Lotus Feet." ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
201:The Self, the Divine, the Supreme Reality, the All, the Transcendent, - the One in all these aspects is then the object of Yogic knowledge. Ordinary objects, the external appearances of life and matter, the psychology of out thoughts and actions, the perception of the forces of the apparent world can be part of this knowledge, but only in so far as it is part of the manifestation of the One. It becomes at once evident that the knowledge for which Yoga strives must be different from what men ordinarily understand by the word. For we mean ordinarily by knowledge an intellectual appreciation of the facts of life, mind and matter and the laws that govern them. This is a knowledge founded upon our sense-perception and upon reasoning from our sense-perceptions and it is undertaken partly for the pure satisfaction of the intellect, partly for practical efficiency and the added power which knowledge gives in managing our lives and the lives of others, in utilising for human ends the overt or secret forces of Nature and in helping or hurting, in saving and ennobling or in oppressing and destroying our fellow-men. Yoga, indeed, is commensurate with all life and can include these subjects and objects.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Status of Knowledge,
202:A book like this, a problem like this, is in no hurry; we both, I just as much as my book, are friends of lento. It is not for nothing that I have been a philologist, perhaps I am a philologist still, that is to say, A TEACHER OF SLOW READING:- in the end I also write slowly. Nowadays it is not only my habit, it is also to my taste - a malicious taste, perhaps? - no longer to write anything which does not reduce to despair every sort of man who is 'in a hurry'. For philology is that venerable art which demands of its votaries one thing above all: to go aside, to take time, to become still, to become slow - it is a goldsmith's art and connoisseurship of the WORD which has nothing but delicate, cautious work to do and achieves nothing if it does not achieve it lento. But precisely for this reason it is more necessary than ever today, by precisely this means does it entice and enchant us the most, in the midst of an age of 'work', that is to say, of hurry, of indecent and perspiring haste, which wants to 'get everything done' at once, including every old or new book:- this art does not so easily get anything done, it teaches to read WELL, that is to say, to read slowly, deeply, looking cautiously before and aft, with reservations, with doors left open, with delicate eyes and fingers...My patient friends, this book desires for itself only perfect readers and philologists: LEARN to read me well! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
203:The scientists, all of them, have their duties no doubt, but they do not fully use their education if they do not try to broaden their sense of responsibility toward all mankind instead of closing themselves up in a narrow specialization where they find their pleasure. Neither engineers nor other scientific men have any right to prefer their own personal peace to the happiness of mankind; their place and their duty are in the front line of struggling humanity, not in the unperturbed ranks of those who keep themselves aloof from life. If they are indifferent, or discouraged because they feel or think that they know that the situation is hopeless, it may be proved that undue pessimism is as dangerous a "religion" as any other blind creed. Indeed there is very little difference in kind between the medieval fanaticism of the "holy inquisition," and modern intolerance toward new ideas. All kinds of intellect must get together, for as long as we presuppose the situation to be hopeless, the situation will indeed be hopeless. The spirit of Human Engineering does not know the word "hopeless"; for engineers know that wrong methods are alone responsible for disastrous results, and that every situation can be successfully handled by the use of proper means. The task of engineering science is not only to know but to know how. Most of the scientists and engineers do not yet realize that their united judgment would be invincible; no system or class would care to disregard it. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
204:the ruthless sacrifice ::: The vulgar conception of sacrifice is an act of painful self-immolation, austere self-mortification, difficult self-effacement; this kind of sacrifice may go even as far as self-mutilation and self-torture. These things may be temporarily necessary in man's hard endeavor to exceed his natural self; if the egoism in his nature is violent and obstinate, it has to be met sometimes by an answering strong internal repression and counterbalancing violence. But the Gita discourages any excess of violence done to oneself; for the self within is really the Godhead evolving, it is Krishna, the Divine; it has not to be troubled and tortured as the Titans of the world trouble and torture it, but to be increased, fostered, cherished, luminously opened to a divine light and strength and joy and wideness. It is not one's self, but the band of the spirit's inner enemies that we have to discourage, expel, slay upon the alter of the growth of the spirit; these can be ruthlessly excised, whose names are desire, wrath, inequality, greed, attachment to outward pleasures and pains, the cohort of usurping demons that are the cause of the soul's errors and sufferings. These should be regarded not as part of oneself but as intruders and perverters of our self's real and diviner nature; these have to be sacrificed in the harsher sense of the word, whatever pain in going they may thrown by reflection on the consciousness of the seeker.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Sacrifice, The Triune Path and the Lord of the Sacrifice,
205:I have spoken of Sri Aurobindo's life as a series of radical turns that changed the movement, the mode of life, almost radically every time the turn came. The turn meant a break with the past and a moving into the future. We have a word for this phenomenon of radical and unforeseen change. You know the word, it is intervention. Intervention means, as the Mother has explained to us more than once, the entry of a higher, a greater force from another world into the already existent world. Into the familiar established mode of existence that runs on the routine of some definite rules and regulations, the Law of the present, there drops all on a sudden another mode of being and consciousness and force, a Higher Law which obliterates or changes out of recognition the familiar mode of living; it is thus that one rises from level to level, moves out into wider ranges of being, otherwise one stands still, remains for ever what he is, stagnant, like an unchanging clod or at the most a repetitive animal. The higher the destiny, the higher also the source of intervention, that is to say, more radical - more destructive yet more creative - destructive of the past, creative of the future.

   I have spoken of the passing away of Sri Aurobindo as a phenomenon of intervention, a great decisive event in view of the work to be done. Even so we may say that his birth too was an act of intervention, a deliberate divine intervention. The world needed it, the time was ripe and the intervention happened and that was his birth as an embodied human being - to which we offer our salutation and obeisance today. ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta,
206:She"
  
   How shall I welcome not this light
   Or, wakened by it, greet with doubt
   This beam as palpable to sight
   As visible to touch? How not,
   Old as I am and (some say) wise,
   Revive beneath her summer eyes?
  
   How not have all my nights and days,
   My spirit ranging far and wide,
   By recollections of her grace
   Enlightened and preoccupied?
   Preoccupied: the Morning Star
   How near the Sun and yet how far!
  
   Enlightened: true, but more than true,
   Or why must I discover there
   The meaning in this taintless dew,
   The dancing wave, this blessed air
   Enchanting in its morning dress
   And calm as everlastingness?
  
   The flame that in the heart resides
   Is parcel of that central Fire
   Whose energy is winds and tides-
   Is rooted deep in the Desire
   That smilingly unseals its power
   Each summer in each springing flower.
  
   Oh Lady Nature-Proserpine,
   Mistress of Gender, star-crowned Queen!
   Ah Rose of Sharon-Mistress mine,
   My teacher ere I turned fourteen,
   When first I hallowed from afar
   Your Beautyship in avatar!
  
   I sense the hidden thing you say,
   Your subtle whisper how the Word
   From Alpha on to Omega
   Made all things-you confide my Lord
   Himself-all, all this potent Frame,
   All save the riddle of your name.
  
   Wisdom! I heard a voice that said:
   "What riddle? What is that to you?
   How! By my follower betrayed!
   Look up-for shame! Now tell me true:
   Where meet you light, with love and grace?
   Still unacquainted with my face?"
  
   Dear God, the erring heart must live-
   Through strength and weakness, calm and glow-
   That answer Wisdom scorns to give.
   Much have I learned. One problem, though,
   I never shall unlock: Who then,
   Who made Sophia feminine?
   ~ Owen Barfield, 1978,
207:Disciple: If the Asuras represent the dark side of God on the vital plane - does this dark side exist on every plane? If so, are there beings on the mental plane which correspond to the dark side?
   Sri Aurobindo: The Asura is really the dark side of God on the mental plane. Mind is the very field of the Asura. His characteristic is egoistic strength, which refuses the Higher Law. The Asura has got Self-control, Tapas, intelligence, only, all that is for his ego.
   On the vital plane the corresponding forces we call the Rakshashas which represent violent passions and impulses. There are other beings on the vital plane which we call pramatta and piśacha and these; manifest, more or less, on the physico-vital plane.
   Distiple: What is the corresponding being on the higher plane?
   Sri Aurobindo: On the higher plane there are no Asuras - there the Truth prevails. There are "Asuras" there in the Vedic sense,- "beings with divine powers". The mental Asura is only a deviation of that power.
   The work of the Asura has all the characteristics of mind in it. It is mind refusing to submit to the Higher Law; it is the mind in revolt. It works on the basis of ego and ignorance.
   Disciple: What are the forces that correspond to the dark side of God on the physical plane?
   Sri Aurobindo: They are what may be called the "elemental beings", or rather, obscure elemental forces - they are more "forces" than "beings". It is these that the Theosophists call the "Elementals". They are not individualised beings like the Asura and the Rakshasas, they are ignorant forces working oh the subtle physical plane.
   Disciple: What is the word for them in Sanskrit;?
   Sri Aurobindo: What are called bhūtas seem most nearly to correspond to them.
   Disciple: The term "Elemental" means that these work through the elements.
   Sri Aurobindo: There are two kinds of "elementals": one mischievous and the other innocent. What the Europeans call the gnomes come under this category. ~ A B Purani, EVENING TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO, 15-06-1926,
208:Has any one at the end of the nineteenth century any distinct notion of what poets of a stronger age understood by the word inspiration? If not, I will describe it. If one had the smallest vestige of superstition left in one, it would hardly be possible completely to set aside the idea that one is the mere incarnation, mouthpiece, or medium of an almighty power. The idea of revelation, in the sense that something which profoundly convulses and upsets one becomes suddenly visible and audible with indescribable certainty and accuracy―describes the simple fact. One hears―one does not seek; one takes―one does not ask who gives. A thought suddenly flashes up like lightening; it comes with necessity, without faltering. I have never had any choice in the matter. There is an ecstasy so great that the immense strain of it is sometimes relaxed by a flood of tears, during which one's steps now involuntarily rush and anon involuntarily lag. There is the feeling that one is utterly out of hand, with the very distinct consciousness of an endless number of fine thrills and titillations descending to one's very toes. There is a depth of happiness in which the most painful and gloomy parts do not act as antitheses to the rest, but are produced and required as necessary shades of color in such an overflow of light. There is an instinct of rhythmic relations which embraces a whole world of forms (length, the need of a wide-embracing rhythm, is almost the measure of the force of an inspiration, a sort of counterpart to its pressure and tension). Everything happens quite involuntary, as if in a tempestuous outburst of freedom, of absoluteness, of power and divinity. The involuntary nature of the figures and similes is the most remarkable thing; everything seems to present itself as the readiest, the truest, and simplest means of expression. It actually seems, to use one of Zarathustra's own phrases, as if all things came to one, and offered themselves as similes. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra [trans. Thomas_Common] (1999),
209:As Korzybski and the general semanticists have pointed out, our words, symbols, signs, thoughts and ideas are merely maps of reality, not reality itself, because "the map is not the territory." The word "water" won't satisfy your thirst.

   But we live in the world of maps and words as if it were the real world. Following in the footsteps of Adam, we have become totally lost in a world of purely fantasy maps and boundaries. And these illusory boundaries, with the opposites they create, have become our impassioned battles.
   Most of our "problems of living," then, are based on the illusion that the opposites can and should be separated and isolated from one another. But since all opposites are actually aspects of one underlying reality, this is like trying to totally separate the two ends of a single rubber band. All you can do is pull harder and harder-until something violently snaps. Thus we might be able to understand that, in all the mystical traditions the world over, one who sees through the illusion of the opposites is called "liberated." Because he is "freed from the pairs" of opposites, he is freed in this life from the fundamentally nonsensical problems and conflicts involved in the war of opposites. He no longer manipulates the opposites one against the other in his search for peace, but instead transcends them both. Not good vs. evil but beyond good and evil. Not life against death but a center of awareness that transcends both. The point is not to separate the opposites and make "positive progress," but rather to unify and harmonize the opposites, both positive and negative, by discovering a ground which transcends and encompasses them both. And that ground, as we will soon see, is unity consciousness itself. In the meantime, let us note, as does the Hindu scripture Bhagavad Gita, that liberation is not freedom from the negative, but freedom from the pairs altogether:
   Content with getting what arrives of itself
   Passed beyond the pairs, free from envy,
   Not attached to success nor failure,
   Even acting, he is not bound.
   He is to be recognized as eternally free
   Who neither loathes nor craves;
   For he that is freed from the pairs,
   Is easily freed from conflict.

   ~ Ken Wilber, No Boundary,
210:But usually the representative influence occupies a much larger place in the life of the sadhaka. If the Yoga is guided by a received written Shastra, - some Word from the past which embodies the experience of former Yogins, - it may be practised either by personal effort alone or with the aid of a Guru. The spiritual knowledge is then gained through meditation on the truths that are taught and it is made living and conscious by their realisation in the personal experience; the Yoga proceeds by the results of prescribed methods taught in a Scripture or a tradition and reinforced and illumined by the instructions of the Master. This is a narrower practice, but safe and effective within its limits, because it follows a well-beaten track to a long familiar goal.

For the sadhaka of the integral Yoga it is necessary to remember that no written Shastra, however great its authority or however large its spirit, can be more than a partial expression of the eternal Knowledge. He will use, but never bind himself even by the greatest Scripture. Where the Scripture is profound, wide, catholic, it may exercise upon him an influence for the highest good and of incalculable importance. It may be associated in his experience with his awakening to crowning verities and his realisation of the highest experiences. His Yoga may be governed for a long time by one Scripture or by several successively, - if it is in the line of the great Hindu tradition, by the Gita, for example, the Upanishads, the Veda. Or it may be a good part of his development to include in its material a richly varied experience of the truths of many Scriptures and make the future opulent with all that is best in the past. But in the end he must take his station, or better still, if he can, always and from the beginning he must live in his own soul beyond the limitations of the word that he uses. The Gita itself thus declares that the Yogin in his progress must pass beyond the written Truth, - sabdabrahmativartate - beyond all that he has heard and all that he has yet to hear, - srotavyasya srutasya ca. For he is not the sadhaka of a book or of many books; he is a sadhaka of the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Four Aids,
211:The Absolute is beyond personality and beyond impersonality, and yet it is both the Impersonal and the supreme Person and all persons. The Absolute is beyond the distinction of unity and multiplicity, and yet it is the One and the innumerable Many in all the universes. It is beyond all limitation by quality and yet it is not limited by a qualityless void but is too all infinite qualities. It is the individual soul and all souls and more of them; it is the formless Brahman and the universe. It is the cosmic and the supracosmic spirit, the supreme Lord, the supreme Self, the supreme Purusha and supreme shakti, the Ever Unborn who is endlessly born, the Infinite who is innumerably finite, the multitudinous One, the complex Simple, the many-sided Single, the Word of the Silence Ineffable, the impersonal omnipresent Person, the Mystery, translucent in highest consciousness to its own spirit, but to a lesser consciousness veiled in its own exceeding light and impenetrable for ever. These things are to the dimensional mind irreconcilable opposites, but to the constant vision and experience of the supramental Truth-Consciousness they are so simply and inevitably the intrinsic nature of each other that even to think of them as contraries is an unimaginable violence. The walls constructed by the measuring and separating Intellect have disappeared and the Truth in its simplicity and beauty appears and reduces all to terms of its harmony and unity and light. Dimensions and distinctions remain but as figures for use, not a separative prison for the self-forgetting Spirit.
2:In the ordinary Yoga of knowledge it is only necessary to recognise two planes of our consciousness, the spiritual and the materialised mental; the pure reason standing between these two views them both, cuts through the illusions of the phenomenal world, exceeds the materialised mental plane, sees the reality of the spiritual; and then the will of the individual Purusha unifying itself with this poise of knowledge rejects the lower and draws back to the supreme plane, dwells there, loses mind and body, sheds life from it and merges itself in the supreme Purusha, is delivered from individual existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis of Yoga, 2.01 - The Object of Knowledge,
212:So then let the Adept set this sigil upon all the Words he hath writ in the book of the Works of his Will. And let him then end all, saying: Such are the Words!2 For by this he maketh proclamation before all them that be about his Circle that these Words are true and puissant, binding what he would bind, and loosing what he would loose. Let the Adept perform this ritual right, perfect in every part thereof, once daily for one moon, then twice, at dawn and dusk, for two moons; next thrice, noon added, for three moons; afterwards, midnight making up his course, for four moons four times every day. Then let the Eleventh Moon be consecrated wholly to this Work; let him be instant in constant ardour, dismissing all but his sheer needs to eat and sleep.3 For know that the true Formula4 whose virtue sufficed the Beast in this Attainment, was thus:

INVOKE OFTEN

So may all men come at last to the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel: thus sayeth The Beast, and prayeth his own Angel that this Book be as a burning Lamp, and as a living Spring, for Light and Life to them that read therein.

1. There is an alternative spelling, TzBA-F, where the Root, "an Host," has the value of 93. The Practicus should revise this Ritual throughout in the Light of his personal researches in the Qabalah, and make it his own peculiar property. The spelling here suggested implies that he who utters the Word affirms his allegiance to the symbols 93 and 6; that he is a warrior in the army of Will, and of the Sun. 93 is also the number of AIWAZ and 6 of The Beast.
2. The consonants of LOGOS, "Word," add (Hebrew values) to 93 [reading the Sigma as Samekh = 60; reading it as Shin = 300 gives 333], and ΕΠΗ, "Words" (whence "Epic") has also that value; ΕΙ∆Ε ΤΑ ΕΠΗ might be the phrase here intended; its number is 418. This would then assert the accomplishment of the Great Work; this is the natural conclusion of the Ritual. Cf. CCXX, III, 75.
3. These needs are modified during the process of Initiation both as to quantity and quality. One should not become anxious about one's phyiscal or mental health on à priori grounds, but pay attention only to indubitable symptoms of distress should such arise. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber Samekh,
213:The poet-seer sees differently, thinks in another way, voices himself in quite another manner than the philosopher or the prophet. The prophet announces the Truth as the Word, the Law or the command of the Eternal, he is the giver of the message; the poet shows us Truth in its power of beauty, in its symbol or image, or reveals it to us in the workings of Nature or in the workings of life, and when he has done that, his whole work is done; he need not be its explicit spokesman or its official messenger. The philosopher's business is to discriminate Truth and put its parts and aspects into intellectual relation with each other; the poet's is to seize and embody aspects of Truth in their living relations, or rather - for that is too philosophical a language - to see her features and, excited by the vision, create in the beauty of her image.

   No doubt, the prophet may have in him a poet who breaks out often into speech and surrounds with the vivid atmosphere of life the directness of his message; he may follow up his injunction "Take no thought for the morrow," by a revealing image of the beauty of the truth he enounces, in the life of Nature, in the figure of the lily, or link it to human life by apologue and parable. The philosopher may bring in the aid of colour and image to give some relief and hue to his dry light of reason and water his arid path of abstractions with some healing dew of poetry. But these are ornaments and not the substance of his work; and if the philosopher makes his thought substance of poetry, he ceases to be a philosophic thinker and becomes a poet-seer of Truth. Thus the more rigid metaphysicians are perhaps right in denying to Nietzsche the name of philosopher; for Nietzsche does not think, but always sees, turbidly or clearly, rightly or distortedly, but with the eye of the seer rather than with the brain of the thinker. On the other hand we may get great poetry which is full of a prophetic enthusiasm of utterance or is largely or even wholly philosophic in its matter; but this prophetic poetry gives us no direct message, only a mass of sublime inspirations of thought and image, and this philosophic poetry is poetry and lives as poetry only in so far as it departs from the method, the expression, the way of seeing proper to the philosophic mind. It must be vision pouring itself into thought-images and not thought trying to observe truth and distinguish its province and bounds and fences.

   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry,
214:Disciple: What are the conditions of success in this yoga?

Sri Aurobindo: I have often told of them. Those go through who have the central sincerity. It does not mean that the sincerity is there in all the parts of the being. In that sense no one is entirely ready. But if the central sincerity is there it is possible to establish it in all the parts of the being.
The second thing necessary is a certain receptivity in the being, what we call, the "opening" up of all the planes to the Higher Power.
The third thing required is the power of holding the higher Force, a certain ghanatwa - mass - that can hold the Power when it comes down.
And about the thing that pushes there are two things that generally push: One is the Central Being. The other is destiny. If the Central Being wants to do something it pushes the man. Even when the man goes off the line he is pushed back again to the path. Of course, the Central Being may push through the mind or any other part of the being. Also, if the man is destined he is pushed to the path either to go through or to get broken,

Disciple: There are some people who think they are destined or chosen and we see that they are not "chosen".

Sri Aurobindo: Of course, plenty of people think that they are specially "chosen" and that they are the first and the "elect" and so on. All that is nothing.

Disciple: Then, can you. say who is fit out of all those that have come?

Sri Aurobindo: It is very difficult to say. But this can be said that everyone of those who have come in has some chance to go through if he can hold on to it.

Disciple: There is also a chance of failure.

Sri Aurobindo: Of course, and besides, the whole universe is a play of forces and one can't always wait till all the conditions of success have been fulfilled. One has to take risks and take his chance.

Disciple: What is meant by "chance"? Does it mean that it is only one possibility out of many others, or does it mean that one would be able to succeed in yoga?

Sri Aurobindo: It means only that he can succeed if he takes his chance properly. For instance, X had his chance.

Disciple: Those who fall on the path or slip, do they go down in their evolution?

Sri Aurobindo: That depends. Ultimately, the Yoga may be lost to him.

Disciple: The Gita says: Na hi kalyānkṛt - nothing that is beneficial - comes to a bad end.

Sri Aurobindo: That is from another standpoint. You must note the word is kalyān kṛt - it is an important addition.
~ Sri Aurobindo, EVENING TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO, RECORDED BY A B PURANI (20-09-1926),
215:Our culture, the laws of our culture, are predicated on the idea that people are conscious. People have experience; people make decisions, and can be held responsible for them. There's a free will element to it. You can debate all that philosophically, and fine, but the point is that that is how we act, and that is the idea that our legal system is predicated on. There's something deep about it, because you're subject to the law, but the law is also limited by you, which is to say that in a well-functioning, properly-grounded democratic system, you have intrinsic value. That's the source of your rights. Even if you're a murderer, we have to say the law can only go so far because there's something about you that's divine.

Well, what does that mean? Partly it means that there's something about you that's conscious and capable of communicating, like you're a whole world unto yourself. You have that to contribute to everyone else, and that's valuable. You can learn new things, transform the structure of society, and invent a new way of dealing with the world. You're capable of all that. It's an intrinsic part of you, and that's associated with the idea that there's something about the logos that is necessary for the absolute chaos of the reality beyond experience to manifest itself as reality. That's an amazing idea because it gives consciousness a constitutive role in the cosmos. You can debate that, but you can't just bloody well brush it off. First of all, we are the most complicated things there are, that we know of, by a massive amount. We're so complicated that it's unbelievable. So there's a lot of cosmos out there, but there's a lot of cosmos in here, too, and which one is greater is by no means obvious, unless you use something trivial, like relative size, which really isn't a very sophisticated approach.

Whatever it is that is you has this capacity to experience reality and to transform it, which is a very strange thing. You can conceptualize the future in your imagination, and then you can work and make that manifest-participate in the process of creation. That's one way of thinking about it. That's why I think Genesis 1 relates the idea that human beings are made in the image of the divine-men and women, which is interesting, because feminists are always criticizing Christianity as being inexorably patriarchal. Of course, they criticize everything like that, so it's hardly a stroke of bloody brilliance. But I think it's an absolute miracle that right at the beginning of the document it says straightforwardly, with no hesitation whatsoever, that the divine spark which we're associating with the word, that brings forth Being, is manifest in men and women equally. That's a very cool thing. You got to think, like I said, do you actually take that seriously? Well, what you got to ask is what happens if you don't take it seriously, right? Read Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. That's the best investigation into that tactic that's ever been produced. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series, 1,
216:Sweet Mother, there's a flower you have named "The Creative Word".

Yes.

What does that mean?

It is the word which creates.

There are all kinds of old traditions, old Hindu traditions, old Chaldean traditions in which the Divine, in the form of the Creator, that is, in His aspect as Creator, pronounces a word which has the power to create. So it is this... And it is the origin of the mantra. The mantra is the spoken word which has a creative power. An invocation is made and there is an answer to the invocation; or one makes a prayer and the prayer is granted. This is the Word, the Word which, in its sound... it is not only the idea, it is in the sound that there's a power of creation. It is the origin, you see, of the mantra.

In Indian mythology the creator God is Brahma, and I think that it was precisely his power which has been symbolised by this flower, "The Creative Word". And when one is in contact with it, the words spoken have a power of evocation or creation or formation or transformation; the words... sound always has a power; it has much more power than men think. It may be a good power and it may be a bad power. It creates vibrations which have an undeniable effect. It is not so much the idea as the sound; the idea too has its own power, but in its own domain - whereas the sound has a power in the material world.

I think I have explained this to you once; I told you, for example, that words spoken casually, usually without any re- flection and without attaching any importance to them, can be used to do something very good. I think I spoke to you about "Bonjour", "Good Day", didn't I? When people meet and say "Bonjour", they do so mechanically and without thinking. But if you put a will into it, an aspiration to indeed wish someone a good day, well, there is a way of saying "Good Day" which is very effective, much more effective than if simply meeting someone you thought: "Ah! I hope he has a good day", without saying anything. If with this hope in your thought you say to him in a certain way, "Good Day", you make it more concrete and more effective.

It's the same thing, by the way, with curses, or when one gets angry and says bad things to people. This can do them as much harm - more harm sometimes - than if you were to give them a slap. With very sensitive people it can put their stomach out of order or give them palpitation, because you put into it an evil force which has a power of destruction.

It is not at all ineffective to speak. Naturally it depends a great deal on each one's inner power. People who have no strength and no consciousness can't do very much - unless they employ material means. But to the extent that you are strong, especially when you have a powerful vital, you must have a great control on what you say, otherwise you can do much harm. Without wanting to, without knowing it; through ignorance.

Anything? No? Nothing?

Another question?... Everything's over? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, 347-349,
217:SLEIGHT OF MIND IN ILLUMINATION
Only those forms of illumination which lead to useful behaviour changes deserve to be known as such. When I hear the word "spirituality", I tend to reach for a loaded wand. Most professionally spiritual people are vile and untrustworthy when off duty, simply because their beliefs conflict with basic drives and only manage to distort their natural behaviour temporarily. The demons then come screaming up out of the cellar at unexpected moments.

When selecting objectives for illumination, the magician should choose forms of self improvement which can be precisely specified and measured and which effect changes of behaviour in his entire existence. Invocation is the main tool in illumination, although enchantment where spells are cast upon oneselves and divination to seek objectives for illumination may also find some application.

Evocation can sometimes be used with care, but there is no point in simply creating an entity that is the repository of what one wishes were true for oneself in general. This is a frequent mistake in religion. Forms of worship which create only entities in the subconscious are inferior to more wholehearted worship, which, at its best, is pure invocation. The Jesuits "Imitation of Christ" is more effective than merely praying to Jesus for example.

Illumination proceeds in the same general manner as invocation, except that the magician is striving to effect specific changes to his everyday behaviour, rather than to create enhanced facilities that can be drawn upon for particular purposes. The basic technique remains the same, the required beliefs are identified and then implanted in the subconscious by ritual or other acts. Such acts force the subconscious acquisition of the beliefs they imply.

Modest and realistic objectives are preferable to grandiose schemes in illumination.

One modifies the behaviour and beliefs of others by beginning with only the most trivial demands. The same applies to oneselves. The magician should beware of implanting beliefs whose expression cannot be sustained by the human body or the environment. For example it is possible to implant the belief that flight can be achieved without an aircraft. However it has rarely proved possible to implant this belief deeply enough to ensure that such flights were not of exceedingly short duration. Nevertheless such feats as fire-walking and obliviousness to extreme pain are sometimes achieved by this mechanism.

The sleight of mind which implants belief through ritual action is more powerful than any other weapon that humanity possesses, yet its influence is so pervasive that we seldom notice it. It makes religions, wars, cults and cultures possible. It has killed countless millions and created our personal and social realities. Those who understand how to use it on others can be messiahs or dictators, depending on their degree of personal myopia. Those who understand how to apply it to themselves have a jewel beyond price if they use it wisely; otherwise they tend to rapidly invoke their own Nemesis with it. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Kaos,
218:28 August 1957
Mother, Sri Aurobindo says here: "Whether the whole of humanity would be touched [by the Supramental influence] or only a part of it ready for the change would depend on what was intended or possible in the continued order of the universe."
The Supramental Manifestation, SABCL, Vol. 16, p. 56

What is meant by "what was intended or possible"? The two things are different. So far you have said that if humanity changes, if it wants to participate in the new birth...

It is the same thing. But when you look at an object on a certain plane, you see it horizontally, and when you look at the same object from another plane, you see it vertically. (Mother shows the cover and the back of her book.) So, if one looks from above, one says "intended"; if one looks from below, one says "possible".... But it is absolutely the same thing, only the point of view is different.

But in that case, it is not our incapacity or lack of will to change that makes any difference.

We have already said this many a time. If you remain in a consciousness which functions mentally, even if it is the highest mind, you have the notion of an absolute determinism of cause and effect and feel that things are what they are because they are what they are and cannot be otherwise.

It is only when you come out of the mental consciousness completely and enter a higher perception of things - which you may call spiritual or divine - that you suddenly find yourself in a state of perfect freedom where everything is possible.

(Silence)

Those who have contacted that state or lived in it, even if only for a moment, try to describe it as a feeling of an absolute Will in action, which immediately gives to the human mentality the feeling of being arbitrary. And because of that distortion there arises the idea - which I might call traditional - of a supreme and arbitrary God, which is something most unacceptable to every enlightened mind. I suppose that this experience badly expressed is at the origin of this notion. And in fact it is incorrect to express it as an absolute Will: it is very, very, very different. It is something else altogether. For, what man understands by "Will" is a decision that is taken and carried out. We are obliged to use the word "will", but in its truth the Will acting in the universe is neither a choice nor a decision that is taken. What seems to me the closest expression is "vision". Things are because they are seen. But of course "seen", not seen as we see with these eyes.

(Mother touches her eyes...) All the same, it is the nearest thing.
It is a vision - a vision unfolding itself.
The universe becomes objective as it is progressively seen.

And that is why Sri Aurobindo has said "intended or possible". It is neither one nor the other. All that can be said is a distortion.

(Silence)

Objectivisation - universal objectivisation - is something like a projection in space and time, like a living image of what is from all eternity. And as the image is gradually projected on the screen of time and space, it becomes objective:

The Supreme contemplating His own Image.
~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958,
219:The ancient Mesopotamians and the ancient Egyptians had some very interesting, dramatic ideas about that. For example-very briefly-there was a deity known as Marduk. Marduk was a Mesopotamian deity, and imagine this is sort of what happened. As an empire grew out of the post-ice age-15,000 years ago, 10,000 years ago-all these tribes came together. These tribes each had their own deity-their own image of the ideal. But then they started to occupy the same territory. One tribe had God A, and one tribe had God B, and one could wipe the other one out, and then it would just be God A, who wins. That's not so good, because maybe you want to trade with those people, or maybe you don't want to lose half your population in a war. So then you have to have an argument about whose God is going to take priority-which ideal is going to take priority.

What seems to happen is represented in mythology as a battle of the gods in celestial space. From a practical perspective, it's more like an ongoing dialog. You believe this; I believe this. You believe that; I believe this. How are we going to meld that together? You take God A, and you take God B, and maybe what you do is extract God C from them, and you say, 'God C now has the attributes of A and B.' And then some other tribes come in, and C takes them over, too. Take Marduk, for example. He has 50 different names, at least in part, of the subordinate gods-that represented the tribes that came together to make the civilization. That's part of the process by which that abstracted ideal is abstracted. You think, 'this is important, and it works, because your tribe is alive, and so we'll take the best of both, if we can manage it, and extract out something, that's even more abstract, that covers both of us.'

I'll give you a couple of Marduk's interesting features. He has eyes all the way around his head. He's elected by all the other gods to be king God. That's the first thing. That's quite cool. They elect him because they're facing a terrible threat-sort of like a flood and a monster combined. Marduk basically says that, if they elect him top God, he'll go out and stop the flood monster, and they won't all get wiped out. It's a serious threat. It's chaos itself making its comeback. All the gods agree, and Marduk is the new manifestation. He's got eyes all the way around his head, and he speaks magic words. When he fights, he fights this deity called Tiamat. We need to know that, because the word 'Tiamat' is associated with the word 'tehom.' Tehom is the chaos that God makes order out of at the beginning of time in Genesis, so it's linked very tightly to this story. Marduk, with his eyes and his capacity to speak magic words, goes out and confronts Tiamat, who's like this watery sea dragon. It's a classic Saint George story: go out and wreak havoc on the dragon. He cuts her into pieces, and he makes the world out of her pieces. That's the world that human beings live in.

The Mesopotamian emperor acted out Marduk. He was allowed to be emperor insofar as he was a good Marduk. That meant that he had eyes all the way around his head, and he could speak magic; he could speak properly. We are starting to understand, at that point, the essence of leadership. Because what's leadership? It's the capacity to see what the hell's in front of your face, and maybe in every direction, and maybe the capacity to use your language properly to transform chaos into order. God only knows how long it took the Mesopotamians to figure that out. The best they could do was dramatize it, but it's staggeringly brilliant. It's by no means obvious, and this chaos is a very strange thing. This is a chaos that God wrestled with at the beginning of time.

Chaos is half psychological and half real. There's no other way to really describe it. Chaos is what you encounter when you're blown into pieces and thrown into deep confusion-when your world falls apart, when your dreams die, when you're betrayed. It's the chaos that emerges, and the chaos is everything it wants, and it's too much for you. That's for sure. It pulls you down into the underworld, and that's where the dragons are. All you've got at that point is your capacity to bloody well keep your eyes open, and to speak as carefully and as clearly as you can. Maybe, if you're lucky, you'll get through it that way and come out the other side. It's taken people a very long time to figure that out, and it looks, to me, that the idea is erected on the platform of our ancient ancestors, maybe tens of millions of years ago, because we seem to represent that which disturbs us deeply using the same system that we used to represent serpentile, or other, carnivorous predators. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series, 1,
220:Chapter LXXXII: Epistola Penultima: The Two Ways to Reality
Cara Soror,
Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

How very sensible of you, though I admit somewhat exacting!

You write-Will you tell me exactly why I should devote so much of my valuable time to subjects like Magick and Yoga.

That is all very well. But you ask me to put it in syllogistic form. I have no doubt this can be done, though the task seems somewhat complicated. I think I will leave it to you to construct your series of syllogisms yourself from the arguments of this letter.

In your main question the operative word is "valuable. Why, I ask, in my turn, should you consider your time valuable? It certainly is not valuable unless the universe has a meaning, and what is more, unless you know what that meaning is-at least roughly-it is millions to one that you will find yourself barking up the wrong tree.

First of all let us consider this question of the meaning of the universe. It is its own evidence to design, and that design intelligent design. There is no question of any moral significance-"one man's meat is another man's poison" and so on. But there can be no possible doubt about the existence of some kind of intelligence, and that kind is far superior to anything of which we know as human.

How then are we to explore, and finally to interpret this intelligence?

It seems to me that there are two ways and only two. Imagine for a moment that you are an orphan in charge of a guardian, inconceivably learned from your point of view.

Suppose therefore that you are puzzled by some problem suitable to your childish nature, your obvious and most simple way is to approach your guardian and ask him to enlighten you. It is clearly part of his function as guardian to do his best to help you. Very good, that is the first method, and close parallel with what we understand by the word Magick.

We are bothered by some difficulty about one of the elements-say Fire-it is therefore natural to evoke a Salamander to instruct you on the difficult point. But you must remember that your Holy Guardian Angel is not only far more fully instructed than yourself on every point that you can conceive, but you may go so far as to say that it is definitely his work, or part of his work; remembering always that he inhabits a sphere or plane which is entirely different from anything of which you are normally aware.

To attain to the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel is consequently without doubt by far the simplest way by which you can yourself approach that higher order of being.

That, then, is a clearly intelligible method of procedure. We call it Magick.

It is of course possible to strengthen the link between him and yourself so that in course of time you became capable of moving and, generally speaking, operating on that plane which is his natural habitat.

There is however one other way, and one only, as far as I can see, of reaching this state.

It is at least theoretically possible to exalt the whole of your own consciousness until it becomes as free to move on that exalted plane as it is for him. You should note, by the way, that in this case the postulation of another being is not necessary. There is no way of refuting the solipsism if you feel like that. Personally I cannot accede to its axiom. The evidence for an external universe appears to me perfectly adequate.

Still there is no extra charge for thinking on those lines if you so wish.

I have paid a great deal of attention in the course of my life to the method of exalting the human consciousness in this way; and it is really quite legitimate to identify my teaching with that of the Yogis.

I must however point out that in the course of my instruction I have given continual warnings as to the dangers of this line of research. For one thing there is no means of checking your results in the ordinary scientific sense. It is always perfectly easy to find a subjective explanation of any phenomenon; and when one considers that the greatest of all the dangers in any line of research arise from egocentric vanity, I do not think I have exceeded my duty in anything that I have said to deter students from undertaking so dangerous a course as Yoga.

It is, of course, much safer if you are in a position to pursue in the Indian Jungles, provided that your health will stand the climate and also, I must say, unless you have a really sound teacher on whom you can safely rely. But then, if we once introduce a teacher, why not go to the Fountain-head and press towards the Knowledge and conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel?

In any case your Indian teacher will ultimately direct you to seek guidance from that source, so it seems to me that you have gone to a great deal of extra trouble and incurred a great deal of unnecessary danger by not leaving yourself in the first place in the hands of the Holy Guardian Angel.

In any case there are the two methods which stand as alternatives. I do not know of any third one which can be of any use whatever. Logically, since you have asked me to be logical, there is certainly no third way; there is the external way of Magick, and the internal way of Yoga: there you have your alternatives, and there they cease.

Love is the law, love under will.

Fraternally,

666 ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears,
221:What are these operations? They are not mere psychological self-analysis and self-observation. Such analysis, such observation are, like the process of right thought, of immense value and practically indispensable. They may even, if rightly pursued, lead to a right thought of considerable power and effectivity. Like intellectual discrimination by the process of meditative thought they will have an effect of purification; they will lead to self-knowledge of a certain kind and to the setting right of the disorders of the soul and the heart and even of the disorders of the understanding. Self-knowledge of all kinds is on the straight path to the knowledge of the real Self. The Upanishad tells us that the Self-existent has so set the doors of the soul that they turn outwards and most men look outward into the appearances of things; only the rare soul that is ripe for a calm thought and steady wisdom turns its eye inward, sees the Self and attains to immortality. To this turning of the eye inward psychological self-observation and analysis is a great and effective introduction.We can look into the inward of ourselves more easily than we can look into the inward of things external to us because there, in things outside us, we are in the first place embarrassed by the form and secondly we have no natural previous experience of that in them which is other than their physical substance. A purified or tranquillised mind may reflect or a powerful concentration may discover God in the world, the Self in Nature even before it is realised in ourselves, but this is rare and difficult. (2) And it is only in ourselves that we can observe and know the process of the Self in its becoming and follow the process by which it draws back into self-being. Therefore the ancient counsel, know thyself, will always stand as the first word that directs us towards the knowledge. Still, psychological self-knowledge is only the experience of the modes of the Self, it is not the realisation of the Self in its pure being.
   The status of knowledge, then, which Yoga envisages is not merely an intellectual conception or clear discrimination of the truth, nor is it an enlightened psychological experience of the modes of our being. It is a "realisation", in the full sense of the word; it is the making real to ourselves and in ourselves of the Self, the transcendent and universal Divine, and it is the subsequent impossibility of viewing the modes of being except in the light of that Self and in their true aspect as its flux of becoming under the psychical and physical conditions of our world-existence. This realisation consists of three successive movements, internal vision, complete internal experience and identity.
   This internal vision, dr.s.t.i, the power so highly valued by the ancient sages, the power which made a man a Rishi or Kavi and no longer a mere thinker, is a sort of light in the soul by which things unseen become as evident and real to it-to the soul and not merely to the intellect-as do things seen to the physical eye. In the physical world there are always two forms of knowledge, the direct and the indirect, pratyaks.a, of that which is present to the eyes, and paroks.a, of that which is remote from and beyond our vision. When the object is beyond our vision, we are necessarily obliged to arrive at an idea of it by inference, imagination, analogy, by hearing the descriptions of others who have seen it or by studying pictorial or other representations of it if these are available. By putting together all these aids we can indeed arrive at a more or less adequate idea or suggestive image of the object, but we do not realise the thing itself; it is not yet to us the grasped reality, but only our conceptual representation of a reality. But once we have seen it with the eyes,-for no other sense is adequate,-we possess, we realise; it is there secure in our satisfied being, part of ourselves in knowledge. Precisely the same rule holds good of psychical things and of he Self. We may hear clear and luminous teachings about the Self from philosophers or teachers or from ancient writings; we may by thought, inference, imagination, analogy or by any other available means attempt to form a mental figure or conception of it; we may hold firmly that conception in our mind and fix it by an entire and exclusive concentration;3 but we have not yet realised it, we have not seen God. It is only when after long and persistent concentration or by other means the veil of the mind is rent or swept aside, only when a flood of light breaks over the awakened mentality, jyotirmaya brahman, and conception gives place to a knowledge-vision in which the Self is as present, real, concrete as a physical object to the physical eye, that we possess in knowledge; for we have seen. After that revelation, whatever fadings of the light, whatever periods of darkness may afflict the soul, it can never irretrievably lose what it has once held. The experience is inevitably renewed and must become more frequent till it is constant; when and how soon depends on the devotion and persistence with which we insist on the path and besiege by our will or our love the hidden Deity.
   (2) And it is only in ourselves that we can observe and know the 2 In one respect, however, it is easier, because in external things we are not so much hampered by the sense of the limited ego as in ourselves; one obstacle to the realisation of God is therefore removed.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Status of Knowledge,
222:To what gods shall the sacrifice be offered? Who shall be invoked to manifest and protect in the human being this increasing godhead?

Agni first, for without him the sacrificial flame cannot burn on the altar of the soul. That flame of Agni is the seven-tongued power of the Will, a Force of God instinct with Knowledge. This conscious and forceful will is the immortal guest in our mortality, a pure priest and a divine worker, the mediator between earth and heaven. It carries what we offer to the higher Powers and brings back in return their force and light and joy into our humanity.

Indra, the Puissant next, who is the power of pure Existence self-manifested as the Divine Mind. As Agni is one pole of Force instinct with knowledge that sends its current upward from earth to heaven, so Indra is the other pole of Light instinct with force which descends from heaven to earth. He comes down into our world as the Hero with the shining horses and slays darkness and division with his lightnings, pours down the life-giving heavenly waters, finds in the trace of the hound, Intuition, the lost or hidden illuminations, makes the Sun of Truth mount high in the heaven of our mentality.

Surya, the Sun, is the master of that supreme Truth, - truth of being, truth of knowledge, truth of process and act and movement and functioning. He is therefore the creator or rather the manifester of all things - for creation is out-bringing, expression by the Truth and Will - and the father, fosterer, enlightener of our souls. The illuminations we seek are the herds of this Sun who comes to us in the track of the divine Dawn and releases and reveals in us night-hidden world after world up to the highest Beatitude.

Of that beatitude Soma is the representative deity. The wine of his ecstasy is concealed in the growths of earth, in the waters of existence; even here in our physical being are his immortalising juices and they have to be pressed out and offered to all the gods; for in that strength these shall increase and conquer.

Each of these primary deities has others associated with him who fulfil functions that arise from his own. For if the truth of Surya is to be established firmly in our mortal nature, there are previous conditions that are indispensable; a vast purity and clear wideness destructive of all sin and crooked falsehood, - and this is Varuna; a luminous power of love and comprehension leading and forming into harmony all our thoughts, acts and impulses, - this is Mitra; an immortal puissance of clear-discerning aspiration and endeavour, - this is Aryaman; a happy spontaneity of the right enjoyment of all things dispelling the evil dream of sin and error and suffering, - this is Bhaga. These four are powers of the Truth of Surya. For the whole bliss of Soma to be established perfectly in our nature a happy and enlightened and unmaimed condition of mind, vitality and body are necessary. This condition is given to us by the twin Ashwins; wedded to the daughter of Light, drinkers of honey, bringers of perfect satisfactions, healers of maim and malady they occupy our parts of knowledge and parts of action and prepare our mental, vital and physical being for an easy and victorious ascension.

Indra, the Divine Mind, as the shaper of mental forms has for his assistants, his artisans, the Ribhus, human powers who by the work of sacrifice and their brilliant ascension to the high dwelling-place of the Sun have attained to immortality and help mankind to repeat their achievement. They shape by the mind Indra's horses, the chariot of the Ashwins, the weapons of the Gods, all the means of the journey and the battle. But as giver of the Light of Truth and as Vritra-slayer Indra is aided by the Maruts, who are powers of will and nervous or vital Force that have attained to the light of thought and the voice of self-expression. They are behind all thought and speech as its impellers and they battle towards the Light, Truth and Bliss of the supreme Consciousness.

There are also female energies; for the Deva is both Male and Female and the gods also are either activising souls or passively executive and methodising energies. Aditi, infinite Mother of the Gods, comes first; and there are besides five powers of the Truthconsciousness, - Mahi or Bharati, the vast Word that brings us all things out of the divine source; Ila, the strong primal word of the Truth who gives us its active vision; Saraswati, its streaming current and the word of its inspiration; Sarama, the Intuition, hound of heaven who descends into the cavern of the subconscient and finds there the concealed illuminations; Dakshina, whose function is to discern rightly, dispose the action and the offering and distribute in the sacrifice to each godhead its portion. Each god, too, has his female energy.

All this action and struggle and ascension is supported by Heaven our Father and Earth our Mother Parents of the Gods, who sustain respectively the purely mental and psychic and the physical consciousness. Their large and free scope is the condition of our achievement. Vayu, master of life, links them together by the mid-air, the region of vital force. And there are other deities, - Parjanya, giver of the rain of heaven; Dadhikravan, the divine war-horse, a power of Agni; the mystic Dragon of the Foundations; Trita Aptya who on the third plane of existence consummates our triple being; and more besides.

The development of all these godheads is necessary to our perfection. And that perfection must be attained on all our levels, - in the wideness of earth, our physical being and consciousness; in the full force of vital speed and action and enjoyment and nervous vibration, typified as the Horse which must be brought forward to upbear our endeavour; in the perfect gladness of the heart of emotion and a brilliant heat and clarity of the mind throughout our intellectual and psychical being; in the coming of the supramental Light, the Dawn and the Sun and the shining Mother of the herds, to transform all our existence; for so comes to us the possession of the Truth, by the Truth the admirable surge of the Bliss, in the Bliss infinite Consciousness of absolute being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, The Doctrine of the Mystics,
223:The Supreme Discovery
   IF WE want to progress integrally, we must build within our conscious being a strong and pure mental synthesis which can serve us as a protection against temptations from outside, as a landmark to prevent us from going astray, as a beacon to light our way across the moving ocean of life.
   Each individual should build up this mental synthesis according to his own tendencies and affinities and aspirations. But if we want it to be truly living and luminous, it must be centred on the idea that is the intellectual representation symbolising That which is at the centre of our being, That which is our life and our light.
   This idea, expressed in sublime words, has been taught in various forms by all the great Instructors in all lands and all ages.
   The Self of each one and the great universal Self are one. Since all that is exists from all eternity in its essence and principle, why make a distinction between the being and its origin, between ourselves and what we place at the beginning?
   The ancient traditions rightly said:
   "Our origin and ourselves, our God and ourselves are one."
   And this oneness should not be understood merely as a more or less close and intimate relationship of union, but as a true identity.
   Thus, when a man who seeks the Divine attempts to reascend by degrees towards the inaccessible, he forgets that all his knowledge and all his intuition cannot take him one step forward in this infinite; neither does he know that what he wants to attain, what he believes to be so far from him, is within him.
   For how could he know anything of the origin until he becomes conscious of this origin in himself?
   It is by understanding himself, by learning to know himself, that he can make the supreme discovery and cry out in wonder like the patriarch in the Bible, "The house of God is here and I knew it not."
   That is why we must express that sublime thought, creatrix of the material worlds, and make known to all the word that fills the heavens and the earth, "I am in all things and all beings."When all shall know this, the promised day of great transfigurations will be at hand. When in each atom of Matter men shall recognise the indwelling thought of God, when in each living creature they shall perceive some hint of a gesture of God, when each man can see God in his brother, then dawn will break, dispelling the darkness, the falsehood, the ignorance, the error and suffering that weigh upon all Nature. For, "all Nature suffers and laments as she awaits the revelation of the Sons of God."
   This indeed is the central thought epitomising all others, the thought which should be ever present to our remembrance as the sun that illumines all life.
   That is why I remind you of it today. For if we follow our path bearing this thought in our hearts like the rarest jewel, the most precious treasure, if we allow it to do its work of illumination and transfiguration within us, we shall know that it lives in the centre of all beings and all things, and in it we shall feel the marvellous oneness of the universe.
   Then we shall understand the vanity and childishness of our meagre satisfactions, our foolish quarrels, our petty passions, our blind indignations. We shall see the dissolution of our little faults, the crumbling of the last entrenchments of our limited personality and our obtuse egoism. We shall feel ourselves being swept along by this sublime current of true spirituality which will deliver us from our narrow limits and bounds.
   The individual Self and the universal Self are one; in every world, in every being, in every thing, in every atom is the Divine Presence, and man's mission is to manifest it.
   In order to do that, he must become conscious of this Divine Presence within him. Some individuals must undergo a real apprenticeship in order to achieve this: their egoistic being is too all-absorbing, too rigid, too conservative, and their struggles against it are long and painful. Others, on the contrary, who are more impersonal, more plastic, more spiritualised, come easily into contact with the inexhaustible divine source of their being.But let us not forget that they too should devote themselves daily, constantly, to a methodical effort of adaptation and transformation, so that nothing within them may ever again obscure the radiance of that pure light.
   But how greatly the standpoint changes once we attain this deeper consciousness! How understanding widens, how compassion grows!
   On this a sage has said:
   "I would like each one of us to come to the point where he perceives the inner God who dwells even in the vilest of human beings; instead of condemning him we would say, 'Arise, O resplendent Being, thou who art ever pure, who knowest neither birth nor death; arise, Almighty One, and manifest thy nature.'"
   Let us live by this beautiful utterance and we shall see everything around us transformed as if by miracle.
   This is the attitude of true, conscious and discerning love, the love which knows how to see behind appearances, understand in spite of words, and which, amid all obstacles, is in constant communion with the depths.
   What value have our impulses and our desires, our anguish and our violence, our sufferings and our struggles, all these inner vicissitudes unduly dramatised by our unruly imagination - what value do they have before this great, this sublime and divine love bending over us from the innermost depths of our being, bearing with our weaknesses, rectifying our errors, healing our wounds, bathing our whole being with its regenerating streams?
   For the inner Godhead never imposes herself, she neither demands nor threatens; she offers and gives herself, conceals and forgets herself in the heart of all beings and things; she never accuses, she neither judges nor curses nor condemns, but works unceasingly to perfect without constraint, to mend without reproach, to encourage without impatience, to enrich each one with all the wealth he can receive; she is the mother whose love bears fruit and nourishes, guards and protects, counsels and consoles; because she understands everything, she can endure everything, excuse and pardon everything, hope and prepare for everything; bearing everything within herself, she owns nothing that does not belong to all, and because she reigns over all, she is the servant of all; that is why all, great and small, who want to be kings with her and gods in her, become, like her, not despots but servitors among their brethren.
   How beautiful is this humble role of servant, the role of all who have been revealers and heralds of the God who is within all, of the Divine Love that animates all things....
   And until we can follow their example and become true servants even as they, let us allow ourselves to be penetrated and transformed by this Divine Love; let us offer Him, without reserve, this marvellous instrument, our physical organism. He shall make it yield its utmost on every plane of activity.
   To achieve this total self-consecration, all means are good, all methods have their value. The one thing needful is to persevere in our will to attain this goal. For then everything we study, every action we perform, every human being we meet, all come to bring us an indication, a help, a light to guide us on the path.
   Before I close, I shall add a few pages for those who have already made apparently fruitless efforts, for those who have encountered the pitfalls on the way and seen the measure of their weakness, for those who are in danger of losing their self-confidence and courage. These pages, intended to rekindle hope in the hearts of those who suffer, were written by a spiritual worker at a time when ordeals of every kind were sweeping down on him like purifying flames.
   You who are weary, downcast and bruised, you who fall, who think perhaps that you are defeated, hear the voice of a friend. He knows your sorrows, he has shared them, he has suffered like you from the ills of the earth; like you he has crossed many deserts under the burden of the day, he has known thirst and hunger, solitude and abandonment, and the cruellest of all wants, the destitution of the heart. Alas! he has known too the hours of doubt, the errors, the faults, the failings, every weakness.
   But he tells you: Courage! Hearken to the lesson that the rising sun brings to the earth with its first rays each morning. It is a lesson of hope, a message of solace.
   You who weep, who suffer and tremble, who dare not expect an end to your ills, an issue to your pangs, behold: there is no night without dawn and the day is about to break when darkness is thickest; there is no mist that the sun does not dispel, no cloud that it does not gild, no tear that it will not dry one day, no storm that is not followed by its shining triumphant bow; there is no snow that it does not melt, nor winter that it does not change into radiant spring.
   And for you too, there is no affliction which does not bring its measure of glory, no distress which cannot be transformed into joy, nor defeat into victory, nor downfall into higher ascension, nor solitude into radiating centre of life, nor discord into harmony - sometimes it is a misunderstanding between two minds that compels two hearts to open to mutual communion; lastly, there is no infinite weakness that cannot be changed into strength. And it is even in supreme weakness that almightiness chooses to reveal itself!
   Listen, my little child, you who today feel so broken, so fallen perhaps, who have nothing left, nothing to cover your misery and foster your pride: never before have you been so great! How close to the summits is he who awakens in the depths, for the deeper the abyss, the more the heights reveal themselves!
   Do you not know this, that the most sublime forces of the vasts seek to array themselves in the most opaque veils of Matter? Oh, the sublime nuptials of sovereign love with the obscurest plasticities, of the shadow's yearning with the most royal light!
   If ordeal or fault has cast you down, if you have sunk into the nether depths of suffering, do not grieve - for there indeed the divine love and the supreme blessing can reach you! Because you have passed through the crucible of purifying sorrows, the glorious ascents are yours.
   You are in the wilderness: then listen to the voices of the silence. The clamour of flattering words and outer applause has gladdened your ears, but the voices of the silence will gladden your soul and awaken within you the echo of the depths, the chant of divine harmonies!
   You are walking in the depths of night: then gather the priceless treasures of the night. In bright sunshine, the ways of intelligence are lit, but in the white luminosities of the night lie the hidden paths of perfection, the secret of spiritual riches.
   You are being stripped of everything: that is the way towards plenitude. When you have nothing left, everything will be given to you. Because for those who are sincere and true, from the worst always comes the best.
   Every grain that is sown in the earth produces a thousand. Every wing-beat of sorrow can be a soaring towards glory.
   And when the adversary pursues man relentlessly, everything he does to destroy him only makes him greater.
   Hear the story of the worlds, look: the great enemy seems to triumph. He casts the beings of light into the night, and the night is filled with stars. He rages against the cosmic working, he assails the integrity of the empire of the sphere, shatters its harmony, divides and subdivides it, scatters its dust to the four winds of infinity, and lo! the dust is changed into a golden seed, fertilising the infinite and peopling it with worlds which now gravitate around their eternal centre in the larger orbit of space - so that even division creates a richer and deeper unity, and by multiplying the surfaces of the material universe, enlarges the empire that it set out to destroy.
   Beautiful indeed was the song of the primordial sphere cradled in the bosom of immensity, but how much more beautiful and triumphant is the symphony of the constellations, the music of the spheres, the immense choir that fills the heavens with an eternal hymn of victory!
   Hear again: no state was ever more precarious than that of man when he was separated on earth from his divine origin. Above him stretched the hostile borders of the usurper, and at his horizon's gates watched jailers armed with flaming swords. Then, since he could climb no more to the source of life, the source arose within him; since he could no more receive the light from above, the light shone forth at the very centre of his being; since he could commune no more with the transcendent love, that love offered itself in a holocaust and chose each terrestrial being, each human self as its dwelling-place and sanctuary.
   That is how, in this despised and desolate but fruitful and blessed Matter, each atom contains a divine thought, each being carries within him the Divine Inhabitant. And if no being in all the universe is as frail as man, neither is any as divine as he!
   In truth, in truth, in humiliation lies the cradle of glory! 28 April 1912 ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago, The Supreme Discovery,
224:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.
The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.
The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.
It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.
As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.

And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.

It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!
This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.
My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?

A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.
Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.

Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.
If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.
First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!
Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"
I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.
Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.
These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."
Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.
If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'
The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passage

Omnes eodem cogimur, omnium
Versatur urna serius ocius
Sors exitura et nos in aeternum
Exilium impositura cymbae.

Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?
And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'
We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?
And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.
I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!

"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,
'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'
Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,
Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vain
Upon the axis of its pain,
Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,
Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."

Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.
But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!
One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.
But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!

'Farewell, farewell! but this I tell
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!
He prayeth well, who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast.
He prayeth best, who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:The word ‘superstar’ is an illusion. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
2:The word good has many meanings. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
3:I did nothing. The Word did it all. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
4:I think the word rich is all relative. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
5:The word reality frightens me. ~ sir-arthur-eddington, @wisdomtrove
6:The word impossible is not French. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
7:In the word of no master am I bound to believe. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
8:The word is the Verb, and the Verb is God. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
9:I am not afraid of the word tension. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
10:My conscience is captive to the Word of God ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
11:You can't get wet from the word &
12:When there is love, the word duty disappears. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
13:Impossible? The word is a roadblock to progress! ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
14:Our faith is released as we say, pray and do the Word. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
15:I don't call myself a poet, because I don't like the word. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
16:It is notoriously difficult to define the word living. ~ francis-crick, @wisdomtrove
17:never's the word God listens for when he needs a laugh. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
18:Out of purity and silence comes the word of power. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
19:Why isn’t the word “phonetically” spelled with an “f”? ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
20:I do not find myself making any use of the word sacrifice. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
21:Why are there five syllables in the word “monosyllabic”? ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
22:Suit the action to the word, the word to the action. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
23:What else should we do with the Word of God but obey? ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
24:Best productivity tool ever invented? Easy... the word "no". ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
25:Next to the Word of God, music deserves the highest praise. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
26:It is not about reading the Word. It is about obeying the Word. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
27:Next to God, “love” is the word most mangled in every language. ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
28:The word of God tends to make large-minded noble-minded men. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
29:Whose cruel idea was it for the word “lisp” to have an “s” in it? ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
30:Nothing is impossible, the word itself says &
31:The word is half his that speaks, and half his that hears it. ~ michel-de-montaigne, @wisdomtrove
32:The word of God hidden in the heart is a stubborn voice to suppress. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
33:Weapons means killing. Weapons is ah, I'm simply sensitive to the word. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
34:The word is a sign or symbol of the impressions or affections of the soul. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
35:The Devil fears the word of God, He can't bite it; it breaks his teeth. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
36:In the word question, there is a beautiful word - quest. I love that word. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
37:Being impeccable with your word is not using the word against yourself. ~ don-miguel-ruiz, @wisdomtrove
38:If we want revivals, we must revive our reverence for the Word of God. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
39:Perhaps the most important word in success and happiness is the word,"ask." ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
40:We find no rest for our weary bones unless we cling to the word of grace. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
41:Once we know the Word of God, we have a responsibility to be obedient to it. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
42:’Teamwork’ is the word that bosses use when they actually mean ‘Do what I say’ ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
43:The Word of God is the anvil upon which the opinions of men are smashed. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
44:Wherever the Word comes without power its essential content is missed. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
45:In the beginning was the Word. Man acts it out. He is the act, not the actor. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
46:Man's words are mere breath, but the word of the Lord is spirit and life. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
47:Only a Perfect One who is always laughing at the word two can make you know of Love. ~ hafez, @wisdomtrove
48:The word &
49:The word of God is always most precious to the man who most lives upon it. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
50:The unit of the poet is the word, the unit of the prose writer is the sentence. ~ susan-sontag, @wisdomtrove
51:The word must be heard in silence; there must be darkness to see the stars. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
52:The word enthusiasm comes from the Greek root entheos, “having the god within.” ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
53:The Word of God is active, energizing, sharp and powerful like a two-edged sword. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
54:Let him who wants a true church cling to the Word by which everything is upheld. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
55:He swift don't win the race. It goes to the worthy, who can divide the word of truth. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
56:All the cunning of the devil is exercised in trying to tear us away from the word. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
57:For poets (bear the word) Half-poets even, are still whole democrats. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
58:The Word of God is a lamp by night, a light by day, and a delight at all times. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
59:The devil flees before the sound of music almost as much as before the Word of God. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
60:It is wise to listen, not to me but to the Word, and to confess that all things are one. ~ heraclitus, @wisdomtrove
61:The word experience is like a shrapnel shell, and bursts into a thousand meanings. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
62:Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
63:&
64:Train yourself never to put off the word or action for the expression of gratitude. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
65:Audrey Hepburn quote: Nothing is impossible, the word itself says &
66:The word design is everything and nothing. The design and the product itself are inseparable. ~ jony-ive, @wisdomtrove
67:We must never allow the majority to overrule the clear teaching of the Word of God. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
68:The word-coining genius, as if thought plunged into a sea of words and came up dripping. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
69:The word happiness exists in every language; it is plausible the thing itself exists. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
70:One thinking it is right to speak all things, whether the word is fit for speech or unutterable. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
71:No slave is a slave to the same lengths, and in so full a sense of the word, as a wife is. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
72:Reading books everyone died, none became any wise. One who reads the word of Love, only becomes wise. ~ kabir, @wisdomtrove
73:I am done with the monster of "We," the word of serfdom, of plunder, of misery, falsehood and shame. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
74:Transformations is the word. We can do the work of transformation only in the present moment. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
75:Even if religion and morality are dismissed as illusion, the word “Ought” still has sway. ~ sir-arthur-eddington, @wisdomtrove
76:Where shall the word be found, where will the word / Resound? Not here, there is not enough silence. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
77:I simply taught, preached, wrote God's Word: otherwise I did nothing. The Word of God did it all. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
78:The word and works of God is quite clear, that women were made either to be wives or prostitutes. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
79:The word of Mohammad is a voice direct from nature's own heart - all else is wind in comparison. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
80:Many Christians suffer because they're too busy seeking carnal knowledge instead of the Word of God. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
81:The word of God teaches that Christians suffer in order that they might glorify God in their lives. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
82:Whenever the word is rightly preached, and attentively heard, it never fails to bring forth fruit. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
83:Do you serve God or do you serve your feelings? Believe the Word of God over and above your feelings. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
84:I have done nothing; the Word has done and accomplished everything... . I let the Word do its work! ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
85:Ah, this is obviously some strange usage of the word &
86:Sales people should take lessons from their kids. What does the word no’ mean to a child? Almost nothing. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
87:The Master would insist that the final barrier to our attaining God was the word and concept God. ~ anthony-de-mello, @wisdomtrove
88:The word God, to me, is like the word enlightenment. It's become so corrupted by our ideas of what God is. ~ gangaji, @wisdomtrove
89:Look heavenward and speak the word aloud. Peace. We look at our world and speak the word aloud. Peace. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
90:The deeper the nostalgia and the more complete the fear, the purer, the richer the word and the secret. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
91:The word Fascism has now no meaning except in so far as it signifies &
92:a good book can make an almost impossible existence, liveable ( from &
93:Emotion is always new and the word has always served; therein lies the difficulty of expressing emotion. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
94:His books are exciting and powerful and — if I may filch the word from the booksy ones — pulsing. ~ dorothy-parker, @wisdomtrove
95:The word no is a great time-saver. Say no to anything that is not the highest and best use of your time. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
96:The Word of God is different than other words because God's Word is stuffed full of power and anointing. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
97:God created our souls to be satisfied only with the divine everlastingness of the Word made flesh. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
98:The only place we can find a clear, unmistakable message is in the Word of God, which we call the Bible. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
99:There is no point in using the word &
100:The word arse is as much god as the word face. It must be so, otherwise you cut off your god at the waist. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
101:To receive the Word in the ear is one thing, and to receive Jesus into your very soul is quite another. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
102:The materialistic view of happiness of our age starkly revealed in our understanding of the word "luxury. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
103:We are fully human only while playing, and we play only when we are human in the truest sense of the word. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
104:Plots and character don't make life. Life is here and now, anytime you say the word, anytime you let her rip. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
105:There's nothing more dangerous to the kingdom of darkness than a believer with the Word of God in their mouth. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
106:It is a miracle how God has so long preserved His Book! How great and glorious it is to have the Word of God! ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
107:One of the greatest disasters of our time is our universal acceptance of the word "tolerance" as a great virtue. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
108:Come to the Word with a spirit of longing with devotion and humble expectation. Be determined to know God. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
109:I believe nothing merely because Calvin taught it, but because I have found his teaching in the Word of God. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
110:In truth, the degree of anyone's success depends on how often they can say the word yes and hear the word no. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
111:Texas is a state of mind. Texas is an obsession. Above all else, Texas is a nation in every sense of the word. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
112:The word impossible contains the word possible' What's that&
113:We must not regard what or how the world esteems us, so we have the Word pure, and are certain of our doctrine. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
114:As a Christian, instead of concentrating on how you feel, focus on what you know to be truth from the Word of God. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
115:I handed in a script last year and the studio didn't change one word. The word they didn't change was on page 87. ~ steve-martin, @wisdomtrove
116:I think because I have great difficulty saying the word, &
117:Christians must understand most emphatically that the world around us is in conflict with the Word within us. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
118:Architects themselves tend to shy away from the word, preferring instead to talk about the manipulation of space. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
119:Only in silence the word, only in dark the light, only in dying life: bright the hawk's flight on the empty sky. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
120:The soul can do without everything except the word of God, without which none at all of its wants are provided for. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
121:Twas a special gift of God that speech was given to mankind; for through the Word, and not by force, wisdom governs. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
122:I can find only three kinds of business in the universe: mine, yours, and God’s. (For me, the word God means “reality.” ~ byron-katie, @wisdomtrove
123:Stop determining your worth and value by what other people say. Be determined by what the Word of God (scriptures)says. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
124:Nothing is more unbecoming to a teacher of the Word than flippancy. He must be serious and should not act like a clown. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
125:We should discipline ourselves to read the Word until it comes alive... until we can almost feel the breath of God. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
126:I want a real take-home quality to the sermon, so I built the whole sermon series around the word grace, those five letters. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
127:Feelings come, and feelings go, and feelings are deceiving. My warrant is the Word of God, naught else is worth believing. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
128:Do you need someone to make you a paper badge with the word WRITER on it before you can believe you are one? God I hope not. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
129:Start believing the Word of God over our feelings. The truth always overrides our feelings. Find the truth in the scriptures. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
130:The best morale exist when you never hear the word mentioned. When you hear a lot of talk about it, it's usually lousy. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
131:The primitive stages can always be re-established; the primitive mind is, in the fullest meaning of the word, imperishable. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
132:Often we can help each other most by leaving each other alone; at other times we need the hand-grasp and the word of cheer. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
133:So great are the effectiveness and power of the Word of God that the more it is persecuted the more it flourishes and grows. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
134:So he lived, not knowing and not seeing any chance of knowing what he was and for what purpose he had been placed in the word. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
135:There was a serenity about him always that had the look of innocence, when, technically, the word was no longer applicable. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
136:The word courage comes from the French word &
137:Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the word to the action. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
138:Written in Chinese, the word crisis, is composed of two characters. One represents danger and the other represent opportunity. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
139:You should not believe your conscience and your feelings more than the word which the Lord who receives sinners preaches to you. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
140:Faith looks to the word and the promise; that is, to the truth. But hope looks to that which the word has promised, to the gift . ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
141:I am ashamed of my emptiness," said the Word to the Work. "I know how poor I am when I see you," said the Work to the Word. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
142:You may as well quit reading and hearing the Word of God, and give it to the devil, if you do not desire to live according to it. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
143:Stay active. Read the Word. Worship with other believers. Continue to give. Keep learning and growing. Your faith will be unleashed! ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
144:The word education must not be understood in the sense of teaching but of assisting the psychological development of the child. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
145:Signs are taken for wonders. / &
146:I'm looking forward to becoming a marvelous - excuse the word marvelous - character actress. like Marie Dressler, like Will Rogers. ~ marilyn-monroe, @wisdomtrove
147:Like a fellow running from or toward a gun ain't got time to worry whether the word for what he is doing is courage or cowardice. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
148:The difference [God's] timelessness makes is that this now (which slips away from you even as you say the word now) is for Him infinite. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
149:... the whole universe is through and through the playing of love in every shade of the word's use, from animal lust to divine charity. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
150:What the word God means is the mystery really. It's the mystery that we face as humans the mystery of existence, of suffering and of death. ~ ram-das, @wisdomtrove
151:If I can get it down on paper without puking all over the word processor, then as far as I'm concerned, it's fit to see the light of day. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
152:My doubts stand in a circle around every word, I see them before I see the word, but what then! I do not see the word at all, I invent it. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
153:Reading the Bible will help you get to know the word, but it's when you put it down and live your life that you get to know the author. ~ steve-maraboli, @wisdomtrove
154:When people tell a lie about something, they have to make up a bunch of lies to go with the first one. Mythomania’ is the word for it. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
155:Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word “happiness” would lose it’s meaning if it were not balanced by sadness. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
156:Fading, fading: strength beyond hope and despair climbing the third stair. Lord, I am not worthy Lord, I am not worthy but speak the word only. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
157:Hearken to the word; understand knowledge; love life, and no one will persecute you, nor will anyone oppress you, other than you yourselves. ~ jesus-christ, @wisdomtrove
158:I have been saying for many years that we are using the word &
159:Impossible is the word found only in a fool's dictionary. Wise people create opportunities for themselves and make everything possible. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
160:When written in Chinese, the word &
161:We are not walking in the Word if our thoughts are opposite of what it says. We are not walking in the Word if we are not thinking in the Word. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
162:The Word of God is like a lion. You don't have to defend a lion. All you have to do is let the lion loose, and the lion will defend itself. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
163:... the word that seems best to summarize the desire of the human heart is &
164:Feeling is deep and still; and the word that floats on the surface Is as the tossing buoy, that betrays where the anchor is hidden. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
165:The Holocaust is a sacred subject. One should take off one's shoes when entering its domain, one should tremble each time one pronounces the word. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
166:The word &
167:Whatever may be said about the doctrine of election, it is written in the Word of God as with an iron pen, and there is no getting rid of it. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
168:A forest ecology is a delicate one. If the forest perishes, its fauna may go with it. The Athshean word for world is also the word for forest. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
169:What is called a republic, is not any particular form of government ... it is naturally opposed to the word monarchy, which means arbitrary power. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
170:I'm a constant learner. You need to be a constant student because things change and you have to change and grow. And I emphasize the word &
171:Faith, in the sense in which I am here using the word, is the art of holding on to things your reason has once accepted, in spite of your changing moods. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
172:‘Unconscious,’ the way I use the word here, means to be identified with some mental or emotional pattern. It implies complete absence of the watcher. ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
173:The word devil is very beautiful, if you read it backwards it becomes lived. That which is lived becomes divine and that which is not lived becomes the devil. ~ rajneesh, @wisdomtrove
174:The problem of reconciling human suffering with the existence of a God who loves, is only insoluble so long as we attach a trivial meaning to the word "love." ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
175:The word of a gentleman is as good as his bond — sometimes better; as in the present case, where his bond might prove but a doubtful sort of security. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
176:THE WORD OF GOD IS THE CREATION WE BEHOLD: And it is in this word, which no human invention can counterfeit or alter, that God speaketh universally to man. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
177:As to the book called the bible, it is blasphemy to call it the Word of God. It is a book of lies and contradictions and a history of bad times and bad men. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
178:The living tongue that tells the word, the living ear that hears it, bind and bond us in the communion we long for in the silence of our inner solitude. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
179:He who loses sight of the word of God, falls into despair; the voice of heaven no longer sustains him; he follows only the disorderly tendency of his heart. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
180:For years now I have heard the word "wait." It rings in the ear of every Negro with a piercing familiarity. This "wait" has almost always meant "never." ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
181:Let every man recognize what he is, and be certain that we are all equally priests, that is, we have the same power in the word and in any sacrament whatever. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
182:The space in Bombay is asked what is its opinion of the space in Poona. The names differ, but not the space. The word ‘Babaji’ is merely as address. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
183:Next to God, love is the word most mangled in every language. The highest form of regard between two people is friendship, and when love enters, friendship dies. ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
184:In the revolt against idealism, the ambiguities of the word experience have been perceived, with the result that realists have more and more avoided the word. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
185:Zen is a very quick path. Zen is the path of meditation. The word Zen means emptiness or fullness, meditation. Meditation is the quickest path to enlightenment. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
186:A man can no more diminish God's glory by refusing to worship Him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling the word, &
187:I am in no sense of the word a great artist, not even a great animator; I have always had men working for me whose skills were greater than my own. I am an idea man. ~ walt-disney, @wisdomtrove
188:If I ever wrote a book on preaching, it would contain three words: Preach the Word. Get rid of all the other stuff that gets you sidetracked; preach the Word. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
189:We must be on our guard against giving interpretations which are hazardous or opposed to science, and so exposing the word of God to the ridicule of unbelievers. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
190:If there is one word that you find coming out like a bomb from the Upanishads, bursting like a bombshell upon masses of ignorance, it is the word "fearlessness." ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
191:Isaiah calls the Church barren because her children are born without effort by the Word of faith through the Spirit of God. It is a matter of birth, not of exertion. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
192:I arise to day... In the name of Silence / Womb of the Word, / In the name of Stillness / Home of Belonging, / In the name of the Solitude / of the Soul and the Earth ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
193:For me, however, that beloved, glowing little word happiness has become associated with everything I have felt since childhood upon hearing the sound of the word itself. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
194:In societies where coolness and being cool is a top priority, the religious replace the word &
195:I use the word totally too much. I need to change it up and use a word that is different but has the same meaning. Mitch do you like submarine sandwiches? All-encompassingly. ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
196:Within the body there is played Music unending, though without stringed instruments  That music of the Word pervades the entire creation  Who listens to it is freed from all illusion ~ kabir, @wisdomtrove
197:The word "tip" stands for "to insure promptness." So when should you give it? Up front,of course. Sophisticated people don't take chances on poor service, they insure good service. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
198:Isn't Hollywood a dump-in the human sense of the word. A hideous town, pointed up by the insulting gardens of its rich, full of the human spirit at a new low of debasement. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
199:... It would be more consistent that we call [the Bible] the work of a demon than the word of God. It is a history of wickedness that has served to corrupt and brutalize mankind. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
200:Argue for your limitations, and sure enough, they're yours. Do you think, if you say the word "impossible" enough times, that difficult things will suddenly become easier for you? ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
201:Since one cannot educate adults, the word "education" has an evil sound in politics; there is a pretense of education, when the real purpose is coercion without the use of force. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
202:The mind goes astray, the mind returns home. Even the word &
203:You don't necessarily have to write to be a poet. Some people work in gas stations and they're poets. I don't call myself a poet, because I don't like the word. I'm a trapeze artist. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
204:No man should be alone when he opposes Satan. The Church and the ministry of the Word were instituted for this purpose, that hands may be joined together and one may help another. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
205:I was there when God was put on trial... .At the end of the trial, they used the word chayav, rather than &
206:Sometimes it is better not to talk about art by using the word "art". If we just act with awareness and integrity, our art will flower, and we don't have to talk about it at all. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
207:The word enlightenment conjures up the idea of some superhuman accomplishment, and the ego likes to keep it that way, but it is simply your natural state of felt oneness with Being. ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
208:The Holy Spirit gives liberty to the Christian, direction to the worker, discernment to the teacher, power to the Word, and fruit to faithful service. He reveals the things of Christ. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
209:What is being lost is the magic of the word. I am not an image person. Imagery belongs to another civilization: the caveman. Caveman couldn't express himself so he put images on walls. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
210:God wants our conscience to be certain and sure that it is pleasing to Him. This cannot be done if the conscience is led by its own feelings, but only if it relies on the Word of God. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
211:I can safely say, on the authority of all that is revealed in the Word of God, that any man or woman on this earth who is bored and turned off by worship is not ready for heaven. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
212:Those who turn proud when their praise is sounded, who seek their own glory, not Christ's, or those who are moved by slanders and by infamy, had better leave the ministry of the Word. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
213:The word &
214:The word &
215:Today in the west the word &
216:Speak with integrity. Say only what you mean. Avoid using the word to speak against yourself or to gossip about others. Use the power of your word in the direction of truth and love.   ~ don-miguel-ruiz, @wisdomtrove
217:I am bound by the texts of the Bible, my conscience is captive to the Word of God, I neither can nor will recant anything, since it is neither right nor safe to act against my conscience. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
218:I think there's more women that watch me than men, but I don't look at myself as just a minister to women. My ministry began that way, but I really feel like the Word of God is for everybody. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
219:Success? Odd as it seems, you will achieve the greates results in business and career if you drop the word &
220:The bounden duty of a true believer towards men who profess to be Christians, and yet deny the Word of the Lord, and reject the fundamentals of the Gospel, is to come out from among them ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
221:[Our] plan is to follow the example of the prophets and the ancient fathers of the church, and to compose psalms... so that the Word of God may be among the people also in the form of music. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
222:The word &
223:Let the word and the legend go before you. Let the world go before you. Let your shadow grow. Let it grow hair on its face. Let it become dark. Given time, words may even enchant an enchanter. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
224:In one sheet of paper, we see everything else, the cloud, the forest, the logger. I am, therefore you are. You are, therefore I am. That is the meaning of the word "interbeing." We interare. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
225:Learning in the true sense of the word is possible only in that state of attention, in which there is no outer or inner compulsion. Right thinking can come about only when the mind is not ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
226:Yet this is trash that the Church imposes upon the world as the Word of God; this is the collection of lies and contradictions called the Holy Bible! This is the rubbish called Revealed Religion! ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
227:Man himself has become our greatest hazard and our only hope. So that today, St. John the apostle may well be paraphrased: In the end is the Word, and the Word is Man - and the Word is with Men. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
228:Tantra is not sexual yoga. When the word tantra is used in the West, very often people immediately associate it with some kind of sexual yoga in which you use sex as a vehicle for enlightenment. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
229:My future will not copy my fair past, I wrote that once. And, thinking at my side my ministering life-angel justified the word by his appealing look upcast to the white throne of God. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
230:This is not a book in the ordinary sense of the word. No, this is a prolonged insult, a gob of spit in the face of art, a kick in the pants to God, Man, Destiny, Time, Love, Beauty... what you will. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
231:For the spiritual sense of the Word treats everywhere of the spiritual world, that is, of the state of the church in the heavens, as well as in the earth; hence the Word is spiritual and Divine. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
232:Most of us would be upset if we were accused of being "silly." But the word "silly" comes from the old English word "selig," and its literal definition is "to be blessed, happy, healthy and prosperous." ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
233:This year has begun hopefully for right thinkers. After all these centuries of feudal barbarism and political slavery, it is surprising to see how the word of &
234:For in every particular of the Word there is an internal sense which treats of things spiritual and heavenly, not of things natural and worldly, such as are treated of in the sense of the letter. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
235:I got the idea [for Anthem's theme] in my school days, in Soviet Russia, when I heard all the vicious attacks on individualism, and asked myself what the world would be like if men lost the word &
236:Instead of working so hard to prove the skeptics wrong, it makes a lot more sense to delight the true believers. They deserve it, after all, and they're the ones that are going to spread the word for you. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
237:But the word "right" is one of the most deceptive of pitfalls; it is so easy to slip from a qualified meaning in the premise to an unqualified one in the conclusion. Most rights are qualified. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-jr, @wisdomtrove
238:Every time I open my Bible I will read it as the Word of &
239:I type 90 words per minute on the typewriter; I type 100 words per minute on the word processor. But, of course, I don't keep that up indefinitely - every once in a while I do have to think a few seconds. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
240:Reason must be deluded, blinded, and destroyed. Faith must trample underfoot all reason, sense, and understanding, and whatever it sees must be put out of sight and ... know nothing but the word of God. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
241:To be a Christian who is willing to travel with Christ on his downward road requires being willing to detach oneself constantly from any need to be relevant, and to trust ever more deeply the Word of God. ~ henri-nouwen, @wisdomtrove
242:To be entirely safe from the devil's snares the man of God must be completely obedient to the Word of the Lord. The driver on the highway is safe, not when he reads the signs but when he obeys them. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
243:Penetrate deep into the word "Om". Gradually the word will disappear and only the silence will remain. The word is a support. The meaning is within you. Om brings out that meaning which is hidden in your soul. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
244:The Chinese use two brush strokes to write the word &
245:A waiting person is a patient person. The word patience means the willingness to stay where we are and live the situation out to the full in the belief that something hidden there will manifest itself to us. ~ henri-nouwen, @wisdomtrove
246:Whatever the political affiliation of our next President, whatever his views may be on all the issues and problems that rush in upon us, he must above all be the chief executive in every sense of the word. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
247:Feel the underlying meaning of the teachings that are espoused by me or anyone else. The word's don't mean much. Words are supposed to be catalysts for higher states of attention. That is where the action is. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
248:The truly great writer does not want to write: he wants the world to be a place in which he can live the life of the imagination. The first quivering word he puts to paper is the word of the wounded angel: pain. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
249:The word "Guru", as it is used in the contemporary American scene, is someone who takes all your money and tells you what to do with your life. You assume no responsibility. A lot of people want that free ride. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
250:As you pray for the Holy Spirit to make you aware of thoughts that come into your mind that don't line up with God's Word, you'll begin to realize when those thoughts come and you can renew your mind with the Word. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
251:The word ‘bread’: neither can you eat nor live by it; it merely conveys an idea. It acquires meaning only with the actual eating. In the same sense am I telling you that the normal state is not verbal. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
252:Golf is the ultimate avoidance activity for the dysfunctional dad. A game so nonsensically difficult, so pointless, so irrationally time consuming, the word golf itself can only stand for ‘Get Out, Leave Family.’ ~ jerry-seinfeld, @wisdomtrove
253:I would teach my child to respect what is right - the word right is a difficult word to use - I would teach him to respect the intrinsic value of things. Do you see what I mean? The true proportion of things. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
254:Nature never taught me that there exists a God of glory and of infinite majesty. I had to learn that in other ways. But nature gave the word glory a meaning for me. I still do not know where else I could have found one. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
255:This is. And thou art. There is no safety. There is no end. The word must be heard in silence. There must be darkness to see the stars. The dance is always danced above the hollow place, above the terrible abyss. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
256:The word &
257:Some people, when they use the word &
258:Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans - born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
259:The endless cycle of idea and action, / Endless invention, endless experiment, / Brings knowledge of motion, but not of stillness; / Knowledge of speech, but not of silence; / Knowledge of words, and ignorance of The Word. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
260:When I begin to doubt my ability to work the word, I simply read another writer and know I have nothing to worry about. My contest is only with myself, to do it right, with power, and force, and delight, and gamble. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
261:Your soul is your mind, your will and your emotions. When the Word gets rooted in there and begins to change your mind, it begins to heal your emotions and turn your will away from self-will and onto doing the will of God. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
262:Every philosophical problem, when it is subjected to the necessary analysis and justification, is found either to be not really philosophical at all, or else to be, in the sense in which we are using the word, logical. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
263:God will speak to the hearts of those who prepare themselves to hear; and conversely, those who do not so prepare themselves will hear nothing even though the Word of God is falling upon their outer ears every Sunday. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
264:God is not silent. It is the nature of God to speak. The second person of the Holy Trinity is called "The Word." The Bible is the inevitable outcome of God's continuous speech. It is the infallible declaration of His mind. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
265:All the time the joke is that the word "mine" in its fully possessive sense cannot be uttered by a human being about anything. In the long run either [Satan] or God will say "mine" of each thing that exists, and specially of each man. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
266:Avoid using the word &
267:I am quite serious when I say that I do not believe there are, on the whole earth besides, so many intensified bores as in these United States. No man can form an adequate idea of the real meaning of the word, without coming here. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
268:The unconscious is not just evil by nature, it is also the source of the highest good: not only dark but also light, not only bestial, semihuman, and demonic but superhuman, spiritual, and, in the classical sense of the word, "divine.” ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
269:In Hindu philosophy the whole creation is regarded as the Vishnu Lila, the play of Vishnu. Lila means dance or play. Also in Hindu philosophy, they call the world illusion; and in Latin the root of the word illusion is ludere, to play. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
270:The only real argument against the Bible is an unholy life. When a man argues against the Word of God, follow him home, and see if you cannot discover the reason of his enmity to the Word of the Lord. It lies in some sort of sin. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
271:The culture of Rome just doesn't match the culture of Yoga, not as far as I can see. In fact, I've decided that Rome and Yoga don't have anything in common at all. Except for the way they both kind of remind you of the word toga. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
272:The word which gives the key to the national vice is waste. And people who are wasteful are not wise, neither can they remain young and vigorous. In order to transmute energy to higher and more subtle levels one must first conserve it. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
273:Thought is the first level of creation. Next comes the word. Everything you say is a thought expressed. It is creative and sends forth creative energy into the universe. Words are the second level of creation. Next comes action. ~ neale-donald-walsch, @wisdomtrove
274:From the Word of God I gather that damnation is all of man, from top to bottom, and salvation is all of grace, from first to last. He that perishes chooses to perish; but he that is saved is saved because God has chosen to save him. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
275:We minister the Word of God. The proclamation of the Gospel comes after individuals have opened their hearts to God and turned from themselves to others. Only then are they truly ready to hear and benefit fully from the Word of the Lord. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
276:When men's hearts are melted under the preaching of the word, or by sickness, or the loss of friends, believers should be very eager to stamp the truth upon the prepared mind. Such opportunities are to be seized with holy eagerness. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
277:In this war, which was total in every sense of the word, we have seen many great changes in military science. It seems to me that not the least of these was the development of psychological warfare as a specific and effective weapon. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
278:Belonging is a circle that embraces everything; if we reject it, we damage our nature.The word &
279:Love heals. Heals and liberates. I use the word love, not meaning sentimentality, but a condition so strong that it may be that which holds the stars in their heavenly positions and that which causes the blood to flow orderly in our veins. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
280:The usual derivation of the word Metaphysics is not to be sustainedthe science is supposed to take its name from its superiority to physics. The truth is, that Aristotle's treatise on Morals is next in succession to his Book of Physics. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
281:We are approaching levels - if we're not beyond levels - of threshold for the number of messages that consumers can take in in a given day. There is a kind of hunger for some kind of new approach to getting the word out about something. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
282:Force, force, everywhere force; we ourselves a mysterious force in the centre of that. "There is not a leaf rotting on the highway but has Force in it: how else could it rot?" [As used in his time, by the word force, Carlyle means energy.] ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
283:Oh! how great and glorious a thing it is to have before one the Word of God! With that we may at all times feel joyous and secure; we need never be in want of consolation, for we see before us, in all its brightness, the pure and right way. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
284:As long as I talked unceasingly about the Lord,The Lord stayed away, kept at a distance.But when I silenced my mouth, sat very stillAnd fixed my mind at the doorway of the Lord,I was linked to the music of the Word,And all my talking came to an end. ~ kabir, @wisdomtrove
285:The Word of God well understood and religiously obeyed is the shortest route to spiritual perfection. And we must not select a few favorite passages to the exclusion of others. Nothing less than a whole Bible can make a whole Christian. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
286:Every day the word &
287:Stop thinking of God as an entity. An entity is an object in consciousness. This is why the word God can be limiting because it has so much past association with being an object. God is awareness itself. Awareness perceives but cannot be perceived. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
288:When I compare life to a dream I do not mean to denigrate it as some sort of meaningless fantasy. Life is too wonderful to be called an illusion, unless we whisper the word in amazement, as we might when witnessing the most astonishing magic trick. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
289:But the Hebrew word, the word timshel‚îThou mayest'‚î that gives a choice. It might be the most important word in the world. That says the way is open. That throws it right back on a man. For if Thou mayest'‚îit is also true that Thou mayest not. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
290:Now let me make it clear that I believe there can only be one defense policy for the United States and that is summed up in the word &
291:He who is surety is never sure himself. Take advice, and never be security for more than you are quite willing to lose. Remember the word of the wise man: He that is surety for a stranger shall smart for it; and he that hateth suretyship is sure. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
292:The blessed Religion revealed in the word of God will remain an eternal and awful monument to prove that the best Institution may be abused by human depravity; and that they may even, in some instances be made subservient to the vilest purposes. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
293:There is nothing so deluded as feelings. Christians cannot live by feelings. Let me further tell you that many feelings are the work of Satan, for they are not right feelings. What right have you to set up your feelings against the Word of Christ? ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
294:The Puritans were accustomed to explain faith by the word &
295:When I'm ready to make a photograph, I think I quite obviously see in my minds eye something that is not literally there in the true meaning of the word. I'm interested in something which is built up from within, rather than just extracted from without. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
296:Vain is the word of a philosopher which does not heal any suffering of man. For just as there is no profit in medicine if it does not expel the diseases of the body, so there is no profit in philosophy either, if it does not expel the suffering of the mind. ~ epicurus, @wisdomtrove
297:But in addition to all the moral evidence against the Bible, I will, in the progress of this work, produce such other evidence as even a priest cannot deny; and show, from that evidence, that the Bible is not entitled to credit, as being the word of God. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
298:How do you find the divine power in yourself? The word enthusiasm means &
299:It doesn't pay to say too much when you are mad enough to choke. For the word that stings the deepest is the word that is never spoke, Let the other fellow wrangle till the storm has blown away, then he'll do a heap of thinking about the things you didn't say. ~ jules-renard, @wisdomtrove
300:I think someday you're going to be a great writer," he said. "But" he added maliciously, "first you'll have to suffer a bit. I mean really suffer, because you don't know what the word means yet. You only think you've suffered. You've got to fall in love first. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
301:To be human is to belong. Belonging is a circle that embraces everything; if we reject it, we damage our nature. The word ‘belonging’ holds together the two fundamental aspects of life: Being and Longing, the longing of our Being and the being of our Longing. ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
302:As a well cut diamond has many facets, each reflecting a different color of light, so does the word yoga, each facet reflecting a different shade of meaning and revealing different aspects of the entire range of human endeavor to win inner peace and happiness. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
303:I believe that very much of current Arminianism is simply ignorance of gospel doctrine; and if people began to study their Bibles, and to take the Word of God as they find it, they must inevitably, if believers, rise up to rejoice in the doctrines of grace. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
304:The kingdom of God does not consist in talk, but in power, that is, in works and practice. God loves the &
305:I'm not a master. I'm a student-master, meaning that I have the knowledge of a master and the expertise of a master, but I'm still learning. So I'm a student-master. I don't believe in the word &
306:It is almost universally felt that when we call a country democratic we are praising it; consequently, the defenders of every kind of regime claim that it is a democracy, and fear that they might have to stop using the word if it were tied down to any one meaning. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
307:The Vedas teach that the soul is divine, only held in the bondage of matter; perfection will be reached when this bond will burst, and the word they use for it is, therefore, Mukti - freedom, freedom from the bonds of imperfection, freedom from death and misery. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
308:If one has fear, there can be no initiative in the creative sense of the word. To have initiative in this sense is to do something original - to do it spontaneously, naturally, without being guided, forced, controlled. It is to do something which you love to do. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
309:Music is to be praised as second only to the Word of God because by her all the emotions are swayed. That is why there are so many songs and psalms. This precious gift has been bestowed on men alone to remind them that they are created to praise and magnify the Lord. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
310:I cannot choose but adhere to the word of God, which has possession of my conscience; nor can I possibly, nor will I even make any recantation, since it is neither safe nor honest to act contrary to conscience! Here I stand; I cannot do otherwise, so help me God! Amen. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
311:Meditation is not the pursuit of an invisible path leading to some imaginal bliss. The meditative mind is seeing, watching, listening, without the word, without comment, without opinion, attentive to the movement of life in all its relationships throughout the day. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
312:The word civilization to my mind is coupled with death. When I use the word, I see civilization as a crippling, thwarting thing, a stultifying thing. For me it was always so. I don't believe in the golden ages, you see... civilization is the arteriosclerosis of culture. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
313:God has done so much in my life, and my desire is to help others who are hurting to receive His love and get the healing they need - mentally, emotionally and spiritually. I know the Word works and total restoration is possible in Christ because I've experienced it myself. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
314:To restore man, who had been laid low by sin, to the heights of divine glory, the Word of the eternal Father, though containing all things within His immensity, willed to become small. This He did not by putting aside His greatness but by taking to Himself our littleness. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
315:To restore man, who had been laid low by sin, to the heights of divine glory, the Word of the eternal Father, though containing all things within His immensity, willed to become small. This He did not by putting aside His greatness but by taking to Himself our littleness. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
316:Take away from Genesis the belief that Moses was the author, on which only the strange believe that it is the word of God has stood, and there remains nothing of Genesis but an anonymous book of stories, fables, and traditionary or invented absurdities, or of downright lies. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
317:If I were a physician, and if I were allowed to prescribe just one remedy for all the ills of the modern world, I would prescribe silence. For even if the Word of God were proclaimed in the modern world, how could one hear it with so much noise? Therefore, create silence. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
318:If man survives for as long as the least successful of the dinosaurs-those creatures whom we often deride as nature's failures-then we may be certain of this: for all but a vanishingly brief instant near the dawn of history, the word &
319:Modern physics has definitely decided for Plato. For the smallest units of matter are not physical objects in the ordinary sense of the word: they are forms, structures, or – in Plato’s sense – Ideas, which can be unambiguously spoken of only in the language of mathematics. ~ rupert-sheldrake, @wisdomtrove
320:I've been studying the Bible for a long time. I remember that after the first five years or so of diligently studying the Word, I didn't feel like I had made any progress. There were a lot of things in my life that were out of order, and I didn't feel like I was getting anywhere. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
321:&
322:The case, however, is, that the Bible will not bear examination in any part of it, which it would do if it was the Word of God. Those who most believe it are those who know least about it, and priests always take care to keep the inconsistent and contradictory parts out of sight. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
323:Intercessory prayer is exceedingly prevalent. What wonders it has wrought! The Word of God teems with its marvelous deeds. Believer, thou hast a mighty engine in thy hand, use it well, use it constantly, use it with faith, and thou shalt surely be a benefactor to thy brethren. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
324:I speak of God's love and grace and redemption and freedom, but when I say "in the context of this community," it is heard differently. To be with people so obviously broken, so obviously handicapped, and here to discover real joy and peace - that makes the Word of God come alive. ~ henri-nouwen, @wisdomtrove
325:Bless people when they revile you. Think how much good they are doing by helping to stamp out the false ego. Hold fast to the real Self. Think only pure thoughts, and you will accomplish more than a regiment of mere preachers. Out of purity and silence comes the word of power. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
326:A book is a physical object in a world of physical objects. It is a set of dead symbols. And then the right reader comes along, and the words‚or rather the poetry behind the words, for the words themselves are mere symbols‚spring to life, and we have a resurrection of the word. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
327:The roots of the word &
328:In the word question, there is a beautiful word - quest. I love that word. We are all partners in a quest. The essential questions have no answers. You are my question, and I am yours - and then there is dialogue. The moment we have answers, there is no dialogue. Questions unite people. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
329:The word &
330:The Word became flesh to communicate to us human beings caught in the mud, the pain, the fears and the brokenness of existence, the life, the joy, the communion, the ecstatic gift of love that is the source of all love and life and unity in our universe and that is the very life of God. ~ jean-vanier, @wisdomtrove
331:Fools! You think of "god" as a sentient being. God is the word used to represent a force. This force created nothing, it just helps things along. It does not answer prayers, although it may make you think of a way to solve a problem. It has the power to influence you, but not decide for you. ~ diogenes, @wisdomtrove
332:And here, over the portals of my fort, I shall cut in the stone the word which is to be my beacon and my banner. The word which will not die should we all perish in battle. The word which can never die on this earth, for it is the heart of it and the meaning and the glory. The sacred word: EGO ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
333:We need to recapture the gospel glow of the early Christians who were nonconformists in the truest sense of the word . . . Their powerful gospel put an end to such barbaric evils as infanticide and bloody gladiatorial contests. Finally, they captured the Roman Empire for Jesus Christ. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
334:The human qualities of the raw materials show through. Naivety, error, contradiction, even (as in the cursing Psalms) wickedness are not removed. The total result is not "the Word of God" in the sense that every passage in itself, gives impeccable science or history. It carries the Word of God. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
335:Grapes are juicy. Strawberries. Oranges. Good pork chops are succulent," said Dusty. "But the word isn't accurately descriptive of a person." Smiling with delight, Ahriman said, "Oh, really, not accurately descriptive? Be careful housepainter. Your genes are showing. What if I were a cannibal? ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
336:It might interest you to know that the 1828 Noah Webster Dictionary identifies the optimist in complimentary terms, but says nothing about the pessimist. The word &
337:The burden borne by mankind is a heavy and a crushing thing. The word Jesus used means a load carried or toil borne to the point of exhaustion. Rest is simply release from that burden. It is not something we do, it is what comes to us when we cease to do. His own meekness, that is the rest. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
338:Ego is a social institution with no physical reality. The ego is simply your symbol of yourself. Just as the word “water” is a noise that symbolizes a certain liquid without being it, so too the idea of ego symbolizes the role you play, who you are, but it is not the same as your living organism. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
339:We must make a great difference between God's Word and the word of man. A man's word is a little sound, that flies into the air, and soon vanishes; but the Word of God is greater than heaven and earth, yea, greater than death and hell, for it forms part of the power of God, and endures everlastingly. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
340:It seems that God does not exist; because if one of two contraries be infinite, the other would be altogether destroyed. But the word "God" means that He is infinite goodness. If, therefore, God existed, there would be no evil discoverable; but there is evil in the world. Therefore God does not exist. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
341:Let us leave a little room for reflection in our lives, room too for silence. Let us look within ourselves and see whether there is some delightful hidden place inside where we can be free of noise and argument. Let us hear the Word of God in stillness and perhaps we will then come to understand it. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
342:It seems that God does not exist; because if one of two contraries be infinite, the other would be altogether destroyed. But the word "God" means that He is infinite goodness. If, therefore, God existed, there would be no evil discoverable; but there is evil in the world. Therefore God does not exist. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
343:Nowhere in the Word of God is there any text or passage or line that can be twisted or tortured into teaching that the organic living church of Jesus Christ just prior to His return will not have every right and every power and every obligation that she knew in that early part of the book of Acts. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
344:What you do in your house is worth as much as if you did it up in heaven for our Lord God. We should accustom ourselves to think of our position and work as sacred and well-pleasing to God, not on account of the position and work, but on account of the word and faith from which the obedience and work flow. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
345:I'm not a person in your sense of the word, though I may appear a person to you. I am that infinite ocean of consciousness in which all happens. I am also beyond all existence and cognition, pure bliss of being. There is nothing I feel separate from; hence I am all. No thing is me, so I am nothing. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
346:We are convinced that all of our race who die in infancy partake in the redemption wrought out by our Lord Jesus. Whatever some may think, we believe that the whole spirit and tone of the Word of God, as well as the nature of God Himself, lead us to believe that all who leave this world as babes are saved. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
347:The only reality we can ever truly know is that of our perceptions, our own consciousness, while that consciousness, and thus our entire reality, is made of nothing but signs and symbols. Nothing but language. Even God requires language before conceiving the Universe. See Genesis: “In the beginning was the Word. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
348:But this thing, whatever it was, this mistlike something, hung there inside my body like a certain kind of potential. I wanted to give it a name, but the word refused to come to mind. I’m terrible at finding the right words for things. I’m sure Tolstoy would have been able to come up with exactly the right word ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
349:You have two ways: you can give your heart and mind to self-discovery, or you accept my words on trust and act accordingly. In other words, either you become totally self-concerned, or totally un-self-concerned. It is the word &
350:In the critic's vocabulary, the word "precursor" is indispensable, but it should be cleansed of all connotations of polemic or rivalry. The fact is that every writer creates his own precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future." - Essay: "Kafka and his Precursors ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
351:Well, it's an ancestral tribe. These were immigrants from north of Germany who came here about the time of the Civil War, but anyway, these people called themselves free thinkers. They were impressed, incidentally, by Darwin. They're called Humanists now; people who aren't so sure that the Bible is the Word of God. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
352:Another way to be awakened by the beauty and complexity of the word is to get a dog. Small Things like a plant that I had passed a thousand time and never given a second thought to. But the dog is curious. And the dog stops and wants to smell this and smell that. And the dog makes you look and focus and take the time. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
353:The devil, the originator of sorrowful anxieties and restless troubles, flees before the sound of music almost as much as before the Word of God... .Music is a gift and grace of God, not an invention of men. Thus it drives out the devil and makes people cheerful. Then one forgets all wrath, impurity, and other devices. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
354:The word "Verse" is used here as the term most convenient for expressing, and without pedantry, all that is involved in the consideration of rhythm, rhyme, meter, and versification... the subject is exceedingly simple; one tenth of it, possibly may be called ethical; nine tenths, however, appertains to the mathematics. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
355:Religion has traditionally been the domain of such fundamental inquiries within a spiritual framework, but mindfulness has little to do with religion, except in the most fundamental meaning of the word, as an attempt to appreciate the deep mystery of being alive and to acknowledge being vitally connected to all that exists. ~ jon-kabat-zinn, @wisdomtrove
356:Before we embark on our philosophical adventure, let me make something very clear. When I compare life to a dream I do not mean to denigrate it as some sort of meaningless fantasy. Life is too wonderful to be called an illusion, unless we whisper the word in amazement, as we might when witnessing the most astonishing magic trick. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
357:The Word of God will be to you a bulwark and a high tower, a castle of defense against the foe. Oh, see to it that the Word of God is in you, in your very soul, permeating your thoughts, and so operating upon your outward life, that all may know you to be a true Bible-Christian, for they perceive it in your words and deeds. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
358:We are warned by the Word both of our duty, our danger, and our remedy. On the sea of life there would be many more wrecks if it were not for the divine storm-signals which give to the watchful a timely warning. The Bible should be our Mentor, our Monitor, our Memento Mori, our Remembrancer, and the Keeper of our Conscience. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
359:We can never make ourselves better by trying... praying more or longer, studying more of the Word, performing good works, etc. Don't get me wrong... it's not bad to do any of these things. In fact, it's good. It's just that doing them in God's power is the only way those things will have any real and lasting effect in our lives. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
360:Human judgment of human actions is true and void , that is to say, first true and then void... . The judgment of the word is true, the judgment in itself is void... . Only he who is a party can really judge, but as a party he cannot judge. Hence it follows that there is no possibility of judgment in the world, only a glimmer of it. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
361:In Asian languages, the word for &
362:The majority of people are ready to throw their aims and purposes overboard, and give up at the first sign of opposition or misfortune. A few carry on despite all opposition, until they attain their goal. There may be no heroic connotation to the word ‘persistence,’ but the quality is to the character of man what carbon is to steel. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
363:Take a look at your own heart, and you will soon find out what has stuck to it and where your treasure is. It is easy to determine whether hearing the Word of God, living according to it, and achieving such a life gives you as much enjoyment and calls forth as much diligence from you as does accumulating and saving money and property. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
364:I believe that should is one of the most damaging words in our language. Every time we use it, we are, in effect, saying that we are wrong, or we were wrong, or we're going to be wrong. I would like to take the word should out of our vocabulary forever and replace it with the word could. This word gives us a choice, and we're never wrong. ~ louise-hay, @wisdomtrove
365:My life is absolutely meaningless. When I consider the different periods into which it falls, it seems like the word Schnur in the dictionary, which means in the first place a string, in the second, a daughter-in-law. The only thing lacking is that the word Schnur should mean in the third place a camel, in the fourth, a dust-brush. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
366:Unless I am convicted by Scripture and plain reason-I do not accept the authority of popes and councils, for they have contradicted each other-my conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and will not recant anything, for to go against conscience is neither right nor safe. Here I stand, I cannot do otherwise. God help me. Amen. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
367:Using the word political’ in the widest possible sense. Desire to push the world in a certain direction, to alter other peoples’ idea of the kind of society that they should strive after. Once again, no book is genuinely free from political bias. The opinion that art should have nothing to do with politics is itself a political attitude. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
368:When we hear the word &
369:I am looking for the word which is there and shouldn't be there. I wonder, why is it there? Or I look for problems: the Akedah [the Binding of Isaac - Genesis 22]. It still baffles me. Each time I read it - and I read it at least twice a year - each time I discover new layers in it. Always. So this is of more concern to me than the minimalists. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
370:Whenever we read the obscene stories, the voluptuous debaucheries, the cruel and tortuous executions, the unrelenting vindictiveness with which more than half the Bible is filled, it would be more consistent that we call it the word of a demon than the word of God. It is a history of wickedness that has served to corrupt and brutalize humankind. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
371:Now, which am I to believe, a book that any impostor might make and call the Word of God, or the creation itself which none but an Almighty Power could make? For the Bible says one thing; and the creation says the contrary. The Bible represents God with all the passions of a mortal, and the creation proclaims him with all the attributes of a God. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
372:Just as people can watch spellbound a circus artist tumbling through the air in a phosphorized costume, so they can listen to a preacher who uses the Word of God to draw attention to himself. But a sensational preacher stimulates the senses and leaves the spirit untouched. Instead of being the way to God, his &
373:I am not permitted to let my love be so merciful as to tolerate and endure false doctrine. When faith and doctrine are concerned and endangered, neither love nor patience are in order... .when these are concerned, neither toleration nor mercy are in order, but only anger, dispute, and destruction - to be sure, only with the Word of God as our weapon. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
374:I have noticed that whenever a person gives up his belief in the Word of God because it requires that he should believe a good deal, his unbelief requires him to believe a great deal more. If there be any difficulties in the faith of Christ, they are not one-tenth as great as the absurdities in any system of unbelief which seeks to take its place. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
375:The word &
376:When we believe that God hears us, it is but natural that we should be eager to hear Him. Only from Him can come the word which can speak peace to troubled spirits; the voices of men are feeble in such a case, a plaster far too narrow for the sore; but God's voice is power, He speaks and it is done, and hence when we hear Him our distress is ended. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
377:Perception without the word, which is without thought, is one of the strangest phenomena. Then the perception is much more acute, not only with the brain, but also with all the senses. Such perception is not the fragmentary perception of the intellect nor the affair of the emotions. It can be called a total perception, and it is part of meditation. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
378:I am much afraid that the schools will prove the very gates of hell, unless they diligently labour in explaining the Holy Scriptures, and engraving them in the hearts of youth. I advise no one to place his child where the scriptures do not reign paramount. Every institution in which means are not unceasingly occupied with the Word of God must be corrupt. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
379:Science is one thing, wisdom is another. Science is an edged tool, with which men play like children, and cut their own fingers. If you look at the results which science has brought in its train, you will find them to consist almost wholly in elements of mischief. See how much belongs to the word "Explosion" alone, of which the ancients knew nothing. ~ sir-arthur-eddington, @wisdomtrove
380:We might preach till our tongues rotted, till we should exhaust our lungs and die, but never a soul would be converted unless there were mysterious power going with it - the Holy Ghost changing the will of man. O Sirs! We might as well preach to stone walls as preach to humanity unless the Holy Ghost be with the word, to give it power to convert the soul. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
381:Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, "Lenore?" This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, "Lenore!" ‚ Merely this, and nothing more ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
382:Look at the word responsibility—’response-ability’—the ability to choose your response. Highly proactive people recognize that responsibility. They do not blame circumstances, conditions, or conditioning for their behavior. Their behavior is a product of their own conscious choice, based on values, rather than a product of their conditions, based on feeling. ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
383:Do you know that even when you look at a tree and say, `That is an oak tree', or `that is a banyan tree', the naming of the tree, which is botanical knowledge, has so conditioned your mind that the word comes between you and actually seeing the tree? To come in contact with the tree you have to put your hand on it and the word will not help you to touch it. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
384:Look at the word responsibility—’response-ability’—the ability to choose your response. Highly proactive people recognise that responsibility. They do not blame circumstances, conditions, or conditioning for their behaviour. Their behaviour is a product of their own conscious choice, based on values, rather than a product of their conditions, based on feeling. ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
385:One night, I was chatting with a group of 16-year-old girls over a few drinks about a name for the record store ... A bunch of ideas were bounced around, then, as we were all new to business, someone suggested Virgin. It smacked of new and fresh and at the time the word was still slightly risqué, so, thinking it would be an attention-grabber, we went with it. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
386:Children long to know that they are lovable. And there are ways that technology can help with that. But ultimately it's their relationships with their parents, their grandparents, their peers, and their teachers that help them to know that for sure. A child can learn the word "hug" and the letters h-u-g through a computer, but a computer can never give the child a hug. ~ fred-rogers, @wisdomtrove
387:The value of the Old Testament may be dependant on what seems its imperfection. It may repel one use in order that we may be forced to use it in another way-to find the Word in it... to re-live, while we read, the whole Jewish experience of God's gradual and graded self-revelation, to feel the very contentions between the Word and the human material through which it works. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
388:To educate yourself for the feeling of gratitude means to take nothing for granted, but to always seek out and value the kindness that stands behind the action. Nothing that is done for you is a matter of course. Everything originates in a will for the good, which is directed at you. Train yourself never to put off the word or action for the expression of gratitude. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
389:The purpose of a fish trap is to catch fish, and when the fish are caught the trap is forgotten. The purpose of a rabbit snare is to catch rabbits. When the rabbits are caught, the snare is forgotten. The purpose of the word is to convey ideas. When the ideas are grasped, the words are forgotten. Where can I find a man who has forgotten words? He is the one I would like to talk to. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
390:I saw a lady on TV, she was born without arms. That's sad, but then they said, "Lola does not know the meaning of the word &
391:Intensity is a mental attitude more than a physical attitude. Many people misunderstand what intensity means. They think it means straining and sweating. No! That is a wrong meaning of the word! Intensity is to get totally involved, fully immersed and absorbed in what one is doing. Intense practice means a fast and keen mode in adjusting, correcting, and progressively proceeding. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
392:Its very pulse, if I may use the word, was like no other clock. It did not mark the flight of every moment with a gentle second stroke, as though it would check old Time, and have him stay his pace in pity, but measured it with one sledge-hammer beat, as if its business were to crush the seconds as they came trooping on, and remorselessly to clear a path before the Day of Judgment. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
393:Do you desire security? Here you have it. The Lord says to you, "I will never abandon you, I will always be with you." If a good man made you such a promise, you would trust him. God makes it, and do you doubt? Do you seek a support more sure than the word of God, which is infallible? Surely, He has made the promise, He has written it, He has pledged His word for it, it is most certain. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
394:The typical atheist rebels against God as a teenager rebels against his parents. When his own desires or standards are not fulfilled in the way that he sees fit, he, in revolt, storms out of the house in denial of the Word of God and in scrutiny of a great deal of those who stand by the Word of God. The epithet &
395:The problem of why God created the universe still troubles thinking men; but if we cannot know why, we can at least know that He did not bring His worlds into being to meet some unfulfilled need in Himself, as a man might build a house to shelter him against the winter cold or plant a field of corn to provide him with necessary food. The word &
396:I [i.e., God] have given you baptism as a gift for the forgiveness of sins, and preach to you unceasingly by word of mouth concerning this treasure, sealing it with the Sacrament of my body and blood, so that you need never doubt. True, it seems little and insignificant that by the washing of water, the Word, and the Sacrament this should all be effected. But don't let your eyes deceive you. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
397:Of course, if we are identified with just the separate self we can become ‘egotistical’, in the sense of the word ‘ego’ that implies we are selfish, self-obsessed and narcissistic. I’m not saying that’s a good thing. I simply want to suggest that our individuality is something to celebrate not denigrate. And that as we awaken to deep love the separate self becomes a vehicle to express that love. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
398:Feelings come and feelings go, And feelings are deceiving; My warrant is the Word of God&
399:What do we mean by the word &
400:I maintain that any writer of a book is fully authorised in attaching any meaning he likes to a word or phrase he intends to use. If I find an author saying, at the beginning of his book, "Let it be understood that by the word &
401:The continually progressive change to which the meaning of words is subject, the want of a universal language which renders translation necessary, the errors to which translations are again subject, the mistakes of copyists and printers, together with the possibility of willful alteration, are themselves evidences that human language, whether in speech or print, cannot be the vehicle of the Word of God. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
402:I personally do not believe in the word style. Why? Because, unless there are human beings with three arms and four legs, unless we have another group of beings on earth that are structurally different from us, there can be no different style of fighting. Why is that? Because we have two hands and two legs. ... because of styles, people are separated. They are not united together because styles become law. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
403:We can mention only one point (which experience confirms), namely, that next to the Word of God, music deserves the highest praise. No greater commendation than this can be found, at least not by us. After all, the gift of language combined with the gift of song was only given to man to let him know that he should praise God with both word and music, namely, by proclaiming [the Word of God] through music. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
404:Who is Jesus to me? Jesus is the Word made Flesh. Jesus is the Bread of Life. Jesus is the Victim offered for our sins on the cross. Jesus is the sacrifice offered at holy Mass for the sins of the world and for mine. Jesus is the Word - to be spoken. Jesus is the Truth - to be told. Jesus is the Way - to be walked. Jesus is the Light - to be lit. Jesus is the Life - to be lived. Jesus is the Love - to be loved ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
405:Belief, as I use the word here, is the insistence that the truth is what one would "lief" or wish it to be. The believer will open his mind to the truth on condition that it fits in with his preconceived ideas and wishes. Faith, on the other hand, is an unreserved opening of the mind to the truth, whatever it may turn out to be. Faith has no preconceptions; it is a plunge into the unknown. Belief clings, but faith lets go. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
406:Each of those churches shows certain books, which they call revelation, or the Word of God. The Jews say that their Word of God was given by God to Moses face to face; the Christians say, that their Word of God came by divine inspiration; and the Turks say, that their Word of God (the Koran) was brought by an angel from heaven. Each of those churches accuses the other of unbelief; and, for my own part, I disbelieve them all. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
407:But though every created thing is, in this sense, a mystery, the word mystery cannot be applied to moral truth, any more than obscurity can be applied to light. ... Mystery is the antagonist of truth. It is a fog of human invention, that obscures truth, and represents it in distortion. Truth never envelops itself in mystery, and the mystery in which it is at any time enveloped is the work of its antagonist, and never of itself. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
408:The word &
409:Is it easy to love God' asks an old author. &
410:I was in front of an ambulance the other day, and I noticed that the word ambulance was spelled in reverse print on the hood of the ambulance. And I thought, Well, isn't that clever. I look in the rear-view mirror; I can read the word ambulance behind me. Of course while you're reading, you don't see where you're going, you crash. You need an ambulance. I think they're trying to drum up some business on the way back from lunch. ~ jerry-seinfeld, @wisdomtrove
411:Non-violent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and establish such creative tension that a community that has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks so to dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored... I am not afraid of the word tension. I have earnestly worked and preached against violent tension, and there is a type of constructive tension that is necessary for growth. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
412:The continuous cannot be experienced, for it has no borders. Consciousness implies alterations, change followings change, when one thing or state comes to an end and another begins; that which has no borderline cannot be experienced in the common meaning of the word. One can only be it, without knowing, but one can know what it is not. It is definitely not the entire content of consciousness which is always on the move. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
413:Out in Hollywood, where the streets are paved with Goldwyn, the word "sophisticate" means, very simply, "obscene." A sophisticatedstory is a dirty story. Some of that meaning was wafted eastward and got itself mixed up into the present definition. So that a "sophisticate" means: one who dwells in a tower made of a DuPont substitute for ivory and holds a glass of flat champagne in one hand and an album of dirty post cards in the other. ~ dorothy-parker, @wisdomtrove
414:The Hebrew word, the word timshel - &
415:But I still wonder how it was possible, in those graceless years of transition, long ago, that men did not see whither they were going, and went on, in blindness and cowardice, to their fate. I wonder, for it is hard for me to conceive how men who knew the word "I," could give it up and not know what they lost. But such has been the story, for I have lived in the City of the damned, and I know what horror men permitted to be brought upon them. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
416:Who would dare speak the word "happiness" in these tortured times? Yet millions today continue to seek happiness. These years have been for them only a prolonged postponement, at the end of which they hope to find that the possibility for happiness has been renewed. Who could blame them? And who could say that they are wrong? What would justice be without the chance for happiness? What purpose would freedom serve, if we had to live in misery? ~ albert-camus, @wisdomtrove
417:There is such a thing as righteous judgment, but it seems that lately the word &
418:The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy offers this definition of the word "Infinite". Infinite: Bigger than the biggest thing ever and then some. Much bigger than that in fact, really amazingly immense, a totally stunning size, "wow, that's big", time. Infinity is just so big that by comparison, bigness itself looks really titchy. Gigantic multiplied by colossal multiplied by staggeringly huge is the sort of concept we're trying to get across here. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
419:I am constantly concerned about being quoted in the press and perhaps saying the wrong thing or having what I say misinterpreted and bringing reproach to the name of Christ. People do not come to hear what Billy Graham has to say; they want to hear what God has to say. Jesus tells us not to be misled by the voices of strangers. There are so many strange voices being heard in the religious world of our day. We must compare what they say with the Word of God. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
420:A life of faith without love is like sunlight without warmth—the type of light that occurs in winter, when nothing grows and everything droops and dies. Faith rising out of love, on the contrary, is like light from the sun in spring, when everything grows and flourishes. Warmth from the sun is the fertile agent. The same is true in spiritual and heavenly affairs, which are typically represented in the Word by objects found in nature and human culture.” ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
421:Now when I hear about someone's illness, no matter what dire their predicament seems to be, I know that if they're willing to do the mental work of releasing and forgiving, almost anything can be healed. The word incurable, which is so frightening to so many people, really only means that the particular condition cannot be cured by &
422:The third level of wanting is "I commit to being rich." The definition of the word commit is to "devote oneself unreservedly." This means holding absolutely nothing back; giving 100 percent of everything you've got to achieving wealth. It means being willing to do whatever it takes for as long as it takes. This is the warrior's way. No excuses, no ifs, no butts, no maybes-and failure isn't an option. The warrior's way is simple: "I will be rich or I will die trying." ~ t-harv-eker, @wisdomtrove
423:Perhaps we can only truly serve those we are willing to touch, not only with our hands but with our hearts and even our souls. Professionalism has embedded in service a sense of difference, a certain distance. But on the deepest level, service is an experience of belonging, an experience of connection to others and to the word around us. It is this connection that gives us the power to bless the life in others. Without it, the life in them would not respond to us. ~ rachel-naomi-remen, @wisdomtrove
424:A year ago, six months ago, I thought that I was an artist. I no longer think about it, I am. Everything that was literature has fallen from me. There are no more books to be written, thank God. This then? This is not a book. This is libel, slander, defamation of character. This is not a book, in the ordinary sense of the word. No, this is a prolonged insult, a gob of spit in the face of Art, a kick in the pants to God, Man, Destiny, Time, Love, Beauty . . . what you will. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
425:One of the great triumphs of the nineteenth century was to limit the connotation of the word "immoral" in such a way that, for practical purposes, only those were immoral who drank too much or made too copious love. Those who indulged in any or all of the other deadly sins could look down in righteous indignation on the lascivious and the gluttonous... . In the name of all lechers and boozers I most solemnly protest against the invidious distinction made to our prejudice. ~ aldous-huxley, @wisdomtrove
426:Somebody told a lie one day. They couched it in language. They made everything Black ugly and evil. Look in your dictionaries and see the synonyms of the word Black. It's always something degrading and low and sinister. Look at the word White, it's always something pure, high and clean. Well I want to get the language right tonight. I want to get the language so right that everyone here will cry out: &
427:If the lost word is lost, if the spent word is spent If the unheard, unspoken Word is unspoken, unheard; Still is the spoken word, the Word unheard, The Word without a word, the Word within The world and for the world; And the light shone in the darkness and Against the Word the unstilled world still whirled About the center of the silent Word. Oh my people, what have I done unto thee. Where shall the word be found, where shall the word Resound? Not here, there is not enough silence ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
428:I believe certain doctrines because God says they are true; and the only authority I have for their truth is the Word of God. I receive such and such doctrines, not because I can prove them to be compatible with reason, not because my judgment accepts them, but because God says they are true. Now this is one of the best services we can render to God,-to submit ourselves to him in our belief of what he has revealed, and ask him to fix his truths in our hearts, and make us obey them. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
429:When we separate the word business into its component letters, B-U-S-I-N-E-S-S, we find that U and I are both in it. In fact, if U and I were not in business, it would not be business. Furthermore, we discover that U comes before I in business and the I is silent-it is to be seen, not heard. Also, the U in business has the sound of I, which indicates it is an amalgamation of the interests of U and I. When they are properly amalgamated, business becomes harmonious, profitable, and pleasant. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
430:There are many persons of combative tendencies, who read for ammunition, and dig out of the Bible iron for balls. They read, and they find nitre and charcoal and sulphur for powder. They read, and they find cannon. They read, and they make portholes and embrasures. And if a man does not believe as they do, they look upon him as an enemy, and let fly the Bible at him to demolish him. So men turn the word of God into a vast arsenal, filled with all manner of weapons, offensive and defensive. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
431:The great secret found at the heart of all the major spiritual traditions of the world is this. If you pay close attention to your identity, you will discover your subjective nature as awareness. This is your deep I. It is what the Hindu philosophers call the ‘atman’, the Buddhist masters call your ‘buddha-nature’, and the Christian mystics call your ‘spirit’. The word ‘spirit’ means essence. The word ‘essence’ comes from the Latin ‘esse’ meaning ‘to be’. Your deep I is your being. It is what you are. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
432:[Christ's] mission and work it is to help against sin and death, to justify and bring life. He has placed his help in baptism and the Sacrament [i.e., communion/Eucharist/Lord's supper], and incorporated it in the Word and preaching. To our eyes Baptism [capitalized in original] appears to be nothing more than ordinary water, and the Sacrament of Christ's body and blood simple bread and wine, like other bread and wine, and the sermon, hot air from a man's mouth. But we must not trust what our eyes see. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
433:We would like you to release the word "achieve" or "earn" from your vocabulary and from your understanding, altogether, and we would like you to replace those words with the word "allow". You're wanting to allow your Well- being, not achieve it. It's not something that you need to earn. All you have to do is decide what it is you would like to experience, and then allow it in order to achieve it. It isn't something you have to struggle for or try for. You are all worthy beings. You are deserving of this Well- being. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
434:For, as has been indicated from the innate experience as well as from the longings within, a home - home - with all its deeper, inner meanings, is a portion of the entity's desire; to know, to experience, to have the "feel" of, to have the surroundings of that implied by the word home! Is it any wonder then that in all of thy meditation, Ohm-O-h-m-mmmmm has ever been, is ever a portion of that which raises self to the highest influence and the highest vibrations throughout its whole being that may be experienced by the entity? ~ edgar-cayce, @wisdomtrove
435:In short, I will preach it [the Word], teach it, write it, but I will constrain no man by force, for faith must come freely without compulsion. Take myself as an example. I opposed indulgences and all the papists, but never with force. I simply taught, preached, and wrote God's Word; otherwise I did nothing. And while I slept, or drank Wittenberg beer with my friends Philip and Amsdorf, the Word so greatly weakened the papacy that no prince or emperor ever inflicted such losses upon it. I did nothing; the Word did everything. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
436:Well, another senator rose and said {as they always do} &
437:I think that growing up in a crowded continent like Europe with an awful lot of competing claims, ideas, cultures, and systems of thought we have, perforce, developed a more sophisticated notion of what the word freedom means than I see much evidence of in America. To be frank, it sometimes seems that the American idea of freedom has more to do with my freedom to do what I want than your freedom to do what you want. I think that in Europe we're probably better at understanding how to balance those competing claims, though not a lot. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
438:There's nothing to stop a man from writing unless that man stops himself. If a man truly desires to write, then he will. Rejection and ridicule will only strengthen him. And the longer he is held back the stronger he will become, like a mass of rising water against a dam. There is no losing in writing, it will make your toes laugh as you sleep, it will make you stride like a tiger, it will fire the eye and put you face to face with death. You will die a fighter, you will be honored in hell. The luck of the word. Go with it, send it. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
439:We cannot attain to the understanding of Scripture either by study or by the intellect. Your first duty is to begin by prayer. Entreat the Lord to grant you, of His great mercy, the true understanding of His Word. There is no other interpreter of the Word of God than the Author of this Word, as He Himself has said, "They shall be all taught of God" (John 6:45). Hope for nothing from your own labors, from your own understanding: trust solely in God, and in the influence of His Spirit. Believe this on the word of a man who has experience. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
440:Do not suppose that abuses are eliminated by destroying the object which is abused. Men can go wrong with wine and women. Shall we then prohibit and abolish women? The sun, the moon, and the stars have been worshiped. Shall we then pluck them out of the sky? ... see how much he [God] has been able to accomplish through me, though I did no more than pray and preach. The Word did it all. Had I wished I might have started a conflagration at Worms. But while I sat still and drank beer with Philip and Amsdorf, God dealt the papacy a mighty blow. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
441:Part of the problem with the word &
442:God has blessed me in many ways. Money is not the greatest blessing you can have, but I literally had absolutely nothing. The first message that I preached at Life in the Word, I had to borrow a suit from my pastor's wife, because I didn't have any decent clothes, and I was driving a 20-year-old car. We went through a lot of years of having nothing, sleeping in McDonald's parking lots, because we didn't have money to stay all night in a hotel. But, like anybody else who works hard and is diligent and doesn't quit and doesn't give up, there is a day the blessings come. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
443:The problem of reconciling human suffering with the existence of a God who loves, is only insoluble so long as we attach a trivial meaning to the word "love", and look on things as if man were the centre of them. Man is not the centre. God does not exist for the sake of man. Man does not exist for his own sake. "Thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and were created." We were made not primarily that we may love God (though we were made for that too) but that God may love us, that we may become objects in which the divine love may rest "well pleased". ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
444:It's difficult for people to come to the understanding that only a small minority of the people ever really get the word about life, about living abundantly and successfully. Success in the important departments of life seldom comes naturally, no more naturally than success at anything-a musical instrument, sports, fly-fishing, tennis, golf, business, marriage, parenthood, landscape gardening. But somehow people wait passively for success to come to them, living as other people are living in the unspoken, tacit assumption that other people know how to live successfully. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
445:The endless cycle of idea and action, Endless invention, endless experiment, Brings knowledge of motion, but not of stillness; Knowledge of speech, but not of silence; Knowledge of words, and ignorance of the Word. All our knowledge brings us nearer to our ignorance, All our ignorance brings us nearer to death, But nearness to death no nearer to God. Where is the Life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information? The cycles of Heaven in twenty centuries Bring us farther from God and nearer to the Dust. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
446:Courage is a heart word. The root of the word courage is cor - the Latin word for heart. In one of its earliest forms, the word courage meant "To speak one's mind by telling all one's heart." Over time, this definition has changed, and today, we typically associate courage with heroic and brave deeds. But in my opinion, this definition fails to recognize the inner strength and level of commitment required for us to actually speak honestly and openly about who we are and about our experiences - good and bad. Speaking from our hearts is what I think of as "ordinary courage. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
447:We fret about words, we writers. Words mean. Words point. They are arrows. Arrows stuck in the rough hide of reality. And the more portentous, more general the word, the more they can also resemble rooms or tunnels. They can expand, or cave in. They can come to be filled with a bad smell. They will often remind us of other rooms, where we'd rather dwell or where we think we are already living. They can be spaces we lose the art or the wisdom of inhabiting. And eventually those volumes of mental intention we no longer know how to inhabit will be abandoned, boarded up, closed down. ~ susan-sontag, @wisdomtrove
448:Omniscient means all— knowing, all wise. It means that The Absolute is possessed of all knowledge; that it knows everything; that there is nothing that it does not know; that it is the sum total of all the knowledge there is, ever has been or ever will be. If we admit that there is the slightest thing that is not known, or cannot be known, to The Absolute, then we admit that the word is meaningless. And if The Absolute is possessed of all the knowledge there is, then it can make no mistakes; does not find it necessary to change its mind; cannot think or act except wisely, and therefore, justly. ~ william-walker-atkinson, @wisdomtrove
449:We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly I have never yet engaged in a direct action movement that was &
450:It is evident that there are three means for the formation of faith in man: the first is, approaching the Lord; the second, learning truths from the Word; and the third, living in conformity to them. Now these three means being each distinct from the other, it follows that they may be separated; as for instance, a person may approach the Lord, and yet be acquainted with no truths concerning God and the Lord, except such as are historical; so another may be acquainted with abundance of truths derived from the Word, and yet not live in conformity with them; but in such cases, where the three means are separated, that is, where one is without the other, there can be no faith profitable to salvation. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
451:The greatest guilt of today is that of people who accept collectivism by moral default; the people who seek protection from the necessity of taking a stand, by refusing to admit to themselves the nature of that which they are accepting; the people who support plans specifically designed to achieve serfdom, but hide behind the empty assertion that they are lovers of freedom, with no concrete meaning attached to the word; the people who believe that the content of ideas need not be examined, that principles need not be defined, and that facts can be eliminated by keeping one's eyes shut. They expect, when they find themselves in a world of bloody ruins and concentration camps, to escape moral responsibility by wailing: "But I didn't mean this! ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
452:The habit of ignoring our present moments in favor of others yet to come leads directly to a pervasive lack of awareness of the web of life in which we are embedded. This includes a lack of awareness and understanding of our own mind and how it influences our perceptions and our actions. It severely limits our perspective on what it means to be a person and how we are connected to each other and the world around us. Religion has traditionally been the domain of such fundamental inquiries within a spiritual framework, but mindfulness has little to do with religion, except in the most fundamental meaning of the word, as an attempt to appreciate the deep mystery of being alive and to acknowledge being vitally connected to all that exists. ~ jon-kabat-zinn, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:I love the word warm. ~ Anne Sexton,
2:I hate the word sexy. ~ Ursula Andress,
3:The word “He” diminishes Him. ~ Tolstoi,
4:When I say the word You, I mean ~ Rumi,
5:courage to say the word, ~ Lucinda Riley,
6:If? The word is when. ~ George R R Martin,
7:I hate the word 'hippy.' ~ Robert Carlyle,
8:He used the word gamut. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
9:I hate the word wholesome. ~ Julie Andrews,
10:I think the word is adult! ~ Graham Norton,
11:The word of God is my vow. ~ Pittacus Lore,
12:inverse of the word live is evil. ~ Ben Okri,
13:The word "He" diminishes Him. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
14:The Word of God never dies. ~ Robert Godfrey,
15:Why is the word yes so brief? ~ Vera Pavlova,
16:Dr. Seuss invented the word nerd. ~ Anonymous,
17:Meditate on the Word in the Word. ~ John Owen,
18:COWBOYS, just like the word says. ~ John Wayne,
19:The Word Eater, by Mary Amato ~ Donalyn Miller,
20:The word is now a virus. ~ William S Burroughs,
21:The word "superstar" is an ilusion ~ Bruce Lee,
22:I feel like the word shatter. ~ Margaret Atwood,
23:Pardon's the word to all. ~ William Shakespeare,
24:Widow. The word consumes itself. ~ Sylvia Plath,
25:I love the word 'resonance.' ~ William Sanderson,
26:The word is the shadow of the deed. ~ Democritus,
27:People like to hear the word 'love.' ~ Kevin Hart,
28:The word in your mouth is anarchy. ~ Henry Miller,
29:The word of Sin is Restriction ~ Aleister Crowley,
30:The word reality frightens me. ~ Arthur Eddington,
31:Ever heard of the word please?" "Never. ~ P C Cast,
32:I don't understand the word 'hunk. ~ Goran Visnjic,
33:I hate the word wholesome. ~ Julie Andrews Edwards,
34:I did nothing. The Word did it all. ~ Martin Luther,
35:I don't know, I like the word sassy. ~ Kat Dennings,
36:I'm not at ease with the word "love." ~ David Bowie,
37:I think the word 'pregnant' is funny. ~ Tracy Morgan,
38:The word "conviction" means to expose. ~ Johnny Hunt,
39:The word friend is common, the fact is rare. ~ Plato,
40:The word is my fourth dimension. ~ Clarice Lispector,
41:The Word of God is like a lamp to guide us. ~ Origen,
42:The word “snow” enchanted them, ~ Charlie N Holmberg,
43:What power there is in the word my. ~ William Godwin,
44:Wilderness. The word itself is music. ~ Edward Abbey,
45:May God write the Word in our hearts! ~ Andrew Murray,
46:Sometimes the word dictated the melody. ~ Andrew Bird,
47:That is the word of reality - need. ~ Agatha Christie,
48:The word is the making of the world ~ Wallace Stevens,
49:You can't get wet from the word 'water.' ~ Alan Watts,
50:I don't use the word 'artists' lightly. ~ Ciaran Hinds,
51:In the beginning was the word, the word ~ Dylan Thomas,
52:The source of faith is the Word of God. ~ Phil Pringle,
53:the word enthusiasm is “the God within. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
54:The word far is too short for me to spell. ~ Toba Beta,
55:The Word ought to be exposed in the words ~ Karl Barth,
56:Hear the meaning within the word. ~ William Shakespeare,
57:The word diva has a negative connotation. ~ Glenn Close,
58:The word good has many meanings. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
59:the word happiness comes from to happen. ~ Jeff Bridges,
60:The word impossible is not French. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
61:The word of a sociopath is fluid, at best.  ~ Sara King,
62:Today, the word “sin” has lost its power ~ David Brooks,
63:In the word of no master am I bound to believe. ~ Horace,
64:Mum's the word." " To be precise, dumbs the word. ~ Herg,
65:The word is the Verb, and the Verb is God. ~ Victor Hugo,
66:The word of a cat is not to be relied upon. ~ Robin Hobb,
67:Become the Word in body as well as spirit. ~ Pope Francis,
68:Don't follow your feeling. Just follow the word. ~ LeCrae,
69:I don't know what the word is in Austrian. ~ Barack Obama,
70:The word must is not to be used to princes. ~ Elizabeth I,
71:THE WORD OF GOD IS THE CREATION WE BEHOLD: ~ Thomas Paine,
72:The word "rest" is not in my vocabulary. ~ Horace Greeley,
73:We need the word of Christ in each other. ~ Matt Chandler,
74:16 Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, ~ Anonymous,
75:The word “buddha” means one who is awake. ~ Jack Kornfield,
76:The word within a word, unable to speak a word ~ T S Eliot,
77:Who will sell the Cow, must say the word. ~ George Herbert,
78:Ever notice "demon" in the word pandemonium? ~ J C McKenzie,
79:I don't like to use the word sacrifice. ~ William J Clinton,
80:If I hear the word 'perky' again, I'll puke. ~ Katie Couric,
81:My conscience is captive to the Word of God ~ Martin Luther,
82:The only power you have is the word no. ~ Frances McDormand,
83:The word of my lord
is the sword for world. ~ Toba Beta,
84:A romantic, I think the word is. Latin for idiot. ~ Tom Holt,
85:He said, "The word for moonlight is moonlight. ~ Don DeLillo,
86:How every fool can play upon the word! ~ William Shakespeare,
87:I am not afraid of the word tension. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
88:I'm a patriot in the truest sense of the word. ~ Al Sharpton,
89:the word love has no decent definition! ~ Eric Jerome Dickey,
90:You don't need to know the word of God; ~ Leonard Ravenhill,
91:didn’t move his eyes from the word even as ~ Michael Connelly,
92:The hand opens to the word, opens to distance. ~ Edmond Jabes,
93:The word book acted as a transient stimulus ~ Charlotte Bront,
94:the word humanism made me want to vomit, ~ Michel Houellebecq,
95:Ever heard of the word please?"

"Never. ~ Ednah Walters,
96:I'm a Self-made Woman in Every Sense of the Word ~ Laverne Cox,
97:I Used the Word 'Negro' and I was Firmly Corrected ~ Malcolm X,
98:People say the word ‘nice’ and they mean ‘boring. ~ Laura Ruby,
99:The change of the word does not alter the matter ~ Thomas More,
100:The word book acted as a transient stimulus ~ Charlotte Bronte,
101:The word "elegance" is a bit different now. ~ Carolina Herrera,
102:The word 'suffering' is not in my vocabulary. ~ Judith Jamison,
103:Yeah, I’m bringing back the word “slattern.” Deal ~ L H Cosway,
104:Good plans almost never contain the word somehow. ~ Scott Meyer,
105:Jack, you're a switch in every sense of the word. ~ Jack L Pyke,
106:say the word, even now I can barely stand to ~ Elizabeth Strout,
107:The word 'cause' is an altar to an unknown god. ~ William James,
108:The word "dying" was not synonymous with "useless ~ Mitch Albom,
109:The Word we study has to be the Word we pray. ~ Brennan Manning,
110:To despise doctrine is to despise the Word of God. ~ R C Sproul,
111:Well, I am not afraid of the word 'liberal.' ~ Cynthia McKinney,
112:Art is skill, that is the first meaning of the word. ~ Eric Gill,
113:Grath has been a real—what’s the word? Dog. ~ Charlie N Holmberg,
114:I believe the word used wrongly distorts the world. ~ C D Wright,
115:I do like the word timeless. That's a great word. ~ Cass McCombs,
116:Just say the word and you can have me, Fiona. ~ Kristen Callihan,
117:Say the word, Cora, and I’ll kiss you breathless. ~ Aly Martinez,
118:The Word of God bares weight on all ages always. ~ Matt Chandler,
119:Why has the word become such an uncomfortable one? ~ Emma Watson,
120:Coffee justifies the existence of the word 'aroma'. ~ Glen Duncan,
121:For him the word 'horror' had become obsolete. ~ Richard Matheson,
122:Luck's the word those with poor hearts use for ka. ~ Stephen King,
123:There's something hypnotic about the word tea. ~ Dorothy L Sayers,
124:The word is a label and I don't like it at all. ~ Paula Broadwell,
125:The word spinster hid behind it a blazing freedom. ~ Lauren Groff,
126:Discipline? I don't know the meaning of the word. ~ Liam Gallagher,
127:He never falls into the trap of the word "freedom". ~ Paulo Coelho,
128:I'm a lapsed Catholic in the best sense of the word. ~ Denis Leary,
129:Real numbers are good if you add the word 'random'. ~ Peter Sarnak,
130:the word algorithm was derived from al Khwarizm ~ Jack Weatherford,
131:The word Being explains nothing, but nor does God. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
132:The word faith is a noun and has no verbal form in ~ Jerry Bridges,
133:The word heretic ought to be a term of honour. ~ Charles Bradlaugh,
134:Utah, just waiting for the word to be given by the ~ Alan Jacobson,
135:A scar is what happens when the word is made flesh. ~ Leonard Cohen,
136:I’m not stupid.” No, Eve thought, you redefine the word. ~ J D Robb,
137:In the beginning was the word, and it was spoken. ~ N Scott Momaday,
138:In the beginning was the word and the word was CHOICE ~ Tom Robbins,
139:I use the word nursing for want of a better. ~ Florence Nightingale,
140:Luck's the word those with poor hearts use for ka... ~ Stephen King,
141:His gentle breath caresses my lips as he says the word. I ~ Susan Ee,
142:The poem finds the word that finds the feeling. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
143:The word ‘emotion’ stands for ‘energy in motion. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
144:The word 'sorry' is hardly adequate for my actions. ~ Liane Moriarty,
145:To say revelation is to say, 'the Word became flesh...' ~ Karl Barth,
146:Using the word weird implies that there is a norm. ~ Robyn Hitchcock,
147:When you know the Word of God, it will change you. ~ Kenneth E Hagin,
148:All the word's indeed a page and we must loudly tear it. ~ Adam Levin,
149:Don’t just be hearers of the Word of God. Be doers. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
150:I find Cambridge an asylum, in every sense of the word. ~ A E Housman,
151:I have always abhorred the word racism. I never use it. ~ Jim Clyburn,
152:Sorry I painted the word 'twat' on your garage door. ~ David Shrigley,
153:submissive to their own husbands,  w that the word of God ~ Anonymous,
154:The word 'circumnavigate' is quite a beautiful word. ~ Cate Blanchett,
155:the word dyting is not synonymous with the word useless ~ Mitch Albom,
156:This is my child. I mention the word love and she barfs. ~ Lexi Blake,
157:Vendetta is the word, except it isn't strong enough. ~ Sister Souljah,
158:Words can hurt, you know."
"Then call the word police. ~ NisiOisiN,
159:I don't call myself a poet, because I don't like the word. ~ Bob Dylan,
160:It is notoriously difficult to define the word living. ~ Francis Crick,
161:never's the word God listens for when he needs a laugh. ~ Stephen King,
162:Out of purity and silence comes the word of power. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
163:Thats where he had the word "Goodyear" dermabrased off. ~ Jim Cornette,
164:The agitator seizes the word. The artist is seized by it. ~ Karl Kraus,
165:the word assassin is derived from the Arabic hashashin, ~ Daniel Silva,
166:The word 'impossible' ain’t in my dictionary. ~ Jessica Maria Tuccelli,
167:Why isn’t the word “phonetically” spelled with an “f”? ~ Steven Wright,
168:Coincidences do occur, David. That’s why the word exists. ~ John Verdon,
169:Defeat? I do not recognize the meaning of the word. ~ Margaret Thatcher,
170:Define the word exist, and you'll know whether God exists. ~ Bill Gaede,
171:Hawke," he said. "That's the word you need to be saying. ~ Nalini Singh,
172:I don't love the word luxury because it feels Bougy to me. ~ Beth Ditto,
173:I think I was a feminist before the word was invented. ~ Isabel Allende,
174:Nothing is impossible. the word itself says "i'm possible". ~ Anonymous,
175:The Infinite struck the void with the sound of the Word. ~ Marek Halter,
176:There is no fast, easy shortcut for the word abbreviation. ~ Dana Gould,
177:The word is control. That's my ultimate - to have control. ~ Nick Faldo,
178:The word 'potential' used to hang over me like a cloud. ~ Randy Johnson,
179:The word rattled in my head like rocks in an oatmeal box. ~ Janet Fitch,
180:Today we have discovered the word that could not be said. "I ~ Ayn Rand,
181:almost the whole city gathered to hear the word of the Lord. ~ Anonymous,
182:DECAPITATION.
I simply love the word. Head over heels. ~ Ishbelle Bee,
183:For me, the measure of a poem is the word, not the line. ~ John Kinsella,
184:I do not find myself making any use of the word sacrifice. ~ Jane Austen,
185:Illusion is the best synonym for the word religion! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
186:I love working. I don't know what the word vacation means. ~ Frank Gehry,
187:It's the intent, not the word, that makes something harsh. ~ Lisa McMann,
188:The quintessence of the word of God is Christ. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
189:The word gratitude is not part of the Hollywood dictionary. ~ Harry Cohn,
190:The word "noise" is derived from the Latin word nausea. ~ Michael Finkel,
191:The word “noise” is derived from the Latin word nausea. ~ Michael Finkel,
192:The word was the ember and the forest was my life. ~ Jimmy Santiago Baca,
193:We do not see the world as it is. We see the word as we are. ~ Anais Nin,
194:When I hear the word 'culture', I reach for my checkbook. ~ Edward Abbey,
195:Why are there five syllables in the word “monosyllabic”? ~ Steven Wright,
196:Your confession must absolutely agree with the Word of God! ~ T B Joshua,
197:Humans were free before the word freedom became necessary. ~ Edward Abbey,
198:Im not a mom, but I think the word mother is about wisdom. ~ Margaret Cho,
199:In contrast to my husband, I can pronounce the word nuclear. ~ Laura Bush,
200:It depends upon what the meaning of the word 'is' is. ~ William J Clinton,
201:Repentance is the word that gives us a second chance. ~ Fred A Hartley Jr,
202:The word "down," is very musical. It just always comes. ~ Stephen Malkmus,
203:The word “future” and females is a dangerous combination. ~ Chetan Bhagat,
204:When I was born, the word for what I was did not exist. ~ Madeline Miller,
205:You have to be careful how you're using the word boycott. ~ Vernon Jordan,
206:Best productivity tool ever invented? Easy...the word "no". ~ Robin Sharma,
207:Holy Spirit will make the word to be spirit and life; this ~ Andrew Murray,
208:If I am authorized, I will remove the word impossible. ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
209:I learned in therapy the word "No" is a complete sentence. ~ Jaycee Dugard,
210:I'm the first girl to say the word 'period' on television. ~ Courteney Cox,
211:Neighbor… was that the word for "whoring tramp" nowadays? ~ Gena Showalter,
212:Nicole had kept the word cathartic as a kind of souvenir. ~ Laura Benedict,
213:Proclaim the Word more and argue about it less. ~ William Cameron Townsend,
214:Record contracts are just like - I'm gonna say the word, slavery. ~ Prince,
215:Suit the action to the word, the word to the action. ~ William Shakespeare,
216:The art of the word is painting + architecture + music. ~ Yevgeny Zamyatin,
217:the scornful force of his tone turned the word into a curse ~ John Knowles,
218:The word, 'cube', comes directly from the Arabic, Kaaba. ~ Lesley Hazleton,
219:The word mediates the glory, and the glory confirms the word. ~ John Piper,
220:The word of man is the most durable of all material. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
221:The word 'retirement' is not in my vocabulary right now. ~ Charlie Daniels,
222:The word spiritual, not the word religious, is the key. ~ Clarence Clemons,
223:Whenever I hear the word culture, I reach for my revolver ~ Hermann Goring,
224:Wilhelm Johannsen, self-consciously invented the word gene. ~ James Gleick,
225:Without the Word, there is nothing left for us but darkness. ~ John Calvin,
226:At the word trident, it’s as if the old Finnick surfaces. ~ Suzanne Collins,
227:E-I-E-I-O is actually a gross misspelling of the word farm. ~ George Carlin,
228:Hearing the word is the devout receiving of the will of God. ~ William Ames,
229:How can the word love, the word life, even fit in the mouth? ~ Jandy Nelson,
230:I became an ecologist long before I had ever heard the word. ~ Chico Mendes,
231:Ignore everything a politician says before the word but. ~ Frank Mankiewicz,
232:(I’m using the word “probably” a bit too much. Probably.) ~ Haruki Murakami,
233:It's not the length of the word; it's how well you use it! ~ Rachel Vincent,
234:Kya wondered who started using the word cell instead of cage. ~ Delia Owens,
235:Next to the Word of God, music deserves the highest praise. ~ Martin Luther,
236:on the first day of love
you wrapped me in the word special ~ Rupi Kaur,
237:Or had Malfoy’s use of the word “dogging” been a coincidence? ~ J K Rowling,
238:The word preached is not only to inform you but reform you; ~ Thomas Watson,
239:faith begins where the will, or the Word, of God is known. ~ Kenneth E Hagin,
240:He who has heard the Word of God can bear his silences. ~ Ignatius of Loyola,
241:I'm not too in love with the word ambition, but I was driven. ~ Kim Basinger,
242:In the beginning was the word. And the word was "Hey, you! ~ Terry Pratchett,
243:Nothing is impossible, the word itself says 'I'm possible'! ~ Audrey Hepburn,
244:The most life destroying word of all is the word tomorrow. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
245:The only way to describe what happened next is the word attack. ~ Kelly Oram,
246:The word 'no' is a very good word in a singer's repertoire. ~ Kiri Te Kanawa,
247:Death is our road to immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
248:god, they say, is love. and some one's got to pass the word. ~ Richard Fari a,
249:If he loved me so much, couldn’t he have spelled out the word you? ~ R S Grey,
250:I hate the word celebrity. I'm not a celebrity, I'm an actor. ~ Ewan McGregor,
251:I never use the word, it's loaded. What love means to me is need. ~ John Cale,
252:In Spanish, the word esposas means both ‘wives’ and ‘handcuffs’. ~ John Lloyd,
253:I still believe in the power of the word, that words inspire. ~ Joni Mitchell,
254:It is not about reading the Word. It is about obeying the Word. ~ Joyce Meyer,
255:I want to get a tattoo of the word irony, only misspelled. ~ Anthony Jeselnik,
256:Nothing someone says before the word 'but' really counts. ~ George R R Martin,
257:Obedience to the word in humility of mind never confuses. ~ John Nelson Darby,
258:Suit the action to the word, the
Word to the action. ~ William Shakespeare,
259:The best contraceptive is the word no - repeated frequently. ~ Margaret Smith,
260:The older I get, the more beauty I see in the word renunciation. ~ Robert Bly,
261:The secrets to life are hidden behind the word cliché" Shay Carl ~ Tim FERRIS,
262:The word impossible is not in my dictionary. Napoleon Bonaparte ~ Joyce Meyer,
263:The word "paradise" came out of my mouth, without thinking. ~ Paul Fleischman,
264:Americans use the word "dream" as often as psychoanalysts do. ~ Terry Eagleton,
265:Be doers of the word and not hearers only, deluding yourselves. ~ LeBron James,
266:Could the word ‘iron’ be the root from which ‘irony’ is derived? ~ Victor Hugo,
267:Hope is the Word which God has written on the brow of every man. ~ Victor Hugo,
268:I always distrust the word art when it is applied to acting. ~ Anthony Hopkins,
269:I can't even say the word, it's too early in the day to get upset. ~ Bon Scott,
270:is the word we use when we can’t see the levers and pulleys. ~ Jennifer Archer,
271:I've been told that nobody sings the word 'hunger' like I do. ~ Billie Holiday,
272:I wasn't convinced a shop girl would know the word 'Oedipal. ~ Shirley Hazzard,
273:No one signs up to the Word. There is no organization to join. ~ Chris Dietzel,
274:Peace? I hate the word as I hate hell and all Montagues. ~ William Shakespeare,
275:Prax stopped the word obviously just before it fell from his lips. ~ Anonymous,
276:The word nepotism comes, in fact, from nipote, Italian for nephew. ~ Ross King,
277:To raise the dead meant to recover souls from materiality by the word of Truth,
278:You can't do the will of God if you don't know the Word of God. ~ Jack Wyrtzen,
279:you won’t find the word responsibility in the Scriptures. ~ William Paul Young,
280:For the way in which the word is experienced is always momentous ~ Walter J Ong,
281:I am so tired. Even the word sleep is a lure, a seduction. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
282:I don't believe in the word 'inspiration', you just have to do it. ~ Will Alsop,
283:I don't like the word 'futurists.' I think we should be 'nowists.' ~ Joichi Ito,
284:I hate the word 'sneering', I can't help the way my face looks. ~ Jeremy Paxman,
285:Of him that speakes ill, consider the life more then the word. ~ George Herbert,
286:Peace? I hate the word — William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet ~ Karpov Kinrade,
287:The listener is the midwife in the difficult birth of the word. ~ Me a Selimovi,
288:The word "fine" is the greatest abbreviation and obviously wrong. ~ Lydia Davis,
289:The word "influence" means the power to change or affect someone. ~ Johnny Hunt,
290:The word "now" is like a bomb through the window, and it ticks. ~ Arthur Miller,
291:The word “robot” is from a Czech word meaning “compulsory labor. ~ Isaac Asimov,
292:The word trill really REALLY bugs me! Like who made that up??? ~ Kim Kardashian,
293:Use beautiful to describe a sandwich, and the word means nothing. ~ Jess Walter,
294:War?' The word held too much definition for three letters. ~ Shannon A Thompson,
295:we will devote ourselves to prayer and to the ministry of the word. ~ Anonymous,
296:At the beginning was The Word.
Today I see That in great quotes. ~ Toba Beta,
297:But be doers of the word and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. ~ Anonymous,
298:But the word of the Gospel is not as the word of an earthly prince. ~ John Jewel,
299:Each dawn opens into a larger Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
300:For the people of God, the Word of God leaves pleasant bruises. ~ Douglas Wilson,
301:I am an athlete in every sense of the word. Athlete, martial artist. ~ Jon Jones,
302:I can't even say the word 'titmouse' without giggling like a schoolgirl. ~ Homer,
303:I don't understand the word 'lose', I only understand the word 'learn' ~ Pitbull,
304:I think my poems are slightly underrated by the word accessible. ~ Billy Collins,
305:Next to ‘God’, ‘love’ is the word most mangled in every language. ~ Richard Bach,
306:Our sympathies become our torturers. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
307:The listener is the midwife in the difficult birth of the word. ~ Mesa Selimovic,
308:The only use she has for the word fun is to make the word funeral. ~ Rachel Cohn,
309:The word amateur comes from the Latin root meaning "to love. ~ Steven Pressfield,
310:The word human itself comes from the same root as humus, earth. ~ Eben Alexander,
311:When the word is heard consult the source, and beware the messenger. ~ T F Hodge,
312:Can’t never go by your feelings. Got to go by the word of the Lord. ~ Lynn Austin,
313:Dwelling. Miles repeated the word to himself. It was a strange word. ~ Wendy Mass,
314:I like the word bewilderment because it has both be and wild in it. ~ Peter Gizzi,
315:Luck’s the word those with poor hearts use for ka. ~ Roland Deschain Stephen King,
316:My goal is to spread the word about the need for more blood donors. ~ Niki Taylor,
317:Problems is, the word of an addict is just that. A word. nothing more. ~ J R Ward,
318:Reality, in truth is … what is the word? Reality is ironic. ~ Adam Roberts,
319:The Spirit breathes upon the Word and brings the truth to sight. ~ William Cowper,
320:The word "Chivalry" is derived from the French Cheval, a horse. ~ Thomas Bulfinch,
321:The word fit. It was the perfect size. And that was okay. ~ E E Charlton Trujillo,
322:The word of God tends to make large-minded noble-minded men. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
323:Whose cruel idea was it for the word “lisp” to have an “s” in it? ~ Steven Wright,
324:Amphibians—the word comes from the Greek meaning ‘double life. ~ Elizabeth Kolbert,
325:He who has heard the Word of God can bear his silences. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
326:However, the word madda in modern Hebrew specifically means science. ~ Norman Lamm,
327:I don't ever want to read a book with the word globe in it again. ~ Caris O Malley,
328:If a man be new-born, he will desire the sincere milk of the word. ~ Thomas Boston,
329:in the best sense of the word—as if, for a hundred years, people had ~ Neil Gaiman,
330:Its focus wasn't on the written word but how the word was written. ~ Neville Brody,
331:It's only at this age that I can say the word 'art' without flinching. ~ Mira Nair,
332:She is certain[ly] very clever, in a doubtful sense of the word. ~ Candice Millard,
333:Still, the word "boyfriend" starts to sound pathetic after age 30. ~ Carrie Fisher,
334:The definition of the word 'finished' is: 'This word means finished. ~ Idries Shah,
335:The word 'Antichrist', to me, is the collective disbelief in god. ~ Marilyn Manson,
336:The word Hijra, she said, meant a Body in which a Holy Soul lives. ~ Arundhati Roy,
337:The word 'listen' contains the same letters as the word 'silent.' ~ Alfred Brendel,
338:The word 'meaningful' when used today is nearly always meaningless. ~ Paul Johnson,
339:The Word of God is not divine, it is an attribute of The Divine. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
340:To know is best, however hard to bear. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
341:Whatever the word "great" means, Dickens was what it means. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
342:Anyone who knew the word slattern was worth cultivating as a friend. ~ Alan Bradley,
343:A true plague of a girl. And yet a queen in every sense of the word. ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
344:Did you just call me old? I really prefer the word 'experienced'. ~ Morgan Freeman,
345:Each year a mile upon the heavenly Way, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
346:Faith comes by hearing all the Word, not just preferred sections. ~ David Wilkerson,
347:In the first place, the word universal conceals a gross sophism. ~ Fr d ric Bastiat,
348:In truth there is no difference between the word of God and the world. ~ Baha-ulalh,
349:I want to… “Mia—” “Don’t.” The word is a bullet, and it silences me. ~ Amie Kaufman,
350:Okay?” The word barrels down my tongue, elbows other words aside. “Okay. ~ A J Finn,
351:The question was: Will you meet me tomorrow? And the word was: Yes. ~ Lauren Oliver,
352:There is no substitute for a firsthand encounter with the Word of God. ~ Max Anders,
353:The word comes from Latin roots com and templum, “with” and “temple. ~ Gerald G May,
354:The word of God hidden in the heart is a stubborn voice to suppress. ~ Billy Graham,
355:The Word says that God will never give you more than you can bear. Never. ~ E N Joy,
356:Today is the word for winners and tomorrow is the word for losers ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
357:Coincidence is the word we use when we can't see the levers and pulleys. ~ Emma Bull,
358:Every word written is a net to catch the word that has escaped. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
359:Find new ways to spread the word of God to every corner of the world. ~ Pope Francis,
360:God, the name Susan is so ugly. It reminds me of the word sinus. ~ Bret Easton Ellis,
361:I don’t know…” “Please?” Wow. Garrett knows the word please? Shocking ~ Elle Kennedy,
362:I don't use the word minority because there is nothing minor about me. ~ Piri Thomas,
363:If a person uses the word 'sorry' loosely then of course it loses its value. ~ Ciara,
364:In ancient Greek the word ‘idiot’ meant anyone who wasn’t a politician. ~ John Lloyd,
365:In truth there is no difference between the word of God and the world. ~ Baha-ulalh,
366:It is the definition of the word 'object' which destroys all religions. ~ Bill Gaede,
367:It is the nature of the Word to reveal to me what has been hidden. ~ Meister Eckhart,
368:Must fire always test the great of soul? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
369:People tend to forget that the word "history" contains the word "story". ~ Ken Burns,
370:STORY” is more than half of the word “HISTORY”. And that’s no accident. ~ Glenn Beck,
371:Terrorism': the word that means nothing, yet justifies everything. ~ Glenn Greenwald,
372:There just aren't enough o's in the word smooth for me, are there? ~ Lani Diane Rich,
373:The Spirit of God leads the people of God to submit to the Word of God. ~ John Stott,
374:The word love doesn't count when the word ya comes right after it. ~ Tommy Greenwald,
375:The word "mistress" sounds like a cross between mistake and mattress. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
376:The word “mistress” sounds like a cross between mistake and mattress. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
377:We try to reach the heart of God without listening to the Word of God. ~ Larry Crabb,
378:You're your own kind of smart. I loved the way he said the word "smart. ~ Amy Harmon,
379:Being impeccable with your word is not using the word against yourself. ~ Miguel Ruiz,
380:Busy? The word loses all meaning under the canopy of this sky. ~ Barbara Brown Taylor,
381:Home

...Home.
...the word,
...has
...no
...meaning ~ Ellen Hopkins,
382:I am trying really hard not to use the word 'fabulous' right now. ~ Stephanie Perkins,
383:I’d say it’s impossible, but the Commandant trained the word out of me. ~ Sabaa Tahir,
384:I say the word N-U-C-L-E-R the same way that George W. Bush says it. ~ Gillian Jacobs,
385:I've rarely said the word "Lord," unless it's followed by "of the Rings. ~ A J Jacobs,
386:Little known Max fact: I invented the word TWIRGIN (a Twitter virgin). ~ Max Cummings,
387:The gods make use of our forgotten deeds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
388:The only reason I'm in fashion is to destroy the word conformity. ~ Vivienne Westwood,
389:The word courage - God, I love that word. Words are so important to me. ~ Peter Fonda,
390:The word of God is that unto our souls, which our soul is unto our body. ~ John Jewel,
391:To devastate by language, to blow up the word and with it the world. ~ Emile M Cioran,
392:Weapons means killing. Weapons is ah, I'm simply sensitive to the word. ~ Elie Wiesel,
393:What's the word for a perfectly reasonable fear of annoying idiots? ~ Cassandra Clare,
394:A persistently fruitless hearer of the Word cannot be a disciple of Jesus ~ John Piper,
395:At the beginning there was the Word; at the end just the Cliche. ~ Stanislaw Jerzy Lec,
396:between the word and the world lie
fading eternities of soon ~ Laura Riding Jackson,
397:Everybody cryin' mercy / When they don't know the meaning of the word. ~ Mose Allison,
398:I mean, I'm certainly not a 'teaophyte,' or whatever the word would be. ~ Billy Corgan,
399:I see the US Open as glamorous. That's the word that comes to mind. ~ Eugenie Bouchard,
400:Isn’t killing killers”—he finger-quotes the word—“a little ironic?” The ~ K E Ganshert,
401:Let all your frustrations with this world throw you onto the Word of God. ~ John Piper,
402:Lord, I am not worthy
Lord, I am not worthy
but speak the word only. ~ T S Eliot,
403:Love in all eight tones and all five semitones of the word's full octave ~ Stephen Fry,
404:Most of my inspiration, if that's the word, came from books themselves. ~ Shelby Foote,
405:Perhaps the blindness of our will is Fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
406:The word he used was coup, and I'm not speaking French just to arouse you. ~ Jim Lynch,
407:The word is a sign or symbol of the impressions or affections of the soul. ~ Aristotle,
408:The word on the jar was RELISH. And he was glad he had decided to live. ~ Ray Bradbury,
409:The word tomorrow was invented for indecisive people and for children. ~ Ivan Turgenev,
410:those who use the word 'lifestyle' are rarely in possession of either. ~ Fran Lebowitz,
411:Totalitarianism is feudalism in the twelfth century sense of the word. ~ Barbara Amiel,
412:We must redefine the word food, or we must redefine the word cannibal. ~ Philip Wollen,
413:4For the word of the LORD is right and true; he is faithful in all he does. ~ Anonymous,
414:A persistently fruitless hearer of the Word cannot be a disciple of Jesus. ~ John Piper,
415:Arty. To me the word's got as much venom associated with it as 'wacky'. ~ Alex Kapranos,
416:Burn the books and trust the Book; shred the papers and hear the Word. ~ Salman Rushdie,
417:For Jesus the word kingdom meant “God’s dream for this world come true. ~ Scot McKnight,
418:I always think of the word 'abandonment' when I think of the character. ~ Tilda Swinton,
419:I don't think balance is ever achieved in the full sense of the word. ~ Candace Cameron,
420:Judge the spirit of the prophecy before you judge the truth of the word. ~ Graham Cooke,
421:Love in all eight tones and all five semitones of the word's full octave. ~ Stephen Fry,
422:Luck's the word those with poor hearts use for ka, Susannah of New York. ~ Stephen King,
423:Out of the darkness we still grow to light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
424:The aim is never to become a master of the Word, but to be mastered by it. ~ D A Carson,
425:The Devil fears the word of God, He can't bite it; it breaks his teeth. ~ Martin Luther,
426:The more I expose myself to the Word of God, the greater my faith will be. ~ R C Sproul,
427:The power of the word is real whether or not you are conscious of it. ~ Sonia Choquette,
428:The word devil is very beautiful, if you read it backwards it becomes lived. ~ Rajneesh,
429:"The word happy would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness." ~ Carl Jung,
430:The word 'innocence' means a mind that is incapable of being hurt. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
431:Through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, ~ Anonymous,
432:A church that won't listen to the Word of God is a church already lost. ~ Robert Godfrey,
433:Don't be bothered by perfection. Replace the word 'Perfection' by 'Totality. ~ Rajneesh,
434:Every historian has informally an anthropology, without ever using the word. ~ Peter Gay,
435:He swore loudly, confused. I won't repeat the word here. I'm a gentleman. ~ Rose Christo,
436:I always wanted to write a book that ended with the word Mayonnaise. ~ Richard Brautigan,
437:I am paid by the word, so I always write the shortest words possible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
438:Instead of becoming a woman of the world, become a woman of the Word. ~ Elizabeth George,
439:In the word question, there is a beautiful word - quest. I love that word. ~ Elie Wiesel,
440:Isn't it fascinating that Nazis always manage to adopt the word freedom? ~ Steig Larsson,
441:Isn't it fascinating that Nazis always manage to adopt the word freedom? ~ Stieg Larsson,
442:It is in stillness, in the silence, that the word of God is to be heard. ~ Peter Rollins,
443:I want to make sure that my writing grips the reader from the word 'go.' ~ Ashwin Sanghi,
444:Peace is so beneficial that the word itself is pleasant to hear. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
445:Right, pass the word along: no one is to look like a sock, understand? ~ Terry Pratchett,
446:The genius of the word is that it’s more of an expression than a word. ~ Durga Chew Bose,
447:The original ancient Greek meaning of the word planet was simply “wanderer, ~ Mike Brown,
448:The public buys "art" - but the word is drained of its meaning. ~ Michelangelo Antonioni,
449:The word 'celebrity' and the word 'architect' are basically incompatible. ~ Rem Koolhaas,
450:The word 'home', it seemed, once learned, was a hard one to forget. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
451:The word 'influenza' actually means a malign influence from the stars. ~ Jostein Gaarder,
452:Victor. The word thuds to the ground like a scim falling from a dead hand. ~ Sabaa Tahir,
453:WIDOW. The word consumes itself, said Sylvia Plath, who consumed herself. ~ Lauren Groff,
454:But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. ~ Anonymous,
455:By itself, a tree is meaningless, but it is the meaning of the word “tree. ~ Alan W Watts,
456:Death grip, by the way, is the literal translation of the word “mortgage. ~ Russell Brand,
457:Every time I hear the word conservative it makes me sick to my stomach. ~ Charles Barkley,
458:He is dark as history, origin of the word native: the weight of blood ~ Natasha Trethewey,
459:If we want revivals, we must revive our reverence for the Word of God. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
460:I like to think of the word FOCUS as Follow One Course Until Successful. ~ Donald J Trump,
461:It's better to be humbled by the word than by the force of circumstances. ~ Stephen Covey,
462:Some men speak the word of God...
while others have God in their words. ~ Jos N Harris,
463:the church of God can be established in no other way than by the Word. True ~ John Calvin,
464:The word gap leads to an achievement gap and has life-long consequences ~ Hillary Clinton,
465:The word of God is the manna by which our souls are nourished, Matt. 4:4. ~ Matthew Henry,
466:Vain is the word of that philosopher which does not heal any suffering of man. ~ Epicurus,
467:We find no rest for our weary bones unless we cling to the word of grace. ~ Martin Luther,
468:When you get to 60, the word "retirement" comes in on every conversation. ~ Ozzy Osbourne,
469:Women have so much power that even hearing the word power frightens them. ~ Harriet Rubin,
470:Behold, this is the word of Manwë Súlimo, and the voice of the Valar’s desire, ~ Anonymous,
471:Genuine love is always self-forgetful in the true sense of the word. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer,
472:Give diligent heed to the things that are spoken from the Word of God. ~ George Whitefield,
473:how the word janitor came from Janus, the god of entrances and exits, ~ Guillermo del Toro,
474:I always felt like I had the word "illegal" tattooed on my forehead. ~ Jose Antonio Vargas,
475:I didn't invent the word "selfie," but I took tons of Polaroids of myself. ~ Brigid Berlin,
476:I hate the word 'hippy'. I hate a lot of people, and hippies don't do that! ~ Shannon Hoon,
477:I have learned to use the word 'impossible' with the greatest caution. ~ Wernher von Braun,
478:I'm not sexually confused in any way. I'm very much - the word is pansexual. ~ Miley Cyrus,
479:I was using the word awesomeness while you were still in high school, popping zits. ~ Edge,
480:Most of you live your life on flimsy little songs, not upon the word of God. ~ Paul Washer,
481:Nothing is Impossible. The word "impossible" itself reads "I'm Possible"! ~ Mayowa Ajisafe,
482:Preacher: "This is the word of God!"
Constantine: "The edited word of God ~ Garth Ennis,
483:Sadistic is the word for it. God in the Old Testament wasn’t anyone’s pal. ~ Tiffany Reisz,
484:The Cross is the Word through which God has responded to evil in the world. ~ Pope Francis,
485:The word ‘believe’ is an important factor in you securing your success. ~ Stephen Richards,
486:The word ecology is derived from the Greek oikos, the word for home. ~ Robin Wall Kimmerer,
487:The word ghost sounds like memory. The word therapy means exorcism ~ Laurie Halse Anderson,
488:The word impossible has been and must remain deleted from our dictionary. ~ Ingvar Kamprad,
489:The word is a sound of some sort and that's where the energy comes from. ~ Malachy McCourt,
490:The word of God teacheth lowliness of mind; it teacheth us to know ourselves. ~ John Jewel,
491:The word-of-mouth power in one interested person has unbelievable reach. ~ Gary Vaynerchuk,
492:The word "unbearable" makes a liar of you unless it's followed by your death. ~ Saul Black,
493:We are not fountains ourselves; but the Word of God is the true fountain. ~ Dwight L Moody,
494:We love God with our mind by taking the time to fill our mind with the Word. ~ Mike Bickle,
495:why is the word 'qualified' applied only to those who have to be more so? ~ Gloria Steinem,
496:Why so many eager to hear the word of “I love you” and so few care to see? ~ M F Moonzajer,
497:You must embrace the Word of God as the most effective instrument for change. ~ T B Joshua,
498:Before all, be real. Only the truth gives to the word the Orpheus' Lyre power. ~ Pythagoras,
499:Being impeccable with your word is not using the word against yourself. ~ Miguel Angel Ruiz,
500:Each of us has received one gift after another because of all that the Word is. ~ Anonymous,
501:Every scientist should remove the word 'impossible' from their lexicon. ~ Christopher Reeve,
502:His view of human nature is more jaundiced (I think that is the word) than mine. ~ Jean Ure,
503:I’d never heard anyone use the word “feminism” as anything but a reprimand. ~ Tara Westover,
504:I don't like the word ['classic']. It makes you think we didn't do any work. ~ Ralph Lauren,
505:I'm not a body shamer. The word fat has been used to hurt me my entire life. ~ Margaret Cho,
506:In the beginning—before the beginning—was the word. And the word was “Doctor! ~ Neil Gaiman,
507:It is not our comment on the Word that saves, but the Word itself. ~ Robert Murray M Cheyne,
508:It takes the Word of God plus the Spirit of God to equal the Truth of God. ~ Kris Vallotton,
509:Perfect. There’s the word again: a locked-door word – stifling, strangling. ~ Lauren Oliver,
510:Politics, as the word is commonly understood, are nothing but corruptions. ~ Jonathan Swift,
511:Still, I don't like his use of the word fine. I want to be better than fine. ~ Emily Giffin,
512:'Teamwork' is the word that bosses use when they actually mean 'Do what I say' ~ Seth Godin,
513:The more we spread the word, the further it will go and more it will change! ~ Jane Goodall,
514:There's no such thing as forever. I don't know why we use the word. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
515:the word “deadline” has its American origin in Civil War prison camps; ~ Arianna Huffington,
516:The word “mistress” sounds like a cross between mistake and mattress. “We’ve ~ Lisa Kleypas,
517:The Word of God is the anvil upon which the opinions of men are smashed. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
518:The word stands for the body, but the symphony stands for the spirit. ~ Hildegard of Bingen,
519:We have to determine our theology from the Word of God, not from what we feel. ~ R C Sproul,
520:Who can know from the word goodbye what kind of parting is in store for us. ~ Arundhati Roy,
521:22Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says.m ~ Anonymous,
522:Confusion of sign and object is original sin coeval with the word. ~ Willard Van Orman Quine,
523:He repeats my name like the word amuses him. Entertains him. Delights him. In ~ Tahereh Mafi,
524:In some languages, the word for “crisis” is also the word for “opportunity. ~ Scott Kenemore,
525:In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. ~ Amy Harmon,
526:In the beginning was the Word. Man acts it out. He is the act, not the actor. ~ Henry Miller,
527:I've loved a lot of people, and the word hasn't meant the same thing twice. ~ Daniel Abraham,
528:Man's words are mere breath, but the word of the Lord is spirit and life. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
529:Most people do not let the Word of God get in the way of what they believe. ~ Andrew Wommack,
530:Only a Perfect One who is always laughing at the word two can make you know of Love. ~ Hafez,
531:Only a Perfect One Who is always Laughing at the word Two Can make you know Of Love. ~ Hafiz,
532:Realism, in so far as the word means reality to life, is always bad art. ~ Sherwood Anderson,
533:The faith that conquers fear is faith in the Word, not faith in feelings. ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
534:The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever. ~ Anonymous,
535:There is nowhere in the four Gospels where Jesus uses the word 'homosexual.' ~ Michael Moore,
536:"The word happiness’ would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness." ~ Carl Jung,
537:The word of the day is legs. Let's go back to my place and spread the word. ~ Gena Showalter,
538:We don’t use the word crazy around here. We prefer coping mechanism. ~ Jordan Castillo Price,
539:You Keep Using the Word Help. I Do Not Think It Means What You Think It Means ~ Rick Riordan,
540:8The grass withers and the flowers fall, but the word of our God endures forever. ~ Anonymous,
541:A continual diet of the Word satisfies, and it builds an appetite for more. ~ James MacDonald,
542:a feeling of unity, oblivion, mindlessness in the best sense of the word ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
543:Afraid of the word “politics” (which eventually became a synonym for Communism ~ Ray Bradbury,
544:Asylum. The word always made me
smile. Such a pretty name for a hellhole. ~ Jennifer Estep,
545:Christ has no place in the life that is not dominated by the Word. - T.B. Joshua ~ T B Joshua,
546:her feelings could seldom withstand the melancholy influence of the word "last. ~ Jane Austen,
547:If the Word does not dwell with power in us, it will not pass with power from us. ~ John Owen,
548:If you're not ready to die for it, put the word 'freedom' out of your vocabulary. ~ Malcolm X,
549:I prefer the word thriver, because I’m not just surviving, I’m thriving, ~ Laurell K Hamilton,
550:Let us learn from the Virgin Mary how to be bolder in obeying the word of God. ~ Pope Francis,
551:Not in your sense of the word, but in mine you are scheming to destroy me.  ~ Charlotte Bront,
552:People think they are individuals because they use the word ''I'' so often. ~ Edward St Aubyn,
553:senseless. I prefer the word “buzzed,” following the brain/amplifier analogy. ~ Philip Yancey,
554:Some of us – poets are not exactly poets. We live sometimes – beyond the word. ~ Wole Soyinka,
555:Some women can't say the word lesbian... even when their mouth is full of one. ~ Kate Clinton,
556:The word diva to me means doing something supernatural with something natural. ~ Patti LuPone,
557:"The word 'happiness' would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness." ~ Carl Jung,
558:The word Hindu is a geopolitical description and not a religious marker. ~ Maloy Krishna Dhar,
559:The word of God is always most precious to the man who most lives upon it. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
560:... the word still entered my life - as in "Oh, you're still travelling" ... ~ Gloria Steinem,
561:You might be a redneck if your birth announcement included the word rug rat. ~ Jeff Foxworthy,
562:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  ~ Anonymous,
563:Didn’t anyone ever tell you that you can’t spell later without the word late? ~ Gena Showalter,
564:He's not only a good player, but he's spiteful in the nicest sense of the word. ~ Ron Atkinson,
565:He was intent on proving that the word "dying" was not synonymous with "useless. ~ Mitch Albom,
566:He was intent on proving that the word “dying” was not synonymous with “useless. ~ Mitch Albom,
567:I believe I never knew what the word round meant until I saw Earth from space. ~ Alexey Leonov,
568:I don’t even know what the word strange means anymore... that’s really strange. ~ Pete Hautman,
569:If the word doesn't exist, invent it; but first be sure it doesn't exist. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
570:If you're not ready to die for it, take the word 'freedom' out of your vocabulary. ~ Malcolm X,
571:If your word is of no value, you will reason that the Word of God is of no value. ~ E W Kenyon,
572:I have always wanted to write a book that ended with the word 'mayonnaise. ~ Richard Brautigan,
573:It's when the thing itself is missing that you have to supply the word. ~ Henry de Montherlant,
574:My father told and taught me that the word, can hit harder than the fist. ~ Wladimir Klitschko,
575:poorly dressed Anarecsian warrioress who looked chilly in every sense of the word. ~ Anonymous,
576:The higher a man stands, the more the word vulgar becomes unintelligible to him. ~ John Ruskin,
577:The unit of the poet is the word, the unit of the prose writer is the sentence. ~ Susan Sontag,
578:The word Maven comes from the Yiddish, and it means one who accumulates knowledge. ~ Anonymous,
579:The word must be heard in silence; there must be darkness to see the stars. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
580:The word user is the word used by the computer professional when they mean idiot. ~ Dave Barry,
581:Two distant points now touching, the word and the page a bridge and amends. ~ Shawna Yang Ryan,
582:Whatever contradicts the Word of God should be instantly resisted as diabolical. ~ John Bunyan,
583:Whenever someone says the word community, I want to reach for an oxygen mask. ~ Fareed Zakaria,
584:When the word moderation becomes a dirty word we have some soul searching to do. ~ Jon Meacham,
585:You are learned in the Word of God--And if you know His Word, you know His Will. ~ Will Eisner,
586:Your attitude toward the word of God is your attitude toward Jesus (Ps 37:4). ~ David Jeremiah,
587:You.” The word was spat out at her, full of hatred. “What have you done to me? ~ Marissa Meyer,
588:And again and again fell the word, like the ebb of a dying sea.

"Good-bye. ~ E M Forster,
589:Be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. (James 1:22) In ~ Lisa Bevere,
590:Etymologically, the word education means just a process of leading or bringing up. ~ John Dewey,
591:He was intent on proving that the word ‘dying’ was not synonymous with ‘useless’. ~ Mitch Albom,
592:How many times do I need to repeat the word for it to join your vocabulary? ~ Alexandra Bracken,
593:...I guess when you believe the word of a complete liar, logic doesn't come into it. ~ A S King,
594:I know sociologically that words, the power of the word, words stigmatize people. ~ Huey Newton,
595:I understood the meaning of the word swoon — I had become the very definition. ~ Lauren Blakely,
596:Odd thing it is—the word ‘experiment’ is unpopular, but not the word ‘experimental. ~ C S Lewis,
597:Paris. The word clunked into her head, filling up her thoughts with its weight. ~ Marissa Meyer,
598:The faster the word sticks to the thought, the more beautiful is the effect. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
599:The Greek meaning of the word "blessed" is "supreme happiness." [see Matthew 5:3-5] ~ Eric Ludy,
600:The only philosophy is that of language, the only religion is that of the word. ~ Michel Serres,
601:The word doctrine, as used in the Bible, means teaching of duty, not theory. ~ George MacDonald,
602:Whoever invented the word 'grace' must have seen the wing-folding of the plover. ~ Aldo Leopold,
603:You never hear the word “breasts” in a positive scenario. Breasts are bad news. ~ Caitlin Moran,
604:All the word was wind.
Snow an cold were all around.
Darkness was coming. ~ Dan Gemeinhart,
605:A synonym is a word you use when you can't spell the word you first thought of. ~ Burt Bacharach,
606:Happiness like an unmoving dancer.
The Transfiguration of the Word by Kinga Fabo ~ Kinga Fabo,
607:I am stronger than death and greater than my fate
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
608:I lost in '96, in case the word hadn't trickled out, and so I made a few commercials. ~ Bob Dole,
609:I'm sorry, could you please tell me what the definition of the word "is" is? ~ William J Clinton,
610:In Asian languages, the word for mind and the word for heart are the same word. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
611:I've heard the word 'fear'. I simply choose to believe it doesn't apply to me. ~ Cassandra Clare,
612:Let him who wants a true church cling to the Word by which everything is upheld. ~ Martin Luther,
613:Liberty, taking the word in its concrete sense, consists in the ability to choose. ~ Simone Weil,
614:No one will be forced to take the public option. The word option means choice. ~ Valerie Jarrett,
615:Oh for a single hour of that Dundee Who on that day the word of onset gave! ~ William Wordsworth,
616:Paulinus, everyone knows. Say the word, and I'll run the bitch over with my chariot ~ Kate Quinn,
617:Savage. The word hung above us like a guillotine, ready to fall at any moment. "I'm ~ C J Archer,
618:Take delight in questioning; hearken in silence to the word of the saints. ~ Imitation of Christ,
619:The gesture, rather than the word, is the true transmitter of traditions. ~ Nicol s G mez D vila,
620:The other day, I tried to remember what was the word for ‘dragonfly’ and couldn’t. ~ Donna Tartt,
621:The word discipline comes from disciple, someone who is in a position to learn. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
622:They surround the car
and are all moaning something.
Is that the word train?! ~ Ryan Mecum,
623:What if the word of God was enough to inspire passionate worship among his people? ~ David Platt,
624:When people are deeply affected by the Word, they tell it to other people. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer,
625:Beware of bartering the Word of God for a more suitable conception of your own. ~ Oswald Chambers,
626:Grease is the word, is the word that you heard, It's got groove, its got feeling. ~ Frankie Valli,
627:He swift don't win the race. It goes to the worthy, who can divide the word of truth. ~ Bob Dylan,
628:If the Qur'an was the word of God, it had been dictated on a very bad day. ~ Christopher Hitchens,
629:If you want to be led by the Spirit of God, then devote yourself to the Word of God. ~ J D Greear,
630:I had some envy of the man who could use the word "chicanery" with such confidence. ~ Brian Friel,
631:I held in the sneeze, though, by thinking of the word cucumber. It always works. ~ Merrie Haskell,
632:I'm a firm supporter of the word polyamory. But that one is close to my heart. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
633:In Scripture, the word of the gospel and the power of the Spirit always go together. ~ J D Greear,
634:I've always said that the word 'genius,' especially in Hollywood, is way overused. ~ Ted McGinley,
635:Never mind, you know the word must; with that word one does many things. ~ Alexandre Dumas,
636:No woman worth her salt would listen to a proposal without the word ‘love’ in it. ~ Karen Hawkins,
637:One must know and recognize not merely the direct but the secret power of the word. ~ Knut Hamsun,
638:Remember that Puritans were utterly devoted, like literary critics, to the Word. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
639:she’d felt as though she understood the meaning of the word sorrow for the first time. ~ Etaf Rum,
640:The Bible is the Word of God in such a way that when the Bible speaks, God speaks. ~ B B Warfield,
641:The mention of the word dispensationalism usually evokes an immediate reaction. ~ Charles C Ryrie,
642:The more reverence we have for the Word of God, the more joy we shall find in it. ~ Matthew Henry,
643:The pulpit is not a place to settle scores, it’s a place to preach the word of God. ~ Greg Laurie,
644:there is one word that can be the guide for your life- it is the word reciprocity. ~ Pearl S Buck,
645:The roots of the word “compete” are the Latin competure, which means to “seek with. ~ Eric Weiner,
646:The thought is merely a sign, as the word is merely a sign for the thought. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
647:The word “companion” comes from the Latin “cum” (“together”) and “panis” (“bread”). ~ Tim Chester,
648:The word 'democracy' and the name of Assad do not blend very well in much of Syria. ~ Robert Fisk,
649:The word “lepton” derives from the Greek leptos, meaning “light” or “small. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
650:To serve the Word is to fulfill the highest function of which man is capable. ~ G Campbell Morgan,
651:When we have no room for the Word of God in our lives we have no room for success. ~ Phil Pringle,
652:You'll know the green revolution has been won when the word 'green' disappears. ~ Thomas Friedman,
653:1 aIn the bbeginning was the Word, and the cWord was with God, and the dWord was eGod. ~ Anonymous,
654:All the cunning of the devil is exercised in trying to tear us away from the word. ~ Martin Luther,
655:American Christianity is based more on a godless culture than it is the word of God. ~ Paul Washer,
656:Berger’s eyes narrowed. She turned ice-cold. She had had enough of the word whore. ~ Stieg Larsson,
657:Expendable was not the word I was looking to hear to boost my morale, but whatever. ~ Rachel Caine,
658:flesh. The word must become flesh; the soul thirsts. On whatever crumb my eye fastens, ~ Anonymous,
659:For poets (bear the word) Half-poets even, are still whole democrats. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning,
660:God works through men. I see nowhere in the Word where God picks an organization. ~ Dawson Trotman,
661:I am deathless, I am the eternal Lord For I have spread the seed of the Word. ~ Abolqasem Ferdowsi,
662:I'd rather write great songs because the word "commercial" is so subjective ~ Beth Nielsen Chapman,
663:I hate the word 'demigod'. I prefer 'being born with a target on my back. - Blitzen ~ Rick Riordan,
664:I think "immoral" is probably the wrong word to use...I prefer the word "unethical." ~ Ivan Boesky,
665:No one in his right mind will try to grow grapes by the luminosity of the word "day. ~ Paul De Man,
666:Of course, the truly fearless don’t need to tattoo the word “brave” on their anatomy. ~ Joel Ohman,
667:One of the coolest things about the word boobs is, when you look at it, it has boobs. ~ Dana Gould,
668:Perhaps,” he said. He wondered if she knew how much hope stood behind the word. ~ Jonathan Renshaw,
669:Remember: the Word is God and God is the Word. You are what your words are. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
670:She smiled. "How...cute." She chose the word rather like a candy, which she bit. ~ Matthew Skelton,
671:Survive! The word ratcheted through him, an echo that would not be stilled. Endure! ~ Terry Brooks,
672:The grass withers and the flowers fade,        but the word of our God stands forever. ~ Anonymous,
673:There is no excuse for falling into delusion, which is so contrary to the Word of God. ~ Dave Hunt,
674:The squalid cash interpretation put on the word success — is our national disease. ~ William James,
675:The Word of God is a lamp by night, a light by day, and a delight at all times. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
676:What people mean by the word "technology" is the stuff that doesn't really work yet. ~ Bran Ferren,
677:When you focus so much on the word, you tend to neglect the realm of silence. ~ David Steindl Rast,
678:With each passing minute, I’m developing a deeper appreciation of the word mortified, ~ John Green,
679:You know, my childhood was pretty colorful; I like to use the word turbulent. ~ Michael K Williams,
680:8 The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever. ~ Anonymous,
681:Ahimsa is a science. The word 'failure' has no place in the vocabulary of science. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
682:Churches that depart from the Word will soon find that God has departed from them. ~ Robert Godfrey,
683:Faith has nothing to do with circumstances, it deals entirely with the Word of God. ~ Lettie Cowman,
684:If they have to put the word 'natural' on a box to convince you, it probably isn't. ~ Michele Simon,
685:If you want to know whether God exists, all you have to do is define the word 'exist'. ~ Bill Gaede,
686:I hate the word lesbian; it tells you nothing; its only purpose is to inflame. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
687:I have one aim only: to impart a fraction of the meaning of the word now. ~ Frederick Salomon Perls,
688:My doubts stand in a circle around every word, I see them before I see the word. ~ Valeria Luiselli,
689:People throw the word love around like confetti when they actually mean affection. ~ Robert Cormier,
690:The devil flees before the sound of music almost as much as before the Word of God. ~ Martin Luther,
691:The more you study the Word of God, the more it saturates your mind and life. ~ John F MacArthur Jr,
692:There is no way you can use the word “reality” without quotation marks around it. ~ Joseph Campbell,
693:The word 'cancer' carries with it enormous fear, fear for the future, fear for family. ~ Wayne Swan,
694:When referring to an individual, including yourself, never use the word 'just'. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
695:When someone uses the word 'cult,' it usually says more about them than the group ~ J Gordon Melton,
696:22vBut prove yourselves doers of the word, and not merely hearers who delude themselves. ~ Anonymous,
697:As long as we let the word be our only armor we can look confidently into the future. ~ Eric Metaxas,
698:Has any non-dipshit man ever used the word "ladies" not followed by the word "room"? ~ Penn Jillette,
699:His Son Jesus, the Word of God, is our Instructor.... He is God and Creator. ~ Clement of Alexandria,
700:If the word 'No' was removed from the English language, Ian Paisley would be speechless. ~ John Hume,
701:I prefer the word aviatrix. It has more zing to it."
"It's very zingy," I agreed. ~ Kenneth Oppel,
702:I really want to get the word out that I am still relevant and have something to say. ~ Regina Belle,
703:I suspected there would be a good-size crowd once the word got out about my hanging. ~ George W Bush,
704:Never but the one matter. The dead and gone. The dying and going. From the word go. ~ Samuel Beckett,
705:Not every English sentence beginning with the word "why" is a legitimate question. ~ Richard Dawkins,
706:People, they all have the word goodness on lips a bloody knife between their teeth. ~ Eug ne Ionesco,
707:The grass withers, the flower fades,         but the word of our God will stand forever. ~ Anonymous,
708:There's a perilous word fiction writers need to watch out for. The word is 'had.' ~ James Scott Bell,
709:The thought of the word church and the word marketing in the same sentence makes me sick. ~ Rob Bell,
710:The word of God is always most precious to the man who most lives upon it. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
711:The Word, the Gospel, creates not just people individually but A people collectively ~ Matt Chandler,
712:When I wasn't sure what the word "charisma" meant, I met Steve Jobs, and then I knew. ~ Larry Tesler,
713:When they hear, immediately Satan comes and takes away the word sown in them. Mark 4:15 ~ Beth Moore,
714:God help me now to preach the Word to all the dying around, and tell them how. ~ John Alexander Dowie,
715:If we understood what happens when we use the Word of God, we would use it oftener. ~ Oswald Chambers,
716:In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. JOHN 1:1 ~ John Piper,
717:It is wise to listen, not to me but to the Word, and to confess that all things are one. ~ Heraclitus,
718:Kingdoms Come and Go, but the Word Stays True. - Kailin Gow, Fearless Fairy Tales Series ~ Kailin Gow,
719:Martyr More,’ he says. ‘The word is in Rome that he and Fisher are to be made saints. ~ Hilary Mantel,
720:People tell me that I am well-grounded. I am sane in the New England sense of the word. ~ Ali MacGraw,
721:Rationalism... is a secularized form of the belief in the power of the word of God. ~ Paul Feyerabend,
722:Read ingredients lists and don’t eat anything with the word “hydrogenated” on the label. ~ Mark Hyman,
723:Realistic' is a loaded word for me. Anyone who uses the word 'realistic' is all bad. ~ David R Brower,
724:The beginning is the word and the end is silence. And in between are all the stories. ~ Kate Atkinson,
725:The pressure of politics can change the course of history, and even the word of God. ~ Linda Lafferty,
726:The vibrant Christian life is a union of clarity in the Word and openness to the Spirit. ~ J D Greear,
727:The word experience is like a shrapnel shell, and bursts into a thousand meanings. ~ George Santayana,
728:The word God asks a question and then answers it before there is any chance to wonder. ~ Miranda July,
729:The word "hedonistic" to me means pleasure above all else. My pleasure above all else. ~ Fred Melamed,
730:We're still here trying to get the word out that 330 farmers are quitting every week. ~ Willie Nelson,
731:What was “grokking”? He had been using the word for a week—and he didn’t grok it. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
732:What whip lashed them to their knees in shame and submission? The worship of the word "We. ~ Ayn Rand,
733:And life in his mind gave him pleasure, such pleasure that pleasure was not the word. ~ Samuel Beckett,
734:Faith is born and sustained by the Word of God, and out of faith grows the flower of joy. ~ John Piper,
735:...from the word you build the village, but from silence you construct the world. ~ Patrick Chamoiseau,
736:How does the Word memorized become the Word applied? It happens through meditation. ~ Donald S Whitney,
737:I don't like the word 'alcoholic'. I like to think of myself as an advanced drinker. ~ Chelsea Handler,
738:...in English the word 'peripatetic' means 'one who walks habitually and extensively. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
739:I think everybody has to kind of decide what the word 'jazz' means to them, and that's fine. ~ Kenny G,
740:It's the suppression of the word that gives it the power, the violence, the viciousness. ~ Lenny Bruce,
741:I’ve never seen a shambles,” said Mrs. Wiggins, who had no idea what the word meant, ~ Walter R Brooks,
742:I wouldn't write a book, because saying the word I over and over again would nauseate me. ~ John Kluge,
743:John 1 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with god, and the Word was God. ~ Anonymous,
744:Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world. ~ Martin Luther,
745:Saying the word I was not supposed to say is the thing that gave me a voice in the world. ~ Eve Ensler,
746:The grass withers, the flower fades;           but the word of our God will stand forever. ~ Anonymous,
747:The range of phenomena denoted by the word empathy owes a lot to this arrangement. ~ Ant nio R Dam sio,
748:The word 'happiness' does indeed have meaning, doesn't it? I shall go out in search of it. ~ Mariama B,
749:The word itself—dyslexia—is ironically very hard for dyslexic people to spell correctly ~ Eddie Izzard,
750:The word need is never good. I hope you never use it when you’re talking about me, ~ Patricia Cornwell,
751:The Word of God needs to saturate our minds if we want to know and follow God’s will. ~ Brother Andrew,
752:We call the slope of a line m because the word "slope" begins with the letter m. ~ Howard Whitley Eves,
753:What you have not published, you can destroy. The word once sent forth can never be recalled. ~ Horace,
754:I don't like religion much, and I am glad that in the Bible the word is not to be found. ~ Martin Buber,
755:if you’re going to use the word ‘dream’ in a poem, you had better be langston hughes. ~ Jewelle L G mez,
756:I hate the word homophobia. It's not a phobia. You are not scared. You are an asshole. ~ Morgan Freeman,
757:In the beginning – before the beginning – was the word. And the word was ‘Doctor!’ ~ Neil Gaiman,
758:I think that if I discovered I had cancer I would immediately say the word, "Phew."
Phew. ~ Sam Pink,
759:It's like knowing all the word to a song but still finding them beautiful and surprising. ~ Nicola Yoon,
760:Preaching, in the first sense of the word, ceased as soon as ever the gospel was written. ~ John Selden,
761:The calling of the humanities is to make us truly human in the best sense of the word. ~ J Irwin Miller,
762:There are savages without God in any proper sense of the word, but none without ghosts. ~ Thomas Huxley,
763:There’s no sense to expect the fruits where the Word really is no longer being preached. ~ Eric Metaxas,
764:There's no such thing as civilization. The word just means the art of living in cities. ~ Roger Zelazny,
765:There's nothing wrong with the word conspiracy. It just means 'to breathe together.' ~ Janeane Garofalo,
766:The word compassion is derived from the Latin words pati and cum, meaning “to suffer with. ~ Bren Brown,
767:The Word is the Magic that Humans possess and misuse of the Word is Black Magic... ~ Miguel Angel Ruiz,
768:The word poet literally means maker: anything which is not well made doesn't exist. ~ Theophile Gautier,
769:Train yourself never to put off the word or action for the expression of gratitude. ~ Albert Schweitzer,
770:20 He who heeds the word wisely will find good, And whoever trusts in the LORD, happy is he. ~ Anonymous,
771:Do not lose your enthusiasm. In its Greek etymology, the word enthusiasm means, "God in us." ~ Ken Burns,
772:even the word humanism made me want to vomit, but that might have been the canapés. ~ Michel Houellebecq,
773:He means the Word: the sentence that, when uttered, would destroy the mind of the listener. ~ Ted Chiang,
774:I hate the word 'cheap'. People are cheap. Clothing is either expensive or inexpensive. ~ Karl Lagerfeld,
775:I’m not sure I would ever apply the word ‘gooey’ to an animal covered in quills,” Gemma said. ~ K M Shea,
776:In the fifties… we were so busy being cool that we didn’t know how to say the word love ~ Diane di Prima,
777:I think it's the business part of the word show business that causes me the most concern. ~ Brent Spiner,
778:I was thinking about the word handle and all the unholdable things that got handled. ~ John Green,
779:So in 1910 a Danish botanist, Wilhelm Johannsen, self-consciously invented the word gene. ~ James Gleick,
780:The trick to saying the word cock, is to do it like you have one in your mouth. ~ Geoffrey Knight,
781:The word bipartisan usually means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out. ~ George Carlin,
782:The word freedom lost much of its strength when one’s back was weighted down with fieldwork. ~ Bob Mayer,
783:The word "Yankee" itself, I was informed, came from that simplest of Dutch names - Jan. ~ Joseph O Neill,
784:Transformations is the word. We can do the work of transformation only in the present moment ~ Nhat Hanh,
785:What harrowing is after sowing, the same is meditation after hearing--it hides the word. ~ Matthew Henry,
786:A pretty woman, not a bother? As far as he knew, that was the very definition of the word. ~ Joanna Shupe,
787:Beautiful?” said Miss Bartlett, puzzled at the word. “Are not beauty and delicacy the same? ~ E M Forster,
788:Exchange the words 'have to' with 'get to.' Exchange the word 'can't' with 'unwilling. ~ Jamie Lee Curtis,
789:how the word “no” should be the “end of the discussion, not the beginning of a negotiation. ~ Amy Poehler,
790:I don't like the word "brand." When I see people creating a brand, it feels disingenuous. ~ Laura Benanti,
791:ISA40.8 The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever. ~ Anonymous,
792:I think there should be a Marriage Jar. Anyone who mentions the word has to put in a pound ~ Ayisha Malik,
793:It was the Greeks who coined the term “Amazon.” The word literally means “without breast. ~ Stieg Larsson,
794:Joy that throbs behind
The marvel and the mystery of pain. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
795:Knock the T off the word can’t. You can do anything—ANYTHING—if you think you can! ~ Norman Vincent Peale,
796:Mum is the word for just so long and then it has to go back to being a British parent. Of ~ Carrie Fisher,
797:Our description of what we are seeing ought to be begun with the word 'apparently'. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
798:People aren't really afraid of my views. They are just afraid of the word 'nationalism.' ~ Alexei Navalny,
799:The word 'choice' is a fraud while people choose only what they have been taught to choose. ~ Idries Shah,
800:The word-coining genius, as if thought plunged into a sea of words and came up dripping. ~ Virginia Woolf,
801:The word happiness exists in every language; it is plausible the thing itself exists. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
802:THE WORD wife comes from the Proto-Indo-European weip. Weip means to turn, twist, or wrap. ~ Lauren Groff,
803:When the poet makes his perfect selection of a word, he is endowing the word with life. ~ John Drinkwater,
804:Dreams are built around the word hello, but in the end fate only knows the word goodbye. ~ Shannon L Alder,
805:Has the world ever been changed by anything save the thought and its magic vehicle the Word? ~ Thomas Mann,
806:H has moved to a town in Denmark that sounds like someone Scottish saying the word whorehouse. ~ Ali Smith,
807:In fourteenth-century philosophy, the word patient simply meant “the object of an action, ~ Paul Kalanithi,
808:In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
- John 1:1 ~ Anonymous,
809:I think the word 'blog' is an ugly word. I just don't know why people can't use the word 'journal.' ~ Moby,
810:Mercy." He said the word as if he were tasting something unfamiliar. "I could be merciful. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
811:Perhaps the most insidious and least understood form of segregation is that of the word. ~ Claudia Rankine,
812:She lost God so smoothly and painlessly she had to wonder what she'd ever meant by the word. ~ Zadie Smith,
813:testimony unto the word of his grace, and granted signs and wonders to be done by their hands. ~ Anonymous,
814:The next time you find yourself reaching for the word teach, substitute the word learn. It ~ Pam Laricchia,
815:The search for the word gets no easier but nobody else is going to write your novel for you. ~ Neil Gaiman,
816:The strong manly ones in life are those who understand the meaning of the word patience. ~ Ieyasu Tokugawa,
817:The word God is for me nothing more than the expression and product of human weaknesses. ~ Albert Einstein,
818:The word " philosophy " carries unfortunate connotations: impractical, unworldly, weird. ~ Simon Blackburn,
819:UNICEF is such a special organization, and to spread the word just makes me so happy. ~ Charlotte Sullivan,
820:You can just say the word "hair" to a woman, and she tells you the story of her life. ~ Elizabeth Benedict,
821:You want to talk about the word faggot because it really offends you? Well you're a douchebag. ~ Joe Rogan,
822:All around me, grown-up voices called out, "Amen!" as if the word was a hall pass into Heaven. ~ Jane Yolen,
823:by this I know that thou art a man of God, and that the word of the LORD in thy mouth is truth. ~ Anonymous,
824:Everything turned on the word "we", a synonym for love, the thing that saves us all. ~ Marisa de los Santos,
825:If your mind is filled with the Word of God, then it can't be filled with impure thoughts. ~ David Jeremiah,
826:I like the word f-k. F-king deal with it and move on to the first f-king question you have. ~ Ozzy Osbourne,
827:I think you say the word in your mind anyway, you know. When you look at a word, you say it. ~ Robert Barry,
828:Leader. Ship. The word 'ship' is hidden inside the word 'leadership,' as its... derivation. ~ Michael Scott,
829:Loving someone is the easiest thing in the word. Making them love you back is the hard part. ~ Leisa Rayven,
830:Napoleon never liked the word impossible; if he had liked it, he wouldn’t be Napoleon! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
831:Organizations that take the word of overconfident experts can expect costly consequences. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
832:The first and principal duty of a pastor is to feed the flock by diligent preaching of the word ~ John Owen,
833:the human condition can be summed up in just one word, and this is the word: Embarrassment. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
834:The problem Creationists identify is with the word 'theory', not with the case for evolution ~ Lance Parkin,
835:"There is no expression with deeper meaning than that of the word 'just' in 'just sitting.'" ~ Motoko Ikebe,
836:The word "hope" I take for faith; and indeed hope is nothing else but the constancy of faith. ~ John Calvin,
837:The word is too weak. There is no word in the language strong enough to describe my feelings. ~ Jack London,
838:The Word of God became man, that thou mayest learn from man how man may become God. ~ Clement of Alexandria,
839:The word spinster hid behind it a blazing freedom; and how hadn’t Mathilde seen this before? ~ Lauren Groff,
840:We will wait. We will wait till all is made righteous (glorious) according to the word of God. ~ John Piper,
841:What is a shaman? The word was borrowed by anthropologists from the Tungus people of Siberia. ~ Robert Moss,
842:For each his difficult goal
Hewn out of infinite possibility. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
843:I believe the word "perfection" should be changed to "pure fiction" - it's just not possible! ~ Arielle Ford,
844:I don't know what the heart is, not I: I only use the word to denote the mind's frailties. ~ Marquis de Sade,
845:I don't lose any sleep at night over the potential for failure. I cannot even spell the word. ~ James Mattis,
846:If you use the word ‘halt,’ I will hit you.” “Not halt,” he breathlessly said. “Upstairs. Now. ~ Chloe Neill,
847:Immorality is the word we use to describe people that are not sinning the same way we are. ~ Shannon L Alder,
848:In 1961 you usually didn’t hear the word shit from teachers, even if they had a mouthful. But ~ Stephen King,
849:Let me say that God will send me the plan when He gives the word as He has done before now. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
850:Life was dear, in every sense of the word. You just needed to remember it in the dark. ~ Alan Bradley,
851:Much blood has been spilled over words, and a great deal of it over the word ‘God.’ (125) ~ Jean Yves Leloup,
852:Never forget that the word that best describes reliable science is not consensus, but engineering. ~ Vox Day,
853:Never use the word “impossible” seriously again. Toss it into the verbal wastebucket. ~ Norman Vincent Peale,
854:One thinking it is right to speak all things, whether the word is fit for speech or unutterable. ~ Sophocles,
855:The most dangerous word in any human tongue is the word for brother. It's inflammatory. ~ Tennessee Williams,
856:The word bodhisattva refers to those who have committed themselves to the path of compassion. ~ Pema Ch dr n,
857:The word design is everything and nothing. The design and the product itself are inseparable. ~ Jonathan Ive,
858:The word for 'book' in all the known languages of the earth is vallon, 'chamber of words'... ~ Sofia Samatar,
859:The word 'tradition' covered it all, as it covered so many things, some useful, some foolish. ~ Isaac Asimov,
860:Today. Also, use the word motherfucker at some point. You’ll feel a lot better. Trust me. ~ Penelope Douglas,
861:We seek to find peace of mind in the word, the formula, the ritual. The hope is illusion. ~ Benjamin Cardozo,
862:what? drawn and talk of peace? I hate the word as I hate Hell, all Montagues, and thee ~ William Shakespeare,
863:Words were originally magic, and the word retains much of its old magical power even to-day. ~ Sigmund Freud,
864:5) The word Vikings means “fighting men.” Vikings included Danes, Norwegians, and Swedes. ~ Mary Pope Osborne,
865:A lot of words in English confuse the idea of life and electricity, like the word livewire. ~ Laurie Anderson,
866:New house rule: No talking about Parker’s panties. Actually, no using the word panties at all. ~ Lauren Layne,
867:No slave is a slave to the same lengths, and in so full a sense of the word, as a wife is. ~ John Stuart Mill,
868:On the whole I prefer cats to women because cats seldom if ever use the word 'relationship'. ~ Kinky Friedman,
869:Safe? The word still feels so foreign to me. Nothing like the word fear. Fear is like air. ~ Jessica Sorensen,
870:She almost burst out laughing. He’d uttered the word talk like it was a communicable disease. ~ Lorelei James,
871:The civilian world was a dull place, a tired three-piece orchestra, waiting for the word 'fun'. ~ L P Hartley,
872:There are savages without God in any proper sense of the word, but none without ghosts. ~ Thomas Henry Huxley,
873:The word love has become so devalued, we have to put words in front of it, like 'unconditional'. ~ David Icke,
874:The word mother must be replaced with the word extraordinary because they precisely are! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
875:the Word of God we read is written not so much with ink as with the blood of the Son of God; or ~ John Calvin,
876:They conquered him by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony. Revelation 12:11 ~ Beth Moore,
877:Would I use the word 'genius' to describe myself? No. 'Alive?' Perhaps. 'Befuddled?' Certainly. ~ Sean Gibson,
878:You’d make an enemy out of me over a human?” The word “human” might as well have been “rodent. ~ Nalini Singh,
879:Ah, this is obviously some strange usage of the word 'safe' that I wasn't previously aware of. ~ Douglas Adams,
880:Although the Word is common to all, many live as if they had a private understanding of their own ~ Heraclitus,
881:And anyway, the first three letters in the word diet should tell you what I want it to do. ~ Becca Fitzpatrick,
882:but maintained that the bishop of Rome had no authority whatever to dispense with the Word of God. ~ John Foxe,
883:But to find out the truth about how dreams die, one should never take the word of the dreamer. ~ Toni Morrison,
884:But when the image of the word fell on her retina, something strange happened in Kristin’s brain. ~ Robin Cook,
885:However, become doers of the word and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves with false reasoning. ~ Anonymous,
886:I apologize for the fact that the word ‘anti-Mexican’ is being said to a black guy in America. ~ Katt Williams,
887:I didn't know the word no, because I wanted to please everybody all the time. Every kid does ~ Kristy McNichol,
888:I don't like the word 'businesswoman.' Perhaps 'committed mother' would be the best description. ~ Steffi Graf,
889:Inerrancy means the word of God always stands over us and we never stand over the word of God. ~ Kevin DeYoung,
890:I wonder whoever put the word good with bye. It's stupid. There's nothing good about them. ~ Gwendolyn Heasley,
891:I won't mention the word tired. This is the 20th century and I can go around a little faster. ~ Geri Halliwell,
892:JOHN 1 [†] a In the beginning was b the Word, and c the Word was with God, and d the Word was God. ~ Anonymous,
893:People think they are individuals because they use the word "I" so often, Patrick commented. ~ Edward St Aubyn,
894:Still ours the dance, the feast, the glorious Psalm, The mystic lights of emblem, and the Word. ~ Emma Lazarus,
895:The promise given was a necessity of the past: the word broken is a necessity of the present’? ~ Michael Scott,
896:There's a lot of power in the word 'no,' and a lot of people, like myself, need to know that. ~ Meghan Trainor,
897:The word NO, carries a lot more meaning when spoken by a parent who also knows how to say yes. ~ Joyce Maynard,
898:The Word of God has a supernatural edge with which a million-dollar budget can never compete. ~ Joseph Stowell,
899:The Word that ushers divine experience ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
900:To believe in luck, if it were not a solecism so to use the word believe, is skepticism. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
901:To me, the word 'decadent' is so difficult to use; it's a very sensitive word, in a way. ~ Christian Louboutin,
902:To seem to be zealous, if it be not according to the word, is not obedience, but will-worship. ~ Thomas Watson,
903:While we are on the go, we need to stop between steps, to refocus on the Word and the will of God ~ T B Joshua,
904:Compassion is priceless in the truest sense of the word. It must be given freely.In abundance. ~ Steven Erikson,
905:Do you not see that the word, “God with us,” puts impossibility out of all existence? ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
906:I came to understand that the words executive and corporate never belong next to the word chef. ~ Thomas Keller,
907:If I am to have faith when I pray, I must find some promise in the Word of God to rest my faith on ~ R A Torrey,
908:In my experience, Connor acted as if the word no meant nothing unless he was the one saying it. ~ Ilona Andrews,
909:In the phrase ' human being,' the word 'being' is much more important than the word 'human.' ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
910:Jesus didn't come to merely speak words that were true, He is the Word that makes us true. ~ Frederick Buechner,
911:Justin's fan are called Beliebers because it's politically incorrect to use the word retards. ~ Natasha Leggero,
912:Just say the word and I'll make him stay.
I have to do it.
There's no have to. Not even now. ~ Alex Adams,
913:Let the Word be preached, the truth taught, and error will be uncovered and souls delivered. ~ Arno C Gaebelein,
914:No, I did not promise. I only smirked and bowed, and said the word “happy.” There was no promise. ~ Jane Austen,
915:TAKE TIME TO BE HOLY. The word holy does not mean goody-goody; it means set apart for sacred use. ~ Sarah Young,
916:the presence of the Word with them shielded them even from natural corruption, ~ Saint Athanasius of Alexandria,
917:The word defines us relative to each other: one cannot be apart without the other. Einstein ~ John Joseph Adams,
918:The word Fascism has now no meaning except in so far as it signifies 'something not desirable.' ~ George Orwell,
919:The word lethologica describes the state of not being able to remember the word you want. ~ Sarah Addison Allen,
920:The word priority was singular for 500 years—what does priorities mean—'many many first things.' ~ Greg McKeown,
921:...was friend the word? He seemed more like a succession of extraordinary events than a person. ~ Douglas Adams,
922:Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded. ~ Anonymous,
923:Yes," said Mr. Casaubon, with that peculiar pitch of voice which makes the word half a negative. ~ George Eliot,
924:You know, it is not God's desire to conceal but to reveal. The word revelation means "unveiling." ~ Greg Laurie,
925:Zen. It was like the word that ends the spell. The kill that turns the witch back into a princess ~ Jan Ellison,
926:a good book can make an almost impossible existence, liveable ( from 'the luck of the word' ) ~ Charles Bukowski,
927:But there was nothing beautiful about the word "brainwash". To clean the brain. To strip it bare. ~ Gemma Malley,
928:Contrary to popular belief, it's not the legs that go first; it's remembering the word for legs. ~ Larry Gelbart,
929:Forever. He carved the word into his soul. Kiera was his forever, deformity or no deformity. ~ Christine Fonseca,
930:How will you prove that you are a doer of the Word of God as it’s been presented to you here? ~ Donald S Whitney,
931:If you don’t stand by the Word, although God wants to stand by you, He can’t, because the only ~ Kenneth E Hagin,
932:If you find something that gets hold of you in the Word, pass it on to somebody that very day. ~ E Stanley Jones,
933:If you Google the word "fluffy," I'm the first thing that pops up. It's me, dogs and rabbits. ~ Gabriel Iglesias,
934:I had nothing growing up, but I always wanted to be 'sexy,' even before I knew what the word was. ~ Dolly Parton,
935:In the beginning was the Mother, the Word began a new era, one we have come to call Patriarchy. ~ Marilyn French,
936:It’s not the word made flesh we want in writing, in poetry and fiction, but the flesh made word ~ William H Gass,
937:Life was magic in a more mundane sense of the word; the act of living being magic all of its own. ~ Kate Griffin,
938:Lips. There was something strangely, delicately indelicate about the word, like a kiss itself. ~ Cassandra Clare,
939:ma always said the word damn came from beavers who gave up on their houses one stick short. ~ Charlie N Holmberg,
940:Manu is the father of mankind, and therefore from manu comes the word man, or, in Sanskrit, manuṣya. ~ Anonymous,
941:Now, why was it exciting to hear a pretty woman say the word porn, no matter what the context? ~ Katherine Heiny,
942:The people of Asia were slaves, because they had not learned how to pronounce the word 'no'. ~ Winston Churchill,
943:The word "art" does not designate the concept of a mere eventuality; it is a concept of rank. ~ Martin Heidegger,
944:The word was ours now, and as long as we held on to it, we could control the hurt it inflicted. ~ Kody Keplinger,
945:Thoughts are like a train, they'll take us somewhere. Protect by filling with the word of God. ~ Christine Caine,
946:To hear the Japanese plead for free trade is like hearing the word love on the lips of a harlot. ~ Lane Kirkland,
947:We use the word love in such a sloppy way that it can mean almost nothing or absolutely everything. ~ bell hooks,
948:When the grandmothers of today hear the word 'Chippendales,' they don't necessarily think of chairs. ~ Jean Kerr,
949:When your mother starts using the word "party" as a verb about her kid, that's absolutely crazy. ~ Dennis Miller,
950:Where shall the word be found, where will the word / Resound? Not here, there is not enough silence. ~ T S Eliot,
951:You see what the word of Michael Laski is: a minor but perilous triumph of being over nothingness. ~ Joan Didion,
952:A man of spirit must not think of the word difficulty as so much as existing. Away with it! ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
953:Chiron said the word assist as if meant slap upside the head with extreme prejudice. ~ Rick Riordan,
954:Faith, prayer, and the Word of God are the weapons God provides you with to fight spiritual battles. ~ Jim George,
955:He replied to them, “My mother and My brothers are those who hear and do the word of God. ”Luke 8:21 ~ Beth Moore,
956:In computing, turning the obvious into the useful is a living definition of the word "frustration". ~ Alan Perlis,
957:I simply taught, preached, wrote God's Word: otherwise I did nothing. The Word of God did it all. ~ Martin Luther,
958:I think you’re mistaking the word optimistic for inept.” “They’ve got a similar ring to my ear. ~ Lindsay Buroker,
959:It is the task of youth not to reshape the church, but rather to listen to the word of God. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer,
960:Language is the alchemy of transforming a thought into a word, and the word into a new reality. ~ Jennifer Sodini,
961:Noise harms your body and boils your brain. The word "noise" derives from the Latin word nausea. ~ Michael Finkel,
962:One of the main weaknesses of mankind is the average man's familiarity with the word 'impossible. ~ Napoleon Hill,
963:The economy is just a metaphorical device, it’s not real. That's why it's got the word con in it. ~ Russell Brand,
964:There is no point in using the word 'impossible' to describe something that has clearly happened. ~ Douglas Adams,
965:There’s no such thing as fate. It’s just the word men give to decisions which have worked out badly. ~ Kim Wright,
966:The Supermind using the Word is the creative Logos. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads, The Supreme Word,
967:The word and works of God is quite clear, that women were made either to be wives or prostitutes. ~ Martin Luther,
968:The word ‘darshan’ has a double meaning: view as well as worldview, sight as well as insight. ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
969:The word of cheap grace has been the ruin of more Christians than any commandment of works. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer,
970:The word of God is more than enough for the people of God to live their lives to the glory of God ~ Kevin DeYoung,
971:The word of Mohammad is a voice direct from nature's own heart - all else is wind in comparison. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
972:the word ‘paradise’ evolves from the Persian pairi-diza which, simply put, means ‘walled garden’. ~ Anuja Chauhan,
973:understood more clearly in the light of the Gita teaching the implication of the word ‘trustee’. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
974:A block of blood should not have the word "cake" after it...they might as well say "shite gateau ~ Karl Pilkington,
975:Among the children of God, it was they who were most able to rightly divide the word of truth. ~ John Nelson Darby,
976:By the word of the Lord the heavens were made, and all the host of them by the breath of His mouth. ~ Derek Prince,
977:Coffee, according to the women of Denmark, is to the body what the Word of the Lord is to the soul. ~ Isak Dinesen,
978:Don't you loathe it when doctors use the word 'we' when it applies only and solely to yourself? ~ Carson McCullers,
979:Even then I found the word fitting, soothing.

Fireflies.

Fire flies.

Fire, fly. ~ Rin Chupeco,
980:Everyone knows about Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Now help me spread the word about Giving Tuesday! ~ Bill Gates,
981:Gospel is just the truth of the word of God. Anybody can sing it, anybody; anybody can perform it. ~ Yolanda Adams,
982:He could sense the word resting on her tongue as a hedonist sensed a tongue resting on something else. ~ Sam Sykes,
983:His books are exciting and powerful and — if I may filch the word from the booksy ones — pulsing. ~ Dorothy Parker,
984:I am repelled by those who voice the word 'nature', without having any trace of it in their hearts. ~ Odilon Redon,
985:I don't even like the word politics. It implies something underhanded and I think we need less government. ~ Jay Z,
986:If the word ''fuck'' is ''obscene'' or ''dirty'', why isn't the word ''duck'' 75% ''dirty''? ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
987:If they substituted the word 'Lust' for 'Love' in the popular songs it would come nearer the truth. ~ Sylvia Plath,
988:I have done nothing; the Word has done and accomplished everything.... I let the Word do its work! ~ Martin Luther,
989:I like the word 'fuck'. The word means what it means, but it also means whatever you need it to mean. ~ Lisa Glatt,
990:I loved the sound of the word ‘we’. Disaster got averted and tyrants got defeated with the word ‘we’. ~ Simon Wood,
991:In all other things I will yield to any one, but I neither can nor will forsake and deny the word. ~ Martin Luther,
992:In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” [John 1:1, NIV, ESV] ~ Adyashanti,
993:I would have loved you for eternity, even when the word didn't have quite the same connotations. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
994:Let me assure you, you are an ass in the best sense of the word. You don't take shit from people. ~ Dani Alexander,
995:Linguistically, the word "Arab" means deserts and waste barren land well- nigh waterless and treeless. ~ Anonymous,
996:She's bouncing in her seat a little, and her lips make a pretty shape when she says the word corpus. ~ Robin Sloan,
997:The most quieting considerations under affliction are those that are fetched from the word of God. ~ Matthew Henry,
998:The promise given was a necessity of the past: the word broken is a necessity of the present. ~ Niccol Machiavelli,
999:The roots of the word “compete” are the Latin con petire, which meant “to seek together. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
1000:The word of God teaches that Christians suffer in order that they might glorify God in their lives. ~ Billy Graham,
1001:To the ancient Greeks the word, dikaiosini,justice was often synonymous with ekdikisis,vengeance. ~ Sidney Sheldon,
1002:We don't have to do this. Just say the word and I can have a jet here in an hour. We can go anywhere ~ Ally Carter,
1003:Whenever the word is rightly preached, and attentively heard, it never fails to bring forth fruit. ~ Martin Luther,
1004:As long as we let the Word of God be our only armor, we can look confidently into the future. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer,
1005:A soul, therefore, when deprived of the Word of God, is given up unarmed to the devil for destruction ~ John Calvin,
1006:Be careful, though." "Aren't I always?" "No, I think the word for how you usually are is 'reckless. ~ Veronica Roth,
1007:Don't make the mistake of confusing the word of God with the missal industry that lives off it. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
1008:Dude," I said, making the word a disgusted sound. "Single guys everywhere hate you. Starting with me. ~ Jim Butcher,
1009:ignited the word-of-mouth about the book. You are wonderful, amazing, and I’m eternally grateful to you. ~ Susan Ee,
1010:I love films. If I'd known how to get into or do it from the word go, I would have done that. ~ Christopher Hampton,
1011:I never had any ambition to be a star, or whatever it is called, and I'm still embarrassed at the word. ~ John Hurt,
1012:In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
   ~ Anonymous, The Bible, John 1:1,
1013:In the end I decided the word was more about him than it was about me. But isn’t it often that way? ~ David Sedaris,
1014:Men have no special right because they belong to one race or another: the word man defines all rights. ~ Jose Marti,
1015:My ma always said the word damn came from beavers who gave up on their houses one stick short. ~ Charlie N Holmberg,
1016:The promise given was a necessity of the past: the word broken is a necessity of the present. ~ Niccolo Machiavelli,
1017:There is a world of difference between knowing the Word of God and knowing the God of the Word. ~ Leonard Ravenhill,
1018:There is no harder worker than a former government employee who has discovered the word incentive. ~ Nelson DeMille,
1019:The Word expresses that which is self-hidden in the Silence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Reality Omnipresent,
1020:The word planet should be reserved for the small number of truly important things in the solar system. ~ Mike Brown,
1021:Through helping one another, you can often eliminate the prefix ‘im’ from the word impossible! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1022:What, after all, did the word ‘faith’ connote, except a willing blindness to the lack of actual proof? ~ Manil Suri,
1023:Where shall the word be found, where will the word
Resound? Not here, there is not enough silence... ~ T S Eliot,
1024:A man who believes the word of a donkey in preference to my word does not deserve to be lent anything. ~ Idries Shah,
1025:And she was fairly sure there was no e in the word ho unless it was being used in a gardening context. ~ Lucy Parker,
1026:As soon as I hear the word "competition" I get serious and start doing everything that I can do. ~ Maureen McCormick,
1027:Even though it was only the word 'like', it roughly followed the same rules as the other L word. ~ Marshall Thornton,
1028:Excuse me, young elven princess, but have you heard the word of your lord and savior, Diablo, today? ~ Eric S Nylund,
1029:His cracked lips moved.
Beloved.
He couldn't say the word, but I knew it.
And so did his Fool. ~ Robin Hobb,
1030:If there is one word that describes our form of society in America, it may be the word-voluntary. ~ Lyndon B Johnson,
1031:I have no idea what pill makes her use the word folks, but I want to make sure I never take one of those. ~ A S King,
1032:I like the word OLD. Not senior, that's for proms. Older? Older than whom? 'Old' is honorable and ripe ~ Bel Kaufman,
1033:...impossibility. I can tell you this much: the word is a great big log thrown on the fires of love. ~ Sue Monk Kidd,
1034:In my head there is a whole army of people asking to be let out and waiting for the word of command. ~ Anton Chekhov,
1035:In the Old Peculiar language, the word ymbryne (pronounced imm-brinn) means “revolution” or “circuit. ~ Ransom Riggs,
1036:It turns out that the word atheism means much less than I had thought. It is merely the lack of theism. ~ Dan Barker,
1037:Learning French is trivial: the word for horse is cheval, and everything else follows in the same way. ~ Alan Perlis,
1038:Ma vie est une énigme dont ton nom est le mot. (My life is an enigma, of which your name is the word.) ~ Victor Hugo,
1039:My brother, if it's not in the Bible, He's not in it!! If it's not in the Word of God, He is not in it. ~ Benny Hinn,
1040:That in effect was love. It struck him as astonishing. The word was so little in his vocabulary... ~ Ford Madox Ford,
1041:The Master would insist that the final barrier to our attaining God was the word and concept God. ~ Anthony de Mello,
1042:The omitting the Word will be regarded as an Endeavour to conceal a principle of which we are ashamed. ~ Jill Lepore,
1043:There is a reason the word belonging has a synonym for want at its center; it is the human condition. ~ Jodi Picoult,
1044:The word feminism needs to be taken back. It needs to be reclaimed in a way that is inclusive of men. ~ Annie Lennox,
1045:The word God, to me, is like the word enlightenment. It's become so corrupted by our ideas of what God is. ~ Gangaji,
1046:You can tell a paragraph is slipping out of control when there's a runaway use of the word 'hence. ~ Alain de Botton,
1047:You decline?” he cried, almost defiantly. “ `Decline’ isn’t the word. A man doesn’t decline an insult. ~ Henry James,
1048:A feminist?” Blake said the word with equal exclamation, equal questioning. “God, that’s even worse. ~ Laurelin McGee,
1049:For diplomacy to be effective, words must be credible - and no one can now doubt the word of America. ~ George W Bush,
1050:He knew only that his child was his warrant. He said: If he is not the word of God God never spoke. ~ Cormac McCarthy,
1051:I hate the word ‘simple’. Nobody has any business to live in the world and know nothing about its ways. ~ Manju Kapur,
1052:I hate using that word, career. It always feels like the word bitch is hiding out between the letters. ~ Tayari Jones,
1053:I prefer the word "engagement." Instead of empowerment, it's enabling women to engage in business. ~ Sallie Krawcheck,
1054:I would bet that the average teenager in this country has not used the word 'wisdom' in the past year ~ Dennis Prager,
1055:Look heavenward and speak the word aloud. Peace. We look at our world and speak the word aloud. Peace. ~ Maya Angelou,
1056:No image, not even the cross, can become a substitute for the word of God and the gospel of Jesus Christ. ~ Anonymous,
1057:No team is complete without a good technician, and the word for an incomplete team is usually "fatality. ~ Mira Grant,
1058:Sales people should take lessons from their kids. What does the word ‘no’ mean to a child? Almost nothing. ~ Jim Rohn,
1059:That's crazy, because I had no idea what the word 'contraction' meant before I saw it on the Internet. ~ LeBron James,
1060:The deeper the nostalgia and the more complete the fear, the purer, the richer the word and the secret. ~ Elie Wiesel,
1061:The more artificial a human environment becomes, the more the word ‘natural’ becomes a term of value. ~ Wendell Berry,
1062:The only time the word baby doesn't scare me is the time that it should, when it is what a man calls me. ~ Amy Hempel,
1063:The pen is mightier than the sword” only if the brain behind it knows how to wield the word!’ Tony Buzan ~ Tony Buzan,
1064:There's a resistance?" The word sounds sweet as I say it.
"Honey, there's always a resistance. ~ Christina Dalcher,
1065:The Word frees us from smallness of mind (1 Kings 4:29) and from threatening confinements (Psalm 18:19). ~ John Piper,
1066:The word 'ivory' rang in the air, was whispered, was sighed. You would think they were praying to it. ~ Joseph Conrad,
1067:The word translated sober here is nepho, and it means to “be self-possessed under all circumstances. ~ Douglas Wilson,
1068:Through the word, you express your creative power. It is through the word that you manifest everything. ~ Miguel Ruiz,
1069:Trust in Him Trust the Word of God more than you trust the lies of the devil, and keep making progress! ~ Joyce Meyer,
1070:Waiting is part of writing. When I write the word 'waiting' by hand it even looks like 'writing.' ~ Anthony Minghella,
1071:Yearning: It needs to hurt in order to be worthy of the word. Otherwise it is just wanting. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
1072:30As for God, His way is perfect; The word of the LORD is hproven; He is a shield to all who trust in Him. ~ Anonymous,
1073:A key to strengthening spiritual muscles and enduring hardship is finding strength in the Word of God. ~ Walter Martin,
1074:Anything with the word 'Tesco' or 'Weight Watchers' on the label should be viewed with some suspicion. ~ Colin Bateman,
1075:Caution, Sir! I am eternally tired of hearing that word caution. It is nothing but the word of cowardice! ~ John Brown,
1076:Conceive. That is the word that means both the beginning in imagination and the end in creation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1077:Emotion is always new and the word has always served; therein lies the difficulty of expressing emotion. ~ Victor Hugo,
1078:Ender had come to feel a unity so strong that the word we came to his lips much more easily than I. ~ Orson Scott Card,
1079:English teacher: Sam, form a sentence using the word aftermath. Sam: 'I always feel sleepy after math class. ~ Various,
1080:Even those who were ignorant of the word of God were not entirely deprived of divine light, ~ Christopher De Bellaigue,
1081:I exhort all, who reverence the Word of the Lord, to read it, and diligently imprint it on their memory. ~ John Calvin,
1082:Integration is a word of the past, the word of the future and the word of the present is contribution. ~ Tariq Ramadan,
1083:In the beginning was the word. Before all else, the word. So we speak as if words matter, because they do. ~ Anonymous,
1084:In the nineteenth century the more grandiose word inspiration began to replace the word idea in the arts. ~ Lukas Foss,
1085:I think if you would like to describe composing as an act with one word, "slow" would be the word. ~ Esa Pekka Salonen,
1086:I think that, every time you saw the word EBITDA, you should substitute the word "bullshit" earnings. ~ Charlie Munger,
1087:It is a curious fact that the word essayist showed up in English before it existed in French. ~ John Jeremiah Sullivan,
1088:It wasn't Luther or Calvin that reformed the church. It was the Word of God that reformed the church. ~ Robert Godfrey,
1089:I wish the word supermodel would just fall off the face of the earth. Anyone can be a supermodel now. ~ Amber Valletta,
1090:Lips. There was something strangely, delicately
indelicate about the word, like a kiss
itself. ~ Cassandra Clare,
1091:Maybe, just maybe, I should not have used the word "eldritch" so many times now that I think about it. ~ H P Lovecraft,
1092:Philosophy, as I shall understand the word, is something intermediate between theology and science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1093:Power, wealth and immortality--they don't bring happiness. You will never know what the word means. ~ Christopher Pike,
1094:The Word Lady: Most Often Used to Describe Someone You Wouldn't Want to Talk to for Even Five Minutes. ~ Fran Lebowitz,
1095:Unlike so many, we do not peddle the Word of God for profit.” —Paul of Tarsus in 2 Corinthians 2:17, NIV ~ Frank Viola,
1096:What then is the Word of God which gives us life; what but the law, the prophets, and the gospel? Anyone ~ John Calvin,
1097:When a man doesn't know the meaning of the word 'fear', that might just be a deficiency in his education. ~ Mark Steyn,
1098:Whenever he touched me, it was more than just a touch. It was possession. In every sense of the word. ~ Pepper Winters,
1099:Yearning: It needs to hurt in order to be worthy of the word. Otherwise it is just wanting. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
1100:How many divorces are caused by the word nothing? I think this would be a very interesting statistic. ~ Sophie Kinsella,
1101:Hravat is the Croatian word for “Croat” and it’s where we get the word cravat. So Croatia means “tie land. ~ John Lloyd,
1102:I am, in some sense, a writer. Even though I kinda downplay the word thing, I do enjoy writing sometimes. ~ Andrew Bird,
1103:If you don’t walk according to the Word of God, then you are on the way that leads to self-destruction ~ Sunday Adelaja,
1104:I prefer the word 'homemaker' because 'housewife' always implies that there may be a wife someplace else. ~ Bella Abzug,
1105:It's so fun to be in love... or so I've heard, The meaning has no feeling even though I understand the word... ~ Eyedea,
1106:I wouldn’t expect you to know what the word honor means anyway. But when I make a pledge, I uphold it. ~ Amanda Carlson,
1107:I wouldn’t use the word ‘man’. The Hebrew is ha-adam, which I would argue encompasses both sexes. ~ Michel Faber,
1108:Jackass!" Eve yelled.

"You know, when people say that, I just hear the word awesome," Shane said. ~ Rachel Caine,
1109:Love is a special word, and I use it only when I mean it. You say the word too much and it becomes cheap. ~ Ray Charles,
1110:Love is exactly the word I'd use...It's the only thing that comes close to describing this hell with you. ~ Meg Collett,
1111:May the pulpits of the land ring with exposition of the Word of God and exultation in the God of the Word. ~ John Piper,
1112:Neither of us says the word love, not once. It would be tempting fate; it would be romance, bad luck. ~ Margaret Atwood,
1113:Show me a person who really knows what 'good' is, and I will show you that he almost never uses the word. ~ Idries Shah,
1114:The best way to sell a product is to allow it to go viral, to allow its users to spread the word. ~ Instaread Summaries,
1115:The fun of being in the pop world is you can really play with people's perceptions of what the word pop means. ~ Kimbra,
1116:The only place we can find a clear, unmistakable message is in the Word of God, which we call the Bible. ~ Billy Graham,
1117:The word 'art' interests me very much. If it comes from Sanskrit, as I've heard, it signifies 'making. ~ Marcel Duchamp,
1118:Those who hear the Word of the Gospel concerning Christ are sprinkled with the blood of the Son of God. ~ Martin Luther,
1119:We must become a nation of truly competent readers, recognizing all that the word competent implies. ~ Mortimer J Adler,
1120:When I have a terrible need of - shall I say the word - religion. Then I go out and paint the stars. ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
1121:When we meditate on the word of God, it helps renew our minds so we can think good and beneficial things. ~ Joyce Meyer,
1122:Although he didn’t seem pleased, the word of a paladin was renowned as ironclad. “I am your prisoner. ~ Miranda Honfleur,
1123:Ender had come to feel a unity so strong that the word "we" came to his lips much more easily than "I ~ Orson Scott Card,
1124:HAPPY ARE THOSE WHO HAVE A PLACE; WISE ARE THEY WHO FOLLOW THE PATH; BLESSED ARE THEY WHO OBEY THE WORD. ~ Lauren Oliver,
1125:He talks about how the word “no” should be the “end of the discussion, not the beginning of a negotiation. ~ Amy Poehler,
1126:Hooker was falsely thought to be the origin of the word for “prostitute,” because his camp was so rowdy. ~ Susan Cheever,
1127:In the beginning was the word. Before all else, the word. So we speak as if words matter, because they do. ~ Dean Koontz,
1128:I take it this is some obscure West Indian usage of the word 'similar' which means 'nothing at all alike'? ~ Neil Gaiman,
1129:I think that, every time you see the word EBITDA, you should substitute the words "bullshit earnings. ~ Charles T Munger,
1130:One of the most misleading representational techniques in our language is the use of the word 'I.' ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein,
1131:The fashion world doesn't know the word stop, so you have to make sure there are sublime moments every day. ~ Raf Simons,
1132:(The name Wisconsin is believed by some to be a derivation of the word Wishkonsing, place of the beaver.) ~ David Rhodes,
1133:The primary task of the Church and of the Christian minister is the preaching of the Word of God. ~ D Martyn Lloyd Jones,
1134:The word paradise, by the way, which comes to us from the Persian, means literally “a walled garden. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1135:The word 'self' is as great a mystery as the word 'other'. It's just a polarity between two mysteries. ~ Terence McKenna,
1136:When I die, if the word 'thong' appears in the first or second sentence of my obituary, I've screwed up. ~ Albert Brooks,
1137:I'm apt to get drunk on words...Ontology: the word about the essence of things; the word about being. ~ Madeleine L Engle,
1138:Instead of quoting the Buddha, be the Buddha, be “the awakened one,” which is what the word buddha means. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
1139:It is intolerance to speak of toleration. Away with the word from the dictionary! ~ Victor de Riqueti marquis de Mirabeau,
1140:Keep your foot on the devil's neck by standing on the Word of God, and you will see tremendous results! ~ Jesse Duplantis,
1141:Life hack: if you don’t want someone asking you questions, say the word tampon, and the conversation ends. ~ Elle Kennedy,
1142:nakba, the word the Arabs used to describe the catastrophe of their flight from the land of Palestine. The ~ Daniel Silva,
1143:Sometimes she would whisper the word Mama and see her mother’s face a hundred times in a single afternoon. ~ Markus Zusak,
1144:The blacker the night around us grew, the brighter and truer and more beautiful burned the word of God. ~ Corrie ten Boom,
1145:The poor, the unsuccessful, the unhappy, the unhealthy are the ones who use the word tomorrow the most. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
1146:The word arse is as much god as the word face. It must be so, otherwise you cut off your god at the waist. ~ D H Lawrence,
1147:The word liberty in the mouth of Mr. Webster sounds like the word love in the mouth of a courtesan. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1148:The word love has always tasted like the scent of fresh ink and soft paper to me. Like a newly written poem. ~ Megan Hart,
1149:A great curse has fallen upon modern life with the discovery of the vastness of the word Education. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1150:As long as every question is answered by the word "God," scientific inquiry is simply impossible. ~ Robert Green Ingersoll,
1151:English teacher: Sam, form a sentence using the word aftermath.
Sam: 'I always feel sleepy after math class. ~ Various,
1152:Home.’’ Leah Barringer Kincaid sighed the word as the settlement they called Last Chance Creek came into ~ Tracie Peterson,
1153:I am an overcomer and I overcome by the blood of the Lamb and the word of my testimony (Revelation 12:11). ~ Charles Capps,
1154:I suppose the word "unbearable" is a lie by definition. Unless you kill yourself immediately after using it. ~ Glen Duncan,
1155:I think because I have great difficulty saying the word, 'no,' almost every day's a different adventure. ~ Richard Branson,
1156:It is the seeing mind that is the master of poetic utterance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Word and the Spirit,
1157:Marjorie Agosin proves the power of the word to transport us to the center of her humane and human vision. ~ Julia Alvarez,
1158:Mr. Sharpton, his name was. He used to tell me that never’s the word God listens for when he needs a laugh. ~ Stephen King,
1159:Perhaps the most insidious and least understood form of segregation is that of the word. (Ralph Ellison) ~ Claudia Rankine,
1160:The word adventure has gotten overused. For me, when everything goes wrong - that's when adventure starts ~ Yvon Chouinard,
1161:The word impossible contains the word possible' What's that-- some Zen thing?' I think Star Trek. Mr. Spock. ~ Dean Koontz,
1162:The Word of God not only offers hope and forgiveness, but power to live a new life of integrity and faith. ~ John Bradshaw,
1163:To receive the Word in the ear is one thing, and to receive Jesus into your very soul is quite another. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
1164:Although by then not much was disgusting because the word familiar had changed so much since I had woken. ~ Jeff VanderMeer,
1165:A staple of his parlance was the word cartoon, which he used to refer to anything from a graph to a video. ~ Nabeel Qureshi,
1166:A werewolf.” He said the word like he was learning a foreign language and wanted to get the accent right. ~ Tielle St Clare,
1167:Creativity healed me. I don't know that I could think of any word that I get more inspired by than the word healing. ~ Sark,
1168:English teacher: Sam, form a sentence using the word aftermath. Sam: 'I always feel sleepy after math class.' *** ~ Various,
1169:How many adorn their temples, and decorate their priests—but refuse to obey the Word of the Lord! ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
1170:I have always considered myself, when I learned what the word meant, I've always considered myself a Pagan. ~ Timothy Leary,
1171:I’m thinkin’ the word ‘let’ when you’re talkin’ about me should be banished from this house,” she declared ~ Kristen Ashley,
1172:In him soul and Nature, equal Presences,
Balance and fuse in a wide harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
1173:In the beginning was the Word. In the end … past honor, past life, past caring … In the end will be the Word. ~ Dan Simmons,
1174:I personally translated the word 'vendetta' as Italian for 'What do you mean, "you want to see other women"? ~ Gina Barreca,
1175:I shared my grandmother’s distaste for the word rector—it sounded too much like rectum to be taken seriously. ~ John Irving,
1176:Myleene Klass is just the bomb. Her boyfriend is very lucky. She is a definite ten in every sense of the word. ~ David Gest,
1177:Rejection comes easy, because you learn quickly that the worst thing that can happen is to hear the word "no ~ John Grisham,
1178:The best evidence of the Bible's being the word of God is to be found between its covers. It proves itself. ~ Charles Hodge,
1179:The materialistic view of happiness of our age starkly revealed in our understanding of the word "luxury. ~ Alain de Botton,
1180:The word love has been so abused by publicity and advertisements that we no longer know really what it means. ~ Jean Vanier,
1181:When humanitarians in Africa used the word ‘change’, I’d noticed, they’d mostly been talking about themselves. ~ Alex Perry,
1182:Who said 'please' that made you hate the word so much?" Andrew gazed at him in silence for a minute. "I did. ~ Nora Sakavic,
1183:A good test of a relationship is how a person responds to the word 'no.' Love respects 'no,' control does not. ~ Henry Cloud,
1184:A privateer learns to press any advantage."

"And a prince?"

"Princes get used to the word yes. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
1185:Belief in Jesus does not come by the waving of a magic wand. It comes by hearing the word of God through Jesus. ~ John Piper,
1186:But maybe there isn’t a logic behind the word family. The truth is, it isn’t always such a good word. ~ Benjamin Alire S enz,
1187:By the word of the LORD the heavens were made, their starry host by the breath of his mouth” (Ps. 33:6 NIV). ~ Robert Morris,
1188:Cheese that is required by law to append the word food to its title does not go well with red wine or fruit. ~ Fran Lebowitz,
1189:Dear Momma―Wherever you are, if ever you hear the word "nigger" again, remember they are advertising my book. ~ Dick Gregory,
1190:Every Word of God is Spirit and life. When you receive and obey the Word of God, the power of God works in you. ~ T B Joshua,
1191:Experience is the word. Knowledge implies subject and object. But experience is non-terminal, eternal. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
1192:Finding the meaning of life is easy. Simply get a dictionary, go to the 'L' section, and find the word 'life.' ~ Oscar Wilde,
1193:God’s word is the way to God himself. If you miss the word of God, you will miss God. Jesus is the word! ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1194:He doesn't know the meaning of the word fear. Of course, there are lots of other words he doesn't know either. ~ Sid Gillman,
1195:If the word has the potency to revive and make us free, it has also the power to bind, imprison and destroy. ~ Ralph Ellison,
1196:I hate the word starchitect. Stuff like that comes from mean-spirited, untalented journalists. It's demeaning. ~ Frank Gehry,
1197:I love telling stories, that's it. I love it. That's the word I would choose to describe what I love the most. ~ Jeff Probst,
1198:It's odd that the word 'atheist' even exist. I don't play golf, is there a word for non-golf players ? ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
1199:I would like to electrocute everyone who uses the word 'fair' in connection with income tax policies. ~ William F Buckley Jr,
1200:Jesus warns that the word of God, the gospel, which is meant to give us life, can be choked to death by riches. ~ John Piper,
1201:Plots and character don't make life. Life is here and now, anytime you say the word, anytime you let her rip. ~ Henry Miller,
1202:The measure of the state's success is that the word anarchy frightens people, while the word state does not. ~ Joseph Sobran,
1203:The trip was to be an odyssey in the fullest sense of the word, an epic journey that would change everything. ~ Jon Krakauer,
1204:The ultimate purpose of the Word of God is not theological information but heart and life transformation. ~ Paul David Tripp,
1205:The Word of God and the Spirit of God are enough for the people of God to enjoy and spread the worship of God. ~ David Platt,
1206:The Word of God conceived in the heart, formed by the tongue, and spoken out of the mouth is creative power. ~ Charles Capps,
1207:To go upstairs in the word house is to withdraw step by step; while to go down to the cellar is to dream. ~ Gaston Bachelard,
1208:What I said was: We want everybody to learn English because we don't want - I didn't use the word 'Spanish.' ~ Newt Gingrich,
1209:Again the word was a prayer, incense offered up to a high God through this new and unfathomable darkness ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1210:Bravery means doing something scary. Fearlessness means not even understanding what the word scary means. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1211:Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says.
   ~ Anonymous, The Bible, James 1:22 NIV, [T5],
1212:Entertainment has a bad name...The word wears spandex, pasties, a leisure suit studded with blinking lights. ~ Michael Chabon,
1213:Erase the word "failure" from your vocabulary. No case is ever truly closed, and no challenge is ever over. ~ Mary Lou Retton,
1214:Every single day of our lives involves wildlife education. We must teach, spread the word, the wildlife gospel. ~ Steve Irwin,
1215:I do love using keyboards and I love writing keyboard parts, but I am not a player in the true sense of the word. ~ Geddy Lee,
1216:It is a miracle how God has so long preserved His Book! How great and glorious it is to have the Word of God! ~ Martin Luther,
1217:Let’s not merely contemplate the Word of God in the world around us; let’s do what it says (see James 1:22-25). ~ David Platt,
1218:Louis had learned to be suspicious of the word educational. It covered, after all, a multitude of sins. ~ Paul Russell,
1219:Maine sank in Havana harbor and the word "war" was appearing hourly in hysterical extras, Miss Armitage explained ~ Anonymous,
1220:My mother was a Bohemian - in the good sense of the word. A searcher. And she investigated various religions. ~ Madeline Kahn,
1221:Nothing makes you think you might need years of therapy like saying the word breasts in front of your mother. ~ Katie McGarry,
1222:That's the word he'd used - stunning. It's a difficult word to dismiss. She longed to be that word to someone. ~ Shannon Hale,
1223:The Holy Spirit's motivation is always the same thing -to charge the word with heaven's own electric power. ~ Reinhard Bonnke,
1224:The word 'funny' is a bit like the word 'love' - we don't have enough words to describe the many varieties. ~ George Saunders,
1225:The word right should be excluded from political language, as the word cause from the language of philosophy. ~ Auguste Comte,
1226:This one instance of the word’s being withheld was more instructive than all the times the word was printed. It ~ Mary Norris,
1227:To have faith in the Word, Scripture must not grasp us in our critical thought, but in the life of the soul. ~ Abraham Kuyper,
1228:Too heavy falls a Shadow on man’s heart;
It dares not be too happy upon earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
1229:We use the word 'organization' to mean both the state of being organized and the groups that do the organizing. ~ Clay Shirky,
1230:When we realize we have the responsibility to teach the word, it changes everything about how we hear the Word. ~ David Platt,
1231:wince unconsciously as he pronounces the word. I have to bite my lip to keep from correcting him: Scavengers. ~ Lauren Oliver,
1232:Because there are 176 definitions for the word loser on urbandictionary.com.

Don't Be a Statistic. ~ Kimberly McCreight,
1233:Believe me, sir, never a night goes by, be I ever so tired, but I read the Word of God before I go to bed. ~ Douglas MacArthur,
1234:For me, the word "writing" is the exact opposite of the word "waiting". Instead of waiting, there is writing. ~ Roberto Bola o,
1235:He watched Carl pouring coffee into a huge mug bearing a photo of a cute corgi, below which was the word Alastair. ~ K C Wells,
1236:How soon will someone speak the word the resentful millions will understand: the word to be, to act, to live? ~ Richard Wright,
1237:I don't like the word rock opera, but I'm trying to write on that level that's reserved for plays still, or novels. ~ Lou Reed,
1238:I know not what you mean by God; the word God is to me a sound conveying no clear or distinct affirmation. ~ Charles Bradlaugh,
1239:Witch. The word drifted across his mind. We call such women so, because we have no other name. ~ Katherine Arden,
1240:Men who cannot be silent will not say anything when they talk. It is only out of the silence that the Word speaks. ~ A W Tozer,
1241:The word 'archive' seems so reassuring, but I have a lot ofconcern over the longevity of documentary materials. ~ David Grubbs,
1242:The word is like a seed, and the human mind is so fertile, but only for those kinds of seeds it is prepared for. ~ Miguel Ruiz,
1243:The word Shiva means the deathless, changeless, timeless, formless all-pervading absolute essence of the universe.  ~ Amit Ray,
1244:This is the word of the LORD to Zerubbabel: “Not by might nor by power, but by my Spirit,” says the LORD Almighty. ~ Anonymous,
1245:Use the word 'ya'll' and before you knew it, you'd find yourself in a haystack french-kissing an underage goat ~ David Sedaris,
1246:When the voice of Christ speaks through the Word, then you will arise, and leave all, and follow Him. ~ Robert Murray M Cheyne,
1247:Who said 'please' that made you hate the word so much?"
Andrew gazed at him in silence for a minute. "I did. ~ Nora Sakavic,
1248:Who said ‘please’ that made you hate the word so much?"
Andrew gazed at him in silence for a minute. “I did. ~ Nora Sakavic,
1249:Glory belongs to God, of course; that's what the word really means. And you can't serve God with a gun. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
1250:Help must come from the outside, and it has come and comes daily and answers in the Word of Jesus Christ. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer,
1251:I believe nothing merely because Calvin taught it, but because I have found his teaching in the Word of God. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
1252:I had never liked to call myself a woman. I knew I was one, but the word never sounded right when applied to me. ~ Sarai Walker,
1253:I learned the word non-conformist in fourth grade and immediately announced that I would grow up to become one. ~ Nick Offerman,
1254:In truth, the degree of anyone's success depends on how often they can say the word yes and hear the word no. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1255:Philosophy is an odd thing. When we use the word in everyday speech, you know, you sometimes hear it hilariously. ~ Stephen Fry,
1256:Texas is a state of mind. Texas is an obsession. Above all else, Texas is a nation in every sense of the word. ~ John Steinbeck,
1257:The Word of God is forever settled in heaven. Therefore, I establish His Word upon this earth” (Psalms 119:89). ~ Charles Capps,
1258:The word "politics" comes from the Greek politeia which had to do with the citizenry, not the government. ~ Marianne Williamson,
1259:They may not use the word better. But they certainly believe that they'll go to heaven and Jews will not. ~ Neale Donald Walsch,
1260:Um. Ways in which a sentence beginning with the word "missiles" could be a good thing... Nope. I got nuthin'. ~ Dennis E Taylor,
1261:We admire people to the extent that we cannot explain what they do, and the word 'admire' then means 'marvel at.' ~ B F Skinner,
1262:...We Fremen have a saying: 'God created Arrakis to train the faithful.' One cannot go against the word of God. ~ Frank Herbert,
1263:We must beware of thinking the Sunday sermon can carry all the freight of any church’s ministry of the Word. ~ Timothy J Keller,
1264:We must not regard what or how the world esteems us, so we have the Word pure, and are certain of our doctrine. ~ Martin Luther,
1265:we suggest that the term “manager” be replaced with the word “coach,” which more accurately describes the role. ~ Verne Harnish,
1266:'AHAM' is the first name of God. The word ['Aham'] means that which exists, Self-shining and Self-evident. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
1267:Anyone who turns love between two consenting adults into a negative, doesn't understand the meaning of the word. ~ Fran Drescher,
1268:A single word lets loose vast agencies;
A casual act determines the world’s fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
1269:Because of the great distance between us and his heavenly glory, he himself came down to us through the Word. This ~ John Calvin,
1270:He said to me once that most of the time people use the word love as just another way to show off they’re hungry. ~ Colum McCann,
1271:I don't think I've ever used the word 'gay rights,' because I don't really believe in rights based on your behavior. ~ Rand Paul,
1272:I handed in a script last year and the studio didn't change one word. The word they didn't change was on page 87. ~ Steve Martin,
1273:In the world of energy politics, the sudden vanishing of the word 'coal' is a remarkable and unprecedented event. ~ Jeff Goodell,
1274:I put air quotes around the word ethical. I regretted doing that. Instantly. I think that was what provoked him. ~ Stephen White,
1275:I think we are in the process of getting the word out, and we haven't done very well yet. But we are trying. ~ Esa Pekka Salonen,
1276:It is not too much to say that when the word blood is pronounced, this is a sign that reason is about to depart. ~ Doris Lessing,
1277:One reason, of course, as a Christian, I believe the Bible is the word of God. I take the Bible as the standard. ~ Jerry Falwell,
1278:On writer's block: The word block suggests that you are constipated or stuck, when the truth is that you're empty. ~ Anne Lamott,
1279:Our responsibility is to get God's word to their ears. Only God can get the word from their ears to their heart. ~ Albert Mohler,
1280:Patience, she’d tell herself, whispering the word like a prayer. If Vengeance has a mother, her name is Patience. ~ Jay Kristoff,
1281:she whispers it aloud, 'lorelei.' the sound makes her ache, makes the word even more beautiful, even more real. ~ Mary E Pearson,
1282:That's not a very nice word," he said, as though I were a four-year-old who'd just repeated the word "fuck". ~ Marshall Thornton,
1283:The economy is just a metaphorical device, it's not real-that's why it's got the word "con" in the middle of it. ~ Russell Brand,
1284:The promise given was necessity of the past: the word borken is a necessity of the present" -Niccolo Machiavelli ~ Michael Scott,
1285:There is no getting away from the word nigger, not now, not in the world we’ve been given to live in, you and me. ~ Stephen King,
1286:The secret of joy is hidden in the word itself: first J, then O, then Y: Jesus first, Others next, Yourself last. ~ Peter Kreeft,
1287:The word impossible contains the word possible'
What's that-- some Zen thing?'
I think Star Trek. Mr. Spock. ~ Dean Koontz,
1288:The word is a perishable, ephemeral commodity. It takes on the color of the circumstances in which it is used. ~ Christian Bobin,
1289:To discover the fool there is no better reagent than the word “medieval.”

He immediately sees red. ~ Nicol s G mez D vila,
1290:Touch not the flute when drums are sounding around; when fools have the word, the wise will be silent. ~ Johann Gottfried Herder,
1291:Van Helmont finally coined the word “gas” to deal with this miscellany, a word he adapted from the Greek word “chaos. ~ Sam Kean,
1292:Whenever I see the word Operation, especially Trifling Operation, I at once write off the patient as dead. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1293:When there’s something in the Word of God that I don’t like, the problem is not with the Word of God, it’s with me. ~ R C Sproul,
1294:You can leave the Word of God to wound and kill it need not be yourselves cutting in phrase in manner. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
1295:As you read the Word of God today, read it with expectancy and anticipation for the changes it will make in you. ~ David Jeremiah,
1296:Cynics call it fate, romantics call it destiny, lawyers call it malign intent. No one uses the word “coincidence”. ~ Kate Griffin,
1297:For it pleased God, after he had made all things by the word of his power, to create man after his own image. ~ George Whitefield,
1298:For survivors, the word closure often connotes that the bereaved are underachievers who flunked a grief course. ~ Earl A Grollman,
1299:Goofy was the word that was used most often by my sisters because I've been this tall ever since I was 12 years old. ~ Will Smith,
1300:He thought against Napoleon, in both senses of the word. See how fruitful resentment can be, and how it can make one ~ Ren Girard,
1301:If you let someone talk you out of the word “no,” you might as well wear a sign that reads, “You are in charge. ~ Gavin de Becker,
1302:I take it that our state, having been founded and built up on the right lines, is good in the complete sense of the word. ~ Plato,
1303:Knowledge without know-how is sterile. We use the word academic in a pejorative sense to identify this limitation. ~ Myron Tribus,
1304:Love dies before the lover in our breast:
Our joys are perfumes in a brittle vase. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
1305:Philosophy, as we use the word, is a fight against the fascination which forms of expression exert upon us. ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein,
1306:Tea, pa!" said Charlotte, starting at the word like the old war-horse who hears the bugle; and we got down to it. ~ P G Wodehouse,
1307:the bus was running late, but in truth this was no surprise. Delhi probably got its name from the word ‘delay’. ~ Karl Pilkington,
1308:The poet is a magician who hardly knows the secret of his own spell. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Word and the Spirit,
1309:There's something very appealing about the word anything. Anything. Anything. Anything. I am capable of anything. ~ Rahul Kanakia,
1310:The word dropped like a stone on my still living breast. Confess: I was prepared, am somehow ready for the test. ~ Anna Akhmatova,
1311:The word for a lion, ‘Singh’ was also, as we have seen, the name used by the Mughal empire’s Rajput mansabdars. ~ Rajmohan Gandhi,
1312:The word morality, if we met it in the Bible, would surprise us as much as the word telephone or motor car. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1313:Too often here the careless Mother leaves
Her chosen in the envious hands of Fate: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
1314:Whenever you see the word cuisine used instead of the word food, be prepared to pay an additional eighty percent. ~ George Carlin,
1315:When I thought of the word "man," I could only think of those who could defend themselves and those they loved. ~ Andre Dubus III,
1316:10 Hear the word of the LORD,     You rulers of Sodom;     Give ear to the law of our God,     You people of Gomorrah: ~ Anonymous,
1317:2Preach the word! Be ready in season and out of season. Convince, rebuke, exhort, with all longsuffering and teaching. ~ Anonymous,
1318:ALKALI  (A'LKALI)   n.s.[The word alkali comes from an herb, called by the Egyptians kali; by us glasswort.] This ~ Samuel Johnson,
1319:A mighty shuddering coil of ecstasy
   Crept through the deep heart of the universe.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
1320:An aroma more heavenly than a flight of angels trickled on the breeze. "Coffee!" He breathed the word like a prayer. ~ Karen Kincy,
1321:changing the destiny of one individual in the word today, it becomes possible to change the destiny of all mankind ~ Daisaku Ikeda,
1322:Good