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@1.1.000 - John von Neumann (authors) [{0/65}; Mathematics, Computer Science, Physics, Engineer; 1903-1957; [W] [WQ]] ::: was a Hungarian-American mathematician, physicist, computer scientist, engineer and polymath. Von Neumann was generally regarded as the foremost mathematician of his time and said to be "the last representative of the great mathematicians". He integrated pure and applied sciences.


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John von Neumann "person" /jon von noy'mahn/ Born 1903-12-28, died 1957-02-08. A Hungarian-born mathematician who did pioneering work in quantum physics, game theory, and {computer science}. He contributed to the USA's Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb. von Neumann was invited to Princeton University in 1930, and was a mathematics professor at the {Institute for Advanced Studies} from its formation in 1933 until his death. From 1936 to 1938 {Alan Turing} was a visitor at the Institute and completed a Ph.D. dissertation under von Neumann's supervision. This visit occurred shortly after Turing's publication of his 1934 paper "On Computable Numbers with an Application to the Entscheidungs-problem" which involved the concepts of logical design and the universal machine. von Neumann must have known of Turing's ideas but it is not clear whether he applied them to the design of the IAS Machine ten years later. While serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, von Neumann joined the developers of {ENIAC} and made some critical contributions. In 1947, while working on the design for the successor machine, {EDVAC}, von Neumann realized that ENIAC's lack of a centralized control unit could be overcome to obtain a rudimentary stored program computer. He also proposed the {fetch-execute cycle}. His ideas led to what is now often called the {von Neumann architecture}. {(http://sis.pitt.edu/~mbsclass/is2000/hall_of_fame/vonneuma.htm)}. {(http://ei.cs.vt.edu/~history/VonNeumann.html)}. {(http://ftp.arl.mil/~mike/comphist/54nord/)}. (2004-01-14)

John von Neumann ::: (person) /jon von noy'mahn/ Born 1903-12-28, died 1957-02-08.A Hungarian-born mathematician who did pioneering work in quantum physics, game theory, and computer science. He contributed to the USA's Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb. von Neumann was invited to Princeton University in 1930, and was a mathematics professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies from its formation in 1933 until his death.From 1936 to 1938 Alan Turing was a visitor at the Institute and completed a Ph.D. dissertation under von Neumann's supervision. This visit occurred shortly but it is not clear whether he applied them to the design of the IAS Machine ten years later.While serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, von Neumann joined the developers of ENIAC and made some critical contributions. In 1947, while working rudimentary stored program computer. He also proposed the fetch-execute cycle. His ideas led to what is now often called the von Neumann architecture. . . .(2004-01-14)

John von Neumann ::: (person) /jon von noy'mahn/ Born 1903-12-28, died 1957-02-08.A Hungarian-born mathematician who did pioneering work in quantum physics, game theory, and computer science. He contributed to the USA's Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb.von Neumann was invited to Princeton University in 1930, and was a mathematics professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies from its formation in 1933 until his death.From 1936 to 1938 Alan Turing was a visitor at the Institute and completed a Ph.D. dissertation under von Neumann's supervision. This visit occurred shortly but it is not clear whether he applied them to the design of the IAS Machine ten years later.While serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, von Neumann joined the developers of ENIAC and made some critical contributions. In 1947, while working rudimentary stored program computer. He also proposed the fetch-execute cycle. His ideas led to what is now often called the von Neumann architecture. . . .(2004-01-14)


TERMS ANYWHERE

John von Neumann "person" /jon von noy'mahn/ Born 1903-12-28, died 1957-02-08. A Hungarian-born mathematician who did pioneering work in quantum physics, game theory, and {computer science}. He contributed to the USA's Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb. von Neumann was invited to Princeton University in 1930, and was a mathematics professor at the {Institute for Advanced Studies} from its formation in 1933 until his death. From 1936 to 1938 {Alan Turing} was a visitor at the Institute and completed a Ph.D. dissertation under von Neumann's supervision. This visit occurred shortly after Turing's publication of his 1934 paper "On Computable Numbers with an Application to the Entscheidungs-problem" which involved the concepts of logical design and the universal machine. von Neumann must have known of Turing's ideas but it is not clear whether he applied them to the design of the IAS Machine ten years later. While serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, von Neumann joined the developers of {ENIAC} and made some critical contributions. In 1947, while working on the design for the successor machine, {EDVAC}, von Neumann realized that ENIAC's lack of a centralized control unit could be overcome to obtain a rudimentary stored program computer. He also proposed the {fetch-execute cycle}. His ideas led to what is now often called the {von Neumann architecture}. {(http://sis.pitt.edu/~mbsclass/is2000/hall_of_fame/vonneuma.htm)}. {(http://ei.cs.vt.edu/~history/VonNeumann.html)}. {(http://ftp.arl.mil/~mike/comphist/54nord/)}. (2004-01-14)

John von Neumann ::: (person) /jon von noy'mahn/ Born 1903-12-28, died 1957-02-08.A Hungarian-born mathematician who did pioneering work in quantum physics, game theory, and computer science. He contributed to the USA's Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb. von Neumann was invited to Princeton University in 1930, and was a mathematics professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies from its formation in 1933 until his death.From 1936 to 1938 Alan Turing was a visitor at the Institute and completed a Ph.D. dissertation under von Neumann's supervision. This visit occurred shortly but it is not clear whether he applied them to the design of the IAS Machine ten years later.While serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, von Neumann joined the developers of ENIAC and made some critical contributions. In 1947, while working rudimentary stored program computer. He also proposed the fetch-execute cycle. His ideas led to what is now often called the von Neumann architecture. . . .(2004-01-14)

John von Neumann ::: (person) /jon von noy'mahn/ Born 1903-12-28, died 1957-02-08.A Hungarian-born mathematician who did pioneering work in quantum physics, game theory, and computer science. He contributed to the USA's Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb.von Neumann was invited to Princeton University in 1930, and was a mathematics professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies from its formation in 1933 until his death.From 1936 to 1938 Alan Turing was a visitor at the Institute and completed a Ph.D. dissertation under von Neumann's supervision. This visit occurred shortly but it is not clear whether he applied them to the design of the IAS Machine ten years later.While serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, von Neumann joined the developers of ENIAC and made some critical contributions. In 1947, while working rudimentary stored program computer. He also proposed the fetch-execute cycle. His ideas led to what is now often called the von Neumann architecture. . . .(2004-01-14)

Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer "computer" (ENIAC) The first electronic {digital computer} and an ancestor of most computers in use today. ENIAC was developed by Dr. {John Mauchly} and {J. Presper Eckert} during World War II at the Moore School of the {University of Pennsylvania}. In 1940 Dr. {John Vincent Atanasoff} attended a lecture by Mauchly and subsequently agreed to show him his binary calculator, the {Atanasoff-Berry Computer} (ABC), which was partially built between 1937-1942. Mauchly used ideas from the ABC in the design of ENIAC, which was started in June 1943 and released publicly in 1946. ENIAC was not the first digital computer, {Konrad Zuse}'s {Z3} was released in 1941. Though, like the ABC, the Z3 was {electromechanical} rather than electronic, it was freely programmable via paper tape whereas ENIAC was only programmable by manual rewiring or switches. Z3 used binary representation like modern computers whereas ENIAC used decimal like mechanical calculators. ENIAC was underwritten and its development overseen by Lieutenant Herman Goldstine of the U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL). While the prime motivation for constructing the machine was to automate the wartime production of firing and bombing tables, the very first program run on ENIAC was a highly classified computation for Los Alamos. Later applications included weather prediction, cosmic ray studies, wind tunnel design, petroleum exploration, and optics. ENIAC had 20 {registers} made entirely from {vacuum tubes}. It had no other no memory as we currently understand it. The machine performed an addition in 200 {microseconds}, a multiplication in about three {milliseconds}, and a division in about 30 milliseconds. {John von Neumann}, a world-renowned mathematician serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, soon joined the developers of ENIAC and made some critical contributions. While Mauchly, Eckert and the Penn team continued on the technological problems, he, Goldstine, and others took up the logical problems. In 1947, while working on the design for the successor machine, EDVAC, von Neumann realized that ENIAC's lack of a central control unit could be overcome to obtain a rudimentary stored program computer (see the Clippinger reference below). Modifications were undertaken that eventually led to an {instruction set} of 92 "orders". {Von Neumann} also proposed the {fetch-execute cycle}. [R. F. Clippinger, "A Logical Coding System Applied to the ENIAC", Ballistic Research Laboratory Report No. 673, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, September 1948. {(http://ftp.arl.mil/~mike/comphist/48eniac-coding)}]. [H. H. Goldstine, "The Computer from Pascal to von Neumann", Princeton University Press, 1972]. [K. Kempf, "Electronic Computers within the Ordnance Corps", Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 1961. {(http://ftp.arl.mil/~mike/comphist/61ordnance)}]. [M. H. Weik, "The ENIAC Story", J. American Ordnance Assoc., 1961. {(http://ftp.arl.mil/~mike/comphist/eniac-story.html)}]. [How "general purpose" was ENIAC, compared to Zuse's {Z3}?] (2003-10-01)

Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer ::: (computer) (ENIAC) The first electronic digital computer and an ancestor of most computers in use today. ENIAC was developed by Dr. John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert during World War II at the Moore School of the University of Pennsylvania.In 1940 Dr. John Vincent Atanasoff attended a lecture by Mauchly and subsequently agreed to show him his binary calculator, the Atanasoff-Berry from the ABC in the design of ENIAC, which was started in June 1943 and released publicly in 1946.ENIAC was not the first digital computer, Konrad Zuse's Z3 was released in 1941. Though, like the ABC, the Z3 was electromechanical rather than electronic, it manual rewiring or switches. Z3 used binary representation like modern computers whereas ENIAC used decimal like mechanical calculators.ENIAC was underwritten and its development overseen by Lieutenant Herman Goldstine of the U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL). While the prime prediction, cosmic ray studies, wind tunnel design, petroleum exploration, and optics.ENIAC had 20 registers made entirely from vacuum tubes. It had no other no memory as we currently understand it. The machine performed an addition in 200 microseconds, a multiplication in about three milliseconds, and a division in about 30 milliseconds.John von Neumann, a world-renowned mathematician serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, soon joined the developers of ENIAC and made some critical contributions. While Mauchly, Eckert and the Penn team continued on the technological problems, he, Goldstine, and others took up the logical problems.In 1947, while working on the design for the successor machine, EDVAC, von Neumann realized that ENIAC's lack of a central control unit could be overcome below). Modifications were undertaken that eventually led to an instruction set of 92 orders. Von Neumann also proposed the fetch-execute cycle.[R. F. Clippinger, A Logical Coding System Applied to the ENIAC, Ballistic Research Laboratory Report No. 673, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, September 1948. ].[H. H. Goldstine, The Computer from Pascal to von Neumann, Princeton University Press, 1972].[K. Kempf, Electronic Computers within the Ordnance Corps, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 1961. ].[M. H. Weik, The ENIAC Story, J. American Ordnance Assoc., 1961. ].[How general purpose was ENIAC, compared to Zuse's Z3?](2003-10-01)

fetch-execute cycle ::: (architecture, processor) The sequence of actions that a central processing unit performs to execute each machine code instruction in a program.At the beginning of each cycle the CPU presents the value of the program counter on the address bus. The CPU then fetches the instruction from main memory (possibly via a cache and/or a pipeline) via the data bus into the instruction register.From the instruction register, the data forming the instruction is decoded and passed to the control unit which sends a sequence of control signals to the instruction such as reading values from registers, passing them to the ALU to add them together and writing the result back to a register.The program counter is then incremented to address the next instruction and the cycle is repeated.The fetch-execute cycle was first proposed by John von Neumann. (1998-06-25)

fetch-execute cycle "architecture, processor" The sequence of actions that a {central processing unit} performs to execute each {machine code} instruction in a program. At the beginning of each cycle the CPU presents the value of the {program counter} on the {address bus}. The CPU then fetches the instruction from {main memory} (possibly via a {cache} and/or a {pipeline}) via the {data bus} into the {instruction register}. From the instruction register, the data forming the instruction is decoded and passed to the {control unit} which sends a sequence of control signals to the relevant {function units} of the CPU to perform the actions required by the instruction such as reading values from {registers}, passing them to the {ALU} to add them together and writing the result back to a register. The program counter is then incremented to address the next instruction and the cycle is repeated. The fetch-execute cycle was first proposed by {John von Neumann}. (1998-06-25)

Mark I "computer" (Or "Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator", "ASCC") A {first generation computer} that was designed by {Howard Aiken} of {Harvard University}, taking inspiration from {Charles Babbage}'s {Analytical Engine}. The Mark I, as the Harvard University staff called it, was built by {IBM} between 1939 to 1944. It was delivered to Harvard University and became operational in March 1944. The Mark I is considered to be the first full-sized {digital computer}. It was built from clutches, relays, rotating shafts and switches. It read its instructions from one paper tape and data from another. It could store 72 numbers, each of 23 decimal digits. It weighed about 4500 Kg, had 800 Km of wiring, was used only for numeric calculations, and took three seconds to carry out one multiplication. The IBM archives call it the, "...industry's largest electromechanical calculator." One of the Mark I's first programers was {John von Neumann}. The Mark I was retired in 1959, and disassembled. Parts are archived at Harvard in the Science Center. It was followed by the {Mark II}. (1996-11-24)

von Neumann architecture ::: (architecture, computability) A computer architecture conceived by mathematician John von Neumann, which forms the core of nearly every computer successive operation can read or write any memory location, independent of the location accessed by the previous operation.A von Neumann machine also has a central processing unit (CPU) with one or more registers that hold data that are being operated on. The CPU has a set of a program if the binary integer in some register is equal to zero (conditional branch).The CPU can interpret the contents of memory either as instructions or as data according to the fetch-execute cycle.Von Neumann considered parallel computers but recognized the problems of construction and hence settled for a sequential system. For this reason, parallel computers are sometimes referred to as non-von Neumann architectures.A von Neumann machine can compute the same class of functions as a universal Turing machine.[Reference? Was von Neumann's design, unlike Turing's, originally intended for physical implementation?] .(2003-05-16)

von Neumann architecture "architecture, computability" A computer {architecture} conceived by mathematician {John von Neumann}, which forms the core of nearly every computer system in use today (regardless of size). In contrast to a {Turing machine}, a von Neumann machine has a {random-access memory} (RAM) which means that each successive operation can read or write any memory location, independent of the location accessed by the previous operation. A von Neumann machine also has a {central processing unit} (CPU) with one or more {registers} that hold data that are being operated on. The CPU has a set of built-in operations (its {instruction set}) that is far richer than with the Turing machine, e.g. adding two {binary} {integers}, or branching to another part of a program if the binary integer in some register is equal to zero ({conditional branch}). The CPU can interpret the contents of memory either as instructions or as data according to the {fetch-execute cycle}. Von Neumann considered {parallel computers} but recognized the problems of construction and hence settled for a sequential system. For this reason, parallel computers are sometimes referred to as non-von Neumann architectures. A von Neumann machine can compute the same class of functions as a universal {Turing machine}. [Reference? Was von Neumann's design, unlike Turing's, originally intended for physical implementation?] {(http://salem.mass.edu/~tevans/VonNeuma.htm)}. (2003-05-16)

von Neumann, John ::: John von Neumann

von Neumann, John {John von Neumann}



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   1 Wikipedia

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   65 John von Neumann
   2 Jeffrey M Schwartz

1:John von Neumann (/vɒn ˈnɔɪmən/; Hungarian: Neumann Janos Lajos, pronounced [ˈnɒjmɒn ˈjaːnoʃ ˈlɒjoʃ]; December 28, 1903 - February 8, 1957) was a Hungarian-American mathematician, physicist, inventor, computer scientist, and polymath. He made major contributions to a number of fields, including mathematics (foundations of mathematics, functional analysis, ergodic theory, geometry, topology, and numerical analysis), physics (quantum mechanics, hydrodynamics, and quantum statistical mechanics), economics (game theory), computing (Von Neumann architecture, linear programming, self-replicating machines, stochastic computing), and statistics.
   ~ Wikipedia,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Can we survive technology? ~ John von Neumann,
2:John von Neumann was the only student I was ever afraid of. ~ George Polya,
3:Life is a process which may be abstracted from other media. ~ John von Neumann,
4:Computers are like humans - they do everything except think. ~ John von Neumann,
5:You don't have to be responsible for the world that you're in. ~ John von Neumann,
6:Truth is much too complicated to allow anything but approximations. ~ John von Neumann,
7:An element which stimulates itself will hold a stimulus indefinitely. ~ John von Neumann,
8:It is only proper to realize that language is largely a historical accident. ~ John von Neumann,
9:All stable processes we shall predict. All unstable processes we shall control. ~ John von Neumann,
10:Young man, in mathematics you don't understand things. You just get used to them. ~ John von Neumann,
11:In mathematics you don’t understand things. You just get used to them. —John von Neumann ~ Ray Kurzweil,
12:There's no sense in being precise when you don't even know what you're talking about ~ John von Neumann,
13:There's no sense in being precise when you don't even know what you're talking about. ~ John von Neumann,
14:There is no point in being precise if you do not even know what you are talking about. ~ John von Neumann,
15:You wake me up early in the morning to tell me I am right? Please wait until I am wrong. ~ John von Neumann,
16:With four parameters I can fit an elephant, and with five I can make him wiggle his trunk. ~ John von Neumann,
17:There probably is a God. Many things are easier to explain if there is than if there isn't. ~ John von Neumann,
18:I am thinking about something much more important than bombs. I am thinking about computers. ~ John von Neumann,
19:Anyone who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits is, of course, in a state of sin. ~ John von Neumann,
20:Any one who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits is, of course, in a state of sin. ~ John von Neumann,
21:Problems are often stated in vague terms... because it is quite uncertain what the problems really are. ~ John von Neumann,
22:Se la gente non crede che la matematica è semplice, è solo perché non capisce quanto è complicata la vita. ~ John von Neumann,
23:Anyone who attempts to generate random numbers by deterministic means is, of course, living in a state of sin. ~ John von Neumann,
24:In this sense, an object is of the highest degree of complexity if it can do very difficult and involved things. ~ John von Neumann,
25:I would like to make a confession which may seem immoral: I do not believe absolutely in Hilbert space any more. ~ John von Neumann,
26:If you tell me precisely what it is a machine cannot do, then I can always make a machine which will do just that. ~ John von Neumann,
27:If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is. ~ John von Neumann,
28:When we talk mathematics, we may be discussing a secondary language built on the primary language of the nervous system. ~ John von Neumann,
29:Technological possibilities are irresistible to man. If man can go to the moon, he will. If he can control the climate, he will. ~ John von Neumann,
30:Since I am neither a neurologist nor a psychiatrist, but a mathematician, the work that follows requires some explanation and justification. ~ John von Neumann,
31:A system of logical instructions that an automaton can carry out and which causes the automaton to perform some organized task is called a code. ~ John von Neumann,
32:If one has really technically penetrated a subject, things that previously seemed in complete contrast, might be purely mathematical transformations of each other. ~ John von Neumann,
33:In an analog machine each number is represented by a suitable physical quantity, whose values, measured in some pre-assigned unit, is equal to the number in question. ~ John von Neumann,
34:You insist that there is something a machine cannot do. If you tell me precisely what it is a machine cannot do, then I can always make a machine which will do just that. ~ John von Neumann,
35:John von Neumann, one of the founding fathers of computer science, famously said that “with four parameters I can fit an elephant, and with five I can make him wiggle his trunk. ~ Pedro Domingos,
36:He [John von Neumann] had the invaluable faculty of being able to take the most difficult problem and separate it into its components, whereupon everything looked brlliantly simple. ~ Stanislaw Ulam,
37:Thus all sorts of sophisticated order-systems become possible, which keep successively modifying themselves and hence also the computational processes that are likewise under their control. ~ John von Neumann,
38:The emphasis on mathematical methods seems to be shifted more towards combinatorics and set theory - and away from the algorithm of differential equations which dominates mathematical physics. ~ John von Neumann,
39:We do not know where in the physically viewed nervous system a memory resides; we do not know whether it is a separate organ or a collection of specific parts of other already known organs, etc. ~ John von Neumann,
40:It is just as foolish to complain that people are selfish and treacherous as it is to complain that the magnetic field does not increase unless the electric field has a curl. Both are laws of nature. ~ John von Neumann,
41:Science, as well as technology, will in the near and in the farther future increasingly turn from problems of intensity, substance, and energy, to problems of structure, organization, information, and control. ~ John von Neumann,
42:The most vitally characteristic fact about mathematics is, in my opinion, its quite peculiar relationship to the natural sciences, or more generally, to any science which interprets experience on a higher than purely descriptive level. ~ John von Neumann,
43:Any computing machine that is to solve a complex mathematical problem must be 'programmed' for this task. This means that the complex operation of solving that problem must be replaced by a combination of the basic operations of the machine. ~ John von Neumann,
44:John von Neumann draws attention to what seemed to him a contrast. He remarked that for simple mechanisms, it is often easier to describe how they work than what they do, while for more complicated mechanisms, it is usually the other way around. ~ Edsger Dijkstra,
45:A large part of mathematics which becomes useful developed with absolutely no desire to be useful, and in a situation where nobody could possibly know in what area it would become useful; and there were no general indications that it ever would be so. ~ John von Neumann,
46:All existing machines and memories use "direct addressing," which is to say that every word in the memory has a numerical address of its own that characterizes it and its position within the memory (the total aggregate of all hierarchic levels) uniquely. ~ John von Neumann,
47:And' and 'or' are the basic operations of logic. Together with 'no' (the logical operation of negation) they are a complete set of basic logical operations—all other logical operations, no matter how complex, can be obtained by suitable combinations of these. ~ John von Neumann,
48:There probably is a God. Many things are easier to explain if there is than if there isn't. ~ John von Neumann, as quoted in John Von Neumann : The Scientific Genius Who Pioneered the Modern Computer , Game Theory, Nuclear Deterrence and Much More (1992) by Norman Macrae, p. 379,
49:En palabras de George Dyson: «El computador de programa almacenado, tal y como lo imaginó Alan Turing y lo plasmó John von Neumann, diluyó la distinción entre números que significan cosas y números que hacen cosas. Nuestro universo nunca volvería a ser el mismo». ~ Walter Isaacson,
50:All stable processes we shall predict. All unstable processes we shall control. Describing John von Neumann's aspiration for the application of computers sufficiently large to solve the problems of meteorology, despite the sensitivity of the weather to small perturbations. ~ Freeman Dyson,
51:The total subject of mathematics is clearly too broad for any of us. I do not think that any mathematician since Gauss has covered it uniformly and fully; even Hilbert did not and all of us are of considerably lesser width quite apart from the question of depth than Hilbert. ~ John von Neumann,
52:Neumann, to a physicist seeking help with a difficult problem: Simple. This can be solved by using the method of characteristics. Physicist: I'm afraid I don't understand the method of characteristics. Neumann: In mathematics you don't understand things. You just get used to them. ~ John von Neumann,
53:Kurt Godel's achievement in modern logic is singular and monumental - indeed it is more than a monument, it is a landmark which will remain visible far in space and time. ... The subject of logic has certainly completely changed its nature and possibilities with Godel's achievement. ~ John von Neumann,
54:Out of the prospering but vulnerable Hungarian Jewish middle class came no fewer than seven of the twentieth century’s most exceptional scientists: in order of birth, Theodor von Kármán, George de Hevesy, Michael Polanyi, Leo Szilard, Eugene Wigner, John von Neumann and Edward Teller. ~ Richard Rhodes,
55:Any artificial automaton that has been constructed for human use, and specifically for the control of complicated processes, normally possesses a purely logical part and an arithmetical part, i.e. a part in which arithmetical processes play no role, and one in which they are of importance. ~ John von Neumann,
56:Kurt Gödel's achievement in modern logic is singular and monumental – indeed it is more than a monument, it is a landmark which will remain visible far in space and time. ... The subject of logic has certainly completely changed its nature and possibilities with Gödel's achievement." —John von Neumann ~ John von Neumann,
57:Any one who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits is, of course, in a state of sin. For, as has been pointed out several times, there is no such thing as a random number - there are only methods to produce random numbers, and a strict arithmetic procedure of course is not such a method. ~ John von Neumann,
58:In the Game of Life, as in our world, self-reproducing patterns are complex objects. One estimate, based on the earlier work of mathematician John von Neumann, places the minimum size of a self-replicating pattern in the Game of Life at ten trillion squares—roughly the number of molecules in a single human cell. ~ Stephen Hawking,
59:In any conceivable method ever invented by man, an automaton which produces an object by copying a pattern, will go first from the pattern to a description to the object. It first abstracts what the thing is like, and then carries it out. It's therefore simpler not to extract from a real object its definition, but to start from the definition. ~ John von Neumann,
60:John von Neumann gave me an interesting idea: that you don't have to be responsible for the world that you're in. So I have developed a very powerful sense of social irresponsibility as a result of von Neumann's advice. It's made me a very happy man ever since. But it was von Neumann who put the seed in that grew into my active irresponsibility! ~ Richard P Feynman,
61:The calculus was the first achievement of modern mathematics and it is difficult to overestimate its importance. I think it defines more unequivocally than anything else the inception of modern mathematics; and the system of mathematical analysis, which is its logical development, still constitutes the greatest technical advance in exact thinking. ~ John von Neumann,
62:The linear size of a neuron varies widely from one nerve cell to the other, since some of these cells are contained in closely integrated large aggregates and have, therefore, very short axons, while others conduct pulses between rather remote parts of the body and may, therefore, have linear extensions comparable to those of the entire human body. ~ John von Neumann,
63:The very last stage of any memory hierarchy is necessarily the outside world—that is, the outside world as far as the machine is concerned, i.e. that part of it with which the machine can directly communicate, in other words, the input and the output organs of the machine. These are usually punched paper tapes or cards, and on the output side, of course, also printed paper. ~ John von Neumann,
64:By and large it is uniformly true in mathematics that there is a time lapse between a mathematical discovery and the moment when it is useful; and that this lapse of time can be anything from 30 to 100 years, in some cases even more; and that the whole system seems to function without any direction, without any reference to usefulness, and without any desire to do things which are useful. ~ John von Neumann,
65:The sciences do not try to explain, they hardly even try to interpret, they mainly make models. By a model is meant a mathematical construct which, with the addition of certain verbal interpretations, describes observed phenomena. The justification of such a mathematical construct is solely and precisely that it is expected to work-that is, correctly to describe phenomena from a reasonably wide area. ~ John von Neumann,
66:It is exceptional that one should be able to acquire the understanding of a process without having previously acquired a deep familiarity with running it, with using it, before one has assimilated it in an instinctive and empirical way... Thus any discussion of the nature of intellectual effort in any field is difficult, unless it presupposes an easy, routine familiarity with that field. In mathematics this limitation becomes very severe. ~ John von Neumann,
67:I am a little troubled about the tea service in the electronic computer building. Apparently the members of your staff consume several times as much supplies as the same number of people do in Fuld Hall and they have been especially unfair in the matter of sugar.... I should like to raise the question whether it would not be better for the computer people to come up to Fuld Hall at the end of the day at 5 o'clock and have their tea here under proper supervision. ~ John von Neumann,
68:Apart from all other considerations, the main limitation of analog machines relates to precision. Indeed, the precision of electrical analog machines rarely exceeds 1:10^3, and even mechanical ones achieve at best 1:10^4 to 10^5... On the other hand, to go from 1:10^12 to 1:10^13 in a digital machine means merely adding one place to twelve; this means usually no more than a relative increase in equipment (not everywhere!) of 1/12 = 8.3 percent, and an equal loss in speed (not everywhere!) — none of which is serious. ~ John von Neumann,
69:The sciences do not try to explain, they hardly even try to interpret, they mainly make models. By a model is meant a mathematical construct which, with the addition of certain verbal interpretations, describes observed phenomena. The justification of such a mathematical construct is solely and precisely that it is expected to work - that is correctly to describe phenomena from a reasonably wide area. Furthermore, it must satisfy certain esthetic criteria - that is, in relation to how much it describes, it must be rather simple. ~ John von Neumann,
70:My greatest concern was what to call it. I thought of calling it 'information,' but the word was overly used, so I decided to call it 'uncertainty.' When I discussed it with John von Neumann, he had a better idea. Von Neumann told me, 'You should call it entropy, for two reasons. In the first place your uncertainty function has been used in statistical mechanics under that name, so it already has a name. In the second place, and more important, no one really knows what entropy really is, so in a debate you will always have the advantage.' ~ Claude Shannon,
71:When we talk mathematics, we may be discussing a secondary language, built on the primary language truly used by the central nervous system. Thus the outward forms of our mathematics are not absolutely relevant from the point of view of evaluating what the mathematical or logical language truly used by the central nervous system is. However, the above remarks about reliability and logical and arithmetical depth prove that whatever the system is, it cannot fail to differ considerably from what we consciously and explicitly consider as mathematics. ~ John von Neumann,
72:the groundbreakers in many sciences were devout believers. Witness the accomplishments of Nicolaus Copernicus (a priest) in astronomy, Blaise Pascal (a lay apologist) in mathematics, Gregor Mendel (a monk) in genetics, Louis Pasteur in biology, Antoine Lavoisier in chemistry, John von Neumann in computer science, and Enrico Fermi and Erwin Schrodinger in physics. That’s a short list, and it includes only Roman Catholics; a long list could continue for pages. A roster that included other believers—Protestants, Jews, and unconventional theists like Albert Einstein, Fred Hoyle, and Paul Davies—could fill a book. ~ Scott Hahn,
73:John von Neumann (/vɒn ˈnɔɪmən/; Hungarian: Neumann Janos Lajos, pronounced [ˈnɒjmɒn ˈjaːnoʃ ˈlɒjoʃ]; December 28, 1903 - February 8, 1957) was a Hungarian-American mathematician, physicist, inventor, computer scientist, and polymath. He made major contributions to a number of fields, including mathematics (foundations of mathematics, functional analysis, ergodic theory, geometry, topology, and numerical analysis), physics (quantum mechanics, hydrodynamics, and quantum statistical mechanics), economics (game theory), computing (Von Neumann architecture, linear programming, self-replicating machines, stochastic computing), and statistics.
   ~ Wikipedia,
74:Vinge compares it to the Cold War strategy called MAD—mutually assured destruction. Coined by acronym-loving John von Neumann (also the creator of an early computer with the winning initials, MANIAC), MAD maintained Cold War peace through the promise of mutual obliteration. Like MAD, superintelligence boasts a lot of researchers secretly working to develop technologies with catastrophic potential. But it’s like mutually assured destruction without any commonsense brakes. No one will know who is ahead, so everyone will assume someone else is. And as we’ve seen, the winner won’t take all. The winner in the AI arms race will win the dubious distinction of being the first to confront the Busy Child. ~ James Barrat,
75:A code, which according to Turing's schema is supposed to make one machine behave as if it were another specific machine (which is supposed to make the former imitate the latter) must do the following things. It must contain, in terms that the machine will understand (and purposively obey), instructions (further detailed parts of the code) that will cause the machine to examine every order it gets and determine whether this order has the structure appropriate to an order of the second machine. It must then contain, in terms of the order system of the first machine, sufficient orders to make the machine cause the actions to be taken that the second machine would have taken under the influence of the order in question. ~ John von Neumann,
76:In fact, it took the resources of three countries to produce the bomb: the United States, Great Britain, and Canada. But there was more to it than that. In some sense it took some of the most valuable scientific talent of all Europe to do it. Consider this partial list: the Hungarians John von Neumann, Eugene Wigner, and Edward Teller; the Germans Hans Bethe and Rudolf Peierls; the Poles Stanislaw Ulam and Joseph Rotblat; the Austrians Victor Weisskopf and Otto Frisch; the Italians Enrico Fermi and Emilio Segrè; Felix Bloch from Switzerland; and, from Denmark, the Bohrs, Niels and his son Aage. This talent, the B-29 heavy bomber program that could deliver the bombs, plus Manhattan Project efforts—all together cost more than fifty billion in today’s dollars. Wilhelm ~ Gregory Benford,
77:The other line of argument, which leads to the opposite conclusion, arises from looking at artificial automata. Everyone knows that a machine tool is more complicated than the elements which can be made with it, and that, generally speaking, an automaton A, which can make an automaton B, must contain a complete description of B, and also rules on how to behave while effecting the synthesis. So, one gets a very strong impression that complication, or productive potentiality in an organization, is degenerative , that an organization which synthesizes something is necessarily more complicated, of a higher order, than the organization it synthesizes. This conclusion, arrived at by considering artificial automaton, is clearly opposite to our early conclusion, arrived at by considering living organisms. ~ John von Neumann,
78:Laypeople as well as most scientists believe that science regards the world as built out of tiny bits of matter. “Yet this view is wrong,” argues Henry Stapp, a physicist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory high in the hills above Berkeley, California. At least one version of quantum theory, propounded by the Hungarian mathematician John von Neumann in the 1930s, “claims that the world is built not out of bits of matter but out of bits of knowledge—subjective, conscious knowings,” Stapp says. These ideas, however, have fallen far short of toppling the materialist worldview, which has emerged so triumphant that to suggest humbly that there might be more to mental life than action potentials zipping along axons is to risk being branded a scientific naif. Even worse, it is to be branded nonscientific. ~ Jeffrey M Schwartz,
79:An important viewpoint in classifying games is this: Is the sum of all payments received by all players (at the end of the game) always zero; or is this not the case? If it is zero, then one can say that the players pay only to each other, and that no production or destruction of goods is involved. All games which are actually played for entertainment are of this type. But the economically significant schemes are most essentially not such. There the sum of all payments, the total social product, will in general not be zero, and not even constant. I.e., it will depend on the behavior of the players—the participants in the social economy. This distinction was already mentioned in 4.2.1., particularly in footnote 2, p. 34. We shall call games of the first-mentioned type zero-sum games, and those of the latter type non-zero-sum games. ~ John von Neumann,
80:At least one version of quantum theory, propounded by the Hungarian mathematician John von Neumann in the 1930's "claims that the world is built no out of bits of matter but out of bits of knowledge-subjective, conscious knowings," Stapp says. These ideas, however, have fallen far short of toppling the materialist worldview, which has emerged so triumphant that to suggest humbly that there might be more to mental life than action potentials zipping along axons is to risk being branded a scientific naif. Even worse, it is to be branded nonscientific. When, in 1997, I made just this suggestion over dinner to a former president of the Society for Neuroscience, he exlaimed, "Well, then you are not a scientist." Questioning whether consciousness, emotions, thoughts, the subjective feeling of pain, and the spark of creativity arise from nothing but the electrochemical activity of large collections of neuronal circuits is a good way to get dismissed as a hopeless dualist. ~ Jeffrey M Schwartz,
81:Anybody who looks at living organisms knows perfectly well that they can produce other organisms like themselves. This is their normal function, they wouldn't exist if they didn't do this, and it's not plausible that this is the reason why they abound in the world. In other words, living organisms are very complicated aggregations of elementary parts, and by any reasonable theory of probability or thermodynamics highly improbable. That they should occur in the world at all is a miracle of the first magnitude; the only thing which removes, or mitigates, this miracle is that they reproduce themselves. Therefore, if by any peculiar accident there should ever be one of them, from there on the rules of probability do not apply, and there will be many of them, at least if the milieu is reasonable. But a reasonable milieu is already a thermodynamically much less improbable thing. So, the operations of probability somehow leave a loophole at this point, and it is by the process of self-reproduction that they are pierced. ~ John von Neumann,
82:THE VASTNESS OF OUR MEMORY
Holography also explains how our brains can store so many memories in so little space. The brilliant Hungarian-born physicist and mathematician John von Neumann once calculated that over the course of the average human lifetime, the brain stores something on the order of 2. 8 x 1020 (280, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000) bits of information. This is a staggering amount of information, and brain researchers have long struggled to come up with a mechanism that explains such a vast capability. Interestingly, holograms also possess a fantastic capacity for information storage. By changing the angle at which the two lasers strike a piece of photographic film, it is possible to record many different images on the same surface. Any image thus recorded can be retrieved simply by illuminating the film with a laser beam possessing the same angle as the original two beams. By employing this method researchers have calculated that a one-inch-square of film can store the same amount of information contained in fifty Bibles! ~ Michael Talbot,
83:Furthermore, it's equally evident that what goes on is actually one degree better than self-reproduction, for organisms appear to have gotten more elaborate in the course of time. Today's organisms are phylogenetically descended from others which were vastly simpler than they are, so much simpler, in fact, that it's inconceivable, how any kind of description of the latter, complex organism could have existed in the earlier one. It's not easy to imagine in what sense a gene, which is probably a low order affair, can contain a description of the human being which will come from it. But in this case you can say that since the gene has its effect only within another human organism, it probably need not contain a complete description of what is to happen, but only a few cues for a few alternatives. However, this is not so in phylogenetic evolution. That starts from simple entities, surrounded by an unliving amorphous milieu, and produce, something more complicated. Evidently, these organisms have the ability to produce something more complicated than themselves. ~ John von Neumann,

IN CHAPTERS [1/1]









The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  friend John von Neumann, who had all the makings of a humorist:
  he was a mathematical genius and he came from Budapest.

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun john_von_neumann

The noun john von neumann has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
              
1. von Neumann, Neumann, John von Neumann ::: (United States mathematician who contributed to the development of atom bombs and of stored-program digital computers (1903-1957))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun john_von_neumann

1 sense of john von neumann                      

Sense 1
von Neumann, Neumann, John von Neumann
   INSTANCE OF=> mathematician
     => scientist
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun john_von_neumann
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun john_von_neumann

1 sense of john von neumann                      

Sense 1
von Neumann, Neumann, John von Neumann
   INSTANCE OF=> mathematician




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun john_von_neumann

1 sense of john von neumann                      

Sense 1
von Neumann, Neumann, John von Neumann
  -> mathematician
   => algebraist
   => arithmetician
   => geometer, geometrician
   => number theorist
   => probability theorist
   => statistician, mathematical statistician
   => trigonometrician
   HAS INSTANCE=> Abel, Niels Abel, Niels Henrik Abel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alhazen, Alhacen, al-Haytham, Ibn al-Haytham, Al-Hasan ibn al-Haytham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Archimedes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bayes, Thomas Bayes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bernoulli, Jakob Bernoulli, Jacques Bernoulli, James Bernoulli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bernoulli, Johann Bernoulli, Jean Bernoulli, John Bernoulli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bessel, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boole, George Boole
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bowditch, Nathaniel Bowditch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Condorcet, Marquis de Condorcet, Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas Caritat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Descartes, Rene Descartes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diophantus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eratosthenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Euler, Leonhard Euler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fermat, Pierre de Fermat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fourier, Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, Baron Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galois, Evariste Galois
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gauss, Karl Gauss, Karl Friedrich Gauss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Godel, Kurt Godel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamilton, William Rowan Hamilton, Sir William Rowan Hamilton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hero, Heron, Hero of Alexandria
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hilbert, David Hilbert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hipparchus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobi, Karl Gustav Jacob Jacobi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Klein, Felix Klein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kronecker, Leopold Kronecker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Laplace, Marquis de Laplace, Pierre Simon de Laplace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leibniz, Leibnitz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lobachevsky, Nikolai Ivanovich Lobachevsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mandelbrot, Benoit Mandelbrot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Markov, Andrei Markov, Markoff, Andre Markoff
   HAS INSTANCE=> Minkowski, Hermann Minkowski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mobius, August F. Mobius, August Ferdinand Mobius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Muller, Johann Muller, Regiomontanus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Napier, John Napier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Newton, Isaac Newton, Sir Isaac Newton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Noether, Emmy Noether
   HAS INSTANCE=> Omar Khayyam
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pascal, Blaise Pascal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Peirce, Benjamin Peirce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pythagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Riemann, Bernhard Riemann, Georg Friedrich Bernhard Riemann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turing, Alan Turing, Alan Mathison Turing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Veblen, Oswald Veblen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vernier, Paul Vernier
   HAS INSTANCE=> von Neumann, Neumann, John von Neumann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Weil, Andre Weil
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whitehead, Alfred North Whitehead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiener, Norbert Wiener




--- Grep of noun john_von_neumann
john von neumann



IN WEBGEN [10000/134]

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Bull ::: TV-14 | 1h | Comedy, Crime, Drama | TV Series (2016 ) Season 5 Returns Monday, March 15 -- Brilliant, brash, and charming, Dr. Bull is the ultimate puppet master as he combines psychology, human intuition, and high-tech data to learn what makes jurors, attorneys, witnesses, and the accused tick.
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Dorei-ku The Animation -- -- TNK, Zero-G -- 12 eps -- Manga -- Drama Psychological -- Dorei-ku The Animation Dorei-ku The Animation -- Eager to know why her best friend’s boyfriend dumped her for a man, the headstrong Eiya Arakawa suggests a meeting with them. Gathered together at a café, Yuuga Oota agrees to answer Eiya’s questions only if she can correctly ascertain the relationship of a couple sitting across from them, which she does on her first attempt. Amazed by her astounding intellect and intuition, he invites her to a private meeting where he introduces her to the concept of Slave Control Method, or SCM, a retainer-like device that has the ability to turn people into slaves. -- -- When two SCM users enter a duel, the devices exert a powerful influence on their brains. Once the duel is over, the SCM amplifies the loser’s sense of obligation and forces them to bend to the will of the winner. Wanting desperately to test his own abilities, Yuuga asks Eiya to act as his insurance in the event that he himself becomes a slave. Granted access to 10 million yen, Eiya’s job is to convince Yuuga’s would-be master to free him from his servitude. Though hesitant at first, Yuuga’s words resonate with her personal yearning for something more from her life, and she agrees to his request. However, when a mysterious organization begins rapidly accruing slaves, Eiya becomes entangled in a game far more dangerous than she ever could have imagined. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Sentai Filmworks -- 51,942 5.98
Mononoke -- -- Toei Animation -- 12 eps -- Original -- Mystery Historical Horror Demons Psychological Supernatural Fantasy Seinen -- Mononoke Mononoke -- The "Medicine Seller" is a deadly and mysterious master of the occult who travels across feudal Japan in search of malevolent spirits called "mononoke" to slay. When he locates one of these spirits, he cannot simply kill it; he must first learn its Form, its Truth, and its Reason in order to wield the mighty Exorcism Sword and fight against it. He must begin his strange exorcisms with intense psychological analysis and careful investigative work—an extremely dangerous step, as he must first confront and learn about the mononoke before he even has the means to defeat it. -- -- The Medicine Seller's journey leads him to an old-fashioned inn where Shino, a pregnant woman, has finally found a place to rest. The owner has reluctantly placed her in the last vacant room; however, as she settles in, it quickly becomes clear that the room is infested by a lethal band of mononoke, the Zashiki Warashi. With his hunter's intuition, the Medicine Seller begins his investigation to discover the Form, the Truth, and the Reason before the Zashiki Warashi can kill again. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Flatiron Film Company -- TV - Jul 13, 2007 -- 228,080 8.43
Mononoke -- -- Toei Animation -- 12 eps -- Original -- Mystery Historical Horror Demons Psychological Supernatural Fantasy Seinen -- Mononoke Mononoke -- The "Medicine Seller" is a deadly and mysterious master of the occult who travels across feudal Japan in search of malevolent spirits called "mononoke" to slay. When he locates one of these spirits, he cannot simply kill it; he must first learn its Form, its Truth, and its Reason in order to wield the mighty Exorcism Sword and fight against it. He must begin his strange exorcisms with intense psychological analysis and careful investigative work—an extremely dangerous step, as he must first confront and learn about the mononoke before he even has the means to defeat it. -- -- The Medicine Seller's journey leads him to an old-fashioned inn where Shino, a pregnant woman, has finally found a place to rest. The owner has reluctantly placed her in the last vacant room; however, as she settles in, it quickly becomes clear that the room is infested by a lethal band of mononoke, the Zashiki Warashi. With his hunter's intuition, the Medicine Seller begins his investigation to discover the Form, the Truth, and the Reason before the Zashiki Warashi can kill again. -- -- TV - Jul 13, 2007 -- 228,080 8.43
Nanbaka -- -- Satelight -- 13 eps -- Web manga -- Action Comedy Drama -- Nanbaka Nanbaka -- Nanba is the world's most formidable prison, built to incarcerate criminals who are too slippery to stay in ordinary confinement. The four inmates who occupy Cell 13 are particularly cunning on that behalf, having escaped every other prison with a perfect success rate. There is Juugo, a specialist in locks who has spent the majority of his life in prison; Uno, a gambler with great intuition; Nico, an otaku whose body reacts strangely to drugs; and Rock, a bruiser with a love for food. The daily shenanigans of the four prisoners always cause trouble for the building supervisor, Hajime Sugoroku, who desperately tries to prevent them from breaking out of Nanba. -- -- Nanbaka follows the comedic, sparkle-filled exploits of these prisoners and their guards. From three square meals a day to sports festivals, prison life in Nanba isn't actually that bad—and it is the closest these four have to a home. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 247,115 7.34
Tate no Yuusha no Nariagari Season 2 -- -- DR Movie, Kinema Citrus -- ? eps -- Light novel -- Action Adventure Drama Fantasy -- Tate no Yuusha no Nariagari Season 2 Tate no Yuusha no Nariagari Season 2 -- Second season of Tate no Yuusha no Nariagari. -- TV - Oct ??, 2021 -- 251,232 N/A -- -- Nanbaka -- -- Satelight -- 13 eps -- Web manga -- Action Comedy Drama -- Nanbaka Nanbaka -- Nanba is the world's most formidable prison, built to incarcerate criminals who are too slippery to stay in ordinary confinement. The four inmates who occupy Cell 13 are particularly cunning on that behalf, having escaped every other prison with a perfect success rate. There is Juugo, a specialist in locks who has spent the majority of his life in prison; Uno, a gambler with great intuition; Nico, an otaku whose body reacts strangely to drugs; and Rock, a bruiser with a love for food. The daily shenanigans of the four prisoners always cause trouble for the building supervisor, Hajime Sugoroku, who desperately tries to prevent them from breaking out of Nanba. -- -- Nanbaka follows the comedic, sparkle-filled exploits of these prisoners and their guards. From three square meals a day to sports festivals, prison life in Nanba isn't actually that bad—and it is the closest these four have to a home. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 247,115 7.34
Artificial intuition
Dangerous Intuition
Ethical intuitionism
Fatal Intuition
Following My Intuition
Intuition
Intuition (Amiga)
Intuition and decision-making
Intuition (Bergson)
Intuition (disambiguation)
Intuition (film)
Intuitionism
Intuitionistic logic
Intuitionistic type theory
Intuition (Jamie Foxx album)
Intuition (novel)
Logical intuition
Pre-intuitionism
Social intuitionism
Spread (intuitionism)
WinTuition
Woman's Intuition



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