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object:MCW
class:collections
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subject class:Yoga
class:favorite
subject class:Integral Yoga
subject class:Integral Yoga (books)

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  MCW
    01PrayersAndMeditations
    02WordsOfLongAgo
    03QuestionsAndAnswers1929-1931
    04QuestionsAndAnswers1950-1951
    05QuestionsAndAnswers1953
    06QuestionsAndAnswers1954
    07QuestionsAndAnswers1955
    08QuestionsAndAnswers1956
    09QuestionsAndAnswers1957-1958
    10OnThoughtsAndAphorisms
    11NotesOnTheWay
    12OnEducation:(The Science of Living)
    13WordsOfTheMother-I
    14WordsOfTheMother-II
    15WordsOfTheMother-III
    16SomeAnswersFromTheMother
    17MoreAnswersFromTheMother
  THE AGENDA
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol1
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol2
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol3
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol4
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol5
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol6
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol7
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol8
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol9
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol10
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol11
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol12
    The_Mother_-_Agenda_Vol13

see also ::: cwsa, The Mothers Agenda



questions, comments, take-down requests, reporting broken-links etc.
contact me @ integralyogin at gmail dot com

--- OBJECT INSTANCES [23]


Agenda_Vol_13
Mantras_Of_The_Mother
More_Answers_From_The_Mother
Notes_On_The_Way
On_Education
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Prayers_And_Meditations
Questions_And_Answers_1929-1931
Questions_And_Answers_1950-1951
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Questions_And_Answers_1956
Questions_And_Answers_1957-1958
Some_Answers_From_The_Mother
Sweet_Mother
The_Sunlit_Path_(compliation)
White_Roses
Words_Of_Long_Ago
Words_of_the_Mother
Words_Of_The_Mother_I
Words_Of_The_Mother_II
Words_Of_The_Mother_III

--- PRIMARY CLASS


books
collections
favorite

--- SEE ALSO


cwsa
The_Mothers_Agenda

--- SIMILAR TITLES [1]


mcw
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards_(table), project, project_0001, Savitri_(cento), Savitri_(extended_toc), the_Temple_of_Sages, three_js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the_Bad, the_God_object, the_Good, the_most_important, the_Ring, the_source_of_inspirations, the_Stack, the_Tarot, the_Word, top_priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


McWilliams, Sandy (fictional)—a bald-


--- QUOTES [1 / 1000 - 290 / 500] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   1 The Mother

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  175 Peter McWilliams
   68 John McWhorter
   13 James McWilliams
   12 Lori McWilliam Pickert
   4 Drew McWeeny
   3 The Mother
   3 Joseph Heller
   2 Harlan Coben

1:The light is everywhere, the force is everywhere. And the world is so small. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother MCW Vol. 15.,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:To affirm is to make firm. ~ Peter McWilliams,
2:We’re all Dennis Hopper now. ~ John McWhorter,
3:Emotion is energy in motion. ~ Peter McWilliams,
4:What if River Phoenix had lived? ~ Drew McWeeny,
5:Ummmm, Excuse me, Cokey McWhoreslut? ~ T Torrest,
6:Oh well," McWatt sang, "what the hell. ~ Joseph Heller,
7:The war on drugs is what makes thugs. ~ John McWhorter,
8:Nothing adventured, nothing attained ~ Peter McWilliams,
9:Guilt is anger directed at ourselves. ~ Peter McWilliams,
10:Keep your goals away from the trolls. ~ Peter McWilliams,
11:Life is not a struggle. It's a wiggle. ~ Peter McWilliams,
12:Life is not a struggle. It’s a wiggle. ~ Peter McWilliams,
13:Today’s “Dialect” Is Tomorrow’s “Language ~ John McWhorter,
14:In life, we have either reasons or results ~ Peter McWilliams,
15:Meditation creates more time than it takes. ~ Peter McWilliams,
16:Collaboration is a key [to success]. It really is. ~ Drew McWeeny,
17:Do we indulge our heart, or cater to our fear? ~ Peter McWilliams,
18:I am not 'African American' —I am black American. ~ John McWhorter,
19:The willingness to do creates the ability to do. ~ Peter McWilliams,
20:We are all, right now, living the life we choose. ~ Peter McWilliams,
21:You can't afford the luxury of a negative thought ~ Peter McWilliams,
22:What if it doesn't work out? Ah, but what if it does. ~ Peter McWilliams,
23:Definition of a victim: a person to whom life happens. ~ Peter McWilliams,
24:Language overlaps with culture but is not subsumed by it ~ John McWhorter,
25:there is nothing to be done. only accept it... and hurt. ~ Peter McWilliams,
26:Worrying is the interest paid on a debt you may not owe. ~ Peter McWilliams,
27:And neither shall we learn to war with ourselves anymore. ~ Peter McWilliams,
28:Comfort zones are most often expanded through discomfort. ~ Peter McWilliams,
29:Do what you love and the necessary resources will follow. ~ Peter McWilliams,
30:I always think shooting dance is a sort of test of a filmmaker. ~ Drew McWeeny,
31:there is no such thing as human beings speaking “bad grammar. ~ John McWhorter,
32:the concept of “language” is a mere terminological convenience. ~ John McWhorter,
33:If you change the belief first, changing the action is easier. ~ Peter McWilliams,
34:People's sense of how they talk tends to differ from the reality. ~ John McWhorter,
35:as Clinton taught us in 1998, any action is potentially negatable. ~ John McWhorter,
36:As the world gets dumber and dumber, I feel more and more at home. ~ Peter McWilliams,
37:Each dialect is just a different roll of the language-mutation dice. ~ John McWhorter,
38:is evidence that human language is to some extent genetically coded. ~ John McWhorter,
39:Plot is unimportant. Family is everything, and 'Furious 7' is a blast. ~ Drew McWeeny,
40:What's more important-your goal, or others' opinions of your goal? ~ Peter McWilliams,
41:In order to truly master the comfort zone, we must learn to love it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
42:This was the beginning of a lifelong obsession with foreign languages. ~ John McWhorter,
43:If we aren't actively pursuing what we want, we don't really want it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
44:Let your intentions create your methods and not the other way around. ~ Peter McWilliams,
45:the grand old tendency in sound change to erode unaccented final vowels ~ John McWhorter,
46:there is nothing to be done.

only accept it...

and hurt. ~ Peter McWilliams,
47:Capitalism is the only economic system compatible with free individuals ~ Peter McWilliams,
48:Choosing what you want to do, and when to do it, is an act of creation. ~ Peter McWilliams,
49:Fear is something to be moved through, not something to be turned from. ~ Peter McWilliams,
50:the first human language emerged roughly 150,000 years ago in East Africa. ~ John McWhorter,
51:The only difference between 'fear' and 'excitement' is what we label it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
52:Goodbye, is strictly speaking a truncated form of “Be with you, be with you! ~ John McWhorter,
53:Language change, to the extent that we can perceive it, appears to be decay. ~ John McWhorter,
54:Latin illa became, with some erosion of sounds into la, the definite article ~ John McWhorter,
55:We saw how close dialects can be compared to “covers” of an original song. A ~ John McWhorter,
56:It is a risk to love. What if it doesn't work out? Ah, but what if it does. ~ Peter McWilliams,
57:To the degree we can live without the things of this world, we are wealthy. ~ Peter McWilliams,
58:It's your life. Live it with people who are alive. It tends to be contagious. ~ Peter McWilliams,
59:will end up being a kind of mantra for this chapter, “dialects is all there is. ~ John McWhorter,
60:For many, negative thinking is a habit which, over time, becomes an addiction. ~ Peter McWilliams,
61:It is a risk to love.
What if it doesn't work out?
Ah, but what if it does. ~ Peter McWilliams,
62:A person you excuse from any genuine challenge is a person you do not truly respect. ~ John McWhorter,
63:Because people are afraid of fear, they give up acre after acre of their own life. ~ Peter McWilliams,
64:Dialects follow naturally from the inherently nondiscrete nature of language change. ~ John McWhorter,
65:The road to positivity is strewn with the abandoned vehicles of the faint-hearted. ~ Peter McWilliams,
66:If you're not actively involved in getting what you want, you don't really want it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
67:mere one percent of the words in English today are not borrowed from other languages. ~ John McWhorter,
68:As with most consensual crimes, this prohibition of hemp is both silly and sinister. ~ Peter McWilliams,
69:You need only look at what's in front of you and find something there to appreciate. ~ Peter McWilliams,
70:In Greenlandic Eskimo, “I should stop drinking” is Iminngernaveersaartunngortussaavunga ~ John McWhorter,
71:The value of action is that we make mistakes; mistakes show us what we need to learn. ~ Peter McWilliams,
72:all languages constantly create expressive usages of words or phrases that gradually wear ~ John McWhorter,
73:To avoid situations in which you might make mistakes may be the biggest mistake of all. ~ Peter McWilliams,
74:Our thoughts create our reality - where we put our focus is the direction we tend to go. ~ Peter McWilliams,
75:Our thoughts create our reality -- where we put our focus is the direction we tend to go. ~ Peter McWilliams,
76:You can always find some expert who will say something hopelessly hopeless about anything. ~ Peter McWilliams,
77:English, however, is kinky. It has a predilection for dressing up like Welsh on lonely nights. ~ John McWhorter,
78:most of the languages that now exist are almost certain to become extinct within this century. ~ John McWhorter,
79:By pursuing any one of our dreams, we can find fulfillment. We don't need to pursue them all. ~ Peter McWilliams,
80:Find your horse. Discover the direction the horse is going. Ride the horse in that direction. ~ Peter McWilliams,
81:I'd have a nervous breakdown except that I've been through this too many times to be nervous. ~ Peter McWilliams,
82:If you want peace, stop fighting. If you want peace of mind, stop fighting with your thoughts. ~ Peter McWilliams,
83:That's what depression had wrought inside me: one, vast, barren rock garden-without the garden ~ Peter McWilliams,
84:Wealth is enjoying what we already have, not getting more of what we think will make us happy. ~ Peter McWilliams,
85:If you were arrested for being kind to yourself..would there be enough evidence to convict you? ~ Peter McWilliams,
86:People who want to appear clever rely on memory. People who want to get things done make lists. ~ Peter McWilliams,
87:For now realize that you can change anything you want, but you can't change everything you want. ~ Peter McWilliams,
88:If we're not enjoying what we've got...and even if we do get 'more,' we won't enjoy that, either. ~ Peter McWilliams,
89:Acceptance is such an important commodity, some have called it "the first law of personal growth". ~ Peter McWilliams,
90:This is how it happens. We get the Dream, but we don't get to dictate every step toward the dream. ~ Peter McWilliams,
91:The purpose of education is to make the choices clear to people, not to make the choices for people. ~ Peter McWilliams,
92:In the nineteenth century, poetry was a bestselling genre rather than the cultish phenomenon it is now. ~ John McWhorter,
93:If we learned all we needed to know in kindergarten, it was promptly drummed out of us in first grade. ~ Peter McWilliams,
94:Stubborness is also determination. It's simply a matter of shifting from "won't power" to "will power. ~ Peter McWilliams,
95:English is one of several languages that evolved from an unwritten ancestor linguists call Proto-Germanic; ~ John McWhorter,
96:The comfort zone takes our greatest aspirations and turns them into excuses for not bothering to aspire. ~ Peter McWilliams,
97:the first human beings to speak language as we know it today lived in East Africa about 150,000 years ago. ~ John McWhorter,
98:However, human language is unique in its ability to communicate or convey an open-ended volume of concepts: ~ John McWhorter,
99:Even Fijian, spoken on a complex of islands by just seven hundred thousand people, has more than one dialect. ~ John McWhorter,
100:Many people weigh the guilt, they will feel against the pleasure of the forbidden action they want to take. ~ Peter McWilliams,
101:the social evaluations we place on how people talk are purely artificial constructs placed on speech varieties ~ John McWhorter,
102:To overcome a fear, here's all you have to do: realize the fear is there, and do the action you fear anyway. ~ Peter McWilliams,
103:The simple solution for disappointment depression Get up and get moving. Physically move. Do. Act. Get going. ~ Peter McWilliams,
104:Don’t tell the Scandinavians I said this, but “Swedish,” “Norwegian,” and “Danish” are all really one “language, ~ John McWhorter,
105:Mistakes, obviously, show us what needs improving. Without mistakes, how would we know what we had to work on? ~ Peter McWilliams,
106:Nausea is an unsolved problem of medicine and marijuana is the finest anti-nausea medication known to science. ~ Peter McWilliams,
107:Although a lot can be learned from adversity, most of the same lessons can be learned through laughter and joy. ~ Peter McWilliams,
108:Courage, contrary to popular belief, is not the absence of fear. Courage is the wisdom to act in spite of fear. ~ Peter McWilliams,
109:To the degree we're not living our dreams, our comfort zone has more control of us than we have over ourselves. ~ Peter McWilliams,
110:You can have anything in life you really want - but you can't have everything in life you really want. Decide. ~ Peter McWilliams,
111:general instability in vowels–in all languages, they tend to gradually mutate into different ones as time goes by. ~ John McWhorter,
112:You learn the basics because they make your work easier and your designs better. — John McWade, designer and author ~ Garr Reynolds,
113:For all but the sliver of poetry fans, over the past forty years popular song lyrics have been the nation’s poetry. ~ John McWhorter,
114:All the good, fine, noble, and creative acts of humanity were conceived as a spark in a single human consciousness. ~ Peter McWilliams,
115:This cycle eloquently demonstrates that, in the end, dialects are all there is: the “language” part is just politics! ~ John McWhorter,
116:I found something in Mercer’s room,” Walker said in a voice as gray as a tombstone. “I think it belongs to Haley McWaid. ~ Harlan Coben,
117:Most people, once they graduate from the School of Hard Knocks, automatically enroll in the University of Adversity. ~ Peter McWilliams,
118:The irony is that the person not taking risks feels the same amount of fear as the person who regularly takes risks. ~ Peter McWilliams,
119:If our early lessons of acceptance were as successful as our early lessons of anger how much happier we would all be. ~ Peter McWilliams,
120:the eight main “dialects” of Chinese are so vastly different that they are, under any analysis, separate languages. The ~ John McWhorter,
121:If you're not playing a big enough game, you'll screw up the game you're playing just to give yourself something to do. ~ Peter McWilliams,
122:There's a McDonalds in Hong Kong & they're offering couples the opportunity to get married. You can have a McWedding. ~ Chelsea Handler,
123:that anything I write or say in this language can be said in about six thousand other ways, with completely different words ~ John McWhorter,
124:No matter what you do, no matter how stupid, dumb or damaging you judge it to be, there is a lesson to be learned from it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
125:Whenever something good happens, write it down. Buy a special notebook . . . and use it to list all the good in your life. ~ Peter McWilliams,
126:When it comes time to teach, teach from your experience. Go out and do, learn from the doing, then teach from the knowing. ~ Peter McWilliams,
127:The Bible, taken as a whole, can be used to praise or condemn practically any human activity, thought, belief, or practice. ~ Peter McWilliams,
128:You're asking the government to control individual morality. This is a government that can't buy a toilet seat for under $600. ~ Peter McWilliams,
129:One of the great joys of life is creativity. Information goes in, gets shuffled about, and comes out in new and interesting ways ~ Peter McWilliams,
130:Running from fear only strengthens fear-you are demonstrating that fear has power over you. Fear must be faced and gone through. ~ Peter McWilliams,
131:We must neither behave as children by resisting honesty, nor allow ourselves to be treated as children by having honesty withheld. ~ John McWhorter,
132:view the world’s six thousand languages as accumulations of endless transformations of the single African progenitor of all of them. ~ John McWhorter,
133:Pain (any pain-emotional, physical, mental) has a message. Once we get the pains message, and follow its advice, the pain goes away. ~ Peter McWilliams,
134:..Because when medical marijuana is fully accepted for what it is, we will see a phenomenon that makes Viagra's phenomenon seem limp. ~ Peter McWilliams,
135:Be willing to be uncomfortable. Be comfortable being uncomfortable. It may get tough, but it's a small price to pay for living a dream. ~ Peter McWilliams,
136:When a note stays unchanged for an eternity, it's unexpected, suggesting either plainchant, willful modernist contrarianism, or bagpipes. ~ John McWhorter,
137:Write 10 times: 'Fear is my friend. Fear is the energy to do my best in a new situation.' You don't have to believe it; just write it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
138:Don't accept the limitations of other people who claim things are 'unchangeable'. If it's written in stone, bring your hammer and chisel. ~ Peter McWilliams,
139:The most recent studies both behavioral and biological, indicate one's sexual orientation is genetic — something determined at conception. ~ Peter McWilliams,
140:For writing, getting off our buts means getting on our butts-putting it into a chair and not moving from the chair for a set period of time. ~ Peter McWilliams,
141:Learn to ask for what you want. The worst people can do is not give you what you ask for which is precisely where you were before you asked. ~ Peter McWilliams,
142:Stephen Jay Gould has told us that evolution is geared not toward progressive “fitness” but toward simply filling available ecological niches. ~ John McWhorter,
143:Guilt is anger directed at ourselves - at what we did or did not do. Resentment is anger directed at others - at what they did or did not do. ~ Peter McWilliams,
144:You have to follow the old rule for a while. In fact, once you master the old rule, you are then the master-and masters get to change things. ~ Peter McWilliams,
145:You cannot kill and eat animals and expect to help them, much less challenge the food system that profits from our choice to keep eating them. ~ James McWilliams,
146:In reality, serendipity accounts for one percent of the blessings we receive in life, work and love. The other 99 percent is due to our efforts. ~ Peter McWilliams,
147:The amount of power freed by telling yourself you no longer choose to put energy into something can be remarkable. Be prepared for extra energy. ~ Peter McWilliams,
148:Because all languages are and have always been in a state of continual transformation, anything we see in a language today is the result of change. ~ John McWhorter,
149:Negative thinking is always expensive--dragging us down mentally, emotionally, and physically--hence I refer to any indulgence in it as a luxury. ~ Peter McWilliams,
150:Positive thoughts: joy, happiness, fulfillment, achievement, worthiness, have positive results: enthusiasm, calm, well-being, ease, energy, love. ~ Peter McWilliams,
151:Negative thinking is always expensive -- dragging us down mentally, emotionally, and physically -- hence I refer to any indulgence in it as a luxury. ~ Peter McWilliams,
152:Send the light of your own loving ahead of you. When you get there, the loving will have prepared a place for you. Be kind, gentle, and enjoy the journey. ~ Peter McWilliams,
153:The ongoing successful treatment of my depression is the single most important positive step I have taken in my life, hence my enthusiasm for the subject. ~ Peter McWilliams,
154:Shakespeare, as it happens, writing as the 1500s became the 1600s, wrote in a period when English was just becoming what we would recognize as “our language. ~ John McWhorter,
155:Bacteria, toads, wallabies, and orangutans do not fall on a cline of increasing closeness to God; all four are equally well suited to leading the lives they lead. ~ John McWhorter,
156:The more severe the pain or illness, the more severe will be the necessary changes. These may involve breaking bad habits, or acquiring some new and better ones. ~ Peter McWilliams,
157:There is no answer to any of these questions. It's a matter of time and timing, of seas and seasons, of breathing in and breathing out. It's a matter of balance. ~ Peter McWilliams,
158:Because of that ever-looming implication of futurity whenever one said going to, after a while going to started to actually mean the future rather than actual going. ~ John McWhorter,
159:Real project work is work that is chosen by children and done by children, with the help of attentive adults who are there to mentor, facilitate, and support. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
160:When we realize one Dream, sometimes a deeper Dream reveals itself. At other times a parallel Dream appears. The one that scares the hell out of you is probably it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
161:Every time we give our word, it counts. For the most part, people give their word entirely too often. Our word is a precious commodity and should be treated as such. ~ Peter McWilliams,
162:However close you can be to a vegan diet and further from the mean American diet, the better you are for the planet." quoted by Gidon Eshel (Bard College geographer) ~ James McWilliams,
163:There is a thirst for Love which no human relation can quench. It is only the Divine's love that can satisfy that thirst.

MCW, vol 14, Words Of The Mother II, p.121 ~ The Mother,
164:To visualize is to see what is not there, what is not real - a dream. To visualize is, in fact, to make visual lies. Visual lies, however, have a way of coming true. ~ Peter McWilliams,
165:Ultimately, censorship comes down to taste. What offends me may enlighten you. Do you want me deciding-based on my taste-what you should or should not be exposed to? ~ Peter McWilliams,
166:If language arose approximately when sapiens did, then a combination of the fossil record and modern comparative genetic analysis can point us to language’s time of origin. ~ John McWhorter,
167:(I must note that the copy editor for this book, upon reading this section, actually allowed me to use singular they throughout the book. Here’s to them in awed gratitude!) ~ John McWhorter,
168:Depression is an illness that robs one of the meaning of life. Heal the illness. As the depression heals, enthusiasm, well-being, and a sense of life's purpose will return. ~ Peter McWilliams,
169:I'm tired of people thinking that Libertarians don't have morality- that they don't have values. that's a lot of hogwash. Libertarians are the ONLY politicians with values. ~ Peter McWilliams,
170:The news media are, for the most part, the bringers of bad news… and it’s not entirely the media’s fault, bad news gets higher ratings and sells more papers than good news. ~ Peter McWilliams,
171:Fill your life with people who applaud your positive thoughts, feelings, and actions; who encourage you toward more and better; who know how to praise the good and beautiful. ~ Peter McWilliams,
172:is no logical conception of “language” as “proper” speech as distinguished from “quaint,” “broken” varieties best kept down on the farm or over on the other side of the tracks. ~ John McWhorter,
173:Laughter is essential to our equilibrium, to our well-being, to our aliveness. If we're not well, laughter helps us get well. If we are well, laughter helps us stay that way. ~ Peter McWilliams,
174:The news media are, for the most part, the bringers of bad news... and it's not entirely the media's fault, bad news gets higher ratings and sells more papers than good news. ~ Peter McWilliams,
175:and a great, choking moan tore from Yossarian’s throat as McWatt turned again, dipped his wings once in salute, decided oh, well, what the hell, and flew into a mountain. Colonel ~ Joseph Heller,
176:..we are trained as children to get good grades, get a good job, get a good spouse, get children, get ahead. In all this getting we get something else: anxiety and depression. ~ Peter McWilliams,
177:I'm a confirmed negaholic. I don't just see a glass that's half full and call it half-empty; I see a glass that's completely full and worry that someone's going to tip it over. ~ Peter McWilliams,
178:More to the point, though, a language consists not only of isolated words but also sounds and sentence structures, and these are at all times changing along with the word meanings. ~ John McWhorter,
179:While goals are chosen, a purpose is discovered. Our purpose is something we have been doing all along, and will continue to do, regardless of circumstances, until the day we die ~ Peter McWilliams,
180:Defending her scandalized ex-husband had cost Jenna Wheeler’s family greatly in the suburban standings—but the murder of Haley McWaid must have made life here fairly untenable. Parents ~ Harlan Coben,
181:The reason we feel hurt and anger when things and people outside us let us down is because we believe those things and people shouldn't. Well, sorry, that's not life here on earth. ~ Peter McWilliams,
182:Gays seem to be at the bottom of the pecking order: no matter how far down the pecking order another group is, its members still feel superior to and have no problem picking on gays. ~ Peter McWilliams,
183:We can do anything we want. The next time you hear yourself saying, to another-and especially yourself-I Can't, take a deep breath and say instead, My resources are otherwise engaged. ~ Peter McWilliams,
184:When we put things off until some future-probably mythical-Laterland, we drag the past into the future. The burden of yesterday's incompletions is a heavy load to carry. Don't carry it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
185:When you start noticing even a small portion of all there is to be grateful for, you'll find there is no room for lack, hurt, or want. The attitude of gratitude: the great, full feeling. ~ Peter McWilliams,
186:You're a gay detective? I don't think I've ever met one before."

"Of course you have," McWhirter put in emphatically. "You just didn't know they were gay. That's the whole point. ~ Richard Stevenson,
187:Learn to forgive fully and completely. If you want health, wealth, and happiness, you can't afford the luxury of lugging around all those unforgiven, unforgotten past events. Let them go. ~ Peter McWilliams,
188:This is our true wealth: the riches we take with us, the joy we carry inside, the support we learn to give ourselves, and the self-loving that flows as a natural by-product of that support. ~ Peter McWilliams,
189:The state, frankly, could care less. Historically, the state has been able to use any religious point of view for its own ends. . . . The examples of government misusing religion are endless. ~ Peter McWilliams,
190:We are not responsible for every thought that goes wandering through our mind. We are, however, responsible for the ones we hold there. We're especially responsible for the one's we put there. ~ Peter McWilliams,
191:Willingness opens the doors to knowledge, direction, and achievement. Be willing to know, be willing to do, be willing to create a positive result. Be willing, especially, to follow your dream. ~ Peter McWilliams,
192:Now independent, the Moldovans continue to encourage a perception of “Moldovan” as a distinct “language” from Romanian, in part because Romanians tend to dismiss their dialect as sounding uneducated. ~ John McWhorter,
193:Some people think that meditation takes time away from physical accomplishment. Taken to extremes, of course, that's true. Most people, however, find that meditation creates more time than it takes. ~ Peter McWilliams,
194:In this chapter we will go beyond the one type of change we saw in chapter 1, and embrace the word in general as a fundamentally impermanent association of a sequence of sounds with a particular meaning. ~ John McWhorter,
195:Family culture is the manifestation of your priorities — not what you say, not what you wish were true, but what you actually do on a daily basis. You create your family culture with your choices. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
196:To change rules that are already in place takes time, energy, perseverance and a lot of hard work. You only have so many of these assets at your disposal, so choose with care the rules you want to change. ~ Peter McWilliams,
197:Most of what's around us we take for granted. We ignore it. Appreciation-spending time looking for the good-helps us overcome one of the primary limitations to enjoying the wealth we already have: ignoreance. ~ Peter McWilliams,
198:..Since depression is a genetic biological illness, like diabetes, or low thyroid, it wasn't lack of character, laziness, or something I could "snap out of"-it would be like trying to snap out of a toothache. ~ Peter McWilliams,
199:First, all relationships are with yourself-and sometimes they involve other people. Second, the most important relationship in your life-the one you have, like it or not, until the day you die-is with yourself. ~ Peter McWilliams,
200:Be easier on yourself, on everyone, on everything. Suspend your judgments on the way things should be, must be, and ought to be. Suspending judgments gives you greater ease. Consider ease the antidote for disease. ~ Peter McWilliams,
201:If you want to learn about how humans differ, study cultures. However, if you want insight as to what makes all humans worldwide the same, beyond genetics, there are few better places to start than how language works. ~ John McWhorter,
202:The laws against public nudity make no sense. The idea that Jerry Falwell can go topless while Cindy Crawford cannot is an absolute affront to logic, common sense and the 5000 year human struggle for aesthetic taste. ~ Peter McWilliams,
203:For the most part, most people most often choose comfort - the familiar, the time-honored, the well-worn but well-known. After a lifetime of choosing between comfort and risk, we are left with the life we currently have. ~ Peter McWilliams,
204:The late twentieth century has been the locus of a new lurch on English’s time line in America, where oratorical, poetic, and compositional craft of a rigorously exacting nature has been cast to the margins of the culture. ~ John McWhorter,
205:Anger begins as an inner twinge. We sense something long before it blossoms (explodes?) into an emotional tirade. If we listen to this twinge -- and follow its advice -- the emotional outburst (or in burst) is not needed. ~ Peter McWilliams,
206:The media tends to report rumors, speculations, and projections as facts... How does the media do this? By quoting some 'expert'... you can always find some expert who will say something hopelessly hopeless about anything. ~ Peter McWilliams,
207:Our thoughts create our reality-not instantly, necessarily, as in "Poof! There it is" - but eventually. Where we put our focus - our inner and outer vision - is the direction we tend to go. That's our desire, our intention. ~ Peter McWilliams,
208:When thought and action are combined, the results are powerful-among the most powerful forces on earth. The combination of successful communication-the sharing of thoughts-and physical action can, literally, move mountains. ~ Peter McWilliams,
209:When people don't understand that being uncomfortable is part of the process of achievement, they use the discomfort as a reason not to do. They don't get what they want. We must learn to tolerate discomfort in order to grow. ~ Peter McWilliams,
210:Your Master Teacher knows all you need to learn, the perfect timing for your learning it, and the ideal way of teaching it to you. You don't create a Master Teacher -- that's already been done. You discover your Master Teacher. ~ Peter McWilliams,
211:Desire happiness, aspire to gratitude, long for health, crave compassion, seek satisfaction, lust after God, however & whatever you perceive God to be, want to love yourself, others & everything around you more and more each day ~ Peter McWilliams,
212:You are powerful. Sorry. Hate to be the bearer of bad news. You are. You can continue arm wrestling with yourself, or you can use both arms, your whole heart, and all your strength to wrestle with greatness. The choice is yours. ~ Peter McWilliams,
213:We can consciously end our life almost anytime we choose. This ability is an endowment, like laughing and blushing, given to no other animal... in any given moment, by not exercising the option of suicide, we are choosing to live ~ Peter McWilliams,
214:To learn how to do, we need something real to focus on — not a task assigned by someone else, but something we want to create, something we want to understand. Not an empty exercise but a meaningful, self-chosen undertaking. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
215:God within is leading us always aright even when we are in the bonds of the ignorance; but then, though the goal is sure, it is attained by circlings and deviations.

Sri Aurobindo
MCW, vol 10, On Thoughts and Aphorisms, p.258 ~ Sri Aurobindo,
216:All the things you think you should have done that you didn't do, and all the things you did that you think you shouldn't have done, accept them. You did (or didn't ) do them. That's reality. That's what happened. No changing the past. ~ Peter McWilliams,
217:I must conquer my loneliness alone. I must be happy with myself or I have nothing to offer you. Two halves have little choice but to join; and yes, they do make a whole. But two wholes when they coincide... that is beauty. That is love. ~ Peter McWilliams,
218:Pettiness seems to go hand in hand with vindictiveness. The smaller the person, the larger the need for revenge. This may account for the fact that some consensual crimes have stiffer penalties than do most crimes with innocent victims. ~ Peter McWilliams,
219:We have to make reasonable inferences, assume similarity over difference, and learn to accept some ambiguity while conceding the strong likelihood that the animals we kill and eat are emotional beings that suffer when we kill and eat them. ~ James McWilliams,
220:Her comparison of grass-fed versus conventional production, published in leading peer-reviewed journals, found that, pound for pound, grass-fed beef had an overall carbon footprint that was roughly 20 percent higher than feedlot production.53 ~ James McWilliams,
221:Some of what we learned early on turned out to be true (the earth is round; if you want a friend be a friend; cleanliness is next to impossible) and some of it turned out to be false (Santa Claus; the Tooth Fairy; Kansas is more fun than Oz). ~ Peter McWilliams,
222:Prescriptive grammar has spread linguistic insecurity like a plague among English speakers for centuries, numbs us to the aesthetic richness of non-standard speech, and distracts us from attending to genuine issues of linguistic style in writing. ~ John McWhorter,
223:The only difference between fear and excitement is what we label it. The two are pretty much the same physiological/emotional reaction. With fear, we put a negative spin on it: "Oh no!" With excitement, we give it some positive english: "Oh, boy!" ~ Peter McWilliams,
224:Drugs, gambling, and prostitution are the Big Three underground 'moneymakers' in consensual crime. There would be, however, significant boosts to the economy if the stigma attached to the other consensual crimes were eliminated through legalization. ~ Peter McWilliams,
225:Polish has developed unimpeded; someone put their foot out and tripped English. The human grammar is a fecund weed, like grass. Languages like English, Persian, and Mandarin Chinese are mowed lawns, indicative of an interruption in natural proliferation. ~ John McWhorter,
226:..Fear is the energy to do your best in a new situation. The feeling of fear (anxiety, nervousness, shyness, or any of its other aliases) is really "preparation energy". It's getting you ready to excel, to succeed, to do your best and to learn the most. ~ Peter McWilliams,
227:In an ideal world, the time English speakers devote to steeling themselves against, and complaining about, things like Billy and me, singular they, and impact as a verb would be better spent attending to genuine matters of graceful oral and written expression. ~ John McWhorter,
228:Linguists traditionally observe that esteemed writers have been using they as a gender-neutral pronoun for almost a thousand years. As far back as the 1400s, in the Sir Amadace story, one finds the likes of Iche mon in thayre degree (“Each man in their degree”). ~ John McWhorter,
229:There is a vast gulf in complexity, subtlety, and flexibility between human beings and other animals in regard to language ability, and that gulf is a large part of why humans have been such a successful species of such disproportionate influence on this planet. ~ John McWhorter,
230:I feel that I am entitled to take medicinal marijuana. In general, I believe that everyone who has a doctor's prescription is entitled to take marijuana. I, however, do not believe that my day in court should be taken from me, and that's essentially what's happening. ~ Peter McWilliams,
231:Our sense of what American English is has upended our relationship to articulateness, our approach to writing, and how (and whether) we impart it to the young, our interest in poetry, and our conception of what it is, and even our response to music and how we judge it. ~ John McWhorter,
232:The philosophy of project-based homeschooling — this particular approach to helping children become strong thinkers, learners, and doers — is dependent upon the interest and the enthusiastic participation and leadership of the learners themselves, the children. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
233:Happiness requires courage, stamina, persistence, fortitude, perseverance, bravery, boldness, valor, vigor, concentration, solidity, substance, backbone, grit, guts, moxie, nerve, pluck, resilience, spunk, tenacity, tolerance, will power, chutzpah, and a good thesaurus. ~ Peter McWilliams,
234:I see nothing wrong with the human trait to desire. In fact, I consider it integral to our success mechanism. Becoming attached to what we desire is what causes the trouble. If you must have it in order to be happy, then you are denying the happiness of the here and now. ~ Peter McWilliams,
235:Mark and I were launching an international awareness campaign that would eventually result in thousands of letters from all over the world asking Governor McWherter “what does ‘national security’ have to do with the documented rape and molestation of a child’s mind and body? ~ Cathy O Brien,
236:Heroes became heroes flaws and all gives us hope. "You mean I don't have to be perfect to fulfill my Dream, to make a contribution?" Hardly. It takes commitment, courage, and passion to live a dream and make a contribution. Heroes had these qualities along with their flaws. ~ Peter McWilliams,
237:If you want physical peace, stop the struggle of life. Don't push the body beyond its fatigue point. Rest the body enough. Exercise it enough. Then let it be. ... If you want peace with others, don't fight them. Go your own way. Live your own life. If some walk with you, fine. ~ Peter McWilliams,
238:No matter what you do, no matter how stupid, dumb or damaging you judge it to be, there is a lesson to be learned from it. No matter what happens to you, no matter how unfair, inequitable or wrong, there's something you can take from the situation and use for your advancement. ~ Peter McWilliams,
239:For many, negative thinking is a habit, which over time, becomes an addiction... A lot of people suffer from this disease because negative thinking is addictive to each of the Big Three - the mind, the body, and the emotions. If one doesn't get you, the others are waiting in the wings. ~ Peter McWilliams,
240:People do not know how important is faith, how faith is miracle, creator of miracles. If you expect at every moment to be lifted up and pulled towards the Divine, He will come to lift you and He will be there, quite close, closer, ever closer.

MCW, vol. 13, Words of the Mother - I, p.76 ~ The Mother,
241:Proto-Germanic had not one but three genders—masculine, feminine, and neuter—and in some cases modern Germanic languages retain all three, in such user-hostile cases as each piece of silverware in German having a different gender: spoons are boys, forks are girls, knives are hermaphrodites. ~ John McWhorter,
242:Everyone thinks they can be a writer. Most people dont understand whats involved. The real writers persevere. The ones that dont either dont have enough fortitude and they probably wouldnt succeed anyway, or they fall in love with the glamour of writing as opposed to the writing of writing. ~ Peter McWilliams,
243:The difference between educated people and uneducated people is that educated people have been opened up to the notion that you can disagree without fighting; whereas uneducated people, in conversation, seek to always agree--everybody agrees and agrees and that's considered basic social libation. ~ John McWhorter,
244:Acceptance is not a state of passivity or inaction. We are not saying you can't change the world, right wrongs or replace evil with good. Acceptance is, in fact, the first step to successful action. If you don't fully accept a situation precisely the way it is, you will have difficulty changing it. ~ Peter McWilliams,
245:There are many misconceptions about depression-mostly negative. Unfortunately, because depressed people think negatively about depression and its treatment, they don't get help, which allows the depression to worsen, which leads to more negative thinking, which produces a vicious cycle of suffering. ~ Peter McWilliams,
246:Marijuana is the finest anti-nausea medication known to science, and our leaders have lied about this consistently. [Arresting people for] medical marijuana is the most hideous example of government interference in the private lives of individuals. It's an outrage within an outrage within an outrage. ~ Peter McWilliams,
247:Prison is a crash course in the darker side of life. Few survive it without becoming a different person: more cynical, jaded, fearful, angry. Its hard to trust again, hard to believe, easy to hate a system that destroyed your life behind the pompous pretense of saving you from yourself, for your own good. ~ Peter McWilliams,
248:You can multiply your possibilities, enlarge and increase them... When one discovers one's psychic being within, at the same time there develop and manifest, quite unexpectedly, things one could not do at all before and which one didn't think were in one's nature.

MCW, vol. 9, Questions and Answers 1957-1958, p.396 ~ The Mother,
249:Lifelong learning” is a phrase so trite it makes your teeth hurt, but being a good mentor means showing your child that learning doesn’t stop when someone hands you a diploma. Not by treacly speech, but by everyday immersion in a life that celebrates learning interesting things and doing challenging, meaningful work. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
250:Contrary to popular belief, a good number of transvestites-both male and female-are also heterosexual. Just because they want to get dressed up like the opposite sex does not necessarily mean they want to go to bed with the same sex. Some have successful heterosexual marriages & enjoy the most delightful shopping experiences. ~ Peter McWilliams,
251:I am the representative of all the sick people and what they are doing to me is only the worst case right now, but there will be others. I am living on borrowed time anyway. I owe this part of my life to luck and modern medical science. But I can't imagine what the rest of it will be like if they won't let me use medical marijuana. ~ Peter McWilliams,
252:There is more empty space in the book you're holding, than book. The electrons in the atoms of the book are moving so fast, they give the illusion of solid ink on solid paper. It's not. It's just an illusion. If all the electrons would stop moving for even an instant, the book would not just crumble into dust, it would disappear. Poof ~ Peter McWilliams,
253:This is a lifetime of good-byes. In our time, we will say good-bye to cherished people, things, and ideas. Eventually, we say good-bye to life itself with our death. Learn to say a good good-bye. Allow yourself to mourn each loss. As with a physical wound, the body has its own schedule for healing. It will tell you when it has healed. ~ Peter McWilliams,
254:We have a problem with drugs? Let's declare war on drugs! We have a problem with crime? Let's declare war on crime! We have a problem with violence? Let's declare war on violence! The deeply ingrained American attitude that we can solve any problem w/enough force creates, feeds, & rewards the epidemic of violence we are currently experiencing. ~ Peter McWilliams,
255:Pain (any pain--emotional, physical, mental) has a message. The information it has about our life can be remarkably specific, but it usually falls into one of two categories: We would be more alive if we did more of this and Life would be more lovely if we did less of that. Once we get the pain's message, and follow its advice, the pain goes away. ~ Peter McWilliams,
256:AIDS has come upon us with cruel abandon. It has forced us to confront and deal with the frailty of our being and the reality of death. It has forced us into a realization that we must cherish every moment of the glorious experience of this thing we call life. We are learning to value our own lives of our loved ones as if any moment may be the last. ~ Peter McWilliams,
257:Pain (any pain--emotional, physical, mental) has a message.
The information it has about our life can be remarkably
specific, but it usually falls into one of two categories: We
would be more alive if we did more of this and Life would be
more lovely if we did less of that. Once we get the pain's
message, and follow its advice, the pain goes away.
~ Peter McWilliams,
258:If we want the freedom to take part in our bit of differentness, then we must allow others their rights to take part in theirs, as long as they do not harm the person or property of a non-consenting other, of course. IT'S JUST common sense. It's also constitutional and it forms the cornerstone of the American ideal: free individual expression, tolerance and compassion. ~ Peter McWilliams,
259:The part of us that feels anger and depression is the same part that feels peace and love. If you refuse to feel the anger and the pain of a loss, you will not be able to feel anything else until that area heals. In other words, stay out of your own way. Let yourself feel bad if you want to feel bad. Feel joy, too. Healing is taking place. Give yourself the gift of healing. ~ Peter McWilliams,
260:Avoid People and Situations That Upset You. Those things, people, situations, and experiences you dont like--avoid them. Stay away. Walk away. Do something else. Some might call this cowardly. I call it smart. The world is brimming with things, people, and experiences. We will never experience all of them if we live to be 10,000. So why not associate with the ones that naturally please you? ~ Peter McWilliams,
261:We instinctively feel an overwhelming desire to take sides: organic or conventional, fair or free trade, "pure" or genetically engineered food, wild or farm-raised fish. Like most things in life, though, the sensible answer lies somewhere between the extremes, somewhere in that dull but respectable placed called the pragmatic center. To be a centrist when it comes to food is, unfortunately, to be a radical. ~ James McWilliams,
262:Światowe Banki Centralne wpompowały w sumie 8,7 biliona dolarów w system bankowy, żeby „ocalić świat”. Ratowanie banków kosztowało więcej niż całość wydatków na prowadzenie II wojny światowej, pierwszej wojny w Zatoce, wysłanie człowieka na Księżyc, posprzątanie po ubiegłorocznym tsunami w Japonii oraz budżet wszystkich krajów afrykańskich za ostatnie 20 lat, a wszystko razem wzięte. David McWilliams, PunkEconomics ~ Anonymous,
263:Poetry that tames language into tight structures and yet manages to move us comes off as a feat, paralleling ballet or athletic talent in harnessing craft to beauty. When poetry is based on a less rigorous, more impressionistic definition of craft, its appeal depends more on whether one happens to be individually constituted to “get it” for various reasons. The audience narrows: poetry becomes more like tai chi than baseball. ~ John McWhorter,
264:That the religious right completely took over the word Christian is a given. At one time, phrases such as Christian charity and Christian tolerance were used to denote kindness and compassion. To perform a "Christian" act meant an act of giving, of acceptance, of toleration. Now, Christian is invariably linked to right-wing conservative political thought -- Christian nation, Christian morality, Christian values, Christian family. ~ Peter McWilliams,
265:Under this law (Controlled Substances Act) a bureaucrat-usually not elected-decides whether or not a substance is dangerous and how dangerous that substance is. There's no more messing around with legislatures, presidents, or other bothersome formalities. When MDMA (ecstasy) was made illegal in 1986, no elected official voted on that. It was done "in house." People are now in jail because they did something that an administrator declared was wrong. ~ Peter McWilliams,
266:Children, even when very young, have the capacity for inventive thought and decisive action. They have worthwhile ideas. They make perceptive connections. They’re individuals from the start: a unique bundle of interests, talents, and preferences. They have something to contribute. They want to be a part of things.

It’s up to us to give them the opportunity to express their creativity, explore widely, and connect with their own meaningful work. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
267:sodium nitrate. This active compound, which is mined exclusively in South America, is employed primarily by organic farmers growing winter vegetables in dry soil. They use it as a soluble fertilizer to enhance the soil with nitrogen. In addition to the environmental costs of mining and shipping the compound, sodium nitrate contributes to groundwater pollution by furthering freshwater eutrophication (intensification of phosphorous and nitrogen) and salinization. ~ James McWilliams,
268:[I] would argue that native-born blacks are so vastly less "African" than actual Africans that calling ourselves 'African American' is not only illogical but almost disrespectful to African immigrants. Here are people who were born in Africa, speak African languages, eat African food, dance in African ways, remember African stories, and will spiritually always be a part of Africa -and we stand up and insist that we, too, are 'African' because Jesse Jackson said so? ~ John McWhorter,
269:None of this is to argue that growing plants for people to eat isn’t beset with uncontrollable variables as well. It’s only to note that, while there will always be ecological and ethical costs to growing food for billions of people, kale doesn’t have to be sent to a slaughterhouse. Kale doesn’t have to be fed with forage grown elsewhere. Kale won’t wander off to the highway and get hit by a semi. And if it dies a sudden death, rotten kale makes terrific compost. ~ James McWilliams,
270:Some adults attempting project-based learning make the same mistake, moving forward relentlessly and forgetting the importance of doubling back. Interests are identified, research is completed, and then there is a big, impressive third act that brings everything to a close. Unfortunately, though appealing in its simplicity, this highly controlled approach cheats children out of the opportunity to lay down multiple layers of learning. The adult is satisfied. Is the child? ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
271:...no matter how rhapsodic one waxes about the process of wresting edible plants and tamed animals from the sprawling vagaries of nature, there's a timeless, unwavering truth espoused by those who worked the land for ages: no matter how responsible agriculture is, it is essentially about achieving the lesser of evils. To work the land is to change the land, to shape it to benefit one species over another, and thus necessarily to tame what is wild. Our task should be to deliver our blows gently. ~ James McWilliams,
272:There are many things you can do to help your child direct and manage her own learning, but perhaps the most important one is choosing how and where to put your attention. Think hard about what you value most, because that’s what deserves your attention. Your child will respond by doing more of whatever earns your focus. You feed a behavior with your attention, and by feeding it, you create more of it — so be thoughtful about what you invest with that power. Contemplate your goals and intentions. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
273:McWorld is a product of popular culture driven by expansionist commerce. Its template is American, its form style. Its goods are as much images as matériel, an aesthetic as well as a product line. It is about culture as commodity, apparel as ideology. Its symbols are Harley-Davidson motorcycles and Cadillac motorcars hoisted from the roadways, where they once represented a mode of transportation, to the marquees of global market cafés like Harley-Davidson's and the Hard Rock where they become icons of lifestyle. ~ Benjamin Barber,
274:Allowing children to learn about what interests them is good, but helping them do it in a meaningful, rigorous way is better. Freedom and choice are good, but a life steeped in thinking, learning, and doing is better. It’s not enough to say, “Go, do whatever you like.” To help children become skilled thinkers and learners, to help them become people who make and do, we need a life centered around those experiences. We need to show them how to accomplish the things they want to do. We need to prepare them to make the life they want. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
275:The child who is a skilled thinker and adept learner can adjust to whatever the future doles out. She can spackle in those holes in her knowledge, and she knows how to acquire skills she needs to do things she wants to do. On the other hand, the child who shoveled down his prepared education but lost his curiosity, whose interests withered away and were replaced by a general malaise and desire to just be left alone — that child has a bagful of knowledge and skills with varying expiration dates and dubious ability or desire to acquire more. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
276:Did you ever notice that when you learn a foreign language, one of the first things you have to unlearn as an English speaker is the way we use do in questions and in negative statements? Take Did you ever notice . . . ? for example. Or I did not notice. We’re used to this do business, of course. But it’s kind of strange if you think about it. In this usage, do has no meaning whatsoever. It’s just there, but you have to use it. One cannot, speaking English, walk around saying things like Noticed you ever? or I not notice. English has something we will call meaningless do. ~ John McWhorter,
277:Intentional death is the essential feature of both systems. This claim is neither melodrama nor overstatement. It is a fact. Without systematic animal death, you have no animal farm—factory or otherwise, big or small, conventional or organic. It might take longer to get an animal to slaughter weight in the alternative arrangement, and that animal might have a lot more fun having sex and eating real food, but that animal’s foundational and functional role in the system remains exactly the same as in the factory farm: to get fat fast, die relatively young, and feed people food they do not need to eat. ~ James McWilliams,
278:This death, no matter how “humane,” no matter how respectfully administered, no matter how thickly clothed in feel-good rationalizations (“it had a good life”), essentially negates the moral consideration that inspired us to condemn factory farms in the first place. You can’t claim to truly care about an animal, alter her environment to demonstrate your care for that animal, and then, when the animal is nowhere near even the middle of her natural life, kill the animal for no vital reason. Doing so is morally and logically inconsistent. It’s worse than ambiguous. It’s wrong. It is, alas, the omnivore’s contradiction. ~ James McWilliams,
279:In fact, however, the most useful analogy to keep in mind is that a language is like a lava lamp. The “lava” slowly swirls and clumps and rises and falls in its fluid in an eternal, mesmerizing flow. Although constantly changing, in no sense is the clump of lava decaying—if one piece is beginning to drip or split into strands, we can be sure that a few inches away, other pieces are joining together. At any given point, we do not see the present configuration of the lava clump as somehow “better” than the one thirty seconds ago—the joy is in the infinite variations that the clump can take while at all times remaining consistent in its expressive motility. DIFFERENT SPINS ~ John McWhorter,
280:what would the masters do?

when people arn’t successful, they sometimes wonder, why not? they get answers, then they wonder why those answers don’t seem to meet their needs. they get the wrong answers, and they get upset about it. perhaps they’re really getting the right answers, but answering the wrong questions.

too many people ask nothing but “Why” questions.
they analyze and analyse problems - but no solution. “you can analyse a glass of water and you’re left with a lot of chemical components, but nothing you can drink”.

“Why?” questions can drive us crazy. “What?” questions drive us sane.

What questions lead us to practical solutions. ~ Peter McWilliams,
281:While researching his book Comfortably Unaware he did a quick calculation and discovered something that captures the folly of trying to have our steak and eat it too.56 He figured that if you had two acres of decent land and placed a cow on it, you would, after two years, have about four hundred pounds of edible beef. That same land, in the same amount of time, for much less of the cost, could produce five thousand pounds of kale and quinoa. This kale and quinoa could be obtained without the additional methane output or trampling impact and, most important, without the slaughter of sentient animals who would rather not be born in order to be killed and eaten by people with a warped sense of what cows were meant to do. ~ James McWilliams,
282:I became a vegan the day I watched a video of a calf being born on a factory farm. The baby was dragged away from his mother before he hit the ground. The helpless calf strained its head backwards to find his mother. The mother bolted after her son and exploded into a rage when the rancher slammed the gate on her. She wailed the saddest noise I’d ever heard an animal make, and then thrashed and dug into the ground, burying her face in the muddy placenta. I had no idea what was happening respecting brain chemistry, animal instinct, or whatever. I just knew that this was deeply wrong. I just knew that such suffering could never be worth the taste of milk and veal. I empathized with the cow and the calf and, in so doing, my life changed. ~ James McWilliams,
283:Modern Our Father, who is in heaven, blessed be your name. Give us our daily bread today. All three of these languages were rich, beautiful systems. There are no dogs to be seen. Middle English, the language of Chaucer, does not give the impression of being a “bastardization” of Old English or an example of “Old English in decay.” It was simply a new English of its own, the product of the gradual transformation of Old English, a transformation barely perceptible to Old English speakers themselves but visible to us by looking at texts over time. Similarly, Modern English, the language of Jane Austen, is surely not “bad” Middle English, but a new English in its own right. In other words, the progression from Old to Middle to Modem English shows us that contrary to the impression so easy ~ John McWhorter,
284:Moreover, a similar study published in 2009 by Stephanie K. McWhorter, which examined 1,149 navy recruits who’d never been convicted of sexual assault, replicated Lisak’s findings: 144 of the recruits (13 percent) turned out to be undetected rapists, and 71 percent of these 144 rapists were repeat offenders. An average of 6.3 rapes or attempted rapes could be attributed to each of them. Of the 865 rapes and attempted rapes reported in McWhorter’s study, 95 percent of the assaults were committed by just 96 individuals. As Lisak had reported, a small number of indiscernible offenders—only 8.4 percent of the population studied—were responsible for a staggering number of rapes. It should be noted that all of the subjects in the studies by Lisak and McWhorter participated voluntarily and that none of the undetected rapists identified by the researchers considered themselves rapists. ~ Jon Krakauer,
285:Project-based homeschooling is concerned with the underlying motives, habits, and attitudes of thinking and learning. However you feel about knowledge and skills — whether you’re a Latin-loving classicist or a relaxed unschooler or somewhere in-between — the point of project-based homeschooling is to devote some time to helping your child direct and manage his own learning. This does not have to comprise your entire curriculum. (Though it can.) It does not have to be the primary focus of your learning life. (Though it can be.) But it is essential. It is the part of your child’s education that is focused on that underlying machinery. It is the part of your child’s learning life that is focused on your child’s very specific and unique interests, talents, and passions. It is the part of your child’s learning when he is not only free to explore whatever interests him, but he receives attention, support, and consistent, dependable mentoring to help him succeed. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
286:You can’t separate how you approach life as a family and how your child will approach life as a thinker and learner. Your home is your child’s first workplace, first studio, first school — and your family members are your child’s first friends, first coworkers, first audience, first collaborators. You are his first mentor, and his siblings are his first teammates. You can’t separate learning from living. If your daily habits and routines don’t support your learning goals, you need to get them back into alignment. You want to build a family culture that celebrates and supports meaningful work. This is much more than saying the right thing — this is creating a lifestyle, a set of articulated beliefs, and a daily routine that encourage and sustain the life you want for your family. Building a family culture means being purposeful with your choices. What you say you value pales in importance next to the way you live from day to day, the choices you make, big and small. ~ Lori McWilliam Pickert,
287:It has become increasingly popular today to say that we live in an era of what Benjamin Barber has labelled ‘Jihad vs. McWorld’. The globalising powers of capitalism (‘McWorld’) are confronted with or resisted by the forces that Barber labels ‘Jihad’ – the variety of tribal particularisms and ‘narrowly conceived faiths’ opposed to the homogenising force of capital. Even those with a critical view of the growth of American empire and the expansion of what is erroneously termed the global market usually subscribe to this interpretation. In fact it is the critics who often argue that we need a better understanding of these local forms of resistance against the ‘universal’ force of the market.


The terms of this debate are quite misleading. We live in an age, to adapt Barber’s nomenclature, of ‘McJihad’. It is an age in which the mechanisms of what we call capitalism appear to operate, in certain critical instances, only by adopting the social force and moral authority of conservative Islamic movements. ~ Timothy Mitchell,
288:When I first began to criticize small farming, a number of critics (most of them small-scale farmers) roundly condemned me for supporting agribusiness. In my favorite example to date, Joel Salatin, who figures prominently in the grass-fed-beef chapter, condemned my “love affair with confinement hog factories”! This reaction, while wildly inaccurate, is nonetheless important to take seriously. Most notably, it’s almost comically indicative of how narrowly we have framed our options. Joel was serious. His accusation shows that by constricting our choices to animal products sourced from either industrial or nonindustrial operations, by holding up the animal-based alternatives to industrial agriculture as our only alternative, we have silenced discussion of the most fertile, most politically consequential, and most reform-minded choice: eating plants. This alternative to the alternatives changes the entire game of revolutionizing our broken food system. It places the food movement on a new foundation, infuses it with fresh energy, and promotes the only choice that keeps agribusiness executives awake at night. ~ James McWilliams,
289:Oh, those lapses, darling. So many of us walk around letting fly with “errors.” We could do better, but we’re so slovenly, so rushed amid the hurly-burly of modern life, so imprinted by the “let it all hang out” ethos of the sixties, that we don’t bother to observe the “rules” of “correct” grammar.

To a linguist, if I may share, these “rules” occupy the exact same place as the notion of astrology, alchemy, and medicine being based on the four humors. The “rules” make no logical sense in terms of the history of our language, or what languages around the world are like.

Nota bene: linguists savor articulateness in speech and fine composition in writing as much as anyone else. Our position is not—I repeat, not—that we should chuck standards of graceful composition. All of us are agreed that there is usefulness in a standard variety of a language, whose artful and effective usage requires tutelage. No argument there.

The argument is about what constitutes artful and effective usage. Quite a few notions that get around out there have nothing to do with grace or clarity, and are just based on misconceptions about how languages work.

Yet, in my experience, to try to get these things across to laymen often results in the person’s verging on anger. There is a sense that these “rules” just must be right, and that linguists’ purported expertise on language must be somehow flawed on this score. We are, it is said, permissive—perhaps along the lines of the notorious leftist tilt among academics, or maybe as an outgrowth of the roots of linguistics in anthropology, which teaches that all cultures are equal. In any case, we are wrong. Maybe we have a point here and there, but only that. ~ John McWhorter,
290:Yossarian went to bed early for safety and soon dreamed that he was fleeing almost headlong down an endless wooden staircase, making a loud, staccato clatter with his heels. Then he woke up a little and realized someone was shooting at him with a machine gun. A tortured, terrified sob rose in his throat. His first thought was that Milo was attacking the squadron again, and he rolled off his cot to the floor and lay underneath in a trembling, praying ball, his heart thumping like a drop forge, his body bathed in a cold sweat. There was no noise of planes. A drunken, happy laugh sounded from afar. 'Happy New Year, Happy New Year!' a triumphant familiar voice shouted hilariously from high above between the short, sharp bursts of machine gun fire, and Yossarian understood that some men had gone as a prank to one of the sandbagged machine-gun emplacements Milo had installed in the hills after his raid on the squadron and staffed with his own men.
Yossarian blazed with hatred and wrath when he saw he was the victim of an irresponsible joke that had destroyed his sleep and reduced him to a whimpering hulk. He wanted to kill, he wanted to murder. He was angrier than he had ever been before, angrier even than when he had slid his hands around McWatt's neck to strangle him. The gun opened fire again. Voices cried 'Happy New Year!' and gloating laughter rolled down from the hills through the darkness like a witch's glee. In moccasins and coveralls, Yossarian charged out of his tent for revenge with his .45, ramming a clip of cartridges up into the grip and slamming the bolt of the gun back to load it. He snapped off the safety catch and was ready to shoot. He heard Nately running after him to restrain him, calling his name. The machine gun opened fire once more from a black rise above the motor pool, and orange tracer bullets skimmed like low-gliding dashes over the tops of the shadowy tents, almost clipping the peaks. Roars of rough laughter rang out again between the short bursts. Yossarian felt resentment boil like acid inside him; they were endangering his life, the bastards! ~ Joseph Heller,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



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