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branches ::: Tibetan Buddhism

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subject class:Buddhism
subject:Buddhism
class:subject

--- Shastras

The study of Indian Buddhist texts called shastras is central to Tibetan Buddhist scholasticism. Since the late 11th century, traditional Tibetan monastic colleges generally organized the exoteric study of Buddhism into "five great textual traditions" (zhungchen-nga).[93]

  Abhidharma
    Asanga's Abhidharma-samuccaya
    Vasubandhu's Abhidharma-koa
  Prajnaparamita
    Abhisamayalankara
    Shantideva's Bodhisattvacaryvatra
  Madhyamaka
    Nagarjuna's Mlamadhyamakakrik
    Aryadeva's Four Hundred Verses (Catuhsataka)
    Candrakrti's Madhyamakvatra
    ntarakita's Madhyamkalakra
    Shantideva's Bodhisattvacaryvatra
  Pramana
    Dharmakirti's Pramavarttika
    Dignga's Prama-samuccaya
  Vinaya
    Gunaprabha's Vinayamula Sutra

--- Other important texts
  Also of great importance are the "Five Treatises of Maitreya" including the influential Ratnagotravibhga, a compendium of the tathgatagarbha literature, and the Mahayanasutralankara, a text on the Mahayana path from the Yogacara perspective, which are often attributed to Asanga. Practiced focused texts such as the Yogcrabhmi-stra and Kamalala's Bhvankrama are the major sources for meditation.

  While the Indian texts are often central, original material by key Tibetan scholars is also widely studied and collected into editions called sungbum.[94] The commentaries and interpretations that are used to shed light on these texts differ according to tradition. The Gelug school for example, use the works of Tsongkhapa, while other schools may use the more recent work of Rim movement scholars like Jamgon Kongtrul and Jamgon Ju Mipham Gyatso.

  A corpus of extra-canonical scripture, the treasure texts (terma) literature is acknowledged by Nyingma practitioners, but the bulk of the canon that is not commentary was translated from Indian sources. True to its roots in the Pla system of North India, however, Tibetan Buddhism carries on a tradition of eclectic accumulation and systematisation of diverse Buddhist elements, and pursues their synthesis. Prominent among these achievements have been the Stages of the Path and mind training literature, both stemming from teachings by the Indian scholar Atia.


--- Tantric literature
Main article: Tantras (Buddhism)

In Tibetan Buddhism, the Buddhist Tantras are divided into four or six categories, with several sub-categories for the highest Tantras.

In the Nyingma, the division is into Outer Tantras (Kriyayoga, Charyayoga, Yogatantra); and Inner Tantras (Mahayoga, Anuyoga, Atiyoga (Tib. Dzogchen)), which correspond to the "Anuttarayogatantra".[95] For the Nyingma school, important tantras include the Guhyagarbha tantra, the Guhyasamaja tantra,[96] the Kulayarja Tantra and the 17 Dzogchen tantras.

In the Sarma schools, the division is:[97]

  Kriyayoga - These have an emphasis on purification and ritual acts and include texts like the Majurmlakalpa.
  Charyayoga - Contain "a balance between external activities and internal practices", mainly referring to the Mahvairocana Abhisabodhi Tantra.
  Yogatantra, is mainly concerned with internal yogic techniques and includes the Tattvasagraha Tantra.
  Anuttarayogatantra, contains more advanced techniques such as subtle body practices and is subdivided into:
    Mother class tantras, which emphasize illusory body and completion stage practices and includes the Guhyasamaja tantra and Yamantaka tantra.
    Father class, which emphasize the development stage and clear light mind and includes the Hevajra Tantra and Cakrasamvara Tantra.
    Non-dual class, which balance the above elements, and mainly refers to the Kalacakra tantra

It is important to note that the root tantras themselves are almost unintelligible without the various Indian and Tibetan commentaries, therefore, they are never studied without the use of the tantric commentarial apparatus.

--- Transmission and realization
There is a long history of oral transmission of teachings in Tibetan Buddhism. Oral transmissions by lineage holders traditionally can take place in small groups or mass gatherings of listeners and may last for seconds (in the case of a mantra, for example) or months (as in the case of a section of the Tibetan Buddhist canon). It is held that a transmission can even occur without actually hearing, as in Asanga's visions of Maitreya.

An emphasis on oral transmission as more important than the printed word derives from the earliest period of Indian Buddhism, when it allowed teachings to be kept from those who should not hear them.[98] Hearing a teaching (transmission) readies the hearer for realization based on it. The person from whom one hears the teaching should have heard it as one link in a succession of listeners going back to the original speaker: the Buddha in the case of a sutra or the author in the case of a book. Then the hearing constitutes an authentic lineage of transmission. Authenticity of the oral lineage is a prerequisite for realization, hence the importance of lineages.




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--- PRIMARY CLASS


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--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [0]


The World of Tibetan Buddhism An Overview of Its Philosophy and Practice
Tibetan Buddhism
Turning Confusion into Clarity A Guide to the Foundation Practices of Tibetan Buddhism
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--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


Tibetan Buddhism ::: A form of Vajrayana Buddhism practiced within Tibet. Much of Tantric practice finds its links to this style of Buddhism.


--- QUOTES [117 / 117 - 20 / 20] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   39 Chamtrul Rinpoche
   22 Jetsun Milarepa
   8 Geshe Kelsang Gyatso
   7 Patrul Rinpoche
   5 Jigme Lingpa
   4 Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye
   3 Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche
   3 Mingyur Rinpoche
   2 Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche
   2 Padampa Sangye
   2 Jamyang Khyentse Chokyi Lodro
   2 Gyatrul Rinpoche
   2 Dudjom Rinpoche
   2 Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche
   2 Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche
   2 Atisha
   2
   1 Yeshe Tsogyal
   1 Wikipedia
   1 Tulku Thondup
   1 Tsoknyi Rinpoche
   1 Tsogdruk Rinpoche
   1 Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche
   1 Karma-glin-pa
   1 Judith Simmer-Brown

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   3 Tenzin Palmo
   3 B Alan Wallace
   2 Scott Carney

1:In the gap between thoughts ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
2:My religion is not deceiving myself. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
3:My religion is to live and die without regret. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
4:Among others guard your speech; When alone guard your mind. ~ Atisha,
5:I study my mind and therefore all appearances are my texts. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
6:If you marry the dharma, realizations will be your children. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
7:Do not entertain hopes for realization, but practice all your life. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
8:Never underestimate your potential. Buddha nature is always there. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
9:In a state without thoughts, without distraction, abandon the watcher. ~ Padampa Sangye,
10:The greatest gift that you can give your teacher is doing your practice. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
11:If you do not let go of what binds you to samsara, you will never be free. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
12:Tomorrow or your next existence,Who knows which will come first? ~ Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche,
13:If you speak beautifully but behave badly, you become the worst of practitioners. ~ Padampa Sangye,
14:In the monastery of your heart, you have a temple where all Buddhas unite. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
15:Do not cling to the experience of emptiness, and appearances will purify themselves. ~ Yeshe Tsogyal,
16:One of the most common ways of not acknowledging our faults is to blame others. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
17:It is impossible to have complete control over the world. Control your mind instead. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
18:The affairs of the world will go on forever, do not delay the practice of meditation. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
19:Theoretical knowledge has no end. Take to heart and practice what you have learned. ~ Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche,
20:The young grasp at the future. The old grasp at the past. The wise remain in the present. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
21:Since you cannot tame the minds of others until you have tamed your own, begin by taming your own mind. ~ Atisha,
22:Anything is possible. The point is to keep your heart and mind open to the likelihood of change. ~ Tsoknyi Rinpoche,
23:If the meditator is able to use whatever occurs in his life as the path, his body becomes a retreat hut. ~ Jigme Lingpa,
24:The root cause of the lower realms is anger, therefore practice patience, even at the cost of your life. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
25:Faith is like pure eyes that enable us to see a pure and perfect world beyond the suffering world of samsara. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
26:All objects whether pleasant, unpleasant or neutral, are mere appearances to the mind just like things experienced in a dream ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
27:The most advanced technology and the most valuable asset that you will ever own is your mind. You will not find anything greater. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
28:Deep in the wild mountains, is a strange marketplace, where you can trade the hassle and noise of everyday life, for eternal Light. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
29:You might meet with many obstacles in your life. But if you are a true practitioner, you will use them as training grounds of the path. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
30:However beautiful a song may be, it is just a tune to those who do not understand its meaning. ~ Jetsun Milarepa, The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa ,
31:The mind is the source of all experience, and by changing the direction of the mind, we can change the quality of everything we experience. ~ Mingyur Rinpoche,
32:There is no such thing as a bad mind. There is only a mind that is untrained, or trained. Every being has the same potential, including you. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
33:Whenever you are in awe of an enlightened being, remember to be in awe of your own potential too. Because ultimately there is no difference. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
34:Train yourself, your mind, with the meditation techniques you have received, and don't twist the techniques to protect your delusion. ~ Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche,
35:True success is not measured by the amount of money that you have made. It is measured by the amount of wisdom and compassion that you have cultivated. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
36:In those who lack faithNothing positive will growJust as from a burnt seedNo green shoot will ever sprout. ~ Patrul Rinpoche, The Words of My Perfect Teacher ,
37:Mesmerized by the huge variety of perceptions, which are like the illusory reflections of the moon in water, beings wander endlessly in samsara's vicious cycle. ~ Jigme Lingpa,
38:Unless mind is tamed within,Outer enemies will be inexhaustible.If you tame the anger within,All enemies on earth will be pacified. ~ Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye,
39:Your path may be different to your family, friends, and country. But despite what they may think, it does not mean that you are going in the wrong direction. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
40:Becoming liberated from samsara is an inner journey. You can travel across the world and universe, and you will not find a way out. To get out, you must go in. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
41:The faith of total trust allows blessings to enter you.When the mind is free of doubt, whatever you wish can be achieved. ~ Patrul Rinpoche, The Words of My Perfect Teacher ,
42:The hungry are not satisfied by hearing about food; what they need is to eat. In the same way, just to know about Dharma is useless; it has to be practiced. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
43:The most precious gift that you could ever give to somebody is the Dharma.The most precious gift that you could ever give to yourself is the practice of it. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
44:For all who think of him with faithThe Buddha is there in front of themAnd will give empowerments and blessings. ~ Patrul Rinpoche, The Words of My Perfect Teacher ,
45:In order to look inward at this mind,Meditate without conceptual labeling.In order that appearances arise as text,Be a student of your own mind. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
46:Of course you must study the dharma to know exactly what you have to do, but you must also understand that an inch of practice can sometimes be worth a mile of theory. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
47:Practice is the act of rehearsing a behavior over and over, or engaging in an activity again and again, for the purpose of improving or mastering it, as in the phrase practice makes perfect. ~ ,
48:As you start to see your own potential, you will also begin to recognize it in every being around you. Buddha nature is not a special quality available to just a privileged few. ~ Mingyur Rinpoche,
49:Going for refuge to Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha means that we apply effort to receiving Buddha's blessings, to putting Dharma into practice, and to receiving help from Sangha. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
50:If we think of ourselves as cattle with ropes hanging from our noses, Dharma practitioners hold that rope in their own hands, whereas ordinary people are controlled by others. ~ Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche,
51:The speed and distance that you travel on the path is determined by the level of your courage to go in the opposite direction from what you have been doing since beginningless time. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
52:The speed and distance that you travel on the path is determined by the level of your courage to go in the opposite direction from what you have been doing since beginningless time. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
53:When desire or anger arise, the weakest practitioners immediately blame the outside world, and never practice. While the strongest practitioners immediately look inside, and always practice. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
54:The greater the practitioner, the smaller their eight worldly concerns. (The eight worldly concerns: Attachment to gain, pleasure, praise, and fame. Aversion to loss, pain, blame, and bad reputation) ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
55:No matter what you experience on the path, never give up. Because all of the buddhas became enlightened for you. They know your potential, and they will not stop helping until you are enlightened too. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
56:When you are away from your spiritual friends, and you feel lonely on the path, and you feel a lack of encouragement to go on, just remember that all of the enlightened beings are always with you. You are never alone. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
57:Never underestimate the importance of keeping your vows. Just how a castle will protect the king from being attacked by the enemy, the vows will protect your mind from being attacked by your mental afflictions. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
58:He who has made the Buddha his refugeCannot be killed by ten million demons;Through he transgress his vows or be tormented in mind,It is certain that he will go beyond rebirth. ~ Patrul Rinpoche, The Words of My Perfect Teacher ,
59:Rest in natural great peace, this exhausted mind,Beaten helpless by karma and neurotic thoughts,Like the relentless fury of the pounding wavesIn the infinite ocean of samsara.Rest in natural great peace. ~ Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche,
60:The practice of Dharma is to cut off all that binds you to samsara, to cultivate gentle love and compassion for all beings of the six realms, and at all times, without distraction, to thoroughly master your own mind. ~ Jamyang Khyentse Chokyi Lodro,
61:The practice of Dharma is to cut off all that binds you to samsara, to cultivate gentle love and compassion for all beings of the six realms, and at all times, without distraction, to thoroughly master your own mind. ~ Jamyang Khyentse Chokyi Lodro,
62:If you can practice the dharma with as much energy that you have been giving to your samsaric existence, sooner or later you will definitely become a buddha. It is your choice. You have been shown the way. Nobody can do it for you. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
63:Mental activity in the daytime creates a latent form of habitual thought which again transforms itself at night into various delusory visions sensed by the semi-consciousness. This is called the deceptive and magic-like Bardo of Dream. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
64:If deep down you continue to believe a tiny corner of samsara could be useful, or that it might even offer the ultimate solution to all your worldly problems, it will be extremely difficult to become a genuine spiritual seeker. ~ Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye,
65:Without any possessions, and locked inside a prison, an experienced meditator could still feel joyful and free. While so many people who may travel the world, and who have every luxury and freedom, are still feeling joyless and imprisoned. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
66:When the wind blows the clouds disappear, and all of space is filled with the light of the sun. Likewise, through the power of dharma practice, our obscurations will disappear, revealing what has been there since beginningless time; a buddha. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
67:If the root of a tree is medicinal, then the fruit will be medicine. But if the root is poisonous, then the fruit will be poison. Likewise, positive and negative qualities come from one's motivation, and not from one's physical actions in themselves. ~ Jigme Lingpa,
68:Just as light destroys darkness,Generosity destroys miserliness,Discipline destroys harmfulness.Patience destroys intolerance,Perseverance destroys laziness,Concentration destroys distraction, Wisdom destroys ignorance. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
69:Ask yourself: Do I want to continue being a great practitioner of ignorance, anger, and desire? Or do I want to become a great practitioner of wisdom and compassion instead?Do not waste your precious human rebirth by making the wrong decision. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
70:If anyone - superior or inferior - comes to hinder your practice, you should be unshakable, like an iron boulder pulled by a silk scarf. It won't do to be a weak character whose head bends in whichever direction the wind blows, like grass on a mountain pass. ~ Dudjom Rinpoche,
71:True teachers who do not deceive on the supreme path, are like great ships that rescue beings from the ocean of existence. They are like rain of nectar that covers the flames of karma and defilements. And they are like the sun and moon that dispels the darkness of ignorance. ~ Jigme Lingpa,
72:True teachers who do not deceive on the supreme path, are like great ships that rescue beings from the ocean of existence. They are like rain of nectar that covers the flames of karma and defilements. And they are like the sun and moon that dispels the darkness of ignorance. ~ Jigme Lingpa,
73:If you could take the bliss and happiness that comes from meditation, and put it into a bottle, it would be the most popular drink in the world. Of course, this is not possible. But the good news is that it is free, it is good for your health, and it is always available. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
74:No matter how insignificant you feel, no matter what problems you have, and no matter how many afflictive emotions fill your mind, never underestimate your potential for a single moment. Like a diamond covered by dirt, your buddha nature is there, waiting to be discovered. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
75:If you can remember that all beings have buddha nature, it will help you cultivate equanimity, because it will feel like everybody is your family. The greater your equanimity, the greater your love and compassion towards them, no matter who they are, or what they have done. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
76:Life is short and the time of death is uncertain; so apply yourself to meditation. Avoid doing evil, and acquire merit, to the best of your ability, even at the cost of life itself. In short: Act so that you have no cause to be ashamed of yourselves and hold fast to this rule. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
77:With enough heat, ice will turn into water, and then water will turn into steam. Likewise, with the heat of practice, intellectually understanding the nature of reality will eventually turn into the direct experience of it. As long as you keep practicing, this is guaranteed. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
78:Like a feather that is blown wherever the wind takes it, a weak and undisciplined mind is easily influenced by its environment and can be blown off the path.Until your mind becomes like a mountain that no wind can move, take care of who you mix with, and how you spend your time. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
79:Studying the dharma is a vital part of our path. But if we never practice what we have studied, it is as if we have built a great ship, and then left it on dry land. The ship must set sail. That is the only way that we can cross the ocean of samsara to the enlightened state of a buddha. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
80:It's very important to understand what creates samsara, also called the realm of confusion. Samsara does not arise from external circumstances. It's not tied to any particular object in the world around us. What creates samsara is how the mind habitually clings to its misperceptions of reality. ~ Mingyur Rinpoche,
81:Always remember that how we react to every moment of our life will reinforce either our negative habits or positive habits. No matter how challenging life may be, each moment can be seen as either a problem or an opportunity. If we can understand this, we can start to bring our entire life to the path. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
82:But, nevertheless, if there is even the slightest recognition, liberation is easy. Should you ask why this is so-it is because once the awesome, terrifying and fearful appearances arise, the awareness does not have the luxury of distraction. The awareness is one-pointedly concentrated. ~ Karma-glin-pa, The Tibetan Book of the Dead ,
83:If you meditate on mind training, and your personality becomes stiff with pride and arrogance, it is as though you have reduced a god to a demon - dharma has become non-dharma.The more you meditate on mind training, the more supple your personality should become.Act as the lowest servant to everyone. ~ Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye,
84:The dharma, whether it is sutra, tantra, mahamudra, or dzogchen, is like pure gold. No matter how many other metals that mix with it, pure gold can always be extracted. Likewise, any culture can easily absorb the dharma, whether it is in ancient Tibet or the modern day West, as the dharma is beyond culture, time, and place. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
85:If you meditate on mind training, and your personality becomes stiff with pride and arrogance, it is as though you have reduced a god to a demon - dharma has become non-dharma. The more you meditate on mind training and dharma, the more supple your personality should become. Act as the lowest servant to everyone. ~ Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye,
86:Just as full sunlight completely dispels all darkness but even a few rays provide a measure of light, so, if we complete the practice of training the mind, we will totally dispel the darkness of our ignorance, but if we engage in only some parts of the practice, this will still help to reduce our ignorance and self-cherishing . ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
87:If we want to cook food we need to leave the stove on continuously and not keep turning it on and off. If the heat is continuous, no matter whether it is high or low our food will eventually be cooked. Similarly, if we continuously apply effort, even if it is only a small effort, it is certain that we shall eventually experience the fruits of our practice. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
88:A practice that is suitable for one person is not necessarily suitable for someone else, and a practice that is appropriate for one person at one time is not necessarily appropriate for that same person at another time. Buddha did not expect us to put all his teachings into practice right away--they are intended for a great variety of practitioners of different levels and dispositions. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
89:Death can not be fought off by any warrior, ordered away by the powerful, or paid off by the rich. Death leaves nowhere to run to, no place to hide, no refuge, no defender or guide. So, reflect sincerely and meditate on how important it is from this very moment onwards never to slip into laziness and procrastination, but to practice the true Dharma, the only thing you can be sure will help at the moment of death. ~ Patrul Rinpoche,
90:Just as eagles soar through the vast expanse of the sky without meeting any obstructions, needing only minimal effort to maintain their flight, so advanced meditators concentrating on emptiness can meditate on emptiness for a long time with little effort. Their minds soar through space-like emptiness, undistracted by any other phenomenon. When we meditate on emptiness we should try to emulate these meditators. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
91:Activities are endless, like ripples on a stream. They end only when you drop them.Human moods are like the changing highlights and shadows on a sunlit mountain range.All activities are like the games children play, like castles being made of sand.View them with delight and equanimity, like grandparents overseeing their grandchildren, or a shepherd resting on a hill watching over his grazing flock. ~ Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche,
92:All worldly pursuits have but one unavoidable and inevitable end, which is sorrow; acquisitions end in dispersion; buildings in destruction; meetings in separation; births in death. Knowing this, one should, from the very first, renounce acquisitions and storing-up, and building, and meeting; and, faithful to the commands of an eminent Guru, set about realizing the Truth. That alone is the best of religious observances. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
93:Practice in a straightforward way. There is no need to live in fantasy and 'pretend' to be anything other than what you are. Be honest and open with yourself - if you are a good person, recognize that goodness and build upon it. If you are a deluded person, recognize that delusion and begin to disentangle yourself from it, be rid of it. It is essential that your practice be pure, straightforward and honest. ~ Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche,
94:Our mind is spinning around,About carrying out a lot of useless projects.It's a waste! Give it up!Thinking about the hundred plans you want to accomplish,With never enough time to finish them,Just weighs down your mind.You are completely distracted,By all of these projects, which never come to an end,But keep spreading out more, like ripples in water.Don't be a fool. For once, just sit tight. ~ Patrul Rinpoche,
95:Throughout the past 2500 years, whichever country Buddhism has been taught in, there have always been great yogis. Likewise, sooner or later there will be the great yogis of the West. This is because Buddhism has nothing to do with culture, gender, language, or colour. Buddhism is for all beings throughout time and space. And whoever dedicates their life to putting the teachings into practice will become a great yogi. It is as simple as that. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
96:At all times, do not lose courage in your inner awareness; uplift yourself, while assuming a humble position in your outer demeanor. Follow the example of the life and complete liberation of previous accomplished masters. Do not blame your past karma; instead, be someone who purely and flawlessly practices the dharma. Do not blame temporary negative circumstances; instead, be someone who remains steadfast in the face of whatever circumstances may arise. ~ Dudjom Rinpoche,
97:This awareness, free from an inside or an outside, is open like the sky. It is penetrating Wakefulness free from limitations and partiality. Within the vast and open space of this all-embracing mind, All phenomena of samsara and nirvana manifest like rainbows in the sky. Within this state of unwavering awareness, All that appears and exists, like a reflection, Appears but is empty, resounds but is empty. Its nature is Emptiness from the very beginning. ~ Tsogdruk Rinpoche, The Flight of Garuda ,
98:Please understand that all sentient beings, all our past parents, want nothing but happiness. Unfortunately, through their negative actions they only create the causes for further pain and suffering. Take this to heart and consider all our parents, wandering blindly and endlessly through painful samsaric states. When we truly take this to heart, out of compassion we feel motivated to achieve enlightenment to truly help all of them. This compassionate attitude is indispensable as a preparation for practice. ~ Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche,
99:Never underestimate the long-term consequences of your actions. For as long as the mind has the obscurration of grasping at an inherently existing "me", then there will be karma. No matter how far on the path one is, no matter how realised one is, no matter how many miraculous powers one has attained, for as long as there is even a subtle trace of this obscurration, karma is there. That is why Padmasambhava, an enlightened being not even affected by it, had skilfully told ordinary beings, "My realization is higher than the sky, but my observance of karma is finer than grains of flour." ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
100:The reason why you do not touch fire is because you know that it will cause you to suffer. Likewise, if you truly understand karma, you will not commit a single negative action, because unless that negative karma is purified, you know that it will eventually ripen into suffering.You might forget this natural process, or you might not believe in it, because the ripening does not always happen immediately. But your karma will follow you like your shadow, that gets closer and closer without you realising, until you are eventually touched by it. Please, I urge you to always remember this. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
101:So, first of all, it is most important to turn inwards and change your motivation.If you can correct your attitude, skilful means will permeate your positive actions, and you will have set out on the path of great beings.If you cannot, you might think that you are studying and practising the Dharma but it will be no more than a semblance of the real thing.Therefore, whenever you listen to the teachings and whenever you practise, be it meditating on a deity, doing prostrations and circumambulations, or reciting a mantra-even a single mani it is always essential to give rise to bodhicitta. ~ Patrul Rinpoche,
102:I would like to tell you that an enlightened essence is present in everyone. It is present in every state, both samsara and nirvana, and in all sentient beings; there is no exception. Experience your buddha nature, make it your constant practice, and you will reach enlightenment. In my lifetime I have known many, many people who attained such and enlightened state, both male and female. Awakening to enlightenment is not an ancient fable. It is not mythology. It actually does happen. Bring the oral instructions into your own practical experience and enlightenment is indeed possible; it is not just a fairy tale. ~ Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche,
103:The Song On Reaching The Mountain Peak :::Hearken, my sons! If you want To climb the mountain peak You should hold the Self-mind's light, Tie it with a great "Knot," And catch it with a firm "Hook." If you practice thus You can climb the mountain peak To enjoy the view. Come, you gifted men and women, Drink the brew of Experience! Come "inside" to enjoy the scene See it and enjoy it to the full! The Incapable remain outside; Those who cannot drink pure Beer may quaff small beer. He who cannot strive for Bodhi, Should strive for superior birth. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
104:The obstacles that we may face include having expectations, lack of self-confidence, indifference, and unwholesome distractions and activities. If we keep entertaining these negative acts and not believing in ourselves, thinking, "I'm not doing the practice well enough," "I'm not capable," "Everything is fated, so why should I try?"-at best, these acts and thoughts will divert us from our goal and slow down our spiritual progress. At worst, indulging in distractions, unwholesome activities, and negative attitudes will drag us on the wrong track and slowly lead us into the worst possible way of living, destroying all the possible fruits that this amazing human life could bring us. ~ Tulku Thondup,
105:There are a vast amount of Buddhas already, and each one manifests countless forms simultaneously throughout all of the planes of cyclic existence for the benefit of all beings. However, at any given time, each individual being will have a stronger karmic connection with certain Buddhas, compared to other Buddhas. Likewise, if you were a Buddha, since a huge number of beings throughout cyclic existence would have a stronger karmic connection with you during certain times, you would be able to benefit them much more directly than the many other Buddhas would be able to. Do not forget this. The deeper you realise this, the greater your bodhicitta motivation becomes - in other words, the greater your compassionate wish to attain the enlightened state of a Buddha for the benefit of all beings, as soon as possible! ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
106:When ye look at me I am an idle, idle man; when I look at myself I am a busy, busy man. Since upon the plain of uncreated infinity I am building, building the tower of ecstasy, I have no time for building houses. Since upon the steppe of the void of truth I am breaking, breaking the savage fetter of suffering, I have no time for ploughing family land. Since at the bourn of unity ineffable I am subduing, subduing the demon-foe of self, I have no time for subduing angry foe-men. Since in the palace of mind which transcends duality I am waiting, waiting for spiritual experience as my bride, I have no time for setting up house. Since in the circle of the Buddhas of my body I am fostering, fostering the child of wisdom, I have no time for fostering snivelling children. Since in the frame of the body, the seat of all delight, I am saving, saving precious instruction and reflection, I have no time for saving wordly wealth. ~ Jetsun Milarepa, Songs of Milarepa ,
107:The Profound Definitive Meaning :::For the mind that masters view the emptiness dawns In the content seen not even an atom exists A seer and seen refined until they're gone This way of realizing view, it works quite well When meditation is clear light river flow There is no need to confine it to sessions and breaks Meditator and object refined until they're gone This heart bone of meditation, it beats quite well When you're sure that conducts work is luminous light And you're sure that interdependence is emptiness A doer and deed refined until they're gone This way of working with conduct, it works quite well When biased thinking has vanished into space No phony facades, eight dharmas, nor hopes and fears, A keeper and kept refined until they're gone This way of keeping samaya, it works quite well When you've finally discovered your mind is dharmakaya And you're really doing yourself and others good A winner and won refined until they're gone This way of winning results, it works quite well. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
108:The Particular Necessity for PracticeThe second part discusses "the particular necessity for practice."Through the power of the yoga of speech, the stains that obscure the mind are removed. Once this happens, speech reaches its full potential. It is like discovering the true nature of your speech for the very first time.To activate the yoga of speech, summon the primordial wisdom deities by calling their names. Just as calling someone's name naturally causes that person to draw closer to you, in the same way calling the wisdom deities by name brings them nearer to you.They come to see what you want.This does not mean the wisdom deities will not come if you do not call them. They could come even if you did not call their names.You call their names-which is what you are doing when you recite mantras-because their names express their actual nature. A quote from the Dorje Kur (rDo rje gur) scripture reads: "To directly perceive the buddhas, bodhisattvas, dakinis and your own consort, get their attention by calling their names and invite them to come." Reciting the deity's name over and over purifies obscurations of speech and establishes the cause of vajra speech.This cause produces the condition that averts adverse conditions.The speech of the wisdom deities and your own speech will become the same-vajra speech. ~ Gyatrul Rinpoche, Generating the Deity ,
109:CHAPTER VThe Actual Practice:The Yoga of Meditative EquipoisePart IIThe Yoga of the Speech RecitationThe next section explains the yoga of vajra recitation in seven parts:(1) general understanding, (2) the particular necessity for practice, (3) the actual nature of the recitation, (4) different types of recitation, (5) the manner of reciting the mantra, (6) number of recitations and (7) activity upon completion.General UnderstandingA general understanding of the yoga of vajra recitation is approached by considering the object that needs to be purified by the yoga, the means of purification and the result. The object that needs to be purified through the yoga of speech is the habit of perceiving all sounds-names, words, syllables and anything that is spoken-as merely ordinary sounds with ordinary meanings.Simply stated, the object to purify is your present, obscured experience of speech and the habitual instincts that accompany it.The practice of mantra recitation purifies this impure experience and results in pure, vajra-like speech. One achieves the Sambhogakaya and becomes imbued with the sixty qualities of the Buddha's speech. All of one's words become pleasing, meaningful and helpful. The means of purification is to recite the mantra, the pure sounds which the buddhas have given to us, over and over until they are like a spinning wheel of sound. ~ Gyatrul Rinpoche, Generating the DeityZ ,
110:The Song Of View, Practice, And Action :::Oh, my Guru! The Exemplar of the View, Practice, and Action, Pray vouchsafe me your grace, and enable me To be absorbed in the realm of Self-nature! For the View, Practice, Action, and Accomplishment There are three Key-points you should know: All the manifestation, the Universe itself, is contained in the mind; The nature of Mind is the realm of illumination Which can neither be conceived nor touched. These are the Key-points of the View. Errant thoughts are liberated in the Dharmakaya; The awareness, the illumination, is always blissful; Meditate in a manner of non-doing and non-effort. These are the Key-points of Practice. In the action of naturalness The Ten Virtues spontaneously grow; All the Ten Vices are thus purified. By corrections or remedies The Illuminating Void is ne'er disturbed. These are the Key-points of Action. There is no Nivana to attain beyond; There is no Samsara here to renounce; Truly to know the Self-mind It is to be the Buddha Himself. These are the Key-points of Accomplishment. Reduce inwardly the Three Key-points to One. This One is the Void Nature of Being, Which only a wondrous Guru Can clearly illustrate. Much activity is of no avail; If one sees the Simultaneously Born Wisdom, He reaches the goal. For all practioners of Dharma The preaching is a precious gem; It is my direct experience from yogic meditation. Think carefully and bear it in your minds, Oh, my children and disciples. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
111:In the Judeo-Christian tradition, it is called 'the resurrection body ' and 'the glorified body.' The prophet Isaiah said, 'The dead shall live, their bodies shall rise' (Isa. 26:19). St. Paul called it 'the celestial body' or 'spiritual body ' (soma pneumatikon) (I Corinthians 15:40). In Sufism it is called 'the most sacred body ' (wujud al-aqdas) and 'supracelestial body ' (jism asli haqiqi). In Taoism, it is called 'the diamond body,' and those who have attained it are called 'the immortals' and 'the cloudwalkers.' In Tibetan Buddhism it is called 'the light body.' In Tantrism and some schools of yoga, it is called 'the vajra body,' 'the adamantine body,' and 'the divine body.' In Kriya yoga it is called 'the body of bliss.' In Vedanta it is called 'the superconductive body.' In Gnosticism and Neoplatonism, it is called 'the radiant body.' In the alchemical tradition, the Emerald Tablet calls it 'the Glory of the Whole Universe' and 'the golden body.' The alchemist Paracelsus called it 'the astral body.' In the Hermetic Corpus, it is called 'the immortal body ' (soma athanaton). In some mystery schools, it is called 'the solar body.' In Rosicrucianism, it is called 'the diamond body of the temple of God.' In ancient Egypt it was called 'the luminous body or being' (akh). In Old Persia it was called 'the indwelling divine potential' (fravashi or fravarti). In the Mithraic liturgy it was called 'the perfect body ' (soma teilion). In the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo, it is called 'the divine body,' composed of supramental substance. In the philosophy of Teilhard de Chardin, it is called 'the ultrahuman'. ~ , http://herebedragons.weebly.com/homo-lumen.php ,
112:Response To A Logician :::I bow at the feet of my teacher Marpa. And sing this song in response to you. Listen, pay heed to what I say, forget your critique for a while. The best seeing is the way of "nonseeing" the radiance of the mind itself. The best prize is what cannot be looked for the priceless treasure of the mind itself. The most nourishing food is "noneating" the transcendent food of samadhi. The most thirst-quenching drink is "nondrinking" the nectar of heartfelt compassion. Oh, this self-realizing awareness is beyond words and description! The mind is not the world of children, nor is it that of logicians. Attaining the truth of "nonattainment," you receive the highest initiation. Perceiving the void of high and low, you reach the sublime stage. Approaching the truth of "nonmovement," you follow the supreme path. Knowing the end of birth and death, the ultimate purpose is fulfilled. Seeing the emptiness of reason, supreme logic is perfected. When you know that great and small are groundless, you have entered the highest gateway. Comprehending beyond good and evil opens the way to perfect skill. Experiencing the dissolution of duality, you embrace the highest view. Observing the truth of "nonobservation" opens the way to meditating. Comprehending beyond "ought" and "oughtn't" opens the way to perfect action. When you realize the truth of "noneffort," you are approaching the highest fruition. Ignorant are those who lack this truth: arrogant teachers inflated by learning, scholars bewitched by mere words, and yogis seduced by prejudice. For though they yearn for freedom, they find only enslavement. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
113:Song To The Rock Demoness :::River, ripples, and waves, these three, When emerging, arise from the ocean itself. When disappearing, they disappear into the ocean itself. Habitual thinking, love, and possessiveness, these three, When arising, arise from the alaya consciousness itself. When disappearing, they disappear into the alaya consciousness itself. Self-awareness, self-illumination, self-liberation, these three, When arising, arise from the mind itself. When disappearing, they disappear into the mind itself. The unborn, unceasing, and unexpressed, these three, When emerging, arise from the nature of being itself. When disappearing, they disappear into the nature of being itself. The visions of demons, clinging to demons, and thoughts of demons, When arising, arise from the Yogin himself. When disappearing, they disappear into the Yogin himself. Since demons are the phantoms of the mind, If it is not understood by the Yogin that they are empty appearances, And even if he thinks they are real, meditation is confused. But the root of the delusion is in his own mind. By observation of the nature of manifestations, He realizes the identity of manifestation and void, And by understanding, he knows that the two are not different. Meditation and not meditation are not two but one, The cause of all errors is to look upon the two things as different. From the ultimate point of view, there is no view. If you make comparison between the nature of the mind And the nature of the heavens, Then the true nature of being itself is penetrated. See, now, that you look into the true meaning which is beyond thought. Arrange to enter into undisturbed meditation. And be mindful of the Unceasing Intuitive Sensation! ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
114:WHEN THE GREAT YOGIN Padmasambhava, called by Tibetans Guru Rinpoche, "the precious teacher," embarks on his spiritual journey, he travels from place to place requesting teachings from yogins and yoginls. Guided by visions and dreams, his journey takes him to desolate forests populated with ferocious wild animals, to poison lakes with fortified islands, and to cremation grounds. Wherever he goes he performs miracles, receives empowerments, and ripens his own abilities to benefit others. When he hears of the supreme queen of all dakinls, the greatly accomplished yogini called Secret Wisdom, he travels to the Sandal Grove cremation ground to the gates of her abode, the Palace of Skulls. He attempts to send a request to the queen with her maidservant Kumari. But the girl ignores him and continues to carry huge brass jugs of water suspended from a heavy yoke across her shoulders. When he presses his request, Kumari continues her labors, remaining silent. The great yogin becomes impatient and, through his yogic powers, magically nails the heavy jugs to the floor. No matter how hard Kumari struggles, she cannot lift them. Removing the yoke and ropes from her shoulders, she steps before Padmasambhava, exclaiming, "You have developed great yogic powers. What of my powers, great one?" And so saying, she draws a sparkling crystal knife from the girdle at her waist and slices open her heart center, revealing the vivid and vast interior space of her body. Inside she displays to Guru Rinpoche the mandala of deities from the inner tantras: forty-two peaceful deities manifested in her upper torso and head and fifty-eight wrathful deities resting in her lower torso. Abashed that he did not realize with whom he was dealing, Guru Rinpoche bows before her and humbly renews his request for teachings. In response, she offers him her respect as well, adding, "I am only a maidservant," and ushers him in to meet the queen Secret Wisdom. ~ Judith Simmer-Brown, Dakini's Warm Breath: The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism Introduction: Encountering the Dakini,
115:The Song Of Food And Dwelling :::I bow down at the feet of the wish-fulfilling Guru. Pray vouchsafe me your grace in bestowing beneficial food, Pray make me realize my own body as the house of Buddha, Pray grant me this knowledge. I built the house through fear, The house of Sunyata, the void nature of being; Now I have no fear of its collapsing. I, the Yogi with the wish-fulfilling gem, Feel happiness and joy where'er I stay. Because of the fear of cold, I sought for clothes; The clothing I found is the Ah Shea Vital Heat. Now I have no fear of coldness. Because of the fear of poverty, I sought for riches; The riches I found are the inexhaustible Seven Holy Jewels. Now I have no fear of poverty. Because of the fear of hunger, I sought for food; The food I found is the Samadhi of Suchness. Now I have no fear of hunger. Because of the fear of thirst, I sought for drink; The heavenly drink I found is the wine of mindfulness. Now I have no fear of thirst. Because of the fear of loneliness, I searched for a friend; The friend I found is the bliss of perpetual Sunyata. Now I have no fear of loneliness. Because of the fear of going astray, I sought for the right path to follow. The wide path I found is the Path of Two-in-One. Now I do not fear to lose my way. I am a yogi with all desirable possessions, A man always happy where'er he stays. Here at Yolmo Tagpu Senge Tson, The tigress howling with a pathetic, trembling cry, Reminds me that her helpless cubs are innocently playing. I cannot help but feel a great compassion for them, I cannot help but practice more diligently, I cannot help but augment thus my Bodhi-Mind. The touching cry of the monkey, So impressive and so moving, Cannot help but raise in me deep pity. The little monkey's chattering is amusing and pathetic; As I hear it, I cannot but think of it with compassion. The voice of the cuckoo is so moving, And so tuneful is the lark's sweet singing, That when I hear them I cannot help but listen When I listen to them, I cannot help but shed tears. The varied cries and cawings of the crow, Are a good and helpful friend unto the yogi. Even without a single friend, To remain here is a pleasure. With joy flowing from my heart, I sing this happy song; May the dark shadow of all men's sorrows Be dispelled by my joyful singing. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
116:Ekajaṭī or Ekajaṭā, (Sanskrit: "One Plait Woman"; Wylie: ral gcig ma: one who has one knot of hair),[1] also known as Māhacīnatārā,[2] is one of the 21 Taras. Ekajati is, along with Palden Lhamo deity, one of the most powerful and fierce goddesses of Vajrayana Buddhist mythology.[1][3] According to Tibetan legends, her right eye was pierced by the tantric master Padmasambhava so that she could much more effectively help him subjugate Tibetan demons. Ekajati is also known as "Blue Tara", Vajra Tara or "Ugra Tara".[1][3] She is generally considered one of the three principal protectors of the Nyingma school along with Rāhula and Vajrasādhu (Wylie: rdo rje legs pa). Often Ekajati appears as liberator in the mandala of the Green Tara. Along with that, her ascribed powers are removing the fear of enemies, spreading joy, and removing personal hindrances on the path to enlightenment. Ekajati is the protector of secret mantras and "as the mother of the mothers of all the Buddhas" represents the ultimate unity. As such, her own mantra is also secret. She is the most important protector of the Vajrayana teachings, especially the Inner Tantras and termas. As the protector of mantra, she supports the practitioner in deciphering symbolic dakini codes and properly determines appropriate times and circumstances for revealing tantric teachings. Because she completely realizes the texts and mantras under her care, she reminds the practitioner of their preciousness and secrecy.[4] Düsum Khyenpa, 1st Karmapa Lama meditated upon her in early childhood. According to Namkhai Norbu, Ekajati is the principal guardian of the Dzogchen teachings and is "a personification of the essentially non-dual nature of primordial energy."[5] Dzogchen is the most closely guarded teaching in Tibetan Buddhism, of which Ekajati is a main guardian as mentioned above. It is said that Sri Singha (Sanskrit: Śrī Siṃha) himself entrusted the "Heart Essence" (Wylie: snying thig) teachings to her care. To the great master Longchenpa, who initiated the dissemination of certain Dzogchen teachings, Ekajati offered uncharacteristically personal guidance. In his thirty-second year, Ekajati appeared to Longchenpa, supervising every ritual detail of the Heart Essence of the Dakinis empowerment, insisting on the use of a peacock feather and removing unnecessary basin. When Longchenpa performed the ritual, she nodded her head in approval but corrected his pronunciation. When he recited the mantra, Ekajati admonished him, saying, "Imitate me," and sang it in a strange, harmonious melody in the dakini's language. Later she appeared at the gathering and joyously danced, proclaiming the approval of Padmasambhava and the dakinis.[6] ~ Wikipedia,
117:GURU YOGA Guru yoga is an essential practice in all schools of Tibetan Buddhism and Bon. This is true in sutra, tantra, and Dzogchen. It develops the heart connection with the masteR By continually strengthening our devotion, we come to the place of pure devotion in ourselves, which is the unshakeable, powerful base of the practice. The essence of guru yoga is to merge the practitioner's mind with the mind of the master. What is the true master? It is the formless, fundamental nature of mind, the primordial awareness of the base of everything, but because we exist in dualism, it is helpful for us to visualize this in a form. Doing so makes skillful use of the dualisms of the conceptual mind, to further strengthen devotion and help us stay directed toward practice and the generation of positive qualities. In the Bon tradition, we often visualize either Tapihritsa* as the master, or the Buddha ShenlaOdker*, who represents the union of all the masters. If you are already a practitioner, you may have another deity to visualize, like Guru Rinpoche or a yidam or dakini. While it is important to work with a lineage with which you have a connection, you should understand that the master you visualize is the embodiment of all the masters with whom you are connected, all the teachers with whom you have studied, all the deities to whom you have commitments. The master in guru yoga is not just one individual, but the essence of enlightenment, the primordial awareness that is your true nature. The master is also the teacher from whom you receive the teachings. In the Tibetan tradition, we say the master is more important than the Buddha. Why? Because the master is the immediate messenger of the teachings, the one who brings the Buddha's wisdom to the student. Without the master we could not find our way to the Buddha. So we should feel as much devotion to the master as we would to the Buddha if the Buddha suddenly appeared in front of us. Guru yoga is not just about generating some feeling toward a visualized image. It is done to find the fundamental mind in yourself that is the same as the fundamental mind of all your teachers, and of all the Buddhas and realized beings that have ever lived. When you merge with the guru, you merge with your pristine true nature, which is the real guide and masteR But this should not be an abstract practice. When you do guru yoga, try to feel such intense devotion that the hair stands upon your neck, tears start down your face, and your heart opens and fills with great love. Let yourself merge in union with the guru's mind, which is your enlightened Buddha-nature. This is the way to practice guru yoga. The Practice After the nine breaths, still seated in meditation posture, visualize the master above and in front of you. This should not be a flat, two dimensional picture-let a real being exist there, in three dimensions, made of light, pure, and with a strong presence that affects the feeling in your body,your energy, and your mind. Generate strong devotion and reflect on the great gift of the teachings and the tremendous good fortune you enjoy in having made a connection to them. Offer a sincere prayer, asking that your negativities and obscurations be removed, that your positive qualities develop, and that you accomplish dream yoga. Then imagine receiving blessings from the master in the form of three colored lights that stream from his or her three wisdom doors- of body, speech, and mind-into yours. The lights should be transmitted in the following sequence: White light streams from the master's brow chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your entire body and physical dimension. Then red light streams from the master's throat chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your energetic dimension. Finally, blue light streams from the master's heart chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your mind. When the lights enter your body, feel them. Let your body, energy, and mind relax, suffused inwisdom light. Use your imagination to make the blessing real in your full experience, in your body and energy as well as in the images in your mind. After receiving the blessing, imagine the master dissolving into light that enters your heart and resides there as your innermost essence. Imagine that you dissolve into that light, and remain inpure awareness, rigpa. There are more elaborate instructions for guru yoga that can involve prostrations, offerings, gestures, mantras, and more complicated visualizations, but the essence of the practice is mingling your mind with the mind of the master, which is pure, non-dual awareness. Guru yoga can be done any time during the day; the more often the better. Many masters say that of all the practices it is guru yoga that is the most important. It confers the blessings of the lineage and can open and soften the heart and quiet the unruly mind. To completely accomplish guru yoga is to accomplish the path. ~ Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Yogas Of Dream And Sleep ,

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1:Tibetan Buddhism had an enormous impact on me. ~ Richard Gere,
2:Tibetan Buddhism, has inspired me and accelerated my understanding of life. ~ Jet Li,
3:I was studying Tibetan Buddhism when I was quite young, again influenced by Kerouac. ~ David Bowie,
4:Buddhism - Tibetan Buddhism - teaches us many things, peace comes from within, we must be free ourselves from earthly desires... ~ Peter Sagal,
5:As a dialectical teacher, I have had many lives where I have taught Zen and Tibetan Buddhism and mysticism. I teach in many different modalites. But the theme that unites them - is love. ~ Frederick Lenz,
6:A text of Tibetan Buddhism describes the time of death as a unique opportunity for spiritual liberation from the cycles of death and rebirth and a period that determines our next incarnation. ~ Stanislav Grof,
7:What I like about Tibetan Buddhism is it was taken to Tibet in the 7th century and then again in the 11th. It has everything that had been collected in India up until that time. And so on all levels, it's so vast. ~ Tenzin Palmo,
8:According to Tibetan Buddhism, otherness and self are identical, and when man wars against this otherness he wars against his own body, his own oneness with the self. ~ Rix Weaver, The Wise Old Woman: A Study of Active Imagination,
9:What sets Tibetan Buddhism apart from other Buddhist traditions—such as the Zen Buddhism of Japan or the Theravada tradition in Sri Lanka—is that while Tibetans aim to become enlightened, they don’t want to enter Nirvana. ~ Scott Carney,
10:The teachings of Osho, in fact, encompass many religions, but he is not defined by any of them. He is an illuminating speaker on Zen, Taoism, Tibetan Buddhism, Christianity and ancient Greek philosophy... and also a prolific author. ~ Nevill Drury,
11:In the early '60s there was very little reliable information on Tibetan Buddhism. I was living in London and I had joined the Buddhist Society. For the most part, people there were either interested in Theravada or Zen Buddhism. There was almost no one into Tibetan Buddhism at that time. ~ Tenzin Palmo,
12:My mother was a spiritualist. We had weekly séances at our house with a neighbor who was a medium and various friends, and so I was brought up with the idea that there are many realms of being all around us. So that prepared me for Buddhism, and especially Tibetan Buddhism with all its talk of different realms and dimensions of being. ~ Tenzin Palmo,
13:Within Tibetan Buddhism, shamatha practice maps on to the nine stages of attentional development wherein thoughts gradually subside as concentrative power is increased to the point at which one can effortlessly maintain single-pointed focus on a chosen object for at least four hours. The accomplishment of shamatha is accompanied by a powerful experience of bliss, luminosity, and stillness. ~ B Alan Wallace,
14:In Tibetan Buddhism, taking a root lama creates a sort of indelible connection to a teacher that can’t be erased by any sort of worldly action. The vows of obedience work on the spiritual plane and form a connection that persists in all future rebirths. It entails total submission to the will of another person, and complete trust that they will give you the tools you need to progress spiritually. From the moment she took the vows, McNally gave away control of her own life. ~ Scott Carney,
15:Our ancient sources of wisdom call on human beings to rise to their highest capacity and behave in extraordinarily open and generous ways to one another, under difficult circumstances to transcend differences and create understanding across all barriers of convention and fear. This wisdom is fragile as our environment is fragile, threatened by an overwhelming material culture. I believe in a spiritual ecology. In today’s world, Judaism and Tibetan Buddhism and other wisdom traditions are endangered species. ~ Rodger Kamenetz,
16:The text presented here, the Vajra Essence by Düdjom Lingpa, a nineteenth-century master of the Nyingma order of Tibetan Buddhism, is known as the Nelug Rangjung in Tibetan, meaning “the natural emergence of the nature of existence.”1 This is an ideal teaching in which to unravel some of the common misunderstandings of Tibetan Buddhism, since it is a sweeping practice that can take one from the basics all the way to enlightenment in a single lifetime. The present volume explains the initial section on shamatha, or meditative quiescence, about nine percent of the entire Vajra Essence root text. ~ B Alan Wallace,
17:Shamatha is presented in the Vajra Essence as a foundational practice on the Dzogchen path. Dzogchen, often translated as “the Great Perfection,” is the highest of the nine vehicles (yanas) in the Nyingma tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. Classically speaking, after achieving shamatha, the yogi will use his or her newly acquired powers of concentration to practice insight into the nature of emptiness (vipashyana), followed by the Dzogchen practices of tregchö (breakthrough) and tögal (direct crossing-over). These four practices comprise the essential path to enlightenment from the Nyingma point of view. The practice of Dzogchen brings one into direct contact with reality, unmediated by the individual personality or society. ~ B Alan Wallace,
18:As we go through life, the experiences we encounter depend largely upon our own minds. Tibetan Buddhism teaches that the mind does not passively receive images of the world but actually creates and projects them onto the sense impressions of bare reality, using its store of memories and habitual traits. For this reason, few of us ever experience reality as it is in actuality, but instead overlay it with a host of our own projections. These projections are usually negative in nature.

According to our level of inner growth, we may be able to modify these self-created visions into forms and images that are more conducive to our spiritual health and growth. Their hallucinatory nature becomes more apparent at the time of death as well as when we become more accomplished in meditation.

In only we can let go of our needs and fears, then we can come to terms with such projections. If we can let go, we will come to rest in the natural state of the mind. For this profound experience to occur, our confused minds must be soothed and all our fears pacified by the compassion and skill of our spiritual friends and guides. ~ Jeffrey M Schwartz,
19:Your job then, should you choose to accept it, is to keep searching for the metaphors, rituals and teachers that will help you move ever closer to divinity. The Yogic scriptures say that God responds to the sacred prayers and efforts of human beings in any way whatsoever that mortals choose to worship—just so long as those prayers are sincere.

I think you have every right to cherry-pick when it comes to moving your spirit and finding peace in God. I think you are free to search for any metaphor whatsoever which will take you across the worldly divide whenever you need to be transported or comforted. It's nothing to be embarrassed about. It's the history of mankind's search for holiness. If humanity never evolved in its exploration of the divine, a lot of us would still be worshipping golden Egyptian statues of cats. And this evolution of religious thinking does involve a fair bit of cherry-picking. You take whatever works from wherever you can find it, and you keep moving toward the light.

The Hopi Indians thought that the world's religions each contained one spiritual thread, and that these threads are always seeking each other, wanting to join. When all the threads are finally woven together they will form a rope that will pull us out of this dark cycle of history and into the next realm. More contemporarily, the Dalai Lama has repeated the same idea, assuring his Western students repeatedly that they needn't become Tibetan Buddhists in order to be his pupils. He welcomes them to take whatever ideas they like out of Tibetan Buddhism and integrate these ideas into their own religious practices. Even in the most unlikely and conservative of places, you can find sometimes this glimmering idea that God might be bigger than our limited religious doctrines have taught us. In 1954, Pope Pius XI, of all people, sent some Vatican delegates on a trip to Libya with these written instructions: "Do NOT think that you are going among Infidels. Muslims attain salvation, too. The ways of Providence are infinite."

But doesn't that make sense? That the infinite would be, indeed ... infinite? That even the most holy amongst us would only be able to see scattered pieces of the eternal picture at any given time? And that maybe if we could collect those pieces and compare them, a story about God would begin to emerge that resembles and includes everyone? And isn't our individual longing for transcendence all just part of this larger human search for divinity? Don't we each have the right to not stop seeking until we get as close to the source of wonder as possible? Even if it means coming to India and kissing trees in the moonlight for a while?

That's me in the corner, in other words. That's me in the spotlight. Choosing my religion. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
20:William Butler Yeats’s “Second Coming” seems perfectly to render our present predicament: “The best lack all conviction, while the worst / Are full of passionate intensity.” This is an excellent description of the current split between anaemic liberals and impassioned fundamentalists. “The best” are no longer able to fully engage, while “the worst” engage in racist, religious, sexist fanaticism.
However, are the terrorist fundamentalists, be they Christian or Muslim, really fundamentalists in the authentic sense of the term? Do they really believe? What they lack is a feature that is easy to discern in all authentic fundamentalists, from Tibetan Buddhists to the Amish in the U.S.: the absence of resentment and envy, the deep indifference towards the non-believers’ way of life. If today’s so-called fundamentalists really believe they have their way to truth, why should they feel threatened by non-believers, why should they envy them? When a Buddhist encounters a Western hedonist, he hardly condemns him. He just benevolently notes that the hedonist’s search for happiness is self-defeating. In contrast to true fundamentalists, the terrorist pseudo-fundamentalists are deeply bothered, intrigued, fascinated by the sinful life of the non-believers. One can feel that, in fighting the sinful Other, they are fighting their own temptation. These so-called Christian or Muslim fundamentalists are a disgrace to true fundamentalists.
It is here that Yeats’s diagnosis falls short of the present predicament: the passionate intensity of a mob bears witness to a lack of true conviction. Deep in themselves, terrorist fundamentalists also lack true conviction-their violent outbursts are proof of it. How fragile the belief of a Muslim must be, if he feels threatened by a stupid caricature in a low-circulation Danish newspaper. The fundamentalist Islamic terror is not grounded in the terrorists’ conviction of their superiority and in their desire to safeguard their cultural-religious identity from the onslaught of global consumerist civilization. The problem with fundamentalists is not that we consider them inferior to us, but rather that they themselves secretly consider themselves inferior. This is why our condescending, politically correct assurances that we feel no superiority towards them only make them more furious and feeds their resentment. The problem is not cultural difference (their effort to preserve their identity), but the opposite fact that the fundamentalists are already like us, that secretly they have already internalized our standards and measure themselves by them. (This clearly goes for the Dalai Lama, who justifies Tibetan Buddhism in Western terms of the pursuit of happiness and avoidance of pain.) Paradoxically, what the fundamentalists really lack is precisely a dose of that true “racist” conviction of one’s own superiority. ~ Slavoj i ek,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



9

   3 Buddhism


   3 Thubten Chodron
   3 Bokar Rinpoche


   3 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   3 How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator


1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  we can say that our karmic predispositions made us
  meet one of the great orders of Tibetan Buddhism in
  particular. The same predispositions make us situate
  --
  differences prevent them from entering as easily as the
  Tibetans themselves into the practice of Tibetan Buddhism,
  especially in regard to deities. They may believe, for
  --
  Sanskrit and had perfectly studied the doctrines of all
  the lineages of Tibetan Buddhism as well as Hindu
  doctrines. The Dalai Lama himself received many
  --
  missionary-there were a few of them in Kham-who
  had entered Tibetan Buddhism.
  It happened that no one had seen the sahib for

1.01_-_Who_is_Tara, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  
  ers of Tibetan Buddhism meditate upon such a being? How can a spiritual
  relationship with her enrich our lives?

1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  certain requirements are necessary. Practitioners should consult a qualied
  teacher of Tibetan Buddhism. The following description alone is not to be
  used for meditation.
  --
  This may stem from a common misunderstanding among Westerners
  about Tibetan Buddhism. I have heard people speak of Theravada, Mahayana,
  
  --
  those who practice Vajrayana do not do Theravada or Mahayana practices.
  Others think that if someone practices Mahayana, she doesnt practice Theravada teachings. Some Westerners believe that Tibetan Buddhism is only
  Vajrayana, that it doesnt include the Theravada or general Mahayana teachings. Such ideas are incorrect.
  Tibetan teachers make it clear that someone following Tibetan Buddhism
  doesnt practice only Vajrayana. Visualizations and the chanting of mantras

1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  There are many Tara rituals, which the various
  traditions of Tibetan Buddhism use according to their
  preference. The one most often used in the Kagyu

1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  sisters, have attained rainbow bodies.
  In all the schools of Tibetan Buddhism, Nyingma,
  Sakya, Kagyu, and Gelug, numerous women have

1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  prevent people from thinking that all we have to do is pray for something, but
  we dont have to take responsibility for making it happen. In Tibetan Buddhism we make long life pujas with elaborate offerings for our teachers. Once
  some people in the West wanted to do this after a series of teachings, and
  --
  everything!
  Not observing who is qualied and who is not. I remember in the midseventies when people were just learning Tibetan Buddhism, they would
  often request highest yoga tantra initiations from Lama Yeshe, Lama, please
  --
  simple. In addition, we must remain simple. The fact is that many Westerners like the exotica: big thrones, intricate brocade, long horns, and chanting
  done in deep voices. In Tibetan Buddhism, there are red hats, yellow hats,
  and black hats. People compete to get hats; they ght over hats. Such behavior is not Dharma.

3.4.2_-_Guru_Yoga, #The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep, #Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  subject:Buddhism
  Guru yoga is an essential practice in all schools of Tibetan Buddhism and Bon. This is true in sutra, tantra, and Dzogchen. It develops the heart connection with the master. By continually strengthening our devotion, we come to the place of pure devotion in ourselves, which is the unshakeable, powerful base of the practice. The essence of guru yoga is to merge the practitioner's mind with the mind of the master.
  What is the true master? It is the formless, fundamental nature of mind, the primordial awareness of the base of everything, but because we exist in dualism, it is helpful for us to visualize this in a form. Doing so makes skillful use of the dualisms of the conceptual mind, to further strengthen devotion and help us stay directed toward practice and the generation of positive qualities.

class, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
     7 Aristotle
     6 Tibetan Buddhism
     6 things

The_Act_of_Creation_text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  related. In Eastern religions, evocation of the names of deities the
  recital of mantras fulfils a magic function; in Tibetan Buddhism
  the work is left to the prayer mill. This attitude lingers on in medieval

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