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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [0]


--- PRIMARY CLASS


--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [1]


1.03 - On Children
children
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--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


children ::: pl. --> of Child ::: n. --> pl. of Child.

children ::: pl. --> of Child ::: n. --> pl. of Child.

children were sacrificed. He has been equated with

children), Af (over men), Hemah (over domestic

Children of Heaven—in Enoch I, the children

children of Heaven, and none their equal among

children's literature: Literature targeted at children.


--- QUOTES [73 / 73 - 500 / 34001] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   18 The Mother
   16 Sri Aurobindo
   3 Jetsun Milarepa
   2 William Gibson
   2 Alfred Korzybski
   2 Alan Turing
   1 Taigu Ryokan
   1 Saul Williams
   1 Saint Josemaria Escriva
   1 Robert Heinlein
   1 Robert Anton Wilson
   1 Oriah Mountain Dreamer
   1 Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche
   1 Nik Douglas and Penny Slinger
   1 Nagarjuna
   1 Lewis Carroll
   1 Ken Wilber
   1 Jean Piaget
   1 H. P. Lovecraft
   1 Howard Gardner
   1 Heraclitus
   1 Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa
   1 Guru Rinpoche
   1 G K Chesterton
   1 George Carlin
   1 Fyodor Dostoevsky
   1 Fred Hosea
   1 C S Lewis
   1 Chamtrul Rinpoche
   1 Bertrand Russell
   1 Ayn Rand
   1 Allen Ginsberg
   1 Aldous Huxley
   1 Albert Einstein
   1 Abu Hamid al-Ghazali?
   1 Abraham Maslow

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   14 Anonymous
   7 Harper Lee
   6 John Green
   5 Mark Twain
   5 Fyodor Dostoyevsky
   4 W C Fields
   4 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   4 Paulo Coelho
   4 Michael Jackson
   4 Herbert Hoover
   4 Euripides
   3 William Shakespeare
   3 Sophocles
   3 Pope Francis
   3 Max Lucado
   3 Bill Cosby
   2 William Cowper
   2 William Butler Yeats
   2 Whitney Houston
   2 Tom Waits
   2 Tom Felton
   2 Tamora Pierce
   2 Stevie Wonder
   2 Robin Hobb
   2 Robert Louis Stevenson
   2 Plato
   2 Neil Gaiman
   2 Moliere
   2 Maya Angelou
   2 Maria Montessori
   2 Malcolm X
   2 Leo Tolstoy
   2 Lee Child
   2 Laozi
   2 Katherine Mansfield
   2 Joseph Haydn
   2 John Steinbeck
   2 John Heywood
   2 Isabel Allende
   2 Gabriel Garc a M rquez
   2 Fyodor Dostoevsky
   2 Erma Bombeck
   2 Erica Jong
   2 Elie Wiesel
   2 Diane Greene
   2 Daniel Harvey Hill
   2 Dalai Lama
   2 Cindy Crawford
   2 Carl Sagan
   2 Brene Brown
   2 Bob Marley
   2 Asa Don Brown

1:If you marry the dharma, realizations will be your children. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
2:Only those who are perfectly truthful can be my true children. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
3:Time is a game played beautifully by children. ~ Heraclitus,
4:I am not, I will not be.I have not, I will not have.This frightens all children,And kills fear in the wise. ~ Nagarjuna,
5:Don't just teach your children to read...Teach them to question what they read.Teach them to question everything. ~ George Carlin,
6:If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales. ~ Albert Einstein,
7:I am never far from those with faith, or even from those without it, though they do not see me. My children will always, always, be protected by my compassion. ~ Guru Rinpoche,
8:He [the child] does not despise real woods because he has read of enchanted woods: the reading makes all real woods a little enchanted. ~ C S Lewis, "On Three Ways of Writing for Children" (1952) ,
9:If you treat your children at home in the same way you treat your animals in the lab, your wife will scratch your eyes out. My wife ferociously warned me against experimenting on her babies. ~ Abraham Maslow,
10:Are we forming children who are only capable of learning what is already known? Or should we try to develop creative and innovative minds, capable of discovery from the preschool age on, throughout life? ~ Jean Piaget,
11:The natural man has to evolve himself into the divine Man; the sons of Death have to know themselves as the children of Immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine The Progress to Knowledge - God,
12:We would like to be able to show the children pictorial representations of what life should be, but we still have not reached that stage, very far from it. Those films are yet to be made... ~ The Mother, On Education 1968,
13:The Way Of The Holy Fool ::: At the crossroads this year, after begging all day I lingered at the village temple. Children gather round me and whisper, "The crazy monk has come back to play." ~ Taigu Ryokan,
14:Each of us bears his punishment, fruit of a seed that’s forgotten;Each of us curses his neighbour protecting his heart with illusions:Therefore like children we blame each other and hate and are angry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
15:For those who use their intelligence and their study as a weapon, the Rosary is most effective. Because that apparently monotonous way of beseeching Our Lady as children do their Mother, can destroy every seed of vainglory and pride. ~ Saint Josemaria Escriva,
16:Who is worthy or unworthy in front of the Divine Grace? All are children of the one and the same Mother. Her love is equally spread over all of them. But to each one She gives according to his nature and receptivity. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
17:Children are nowhere taught, in any systematic way, to distinguish true from false, or meaningful from meaningless, statements. Why is this so? Because their elders, even in the democratic countries, do not want them to be given this kind of education. ~ Aldous Huxley,
18:To share the suffering of the world I came,I draw my children’s pangs into my breast.I am the nurse of the dolour beneath the stars;I am the soul of all who wailing writheUnder the ruthless harrow of the Gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
19:Cyberspace is colonising what we used to think of as the real world. I think that our grandchildren will probably regard the distinction we make between what we call the real world and what they think of as simply the world as the quaintest and most incomprehensible thing about us. ~ William Gibson,
20:Only for you, children of doctrine and learning, have we written this work. Examine this book, ponder the meaning we have dispersed in various places and gathered again; what we have concealed in one place we have disclosed in another, that it may be understood by your wisdom. ~ Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa,
21:Children of Immortality, gods who are joyous for ever,Rapture is ours and eternity measures our lives by his aeons.For we desireless toil who have joy in the fall as the triumph,Knowledge eternal possessing we work for an end that is destinedL ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
22:In attempting to construct such machines we should not be irreverently usurping His power of creating souls, any more than we are in the procreation of children: rather we are, in either case, instruments of His will providing mansions for the souls that He creates. ~ Alan Turing, Computing Machinery and Intelligence ,
23:Mother-EarthWho but the fool and improvident, who but the dreamer and madmanLeaves for the far and ungrasped earth’s close and provident labour?Children of earth, our mother gives tokens, she lays down her signposts,Step by step to advance on her bosom, to g ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
24:Suffering is the food of our strength and torture the bliss of our entrails.We are pitiless, mighty and glad, the gods fear our laughter inhuman.Our hearts are heroic and hard; we wear the belt of Orion:Our will has the edge of the thunderbolt, o ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Children of Wotan,
25:We are the javelins of Destiny, we are the children of Wotan,We are the human Titans, the supermen dreamed by the sage.A cross of the beast and demoniac with the godhead of power and will,We were born in humanity’s sunset, to the Night is our pil ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Children of Wotan,
26:In attempting to construct such (artificially intelligent) machines we should not be irreverently usurping His (God's) power of creating souls, any more than we are in the procreation of children,' Turing had advised. 'Rather we are, in either case, instruments of His will providing mansions for the souls that He creates. ~ Alan Turing,
27:There is an old, old story about a theologian who was asked to reconcile the Doctrine of Divine Mercy with the doctrine of infant damnation. 'The Almighty,' he explained, 'finds it necessary to do things in His official and public capacity which in His private and personal capacity He deplores. ~ Robert Heinlein, Methuselah's Children. ,
28:They were bewildered, unhappy children-he thought-all of them, even his mother, and he was foolish to resent their ineptitude; it came from their helplessness, not from malice. It was he who had to make himself learn to understand them, since he had so much to give, since they could never share his sense of joyous, boundless power. ~ Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged ,
29:Children will always be afraid of the dark, and men with minds sensitive to hereditary impulse will always tremble at the thought of the hidden and fathomless worlds of strange life which may pulsate in the gulfs beyond the stars, or press hideously upon our own globe in unholy dimensions which only the dead and the moonstruck can glimpse. ~ H. P. Lovecraft, Supernatural Horror in Literature ,
30:When we love a person, we love all that belongs to him; we extend to the children the affection we feel for the parent. Now every Soul is a daughter of the [Godhead]. How can this world be separated from the spiritual world? Those who despise what is so nearly akin to the spiritual world, prove that they know nothing of the spiritual world, except in name. ~ Ken Wilber, Sex Ecology Spirituality ,
31:Cyberspace. A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts... A graphic representation of data abstracted from banks of every computer in the human system. Unthinkable complexity. Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data. Like city lights, receding... ~ William Gibson,
32:When speaking to parents, I encourage them to take their child(ren) to a children's museum and watch carefully what the child does, how she/she does it, what he/she returns to, where there is definite growth. Teachers could do the same or could set up 'play areas' which provide 'nutrition' for different intelligences... and watch carefully what happens and what does not happen with each child. ~ Howard Gardner,
33:Activities are endless, like ripples on a stream. They end only when you drop them.Human moods are like the changing highlights and shadows on a sunlit mountain range.All activities are like the games children play, like castles being made of sand.View them with delight and equanimity, like grandparents overseeing their grandchildren, or a shepherd resting on a hill watching over his grazing flock. ~ Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche,
34:The Gita has laid it down from the beginning that the very first precondition of the divine birth, the higher existence is the slaying of rajasic desire and its children, and that means the exclusion of sin. Sin is the working of the lower nature for the crude satisfaction of its own ignorant, dull or violent rajasic and tamasic propensities in revolt against any high self-control and self-mastery of the nature by the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita ,
35:And it shall also be a sign of the teacher of the integral Yoga that he does not arrogate to himself Guruhood in a humanly vain and self-exalting spirit. His work, if he has one, is a trust from above, he himself a channel, a vessel or a representative. He is a man helping his brothers, a child leading children, a Light kindling other lights, an awakened Soul awakening souls, at highest a Power or Presence of the Divine calling to him other powers of the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.01 - The Four Aids,
36:Mother, Some people criticise the fact that we have too many rules in our physical education and that we impose too much discipline on the children. There can be no physical education without discipline. The body itself could not function without a strict discipline. Actually, the failure to recognise this fact is the principal cause of illness. Digestion, growth, blood-circulation, everything, everything is a discipline. Thought, movement, gestures, everything is a discipline, and if there is no discipline people immediately fall ill. ~ The Mother, On Education ,
37:Masturbation is not the happiest form of sexuality, but the most advisable for him who wants to be alone and think. I detect the aroma of this pleasant vice in most philosophers, and a happily married logicians is almost a contradiction in terms. So many sages have regarded Woman as temptress because fornication often leads to marriage, which usually leads to children, which always leads to a respectable job and pretending to believe the idiocies your neighbors believe. The hypocrisy of the sages has been to conceal their timid onanism and call it celibacy. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
38:CheerfulnessONE AFTERNOON, in a large town in a rainy country, I saw seven or eight vehicles full of children. That morning, they had been taken into the country to play in the fields, but the bad weather had made them return home early in the rain.And yet they were singing, laughing and waving merrily to the passers-by.They had kept their cheerfulness in this gloomy weather. If one of them had felt sad, the songs of the others would have cheered him. And for the people hurrying by, who heard the children's laughter, it seemed that the sky had brightened for a moment. ~ The Mother, 189.php">CWM.php">189 ,
39:There are two ways to slide easily through life; to believe everything or doubt everything. Both ways save us from thinking. The majority take the line of least resistance, preferring to have their thinking done for them; they accept ready-made individual, private doctrines as their own and follow them more or less blindly. Every generation looks upon its own creeds as true and permanent and has a mingled smile of pity and contempt for the prejudices of the past. For two hundred or more generations of our historical past this attitude has been repeated two hundred or more times, and unless we are very careful our children will have the same attitude toward us. ~ Alfred Korzybski,
40:Your time is your life, and your life is your capital: by it you make your trade, and by it you will reach the eternal bounties in the proximity of Allah. Every single breath of yours is a priceless jewel, because it is irreplaceable; once it is gone, there is no return for it. So do not be like fools who rejoice each day as their wealth increases while their lives decrease. What good is there in wealth that increases while one's lifespan decreases?Do not rejoice except in an increase of knowledge or an increase of good works. Truly they are your two friends who will accompany you in your grave, when your spouse, your wealth, your children, and your friends will remain behind. ~ Abu Hamid al-Ghazali?,
41:Because children have abounding vitality,because they are in spirit fierce and free,therefore they want things repeated and unchanged.They always say, "Do it again";and the grown-up person does it againuntil he is nearly dead.For grown-up people are not strong enoughto exult in monotony.But perhaps God is strong enoughto exult in monotony.It is possible that God says every morning,"Do it again"to the sun; and every evening,"Do it again" to the moon.It may not be automatic necessitythat makes all daisies alike;it may be that God makes every daisy separately,but has never got tired of making them.It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy;for we have sinned and grown old,and our Father is younger than we." ~ G K Chesterton, Orthodoxy ,
42:I have said that from a young age children should be taught to respect good health, physical strength and balance. The great importance of beauty must also be emphasised. A young child should aspire for beauty, not for the sake of pleasing others or winning their admiration, but for the love of beauty itself; for beauty is the ideal which all physical life must realise. Every human being has the possibility of establishing harmony among the different parts of his body and in the various movements of the body in action. Every human body that undergoes a rational method of culture from the very beginning of its existence can realise its own harmony and thus become fit to manifest beauty. When we speak of the other aspects of an integral education, we shall see what inner conditions are to be fulfilled so that this beauty can one day be manifested. ~ The Mother, On Education 1.03 - Physical Education,
43:And He will judge and will forgive all, the good and the evil, the wise and the meek . . . And when He has done with all of them, then He will summon us. 'You too come forth,' He will say, 'Come forth ye drunkards, come forth, ye weak ones, come forth, ye children of shame!' And we shall all come forth, without shame and shall stand before him. And He will say unto us, 'Ye are swine, made in the Image of the Beast and with his mark; but come ye also!' And the wise ones and those of understanding will say, 'Oh Lord, why dost Thou receive these men?' And He will say, 'This is why I receive them, oh ye wise, this is why I receive them, oh ye of understanding, that not one of them believed himself to be worthy of this.' And He will hold out His hands to us and we shall fall down before him . . . and we shall weep . . . and we shall understand all things! Then we shall understand everything! . . . and all will understand ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
44:When ye look at me I am an idle, idle man; when I look at myself I am a busy, busy man. Since upon the plain of uncreated infinity I am building, building the tower of ecstasy, I have no time for building houses. Since upon the steppe of the void of truth I am breaking, breaking the savage fetter of suffering, I have no time for ploughing family land. Since at the bourn of unity ineffable I am subduing, subduing the demon-foe of self, I have no time for subduing angry foe-men. Since in the palace of mind which transcends duality I am waiting, waiting for spiritual experience as my bride, I have no time for setting up house. Since in the circle of the Buddhas of my body I am fostering, fostering the child of wisdom, I have no time for fostering snivelling children. Since in the frame of the body, the seat of all delight, I am saving, saving precious instruction and reflection, I have no time for saving wordly wealth. ~ Jetsun Milarepa, Songs of Milarepa ,
45:Influence is more important than example. Influence is not the outward authority of the Teacher over his disciple, but the power of his contact, of his presence, of the nearness of his soul to the soul of another, infusing into it, even though in silence, that which he himself is and possesses. This is the supreme sign of the Master. For the greatest Master is much less a Teacher than a Presence pouring the divine consciousness and its constituting light and power and purity and bliss into all who are receptive around him. And it shall also be a sign of the teacher of the integral Yoga that he does not arrogate to himself Guruhood in a humanly vain and self-exalting spirit. His work, if he has one, is a trust from above, he himself a channel, a vessel or a representative. He is a man helping his brothers, a child leading children, a Light kindling other lights, an awakened Soul awakening souls, at highest a Power or Presence of the Divine calling to him other ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
46:Yet not for tyrant wrong nor to serve as a sword for our passionsZeus created our strength, but that earth might have help from her children.Not of our moulding its gifts to our soul nor were formed by our labour!When did we make them, where were ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.02 - The Motives of Devotion,
47:Only by our coming into constant touch with the divine Consciousness and its absolute Truth can some form of the conscious Divine, the dynamic Absolute, take up our earth-existence and transform its strife, stumbling, sufferings and falsities into an image of the supreme Light, Power and Ananda. The culmination of the soul's constant touch with the Supreme is that self-giving which we call surrender to the divine Will and immergence of the separated ego in the One who is all. A vast universality of soul and an intense unity with all is the base and fixed condition of the supramental consciousness and spiritual life. In that universality and unity alone can we find the supreme law of the divine manifestation in the life of the embodied spirit; in that alone can we discover the supreme motion and right play of our individual nature. In that alone can all these lower discords resolve themselves into a victorious harmony of the true relations between manifested beings who are portions of the one Godhead and children of one universal Mother. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.07 - Standards of Conduct and Spiritual Freedom,
48:From what we've seen in sci-fi movies and literature and generally xenophobic public behavior about Others (immigrants, apostates, and liberals, e.g.,), and the primordial urges to solve imagined or perceived threats with military force, I think the only possibly positive version of alien visitations would be if (a) they're sufficiently evolved to be able to understand the utter primitivity of human behavior as collectives, and (b) they're sufficiently caring to treat Earth as a planet of ill-bred children, mostly incapable of acting, as a collective -- on their higher natures. It seems far more likely that we would be perceived as a vastly inferior species of antlike primitives, warring uselessly amongst ourselves with robotic persistence over millennia.If, based on their other cosmic travels and intergalactic species science, the extraterrestrials are able to have undeservedly benign interventions with humans without somehow provoking paranoid hysteria, religious panics and miitary holocaust, then we might have something to look forward to; but this, unfortunately, is placing a huge gamble on extraterrestrials to be the prevailingly benign moderators of our fate than we ourselves are ever likely to be as a species. ~ Fred Hosea,
49:When I was a child of about thirteen, for nearly a year every night as soon as I had gone to bed it seemed to me that I went out of my body and rose straight up above the house, then above the city, very high above. Then I used to see myself clad in a magnificent golden robe, much longer than myself; and as I rose higher, the robe would stretch, spreading out in a circle around me to form a kind of immense roof over the city. Then I would see men, women, children, old men, the sick, the unfortunate coming out from every side; they would gather under the outspread robe, begging for help, telling of their miseries, their suffering, their hardships. In reply, the robe, supple and alive, would extend towards each one of them individually, and as soon as they had touched it, they were comforted or healed, and went back into their bodies happier and stronger than they had come out of them. Nothing seemed more beautiful to me, nothing could make me happier; and all the activities of the day seemed dull and colourless and without any real life, beside this activity of the night which was the true life for me. Often while I was rising up in this way, I used to see at my left an old man, silent and still, who looked at me with kindly affection and encouraged me by his presence. This old man, dressed in a long dark purple robe, was the personification-as I came to know later-of him who is called the Man of Sorrows. ~ The Mother, Prayers And Meditations ,
50:The whole history of mankind and especially the present condition of the world unite in showing that far from being merely hypothetical, the case supposed has always been actual and is actual to-day on a vaster scale than ever before. My contention is that while progress in some of the great matters of human concern has been long proceeding in accordance with the law of a rapidly increasing geometric progression, progress in the other matters of no less importance has advanced only at the rate of an arithmetical progression or at best at the rate of some geometric progression of relatively slow growth. To see it and to understand it we have to pay the small price of a little observation and a little meditation. Some technological invention is made, like that of a steam engine or a printing press, for example; or some discovery of scientific method, like that of analytical geometry or the infinitesimal calculus; or some discovery of natural law, like that of falling bodies or the Newtonian law of gravitation. What happens? What is the effect upon the progress of knowledge and invention? The effect is stimulation. Each invention leads to new inventions and each discovery to new discoveries; invention breeds invention, science begets science, the children of knowledge produce their kind in larger and larger families; the process goes on from decade to decade, from generation to generation, and the spectacle we behold is that of advancement in scientific knowledge and technological power according to the law and rate of a rapidly increasing geometric progression or logarithmic function. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
51:The Song Of View, Practice, And Action :::Oh, my Guru! The Exemplar of the View, Practice, and Action, Pray vouchsafe me your grace, and enable me To be absorbed in the realm of Self-nature! For the View, Practice, Action, and Accomplishment There are three Key-points you should know: All the manifestation, the Universe itself, is contained in the mind; The nature of Mind is the realm of illumination Which can neither be conceived nor touched. These are the Key-points of the View. Errant thoughts are liberated in the Dharmakaya; The awareness, the illumination, is always blissful; Meditate in a manner of non-doing and non-effort. These are the Key-points of Practice. In the action of naturalness The Ten Virtues spontaneously grow; All the Ten Vices are thus purified. By corrections or remedies The Illuminating Void is ne'er disturbed. These are the Key-points of Action. There is no Nivana to attain beyond; There is no Samsara here to renounce; Truly to know the Self-mind It is to be the Buddha Himself. These are the Key-points of Accomplishment. Reduce inwardly the Three Key-points to One. This One is the Void Nature of Being, Which only a wondrous Guru Can clearly illustrate. Much activity is of no avail; If one sees the Simultaneously Born Wisdom, He reaches the goal. For all practioners of Dharma The preaching is a precious gem; It is my direct experience from yogic meditation. Think carefully and bear it in your minds, Oh, my children and disciples. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
52:Why do some children take interest in things only when there is some excitement? They are tamasic. It is due to the large proportion of tamas in their nature. The more tamasic one is, the more does one need something violent and exciting circumstances. When the physical is tamasic, unless one eats spices and highly flavoured food, one does not feel nourished. And yet these are poisons. They act exactly like poison on the nerves. They do not nourish. But it is because people are tamasic, because their body's consciousness is not sufficiently developed. Well, mentally it is the same thing, vitally the same thing. If they are tamasic, they always need new excitements, dramas, murders, suicides, etc. to feel anything at all, otherwise.... And there is nothing, nothing that makes one more wicked and cruel than tamas. For it is this need of excitement which shakes you up a little, makes you come out of yourself. And one must also learn, there, to distinguish between those who are exclusively tamasic and those who are mixed, and those who are struggling within themselves with their different parts. One can, one must know in what proportion their nature is constituted, so as to be able to insist at need on one thing or another. Some people constantly need a whipping from life in order to move, otherwise they would spend their time sleeping. Others, on the contrary, need soothing things, silence, a retreat in the country-side - all things that do a lot of good but which must disappear as soon as one needs to make an effort for progress or to realise something or struggle against a defect, conquer an obstacle.... It is complicated, don't you think so? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 ,
53:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. These passions, like great winds, have blown me hither and thither, in a wayward course, over a great ocean of anguish, reaching to the very verge of despair. I have sought love, first, because it brings ecstasy - ecstasy so great that I would often have sacrificed all the rest of life for a few hours of this joy. I have sought it, next, because it relieves loneliness--that terrible loneliness in which one shivering consciousness looks over the rim of the world into the cold unfathomable lifeless abyss. I have sought it finally, because in the union of love I have seen, in a mystic miniature, the prefiguring vision of the heaven that saints and poets have imagined. This is what I sought, and though it might seem too good for human life, this is what--at last--I have found. With equal passion I have sought knowledge. I have wished to understand the hearts of men. I have wished to know why the stars shine. And I have tried to apprehend the Pythagorean power by which number holds sway above the flux. A little of this, but not much, I have achieved. Love and knowledge, so far as they were possible, led upward toward the heavens. But always pity brought me back to earth. Echoes of cries of pain reverberate in my heart. Children in famine, victims tortured by oppressors, helpless old people a burden to their sons, and the whole world of loneliness, poverty, and pain make a mockery of what human life should be. I long to alleviate this evil, but I cannot, and I too suffer. This has been my life. I have found it worth living, and would gladly live it again if the chance were offered me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
54:Response To A Logician :::I bow at the feet of my teacher Marpa. And sing this song in response to you. Listen, pay heed to what I say, forget your critique for a while. The best seeing is the way of "nonseeing" the radiance of the mind itself. The best prize is what cannot be looked for the priceless treasure of the mind itself. The most nourishing food is "noneating" the transcendent food of samadhi. The most thirst-quenching drink is "nondrinking" the nectar of heartfelt compassion. Oh, this self-realizing awareness is beyond words and description! The mind is not the world of children, nor is it that of logicians. Attaining the truth of "nonattainment," you receive the highest initiation. Perceiving the void of high and low, you reach the sublime stage. Approaching the truth of "nonmovement," you follow the supreme path. Knowing the end of birth and death, the ultimate purpose is fulfilled. Seeing the emptiness of reason, supreme logic is perfected. When you know that great and small are groundless, you have entered the highest gateway. Comprehending beyond good and evil opens the way to perfect skill. Experiencing the dissolution of duality, you embrace the highest view. Observing the truth of "nonobservation" opens the way to meditating. Comprehending beyond "ought" and "oughtn't" opens the way to perfect action. When you realize the truth of "noneffort," you are approaching the highest fruition. Ignorant are those who lack this truth: arrogant teachers inflated by learning, scholars bewitched by mere words, and yogis seduced by prejudice. For though they yearn for freedom, they find only enslavement. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
55:It doesnt interest me what you do for a living. I want to know what you ache for, and if you dare to dream of meeting your hearts longing. It doesnt interest me how old you are. I want to know if you will risk looking like a fool for love, for your dream, for the adventure of being alive. It doesnt interest me what planets are squaring your moon. I want to know if you have touched the center of your own sorrow, if you have been opened by lifes betrayals or have become shriveled and closed from fear of further pain!I want to know if you can sit with pain, mine or your own, without moving to hide it or fade it, or fix it. I want to know if you can be with joy, mine or your own, if you can dance with wildness and let the ecstasy fill you to the tips of your fingers and toes without cautioning us to be careful, to be realistic, to remember the limitations of being human. It doesnt interest me if the story you are telling me is true. I want to know if you can disappoint another to be true to yourself; if you can bear the accusation of betrayal and not betray your own soul; if you can be faithlessand therefore trustworthy. I want to know if you can see beauty even when its not pretty, every day,and if you can source your own life from its presence. I want to know if you can live with failure, yours and mine, and still stand on the edge of the lake and shout to the silver of the full moon, Yes! It doesnt interest me to know where you live or how much money you have. I want to know if you can get up, after the night of grief and despair, weary and bruised to the bone, and do what needs to be done to feed the children. It doesnt interest me who you know or how you came to be here. I want to know if you will stand in the center of the fire with me and not shrink back. It doesnt interest me where or what or with whom you have studied. I want to know what sustains you, from the inside, when all else falls away. I want to know if you can be alone with yourself and if you truly like the company you keep in the empty moments. ~ Oriah Mountain Dreamer,
56:Imperial Maheshwari is seated in the wideness above the thinking mind and will and sublimates and greatens them into wisdom and largeness or floods with a splendour beyond them. For she is the mighty and wise One who opens us to supramental infinities and the cosmic vastness, to the grandeur of the supreme Light, to a treasure-house of miraculous knowledge, to the measureless movement of the Mother's eternal forces. Tranquil is she and wonderful, great and calm for ever. Nothing can move her because all wisdom is in her; nothing is hidden from her that she chooses to know; she comprehends all things and all beings and their nature and what moves them and the law of the world and its times and how all was and is and must be. A strength is in her that meets everything and masters and none can prevail in the end against her vast intangible wisdom and high tranquil power. Equal, patient, unalterable in her will she deals with men according to their nature and with things and happenings according to their Force and truth that is in them. Partiality she has none, but she follows the decrees of the Supreme and some she raises up and some she casts down or puts away into the darkness. To the wise she gives a greater and more luminous wisdom; those that have vision she admits to her counsels; on the hostile she imposes the consequence of their hostility; the ignorant and foolish she leads them according to their blindness. In each man she answers and handles the different elements of his nature according to their need and their urge and the return they call for, puts on them the required pressure or leaves them to their cherished liberty to prosper in the ways of the Ignorance or to perish. For she is above all, bound by nothing, attached to nothing in the universe. Yet she has more than any other the heart of the universal Mother. For her compassion is endless and inexhaustible; all are to her eyes her children and portions of the One, even the Asura and Rakshasa and Pisacha and those that are revolted and hostile. Even her rejections are only a postponement, even her punishments are a grace. But her compassion does not blind her wisdom or turn her action from the course decreed; for the Truth of things is her one concern, knowledge her centre of power and to build our soul and our nature into the divine Truth her mission and her labour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother game test3,
57:Fundamentally, whatever be the path one follows - whe- ther the path of surrender, consecration, knowledge-if one wants it to be perfect, it is always equally difficult, and there is but one way, one only, I know of only one: that is perfect sincerity, but perfect sincerity!Do you know what perfect sincerity is?...Never to try to deceive oneself, never let any part of the being try to find out a way of convincing the others, never to explain favourably what one does in order to have an excuse for what one wants to do, never to close one's eyes when something is unpleasant, never to let anything pass, telling oneself, "That is not important, next time it will be better."Oh! It is very difficult. Just try for one hour and you will see how very difficult it is. Only one hour, to be totally, absolutely sincere. To let nothing pass. That is, all one does, all one feels, all one thinks, all one wants, is exclusively the Divine."I want nothing but the Divine, I think of nothing but the Divine, I do nothing but what will lead me to the Divine, I love nothing but the Divine."Try - try, just to see, try for half an hour, you will see how difficult it is! And during that time take great care that there isn't a part of the vital or a part of the mind or a part of the physical being nicely hidden there, at the back, so that you don't see it (Mother hides her hands behind her back) and don't notice that it is not collaborating - sitting quietly there so that you don't unearth it... it says nothing, but it does not change, it hides itself. How many such parts! How many parts hide themselves! You put them in your pocket because you don't want to see them or else they get behind your back and sit there well-hidden, right in the middle of your back, so as not to be seen. When you go there with your torch - your torch of sincerity - you ferret out all the corners, everywhere, all the small corners which do not consent, the things which say "No" or those which do not move: "I am not going to budge. I am glued to this place of mine and nothing will make me move."... You have a torch there with you, and you flash it upon the thing, upon everything. You will see there are many of them there, behind your back, well stuck.Try, just for an hour, try!No more questions?Nobody has anything to say? Then, au revoir, my children! ~ The Mother, Question and Answers Volume-6,
58:When one is bored, Mother, does that mean one does not progress? At that time, yes, certainly without a doubt; not only does one not progress, but one misses an opportunity for progressing. There was a concurrence of circumstances which seemed to you dull, boring, stupid and you were in their midst; well, if you get bored, it means that you yourself are as boring as the circumstances! And that is a clear proof that you are simply not in a state of progress. There is nothing more contrary to the very reason of existence than this passing wave of boredom. If you make a little effort within yourself at that time, if you tell yourself: "Wait a bit, what is it that I should learn? What does all that bring to me so that I may learn something? What progress should I make in overcoming myself? What is the weakness that I must overcome? What is the inertia that I must conquer?" If you say that to yourself, you will see the next minute you are no longer bored. You will immediately get interested and you will make progress! This is a commonplace of consciousness. And then, you know, most people when they get bored, instead of trying to rise a step higher, descend a step lower, they become still worse than what they were, and they do all the stupid things that others do, go in for all the vulgarities, all the meannesses, everything, in order to amuse themselves. They get intoxicated, take poison, ruin their health, ruin their brain, they utter crudities. They do all that because they are bored. Well, if instead of going down, one had risen up, one would have profited by the circumstances. Instead of profiting, one falls a little lower yet than where one was. When people get a big blow in their life, some misfortune (what men call "misfortune", there are people who do have misfortunes), the first thing they try to do is to forget it - as though one did not forget quickly enough! And to forget, they do anything whatsoever. When there is something painful, they want to distract themselves - what they call distraction, that is, doing stupid things, that is to say, going down in their consciousness, going down a little instead of rising up.... Has something extremely painful happened to you, something very grievous? Do not become stupefied, do not seek forgetfulness, do not go down into the inconscience; you must go to the end and find the light that is behind, the truth, the force and the joy; and for that you must be strong and refuse to slide down. But that we shall see a little later, my children, when you will be a little older. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 Talks 026-050,
59:This is true in a general way; when those born scattered over the world at great distances from one another are driven by circumstances or by an impulsion to come and gather here, it is almost always because they have met in one life or another (not all in the same life) and because their psychic being has felt that they belonged to the same family; so they have taken an inner vow to continue to act together and collaborate. That is why even though they are born far from one another, there is something which compels them to come together; it is the psychic being, the psychic consciousness that is behind. And only to the extent the psychic consciousness is strong enough to order and organise the circumstances or the life, that is, strong enough not to allow itself to be opposed by outside forces, outside life movements, can people meet.It is profoundly true in reality; there are large "families of beings" who work for the same cause, who have gathered in more or less large numbers and who come in groups as it were. It is as though at certain times there were awakenings in the psychic world, as though lots of little sleeping children were being called to wake up: "It is time, quick, quick, go down!" And they hurry down. And sometimes they do not drop at the same place, they are dispersed, yet there is something within which troubles them, pushes them; for one reason or another they are drawn close and that brings them together. But it is something deep in the being, something that is not at all on the surface; otherwise, even if people met they would not perhaps become aware of the bond. People meet and recognise each other only to the extent they become conscious of their psychic being, obey their psychic being, are guided by it; otherwise there is all that comes in to oppose it, all that veils, all that stupefies, all those obstacles to prevent you from finding yourself in your depths and being able to collaborate truly in the work. You are tossed about by the forces of Nature.There is only one solution, to find your psychic being and once it is found to cling to it desperately, to let it guide you step by step whatever be the obstacle. That is the only solution. All this I did not write but I explained it to that lady. She had put to me the question: "How did I happen to come here?" I told her that it was certainly not for reasons of the external consciousness, it was something in her inner being that had pushed her. Only the awakening was not strong enough to overcome all the rest and she returned to the ordinary life for very ordinary reasons of living. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 ,
60:The Teacher of the integral Yoga will follow as far as he may the method of the Teacher within us. He will lead the disciple through the nature of the disciple. Teaching, example, influence, - these are the three instruments of the Guru. But the wise Teacher will not seek to impose himself or his opinions on the passive acceptance of the receptive mind; he will throw in only what is productive and sure as a seed which will grow under the divine fostering within. He will seek to awaken much more than to instruct; he will aim at the growth of the faculties and the experiences by a natural process and free expansion. He will give a method as an aid, as a utilisable device, not as an imperative formula or a fixed routine. And he will be on his guard against any turning of the means into a limitation, against the mechanising of process. His whole business is to awaken the divine light and set working the divine force of which he himself is only a means and an aid, a body or a channel.The example is more powerful than the instruction; but it is not the example of the outward acts nor that of the personal character which is of most importance. These have their place and their utility; but what will most stimulate aspiration in others is the central fact of the divine realisation within him governing his whole life and inner state and all his activities. This is the universal and essential element; the rest belongs to individual person and circumstance. It is this dynamic realisation that the sadhaka must feel and reproduce in himself according to his own nature; he need not strive after an imitation from outside which may well be sterilising rather than productive of right and natural fruits.Influence is more important than example. Influence is not the outward authority of the Teacher over his disciple, but the power of his contact, of his presence, of the nearness of his soul to the soul of another, infusing into it, even though in silence, that which he himself is and possesses. This is the supreme sign of the Master. For the greatest Master is much less a Teacher than a Presence pouring the divine consciousness and its constituting light and power and purity and bliss into all who are receptive around him.And it shall also be a sign of the teacher of the integral Yoga that he does not arrogate to himself Guruhood in a humanly vain and self-exalting spirit. His work, if he has one, is a trust from above, he himself a channel, a vessel or a representative. He is a man helping his brothers, a child leading children, a Light kindling other lights, an awakened Soul awakening souls, at highest a Power or Presence of the Divine calling to him other powers of the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis of Yoga ,
61:Mother of Dreams ::: Goddess supreme, Mother of Dream, by thy ivory doors when thou standest,Who are they then that come down unto men in thy visions that troop, group upon group, down the path of the shadows slanting?Dream after dream, they flash and they gleam with the flame of the stars still around them;Shadows at thy side in a darkness ride where the wild fires dance, stars glow and glance and the random meteor glistens;There are voices that cry to their kin who reply; voices sweet, at the heart they beat and ravish the soul as it listens.What then are these lands and these golden sands and these seas more radiant than earth can imagine?Who are those that pace by the purple waves that race to the cliff-bound floor of thy jasper shore under skies in which mystery muses,Lapped in moonlight not of our night or plunged in sunshine that is not diurnal?Who are they coming thy Oceans roaming with sails whose strands are not made by hands, an unearthly wind advances?Why do they join in a mystic line with those on the sands linking hands in strange and stately dances?Thou in the air, with a flame in thy hair, the whirl of thy wonders watching,Holdest the night in thy ancient right, Mother divine, hyacinthine, with a girdle of beauty defended.Sworded with fire, attracting desire, thy tenebrous kingdom thou keepest,Starry-sweet, with the moon at thy feet, now hidden now seen the clouds between in the gloom and the drift of thy tresses.Only to those whom thy fancy chose, O thou heart-free, is it given to see thy witchcraft and feel thy caresses.Open the gate where thy children wait in their world of a beauty undarkened.High-throned on a cloud, victorious, proud I have espied Maghavan ride when the armies of wind are behind him;Food has been given for my tasting from heaven and fruit of immortal sweetness;I have drunk wine of the kingdoms divine and have healed the change of music strange from a lyre which our hands cannot master,Doors have swung wide in the chambers of pride where the Gods reside and the Apsaras dance in their circles faster and faster.For thou art she whom we first can see when we pass the bounds of the mortal;There at the gates of the heavenly states thou hast planted thy wand enchanted over the head of the Yogin waving.From thee are the dream and the shadows that seem and the fugitive lights that delude us;Thine is the shade in which visions are made; sped by thy hands from celestial lands come the souls that rejoice for ever.Into thy dream-worlds we pass or look in thy magic glass, then beyond thee we climb out of Space and Time to the peak of divine endeavour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems ,
62:Mother, suffering comes from ignorance and pain, but what is the nature of the suffering and pain the Divine Mother feels for her children-the Divine Mother in Savitri?It is because she participates in their nature. She has descended upon earth to participate in their nature. Because if she did not participate in their nature, she could not lead them farther. If she remained in her supreme consciousness where there is no suffering, in her supreme knowledge and consciousness, she could not have any contact with human beings. And it is for this that she is obliged to take on the human consciousness and form, it is to be able to enter into contact with them. Only, she does not forget: she has adopted their consciousness but she remains in relation with her own real, supreme consciousness. And thus, by joining the two, she can make those who are in that other consciousness progress. But if she did not adopt their consciousness, if she did not suffer with their sorrow, she could not help them. Hers is not a suffering of ignorance: it is a suffering through identity. It is because she has accepted to have the same vibrations as they, in order to be able to enter into contact with them and pull them out of the state they are in. If she did not enter into contact with them, she would not be felt at all or no one could bear her radiance.... This has been said in all kinds of forms, in all kinds of religions, and they have spoken very often of the divine Sacrifice, but from a certain point of view it is true. It is a voluntary sacrifice, but it is true: giving up a state of perfect consciousness, perfect bliss, perfect power in order to accept the state of ignorance of the outer world so as to pull it out of that ignorance. If this state were not accepted, there would be no contact with it. No relation would be possible. And this is the reason of the incarnations. Otherwise, there would be no necessity. If the divine consciousness and divine force could work directly from the place or state of their perfection, if they could work directly on matter and transform it, there would be no need to take a body like man's. It would have been enough to act from the world of Truth with the perfect consciousness and upon consciousness. In fact that acts perhaps but so slowly that when there is this effort to make the world progress, make it go forward more rapidly, well, it is necessary to take on human nature. By taking the human body, one is obliged to take on human nature, partially. Only, instead of losing one's consciousness and losing contact with the Truth, one keeps this consciousness and this Truth, and it is by joining the two that one can create exactly this kind of alchemy of transformation. But if one did not touch matter, one could do nothing for it. ~ The Mother, Question And Answers ,
63:Sometimes while reading a text one has ideas, then Sweet Mother, how can one distinguish between the other person's idea and one's own?Oh! This, this doesn't exist, the other person's idea and one's own idea. Nobody has ideas of his own: it is an immensity from which one draws according to his personal affinity; ideas are a collective possession, a collective wealth. Only, there are different stages. So there is the most common level, the one where all our brains bathe; this indeed swarms here, it is the level of "Mr. Everybody". And then there is a level that's slightly higher for people who are called thinkers. And then there are higher levels still - many - some of them are beyond words but they are still domains of ideas. And then there are those capable of shooting right up, catching something which is like a light and making it come down with all its stock of ideas, all its stock of thoughts. An idea from a higher domain if pulled down organises itself and is crystallised in a large number of thoughts which can express that idea differently; and then if you are a writer or a poet or an artist, when you make it come lower down still, you can have all kinds of expressions, extremely varied and choice around a single little idea but one coming from very high above. And when you know how to do this, it teaches you to distinguish between the pure idea and the way of expressing it. Some people cannot do it in their own head because they have no imagination or faculty for writing, but they can do it through study by reading what others have written. There are, you know, lots of poets, for instance, who have expressed the same idea - the same idea but with such different forms that when one reads many of them it becomes quite interesting to see (for people who love to read and read much). Ah, this idea, that one has said it like this, that other has expressed it like that, another has formulated it in this way, and so on. And so you have a whole stock of expressions which are expressions by different poets of the same single idea up there, above, high above. And you notice that there is an almost essential difference between the pure idea, the typal idea and its formulation in the mental world, even the speculative or artistic mental world. This is a very good thing to do when one loves gymnastics. It is mental gymnastics. Well, if you want to be truly intelligent, you must know how to do mental gymnastics; as, you see, if you want really to have a fairly strong body you must know how to do physical gymnastics. It is the same thing. People who have never done mental gymnastics have a poor little brain, quite over-simple, and all their life they think like children. One must know how to do this - not take it seriously, in the sense that one shouldn't have convictions, saying, "This idea is true and that is false; this formulation is correct and that one is not and this religion is the true one and that religion is false", and so on and so forth... this, if you enter into it, you become absolutely stupid. But if you can see all that and, for example, take all the religions, one after another and see how they have expressed the same aspiration of the human being for some Absolute, it becomes very interesting; and then you begin... yes, you begin to be able to juggle with all that. And then when you have mastered it all, you can rise above it and look at all the eternal human discussions with a smile. So there you are master of the thought and can no longer fly into a rage because someone else does not think as you, something that's unfortunately a very common malady here. Now, there we are. Nobody has any questions, no? That's enough? Finished! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
64:Sweet Mother, how can we make our resolution very firm? By wanting it to be very firm! (Laughter) No, this seems like a joke... but it is absolutely true. One does not want it truly. There is always, if you... It is a lack of sincerity. If you look sincerely, you will see that you have decided that it will be like this, and then, beneath there is something which has not decided at all and is waiting for the second of hesitation in order to rush forward. If you are sincere, if you are sincere and get hold of the part which is hiding, waiting, not showing itself, which knows that there will come a second of indecision when it can rush out and make you do the thing you have decided not to do... [] But if you really want it, nothing in the world can prevent you from doing what you want. It is because one doesn't know how to will it. It is because one is divided in one's will. If you are not divided in your will, I say that nothing, nobody in the world can make you change your will. But one doesn't know how to will it. In fact one doesn't even want to. These are velleities: "Well, it is like this.... It would be good if it were like that... yes, it would be better if it were like that... yes, it would be preferable if it were like that." But this is not to will. And always there at the back, hidden somewhere in a corner of the brain, is something which is looking on and saying, "Oh, why should I want that? After all one can as well want the opposite." And to try, you see... Not like that, just wait... But one can always find a thousand excuses to do the opposite. And ah, just a tiny little wavering is enough... pftt... the thing swoops down and there it is. But if one wills, if one really knows that this is the thing, and truly wants this, and if one is oneself entirely concentrated in the will, I say that there is nothing in the world that can prevent one from doing it, from doing it or being obliged to do it. It depends on what it is. One wants. Yes, one wants, like this (gestures). One wants: "Yes, yes, it would be better if it were like that. Yes, it would be finer also, more elegant."... But, eh, eh, after all one is a weak creature, isn't that so? And then one can always put the blame upon something else: "It is the influence coming from outside, it is all kinds of circumstances." A breath has passed, you see. You don't know... something... a moment of unconsciousness... "Oh, I was not conscious." You are not conscious because you do not accept... And all this because you don't know how to will. [] To learn how to will is a very important thing. And to will truly, you must unify your being. In fact, to be a being, one must first unify oneself. If one is pulled by absolutely opposite tendencies, if one spends three-fourths of one's life without being conscious of oneself and the reasons why one does things, is one a real being? One does not exist. One is a mass of influences, movements, forces, actions, reactions, but one is not a being. One begins to become a being when one begins to have a will. And one can't have a will unless one is unified. And when you have a will, you will be able to say, say to the Divine: "I want what You want." But not before that. Because in order to want what the Divine wants, you must have a will, otherwise you can will nothing at all. You would like to. You would like it very much. You would very much like to want what the Divine wants to do. You don't possess a will to give to Him and to put at His service. Something like that, gelatinous, like jelly-fish... there... a mass of good wills - and I am considering the better side of things and forgetting the bad wills - a mass of good wills, half-conscious and fluctuating.... Ah, that's all, my children. That's enough for today. There we are. Only, put this into practice; just a little of what I have said, not all, eh, just a very little. There. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
65:64 Arts 1. Geet vidya: art of singing. 2. Vadya vidya: art of playing on musical instruments. 3. Nritya vidya: art of dancing. 4. Natya vidya: art of theatricals. 5. Alekhya vidya: art of painting. 6. Viseshakacchedya vidya: art of painting the face and body with color 7. Tandula­kusuma­bali­vikara: art of preparing offerings from rice and flowers. 8. Pushpastarana: art of making a covering of flowers for a bed. 9. Dasana­vasananga­raga: art of applying preparations for cleansing the teeth, cloths and painting the body. 10. Mani­bhumika­karma: art of making the groundwork of jewels. 11. Aayya­racana: art of covering the bed. 12. Udaka­vadya: art of playing on music in water. 13. Udaka­ghata: art of splashing with water. 14. Citra­yoga: art of practically applying an admixture of colors. 15. Malya­grathana­vikalpa: art of designing a preparation of wreaths. 16. Sekharapida­yojana: art of practically setting the coronet on the head. 17. Nepathya­yoga: art of practically dressing in the tiring room. 18. Karnapatra­bhanga: art of decorating the tragus of the ear. 19. Sugandha­yukti: art of practical application of aromatics. 20. Bhushana­yojana: art of applying or setting ornaments. 21. Aindra­jala: art of juggling. 22. Kaucumara: a kind of art. 23. Hasta­laghava: art of sleight of hand. 24. Citra­sakapupa­bhakshya­vikara­kriya: art of preparing varieties of delicious food. 25. Panaka­rasa­ragasava­yojana: art of practically preparing palatable drinks and tinging draughts with red color. 26. Suci­vaya­karma: art of needleworks and weaving. 27. Sutra­krida: art of playing with thread. 28. Vina­damuraka­vadya: art of playing on lute and small drum. 29. Prahelika: art of making and solving riddles. 30. Durvacaka­yoga: art of practicing language difficult to be answered by others. 31. Pustaka­vacana: art of reciting books. 32. Natikakhyayika­darsana: art of enacting short plays and anecdotes. 33. Kavya­samasya­purana: art of solving enigmatic verses. 34. Pattika­vetra­bana­vikalpa: art of designing preparation of shield, cane and arrows. 35. Tarku­karma: art of spinning by spindle. 36. Takshana: art of carpentry. 37. Vastu­vidya: art of engineering. 38. Raupya­ratna­pariksha: art of testing silver and jewels. 39. Dhatu­vada: art of metallurgy. 40. Mani­raga jnana: art of tinging jewels. 41. Akara jnana: art of mineralogy. 42. Vrikshayur­veda­yoga: art of practicing medicine or medical treatment, by herbs. 43. Mesha­kukkuta­lavaka­yuddha­vidhi: art of knowing the mode of fighting of lambs, cocks and birds. 44. Suka­sarika­pralapana: art of maintaining or knowing conversation between male and female cockatoos. 45. Utsadana: art of healing or cleaning a person with perfumes. 46. Kesa­marjana­kausala: art of combing hair. 47. Akshara­mushtika­kathana: art of talking with fingers. 48. Dharana­matrika: art of the use of amulets. 49. Desa­bhasha­jnana: art of knowing provincial dialects. 50. Nirmiti­jnana: art of knowing prediction by heavenly voice. 51. Yantra­matrika: art of mechanics. 52. Mlecchita­kutarka­vikalpa: art of fabricating barbarous or foreign sophistry. 53. Samvacya: art of conversation. 54. Manasi kavya­kriya: art of composing verse 55. Kriya­vikalpa: art of designing a literary work or a medical remedy. 56. Chalitaka­yoga: art of practicing as a builder of shrines called after him. 57. Abhidhana­kosha­cchando­jnana: art of the use of lexicography and meters. 58. Vastra­gopana: art of concealment of cloths. 59. Dyuta­visesha: art of knowing specific gambling. 60. Akarsha­krida: art of playing with dice or magnet. 61. Balaka­kridanaka: art of using children's toys. 62. Vainayiki vidya: art of enforcing discipline. 63. Vaijayiki vidya: art of gaining victory. 64. Vaitaliki vidya: art of awakening master with music at dawn. ~ Nik Douglas and Penny Slinger, Sexual Secrets ,
66:Coded LanguageWhereas, breakbeats have been the missing link connecting the diasporic community to its drum woven pastWhereas the quantised drum has allowed the whirling mathematicians to calculate the ever changing distance between rock and stardom.Whereas the velocity of the spinning vinyl, cross-faded, spun backwards, and re-released at the same given moment of recorded history, yet at a different moment in time's continuum has allowed history to catch up with the present.We do hereby declare reality unkempt by the changing standards of dialogue.Statements, such as, "keep it real", especially when punctuating or anticipating modes of ultra-violence inflicted psychologically or physically or depicting an unchanging rule of events will hence forth be seen as retro-active and not representative of the individually determined is.Furthermore, as determined by the collective consciousness of this state of being and the lessened distance between thought patterns and their secular manifestations, the role of men as listening receptacles is to be increased by a number no less than 70 percent of the current enlisted as vocal aggressors.Motherfuckers better realize, now is the time to self-actualizeWe have found evidence that hip hops standard 85 rpm when increased by a number as least half the rate of it's standard or decreased at ¾ of it's speed may be a determining factor in heightening consciousness.Studies show that when a given norm is changed in the face of the unchanging, the remaining contradictions will parallel the truth.Equate rhyme with reason, Sun with seasonOur cyclical relationship to phenomenon has encouraged scholars to erase the centers of periods, thus symbolizing the non-linear character of cause and effectReject mediocrity!Your current frequencies of understanding outweigh that which as been given for you to understand.The current standard is the equivalent of an adolescent restricted to the diet of an infant.The rapidly changing body would acquire dysfunctional and deformative symptoms and could not properly mature on a diet of apple sauce and crushed pearsLight years are interchangeable with years of living in darkness.The role of darkness is not to be seen as, or equated with, Ignorance, but with the unknown, and the mysteries of the unseen.Thus, in the name of:ROBESON, GOD'S SON, HURSTON, AHKENATON, HATHSHEPUT, BLACKFOOT, HELEN,LENNON, KHALO, KALI, THE THREE MARIAS, TARA, LILITHE, LOURDE, WHITMAN,BALDWIN, GINSBERG, KAUFMAN, LUMUMBA, Gandhi, GIBRAN, SHABAZZ, SIDDHARTHA,MEDUSA, GUEVARA, GUARDSIEFF, RAND, WRIGHT, BANNEKER, TUBMAN, HAMER, HOLIDAY,DAVIS, COLTRANE, MORRISON, JOPLIN, DUBOIS, CLARKE, SHAKESPEARE, RACHMNINOV,ELLINGTON, CARTER, GAYE, HATHOWAY, HENDRIX, KUTL, DICKERSON, RIPPERTON,MARY, ISIS, THERESA, PLATH, RUMI, FELLINI, MICHAUX, NOSTRADAMUS, NEFERTITI,LA ROCK, SHIVA, GANESHA, YEMAJA, OSHUN, OBATALA, OGUN, KENNEDY, KING, FOURLITTLE GIRLS, HIROSHIMA, NAGASAKI, KELLER, BIKO, PERONE, MARLEY, COSBY,SHAKUR, THOSE STILL AFLAMED, AND THE COUNTLESS UNNAMEDWe claim the present as the pre-sent, as the hereafter.We are unraveling our navels so that we may ingest the sun.We are not afraid of the darkness, we trust that the moon shall guide us.We are determining the future at this very moment.We now know that the heart is the philosophers' stoneOur music is our alchemyWe stand as the manifested equivalent of 3 buckets of water and a hand full of minerals, thus realizing that those very buckets turned upside down supply the percussion factor of forever.If you must count to keep the beat then count.Find you mantra and awaken your subconscious.Curve you circles counterclockwiseUse your cipher to decipher, Coded Language, man made laws.Climb waterfalls and trees, commune with nature, snakes and bees.Let your children name themselves and claim themselves as the new day for today we are determined to be the channelers of these changing frequencies into songs, paintings, writings, dance, drama, photography, carpentry, crafts, love, and love.We enlist every instrument: Acoustic, electronic.Every so-called race, gender, and sexual preference.Every per-son as beings of sound to acknowledge their responsibility to uplift the consciousness of the entire fucking World.Any utterance will be un-aimed, will be disclaimed - two rappers slainAny utterance will be un-aimed, will be disclaimed - two rappers slain ~ Saul Williams,
67:A God's LabourI have gathered my dreams in a silver air Between the gold and the blueAnd wrapped them softly and left them there, My jewelled dreams of you.I had hoped to build a rainbow bridge Marrying the soil to the skyAnd sow in this dancing planet midge The moods of infinity.But too bright were our heavens, too far away, Too frail their ethereal stuff;Too splendid and sudden our light could not stay; The roots were not deep enough.He who would bring the heavens here Must descend himself into clayAnd the burden of earthly nature bear And tread the dolorous way.Coercing my godhead I have come down Here on the sordid earth,Ignorant, labouring, human grown Twixt the gates of death and birth.I have been digging deep and long Mid a horror of filth and mireA bed for the golden river's song, A home for the deathless fire.I have laboured and suffered in Matter's night To bring the fire to man;But the hate of hell and human spite Are my meed since the world began.For man's mind is the dupe of his animal self; Hoping its lusts to win,He harbours within him a grisly Elf Enamoured of sorrow and sin.The grey Elf shudders from heaven's flame And from all things glad and pure;Only by pleasure and passion and pain His drama can endure.All around is darkness and strife; For the lamps that men call sunsAre but halfway gleams on this stumbling life Cast by the Undying Ones.Man lights his little torches of hope That lead to a failing edge;A fragment of Truth is his widest scope, An inn his pilgrimage.The Truth of truths men fear and deny, The Light of lights they refuse;To ignorant gods they lift their cry Or a demon altar choose.All that was found must again be sought, Each enemy slain revives,Each battle for ever is fought and refought Through vistas of fruitless lives.My gaping wounds are a thousand and one And the Titan kings assail,But I dare not rest till my task is done And wrought the eternal will.How they mock and sneer, both devils and men! "Thy hope is Chimera's headPainting the sky with its fiery stain; Thou shalt fall and thy work lie dead."Who art thou that babblest of heavenly ease And joy and golden roomTo us who are waifs on inconscient seas And bound to life's iron doom?"This earth is ours, a field of Night For our petty flickering fires.How shall it brook the sacred Light Or suffer a god's desires?"Come, let us slay him and end his course! Then shall our hearts have releaseFrom the burden and call of his glory and force And the curb of his wide white peace."But the god is there in my mortal breast Who wrestles with error and fateAnd tramples a road through mire and waste For the nameless Immaculate.A voice cried, "Go where none have gone! Dig deeper, deeper yetTill thou reach the grim foundation stone And knock at the keyless gate."I saw that a falsehood was planted deep At the very root of thingsWhere the grey Sphinx guards God's riddle sleep On the Dragon's outspread wings.I left the surface gauds of mind And life's unsatisfied seasAnd plunged through the body's alleys blind To the nether mysteries.I have delved through the dumb Earth's dreadful heart And heard her black mass' bell.I have seen the source whence her agonies part And the inner reason of hell.Above me the dragon murmurs moan And the goblin voices flit;I have pierced the Void where Thought was born, I have walked in the bottomless pit.On a desperate stair my feet have trod Armoured with boundless peace,Bringing the fires of the splendour of God Into the human abyss.He who I am was with me still; All veils are breaking now.I have heard His voice and borne His will On my vast untroubled brow.The gulf twixt the depths and the heights is bridged And the golden waters pourDown the sapphire mountain rainbow-ridged And glimmer from shore to shore.Heaven's fire is lit in the breast of the earth And the undying suns here burn;Through a wonder cleft in the bounds of birth The incarnate spirits yearnLike flames to the kingdoms of Truth and Bliss: Down a gold-red stairway wendThe radiant children of Paradise Clarioning darkness' end.A little more and the new life's doors Shall be carved in silver lightWith its aureate roof and mosaic floors In a great world bare and bright.I shall leave my dreams in their argent air, For in a raiment of gold and blueThere shall move on the earth embodied and fair The living truth of you. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems A God's Labour,
68:Death & FameWhen I dieI don't care what happens to my body throw ashes in the air, scatter 'em in East River bury an urn in Elizabeth New Jersey, B'nai Israel CemeteryBut I want a big funeral St. Patrick's Cathedral, St. Mark's Church, the largest synagogue in ManhattanFirst, there's family, brother, nephews, spry aged Edith stepmother 96, Aunt Honey from old Newark,Doctor Joel, cousin Mindy, brother Gene one eyed one ear'd, sister-in-law blonde Connie, five nephews, stepbrothers & sisters their grandchildren, companion Peter Orlovsky, caretakers Rosenthal & Hale, Bill Morgan--Next, teacher Trungpa Vajracharya's ghost mind, Gelek Rinpoche, there Sakyong Mipham, Dalai Lama alert, chance visiting America, Satchitananda Swami Shivananda, Dehorahava Baba, Karmapa XVI, Dudjom Rinpoche, Katagiri & Suzuki Roshi's phantoms Baker, Whalen, Daido Loorie, Qwong, Frail White-haired Kapleau Roshis, Lama Tarchen --Then, most important, lovers over half-century Dozens, a hundred, more, older fellows bald & rich young boys met naked recently in bed, crowds surprised to see each other, innumerable, intimate, exchanging memories"He taught me to meditate, now I'm an old veteran of the thousandday retreat --""I played music on subway platforms, I'm straight but loved him he loved me""I felt more love from him at 19 than ever from anyone""We'd lie under covers gossip, read my poetry, hug & kiss belly to belly arms round each other""I'd always get into his bed with underwear on & by morning my skivvies would be on the floor""Japanese, always wanted take it up my bum with a master""We'd talk all night about Kerouac & Cassady sit Buddhalike then sleep in his captain's bed.""He seemed to need so much affection, a shame not to make him happy""I was lonely never in bed nude with anyone before, he was so gentle my stomach shuddered when he traced his finger along my abdomen nipple to hips-- ""All I did was lay back eyes closed, he'd bring me to come with mouth & fingers along my waist""He gave great head"So there be gossip from loves of 1948, ghost of Neal Cassady commin-gling with flesh and youthful blood of 1997 and surprise -- "You too? But I thought you were straight!""I am but Ginsberg an exception, for some reason he pleased me.""I forgot whether I was straight gay queer or funny, was myself, tender and affectionate to be kissed on the top of my head, my forehead throat heart & solar plexus, mid-belly. on my prick, tickled with his tongue my behind""I loved the way he'd recite 'But at my back allways hear/ time's winged chariot hurrying near,' heads together, eye to eye, on a pillow --"Among lovers one handsome youth straggling the rear"I studied his poetry class, 17 year-old kid, ran some errands to his walk-up flat, seduced me didn't want to, made me come, went home, never saw him again never wanted to... ""He couldn't get it up but loved me," "A clean old man." "He made sure I came first"This the crowd most surprised proud at ceremonial place of honor--Then poets & musicians -- college boys' grunge bands -- age-old rock star Beatles, faithful guitar accompanists, gay classical con-ductors, unknown high Jazz music composers, funky trum-peters, bowed bass & french horn black geniuses, folksinger fiddlers with dobro tamborine harmonica mandolin auto-harp pennywhistles & kazoosNext, artist Italian romantic realists schooled in mystic 60's India, Late fauve Tuscan painter-poets, Classic draftsman Massa-chusets surreal jackanapes with continental wives, poverty sketchbook gesso oil watercolor masters from American provincesThen highschool teachers, lonely Irish librarians, delicate biblio-philes, sex liberation troops nay armies, ladies of either sex"I met him dozens of times he never remembered my name I loved him anyway, true artist""Nervous breakdown after menopause, his poetry humor saved me from suicide hospitals""Charmant, genius with modest manners, washed sink, dishes my studio guest a week in Budapest"Thousands of readers, "Howl changed my life in Libertyville Illinois""I saw him read Montclair State Teachers College decided be a poet-- ""He turned me on, I started with garage rock sang my songs in Kansas City""Kaddish made me weep for myself & father alive in Nevada City""Father Death comforted me when my sister died Boston l982""I read what he said in a newsmagazine, blew my mind, realized others like me out there"Deaf & Dumb bards with hand signing quick brilliant gesturesThen Journalists, editors's secretaries, agents, portraitists & photo-graphy aficionados, rock critics, cultured laborors, cultural historians come to witness the historic funeral Super-fans, poetasters, aging Beatnicks & Deadheads, autograph-hunters, distinguished paparazzi, intelligent gawkersEveryone knew they were part of 'History" except the deceased who never knew exactly what was happening even when I was aliveFebruary 22, 1997 ~ Allen Ginsberg,
69:Education THE EDUCATION of a human being should begin at birth and continue throughout his life. Indeed, if we want this education to have its maximum result, it should begin even before birth; in this case it is the mother herself who proceeds with this education by means of a twofold action: first, upon herself for her own improvement, and secondly, upon the child whom she is forming physically. For it is certain that the nature of the child to be born depends very much upon the mother who forms it, upon her aspiration and will as well as upon the material surroundings in which she lives. To see that her thoughts are always beautiful and pure, her feelings always noble and fine, her material surroundings as harmonious as possible and full of a great simplicity - this is the part of education which should apply to the mother herself. And if she has in addition a conscious and definite will to form the child according to the highest ideal she can conceive, then the very best conditions will be realised so that the child can come into the world with his utmost potentialities. How many difficult efforts and useless complications would be avoided in this way! Education to be complete must have five principal aspects corresponding to the five principal activities of the human being: the physical, the vital, the mental, the psychic and the spiritual. Usually, these phases of education follow chronologically the growth of the individual; this, however, does not mean that one of them should replace another, but that all must continue, completing one another until the end of his life. We propose to study these five aspects of education one by one and also their interrelationships. But before we enter into the details of the subject, I wish to make a recommendation to parents. Most parents, for various reasons, give very little thought to the true education which should be imparted to children. When they have brought a child into the world, provided him with food, satisfied his various material needs and looked after his health more or less carefully, they think they have fully discharged their duty. Later on, they will send him to school and hand over to the teachers the responsibility for his education. There are other parents who know that their children must be educated and who try to do what they can. But very few, even among those who are most serious and sincere, know that the first thing to do, in order to be able to educate a child, is to educate oneself, to become conscious and master of oneself so that one never sets a bad example to one's child. For it is above all through example that education becomes effective. To speak good words and to give wise advice to a child has very little effect if one does not oneself give him an example of what one teaches. Sincerity, honesty, straightforwardness, courage, disinterestedness, unselfishness, patience, endurance, perseverance, peace, calm, self-control are all things that are taught infinitely better by example than by beautiful speeches. Parents, have a high ideal and always act in accordance with it and you will see that little by little your child will reflect this ideal in himself and spontaneously manifest the qualities you would like to see expressed in his nature. Quite naturally a child has respect and admiration for his parents; unless they are quite unworthy, they will always appear to their child as demigods whom he will try to imitate as best he can. With very few exceptions, parents are not aware of the disastrous influence that their own defects, impulses, weaknesses and lack of self-control have on their children. If you wish to be respected by a child, have respect for yourself and be worthy of respect at every moment. Never be authoritarian, despotic, impatient or ill-tempered. When your child asks you a question, do not give him a stupid or silly answer under the pretext that he cannot understand you. You can always make yourself understood if you take enough trouble; and in spite of the popular saying that it is not always good to tell the truth, I affirm that it is always good to tell the truth, but that the art consists in telling it in such a way as to make it accessible to the mind of the hearer. In early life, until he is twelve or fourteen, the child's mind is hardly open to abstract notions and general ideas. And yet you can train it to understand these things by using concrete images, symbols or parables. Up to quite an advanced age and for some who mentally always remain children, a narrative, a story, a tale well told teach much more than any number of theoretical explanations. Another pitfall to avoid: do not scold your child without good reason and only when it is quite indispensable. A child who is too often scolded gets hardened to rebuke and no longer attaches much importance to words or severity of tone. And above all, take good care never to scold him for a fault which you yourself commit. Children are very keen and clear-sighted observers; they soon find out your weaknesses and note them without pity. When a child has done something wrong, see that he confesses it to you spontaneously and frankly; and when he has confessed, with kindness and affection make him understand what was wrong in his movement so that he will not repeat it, but never scold him; a fault confessed must always be forgiven. You should not allow any fear to come between you and your child; fear is a pernicious means of education: it invariably gives birth to deceit and lying. Only a discerning affection that is firm yet gentle and an adequate practical knowledge will create the bonds of trust that are indispensable for you to be able to educate your child effectively. And do not forget that you have to control yourself constantly in order to be equal to your task and truly fulfil the duty which you owe your child by the mere fact of having brought him into the world. Bulletin, February 1951 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
70:The whole question. The whole question? And now, do you understand?... Not quite? I told you that you did not understand because it was muddled up; in one question three different ideas were included. So naturally it created a confusion. But taken separately they are what I explained to you just now, most probably; that is to say, one has this altogether ignorant and obliterated consciousness and is convinced that he is the cause and effect, the origin and result of himself, separate from all others, separate with a limited power to act upon others and a little greater capacity to be set in movement by others or to react to others' influence. That is how people think usually, something like that, isn't that so? How do you feel, you? What effect do you have upon yourself? And you? And you?... You have never thought about it? You have never looked into yourself to see what effect you exercise upon yourself? Never thought over it? No? How do you feel? Nobody will tell me? Come, you tell me that. Never tried to understand how you feel? Yes? No? How strange! Never sought to understand how, for example, decisions take place in you? From where do they come? What makes you decide one thing rather than another? And what is the relation between a decision of yours and your action? And to what extent do you have the freedom of choice between one thing and another? And how far do you feel you are able to, you are free to do this or that or that other or nothing at all?... You have pondered over that? Yes? Is there any one among the students who has thought over it? No? Nobody put the question to himself? You? You?... Even if one thinks over it, perhaps one is not able to answer! One cannot explain? No. It is difficult to explain? Even this simple little thing, to see where in your consciousness the wills that come from outside meet your will (which you call yours, which comes from within), at what place the two join together and to what extent the one from outside acts upon that from within and the one from within acts upon that from outside? You have never tried to find this out? It has never seemed to you unbearable that a will from outside should have an action upon your will? No? I do not know. Oh! I am putting very difficult problems! But, my children, I was preoccupied with that when I was a child of five!... So I thought you must have been preoccupied with it since a long time. In oneself, there are contradictory wills. Yes, many. That is one of the very first discoveries. There is one part which wants things this way; and then at another moment, another way, and a third time, one wants still another thing! Besides, there is even this: something that wants and another which says no. So? But it is exactly that which has to be found if you wish in the least to organise yourself. Why not project yourself upon a screen, as in the cinema, and then look at yourself moving on it? How interesting it is! This is the first step. You project yourself on the screen and then observe and see all that is moving there and how it moves and what happens. You make a little diagram, it becomes so interesting then. And then, after a while, when you are quite accustomed to seeing, you can go one step further and take a decision. Or even a still greater step: you organise - arrange, take up all that, put each thing in its place, organise in such a way that you begin to have a straight movement with an inner meaning. And then you become conscious of your direction and are able to say: "Very well, it will be thus; my life will develop in that way, because that is the logic of my being. Now, I have arranged all that within me, each thing has been put in its place, and so naturally a central orientation is forming. I am following this orientation. One step more and I know what will happen to me for I myself am deciding it...." I do not know, I am telling you this; to me it seemed terribly interesting, the most interesting thing in the world. There was nothing, no other thing that interested me more than that. This happened to me.... I was five or six or seven years old (at seven the thing became quite serious) and I had a father who loved the circus, and he came and told me: "Come with me, I am going to the circus on Sunday." I said: "No, I am doing something much more interesting than going to the circus!" Or again, young friends invited me to attend a meeting where we were to play together, enjoy together: "No, I enjoy here much more...." And it was quite sincere. It was not a pose: for me, it was like this, it was true. There was nothing in the world more enjoyable than that. And I am so convinced that anybody who does it in that way, with the same freshness and sincerity, will obtain most interesting results.... To put all that on a screen in front of yourself and look at what is happening. And the first step is to know all that is happening and then you must not try to shut your eyes when something does not appear pleasant to you! You must keep them wide open and put each thing in that way before the screen. Then you make quite an interesting discovery. And then the next step is to start telling yourself: "Since all that is happening within me, why should I not put this thing in this way and then that thing in that way and then this other in this way and thus wouldn't I be doing something logical that has a meaning? Why should I not remove that thing which stands obstructing the way, these conflicting wills? Why? And what does that represent in the being? Why is it there? If it were put there, would it not help instead of harming me?" And so on. And little by little, little by little, you see clearer and then you see why you are made like that, what is the thing you have got to do - that for which you are born. And then, quite naturally, since all is organised for this thing to happen, the path becomes straight and you can say beforehand: "It is in this way that it will happen." And when things come from outside to try and upset all that, you are able to say: "No, I accept this, for it helps; I reject that, for that harms." And then, after a few years, you curb yourself as you curb a horse: you do whatever you like, in the way you like and you go wherever you like. It seems to me this is worth the trouble. I believe it is the most interesting thing. ...You must have a great deal of sincerity, a little courage and perseverance and then a sort of mental curiosity, you understand, curious, seeking to know, interested, wanting to learn. To love to learn: that, one must have in one's nature. To find it impossible to stand before something grey, all hazy, in which nothing is seen clearly and which gives you quite an unpleasant feeling, for you do not know where you begin and where you end, what is yours and what is not yours and what is settled and what is not settled - what is this pulp-like thing you call yourself in which things get intermingled and act upon one another without even your being aware of it? You ask yourself: "But why have I done this?" You know nothing about it. "And why have I felt that?" You don't know that, either. And then, you are thrown into a world outside that is only fog and you are thrown into a world inside that is also for you another kind of fog, still more impenetrable, in which you live, like a cork thrown upon the waters and the waves carry it away or cast it into the air, and it drops and rolls on. That is quite an unpleasant state. I do not know, but to me it appears unpleasant. To see clearly, to see one's way, where one is going, why one is going there, how one is to go there and what one is going to do and what is the kind of relation with others... But that is a problem so wonderfully interesting - it is interesting - and you can always discover things every minute! One's work is never finished. There is a time, there is a certain state of consciousness when you have the feeling that you are in that condition with all the weight of the world lying heavy upon you and besides you are going in blinkers and do not know where you are going, but there is something which is pushing you. And that is truly a very unpleasant condition. And there is another moment when one draws oneself up and is able to see what is there above, and one becomes it; then one looks at the world as though from the top of a very very high mountain and one sees all that is happening below; then one can choose one's way and follow it. That is a more pleasant condition. This then is truly the truth, you are upon earth for that, surely. All individual beings and all the little concentrations of consciousness were created to do this work. It is the very reason for existence: to be able to become fully conscious of a certain sum of vibrations representing an individual being and put order there and find one's way and follow it. And so, as men do not know it and do not do it, life comes and gives them a blow here: "Oh! that hurts", then a blow there: "Ah! that's hurting me." And the thing goes on like that and all the time it is like that. And all the time they are getting pain somewhere. They suffer, they cry, they groan. But it is simply due to that reason, there is no other: it is that they have not done that little work. If, when they were quite young, there had been someone to teach them to do the work and they had done it without losing time, they could have gone through life gloriously and instead of suffering they would have been all-powerful masters of their destiny. This is not to say that necessarily all things would become pleasant. It is not at all that. But your reaction towards things becomes the true reaction and instead of suffering, you learn; instead of being miserable, you go forward and progress. After all, I believe it is for this that you are here - so that there is someone who can tell you: "There, well, try that. It is worth trying." ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 199,
71:[The Gods and Their Worlds] [...] According to traditions and occult schools, all these zones of realities, these planes of realities have got different names; they have been classified in a different way, but there is an essential analogy, and if you go back far enough into the traditions, you see only the words changing according to the country and the language. Even now, the experiences of Western occultists and those of Eastern occultists offer great similarities. All who set out on the discovery of these invisible worlds and make a report of what they saw, give a very similar description, whether they be from here or there; they use different words, but the experience is very similar and the handling of forces is the same. This knowledge of the occult worlds is based on the existence of subtle bodies and of subtle worlds corresponding to those bodies. They are what the psychological method calls "states of consciousness", but these states of consciousness really correspond to worlds. The occult procedure consists then in being aware of these various inner states of being or subtle bodies and in becoming sufficiently a master of them so as to be able to go out of them successively, one after another. There is indeed a whole scale of subtleties, increasing or decreasing according to the direction in which you go, and the occult procedure consists in going out of a denser body into a subtler body and so on again, up to the most ethereal regions. You go, by successive exteriorisations, into bodies or worlds more and more subtle. It is somewhat as if every time you passed into another dimension. The fourth dimension of the physicists is nothing but the scientific transcription of an occult knowledge. To give another image, one can say that the physical body is at the centre - it is the most material, the densest and also the smallest - and the inner bodies, more subtle, overflow more and more the central physical body; they pass through it, extending themselves farther and farther, like water evaporating from a porous vase and forming a kind of steam all around. And the greater the subtlety, the more the extension tends to unite with that of the universe: one ends by universalising oneself. And it is altogether a concrete process which gives an objective experience of invisible worlds and even enables one to act in these worlds. There are, then, only a very small number of people in the West who know that these gods are not merely subjective and imaginary - more or less wildly imaginary - but that they correspond to a universal truth. All these regions, all these domains are filled with beings who exist, each in its own domain, and if you are awake and conscious on a particular plane - for instance, if on going out of a more material body you awake on some higher plane, you have the same relation with the things and people of that plane as you had with the things and people of the material world. That is to say, there exists an entirely objective relation that has nothing to do with the idea you may have of these things. Naturally, the resemblance is greater and greater as you approach the physical world, the material world, and there even comes a time when the one region has a direct action upon the other. In any case, in what Sri Aurobindo calls the overmental worlds, you will find a concrete reality absolutely independent of your personal experience; you go back there and again find the same things, with the differences that have occurred during your absence. And you have relations with those beings that are identical with the relations you have with physical beings, with this difference that the relation is more plastic, supple and direct - for example, there is the capacity to change the external form, the visible form, according to the inner state you are in. But you can make an appointment with someone and be at the appointed place and find the same being again, with certain differences that have come about during your absence; it is entirely concrete with results entirely concrete. One must have at least a little of this experience in order to understand these things. Otherwise, those who are convinced that all this is mere human imagination and mental formation, who believe that these gods have such and such a form because men have thought them to be like that, and that they have certain defects and certain qualities because men have thought them to be like that - all those who say that God is made in the image of man and that he exists only in human thought, all these will not understand; to them this will appear absolutely ridiculous, madness. One must have lived a little, touched the subject a little, to know how very concrete the thing is. Naturally, children know a good deal if they have not been spoilt. There are so many children who return every night to the same place and continue to live the life they have begun there. When these faculties are not spoilt with age, you can keep them with you. At a time when I was especially interested in dreams, I could return exactly to a place and continue a work that I had begun: supervise something, for example, set something in order, a work of organisation or of discovery, of exploration. You go until you reach a certain spot, as you would go in life, then you take a rest, then you return and begin again - you begin the work at the place where you left off and you continue it. And you perceive that there are things which are quite independent of you, in the sense that changes of which you are not at all the author, have taken place automatically during your absence. But for this, you must live these experiences yourself, you must see them yourself, live them with sufficient sincerity and spontaneity in order to see that they are independent of any mental formation. For you can do the opposite also, and deepen the study of the action of mental formation upon events. This is very interesting, but it is another domain. And this study makes you very careful, very prudent, because you become aware of how far you can delude yourself. So you must study both, the dream and the occult reality, in order to see what is the essential difference between the two. The one depends upon us; the other exists in itself; entirely independent of the thought that we have of it. When you have worked in that domain, you recognise in fact that once a subject has been studied and something has been learnt mentally, it gives a special colour to the experience; the experience may be quite spontaneous and sincere, but the simple fact that the subject was known and studied lends a particular quality. Whereas if you had learnt nothing about the question, if you knew nothing at all, the transcription would be completely spontaneous and sincere when the experience came; it would be more or less adequate, but it would not be the outcome of a previous mental formation. Naturally, this occult knowledge or this experience is not very frequent in the world, because in those who do not have a developed inner life, there are veritable gaps between the external consciousness and the inmost consciousness; the linking states of being are missing and they have to be constructed. So when people enter there for the first time, they are bewildered, they have the impression they have fallen into the night, into nothingness, into non-being! I had a Danish friend, a painter, who was like that. He wanted me to teach him how to go out of the body; he used to have interesting dreams and thought that it would be worth the trouble to go there consciously. So I made him "go out" - but it was a frightful thing! When he was dreaming, a part of his mind still remained conscious, active, and a kind of link existed between this active part and his external being; then he remembered some of his dreams, but it was a very partial phenomenon. And to go out of one's body means to pass gradually through all the states of being, if one does the thing systematically. Well, already in the subtle physical, one is almost de-individualised, and when one goes farther, there remains nothing, for nothing is formed or individualised. Thus, when people are asked to meditate or told to go within, to enter into themselves, they are in agony - naturally! They have the impression that they are vanishing. And with reason: there is nothing, no consciousness! These things that appear to us quite natural and evident, are, for people who know nothing, wild imagination. If, for example, you transplant these experiences or this knowledge to the West, well, unless you have been frequenting the circles of occultists, they stare at you with open eyes. And when you have turned your back, they hasten to say, "These people are cranks!" Now to come back to the gods and conclude. It must be said that all those beings who have never had an earthly existence - gods or demons, invisible beings and powers - do not possess what the Divine has put into man: the psychic being. And this psychic being gives to man true love, charity, compassion, a deep kindness, which compensate for all his external defects. In the gods there is no fault because they live according to their own nature, spontaneously and without constraint: as gods, it is their manner of being. But if you take a higher point of view, if you have a higher vision, a vision of the whole, you see that they lack certain qualities that are exclusively human. By his capacity of love and self-giving, man can have as much power as the gods and even more, when he is not egoistic, when he has surmounted his egoism. If he fulfils the required condition, man is nearer to the Supreme than the gods are. He can be nearer. He is not so automatically, but he has the power to be so, the potentiality. If human love manifested itself without mixture, it would be all-powerful. Unfortunately, in human love there is as much love of oneself as of the one loved; it is not a love that makes you forget yourself. - 4 November 1958 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III 355
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72:Mental EducationOF ALL lines of education, mental education is the most widely known and practised, yet except in a few rare cases there are gaps which make it something very incomplete and in the end quite insufficient. Generally speaking, schooling is considered to be all the mental education that is necessary. And when a child has been made to undergo, for a number of years, a methodical training which is more like cramming than true schooling, it is considered that whatever is necessary for his mental development has been done. Nothing of the kind. Even conceding that the training is given with due measure and discrimination and does not permanently damage the brain, it cannot impart to the human mind the faculties it needs to become a good and useful instrument. The schooling that is usually given can, at the most, serve as a system of gymnastics to increase the suppleness of the brain. From this standpoint, each branch of human learning represents a special kind of mental gymnastics, and the verbal formulations given to these various branches each constitute a special and well-defined language. A true mental education, which will prepare man for a higher life, has five principal phases. Normally these phases follow one after another, but in exceptional individuals they may alternate or even proceed simultaneously. These five phases, in brief, are: (1) Development of the power of concentration, the capacity of attention. (2) Development of the capacities of expansion, widening, complexity and richness. (3) Organisation of one's ideas around a central idea, a higher ideal or a supremely luminous idea that will serve as a guide in life. (4) Thought-control, rejection of undesirable thoughts, to become able to think only what one wants and when one wants. (5) Development of mental silence, perfect calm and a more and more total receptivity to inspirations coming from the higher regions of the being. It is not possible to give here all the details concerning the methods to be employed in the application of these five phases of education to different individuals. Still, a few explanations on points of detail can be given. Undeniably, what most impedes mental progress in children is the constant dispersion of their thoughts. Their thoughts flutter hither and thither like butterflies and they have to make a great effort to fix them. Yet this capacity is latent in them, for when you succeed in arousing their interest, they are capable of a good deal of attention. By his ingenuity, therefore, the educator will gradually help the child to become capable of a sustained effort of attention and a faculty of more and more complete absorption in the work in hand. All methods that can develop this faculty of attention from games to rewards are good and can all be utilised according to the need and the circumstances. But it is the psychological action that is most important and the sovereign method is to arouse in the child an interest in what you want to teach him, a liking for work, a will to progress. To love to learn is the most precious gift that one can give to a child: to love to learn always and everywhere, so that all circumstances, all happenings in life may be constantly renewed opportunities for learning more and always more. For that, to attention and concentration should be added observation, precise recording and faithfulness of memory. This faculty of observation can be developed by varied and spontaneous exercises, making use of every opportunity that presents itself to keep the child's thought wakeful, alert and prompt. The growth of the understanding should be stressed much more than that of memory. One knows well only what one has understood. Things learnt by heart, mechanically, fade away little by little and finally disappear; what is understood is never forgotten. Moreover, you must never refuse to explain to a child the how and the why of things. If you cannot do it yourself, you must direct the child to those who are qualified to answer or point out to him some books that deal with the question. In this way you will progressively awaken in the child the taste for true study and the habit of making a persistent effort to know. This will bring us quite naturally to the second phase of development in which the mind should be widened and enriched. You will gradually show the child that everything can become an interesting subject for study if it is approached in the right way. The life of every day, of every moment, is the best school of all, varied, complex, full of unexpected experiences, problems to be solved, clear and striking examples and obvious consequences. It is so easy to arouse healthy curiosity in children, if you answer with intelligence and clarity the numerous questions they ask. An interesting reply to one readily brings others in its train and so the attentive child learns without effort much more than he usually does in the classroom. By a choice made with care and insight, you should also teach him to enjoy good reading-matter which is both instructive and attractive. Do not be afraid of anything that awakens and pleases his imagination; imagination develops the creative mental faculty and through it study becomes living and the mind develops in joy. In order to increase the suppleness and comprehensiveness of his mind, one should see not only that he studies many varied topics, but above all that a single subject is approached in various ways, so that the child understands in a practical manner that there are many ways of facing the same intellectual problem, of considering it and solving it. This will remove all rigidity from his brain and at the same time it will make his thinking richer and more supple and prepare it for a more complex and comprehensive synthesis. In this way also the child will be imbued with the sense of the extreme relativity of mental learning and, little by little, an aspiration for a truer source of knowledge will awaken in him. Indeed, as the child grows older and progresses in his studies, his mind too ripens and becomes more and more capable of forming general ideas, and with them almost always comes a need for certitude, for a knowledge that is stable enough to form the basis of a mental construction which will permit all the diverse and scattered and often contradictory ideas accumulated in his brain to be organised and put in order. This ordering is indeed very necessary if one is to avoid chaos in one's thoughts. All contradictions can be transformed into complements, but for that one must discover the higher idea that will have the power to bring them harmoniously together. It is always good to consider every problem from all possible standpoints so as to avoid partiality and exclusiveness; but if the thought is to be active and creative, it must, in every case, be the natural and logical synthesis of all the points of view adopted. And if you want to make the totality of your thoughts into a dynamic and constructive force, you must also take great care as to the choice of the central idea of your mental synthesis; for upon that will depend the value of this synthesis. The higher and larger the central idea and the more universal it is, rising above time and space, the more numerous and the more complex will be the ideas, notions and thoughts which it will be able to organise and harmonise. It goes without saying that this work of organisation cannot be done once and for all. The mind, if it is to keep its vigour and youth, must progress constantly, revise its notions in the light of new knowledge, enlarge its frame-work to include fresh notions and constantly reclassify and reorganise its thoughts, so that each of them may find its true place in relation to the others and the whole remain harmonious and orderly. All that has just been said concerns the speculative mind, the mind that learns. But learning is only one aspect of mental activity; the other, which is at least equally important, is the constructive faculty, the capacity to form and thus prepare action. This very important part of mental activity has rarely been the subject of any special study or discipline. Only those who want, for some reason, to exercise a strict control over their mental activities think of observing and disciplining this faculty of formation; and as soon as they try it, they have to face difficulties so great that they appear almost insurmountable. And yet control over this formative activity of the mind is one of the most important aspects of self-education; one can say that without it no mental mastery is possible. As far as study is concerned, all ideas are acceptable and should be included in the synthesis, whose very function is to become more and more rich and complex; but where action is concerned, it is just the opposite. The ideas that are accepted for translation into action should be strictly controlled and only those that agree with the general trend of the central idea forming the basis of the mental synthesis should be permitted to express themselves in action. This means that every thought entering the mental consciousness should be set before the central idea; if it finds a logical place among the thoughts already grouped, it will be admitted into the synthesis; if not, it will be rejected so that it can have no influence on the action. This work of mental purification should be done very regularly in order to secure a complete control over one's actions. For this purpose, it is good to set apart some time every day when one can quietly go over one's thoughts and put one's synthesis in order. Once the habit is acquired, you can maintain control over your thoughts even during work and action, allowing only those which are useful for what you are doing to come to the surface. Particularly, if you have continued to cultivate the power of concentration and attention, only the thoughts that are needed will be allowed to enter the active external consciousness and they then become all the more dynamic and effective. And if, in the intensity of concentration, it becomes necessary not to think at all, all mental vibration can be stilled and an almost total silence secured. In this silence one can gradually open to the higher regions of the mind and learn to record the inspirations that come from there. But even before reaching this point, silence in itself is supremely useful, because in most people who have a somewhat developed and active mind, the mind is never at rest. During the day, its activity is kept under a certain control, but at night, during the sleep of the body, the control of the waking state is almost completely removed and the mind indulges in activities which are sometimes excessive and often incoherent. This creates a great stress which leads to fatigue and the diminution of the intellectual faculties. The fact is that like all the other parts of the human being, the mind too needs rest and it will not have this rest unless we know how to provide it. The art of resting one's mind is something to be acquired. Changing one's mental activity is certainly one way of resting; but the greatest possible rest is silence. And as far as the mental faculties are concerned a few minutes passed in the calm of silence are a more effective rest than hours of sleep. When one has learned to silence the mind at will and to concentrate it in receptive silence, then there will be no problem that cannot be solved, no mental difficulty whose solution cannot be found. When it is agitated, thought becomes confused and impotent; in an attentive tranquillity, the light can manifest itself and open up new horizons to man's capacity. Bulletin, November 1951 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
73:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passageOmnes eodem cogimur, omniumVersatur urna serius ociusSors exitura et nos in aeternumExilium impositura cymbae.Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vainUpon the axis of its pain,Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!'Farewell, farewell! but this I tellTo thee, thou Wedding-Guest!He prayeth well, who loveth wellBoth man and bird and beast.He prayeth best, who loveth bestAll things both great and small;For the dear God who loveth us,He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:two children and the ~ Susan May,
2:And children know, ~ Walter Scott,
3:Children are a place ~ Celeste Ng,
4:Look at children... ~ Dalai Lama,
5:Aymaras—“children ~ Isabel Allende,
6:They are but children. ~ Gene Brewer,
7:children get to bed now. ~ Harper Lee,
8:I like children - fried. ~ W C Fields,
9:Children love me, dammit! ~ Kurt Angle,
10:Love's what children do. ~ M L Stedman,
11:Children are so precious. ~ Shayne Ward,
12:All Children are Artists ~ Pablo Picasso,
13:Children are geniuses. ~ Kristin Cashore,
14:Got 27 children I never see. ~ Tom Waits,
15:Great Stories for Children ~ Ruskin Bond,
16:We are all God's children. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
17:We're all God's children. ~ Dolly Parton,
18:Children are a gift from God. ~ Anonymous,
19:I have two grandchildren. ~ Gloria Allred,
20:Never let the children cry, ~ Bob Marley,
21:Once there were four children ~ C S Lewis,
22:Tell the children the truth. ~ Bob Marley,
23:Children think sex is funny ~ Joe Brainard,
24:I am where dead children go. ~ Rin Chupeco,
25:Children are very wise ~ Virginia C Andrews,
26:I'm the third of five children. ~ Rand Paul,
27:Move children! Vamanos! ~ M Night Shyamalan,
28:There is truth in wine and children ~ Plato,
29:All Children Have Brain Damage! ~ Bill Cosby,
30:Shotguns and children don't mix. ~ Lee Child,
31:Unhappily children do hurt flies ~ Jean Rhys,
32:What do the only children do? ~ Ann Patchett,
33:Ah, there are no children nowadays. ~ Moliere,
34:All God’s children have shoes. ~ Stephen King,
35:Children and fools cannot lie. ~ John Heywood,
36:Children can change the world. ~ Jane Goodall,
37:Children live what they learn. ~ Diane Greene,
38:Disneyland is Vegas for children. ~ Tom Waits,
39:DREAMS THE CHILDREN HAVE FOR ~ Iyanla Vanzant,
40:We are all the children of God ~ Alice Bailey,
41:All mothers breed dead children. ~ Mie Hansson,
42:Children and fooles cannot lye. ~ John Heywood,
43:Children are all sorts of people, ~ Ann Leckie,
44:I'm obsessed with my children. ~ Travis Barker,
45:My children are my whole life. ~ Kelly LeBrock,
46:Noble fathers have noble children. ~ Euripides,
47:There were always children, Miss ~ Colm T ib n,
48:Ah, there are no longer any children! ~ Moliere,
49:All children, except one, grow up. ~ J M Barrie,
50:Children always turn to the light. ~ David Hare,
51:Children understand. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
52:Fuck children for being creepy. ~ Tade Thompson,
53:God has no cousins, only children. ~ Max Lucado,
54:God never abandons His children. ~ Paulo Coelho,
55:I love my children unconditionally. ~ Gary Kemp,
56:One of the children lived. ~ Michael J Sullivan,
57:Our children are our hearts. ~ Michael Connelly,
58:We were all just children once. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
59:Wu-Tang is for the children. ~ Ol Dirty Bastard,
60:always loved children.” Nellie ~ Greer Hendricks,
61:Beatles, women and children first! ~ Ringo Starr,
62:Children are the keys of paradise. ~ Eric Hoffer,
63:Children be comforted, I am well. ~ Joseph Haydn,
64:Happy, calm children learn best ~ Daniel Goleman,
65:Only thieves and children run. ~ Tracy Chevalier,
66:Children make your life important. ~ Erma Bombeck,
67:I could have sat on the children. ~ Thea Harrison,
68:I hate children! I hate them all! ~ Lindsay Lohan,
69:Love is for children and dimwads. ~ Ellen Hopkins,
70:luck belongs to children and madmen. ~ Robin Hobb,
71:Mom worked with autistic children. ~ Isabel Lucas,
72:Never work with animals or children. ~ W C Fields,
73:What are men? Children who doubt. ~ Derek Walcott,
74:who bore him three children ~ William Shakespeare,
75:All my films are all my children. ~ Hayao Miyazaki,
76:Books, the children of the brain. ~ Jonathan Swift,
77:Cheer up, children, I am all right. ~ Joseph Haydn,
78:Children are all foreigners. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
79:Children are gleeful barbarians. ~ Joe Morgenstern,
80:Children are such consummate liars ~ Jasper Fforde,
81:Fair and unfair are for children ~ Michelle Lovric,
82:If children could, if adults knew. ~ Sigmund Freud,
83:In the real world, children love me. ~ Jackie Chan,
84:pretty mother of two young children ~ JoAnn Durgin,
85:She found beauty in the children. ~ Sinclair Lewis,
86:All children, except one, grow up. ~ James M Barrie,
87:And they fell asleep like children. ~ Richard Yates,
88:Children: a torment and nothing more. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
89:I care about the children of Detroit. ~ John Engler,
90:I didn't play with other children. ~ Karl Lagerfeld,
91:Little children, keep yourselves from idols. ~ John,
92:Proud parents to two children ~ John Walter Bratton,
93:Read to your children all of the time ~ Taylor Mali,
94:Repentance is for little children. ~ Adolf Eichmann,
95:We are children of earth and sky. ~ Guy Gavriel Kay,
96:You gotsta love all God's children! ~ Joseph Lowery,
97:Adults follow paths. Children explore. ~ Neil Gaiman,
98:All children are mirrors of death ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
99:But children disappeared all the time, ~ Nancy Kress,
100:Children are no antidote to loneliness. ~ Erica Jong,
101:Euclid for children is barbarous. ~ Oliver Heaviside,
102:I am fond of children - except boys. ~ Lewis Carroll,
103:Lord save little children! They abide. ~ Davis Grubb,
104:Our children are weird. Nicely phrased. ~ John Green,
105:Sarcasm was a weapon for children. ~ Jennifer Echols,
106:Some children are wiser than adults. ~ Thubten Yeshe,
107:Train our children to love God. ~ Daniel Harvey Hill,
108:What a gamble it is to have children! ~ Rebecca West,
109:When adults wage war, children perish. ~ Elie Wiesel,
110:Wise men hear and see as little children do. ~ Laozi,
111:Your children get only one childhood. ~ Regina Brett,
112:Blame is for God and small children. ~ Dustin Hoffman,
113:Children hated generously, capriciously. ~ Ian McEwan,
114:God doesn't have any grandchildren. ~ E Stanley Jones,
115:God, my children, is the wilderness. ~ Steven Erikson,
116:Laywers, I suppose, were children once. ~ Jane Gardam,
117:Love is for children. I owe him a debt. ~ Joss Whedon,
118:My grandchildren are fabulous and funny. ~ Erica Jong,
119:My own children rarely brush their teeth. ~ Anonymous,
120:Never have children, only grandchildren. ~ Gore Vidal,
121:No one chooses to raise children alone. ~ Erykah Badu,
122:Peanut butter is pâté for children. ~ Brigitte Bardot,
123:Savage mothers eat their children! ~ Michael McDowell,
124:We are all children when we sleep. ~ Rabih Alameddine,
125:We are the buffoons of our children. ~ Pietro Aretino,
126:What madness to beget children! ~ Joris Karl Huysmans,
127:All children are essentially criminal. ~ Denis Diderot,
128:All my children inherited perfect pitch. ~ Chevy Chase,
129:Children and fools always speak the truth ~ Mark Twain,
130:Children are apt to forget to remember. ~ E E Cummings,
131:Children reinvent your world for you. ~ Susan Sarandon,
132:Children want to do what grownups do. ~ Beverly Cleary,
133:Familiarity breeds contempt and children. ~ Mark Twain,
134:God has pity on kindergarten children ~ Yehuda Amichai,
135:Grandparents are God's gifts to children. ~ Bill Cosby,
136:I am only as good as my children are. ~ Michelle Obama,
137:I enjoy helping young children succeed. ~ William Hung,
138:I'm way too selfish to have children. ~ Colleen Hoover,
139:It isn't just children who need heros. ~ Tamora Pierce,
140:Lawyers, I suppose, were children once. ~ Charles Lamb,
141:Let all children come unto me. ~ Marian Wright Edelman,
142:Love is like ice in the hands of children. ~ Sophocles,
143:Men are but children of a larger growth. ~ John Dryden,
144:The cobbler’s children go barefoot, ~ Jonathan Tropper,
145:The first victims are always the children. ~ Loung Ung,
146:Where children are, there is the golden age. ~ Novalis,
147:All God's children need traveling shoes. ~ Maya Angelou,
148:a sense, considering it on her children's ~ Jo Beverley,
149:Chickens, children, they're all the same. ~ Emma Hooper,
150:Children and fools always speak the truth. ~ Mark Twain,
151:Children are the citizens of tomorrow. ~ Mallika Chopra,
152:Children do better when they feel better. ~ Jane Nelsen,
153:Children's books are by nature partisan. ~ Eric Walters,
154:Cruel children, crying babies, ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
155:I always love writing about children. ~ Joanna Trollope,
156:I am glad that I do not have any children. ~ Anna Freud,
157:I believe the children are our future ~ Whitney Houston,
158:It's not just children who need heroes. ~ Tamora Pierce,
159:Lawyers, I suppose, were children once.’ – ~ Harper Lee,
160:Lawyers, I suppose were once children, too ~ Harper Lee,
161:Let's welcome the children into the world. ~ Mike Pence,
162:Men aren't asked about their children. ~ Julianne Moore,
163:Men from children nothing differ. ~ William Shakespeare,
164:Prison is for other people’s children. ~ Angela Marsons,
165:Those Athena children always had a plan. ~ Rick Riordan,
166:Tomorrow we settle this like children. ~ Jhonen V squez,
167:with a man. Three children walking stolidly ~ Lee Child,
168:you have to smile at idiots and children. ~ Jim Butcher,
169:bastards grow up faster than other children. ~ Anonymous,
170:Children are the anchors of a mother's life. ~ Sophocles,
171:Familiarity breeds contempt - and children. ~ Mark Twain,
172:Fathers should speak with their children. ~ Pope Francis,
173:I believe that children are our future ~ Whitney Houston,
174:I'm living a life. I have nine children. ~ Stevie Wonder,
175:I wish this country was run by children ~ Jonathan Dunne,
176:Let's teach our children to be thinkers. ~ Jacque Fresco,
177:My best creation is my children. ~ Diane von Furstenberg,
178:Now then, leave the children to themselves ~ Leo Tolstoy,
179:Spring appears and we are once more children. ~ Stendhal,
180:The soul is cured through children. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
181:We are the world, we are the children. ~ Michael Jackson,
182:Beloved, now we are children of God. ~ Smith Wigglesworth,
183:But O, sick children of the world, ~ William Butler Yeats,
184:Children are our greatest untapped resource. ~ Dalai Lama,
185:Children are our most valuable resource. ~ Herbert Hoover,
186:Children are what the mothers are. ~ Walter Savage Landor,
187:Children make you want to start life over. ~ Muhammad Ali,
188:Death will be my wedding, children and glory. ~ Euripides,
189:For his children, he would move mountains. ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
190:God looks after children, animals and idiots. ~ Lou Holtz,
191:I always knew I wanted to have children. ~ Cindy Crawford,
192:I call children "our ultimate investment." ~ Laura Huxley,
193:If young children boo me, that makes my day. ~ Tom Felton,
194:I hope I inspire children to make films. ~ Martin Freeman,
195:I like children. If they're properly cooked. ~ W C Fields,
196:I like throwing snowballs at small children. ~ Sam Mendes,
197:Little children, guard yourselves from idols. ~ Anonymous,
198:saw females and children who appeared to ~ Isabel Allende,
199:Sorrow makes us all children again. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
200:Through children the soul is healed… ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
201:... War is for everyone, for children too. ~ Robert Frost,
202:We are all children until our fathers die. ~ Melissa Bank,
203:Why are children so much smarter than adults? ~ Dara Horn,
204:You are almost never cool to your children. ~ Neil Gaiman,
205:Adults are just children who earn money. ~ Kenneth Branagh,
206:Children need models rather than critics. ~ Joseph Joubert,
207:Coitus is random, children are definite. ~ Thomas Keneally,
208:Fear is a state of nervousness only fit for children ~ RZA,
209:I do not teach children, I give them joy. ~ Isadora Duncan,
210:I'm fascinated in the children within adults. ~ Jason Gann,
211:Instinct chooses her own children. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
212:I've worked with children all my life. ~ Denzel Washington,
213:Let's not bequeath the pop charts to just children. ~ Bono,
214:Now's the time when children's noses ~ Katherine Mansfield,
215:Our children are being raised by appliances. ~ Bill Moyers,
216:Our children are hostages to the world. ~ Maureen F McHugh,
217:Philosophy has forgotten about children ~ Bernhard Schlink,
218:the children and me ahead, and then he will ~ Bodie Thoene,
219:the Massachusetts School for Idiotic Children ~ John Lloyd,
220:We are all children, Kheldar.
--Cyradis ~ David Eddings,
221:Weep not for me but for thy children. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
222:1CH19.6 And when the children of Ammon saw that ~ Anonymous,
223:Add children to the list of things I hate. ~ Lauren Morrill,
224:A generation of children has been betrayed. ~ William Hague,
225:Birds fly, fish swim, and children play. ~ Garry L Landreth,
226:Children add to the wonder of being alive. ~ Herbert Hoover,
227:Children are everything we could have been. ~ Bryant McGill,
228:Children have neither past nor future; ~ Jean de la Bruyere,
229:Hope is born again in the faces of children. ~ Maya Angelou,
230:Humorists always sit at the children's table. ~ Woody Allen,
231:I am curious about grownups, not children. ~ Jerzy Kosinski,
232:I strongly support the feeding of children. ~ Gerald R Ford,
233:I want my ex-wife and children to be happy. ~ Scott Weiland,
234:Killing children or adults -- equally horrible. ~ NisiOisiN,
235:Lonely children probably wrote the Bible. ~ Heather O Neill,
236:Most parents don't know really their children. ~ John Green,
237:most parents don’t know really their children. ~ John Green,
238:Most parents don’t know really their children. ~ Otto Frank,
239:Most parents don't really know their children. ~ John Green,
240:Our children tremble in their teen-age cribs, ~ Anne Sexton,
241:Reading to small children is a specialty. ~ Clifton Fadiman,
242:Self-pity was for children and half-wits. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
243:Shee spins well that breedes her children. ~ George Herbert,
244:sometimes luck belongs to children and madmen. ~ Robin Hobb,
245:Sorrow makes us all children again - ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
246:The dogs did bark, the children screamed, ~ William Cowper,
247:The three children had no chance to visit the ~ Enid Blyton,
248:those children to work while Tom’s in jail. If ~ Harper Lee,
249:Time is a game played beautifully by children. ~ Heraclitus,
250:We don't teach our children how to dream. ~ Stephen LaBerge,
251:You can't expect your children to be perfect. ~ Grace Jones,
252:All men know their children mean more than life. ~ Euripides,
253:And none of us became children to be orphans. ~ Laini Taylor,
254:Children are our greatest natural resource. ~ Herbert Hoover,
255:Children can be shaped into any way one desires. ~ Anonymous,
256:Children don't get cheaper when they turn six. ~ Chris Bowen,
257:Children have a strange tolerance for repetition. ~ Jung Yun,
258:Children (nay, and men too) do most by example. ~ John Locke,
259:Children of heroes have glory for breakfast. ~ William Edgar,
260:Children spell love with four letters: T-I-M-E. ~ Max Lucado,
261:Children were experiments, and his had failed. ~ Maile Meloy,
262:Did your great-grandfather have any children? ~ Fern Britton,
263:God is faithful even when his children are not. ~ Max Lucado,
264:Good words will not give me back my children. ~ Chief Joseph,
265:GO SISTER
CHILDREN MUST ALWAYS BE KEPT SAFE. ~ Sui Ishida,
266:Hmp, maybe we need a police force of children . ~ Harper Lee,
267:Kids your age will always be children to me. ~ Carolyn Brown,
268:Love? Love is for children and poor people... ~ Molly Harper,
269:Men are all alike. Grown-up children. ~ Suzanne Woods Fisher,
270:Oldest children are always high-achieving bores. ~ Jenny Han,
271:One of the most popular children’s books ever’ – ~ Anonymous,
272:Parents and children seldom act in concert: ~ Samuel Johnson,
273:Perhaps it takes courage to raise children. ~ John Steinbeck,
274:Some people should never have children. ~ Eric Van Lustbader,
275:There are children with dreams counting on us. ~ Tom Vilsack,
276:The sports of children satisfy the child. ~ Oliver Goldsmith,
277:The winter does what it can for its children. ~ John Ashbery,
278:toward my children, but I know that was ~ Robert W Firestone,
279:We are always children to our mothers. ~ Ivy Compton Burnett,
280:We are writing for children...not idiots. ~ Ludwig Bemelmans,
281:We, her children, are heroic, dersperate. ~ Marguerite Duras,
282:You can't live your life through your children. ~ Carl Lewis,
283:younger children.” Roady’s eyes warmed. She ~ Caroline Fyffe,
284:All children are sad,
but some get over it. ~ Louise Penny,
285:Children become like the things they love. ~ Maria Montessori,
286:Children’s laughter is the music of heaven. ~ Linda Goodnight,
287:Children ... smile as many as 400 times per day. ~ Ron Gutman,
288:Dreams are the children of idled minds. ~ William Shakespeare,
289:Every man should see the birth of his children ~ Dennis Banks,
290:I don't know how to write a children's book. ~ Maurice Sendak,
291:I grew up on the golden age of children's TV. ~ Edward Norton,
292:I preferred sewing to bossing little children. ~ Mother Jones,
293:I was a wonderful parent before I had children. ~ Adele Faber,
294:Men, in general, are but great children. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
295:Must we make battlegrounds out of our children? ~ Sarah Perry,
296:Our children are our most important assets. ~ Rodney Erickson,
297:Perhaps it takes courage to raise children.. ~ John Steinbeck,
298:The children form his human shield. There’s ~ Suzanne Collins,
299:There are no amateurs in the world of children. ~ Don DeLillo,
300:They were amazing, fierce, beautiful children. ~ Adam Gidwitz,
301:We cannot give our children what we don’t have. ~ Brene Brown,
302:When you wanna rock hard, children, lean on F#. ~ Tom Morello,
303:Women that bear children must exist in Zululand only. ~ Shaka,
304:You left us. How do you leave your children?” “I ~ Vi Keeland,
305:All men are children, and of one family. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
306:Already the new-born children interpret love ~ Wallace Stevens,
307:And heaven wept to see the sins of her children. ~ Lauren Kate,
308:As children grow, they gravitate to their fates. ~ Mitch Albom,
309:Because you’re children and you can understand it, ~ Anonymous,
310:Children don’t need things, they need love. But ~ Kelly Rimmer,
311:Children, don't waste a single second. ~ Mata Amritanandamayi,
312:Childrens' laughter is like medicine to sadness. ~ Tyler Perry,
313:Fear is a state of nervousness only fit for children ~ The RZA,
314:Gay adoption is discrimination against children ~ Pope Francis,
315:Never allow your enemies to educate your children. ~ Malcolm X,
316:Nothing you do for children is ever wasted. ~ Garrison Keillor,
317:Once you have six children, you're committed. ~ Angelina Jolie,
318:The children of hell shan’t go hungry on my watch. ~ Anonymous,
319:The children of Lucifer are often beautiful— ~ Agatha Christie,
320:The cruelty of children comes as news to no one. ~ Yann Martel,
321:The day we were born, we were all God's children. ~ Ray Davies,
322:The soul is healed by being with children. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
323:The soul is healed by being with children ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
324:trust a man who doesn’t like children or animals, ~ Jane Green,
325:We are all meant to shine, as children do. ~ Steven Pressfield,
326:When you have children, you're obligated to live. ~ Anne Tyler,
327:work with deficient children (1898 to 1900) ~ Maria Montessori,
328:1CH19.9 And the children of Ammon came out, and put ~ Anonymous,
329:Be not children in understanding,be men. ~ I Corinthians XIV 20,
330:children are a thing only a parent can stand, ~ Thornton Wilder,
331:Children are very fair minded, they really are. ~ Chinua Achebe,
332:Children of the night?’ ‘Believe me, they’re down ~ Simon Clark,
333:Dare to be the adults we want our children to be. ~ Brene Brown,
334:"God loves all his children" is somehow forgotten ~ Macklemore,
335:I am available for children's parties, by the way. ~ Bill Hicks,
336:I love children. I've always loved children. ~ Georgina Chapman,
337:I mostly want to be friends with my children. ~ Vanessa Paradis,
338:Let our children be taught love love love. ~ Daniel Harvey Hill,
339:Let your children go if you want to keep them. ~ Malcolm Forbes,
340:My children are lovely. They're perfect. ~ Kristin Scott Thomas,
341:NCLB should be called "More Children Left behind". ~ Jim DeMint,
342:Not by force shall the children learn, but through play ~ Plato,
343:Only a fool would let his enemy teach his children. ~ Malcolm X,
344:Our children's children will hear a good story. ~ Richard Adams,
345:Perfection is terrible, it cannot have children. ~ Sylvia Plath,
346:Remember, children, all the stories are true. ~ Cassandra Clare,
347:schoolchildren. Plus he has erectile dysfunction. ~ J A Konrath,
348:So parents, get your children's permission to watch! ~ Triple H,
349:Steppenwolf and Operation International Children, ~ Gary Sinise,
350:Summer, and he watched his children's heart break. ~ Harper Lee,
351:The soul is healed by being with children. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
352:When family ties are disturbed, devoted children arise. ~ Laozi,
353:Wisdom is vindicated by all her children. ~ Luke the Evangelist,
354:Wisdom sits with children round her knees. ~ William Wordsworth,
355:a classic children’s book from Catherynne Valente. ~ John Scalzi,
356:Another leadership quality is courage. Children ~ Hannah Raybans,
357:Be like children , Not childish BUT childlike. ~ Michael Jackson,
358:Children are f - king crazy. They're also suicidal. ~ Mila Kunis,
359:Children are the anchors that hold a mother to life. ~ Sophocles,
360:Children do not constitute anyone's property: ~ Mikhail Bakunin,
361:Children don’t need drugs, because they have sweets. ~ Anonymous,
362:Children have their morning song as well as birds. ~ Victor Hugo,
363:Children live life as a controlled experiment. ~ Jennifer Senior,
364:Children must be educated by love, not punishment. ~ James Joyce,
365:Children need continuity as they grow and learn. ~ Thomas Menino,
366:Children see magic because they look for it. ~ Christopher Moore,
367:Children sniff out secrets better than the NSA. ~ Victor LaValle,
368:Fathers, provoke not your children to wrath. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
369:Finance, like time, devours its own children. ~ Honore de Balzac,
370:God bless all the little children in the world. ~ Richard Dawson,
371:Grownups shouldn’t turn their backs on children. ~ Deborah Ellis,
372:Having children really changes your priorities. ~ Cindy Crawford,
373:Having children with someone is the real bond. ~ Francesca Annis,
374:I don't remember my life before I had children. ~ John Malkovich,
375:If children have interest, then Education happens ~ Sugata Mitra,
376:I have four children and I have seven grandkids. ~ Dick Van Dyke,
377:I love kids and children, and I love being a mom. ~ Jennie Garth,
378:It's not only children who grow. Parents do too. ~ Joyce Maynard,
379:Lawyers, I suppose, were children once. Charles Lamb ~ Anonymous,
380:Like the children we will never ever cease to be. ~ Paulo Coelho,
381:Men deal with life as children with their play, ~ William Cowper,
382:nurturers in our society: women to whom children ~ Peter Vronsky,
383:The intelligent desire self-control; children want candy. ~ Rumi,
384:The visions we offer our children shape the future. ~ Carl Sagan,
385:Time spent with your children is time wisely spent. ~ Mark Twain,
386:What's done to the children is done to society. ~ Gautama Buddha,
387:You should always trust the instincts of children. ~ Ally Carter,
388:All these differences between children and adults ~ Alison Gopnik,
389:Children are assholes and they ruin everything. ~ Gabourey Sidibe,
390:Children are capable of such open rudeness. ~ Trenton Lee Stewart,
391:Children are our most valuable natural resource. ~ Herbert Hoover,
392:Children are the world's most valuable resource. ~ Jerry Sandusky,
393:Children are to be welcomed, cherished, protected. ~ Pope Francis,
394:Children give life a reason to be - they make life. ~ Len Goodman,
395:Children give terrible gifts because they are poor. ~ Rob Delaney,
396:Children have taught me to always be forgiving. ~ Michael Jackson,
397:Children inherit their parents' madness. ~ Gabriel Garc a M rquez,
398:Children inherit their parents’ madness. ~ Gabriel Garc a M rquez,
399:Children represent God's most generous gift to us. ~ James Dobson,
400:Children's hospitals are not designed for teenagers. ~ John Green,
401:Divorce can leave children feeling like defectors. ~ Diane Greene,
402:Every generation of children has its private hero. ~ Arthur Smith,
403:Fathers, provoke not your children to wrath. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
404:Grandchildren are their grandparents' toys. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
405:I did not become a father because I am fond of children. ~ Thales,
406:I don't have slim children. I have hearty ones. ~ Jessica Capshaw,
407:I hate all children of precocious talent. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
408:I love children. I'm embarrassingly baby-crazy. ~ Sarah Silverman,
409:I must endure...for the world for the children. ~ Michael Jackson,
410:Loving children is easy. Keeping them is hard. ~ Michael Robotham,
411:Made weird children--will die proud. -Rachel Pealer ~ Larry Smith,
412:Men and women are but children of a larger growth. ~ George Eliot,
413:NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children, ~ Julie Lythcott Haims,
414:Only the guilty are guilty. Their children are not. ~ Elie Wiesel,
415:People like to make children into little grown-ups. ~ Mara Wilson,
416:Please, mein Herr, shoot the children cleanly. ~ Jonathan Littell,
417:Talking among children is an overrated concept. ~ Gregory Maguire,
418:We must believe the things We teach our children ~ Woodrow Wilson,
419:We need to be the adults we want our children to be. ~ Bren Brown,
420:When you have children it wakes up the child in you. ~ Jeppe Hein,
421:wife and their three children had taken a quick ~ Walter Isaacson,
422:Wisdom is justified by all her children.
Luke 7:35 ~ Anonymous,
423:A city is judged by the beauty of the children's parks. ~ Amit Ray,
424:All my children are my babies. They're our babies. ~ Stevie Wonder,
425:But I thought you said you like children, Professor, ~ Imbolo Mbue,
426:Children are often the silent victims of drug abuse. ~ Rick Larsen,
427:Children are unaccountable little creatures. ~ Katherine Mansfield,
428:Children become adults who become children again. ~ Kristin Hannah,
429:Children do make life more interesting, he thought. ~ S M Stirling,
430:Children have a great urge to learn about dinosaurs. ~ Jack Horner,
431:Every woman wants to get married and have children. ~ Fannie Flagg,
432:Fallow land is kind to children, and keeps off the hexes. ~ Hesiod,
433:For all for children
To whom we entrust the future ~ Lois Lowry,
434:Give to these children, new from the world, ~ William Butler Yeats,
435:How many children go to sleep at night afraid of hell? ~ Anonymous,
436:I, and all the rest of us, are charity-children. ~ Charlotte Bront,
437:If we taught children to speak, they'd never learn. ~ William Hull,
438:I'm not writing to make anyone's children feel safe. ~ J K Rowling,
439:In wars, it is always the children who suffer the most. ~ T A Uner,
440:I travel all the time, and I have two small children. ~ Hope Davis,
441:I try to simplify things for the children. ~ Lucile Hadzihalilovic,
442:Lawyers, I suppose, were children once. —Charles Lamb ~ Harper Lee,
443:Like lost children we live our unfinished adventures. ~ Guy Debord,
444:Lord that she might be safe. She and my children. ~ Diana Gabaldon,
445:Love between parents begets love for the children. ~ Irvin D Yalom,
446:May the forests be with you and with your children. ~ Daniel Quinn,
447:most abducted children are taken by people they know; ~ Amy Gentry,
448:My wife was a beautiful woman before we had children. ~ Bill Cosby,
449:Never have more children than you have car windows. ~ Erma Bombeck,
450:Never work with children, puppies or bulimics ~ Augusten Burroughs,
451:No parent wants to be a burden to their children. ~ Kerry Lonsdale,
452:O children of desire, cast off your garb of vanities. ~ Baha-ullah,
453:Parents should never have to bury their own children. ~ Alex Jones,
454:The children in the woods play wild, secret games. ~ Gillian Flynn,
455:To the children and the innocent it's all the same. ~ Jack Kerouac,
456:Want to raise kind children? Be kind to your children. ~ L R Knost,
457:We are the children equally of the Sky and the Earth. ~ Carl Sagan,
458:We raise predators by treating children as prey. ~ Stefan Molyneux,
459:We're children. We're supposed to be childish. ~ George R R Martin,
460:Women's love is for their men, not for their children. ~ Euripides,
461:Buildings, too, are children of Earth and Sun. ~ Frank Lloyd Wright,
462:Children are excellent judges of character, you know ~ Mohsin Hamid,
463:Children are the anchors that hold a mother to life. ~ Jodi Picoult,
464:Children need parameters, know what's right or wrong. ~ Andy Garcia,
465:Children should be witnesses of parental affection. ~ Asa Don Brown,
466:Children's lies are signs of great talent. ~ Gabriel Garcia Marquez,
467:Children want to feel as though their life matters. ~ Asa Don Brown,
468:Children will usually live up to our expectations. ~ Steve Biddulph,
469:Future wife. Mother of my children. Keeper of my cock ~ Jewel E Ann,
470:Give us strength, oh Lord, to let our children starve. ~ Roald Dahl,
471:I get paid large sums of money to kill children. ~ Armand Rosamilia,
472:I had two children. I had a nanny to manage my kids. ~ Leslie Caron,
473:I hope my own children never have to fight a war. ~ George H W Bush,
474:I hope to be scaring children for the rest of my life. ~ Tom Felton,
475:Kinder, Kirche, Küche: children, church, kitchen; this ~ Jenna Blum,
476:My children are the most important thing in my life. ~ Columba Bush,
477:Necessity can sharpen the wits even of children. ~ Timothy Dwight V,
478:One thing I love is to do childrens hospital visits. ~ James Maslow,
479:Only children believe they're capable of everything. ~ Paulo Coelho,
480:Our fears are the bastard children of our longings. ~ Tiffany Reisz,
481:Posterity is the patriotic name for grandchildren. ~ Art Linkletter,
482:Sanctions always hurt the poor, the weak, the children. ~ Brian May,
483:Teach the children! It is painting in fresco. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
484:The best security for old age: respect your children. ~ Sholem Asch,
485:The illiteracy level of our children are appalling. ~ George W Bush,
486:The more I see of dogs, the more I like children. ~ Winifred Holtby,
487:The more wealth a man has, the louder his children talk. ~ E W Howe,
488:The only true immortality lies in one's children. ~ Johannes Brahms,
489:There's no such thing as other people's children. ~ Hillary Clinton,
490:Time ensures children never know their parents young. ~ Delia Owens,
491:We must marry, have children, reproduce the species. ~ Paulo Coelho,
492:When we are no longer children, we are already dead. ~ Damien Hirst,
493:You want to look younger... rent smaller children. ~ Phyllis Diller,
494:Actually, I didn't start sweating until I had children. ~ Dave Grohl,
495:Adults are just obsolete children and the hell with them. ~ Dr Seuss,
496:All children in adventure books have to be orphans. ~ Charlie Higson,
497:Anyone who hates children and animals can't be all bad. ~ W C Fields,
498:A vaguely pedophilic swing set seeks butts of children. ~ John Green,
499:Children and cats are the best machines of fun! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
500:Children are certainly too good to be true. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



50

   22 Occultism
   15 Yoga
   12 Philosophy
   12 Christianity
   8 Integral Yoga
   4 Buddhism
   3 Hinduism
   2 Kabbalah
   2 Integral Theory


   21 Sri Aurobindo
   20 Aleister Crowley
   19 Sri Ramakrishna
   13 The Mother
   10 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   9 Swami Vivekananda
   7 Aldous Huxley
   6 Swami Krishnananda
   5 Satprem
   5 Saint Teresa of Avila
   5 Friedrich Nietzsche
   4 Carl Jung
   4 Bokar Rinpoche
   3 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Thubten Chodron
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Lewis Carroll


   22 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   19 Savitri
   14 Magick Without Tears
   12 Words Of Long Ago
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   11 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   10 Collected Poems
   9 Liber ABA
   8 Talks
   8 Essays On The Gita
   7 The Perennial Philosophy
   7 The Bible
   6 Walden
   6 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   5 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   5 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   5 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   5 Kena and Other Upanishads
   5 Dark Night of the Soul
   5 Bhakti-Yoga
   4 Twilight of the Idols
   4 The Way of Perfection
   4 The Secret Of The Veda
   4 The Life Divine
   4 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   4 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   4 On Education
   4 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   4 Aion
   3 Theosophy
   3 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   3 The Lotus Sutra
   3 Raja-Yoga
   3 Isha Upanishad
   3 Essays Divine And Human
   2 The Red Book Liber Novus
   2 The Divine Comedy
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   2 Letters On Yoga III
   2 Letters On Yoga II
   2 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   2 How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator
   2 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   2 Book of Certitude
   2 Alice in Wonderland
   2 Agenda Vol 1


0.04_-_1951-1954, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  ' ... There are other great Personalities of the Divine Mother, but they were more difficult to bring
  8The following text is an extract from a 'Wednesday Class,' when every Wednesday Mother would answer questions raised by the disciples and children at the Ashram Playground.
  
  --
  Mother, previously things were very strict in the Ashram, but not now. Why?
  Yes, I have always said that it changed when we had to take the very little children. How can you envision an ascetic life with little sprouts no bigger than that? It's impossible! But that's the little surprise package the war left on our doorstep. When it was found that Pondicherry was the safest place on earth, naturally people came wheeling in here with all their baby carriages filled and asked us if we could shelter them, so we couldn't very well turn them away, could we?! That's how it happened, and in no other way ... But, in the beginning, the first condition for coming here was that you would have nothing more to do with your family! If a man was married, then he had to completely overlook the fact that he had a wife and children - completely sever all ties, have nothing further to do with them. And if ever a wife asked to come just because her husband happened to be here, we told her, 'You have no business coming here!'
  In the beginning, it was very, very strict - for a long time.
  --
  
  (Mother gets up to go, but while leaving, She says to the children around her:) If you had made just one little decision to try to feel your psychic being, my time would not have been wasted.
  

0.06_-_INTRODUCTION, #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  proficients, who have not yet acquired mature habits of spirituality and who
  therefore still conduct themselves as children. The imperfections are examined one
  by one, following the order of the seven deadly sins, in chapters (ii-viii) which once

0.07_-_1957, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  Those to whom I have said, 'You are my children,' are always so, no matter where they are or what they do.
  

02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A race and laughter of immortal strengths,
  The nude god-children in their play-fields ran
  Smiting the winds with splendour and with speed;

02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And share the fate of perishable things.
  The children of the unembodied Gleam
  Arisen from a formless thought in the soul

02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    Her green of leaves and hue and scent of flowers
    And the charm of children and the love of friends
    And the beauty of women and kindly hearts of men,

02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Under the dangerous arches of their power;
  For even the radiant children of the gods
  To darken their privilege is and dreadful right.

02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Stood there, a race of young keen-visioned gods,
  King-children born on Wisdom's early plane,
  Taught in her school world-making's mystic play.

02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  For ever united and inseparable,
  The radiant children of Eternity dwell
  On the wide spirit height where all are one.

02.13_-_In_the_Self_of_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Our sweet and mighty Mother was not there
  Who gathers to her bosom her children's lives,
  Her clasp that takes the world into her arms

03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  I saw them cross the twilight of an age,
  The sun-eyed children of a marvellous dawn,
  The great creators with wide brows of calm,

04.04_-_The_Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The heroic leaders of a coming time,
  King-children nurtured in that spacious air
  Like lions gambolling in sky and sun

05.01_-_The_Destined_Meeting-Place, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The trees bloomed in their green felicity
  And the wild children brooded not on pain.
  

06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The charmed mutations of the enchanter life
  Race like bright children past the smiling hours.
  

07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  To share the suffering of the world I came,
  I draw my children's pangs into my breast.
  

07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But since she knows the toil of mind and life
  As a mother feels and shares her children's lives,
  She puts forth a small portion of herself,

07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  These seemed not born nor made in human Time:
  children of cosmic Nature from a far world,
  Idea's shapes in complete armour of words

10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  When their supporting ground is cut away,
  These children of Matter into Matter die.
  

10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  She weeps and makes her creatures' eyes to weep;
  Testing with sorrow's edge her children's breasts,
  She spends on life's vain waste of hope and toil
  --
  A gentle memory pushed away from thee
  By new love and thy children's tender hands,
  Till thou shalt wonder if thou lov'dst at all.

10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The cherished idea elect among the elect,
  Thought's favourite mid the children of half-light
  Who high-voiced crowd the playgrounds of the mind

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  One right hand offers boons to Her children; the other allays their fear. The majesty of Her posture can hardly be described. It combines the terror of destruction with the reassurance of motherly tenderness. For She is the Cosmic Power, the totality of the universe, a glorious harmony of the pairs of opposites. She deals out death, as She creates and preserves. She has three eyes, the third being the symbol of Divine Wisdom; they strike dismay into the wicked, yet pour out affection for Her devotees.
  
  The whole symbolic world is represented in the temple garden - the Trinity of the Nature Mother (Kli), the Absolute (iva), and Love (Radhknta), the Arch spanning heaven and earth. The terrific Goddess of the Tantra, the soul-enthralling Flute-Player of the Bhgavata, and the Self-absorbed Absolute of the Vedas live together, creating the greatest synthesis of religions. All aspects of Reality are represented there. But of this divine household, Kli is the pivot, the sovereign Mistress. She is Prakriti, the Procreatrix, Nature, the Destroyer, the Creator. Nay, She is something greater and deeper still for those who have eyes to see. She is the Universal Mother, "my Mother" as Ramakrishna would say, the All-powerful, who reveals Herself to Her children under different aspects and Divine Incarnations, the Visible God, who leads the elect to the Invisible Reality; and if it so pleases Her, She takes away the last trace of ego from created beings and merges it in the consciousness of the Absolute, the undifferentiated God. Through Her grace "the finite ego loses itself in the illimitable Ego-tman-Brahman".
  
  --
  
  "O Mother," he would constantly pray, "I have taken refuge in Thee. Teach me what to do and what to say. Thy will is paramount everywhere and is for the good of Thy children. Merge my will in Thy will and make me Thy instrument."
  
  --
  
  Keshab Chandra Sen and Sri Ramakrishna met for the first time in the garden house of Jaygopl Sen at Belgharia, a few miles from Dakshinewar, where the great Brhmo leader was staying with some of his disciples. In many respects the two were poles apart, though an irresistible inner attraction was to make them intimate friends. The Master had realized God as Pure Spirit and Consciousness, but he believed in the various forms of God as well. Keshab, on the other hand, regarded image worship as idolatry and gave allegorical explanations of the Hindu deities. Keshab was an orator and a writer of books and magazine articles; Sri Ramakrishna had a horror of lecturing and hardly knew how to write his own name. Keshab's fame spread far and wide, even reaching the distant shores of England; the Master still led a secluded life in the village of Dakshinewar. Keshab emphasized social reforms for India's regeneration; to Sri Ramakrishna God-realization was the only goal of life. Keshab considered himself a disciple of Christ and accepted in a diluted form the Christian sacraments and Trinity; Sri Ramakrishna was the simple child of Kli, the Divine Mother, though he too, in a different way, acknowledged Christ's divinity. Keshab was a householder and took a real interest in the welfare of his children, whereas Sri Ramakrishna was a paramahamsa and completely indifferent to the life of the world. Yet, as their acquaintance ripened into friendship, Sri Ramakrishna and Keshab held each other in great love and respect. Years later, at the news of Keshab's death, the Master felt as if half his body had become paralysed. Keshab's concepts of the harmony of religions and the Motherhood of God were deepened and enriched by his contact with Sri Ramakrishna.
  
  --
  
  Contact with the Brahmos increased Sri Ramakrishna's longing to encounter aspirants who would be able to follow his teachings in their purest form. "There was no limit", he once declared, "to the longing I felt at that time. During the day-time I somehow managed to control it. The secular talk of the worldly-minded was galling to me, and I would look wistfully to the day when my own beloved companions would come. I hoped to find solace in conversing with them and relating to them my own realizations. Every little incident would remind me of them, and thoughts of them wholly engrossed me. I was already arranging in my mind what I should say to one and give to another, and so on. But when the day would come to a close I would not be able to curb my feelings. The thought that another day had gone by, and they had not come, oppressed me. When, during the evening service, the temples rang with the sound of bells and conchshells, I would climb to the roof of the Kuthi in the garden and, writhing in anguish of heart, cry at the top of my voice: 'Come, my children! Oh, where are you? I cannot bear to live without you.' A mother never longed so intensely for the sight of her child, nor a friend for his companions, nor a lover for his sweetheart, as I longed for them. Oh, it was indescribable! Shortly after this period of yearning the devotees began to come."
  
  --
  
  For the householders Sri Ramakrishna did not prescribe the hard path of total renunciation. He wanted them to discharge their obligations to their families. Their renunciation was to be mental. Spiritual life could not he acquired by flying away from responsibilities. A married couple should live like brother and sister after the birth of one or two children, devoting their time to spiritual talk and contemplation. He encouraged the householders, saying that their life was, in a way, easier than that of the monk, since it was more advantageous to fight the enemy from inside a fortress than in an open field. He insisted, however, on their repairing into solitude every now and then to strengthen their devotion and faith in God through prayer, japa, and meditation. He prescribed for them the companionship of sdhus. He asked them to perform their worldly duties with one hand, while holding to God with the other, and to pray to God to make their duties fewer and fewer so that in the end they might cling to Him with both hands. He would discourage in both the householders and the celibate youths any lukewarmness in their spiritual struggles. He would not ask them to follow indiscriminately the ideal of non-resistance, which ultimately makes a coward of the unwary.
  
  --
  
  Pratp Hazra, a middle-aged man, hailed from a village near Kmrpukur. He was not altogether unresponsive to religious feelings. On a moment's impulse he had left his home, aged mother, wife, and children, and had found shelter in the temple garden at Dakshinewar, where he intended to lead a spiritual life. He loved to argue, and the Master often pointed him out as an example of barren argumentation. He was hypercritical of others and cherished an exaggerated notion of his own spiritual advancement. He was mischievous and often tried to upset the minds of the Master's young disciples, criticizing them for their happy and joyous life and asking them to devote their time to meditation. The Master teasingly compared Hazra to Jatila and Kutila, the two women who always created obstructions in Krishna's sport with the gopis, and said that Hazra lived at Dakshinewar to "thicken the plot" by adding complications.
  
  --
  
  When they returned to the room and Narendra heard the Master speaking to others, he was surprised to find in his words an inner logic, a striking sincerity, and a convincing proof of his spiritual nature. In answer to Narendra's question, "Sir, have you seen God?" the Master said: "Yes, I have seen God. I have seen Him more tangibly than I see you. I have talked to Him more intimately than I am talking to you." Continuing, the Master said: "But, my child, who wants to see God? People shed jugs of tears for money, wife, and children. But if they would weep for God for only one day they would surely see Him." Narendra was amazed. These words he could not doubt. This was the first time he had ever heard a man saying that he had seen God. But he could not reconcile these words of the Master with the scene that had taken place on the verandah only a few minutes before. He concluded that Sri Ramakrishna was a monomaniac, and returned home rather puzzled in mind.
  
  --
  
  Two more young men, Srad Prasanna and Tulasi, complete the small band of the Master's disciples later to embrace the life of the wandering monk. With the exception of the elder Gopl, all of them were in their teens or slightly over. They came from middle-class Bengli families, and most of them were students in school or college. Their parents and relatives had envisaged for them bright worldly careers. They came to Sri Ramakrishna with pure bodies, vigorous minds, and uncontaminated souls. All were born with unusual spiritual attributes. Sri Ramakrishna accepted them, even at first sight, as his children, relatives, friends, and companions. His magic touch unfolded them. And later each according to his measure reflected the life of the Master, becoming a torch-bearer of his message across land and sea.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Sri Ramakrishna was a teacher for both the Orders of mankind, Sannysins and householders. His own life offered an ideal example for both, and he left behind disciples who followed the highest traditions he had set in respect of both these ways of life. M., along with Nag Mahashay, exemplified how a householder can rise to the highest level of sagehood. M. was married to Nikunja Devi, a distant relative of Keshab Chander Sen, even when he was reading at College, and he had four children, two sons and two daughters. The responsibility of the family, no doubt, made him dependent on his professional income, but the great devotee that he was, he never compromised with ideals and principles for this reason. Once when he was working as the headmaster in a school managed by the great Vidysgar, the results of the school at the public examination happened to be rather poor, and Vidysgar attributed it to M's preoccupation with the Master and his consequent failure to attend adequately to the school work. M. at once resigned his post without any thought of the morrow. Within a fortnight the family was in poverty, and M. was one day pacing up and down the verandah of his house, musing how he would feed his children the next day. Just then a man came with a letter addressed to 'Mahendra Babu', and on opening it, M. found that it was a letter from his friend Sri Surendra Nath Banerjee, asking whether he would like to take up a professorship in the Ripon College. In this way three or four times he gave up the job that gave him the wherewithal to support the family, either for upholding principles or for practising spiritual Sadhanas in holy places, without any consideration of the possible dire worldly consequences; but he was always able to get over these difficulties somehow, and the interests of his family never suffered. In spite of his disregard for worldly goods, he was, towards the latter part of his life, in a fairly flourishing condition as the proprietor of the Morton School which he developed into a noted educational institution in the city. The Lord has said in the Bhagavad Git that in the case of those who think of nothing except Him, He Himself would take up all their material and spiritual responsibilities. M. was an example of the truth of the Lord's promise.
  
  
  Though his children received proper attention from him, his real family, both during the Master's lifetime and after, consisted of saints, devotees, Sannysins and spiritual aspirants. His life exemplifies the Master's teaching that an ideal householder must be like a good maidservant of a family, loving and caring properly for the children of the house, but knowing always that her real home and children are elsewhere. During the Master's lifetime he spent all his Sundays and other holidays with him and his devotees, and besides listening to the holy talks and devotional music, practised meditation both on the Personal and the Impersonal aspects of God under the direct guidance of the Master. In the pages of the Gospel the reader gets a picture of M.'s spiritual relationship with the Master how from a hazy belief in the Impersonal God of the Brahmos, he was step by step brought to accept both Personality and Impersonality as the two aspects of the same Non-dual Being, how he was convinced of the manifestation of that Being as Gods, Goddesses and as Incarnations, and how he was established in a life that was both of a Jnni and of a Bhakta. This Jnni-Bhakta outlook and way of living became so dominant a feature of his life that Swami Raghavananda, who was very closely associated with him during his last six years, remarks: "Among those who lived with M. in latter days, some felt that he always lived in this constant and conscious union with God even with open eyes (i.e., even in waking consciousness)." (Swami Raghavananda's article on M. in Prabuddha Bharata vol. XXXVII. P. 442.)
  

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  We have divided inheritance into seven categories: to the children, We have allotted nine parts comprising five hundred and forty shares; to the wife, eight parts comprising four hundred and eighty shares; to the father, seven parts comprising four hundred and twenty shares; to the mother, six parts comprising three hundred and sixty shares; to the brothers, five parts or three hundred shares; to the sisters, four parts or two hundred and forty shares; and to the teachers, three parts or one hundred and eighty shares. Such was the ordinance of My Forerunner, He Who extolleth My Name in the night season and at the break of day.
  
  
  When We heard the clamour of the children as yet unborn, We doubled their share and decreased those of the rest. He, of a truth, hath power to ordain whatsoever He desireth, and He doeth as He pleaseth by virtue of His sovereign might.
  
  --
  
  Should the son of the deceased have passed away in the days of his father and have left children, they will inherit their father's share, as prescribed in the Book of God. Divide ye their share amongst them with perfect justice. Thus have the billows of the Ocean of Utterance surged, casting forth the pearls of the laws decreed by the Lord of all mankind.
  
  --
  
  If the deceased should leave children who are under age, their share of the inheritance must be entrusted to a reliable individual, or to a company, that it may be invested on their behalf in trade and business until they come of age. The trustee should be assigned a due share of the profit that hath accrued to it from being thus employed.
  
  --
  
  Say: This is that hidden knowledge which shall never change, since its beginning is with nine, the symbol that betokeneth the concealed and manifest, the inviolable and unapproachably exalted Name. As for what We have appropriated to the children, this is a bounty conferred on them by God, that they may render thanks unto their Lord, the Compassionate, the Merciful. These, verily, are the Laws of God; transgress them not at the prompting of your base and selfish desires. Observe ye the injunctions laid upon you by Him Who is the Dawning-place of Utterance. The sincere among His servants will regard the precepts set forth by God as the Water of Life to the followers of every faith, and the Lamp of wisdom and loving providence to all the denizens of earth and heaven.
  
  --
  
  Teach your children the verses revealed from the heaven of majesty and power, so that, in most melodious tones, they may recite the Tablets of the All-Merciful in the alcoves within the Mashriqu'l-Adhkars.
  

1.00_-_PREFACE, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  The age of adventures is over. Even if we reach the seventh galaxy,
  we will go there helmeted and mechanized, and it will not change a thing for us; we will find ourselves exactly as we are now: helpless children in the face of death, living beings who are not too sure how they live, why they are alive, or where they are going. On the earth, as we know, the times of Cortez and Pizarro are over; one and the same pervasive Mechanism stifles us: the trap is closing inexorably. But, as always, it turns out that our bleakest adversities are also our most promising opportunities, and that the dark passage is only a passage leading to a greater light. Hence, with our backs against the wall, we are facing the last territory left for us to explore, the ultimate adventure: ourselves.
  Indeed, there are plenty of simple and obvious signs. This decade's [the 60's] most important phenomenon is not the trip to the moon, but the "trips" on drugs, the student restlessness throughout the world, and the great hippie migration. But where could they possibly go? There is no more room on the teeming beaches, no more room on the crowded roads, no more room in the ever-expanding anthills of our cities. We have to find a way out elsewhere.

1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
  
  If we sit down quietly and investigate the contents of our minds, we shall find that even at the best of times the principal characteristics are wandering and distraction. Any one who has had anything to do with children and untrained minds generally knows that fixity of attention is never present, even when there is a large amount of intelligence and good will.
  
  --
  
  The history of Christianity shows precisely the same remarkable fact. Jesus Christ was brought up on the fables to the Old Testament, and so was compelled to ascribe his experiences to Jehovah, although his gentle spirit could have had nothing in common with the monster who was always commanding the rape of virgins and the murder of little children, and whose rites were then, and still are, celebrated by human sacrifice.1
  
  --
  
  1 The massacres of Jews in Eastern Europe which surprise the ignorant, are almost invariably excited by the disappearance of Christian children, stolen, as the parents suppose, for purposes of ritual murder.
  

1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Mythology
    I will be no savior, no lawgiver, no master teacher unto you.
    You are no longer little children. 28
    Giving laws, wanting improvements, making things easier, has all become wrong and evil. May each one seek out his own way.

1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  but also with an English governess, Miss Pagett, and then sent off at the age of five to an Irish convent school in Darjeeling among the sons of British administrators. Two years later, the three Ghose boys would leave for England. Sri Aurobindo was seven. Not until the age of twenty would he learn his mother tongue, Bengali. He would never see his father again, who died just before his return to India, and barely his mother, who was ill and did not recognize him on his return. Hence, this is a child who grew up outside every influence of family, country, and tradition a free spirit. The first lesson Sri Aurobindo gives us is perhaps, precisely, a lesson of freedom.
  Sri Aurobindo and his two brothers were entrusted to an Anglican clergyman of Manchester, with strict instruction that they should not be allowed the acquaintance of any Indian or undergo any Indian influence.4 Dr. Ghose was indeed a peculiar man. He also ordered Pastor Drewett not to give his sons any religious instruction, so they could choose a religion themselves, if they so wished, when they came of age. He then left them to their fate for thirteen years. He believed his children should become men of character. Dr. Ghose may appear to have been a hardhearted man, but he was nothing of the kind; not only did he donate his services as a doctor but also gave his money to poor Bengali villagers (while his sons had hardly anything to eat or wear in London), and he died of shock when he was mistakenlyinformed that his favorite son, Aurobindo, had died in a shipwreck.
  The first few years in Manchester were of some importance to Sri Aurobindo because this is where he learned French (English was his "mother tongue") and discovered a spontaneous affinity for France:
  --
  
  although he was quite unimpressed with religion, as is evident from the account he gives of his "conversion." Predictably, Clergyman Drewett's mother had undertaken the task of saving the souls of the three heretic children, or at least that of the youngest one, whom she took one day to a meeting of "nonconformist" ministers. After the prayers were over, wrote Sri Aurobindo, nearly all dispersed, but devout people remained a little longer, and it was at that time that conversions were made. I was feeling completely bored. Then a minister approached me and asked me some questions. (I was about ten at that time.) I did not give any reply. Then they all shouted, "He is saved, he is saved," and began to pray for me and offer thanks to God.6 Sri Aurobindo, the seer, was never to become a religious man,
  not even in India, and he often emphasized that religion and spirituality are not necessarily synonymous: True theocracy, he would write later, is the kingdom of God in man and not the kingdom of a Pope, a priesthood or a sacerdotal class.7

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  I should not obtrude my affairs so much on the notice of my readers if very particular inquiries had not been made by my townsmen concerning my mode of life, which some would call impertinent, though they do not appear to me at all impertinent, but, considering the circumstances, very natural and pertinent. Some have asked what I got to eat; if I did not feel lonesome; if I was not afraid; and the like. Others have been curious to learn what portion of my income I devoted to charitable purposes; and some, who have large families, how many poor children I maintained. I will therefore ask those of my readers who feel no particular interest in me to pardon me if I undertake to answer some of these questions in this book. In most books, the _I_, or first person, is omitted; in this it will be retained; that, in respect to egotism, is the main difference. We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking. I should not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well.
  
  --
  Nevertheless this points to an important distinction between the civilized man and the savage; and, no doubt, they have designs on us for our benefit, in making the life of a civilized people an
  _institution_, in which the life of the individual is to a great extent absorbed, in order to preserve and perfect that of the race. But I wish to show at what a sacrifice this advantage is at present obtained, and to suggest that we may possibly so live as to secure all the advantage without suffering any of the disadvantage. What mean ye by saying that the poor ye have always with you, or that the fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the childrens teeth are set on edge?
  
  --
  
  Being a microcosm himself, he discovers, and it is a true discovery, and he is the man to make it,that the world has been eating green apples; to his eyes, in fact, the globe itself is a great green apple, which there is danger awful to think of that the children of men will nibble before it is ripe; and straightway his drastic philanthropy seeks out the Esquimaux and the Patagonian, and embraces the populous
  Indian and Chinese villages; and thus, by a few years of philanthropic activity, the powers in the mean while using him for their own ends, no doubt, he cures himself of his dyspepsia, the globe acquires a faint blush on one or both of its cheeks, as if it were beginning to be ripe, and life loses its crudity and is once more sweet and wholesome to live. I never dreamed of any enormity greater than I have committed. I never knew, and never shall know, a worse man than myself.

1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Theosophy
   p. 6
   shown in their childhood by subsequent students of higher knowledge is well known to the experienced in these matters. There are children who look up with religious awe to those whom they venerate. For such people they have a respect which forbids them, even in the deepest recess of their heart, to harbor any thought of criticism or opposition. Such children grow up into young men and women who feel happy when they are able to look up to anything that fills them with veneration. From the ranks of such children are recruited many students of higher knowledge. Have you ever paused outside the door of some venerated person, and have you, on this your first visit, felt a religious awe as you pressed on the handle to enter the room which for you is a holy place? If so, a feeling has been manifested within you which may be the germ of your future adherence to the path of knowledge. It is a blessing for every human being in process of development to have such feelings upon which to build. Only it must not be thought that this disposition leads to submissiveness and slavery. What was once a childlike veneration for persons becomes, later, a veneration for truth and knowledge.
  
  --
  
  The student who is gifted with this feeling, or who is fortunate enough to have had it inculcated in a suitable education, brings a great deal along with him when, later in life, he seeks admittance to higher knowledge. Failing such preparation, he will encounter difficulties at the very first step, unless he undertakes, by rigorous self-education, to create within himself this inner life of devotion. In our time it is especially important that full attention be paid to this point. Our civilization tends more toward critical judgment and condemnation than toward devotion and selfless veneration. Our children already criticize far more than they worship. But every criticism, every adverse judgment passed, disperses the powers of the soul for the attainment of higher knowledge in the same measure that all veneration and reverence develops them. In this we do not wish to say anything against our civilization. There is no question here of leveling criticism against it. To this critical faculty, this self-conscious human judgment, this "test all things and
   p. 9

1.01_-_Introduction, #The Lotus Sutra, #Anonymous, #Various
  Give gifts such as their bodies, esh, hands,
  And feet, as well as their wives and children.
  Moreover, I see bodhisattvas

1.01_-_Prayer, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  "From Brahm to a clump of grass, all things that live in the world are slaves of birth and death caused by Karma; therefore they cannot be helpful as objects of meditation, because they are all in ignorance and subject to change." In commenting on the word Anurakti used by Shandilya, the commentator Svapneshvara says that it means Anu, after, and Rakti, attachment; i.e. the attachment which comes after the knowledge of the nature and glory of God; else a blind attachment to any one, e.g. to wife or children, would be Bhakti. We plainly see, therefore, that Bhakti is a series or succession of mental efforts at religious realisation beginning with ordinary worship and ending in a supreme intensity of love for Ishvara.
  

1.01_-_Sets_down_the_first_line_and_begins_to_treat_of_the_imperfections_of_beginners., #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  3. Therefore, such a soul finds its delight in spending long periods perchance whole nightsin prayer; penances are its pleasures; fasts its joys; and its consolations are to make use of the sacraments and to occupy itself in Divine things.
  In the which things spiritual persons (though taking part in them with great efficacy and persistence and using and treating them with great care) often find themselves, spiritually speaking, very weak and imperfect. For since they are moved to these things and to these spiritual exercises by the consolation and pleasure that they find in them, and since, too, they have not been prepared for them by the practice of earnest striving in the virtues, they have many faults and imperfections with respect to these spiritual actions of theirs; for, after all, any man's actions correspond to the habit of perfection attained by him. And, as these persons have not had the opportunity of acquiring the said habits of strength, they have necessarily to work like feebler children, feebly. In order that this may be seen more clearly, and likewise how much these beginners in the virtues lacks with respect to the works in which they so readily engage with the pleasure aforementioned, we shall describe it by reference to the seven capital sins, each in its turn, indicating some of the many imperfections which they have under each heading; wherein it will be clearly seen how like to children are these persons in all they do. And it will also be seen how many blessings the dark night of which we shall afterwards treat brings with it, since it cleanses the soul and purifies it from all these imperfections.
  

1.01_-_Soul_and_God, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Mythology
  
  51. Black Book 2 continues: I must tell myself most clearly: does He use the image of a child that lives in every man's' soul? Were Horus, Tages, and Christ not children? Dionysus and Heracles were also divine children. Did Christ, the God of man, not call himself the son of man? What was his innermost thought in doing so? Should the daughter of man be God's name? (p. 9).
  
  --
  
  56. In 1931, Jung commented on the pathogenic consequences of the unlived life of parents upon their children: What usually has the strongest psychic effect on the child is the life which the parents... have not lived. This statement would be rather too perfunctory and superficial if we did not add by way of qualification: that part of their lives which might have been lived had not certain somewhat threadbare excuses prevented the parents from doing so (Introduction to
  Frances Wickes, Analyse der Kinderseele: CW 17, 87).

1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  and yaks, she arranged to give something to eat to the
  children who went with her and asked them to watch
  the animals grazing nearby. As soon as she was alone,
  she recited prayers and humbly asked Tara to find her
  lost husband and children. At night, while others were
  asleep, she prayed even more.
  --
  woman appeared in her dream and told her, "Have no
  fear, you will find your husband and children."
  Time passed. At the beginning of the eighties, the

1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  that Every Man was enlightened by the Divine Light of Christ, and I saw it shine through all; And that they that believed in it came out of Condemnation and came to the Light of Life, and became the children of it; And that they that hated it and did not believe in it, were condemned by it, though they made a profession of Christ. This I saw in the pure Openings of Light, without the help of any Man, neither did I then know where to find it in the Scriptures, though afterwards, searching the Scriptures, I found it.
  
  --
  
  All this sheds some lightdim, it is true, and merely inferentialon the problem of the perennialness of the Perennial Philosophy. In India the scriptures were regarded, not as revelations made at some given moment of history, but as eternal gospels, existent from everlasting to everlasting, inasmuch as coeval with man, or for that matter with any other kind of corporeal or incorporeal being possessed of reason. A similar point of view is expressed by Aristotle, who regards the fundamental truths of religion as everlasting and indestructible. There have been ascents and falls, periods (literally roads around or cycles) of progress and regress; but the great fact of God as the First Mover of a universe which partakes of His divinity has always been recognized. In the light of what we know about prehistoric man (and what we know amounts to nothing more than a few chipped stones, some paintings, drawings and sculptures) and of what we may legitimately infer from other, better documented fields of knowledge, what are we to think of these traditional doctrines? My own view is that they may be true. We know that born contemplatives in the realm both of analytic and of integral thought have turned up in fair numbers and at frequent intervals during recorded history. There is therefore every reason to suppose that they turned up before history was recorded. That many of these people died young or were unable to exercise their talents is certain. But a few of them must have survived. In this context it is highly significant that, among many contemporary primitives, two thought-patterns are foundan exoteric pattern for the unphilosophic many and an esoteric pattern (often monotheistic, with a belief in a God not merely of power, but of goodness and wisdom) for the initiated few. There is no reason to suppose that circumstances were any harder for prehistoric men than they are for many contemporary savages. But if an esoteric monotheism of the kind that seems to come natural to the born thinker is possible in modern savage societies, the majority of whose members accept the sort of polytheistic philosophy that seems to come natural to men of action, a similar esoteric doctrine might have been current in prehistoric societies. True, the modern esoteric doctrines may have been derived from higher cultures. But the significant fact remains that, if so derived, they yet had a meaning for certain members of the primitive society and were considered valuable enough to be carefully preserved. We have seen that many thoughts are unthinkable apart from an appropriate vocabulary and frame of reference. But the fundamental ideas of the Perennial Philosophy can be formulated in a very simple vocabulary, and the experiences to which the ideas refer can and indeed must be had immediately and apart from any vocabulary whatsoever. Strange openings and theophanies are granted to quite small children, who are often profoundly and permanently affected by these experiences. We have no reason to suppose that what happens now to persons with small vocabularies did not happen in remote antiquity. In the modern world (as Vaughan and Traherne and Wordsworth, among others, have told us) the child tends to grow out of his direct awareness of the one Ground of things; for the habit of analytical thought is fatal to the intuitions of integral thinking, whether on the psychic or the spiritual level. Psychic preoccupations may be and often are a major obstacle in the way of genuine spirituality. In primitive societies now (and, presumably, in the remote past) there is much preoccupation with, and a widespread talent for, psychic thinking. But a few people may have worked their way through psychic into genuinely spiritual experiencejust as, even in modern industrialized societies, a few people work their way out of the prevailing preoccupation with matter and through the prevailing habits of analytical thought into the direct experience of the spiritual Ground of things.
  

1.01_-_The_First_Steps, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  We shall gradually see the reasons for each exercise and what forces in the body are set in motion. All these things will come to us, but it requires constant practice, and the proof will come by practice. No amount of reasoning which I can give you will be proof to you, until you have demonstrated it for yourselves. As soon as you begin to feel these currents in motion all over you, doubts will vanish, but it requires hard practice every day. You must practice at least twice every day, and the best times are towards the morning and the evening. When night passes into day, and day into night, a state of relative calmness ensues. The early morning and the early evening are the two periods of calmness. Your body will have a like tendency to become calm at those times. We should take advantage of that natural condition and begin then to practice. Make it a rule not to eat until you have practiced; if you do this, the sheer force of hunger will break your laziness. In India they teach children never to eat until they have practiced or worshipped, and it becomes natural to them after a time; a boy will not feel hungry until he has bathed and practiced.
  

1.01_-_The_Four_Aids, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  35:And it shall also be a sign of the teacher of the integral Yoga that he does not arrogate to himself Guruhood in a humanly vain and self-exalting spirit. His work, if he has one, is a trust from above, he himself a channel, a vessel or a representative. He is a man helping his brothers, a child leading children, a Light kindling other lights, an awakened Soul awakening souls, at highest a Power or Presence of the Divine calling to him other powers of the Divine.
  

1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  
  In contrast to these terrible tales of retribution, there are also accounts of children who thanks to heaven's miraculous intervention were enabled to carry out acts of great filial devotion: the story of a rare medicinal stone suddenly appearing in the garden of a son who needed it to cure an ailing father; of midwinter ice breaking up and fresh carp leaping into the arms of a son whose stepmother had a craving for minced fish; of a poor man whose shovel struck a cauldron filled with gold as he was about to bury his child alive to ensure his mother would be adequately fed; of bamboo shoots emerging in midwinter for a son anxious to feed them to his mother; of a carp-filled fountain gushing up in the garden of a son who wanted to satisfy his mother's yearning for fine water and minced fish.
  
  --
  Sharing these premises, Hakuin launched vehement attacks on what he considered the mistaken understanding purveyed by such architects of Confucian orthodoxy as Hayashi Razan (see chapter
  12). Hakuin's ideas on the subject may be summed up fairly well in the calligraphic works he prepared and distributed in large numbers to people. These works consisted of one large character, filiality or parent, followed by the inscription, "There is no more valuable act of filiality than to save one's father and mother from the sad fate of an unfortunate rebirth in the next life"-exactly the sentiments Hakuin had expressed to Sukefusa as a young monk. a It was considered extremely unfilial to injure or disfigure the body of one's (male) children. This was especially heinous in the case of an eldest son, who, according to the canons of filial piety, is venerated because of his superior birth, age, and gender. b Although not all of these references can be traced, most of them are found in Tales of the TwentyFour Paragons of Filial Virtue (Ehr-shih-ssu hsiao), a popular Confucian text of the Yuan dynasty that was reprinted and widely read in Edo Japan. c A legendary sage ruler of ancient China. According to Mencius, when ministers came to him with good advice, Yu always received it with deep gratitude.
  

1.02.4.2_-_Action_and_the_Divine_Will, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  it with which its egoism and ignorance forbid it to put itself
  in harmony, it is subject to the twin children of the Ignorance,
  suffering and falsehood. Not having the divine Truth and Right,

1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  Most of us make our minds like spoiled children, allowing
  them to do whatever they want. Therefore it is necessary that
  --
  that, in the end, we shall find that even the love of husbands
  and wives, and children and friends, slowly decays.
  Decadence seizes everything in this life. It is only when

1.02_-_Skillful_Means, #The Lotus Sutra, #Anonymous, #Various
  Out of piles of earth in desolate places;
  And even children in play
  Who made buddha stupas out of heaps of sand
  --
  Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.
  This even includes children in play
  Who have drawn a buddha image

1.02_-_The_7_Habits_An_Overview, #The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, #Stephen Covey, #unset
  
  I may be ineffective in my interactions with my work associates, my spouse, or my children because
  I constantly tell them what I think, but I never really listen to them. Unless I search out correct principles of human interaction, I may not even know I need to listen.
  --
  
  The little understood concept of interdependence appears to many to smack of dependence, and therefore, we find people often for selfish reasons, leaving their marriages, abandoning their children, and forsaking all kinds of social responsibility -- all in the name of independence.
  
  --
  
  And what about a parent's relationship with a child? When children are little, they are very dependent, very vulnerable. It becomes so easy to neglect the PC work -- the training, the communicating, the relating, the listening. It's easy to take advantage, to manipulate, to get what you want the way you want it -- right now! You're bigger, you're smarter, and you're right! So why not just tell them what to do? If necessary, yell at them, intimidate them, insist on your way.
  
  --
  
  Let me share with you an interesting PC experience I had with one of my daughters. We were planning a private date, which is something I enjoy regularly with each of my children. We find that the anticipation of the date is as satisfying as the realization.
  

1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The Vedic deities are names, powers, personalities of the universal Godhead and they represent each some essential puissance of the Divine Being. They manifest the cosmos and are manifest in it. children of Light, Sons of the Infinite, they recognise in the soul of man their brother and ally and desire to help and increase him by themselves increasing in him so as to possess his world with their light, strength and beauty. The Gods call man to a divine companionship and alliance; they attract and uplift him to their luminous fraternity, invite his aid and offer theirs against the Sons of Darkness and Division. Man in return calls the Gods to his sacrifice, offers to them his swiftnesses and his strengths, his clarities and his sweetnesses, - milk and butter of the shining Cow, distilled juices of the Plant of Joy, the Horse of the Sacrifice, the cake and the wine, the grain for the GodMind's radiant coursers. He receives them into his being and their gifts into his life, increases them by the hymns and the wine and forms perfectly - as a smith forges iron, says the Veda - their great and luminous godheads.
  
  --
  
  We create for ourselves by the sacrifice and by the word shining seers, heroes to fight for us, children of our works. The Rishis and the Gods find for us our luminous herds; the Ribhus fashion by the mind the chariots of the gods and their horses and their shining weapons. Our life is a horse that neighing and galloping bears us onward and upward; its forces are swift-hoofed steeds, the liberated powers of the mind are wide-winging birds; this mental being or this soul is the upsoaring Swan or the Falcon that breaks out from a hundred iron walls and wrests from the jealous guardians of felicity the wine of the Soma. Every shining godward Thought that arises from the secret abysses of the heart is a priest and a creator and chants a divine hymn of luminous realisation and puissant fulfilment. We seek for the shining gold of the Truth; we lust after a heavenly treasure.
  

1.02_-_The_Human_Soul, #The Interior Castle or The Mansions, #Saint Teresa of Avila, #Christianity
  
  9.: A soul which gives itself to prayer, either much or little, should on no account be kept within narrow bounds. Since God has given it such great dignity, permit it to wander at will through the rooms of the castle, from the lowest to the highest. Let it not force itself to remain for very long in the same mansion, even that of self-knowledge. Mark well, however, that self-knowledge is indispensable, even for those whom God takes to dwell in the same mansion with Himself. Nothing else, however elevated, perfects the soul which must never seek to forget its own nothingness. Let humility be always at work, like the bee at the honeycomb, or all will be lost. But, remember, the bee leaves its hive to fly in search of flowers and the soul should sometimes cease thinking of itself to rise in meditation on the grandeur and majesty of its God. It will learn its own baseness better thus than by self-contemplation, and will be freer from the reptiles which enter the first room where self-knowledge is acquired. The palmito here referred to is not a palm, but a shrub about four feet high and very dense with leaves, resembling palm leaves. The poorer classes and principally children dig it up by the roots, which they peel of its many layers until a sort of kernel is disclosed, which is eaten, not without relish, and is somewhat like a filbert in taste. See St. John of the Cross, Accent of Mount Carmel, bk. ii. ch, xiv, 3. Although it is a great grace from God to practise self-examination, yet 'too much is as bad as too little,' as they say; believe me, by God's help, we shall advance more by contemplating the Divinity than by keeping our eyes fixed on ourselves, poor creatures of earth that we are.
  

1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Theosophy
   p. 47
   times to the most contradictory views and, at the same time, bring entirely to silence all assent, and more especially, all adverse criticism. The point is that in so doing, not only all purely intellectual judgment be silenced, but also all feelings of displeasure, denial, or even assent. The student must at all times be particularly watchful lest such feelings, even when not on the surface, should still lurk in the innermost recess of the soul. He must listen, for example, to the statements of people who are, in some respects, far beneath him, and yet while doing so suppress every feeling of greater knowledge or superiority. It is useful for everyone to listen in this way to children, for even the wisest can learn incalculably much from children. The student can thus train himself to listen to the words of others quite selflessly, completely shutting down his own person and his opinions and way of feeling. When he practices listening without criticism, even when a completely contradictory opinion is advanced, when the most hopeless mistake is committed before him, he then learns, little by little, to blend himself with the being of another and become identified with it. Then he hears through the words into
   p. 48

1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  Every morning was a cheerful invitation to make my life of equal simplicity, and I may say innocence, with Nature herself. I have been as sincere a worshipper of Aurora as the Greeks. I got up early and bathed in the pond; that was a religious exercise, and one of the best things which I did. They say that characters were engraven on the bathing tub of king Tching-thang to this effect: Renew thyself completely each day; do it again, and again, and forever again. I can understand that. Morning brings back the heroic ages. I was as much affected by the faint hum of a mosquito making its invisible and unimaginable tour through my apartment at earliest dawn, when I was sitting with door and windows open, as I could be by any trumpet that ever sang of fame. It was Homers requiem; itself an Iliad and Odyssey in the air, singing its own wrath and wanderings. There was something cosmical about it; a standing advertisement, till forbidden, of the everlasting vigor and fertility of the world. The morning, which is the most memorable season of the day, is the awakening hour. Then there is least somnolence in us; and for an hour, at least, some part of us awakes which slumbers all the rest of the day and night. Little is to be expected of that day, if it can be called a day, to which we are not awakened by our Genius, but by the mechanical nudgings of some servitor, are not awakened by our own newly-acquired force and aspirations from within, accompanied by the undulations of celestial music, instead of factory bells, and a fragrance filling the airto a higher life than we fell asleep from; and thus the darkness bear its fruit, and prove itself to be good, no less than the light. That man who does not believe that each day contains an earlier, more sacred, and auroral hour than he has yet profaned, has despaired of life, and is pursuing a descending and darkening way. After a partial cessation of his sensuous life, the soul of man, or its organs rather, are reinvigorated each day, and his Genius tries again what noble life it can make. All memorable events, I should say, transpire in morning time and in a morning atmosphere. The Vedas say, All intelligences awake with the morning. Poetry and art, and the fairest and most memorable of the actions of men, date from such an hour. All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the children of Aurora, and emit their music at sunrise. To him whose elastic and vigorous thought keeps pace with the sun, the day is a perpetual morning. It matters not what the clocks say or the attitudes and labors of men. Morning is when I am awake and there is a dawn in me. Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep.
  
  --
  Shams and delusions are esteemed for soundest truths, while reality is fabulous. If men would steadily observe realities only, and not allow themselves to be deluded, life, to compare it with such things as we know, would be like a fairy tale and the Arabian Nights
  Entertainments. If we respected only what is inevitable and has a right to be, music and poetry would resound along the streets. When we are unhurried and wise, we perceive that only great and worthy things have any permanent and absolute existence,that petty fears and petty pleasures are but the shadow of the reality. This is always exhilarating and sublime. By closing the eyes and slumbering, and consenting to be deceived by shows, men establish and confirm their daily life of routine and habit everywhere, which still is built on purely illusory foundations. children, who play life, discern its true law and relations more clearly than men, who fail to live it worthily, but who think that they are wiser by experience, that is, by failure. I have read in a Hindoo book, that there was a kings son, who, being expelled in infancy from his native city, was brought up by a forester, and, growing up to maturity in that state, imagined himself to belong to the barbarous race with which he lived. One of his fathers ministers having discovered him, revealed to him what he was, and the misconception of his character was removed, and he knew himself to be a prince. So soul, continues the Hindoo philosopher, from the circumstances in which it is placed, mistakes its own character, until the truth is revealed to it by some holy teacher, and then it knows itself to be _Brahme_. I perceive that we inhabitants of New England live this mean life that we do because our vision does not penetrate the surface of things. We think that that _is_ which _appears_ to be.
  
  --
  
  Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature, and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquitos wing that falls on the rails. Let us rise early and fast, or break fast, gently and without perturbation; let company come and let company go, let the bells ring and the children cry,determined to make a day of it. Why should we knock under and go with the stream? Let us not be upset and overwhelmed in that terrible rapid and whirlpool called a dinner, situated in the meridian shallows. Weather this danger and you are safe, for the rest of the way is down hill. With unrelaxed nerves, with morning vigor, sail by it, looking another way, tied to the mast like Ulysses. If the engine whistles, let it whistle till it is hoarse for its pains. If the bell rings, why should we run? We will consider what kind of music they are like. Let us settle ourselves, and work and wedge our feet downward through the mud and slush of opinion, and prejudice, and tradition, and delusion, and appearance, that alluvion which covers the globe, through
  Paris and London, through New York and Boston and Concord, through church and state, through poetry and philosophy and religion, till we come to a hard bottom and rocks in place, which we can call _reality_, and say, This is, and no mistake; and then begin, having a _point dappui_, below freshet and frost and fire, a place where you might found a wall or a state, or set a lamp-post safely, or perhaps a gauge, not a Nilometer, but a Realometer, that future ages might know how deep a freshet of shams and appearances had gathered from time to time. If you stand right fronting and face to face to a fact, you will see the sun glimmer on both its surfaces, as if it were a cimeter, and feel its sweet edge dividing you through the heart and marrow, and so you will happily conclude your mortal career. Be it life or death, we crave only reality. If we are really dying, let us hear the rattle in our throats and feel cold in the extremities; if we are alive, let us go about our business.

1.032_-_Our_Concept_of_God, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The extent of our love of God, the intensity of our feeling for God, will depend upon our idea of God, our concept of God. There are various concepts of the Creator, of God, the Absolute, etc., according to the various philosophical theories, doctrines, and religious traditions. One of the primitive forms of conceiving God is that He is the Creator of the world. We have a childish idea of a creator. A creator is one who makes things, and God is someone who has made this world. "God made this world" is an old saying which we often repeat. God made the world and, therefore, God is the Creator of the world. God is the Father of the world and, therefore, all His children should love Him as the Supreme Parent. The idea of creatorship that is in our minds is the conditioning factor of our love towards this Creator. We have seen in this world that if someone makes something, he is the efficient or sometimes the instrumental cause of that particular thing that he has made, and the thing that he has made is an effect that is produced by him, standing outside him. God can thus be regarded as extra-cosmic, which is the usual way in which we conceive God.
  

1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE, #Alice in Wonderland, #Lewis Carroll, #Fiction
  "Please come back and finish your story!" Alice called after it. And the others all joined in chorus, "Yes, please do!" But the Mouse only shook its head impatiently and walked a little quicker.
  "I wish I had Dinah, our cat, here!" said Alice. This caused a remarkable sensation among the party. Some of the birds hurried off at once, and a Canary called out in a trembling voice, to its children,
  "Come away, my dears! It's high time you were all in bed!" On various pretexts they all moved off and Alice was soon left alone.

1.03_-_A_Parable, #The Lotus Sutra, #Anonymous, #Various
  O riputra! Suppose there were an aged and extremely afuent man, either in a town, city, or country, who has immeasurable wealth, abundant estates, mansions, and servants. He has a spacious house, yet it only has a single entrance. Suppose many people live there, as many as one, two, or even ve hundred people. The buildings are in poor repair, the fences and walls are crumbling, the pillar bases are rotten, and the beams and framework are dangerously tilted.
  Suddenly and unexpectedly, res break out everywhere, setting the house swiftly aame. The children of this man, ten, twenty, or thirty in number are in the house.
  The afuent man, seeing the re breaking out everywhere, becomes alarmed and terried. He thinks:
  I am capable of escaping through the burning entrance in safety, but my children are absorbed in play within the burning house and are not aware [of the re], do not know, are not alarmed or terried, and the
  re is approaching them! They are not troubled about their suffering nor do they intend to leave the house.
  O riputra, this afuent man thought:
  Since I am still physically strong I could take the children out of the house in the folds of my garment or on top of a desk.
  He further thought:
  There is only one entrance to this house and it is very narrow. The children, who are immature and still unaware, are attached to their place of play. They may fall into danger and be burned by the re. I should now tell them of the danger; this house is already burning! They must escape as quickly as they can to avoid being burned by the re!
  
  After considering this he urged the children according to his thought:
  children! Run out immediately!
  Although their father in his concern has given them the proper advice, the children are immersed in their play and do not accept it; they are neither alarmed nor afraid and have no intention of leaving [the burning house].
  Moreover, they do not even know what a re is, the condition of the house, or what they may lose. They merely run about, back and forth, looking at their father.
  Thereupon the afuent man thought:
  This house is already engulfed in ames. If my children and I do not get out, we shall perish in the re. I will now use skillful means to help my children escape from this disaster.
  Since the father already knew that his children were attached to various rare toys and unusual things that each of them liked, he said to them:
  The toys you are fond of are rare and hard to obtain. If you do not take them you will certainly regret it later. Right now, outside the house, there are three kinds of carts. One is yoked to a sheep, one to a deer, and one to an ox. Go play with them. children! Run out of this burning house immediately and I will give you whatever you want!
  The children, hearing what their father had said about the rare toys, became excited and, in their eagerness to get to them they pushed each other out of the way in a mad rush out of the burning house.
  Then the afuent man saw that his children had got out safely and were sitting unharmed in an open area at a crossroad. He was relieved, happy, and joyful. The children said to their father:
  Father, please give us the toys you promised: those [three] carts, one yoked to a sheep, one to a deer, and one to an ox!
  --
   with jeweled cords and hung with ower garlands. They were thickly piled with fabrics, and red pillows had been placed about. These carts were each yoked to an ox with a spotlessly white hide. These oxen had beautiful bodies with powerful muscles, even gaits, and were as swift as the wind; and there were many attendants guarding them. Why did the afuent man give these carts? Because the man had great and immeasurable wealth and his abundant storehouses were full. He thus thought further:
  Since my treasure has no limit, I should not give my children inferior carts. These are my children and I love them all equally. I have an immeasurable number of large carts such as these, decorated with the seven treasures. I should equally distribute them to each child without discrimination. Why is this? Even if I gave carts like these to everyone in the country, their number would not be exhausted. Why should
  I not give them to my own children?
  13a
  
  At that time, the children each climbed into a great cart and had an unprecedented experience, one beyond their original expectations.
  O riputra! What do you think about this? This afuent man gave to his children equally a large cart decorated with precious treasures. Has he deceived them or not?
  riputra replied: No Bhagavat! The afuent man only tried to help his children escape from the disastrous re. He saved their lives and did not deceive them. This is by no means a deception. Why? Because by saving their lives they obtained marvelous toys. Moreover, they were saved from the burning house by skillful means.
  O Bhagavat! If this afuent man had not given them even the smallest cart, it still would not have been a deception. Why is this? Because this afuent man thought before:
  I will help my children escape with skillful means.
  This is why it was not a deception. How much more so, since the afuent man, knowing that he had immeasurable wealth and wanting to benet them equally, gave each of his children a large [ox]cart.
  The Buddha said to riputra: Splendid, splendid! It is exactly as you have said. O riputra, the Tathgata is also just like this. That is to say, as
  --
  How would they be able to understand the Buddhas wisdom?
  O riputra! Although that afuent man had physical strength he did not use it. He only earnestly employed skillful means to save his children from the disaster of the burning house, and later he gave each of them a large cart decorated with precious treasures. The Tathgata is exactly like this.
  Although the Tathgata has power and fearlessness he does not use them, but rescues sentient beings from the burning house of the triple world only through wisdom and skillful means, teaching the three vehicles to the
  --
  When they ride in them, sentient beings will enjoy faculties free from corruption and also powers, paths to enlightenment, meditation, liberation, and concentration. And they themselves will attain immeasurable ease and pleasure.
  O riputra! Those beings, wise by nature, who accept the Dharma from the Buddha Bhagavat, who are diligent, persistent, and wish to escape from the triple world quickly, and who are seeking nirvana, are all practicing the rvaka vehicle. They are like those children who left the burning house seeking the cart yoked to a sheep.
  
  Those beings who accept the Dharma of the Buddha Bhagavat, who are diligent and persevere in seeking the wisdom of the Self-generated One and enjoy tranquility for themselves, who profoundly know the causes of and reasons for existence, are all practicing the pratyekabuddha vehicle.
  They are just like those children who left the burning house seeking the cart yoked to a deer.
  Those beings who accept the Dharma of the Buddha Bhagavat, who are diligent and persevere in seeking the wisdom of the Omniscient One, the wisdom of the Buddha, the wisdom of the Self-generated One, the wisdom acquired without a teacher, the wisdom and insight, powers, and fearlessness of the Tathgata; who are compassionate, put immeasurable sentient beings at ease, benet devas and humans, and save all beings, are all practicing the Mahayana. Bodhisattvas are called mahsattvas (great beings) because they seek this vehicle. They are just like those children who left the burning house seeking the cart yoked to an ox.
  O riputra! That afuent man saw his children leave the burning house safely and arrive at a safe place. Knowing that he had immeasurable wealth, he gave a large cart equally to each child. The Tathgata is exactly like this.
  As the father of all sentient beings he sees that immeasurable thousands of kois of sentient beings escape from the dangers, sufferings, and fears of the triple world through the gates of the Buddhas teaching and attain the pleasure of nirvana.
  Then the Tathgata thought:
  Because I possess the treasure house of the Dharma of all the buddhas, which contains immeasurable limitless wisdom, power, and fearlessness, and because all sentient beings are my children, I will give them equally the Mahayana. I will not allow anyone to attain nirvana merely for himself but will cause everyone to attain it through the Tathgatas nirvana.
  I will give sentient beings who have escaped from the triple world all the toys of the Buddhas meditations and liberations, which are of one character and one kind, are praised by the Noble Ones, and which produce pure and supreme pleasure.
  O riputra! At rst that afuent man attracted his children with three kinds of carts, then later gave them only the safest and best large [ox]cart,
  
  --
  In the midst of their play,
  Your children entered this house.
  Being young and ignorant,
  --
  To save them from the disaster of the re.
  As he thought t, he warned the children
  And explained the various dangers:
  --
  How much more so the conagration!
  But the children, being ignorant,
  Would not listen to their fathers warning.
  --
  Thereupon the afuent man thought:
  My children by doing this
  Increase my distress!
  There is nothing to enjoy now in this house.
  Nevertheless, my children who are absorbed in play
  Will not accept my instructions
  --
  Then he immediately thought
  That he should advise his children
  Using various skillful means, and said:
  --
  They are just outside the gate.
  O children! Come out of the house!
  I had these carts made for you.
  --
  Hearing about these carts,
  The children immediately started
  To push each other out of the way
  --
  They escaped from the disaster.
  The afuent man, seeing that his children
  Had escaped from the burning house
  --
  Now I am happy!
  It is extremely difficult to raise these children.
  Foolish and ignorant,
  --
  In spite of this,
  These children were attached to playing their games.
  But by causing them to escape from the disaster,
  --
  
  Thereupon the children,
  Seeing their father sitting in peace,
  --
  That you just promised us,
  When you said that if we, your children, came out
  You would give us three kinds of carts
  --
  When they were given these ne carts,
  The children were joyful and excited.
  They got on the carts
  --
  The best of the sages.
  All sentient beings are my children.
  They are deeply attached to worldly pleasures
  --
  Now this triple world is my property
  And the sentient beings in it are my children.
  There are now many dangers here
  --
  Escape from the mundane path.
  If these children are resolute,
  They are endowed with the three knowledges
  --
  Wisdoms, and other attributes of the Buddha.
  I cause my children to obtain such a vehicle
  And let them play continuously,
  --
  I tell you, O riputra:
  All of you are my children,
  And I am thus your father.
  --
  If they are born as vermin and enter a village,
  children will beat them because they have scabies,
  Leprosy, and perhaps a missing eye.

1.03_-_A_Sapphire_Tale, #Words Of Long Ago, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Once upon a time, far away in the East, there was a small country that lived in order and harmony, where each one in his own place played the part for which he was made, for the greatest good of all.
  Farmers, craftsmen, workmen and merchants all had but one ambition, one concern: to do their work as best they could. This was in their own interest, firstly because, since each one had freely chosen his occupation, it suited his nature and gave him pleasure, and also because they knew that all good work was fairly rewarded, so that they, their wives and their children could lead a quiet and peaceful life, without useless luxury, but with a generous provision for their needs, which was enough to satisfy them.
  The artists and scientists, few in number but each devoted to his science or art - his purpose in life - were supported by the grateful nation, which was the first to benefit from their useful discoveries and to enjoy their ennobling works. Thus sheltered from the cares of the struggle for life, these scientists had a single aim: that their experimental research, their sincere and earnest studies should serve to allay the sufferings of humanity, to increase its strength and well-being by making superstition and fear draw back as far as possible before the knowledge that brings solace and enlightenment. The artists, whose whole will was free to concentrate upon their art, had only one desire: to manifest beauty, each according to his own highest conception.

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