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object:Essays On The Gita
class:book
class:cwsa
author class:Sri Aurobindo
author class:Sri Aurobindo
subject class:Integral Yoga
subject:Integral Yoga


CONTENTS
FIRST SERIES
1.01 - Our Demand and Need from the Gita
1.02 - The Divine Teacher
1.03 - The Human Disciple
1.04 - The Core of the Teaching
1.05 - Kurukshetra
1.06 - Man and the Battle of Life
1.07 - The Creed of the Aryan Fighter
1.08 - Sankhya and Yoga
1.09 - Sankhya, Yoga and Vedanta
1.10 - The Yoga of the Intelligent Will
1.11 - Works and Sacrifice
1.12- The Significance of Sacrifice
1.13 - The Lord of the Sacrifice
1.14 - The Principle of Divine Works
1.15 - The Possibility and Purpose of Avatarhood
1.16 - The Process of Avatarhood
1.17 - The Divine Birth and Divine Works
1.18 - The Divine Worker
1.19 - Equality
1.20 - Equality and Knowledge
1.21 - The Determinism of Nature
1.22 - Beyond the Modes of Nature
1.23 - Nirvana and Works in the World
1.24 - The Gist of the Karmayoga

SECOND SERIES
Part I - The Synthesis of Works, Love and Knowledge
2.01 - The Two Natures
2.02 - The Synthesis of Devotion and Knowledge
2.03 - The Supreme Divine
2.04 - The Secret of Secrets
2.05 - The Divine Truth and Way
2.06 - Works, Devotion and Knowledge
2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita
2.08 - God in Power of Becoming
2.09 - The Theory of the Vibhuti
2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit- Time the Destroyer
2.11 - The Vision of the World-Spirit- The Double Aspect
2.12 - The Way and the Bhakta

Part II - The Supreme Secret
2.13 - The Field and its Knower
2.14 - Above the Gunas
2.15 - The Three Purushas
2.16 - The Fullness of Spiritual Action
2.17 - Deva and Asura
2.18 - The Gunas, Faith and Works
2.19 - The Gunas, Mind and Works
2.20 - Swabhava and Swadharma
2.21 - Towards the Supreme Secret
2.22 - The Supreme Secret
2.23 - The Core of the Gita's Meaning
2.24 - The Message of the Gita





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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [0]


1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher
1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.11_-_Works_and_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.13_-_The_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.19_-_Equality
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Two_Natures
2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_The_Divine_Truth_and_Way
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.11_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_The_Double_Aspect
2.12_-_The_Way_and_the_Bhakta
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita

--- PRIMARY CLASS


book
cwsa

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [0]


Essays On The Gita
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--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



--- QUOTES [105 / 105 - 0 / 0] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



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  104 Sri Aurobindo
   1 The Mother

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1:God is at once impersonal and personal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.04 - The Secret of Secrets,
2:Inner happiness can only come by right living. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Deva and Asura,
3:The supreme faith is that which sees God in all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.12 - The Way and the Bhakta,
4:A mutual giving and receiving is the law of Life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.13 - The Lord of the Sacrifice,
5:Perfection cannot come without self-knowledge and God-knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Above the Gunas,
6:The Divine is the unborn Eternal who has no origin. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
7:All is one in self, but all is variation in the phenomenon. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.05 - The Divine Truth and Way,
8:The growth of the god in man is man’s proper business. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
9:Death is his mask and immortality is his self-revelation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
10:Nature is God’s power of various self-becoming, ātma-vibhūti. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Theory of the Vibhuti,
11:All existences are instinct with the life of the one indivisible Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.01 - The Two Natures,
12:Here and not elsewhere the highest Godhead has to be found. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
13:In every being and object God dwells concealed and discoverable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.08 - God in Power of Becoming,
14:The Lord is there, not only in that self, but in Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Fullness of Spiritual Action,
15:Nature creates and acts, the Soul enjoys her creation and action. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
16:The soul cannot act by itself, it can only act through Nature and her modes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Above the Gunas,
17:The highest heavens of the cosmic plan are subject to a return to rebirth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.03 - The Supreme Divine,
18:The joy of the soul in the dualities is the secret of the mind’s pleasure in living. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.19 - Equality,
19:The way to liberation is to turn from the outward to the inward. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
20:The sattwic quality is a first mediator between the higher and the lower nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Deva and Asura,
21:Where there is not the personal egoism of the doer, desire becomes impossible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.18 - The Divine Worker,
22:Cosmos cannot be governed by a Power that does not transcend cosmos. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
23:Every breath of life is a breath too of death. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
24:If birth is a becoming, death also is a becoming, not by any means a cessation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.03 - The Supreme Divine,
25:Life is not entirely real until it opens into the sense of the infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.13 - The Lord of the Sacrifice,
26:Destruction is the first condition of progress. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
27:The soul is seated within and impervious to the shocks of external events. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
28:It is possible to be one with all, yet above all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.11 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - The Double Aspect,
29:One Brahman, one reality in Self and Nature is the object of all knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
30:All relations of Soul and Nature are circumstances in the eternity of Brahman. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
31:God to the soul that sees is the path and God is the goal of his journey. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
32:Love of the world, the mask, must change into the love of God, the Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
33:The divine detachment must be the foundation for a divine participation in Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.04 - The Secret of Secrets,
34:The highest spiritual truth can be lived, can be seen, but can only be partially stated. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.01 - The Two Natures,
35:All Yoga is a seeking after the Divine, a turn towards union with the Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
36:Time and Space that are the conceptual movement and extension of the Godhead in us. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.08 - God in Power of Becoming,
37:Delight of the heart in God is the whole constituent and essence of true Bhakti. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
38:Freedom, love and spiritual knowledge raise us from mortal nature to immortal being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
39:The silent all-pervading Self is only one side of the truth of the divine Being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
40:All Shastra is built on a number of preparatory conditions, dharmas; it is a means, not an end. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Deva and Asura,
41:Nothing in God’s workings in this world is done by an abrupt action without procedure or basis. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Deva and Asura,
42:The reason has to be led to a truth beyond itself, but by its own means and in its own manner. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.01 - The Two Natures,
43:To be fixed on the transient, to be limited in the phenomenon is to accept mortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
44:Man ordinarily offers his sacrifice openly or under a disguise to his own ego. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Fullness of Spiritual Action,
45:Mechanical Nature is only a lower truth; it is the formula of an inferior phenomenal action. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.04 - The Secret of Secrets,
46:We have at a certain stage to liberate ourselves even from the desire of our liberation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Determinism of Nature,
47:The world is only a partial manifestation of the Godhead, it is not itself that Divinity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Theory of the Vibhuti,
48:The Avatar of sorrow and suffering must come before there can be the Avatar of divine joy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.16 - The Process of Avatarhood,
49:The force varies always according to the power of consciousness which it embodies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.17 - The Divine Birth and Divine Works,
50:The vision of God brings infallibly the adoration and passionate seeking of the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
51:Life to us means only the way she affects our ego and the way our ego replies to her touches. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Gist of the Karmayoga,
52:The soul’s salvation cannot come without the soul’s perfection, without its growing into the divine nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Above the Gunas,
53:The ecstasy of the spirit’s calm needs to be transformed by the ecstasy of the soul’s Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Fullness of Spiritual Action,
54:All Nature is full of the secret Godhead and in labour to reveal him in her. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
55:Nothing in the universe has its real cause in the universe; all proceeds from this supernal Existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
56:The Godhead is all that is universe and all that is in the universe and all that is more than the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.05 - The Divine Truth and Way,
57:There is a higher which is the spiritual and that is the nature of our spiritual personality, our true person. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.04 - The Secret of Secrets,
58:All existence is a manifestation of the divine Existence and that which is within us is spirit of the eternal Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Above the Gunas,
59:Our persistent consecration turns into knowledge of him all our knowing and into light of his power all our action. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.03 - The Supreme Divine,
60:To enjoy the eternity to which birth and life are only outward circumstances, is the soul’s true immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
61:The assumption of imperfection by the perfect is the whole mystic phenomenon of the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.15 - The Possibility and Purpose of Avatarhood,
62:Nothing can spiritually justify individual violence done in anger or passion or from any vital motive. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Himself and the Ashram Essays on the Gita,
63:The business of knowledge is to comprehend and for the finite intellect that means to define and determine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
64:Not by denying all relations, but through all relations is the Divine Infinite naturally approachable to man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
65:Man can only exceed the law of battle by discovering the greater law of his immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
66:Destruction is always a simultaneous or alternate element which keeps pace with creation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
67:Cosmos is not the Divine in all his utter reality, but a single self-expression, a true but minor motion of his being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.05 - The Divine Truth and Way,
68:The history of the cycles of man is a progress towards the unveiling of the Godhead in the soul and life of humanity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Theory of the Vibhuti,
69:A divine knowledge and a perfect turning with adoration to this Divine is the secret of the great spiritual liberation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
70:Prakriti is the power of the All-Soul, the power of the Eternal and Infinite self-moved to action and creation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Fullness of Spiritual Action,
71:The indefinable Oneness accepts all that climb to it, but offers no help of relation and gives no foothold to the climber. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.12 - The Way and the Bhakta,
72:The unity is the greater truth, the multiplicity is the lesser truth, though both are a truth and neither of them is an illusion. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.01 - The Two Natures,
73:The perfect union is that which meets the Divine at every moment, in every action and with all the integrality of the nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.12 - The Way and the Bhakta,
74:Inwardly, the man who does not destroy his lower self-formations, cannot rise to a greater existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
75:Material existence and earthly activities are not the whole scope of our personal becoming or the whole formula of the cosmos. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
76:All the movement and action of Rudra the Terrible is towards perfection and divine light and completeness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.11 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - The Double Aspect,
77:Rajas is a child of the attachment of the soul to the desire of objects; it is born from the nature’s thirst for an unpossessed satisfaction. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Above the Gunas,
78:Christ and Buddha have come and gone, but it is Rudra who still holds the world in the hollow of his hand. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
79:It seeks the highest truth for the highest practical utility, not for intellectual or even for spiritual satisfaction. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.02 - The Synthesis of Devotion and Knowledge,
80:The weakness of the human heart wants only fair and comforting truths or in their absence pleasant fables. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
81:We cannot get beyond the three gunas, if we do not first develop within ourselves the rule of the highest guna, sattwa. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.02 - The Synthesis of Devotion and Knowledge,
82:Sin consists not at all in the outward deed, but in an impure reaction of the personal will, mind and heart which accompanies it or causes it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.18 - The Divine Worker,
83:The divine Self in things is the sustaining Spirit of the present, the withdrawing Spirit of the past, the creative Spirit of the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.08 - God in Power of Becoming,
84:The will of self-giving forces away by its power the veil between God and man; it annuls every error and annihilates every obstacle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
85:Ethical action is only a means of purification by which we can rise towards the divine nature, but that nature itself is lifted beyond the dualities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.01 - The Two Natures,
86:By virtue alone man cannot attain to the highest, but by virtue he can develop a first capacity for attaining to it, adhikāra. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.02 - The Synthesis of Devotion and Knowledge,
87:All souls are eternal portions of the Divine, the Asura as well as the Deva, all can come to salvation: even the greatest sinner can turn to the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Deva and Asura,
88:A spiritual, not an intellectual knowledge is the indispensable requisite for this way of works, its sole possible light, medium, incentive. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Fullness of Spiritual Action,
89:Reason and intelligence and mind and sense and life and body, all that we vaunt or take for our own, are Nature’s instruments and creations. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Fullness of Spiritual Action,
90:No real peace can be till the heart of man deserves peace; the law of Vishnu cannot prevail till the debt to Rudra is paid. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
91:Action and event have no value in themselves, but only take their value from the force which they represent and the idea which they symbolise. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.17 - The Divine Birth and Divine Works,
92:Undoubtedly sin has to be abandoned if one is to get anywhere near the Godhead; but so too has virtue to be overpassed if we are to enter into the Divine Being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.01 - The Two Natures,
93:What the thought, the inner regard, the faith, śraddhā, settles itself upon with a complete and definite insistence, into that our inner being tends to change. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.03 - The Supreme Divine,
94:God the bountiful and prodigal creator, God the helpful, strong and benignant preserver is also God the devourer and destroyer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.10 - The Vision of the World-Spirit - Time the Destroyer,
95:We imagine that the soul is in the body, almost a result and derivation from the body; even we so feel it: but it is the body that is in the soul and a result and derivation from the soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.01 - The Two Natures,
96:The knowledge which is not companioned by an aspiration and vivified by an uplifting is no true knowledge, for it can be only an intellectual seeing and a barren cognitive endeavour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
97:We are to move inwardly towards a greater consciousness and a supreme existence, not by a total exclusion of our cosmic nature, but by a higher, a spiritual fulfilment of all that we now essentially are. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.03 - The Supreme Divine,
98:The Divine accepts whatever symbol, form or conception of himself is present to the mind of the worshipper, yāṁ yāṁ tanuṁ śraddhayā arcati, as it is said elsewhere, and meets him according to the faith that is in him. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
99:A highest Godward tension liberates the mind through an absolute seeing of knowledge, liberates the heart through an absolute love and delight, liberates the whole existence through an absolute concentration of will towards a greater existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Theory of the Vibhuti,
100:The Gita has laid it down from the beginning that the very first precondition of the divine birth, the higher existence is the slaying of rajasic desire and its children, and that means the exclusion of sin. Sin is the working of the lower nature for the crude satisfaction of its own ignorant, dull or violent rajasic and tamasic propensities in revolt against any high self-control and self-mastery of the nature by the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita ,
101:God must be seen and loved in the ignorant, the humble, the weak, the vile, the outcaste. In the Vibhuti himself it is not, except as a symbol, the outward individual that is to be thus recognised and set high, but the one Godhead who displays himself in the poweR But this does not abrogate the fact that there is an ascending scale in manifestation and that Nature mounts upward in her degrees of self-expression from her groping, dark or suppressed symbols to the first visible expressions of the Godhead. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita ,
102:Arjuna and Krishna, this human and this divine, stand together not as seers in the peaceful hermitage of meditation, but as fighter and holder of the reins in the midst of the hurtling shafts, in the chariot of battle. The Teacher of the Gita is therefore not only the God in man who unveils himself in the word of knowledge, but the God in man who moves our whole world of action, by and for whom all our humanity exists and struggles and labours, towards whom all human life travels and progresses. He is the secret Master of works and sacrifice and the Friend of the human peoples. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita ,
103:Self-DenialOnly when we have climbed above ourselves,A line of the Transcendent meets our roadAnd joins us to the timeless and the true; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.03 - The Supreme Divine,
104:38 - Strange! The Germans have disproved the existence of Christ; yet his crucifixion remains still a greater historic fact than the death of Caesar. - Sri Aurobindo.To what plane of consciousness did Christ belong?In the Essays on the Gita Sri Aurobindo mentions the names of three Avatars, and Christ is one of them. An Avatar is an emanation of the Supreme Lord who assumes a human body on earth.I heard Sri Aurobindo himself say that Christ was an emanation of the Lord's aspect of love.The death of Caesar marked a decisive change in the history of Rome and the countries dependent on her. It was therefore an important event in the history of Europe.But the death of Christ was the starting-point of a new stage in the evolution of human civilisation. This is why Sri Aurobindo tells us that the death of Christ was of greater historical significance, that is to say, it has had greater historical consequences than the death of Caesar. The story of Christ, as it has been told, is the concrete and dramatic enactment of the divine sacrifice: the Supreme Lord, who is All-Light, All-Knowledge, All-Power, All-Beauty, All-Love, All-Bliss, accepting to assume human ignorance and suffering in matter, in order to help men to emerge from the falsehood in which they live and because of which they die.16 June 1960 ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms volume-10,
105:Shastra is the knowledge and teaching laid down by intuition, experience and wisdom, the science and art and ethic of life, the best standards available to the race. The half-awakened man who leaves the observance of its rule to follow the guidance of his instincts and desires, can get pleasure but not happiness; for the inner happiness can only come by right living. He cannot move to perfection, cannot acquire the highest spiritual status. The law of instinct and desire seems to come first in the animal world, but the manhood of man grows by the pursuit of truth and religion and knowledge and a right life. The Shastra, the recognised Right that he has set up to govern his lower members by his reason and intelligent will, must therefore first be observed and made the authority for conduct and works and for what should or should not be done, till the instinctive desire nature is schooled and abated and put down by the habit of self-control and man is ready first for a freer intelligent self-guidance and then for the highest supreme law and supreme liberty of the spiritual nature. For the Shastra in its ordinary aspect is not that spiritual law, although at its loftiest point, when it becomes a science and art of spiritual living, Adhyatma-shastra, - the Gita itself describes its own teaching as the highest and most secret Shastra, - it formulates a rule of the self-transcendence of the sattwic nature and develops the discipline which leads to spiritual transmutation. Yet all Shastra is built on a number of preparatory conditions, dharmas; it is a means, not an end. The supreme end is the freedom of the spirit when abandoning all dharmas the soul turns to God for its sole law of action, acts straight from the divine will and lives in the freedom of the divine nature, not in the Law, but in the Spirit. This is the development of the teaching which is prepared by the next question of Arjuna. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita ,

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42

   6 Integral Yoga


   6 Satprem
   3 The Mother
   3 Sri Aurobindo


   30 Essays On The Gita
   6 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   3 The Mothers Agenda
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo


1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   have missed or only imperfectly grasped so that they deal either with subsidiary and inferior aspects of the truth of things or can merely prepare less evolved minds for the heights to which we have arrived. And we are still prone to force upon ourselves or others the whole sacred mass of the book or gospel we admire, insisting that all shall be accepted as eternally valid truth and no iota or underline or diaeresis denied its part of the plenary inspiration.
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  Essays On The Gita
  
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  Essays On The Gita
   striking speculations of a philosophic intellect, but rather enduring truths of spiritual experience, verifiable facts of our highest psychological possibilities which no attempt to read deeply the mystery of existence can afford to neglect. Whatever the system may be, it is not, as the commentators strive to make it, framed or intended to support any exclusive school of philosophical thought or to put forward predominantly the claims of any one form of Yoga. The language of the Gita, the structure of thought, the combination and balancing of ideas belong neither to the temper of a sectarian teacher nor to the spirit of a rigorous analytical dialectics cutting off one angle of the truth to exclude all the others; but rather there is a wide, undulating, encircling movement of ideas which is the manifestation of a vast synthetic mind and a rich synthetic experience. This is one of those great syntheses in which Indian spirituality has been as rich as in its creation of the more intensive, exclusive movements of knowledge and religious realisation that follow out with an absolute concentration one clue, one path to its extreme issues. It does not cleave asunder, but reconciles and unifies.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of Life in our divine scope as the Lila2 of the Divine; and in some directions it is more immediately rich and fruitful, for it brings forward into the foreground along with divine knowledge, divine works and an enriched devotion of divine Love, the secrets also of the Hatha and Raja Yogas, the use of the body and of mental askesis for the opening up of the divine life on all its planes, to which the Gita gives only a passing and perfunctory attention. Moreover it grasps at that idea of the divine perfectibility of man, possessed by the Vedic Rishis but thrown into the background by the intermediate ages, which is destined to fill so large a place in any future synthesis of human thought, experience and aspiration.

1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   name and form. But it is a veiled manifestation and there is a gradation between the supreme being1 of the Divine and the consciousness shrouded partly or wholly by ignorance of self in the finite. The conscious embodied soul2 is the spark of the divine Fire and that soul in man opens out to self-knowledge as it develops out of ignorance of self into self-being. The Divine also, pouring itself into the forms of the cosmic existence, is revealed ordinarily in an efflorescence of its powers, in energies and magnitudes of its knowledge, love, joy, developed force of being,3 in degrees and faces of its divinity. But when the divine
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the name first in the Chhandogya Upanishad where all we can gather about him is that he was well known in spiritual tradition as a knower of the Brahman, so well known indeed in his personality and the circumstances of his life that it was sufficient to refer to him by the name of his mother as Krishna son of Devaki for all to understand who was meant. In the same Upanishad we find mention of King Dhritarashtra son of Vichitravirya, and since tradition associated the two together so closely that they are both of them leading personages in the action of the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and hidden guide. That action is the action of a whole world of men and nations, some of whom have come as helpers of an effort and result by which they do not personally profit, and to these he is a leader, some as its opponents and to them he also is an opponent, the baffler of their designs and their slayer and he seems even to some of them an instigator of all evil and destroyer of their old order and familiar world and secure conventions of virtue and good; some are representatives of that which has to be fulfilled and to them he is counsellor, helper, friend. Where the action pursues its natural course or the doers of the work have to suffer at the hands of its enemies and undergo the ordeals which prepare them for mastery, the

1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   when the chariot reaches the end of its journey, the own home of
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   never realised it all; obsessed by his claims and wrongs and by the principles of his life, the struggle for the right, the duty of the Kshatriya to protect justice and the law and fight and beat down injustice and lawless violence, he has neither thought it out deeply nor felt it in his heart and at the core of his life. And now it is shown to his vision by the divine charioteer, placed sensationally before his eyes, and comes home to him like a blow delivered at the very centre of his sensational, vital and emotional being.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   hell and rejection of "blood-stained enjoyments"; practically, the sense that the standards of action have led to a result which destroys the practical aims of action. But the whole upshot is that all-embracing inner bankruptcy which Arjuna expresses when he says that his whole conscious being, not the thought alone but heart and vital desires and all, are utterly bewildered and can find nowhere the dharma, nowhere any valid law of action.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   is the Divine to be distinguished among the various states of being which constitute our ordinary experience? What are the great manifestations of its self-energy in the world in which he can recognise and realise it by meditation? May he not see even now the divine cosmic Form of That which is actually speaking to him through the veil of the human mind and body? And his last questions demand a clear distinction between renunciation of works and this subtler renunciation he is asked to prefer; the actual difference between Purusha and Prakriti, the Field and the Knower of the Field, so important for the practice of desireless action under the drive of the divine Will; and finally a clear statement of the practical operations and results of the three modes of Prakriti which he is bidden to surmount.

1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the book and by a certain arrangement of stress in following out its argument, especially if we shut our eyes to the peculiar way in which it uses such a word as sannyasa, renunciation; but it is quite impossible to persist in this view on an impartial reading in face of the continual assertion to the very end that action should be preferred to inaction and that superiority lies with the true, the inner renunciation of desire by equality and the giving up of works to the supreme Purusha.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   no great radical change to be effected. For he is, as the Teacher points out to his disciple, the best who has to set the standard for others; and in fact Arjuna is called upon to live according to the highest ideals of his age and the prevailing culture, but with knowledge, with understanding of that which lay behind, and not as ordinary men, with a following of the merely outward law and rule.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   very roots. And if that is what the Gita has to say on a most poignant moral and spiritual problem, we must put it out of the list of the world's Scriptures and thrust it, if anywhere, then into our library of political science and ethical casuistry.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   metaphysical subtleties and far-off spiritual seekings, eager to get to work and, like Arjuna himself, mainly concerned for a workable law of works, a dharma. But it is the wrong way to handle this Scripture.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   a deity who is the supreme and only Self though by him not yet realised in his own being. This is the initial step. Secondly, not only the desire of the fruit, but the claim to be the doer of works has to be renounced in the realisation of the Self as the equal, the inactive, the immutable principle and of all works as simply the operation of universal Force, of the Nature-Soul, Prakriti, the unequal, active, mutable power. Lastly, the supreme Self has to be seen as the supreme Purusha governing this Prakriti, of whom the soul in Nature is a partial manifestation, by whom all works are directed, in a perfect transcendence, through Nature. To him love and adoration and the sacrifice of works have to be offered; the whole being has to be surrendered to Him and the whole consciousness raised up to dwell in this divine consciousness so that the human soul may share in His divine transcendence of

1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita, 193
  

1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita, 55
  

1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   speaking, the mental power of understanding but it is evidently used by the Gita in a large philosophic sense for the whole action of the discriminating and deciding mind which determines both the direction and use of our thoughts and the direction and use of our acts; thought, intelligence, judgment, perceptive choice and aim are all included in its functioning: for the characteristic of the unified intelligence is not only concentration of the mind that knows, but especially concentration of the mind that decides and persists in the decision, vyavasaya, while the sign of the dissipated intelligence is not so much even discursiveness of the ideas and perceptions as discursiveness of the aims and desires, therefore of the will. Will, then, and knowledge are the two functions of the Buddhi. The unified intelligent will is fixed in the enlightened soul, it is concentrated in inner self-knowledge; the many-branching and multifarious, busied with many things, careless of the one thing needful is on the contrary subject to the restless and discursive action of the mind, dispersed in outward life and works and their fruits. "Works are far inferior," says the Teacher, "to Yoga of the intelligence; desire rather refuge in the intelligence; poor and wretched souls are they who make the fruit of their works the object of their thoughts and activities."
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of Nature-force assuming the forms of our subjectivity in the evolving consciousness of animal and man, we shall see that the Sankhya system squares well enough with all that modern enquiry has elicited by its observation of material Nature. In the evolution of the soul back from Prakriti towards Purusha, the reverse order has to be taken to the original Nature-evolution, and that is how the Upanishads and the Gita following and almost quoting the Upanishads state the ascending order of our subjective powers. "Supreme, they say," beyond their objects
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   liking and disliking, - for rasa has two sides; the soul must, on the contrary, be capable of enduring the physical contact without suffering inwardly this sensuous reaction. Otherwise there is nivr.tti, cessation of the object, vis.aya vinivartante, but no subjective cessation, no nivr.tti of the mind; but the senses are of the mind, subjective, and subjective cessation of the rasa is the only real sign of mastery. But how is this desireless contact with objects, this unsensuous use of the senses possible? It is possible, param dr.s.t.va, by the vision of the supreme, - param, the Soul, the Purusha, - and by living in the Yoga, in union or oneness of the whole subjective being with that, through the Yoga of the intelligence; for the one Soul is calm, satisfied in its own delight, and that delight free from duality can take, once we see this supreme thing in us and fix the mind and will on that, the place of the sensuous object-ridden pleasures and repulsions of the mind. This is the true way of liberation.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   is a particular intensity, not the essential sign. The test is the expulsion of all desires, their inability to get at the mind, and it is the inner state from which this freedom arises, the delight of the soul gathered within itself with the mind equal and still and highpoised above the attractions and repulsions, the alternations of sunshine and storm and stress of the external life. It is drawn inward even when acting outwardly; it is concentrated in self even when gazing out upon things; it is directed wholly to the Divine even when to the outward vision of others busy and preoccupied with the affairs of the world. Arjuna, voicing the average human mind, asks for some outward, physical, practically discernible sign of this great Samadhi; how does such a man speak, how sit, how walk? No such signs can be given, nor does the Teacher attempt to supply them; for the only possible test of its possession is inward and that there are plenty of hostile psychological forces to apply. Equality is the great stamp of the liberated soul and of that equality even the most discernible signs are still subjective. "A man with mind untroubled by sorrows, who has done with desire for pleasures, from whom liking and wrath and fear have passed away, such is the sage whose understanding has become founded in stability." He is "without the triple action of the qualities of Prakriti, without the dualities, ever based in his true being, without getting or having, possessed of his self."
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   world enter into him as waters into the sea, yet he has no desire nor is troubled. For while they are filled with the troubling sense of ego and mine and thine, he is one with the one Self in all and has no "I" or "mine". He acts as others, but he has abandoned all desires and their longings. He attains to the great peace and is not bewildered by the shows of things; he has extinguished his individual ego in the One, lives in that unity and, fixed in that status at his end, can attain to extinction in the Brahman,

1.11_-_Oneness, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  Divine joy.
  Essays On The Gita, 59,516
  The Life Divine, 19:805

1.11_-_Works_and_Sacrifice, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   enjoined, this that it is sought to justify by the teaching of inner peace and desireless equality and status in the Brahman! Here then is an unreconciled contradiction. Arjuna complains that he has been given a contradictory and confusing doctrine, not the clear, strenuously single road by which the human intelligence can move straight and trenchantly to the supreme good. It is in answer to this objection that the Gita begins at once to develop more clearly its positive and imperative doctrine of Works.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   retain the activity of the subjective cause. The objects of sense are only an occasion for our bondage, the mind's insistence on them is the means, the instrumental cause. A man may control his organs of action and refuse to give them their natural play, but he has gained nothing if his mind continues to remember and dwell upon the objects of sense. Such a man has bewildered himself with false notions of self-discipline; he has not understood its object or its truth, nor the first principles of his subjective existence; therefore all his methods of self-discipline are false and null.1 The body's actions, even the mind's actions are nothing in themselves, neither a bondage, nor the first cause of bondage.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of ceremonial sacrifice, daily conduct and social duty, which the man who seeks liberation may do simply because it is enjoined upon him, without any personal purpose or subjective interest in them, with an absolute indifference to the doing, not because he is compelled by his nature but because it is enjoined by the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the opposition in which the idea of works is general and wide.

1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   letter of the Veda, then all the positions of the Vedist dogma are conceded and there is nothing more. Ceremonial sacrifice is the right means of gaining children, wealth, enjoyment; by ceremonial sacrifice rain is brought down from heaven and the prosperity and continuity of the race assured; life is a continual transaction between the gods and men in which man offers ceremonial gifts to the gods from the gifts they have bestowed on him and in return is enriched, protected, fostered. Therefore all human works have to be accompanied and turned into a sacrament by ceremonial sacrifice and ritualistic worship; work not so dedicated is accursed, enjoyment without previous ceremonial sacrifice and ritual consecration is a sin. Even salvation, even the highest good is to be gained by ceremonial sacrifice. It must never be abandoned. Even the seeker of liberation has to continue to do ceremonial sacrifice, although without attachment; it is by ceremonial sacrifice and ritualistic works done without attachment that men of the type of Janaka attained to spiritual perfection and liberation.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of immortality, amr.ta, left over from the offering; and here we have still something of the old Vedic symbolism in which the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   which comes by sacrifice, by self-dedication, by self-mastery, by the giving up of one's lower impulses to a greater and higher aim.

1.12_-_The_Superconscient, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  168 - Savitri 28:80
  169 - Essays On The Gita, 646
  170 - The Synthesis of Yoga, 20:185

1.13_-_The_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   existence is one and its divisions must found themselves on some law of mutual dependence, each growing by each and living by all. Where sacrifice is not willingly given, Nature exacts it by force, she satisfies the law of her living. A mutual giving and receiving is the law of Life without which it cannot for one moment endure, and this fact is the stamp of the divine creative
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   lies beyond; for the sacrifice done with knowledge is the highest sacrifice and that alone brings a perfect working. That can only come when he perceives that the self in him and the self in others are one being and this self is something higher than the ego, an infinite, an impersonal, a universal existence in whom all move and have their being, - when he perceives that all the cosmic gods to whom he offers his sacrifice are forms of one infinite Godhead and when again, leaving all his limited and limiting conceptions of that one Godhead, he perceives him to be the supreme and ineffable Deity who is at once the finite and the infinite, the one self and the many, beyond Nature though manifesting himself through Nature, beyond limitation by qualities though formulating the power of his being through infinite quality. This is the Purushottama to whom the sacrifice has to be offered, not for any transient personal fruit of works, but for the soul's possession of God and in order to live in harmony and union with the Divine.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and acting and moving, under her impulsion entirely, in this one infinite Being; our own finite existence is seen and felt to be only one of these and its workings are seen and felt to be those of Nature, not of our real self which is the silent, impersonal unity. The ego claimed them as its own doings and therefore we thought them ours; but the ego is now dead and henceforth they are no longer ours, but Nature's. We have achieved by the slaying of ego impersonality in our being and consciousness; we have achieved by the renunciation of desire impersonality in the works of our nature. We are free not only in inaction, but in action; our liberty does not depend on a physical and temperamental immobility and vacancy, nor do we fall from freedom directly we act. Even in a full current of natural action the impersonal soul in us remains calm, still and free.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   ego-sense, and then through this delivering impersonality to see them in this God, atmani atho mayi, "in the Self and then in

1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the paths of action, men follow in every way my path, these peoples would sink to destruction if I did not works and I should be the creator of confusion and slay these creatures. As those who know not act with attachment to the action, he who knows should act without attachment, having for his motive to hold together the peoples. He should not create a division of their understanding in the ignorant who are attached to their works; he should set them to all actions, doing them himself with knowledge and in Yoga." There are few more important passages in the Gita than these seven striking couplets.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   works? It is the question of Arjuna,2 but answered from a standpoint other than that from which Arjuna had put it. The motive cannot be personal desire on the intellectual, moral, emotional level, for that has been abandoned, - even the moral motive has been abandoned, since the liberated man has passed beyond the lower distinction of sin and virtue, lives in a glorified purity beyond good and evil. It cannot be the spiritual call to his perfect self-development by means of disinterested works, for the call has been answered, the development is perfect and fulfilled. His motive of action can only be the holding together of the peoples, cikrs.ur lokasangraham. This great march of the peoples towards a far-off divine ideal has to be held together, prevented from falling into the bewilderment, confusion and utter discord of the understanding which would lead to dissolution and destruction and to which the world moving forward in the night or dark twilight of ignorance would be too easily prone if it were not held together, conducted, kept to the great lines of its discipline by the illumination, by the strength, by the rule and example, by the visible standard and the invisible influence of its Best. The best, the individuals who are in advance of the general line and above the general level of the collectivity, are the natural leaders of mankind, for it is they who can point to the race both the way they must follow and the standard or ideal they have to keep to or to attain. But the divinised man is the Best in no ordinary sense of the word and his influence, his example must have a power which that of no ordinarily superior man can exercise. What example then shall he give? What rule or standard shall he uphold?
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   inactive, impersonal self; for that by itself would lead the liberated man to actionless immobility. It is not characteristically that of the Kshara, the multitudinous, the personal, the Purusha self-subjected to Prakriti; for that by itself would lead him back into subjection to his personality and to the lower nature and its qualities. It is the nature of the Purushottama who holds both these together and by his supreme divinity reconciles them in a divine reconciliation which is the highest secret of his being, rahasyam hyetad uttamam. He is not the doer of works in the personal sense of our action involved in Prakriti; for God works through his power, conscious nature, effective force, - Shakti,
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   in life, in action, not outside life and action. Yes, there is a truth in that, replies the Gita; the fulfilment of God in man, the play of the Divine in life is part of the ideal perfection. But if you seek it only in the external, in life, in the principle of action, you will never find it; for you will then not only act according to your nature, which is in itself a rule of perfection, but you will be - and this is a rule of the imperfection - eternally subject to its modes, its dualities of liking and dislike, pain and pleasure and especially to the rajasic mode with its principle of desire and its snare of wrath and grief and longing, - the restless, alldevouring principle of desire, the insatiable fire which besieges your worldly action, the eternal enemy of knowledge by which it is covered over here in your nature as is a fire by smoke or a mirror by dust and which you must slay in order to live in the calm, clear, luminous truth of the spirit. The senses, mind and intellect are the seat of this eternal cause of imperfection and yet it is within this sense, mind and intellect, this play of the lower nature that you would limit your search for perfection!
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   effected, are not a reality and a falsehood in perpetual struggle nor yet two hostile realities, one superior, the other inferior, each fatal to the other; they are the double term of the divine manifestation. The Akshara alone is not the whole key of their fulfilment, not the very highest secret. The double fulfilment, the reconciliation is to be sought in the Purushottama represented here by Krishna, at once supreme Being, Lord of the worlds and

1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the world is not the only object of the descent of the Avatar, that great mystery of the Divine manifest in humanity; for the upholding of the Dharma is not an all-sufficient object in itself, not the supreme possible aim for the manifestation of a Christ, a
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   modern mind about it by which it loses all its inner and helpful significance.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   are even in their individuality unborn spirits, eternal without beginning or end, and in their essential existence and their universality all are the one unborn Spirit of whom birth and death are only a phenomenon of the assumption and change of forms.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   suppose that in any form he comes forward into the frontal, the phenomenal consciousness for a more direct and consciously divine action? Obviously, if at all, then to break the veil between himself and humanity which man limited in his own nature could never lift.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of the ignorance, but the conscious action of the self-existent

1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  But he wrote in an unusual manner not one book after another, but four and even six books concurrently, on the most varied subjects,
  such as The Life Divine, his fundamental "philosophical" work and spiritual vision of evolution; The Synthesis of Yoga, in which he describes the various stages and experiences of the integral yoga, and surveys all the past and present yogic disciplines; the Essays On The Gita, which expounds his philosophy of action; The Secret of the Veda, with a study of the origins of language; and The Ideal of Human Unity and The Human Cycle, which approach evolution from its sociological and psychological standpoints and examine the future possibilities of human societies. He had found
  301

1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   who fight for the continuance of the evil and the darkness. All these are recognised objects of the descent of the Avatar, and it is usually by his work that the mass of men seek to distinguish him and for that that they are ready to worship him. It is only the spiritual who see that this external Avatarhood is a sign, in the symbol of a human life, of the eternal inner Godhead making himself manifest in the field of their own human mentality and corporeality so that they can grow into unity with that and be possessed by it. The divine manifestation of a Christ, Krishna,
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   into the divine consciousness, and in its intensest culmination is a losing of the separate self in that. The soul merges its individuality in an infinite and universal being or loses it in the heights of a transcendent being; it becomes one with the Self, the Brahman, the Divine or, as it is sometimes more absolutely put, becomes the one Self, the Brahman, the Divine. The Gita itself speaks of the soul becoming the Brahman, brahmabhuta, and of its thereby dwelling in the Lord, in Krishna, but it does not, it must be marked, speak of it as becoming the Lord or the Purushottama, though it does declare that the Jiva himself is always Ishwara, the partial being of the Lord, mamaivamsah..
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the Creator, the same language which he will employ when he has to describe his creation of the world. "Although I am the unborn Lord of creatures, I create (loose forth) my self by my
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the Avatar created? If we suppose that the body is always created by the hereditary evolution, by inconscient Nature and its immanent Life-spirit without the intervention of the individual soul, the matter becomes simple. A physical and mental body is prepared fit for the divine incarnation by a pure or great heredity and the descending Godhead takes possession of it. But the

1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   in Duryodhana and his brothers became so great a burden to the earth that she had to call upon God to descend and lighten her load; accordingly Vishnu incarnated as Krishna, delivered the oppressed Pandavas and destroyed the unjust Kauravas. A similar account is given of the descent of the previous Vishnu avatars, of Rama to destroy the unrighteous oppression of Ravana, of Parashurama to destroy the unrighteous license of the military and princely caste, the Kshatriyas, of the dwarf Vamana to destroy the rule of the Titan Bali. But obviously the purely practical, ethical or social and political mission of the Avatar which is thus thrown into popular and mythical form, does not give a right account of the phenomenon of Avatarhood. It does not cover its spiritual sense, and if this outward utility were all, we should have to exclude Buddha and Christ whose mission was not at all to destroy evil-doers and deliver the good, but to bring to all men a new spiritual message and a new law of divine growth and spiritual realisation. On the other hand, if we give to the word dharma only its religious sense, in which it means a law of religious and spiritual life, we shall indeed get to the kernel of the matter, but we shall be in danger of excluding a most important part of the work done by the Avatar. Always we see in the history of the divine incarnations the double work, and inevitably, because the Avatar takes up the workings of God in human life, the way of the divine Will and Wisdom in the world, and that always fulfils itself externally as well as internally, by inner progress in the soul and by an outer change in the life.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   principle working itself out in forms and laws of action, forms of the inner and the outer life, orderings of relations of every kind in the world. Dharma1 is both that which we hold to and that which holds together our inner and outer activities. In its primary sense it means a fundamental law of our nature which secretly conditions all our activities, and in this sense each being, type, species, individual, group has its own dharma. Secondly, there is the divine nature which has to develop and manifest in us, and in this sense dharma is the law of the inner workings by which that grows in our being. Thirdly, there is the law by which we govern our outgoing thought and action and our relations with each other so as to help best both our own growth and that of the human race towards the divine ideal.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   is therefore the taking up of all human relations into a higher divine meaning; starting from the established ethical, social and religious rule which binds together the whole community in which the God-seeker lives, it lifts it up by informing it with the Brahmic consciousness; the law it gives is the law of oneness, of equality, of liberated, desireless, God-governed action, of
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of their human wills and the strife of their human fear, wrath and passion, and liberated from all this unquiet and suffering may live in the calm and bliss of the Divine.2 Nor does it matter essentially in what form and name or putting forward what aspect of the Divine he comes; for in all ways, varying with their nature, men are following the path set to them by the Divine which will in the end lead them to him and the aspect of him which suits their nature is that which they can best follow when he comes to lead them; in whatever way men accept, love and take joy in God, in that way God accepts, loves and takes joy in man. Ye yatha mam prapadyante tams tathaiva bhajamyaham.

1.17_-_The_Transformation, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  Most quotations refer to the complete edition of Sri Aurobindo's works in 30 volumes (The Centenary Edition). Figures in bold indicate the volume number. Other quotations are taken from the following editions and books.
  Sri Aurobindo: Essays On The Gita (1959)
  Sri Aurobindo: On Yoga II, Tome 2 (1958)
  --
  Eight Upanishads (translations & introduction) 1st ed. 1953
  Essays On The Gita, 'Arya' Aug. 1916-July 1920 1st ed. 1922
  The Renaissance in India, 1st ed. 1920

1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   last supreme question, whether all action and life itself are not a delusion and a snare and whether cessation from action, akarma, is not the last resort of the tired and disillusioned human soul.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   with success, with a right adaptation of means to ends: on the contrary a perfect working is easier to action done tranquilly in
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of the evolving Dharma, and every turn of the conflict has been designed and mapped by the foreseeing eye of the Master of the battle, the Lord of works and Guide of the dharma. Honour and dishonour from men cannot move him, nor their praise nor their blame; for he has a greater clear-seeing judge and another standard for his action, and his motive admits no dependence upon worldly rewards. Arjuna the Kshatriya prizes naturally honour and reputation and is right in shunning disgrace and the name of coward as worse than death; for to maintain the point of honour and the standard of courage in the world is part of his dharma: but Arjuna the liberated soul need care for none of these things, he has only to know the kartavyam karma, the work which the supreme Self demands from him, and to do that and leave the result to the Lord of his actions. He has passed even beyond that distinction of sin and virtue which is so allimportant to the human soul while it is struggling to minimise the hold of its egoism and lighten the heavy and violent yoke of its passions, - the liberated has risen above these struggles and is seated firmly in the purity of the witnessing and enlightened soul. Sin has fallen away from him, and not a virtue acquired and increased by good action and impaired or lost by evil action, but the inalienable and unalterable purity of a divine and selfless nature is the peak to which he has climbed and the seat upon which he is founded. There the sense of sin and the sense of virtue have no starting-point or applicability.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   conflict, but can never affect his equal eye, his open heart, his inner embrace of all. And in all his actions there will be the same principle of soul, a perfect equality, and the same principle of work, the will of the Divine in him active for the need of the race in its gradually developing advance towards the Godhead.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   when the self-knowledge within him is released from this dark envelope, that knowledge lights up like a sun the real self within him; he knows himself then to be the soul supreme above the instruments of Nature. Pure, infinite, inviolable, immutable, he is no longer affected; no longer does he imagine himself to be modified by her workings. By complete identification with the

1.19_-_Equality, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   oneness of the Brahman and unity of things. By his equality the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   attracts the soul is the whole mingled weft of the thing we call life with all its disturbance of struggle and seeking, its attractions and repulsions, its offer and its menace, its varieties of every kind. To the rajasic desire-soul in us a monotonous pleasure, success without struggle, joy without a shadow must after a time become fatiguing, insipid, cloying; it needs a background of darkness to give full value to its enjoyment of light: for the happiness it seeks and enjoys is of that very nature, it is in its very essence relative and dependent on the perception and experience of its opposite. The joy of the soul in the dualities is the secret of the mind's pleasure in living.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   than to that union of inner renunciation of desire with continued activity in the world of Nature which the Gita advocates. The
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   whom liking and fear and wrath have passed away, is the sage of settled understanding. Who in all things is without affection though visited by this good or that evil and neither hates nor rejoices, his intelligence sits firmly founded in wisdom." If one abstains from food, it says, giving a physical example, the object of sense ceases to affect, but the affection itself of the sense, the rasa, remains; it is only when, even in the exercise of the sense, it can keep back from seeking its sensuous aim in the object, artha, and abandon the affection, the desire for the pleasure of taste, that the highest level of the soul is reached. It is by using the mental organs on the objects, "ranging over them with the senses," vis.ayan indriyais caran, but with senses subject to the self, freed from liking and disliking, that one gets into a large and sweet clearness of soul and temperament in which passion and grief find no place. All desires have to enter into the soul, as waters into the sea, and yet it has to remain immovable, filled but not disturbed: so in the end all desires can be abandoned.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   causes of sorrow, they have a beginning and an end; therefore the sage, the man of awakened understanding, budhah., does not place his delight in these." "The self in him is unattached to the touches of external things; he finds his happiness in himself."

1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   not the direct doer of our works, but the witness of Nature and her works, not imposing on us either the illusion of being the doer, for that illusion is the result of the ignorance of this lower
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   knowledge of the world, when we see through it the way of the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   vanity of the world's differences and distinctions, the superiority of the inner calm, peace, light, self-dependence. It is an equality of philosophic indifference; it brings a high calm, but not the greater spiritual joy; it is an isolated freedom, a wisdom like that of the Lucretian sage high in his superiority upon the cliff-top whence he looks down on men tossed still upon the tempestuous waters from which he has escaped, - in the end something after all aloof and ineffective. The Gita admits the philosophic motive of indifference as a preliminary movement; but the indifference to which it finally arrives, if indeed that inadequate word can be at all applied, has nothing in it of the philosophic aloofness. It is indeed a position as of one seated above, udasnavat, but as the Divine is seated above, having no need at all in the world, yet he does works always and is present everywhere supporting, helping, guiding the labour of creatures. This equality is founded upon oneness with all beings. It brings in what is wanting to the philosophic equality; for its soul is the soul of peace, but also it is the soul of love. It sees all beings without exception in the Divine, it is one self with the Self of all existences and therefore it is in supreme sympathy with all of them. Without exception, ases.en.a, not only with all that is good and fair and pleases; nothing and no one, however vile, fallen, criminal, repellent in appearance, can be excluded from this universal, this whole-souled sympathy and spiritual oneness. Here there is no room, not merely for hatred or anger or uncharitableness, but for aloofness, disdain or any petty pride of superiority. A divine compassion for the ignorance of the struggling mind, a divine will to pour forth on it all light and power and happiness there will be, indeed, for the apparent man; but for the divine Soul within him there will be more, there will be adoration and love. For from all, from the thief and the harlot and the outcaste as from the saint and the sage, the Beloved looks forth and cries to us, "This is I." "He who loves Me in all beings," - what greater word of power for the utmost intensities and profundities of divine and universal love, has been uttered by any philosophy or any religion?
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   conflict with personal wills which seek rather their own egoistic satisfaction. Therefore Arjuna is bidden to resist, to fight, to conquer; but, to fight without hatred or personal desire or personal enmity or antagonism, since to the liberated soul these feelings are impossible. To act for the lokasangraha, impersonally, for the keeping and leading of the peoples on the path to the divine goal, is a rule which rises necessarily from the oneness of the soul with the Divine, the universal Being, since that is the whole sense and drift of the universal action. Nor does it conflict with our oneness with all beings, even those who present themselves here as opponents and enemies. For the divine goal is their goal also, since it is the secret aim of all, even of those whose outward minds, misled by ignorance and egoism, would wander from the path and resist the impulsion. Resistance and defeat are the best outward service that can be done to them. By this perception the Gita avoids the limiting conclusion which might have been drawn from a doctrine of equality impracticably overriding all relations and of a weakening love without knowledge, while it keeps the one thing essential unimpaired. For the soul oneness with all, for the heart calm universal love, sympathy, compassion, but for the hands freedom to work out impersonally the good, not of this or that person only without regard to or to the detriment of the divine plan, but the purpose of the creation, the progressing welfare and salvation of men, the total good of all existences.

2.01_-_The_Two_Natures, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of our steps in order to avoid error and a missing of the real sense. For we are here no longer steadily on the safe ground of psychological and spiritual experience, but have to deal with intellectual statements of spiritual and often of supracosmic truth.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   cit-sakti, which is behind the self and cosmos. In the immutable
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the absolute powers and values of the supreme Shakti and must go back to them to find their own source and truth and the essential law of their operation and movement. So too the soul or Jiva involved here in the shackled, poor and inferior play of the phenomenal qualities, if he would escape from it and be divine and perfect, must by resort to the pure action of his essential quality of Swabhava go back to that higher law of his own being in which he can discover the will, the power, the dynamic principle, the highest working of his divine nature.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and from that all are born into phenomenal existence. It is that seed of spirit which manifests itself as the essential quality in all becomings and constitutes their swabhava.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   what is meant is that the true and supreme spiritual nature of the Divine is not imprisoned there; they are only phenomena in his being created out of it by the action of the ego and the ignorance. The ignorance presents everything to us in an inverted vision and at least a partially falsified experience. We imagine that the soul is in the body, almost a result and derivation from the body; even we so feel it: but it is the body that is in the soul and a result and derivation from the soul. We think of the spirit as a small part of us - the Purusha who is no bigger than the thumb - in this great mass of material and mental phenomena: in reality, the latter for all its imposing appearance is a very small thing in the infinity of the being of the spirit. So it is here; in much the same sense these things are in the Divine rather than the Divine in these things. This lower nature of the three gunas which creates so false a view of things and imparts to them an inferior character is a Maya, a power of illusion, by which it is not meant that it is all non-existent or deals with unrealities, but that it bewilders our knowledge, creates false values, envelops us in ego, mentality, sense, physicality, limited intelligence and there conceals from us the supreme truth of our existence. This illusive Maya hides from us the Divine that we are, the infinite and imperishable spirit. "By these three kinds of becoming which are of the nature of the gunas, this whole world is bewildered and does not recognise Me supreme beyond them and imperishable." If we could see that that Divine is the real truth of our existence, all else also would change to our vision, assume its true character and our life and action acquire the divine values and move in the law of the divine nature.

2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the Gita now lays down another and greater necessity for the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   knowledge of the one immutable and impersonal self and this mutable multiple Nature as two opposite entities, but rise to the very embrace of the Purushottama discovered simultaneously through both of these powers of our being. All three are the spirit, and the two which are apparent opposites prove to be only confronting faces of the third which is the highest. "There is the immutable and impersonal spiritual being (Purusha)," says
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of the inner knowledge, kamais tais tair hr.tajnanah.. Ignorant, they resort to other godheads, imperfect forms of the deity which correspond to their desire, prapadyante 'nyadevatah.. Limited, they set up this or that rule and cult, tam tam niyamam asthaya, which satisfies the need of their nature. And in all this it is a compelling personal determination, it is this narrow need of their own nature that they follow and take for the highest truth,
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the God-lover who has the knowledge, jnan bhakta. And this knower, says the Godhead in the Gita, is my self; the others seize only motives and aspects in Nature, but he the very self-being and all-being of the Purushottama with which he is in union.

2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   a foreshadowing of the later developments of the religions of
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   experience. By that Brahman, a phrase which in the Upanishads is more than once used for the self-existent as opposed to the phenomenal being, the Gita intends, it appears, the immutable self-existence which is the highest self-expression of the Divine and on whose unalterable eternity all the rest, all that moves and evolves, is founded, aks.aram paramam. By adhyatma it means svabhava, the spiritual way and law of being of the soul in the supreme Nature. Karma, it says, is the name given to the creative impulse and energy, visargah., which looses out things from this first essential self-becoming, this Swabhava, and effects, creates, works out under its influence the cosmic becoming of existences in Prakriti. By adhibhuta is to be understood all the result of mutable becoming, ks.aro bhavah.. By adhidaiva is intended the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   mind and will and sense, all the powers of its conscious being by which it reflects this working of Prakriti are its godheads, adhidaiva. This soul in Nature is therefore the ks.ara purus.a, it is the mutable soul, the eternal activity of the Godhead: the same soul in the Brahman drawn back from her is the aks.ara purus.a, the immutable self, the eternal silence of the Godhead. But in the form and body of the mutable being inhabits the supreme
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   from the mortal plane of living, the importance of our then state of consciousness becomes evident. But it is not a deathbed remembrance at variance with or insufficiently prepared by the whole tenor of our life and our past subjectivity that can have this saving power. The thought of the Gita here is not on a par with the indulgences and facilities of popular religion; it has nothing in common with the crude fancies that make the absolution and last unction of the priest, an edifying "Christian" death after an unedifying profane life or the precaution or accident of a death in sacred Benares or holy Ganges a sufficient machinery of salvation. The divine subjective becoming on which the mind has to be fixed firmly in the moment of the physical death, yam smaran bhavam tyajati ante kalevaram, must have been one into which the soul was at each moment growing inwardly during the physical life, sada tad-bhava-bhavitah.. "Therefore," says the divine Teacher, "at all times remember me and fight; for if thy mind and thy understanding are always fixed on and given up to
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   self-existent Godhead who is the Master of works and the Friend of mankind and of all beings. To know him so and so to seek him does not bind to rebirth or to the chain of Karma; the soul can satisfy its desire to escape permanently from the transient and painful condition of our mortal being. And the Gita here, in order to make more precise to the mind this circling round of births and the escape from it, adopts the ancient theory of the cosmic cycles which became a fixed part of Indian cosmological notions. There is an eternal cycle of alternating periods of cosmic manifestation and non-manifestation, each period called respectively a day and a night of the creator Brahma, each of equal length in Time, the long aeon of his working which endures for a thousand ages, the long aeon of his sleep of another thousand silent ages. At the coming of the Day all manifestations are born into being out of the unmanifest, at the coming of the Night all vanish or are dissolved into it. Thus all these existences alternate helplessly in the cycle of becoming and non-becoming; they come into the becoming again and again, bhutva bhutva, and they go back constantly into the unmanifest. But this unmanifest is not the original divinity of the Being; there is another status of his existence, bhavo 'nyo, a supracosmic unmanifest beyond this cosmic non-manifestation, which is eternally self-seated, is not an opposite of this cosmic status of manifestation but far above and unlike it, changeless, eternal, not forced to perish with the perishing of all these existences. "He is called the unmanifest immutable, him they speak of as the supreme soul and status, and those who attain to him return not; that is my supreme place of being, paramam dhama." For the soul attaining to it has escaped out of the cycle of cosmic manifestation and non-manifestation.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and who traced everywhere an interaction and a sort of identity of the outward with the inward, light and knowledge, the fiery principle and the spiritual energy, - we need observe only the turn by which the Gita closes the passage: "Therefore at all times be in Yoga."

2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the liberation of his spirit, to the fulfilment of his action in the cosmic mystery, and the two - liberation and action - are to be one movement. His intellectual doubts are clearing away as a greater light of self-knowledge and the knowledge of God and
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   impartial doer of whatever has to be done, - leaving the fruit to whatever power may be the master of the cosmic workings. For he very evidently is not the master; it is not for the satisfaction of his personal ego that Nature was set upon her ways, not for the fulfilment of his desires and preferences that the universal
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   but is greater than man and Nature, is found by impersonality of the self, but of which impersonal self is not the whole significance. We now see the meaning of that strong recurring insistence. It was this one Godhead, the same in universal self and man and Nature who through the voice of the Teacher in the chariot was preparing for his absolute claim to the whole being of the awakened seer of things and doer of works. "I who am within thee," he was saying, "I who am here in this human body, I for whom all exists, acts, strives, am at once the secret of the self-existent spirit and of the cosmic action. This 'I' is the greater I of whom the largest human personality is only a partial and fragmentary manifestation, Nature itself only an inferior working. Master of the soul, master of all the works of the cosmos, I am the one Light, the sole Power, the only Being.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the very nature of the Divine, free, spiritual, self-developing, selfexistent, superior to mind, life and body. Both these difficulties and the obscurities they bring in are removed by one illumining ray of truth. Mechanical Nature is only a lower truth; it is the formula of an inferior phenomenal action. There is a higher which is the spiritual and that is the nature of our spiritual personality, our true person. God is at once impersonal and personal. His impersonality is to our psychological realisation an infinite of timeless being, consciousness, bliss of existence; his personality represents itself here as a conscious power of being, a conscious centre of knowledge and will and the joy of multiple self-manifestation. We are that one impersonality in the static essence of our being; we are each of us the multitude of that essential power in our spiritual person. But the distinction is only for the purposes of self-manifestation; the divine impersonality is, when one goes behind it, at the same time infinite He, a supreme soul and spirit. It is the great "I" - so aham, I am
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   with the divisions and imperfections of the apparent nature and seems to exceed it and state something which carries us beyond the first practical facts of our present existence, its grief, its pain, evil, defect, undivine error and stumbling, asubham, then there is no possibility of living out that greater knowledge. The soul that fails to get faith in the higher truth and law, must return into the path of ordinary mortal living subject to death and error and evil: it cannot grow into the Godhead which it denies. For this is a truth which has to be lived, - and lived in the soul's growing light, not argued out in the mind's darkness.

2.05_-_The_Divine_Truth_and_Way, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   name of universe, all this immense sum of motion to which we can fix no limits and vainly seek in its forms and movements for any stable reality, any status, level and point of cosmic leverage, has been spun out, shaped, extended by this highest
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   contained in the cosmos and its creations, but not in the sense that they are outside his being: for there is nothing outside the one Eternal and Real. We realise this first truth of the Godhead spiritually when we get the experience that we live and move and have our being in him alone, that however different from him we may be, we depend on him for our existence and the universe itself is only a phenomenon and movement in the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   divine existence. That is the Real; but they are its expressive realities.3
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the Gita; we have to allow for this variation of the sense of the same truth according to the nodus of relation from which its application comes into force. Otherwise we shall see mere contradiction and inconsistency where none exists or be baffled like Arjuna by what seems to us a riddling utterance.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   immutability, self-existent: the other is a truth of Power of the same being manifest in the government and information of its own self-veiling and self-revealing movements.

2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   is around him in the universe. All things that are he sees as at once in their appearance the veils and in their secret trend the means and signs of self-manifestation of that one unthinkable Reality and everywhere discovers that oneness, Brahman, Purusha, Atman, Vasudeva, the Being that has become all these creatures.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   liberating glimpse of the Divinity who is lodged in the creature.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of knowledge they come to the adoration of the Purushottama, jnana-yajnena yajanto mam upasate. This is a comprehension filled with Bhakti, because it is integral in its instruments, integral in its objective. It is not a pursuit of the Supreme merely as an abstract unity or an indeterminable Absolute. It is a heartfelt seeking and seizing of the Supreme and the Universal, a pursuit of the Infinite in his infinity and of the Infinite in all that is finite, a vision and embracing of the One in his oneness and of the One in all his several principles, his innumerable visages, forces, forms, here, there, everywhere, timelessly and in time, multiply, multitudinously, in endless aspects of his Godhead, in beings without number, all his million universal faces fronting us in the world and its creatures, ekatvena pr.thaktvena bahudha visvatomukham. This knowledge becomes easily an adoration, a large devotion, a vast self-giving, an integral self-offering because it is the knowledge of a Spirit, the contact of a Being, the embrace of a supreme and universal Soul which claims all that we are even as it lavishes on us when we approach it all the treasures of its endless delight of existence.3
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   whom has originated all that originates and creates in space and time and relation. It knows him as the Master and ordainer of all universal and of every individual dispensation. The world and fate and uncertain eventuality cannot terrify, the aspect of suffering and evil cannot bewilder the man who has surrendered himself to the Eternal. God to the soul that sees is the path and
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   bringer to him of every good and of all his inner and outer getting and having, yoga-ks.emam vahamyaham. The joy of heaven and the joy of earth are only a small shadow of his possessions; for as he grows into the Divine, the Divine too flows out upon him with all the light, power and joy of an infinite existence.7
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   longer belong to the limited personal ego. The finite nature thus surrendered becomes a free channel of the Infinite; the soul in its spiritual being, uplifted out of the ignorance and the limitation, returns to its oneness with the Eternal. The Divine Eternal is the inhabitant in all existences; he is equal in all and the equal friend, father, mother, creator, lover, supporter of all creatures.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and while he accepts the law they impose on him for the law of his life, a world of struggle, suffering and sorrow. The way to liberation is to turn from the outward to the inward, from the appearance created by the material life which lays its burden on the mind and imprisons it in the grooves of the life and the body to the divine Reality which waits to manifest itself through the freedom of the spirit. Love of the world, the mask, must change into the love of God, the Truth. Once this secret and inner

2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   receives him, ye yatha mam prapadyante.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of the conscious mental being are from the Divine, represent essential powers of him and must have some justification in their Source and some dynamic way of self-fulfilment in him. No
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   seen that it constantly prepares for this fuller truth and more pregnant experience. Indeed, it is implied in the very form the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   discover his spiritual unity with all creatures, to see all in the self and the self in all beings, even to see all things and creatures as himself, atmaupamyena sarvatra, and accordingly think, feel and act in all his mind, will and living. This Godhead is the origin of all that is here or elsewhere and by his Nature he has become all these innumerable existences, abhut sarvan.i bhutani; therefore man has to see and adore the One in all things animate and inanimate, to worship the manifestation in sun and star and flower, in man and every living creature, in the forms and forces, qualities and powers of Nature, vasudevah. sarvam iti. He has to make himself by divine vision and divine sympathy and finally by a strong inner identity one universality with the universe. A passive relationless identity excludes love and action, but this larger and richer oneness fulfils itself by works and by a pure emotion: it becomes the source and continent and substance and motive and divine purpose of all our acts and feelings. Kasmai devaya havis.a vidhema, to what Godhead shall we give all our life and activities as an offering? This is that Godhead, this the Lord who claims our sacrifice. A passive relationless identity excludes the joy of adoration and devotion; but bhakti is the very soul and heart and summit of this richer, completer, more intimate union.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   me as the unborn without origin . . . " are the opening utterances of this supreme word. And it gives the high promise that this knowledge, not limiting, not intellectual, but pure and spiritual,
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   from us by any unbridgeable gulf and does not disown the creatures that derive from him or condemn them to be only the figments of an illusion. He is the Being, all are his becomings.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   not turn it into an opposition. For that would be to abrogate the universal oneness. The Godhead is one in his transcendence, one all-supporting Self of things, one in the unity of his cosmic nature. These three are one Godhead; all derives from him, all becomes from his being, all is eternal portion or temporal expression of the Eternal. In the Transcendence, in the Absolute, if we are to follow the Gita, we must look, not for a supreme negation of all things, but for the positive key of their mystery, the reconciling secret of their existence.
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  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
  

2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   been admitted for the self-surrender of the will, mind, heart, all the psychological being to the Ishwara, the divine Lord of the nature. It has been completed by the revelation of the supernal
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   arrive at it by their own motion and can only get at imperfect mental reflections that reveal less than they conceal and disfigure.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   shouldst tell me" he says "of thy divine self-manifestations in thy sovereign power of becoming, divya atma-vibhutayah., all without exception, - ases.en.a, nothing omitted, - thy Vibhutis by which thou pervadest these worlds and peoples. How shall
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   differentiations of quality and quantity or by difference of values and oppositions of nature, we shall see that all things are in fact and can be nothing but powers of his manifestation, vibhutis of this universal Soul and Spirit, Yoga of this great
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   among the elephants, among the birds Garuda, Vasuki the snakegod among the serpents, Kamadhuk the cow of plenty among cattle, the alligator among fishes, the lion among the beasts of the forest. I am Margasirsha, first of the months; I am spring, the fairest of the seasons.

2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   are the masks, who reveals his force in the Vibhuti, - the Master of works, the Master of knowledge and adoration, the Lord of
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and moons, has a face of blazing fire and is ever burning up the whole universe with the flame of his energy. The form of him is fierce and marvellous and alone it fills all the regions and occupies the whole space between earth and heaven. The companies of the gods enter it, afraid, adoring; the Rishis and the Siddhas crying "May there be peace and weal" praise it with many praises; the eyes of Gods and Titans and Giants are fixed on it in amazement. It has enormous burning eyes; it has mouths that gape to devour, terrible with many tusks of destruction; it has faces like the fires of Death and Time. The kings and the captains and the heroes on both sides of the world-battle are hastening into its tusked and terrible jaws and some are seen with crushed and bleeding heads caught between its teeth of power; the nations are rushing to destruction with helpless speed into its mouths of flame like many rivers hurrying in their course towards the ocean or like moths that cast themselves on a kindled fire. With those burning mouths the Form of Dread is licking all the regions around; the whole world is full of his burning energies and baked in the fierceness of his lustres. The world and its nations are shaken and in anguish with the terror of destruction and Arjuna shares in the trouble and panic around him; troubled and in pain is the soul within him and he finds no peace or gladness. He cries to the dreadful Godhead, "Declare to me who thou art that wearest this form of fierceness. Salutation to thee, O thou great Godhead, turn thy heart to grace. I would know who thou art who wast from the beginning, for I know not the will of thy workings."
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   or to put it aside as part of Nature, making an unbridgeable opposition between world-nature and God-Nature, as if Nature were independent of God, or to throw the responsibility on man and his sins, as if he had a preponderant voice in the making of this world or could create anything against the will of God, are clumsily comfortable devices in which the religious thought of
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   struggle which thou canst not prevent to battle for the right and slay and conquer its opponents. Thou too, the human soul in
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   has been sown and a harvest that must be reaped. They who have sown the wind, must reap the whirlwind. Nor indeed will his own nature allow him any real abstention, prakr.tis tvam niyoks.yati. This the Teacher tells Arjuna at the close, "That which in thy egoism thou thinkest saying, I will not fight, vain is this thy resolve: Nature shall yoke thee to thy work. Bound by thy own action which is born of the law of thy being, what from delusion thou desirest not to do, that thou shalt do even perforce." Then to give another turn, to use some kind of soul force, spiritual method and power, not physical weapons? But that is only another form of the same action; the destruction will still take place, and the turn given too will be not what the individual ego, but what the World-Spirit wills. Even, the force of destruction may feed on this new power, may get a more formidable impetus and Kali arise filling the world with a more terrible sound of her laughters. No real peace can be till the heart of man deserves peace; the law of Vishnu cannot prevail till the debt to Rudra is paid. To turn aside then and preach to a still unevolved mankind the law of love and oneness? Teachers of the law of love and oneness there must be, for by that way must come the ultimate salvation. But not till the Time-Spirit in man is ready, can the inner and ultimate prevail over the outer and immediate reality. Christ and Buddha have come and gone, but it is Rudra who still holds the world in the hollow of his hand.

2.11_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_The_Double_Aspect, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and infinite and the same in the individual and in the universe.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of the nervous parts or any bewilderment and confusion of the mind, because he descries not only what is terrible and overwhelming in its appearance, but also its high and reassuring significance. And thou also shouldst so envisage it without fear, without confusion of mind, without any sinking of the members; but since the lower nature in thee is not yet prepared to look upon it with that high strength and tranquillity, I will reassume again for thee my Narayana figure in which the human mind sees isolated and toned to its humanity the calm, helpfulness and delight of a friendly Godhead. The greater Form" - and this is repeated again after it has disappeared - "is only for the rare highest souls. The gods themselves ever desire to look upon it. It cannot be won by Veda or austerities or gifts or sacrifice; it can be seen, known, entered into only by that bhakti which regards, adores and loves Me alone in all things."

2.12_-_The_Way_and_the_Bhakta, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the unmanifest and not the manifest is the eternal Spirit. How then does the union which admits the manifestation, admits the lesser thing, come yet to be the greater Yoga-knowledge?
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the divine Nature in us. And when too in the high passion of love the devotee of the Lover and Friend of man and of all creatures casts upon him all his heart of consciousness and yearning of delight, then swiftly the Supreme comes to him as the saviour and deliverer and exalts him by a happy embrace of his mind and heart and body out of the waves of the sea of death in this mortal nature into the secure bosom of the Eternal.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   adoration of the Purushottama must rear the spirit towards some greatest highest perfection of which this calm equality will be the wide foundation. Several formulas of this fundamental equal consciousness are given here. First, an absence of egoism, of Iness and my-ness, nirmamo nirahankarah.. The bhakta of the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of the mental, vital and physical nature. The immortal Dharma is one; it is that of the highest spiritual divine consciousness and its powers, para prakr.tih.. It is beyond the three gunas, and to reach it all these lower dharmas have to be abandoned, sarva-dharman parityajya. Alone in their place the one liberating unifying consciousness and power of the Eternal has to become the infinite source of our action, its mould, determinant and exemplar. To rise out of our lower personal egoism, to enter into the impersonal and equal calm of the immutable eternal all-pervading Akshara Purusha, to aspire from that calm by a perfect self-surrender of all one's nature and existence to that which is other and higher than the Akshara, is the first necessity of this Yoga. In the strength of that aspiration one can rise to the immortal Dharma. There, made one in being, consciousness and divine bliss with the greatest Uttama Purusha, made one with his supreme dynamic nature-force, sva prakr.tih., the liberated spirit can know infinitely, love illimitably, act unfalteringly in the authentic power of a highest immortality and a perfect freedom.

2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   other ego-mind and some personal form and aspect of the Deity, is.t.a-deva, constructed by that mind or offered to it to satisfy its limited ideal, aspiration or desire. That is the ordinary sense and actual character of the normal mental being's religious devotion; but here there is something wider that passes beyond the mind and its limits and its dharmas. It is something deeper than the mind that offers and something greater than the Ishta-deva that receives the surrender.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   us to maintain and satisfy the ideas and desires of its bounded separate personality amid the vast action of the universe. All our dharmas, all the ordinary standards by which we determine our view of things and our knowledge and our action, proceed upon this narrow and limiting basis, and to follow them even in the widest wheelings round our ego centre does not carry us out of this petty circle. It is a circle in which the soul is a contented or struggling prisoner, for ever subject to the mixed compulsions of Nature.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   right and pure hidden now by the limiting mind of ego. The difficulty is that while we can feel a positive release into this impersonality in moments of the quiet and silence of our being, an impersonal activity is by no means so easy to realise.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   takes up his works, movements no longer deformed by ego, and sovereignly acts through him for the keeping together and control of the world and its peoples, loka-sangraharthaya.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
  
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   because they seem other than the ways of man and impose things terrible and unpleasant on his nervous and emotional parts and his intelligence. The spiritual consequences will be infinitely worse now than before, now that a higher truth and a greater way and spirit of action have been revealed to him, if yet persisting in his egoism he perseveres in a vain and impossible refusal. For it is a vain resolution, a futile recoil, since it springs only from a temporary failure of strength, a strong but passing deviation from the principle of energy of his inmost character, and is not the true will and way of his nature. If now he casts down his arms, he will yet be compelled by that nature to resume them when he sees the battle and slaughter go on without him, his abstention a defeat of all for which he has lived, the cause for whose service he was born weakened and bewildered by the absence or inactivity of its protagonist, vanquished and afflicted by the cynical and unscrupulous strength of the champions of a self-regarding unrighteousness and injustice. And in this return there will be no spiritual virtue. It was a confusion of the ideas and feelings of the ego mind that impelled his refusal; it will be his nature working through a restoration of the characteristic ideas and feelings of the ego mind that will compel him to annul his refusal. But whatever the direction, this continued subjection to the ego will mean a worse, a more fatal spiritual refusal, a perdition, vinas.t.i; for it will be a definite falling away from a greater truth of his being than that which he has followed in the ignorance of the lower nature. He has been admitted to a higher consciousness, a new self-realisation, he has been shown the possibility of a divine instead of an egoistic action; the gates have been opened before him of a divine and spiritual in place of a merely intellectual, emotional, sensuous and vital life. He is called to be no longer a great blind instrument, but a conscious soul and an enlightened power and vessel of the Godhead.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   is very obvious. And she has formed and directs the action too, hardly less mechanical as things now are, of our sense-mind and will and intelligence. Only, while in the animal the mind workings are a wholly mechanical obedience to Prakriti, man has this distinction that he embodies a conscious development in which the soul more actively participates, and that gives to his outward mentality the sense, useful to him, indispensable, but very largely a misleading sense, of a certain freedom and increasing mastery of his instrumental nature. And it is especially misleading because it blinds him to the hard fact of his bondage and his false idea of freedom prevents him from finding a true liberty and lordship. For the freedom and mastery of man over his nature are hardly even real and cannot be complete until he becomes aware of the Divinity within him and is in possession of his own real self and spirit other than the ego, atmavan. It is that which Nature is labouring to express in mind and life and body; it is that which imposes on her this or that law of being and working, Swabhava; it is that which shapes the outward destiny and the evolution of the soul within us. It is therefore only when he is in possession of his real self and spirit that his nature can become a conscious instrument and enlightened power of the godhead.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   closing supreme word of the Gita expressing the highest mystery is spoken in two brief, direct and simple slokas and these are left without farther comment or enlargement to sink into the mind and reveal their own fullness of meaning in the soul's experience.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   so real to us and intimate that we can either consciously live and dwell in it or lose our separate selves in the Eternal and no longer be compelled at all by the mental Ignorance.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   indicates that in order that that may wholly be, the surrender must be without reservations; our Yoga, our life, our state of inner being must be determined freely by this living Infinite, not predetermined by our mind's insistence on this or that dharma or any dharma. The divine Master of the Yoga, yogesvarah. kr.s.n.ah., will then himself take up our Yoga and raise us to our utmost possible perfection, not the perfection of any external or mental standard or limiting rule, but vast and comprehensive, to the mind incalculable. It will be a perfection developed by an allseeing Wisdom according to the whole truth, first indeed of our human swabhava, but afterwards of a greater thing into which it will open, a spirit and power illimitable, immortal, free and all-transmuting, the light and splendour of a divine and infinite nature.

2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   if the force of injustice conquers, the individual will still have preserved his virtue and vindicated by his example the highest ideal. On the other hand a more insistent extreme of the inner spiritual direction, passing beyond this struggle between social duty and an absolutist ethical ideal, is apt to take the ascetic turn and to point away from life and all its aims and standards of action towards another and celestial or supracosmic state in which alone beyond the perplexed vanity and illusion of man's birth and life and death there can be a pure spiritual existence.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   satisfactions and self-realisation. The mind of man is not only a vital and physical, but an intellectual, aesthetic, ethical, psychic, emotional and dynamic intelligence, and in the sphere of each of its tendencies its highest and strongest nature is to strain towards some absolute of them which the frame of life will not allow it to capture wholly and embody and make here entirely real. The mental absolute of our aspiration remains as a partly grasped shining or fiery ideal which the mind can make inwardly very present to itself, inwardly imperative on its effort, and can even effectuate partly, but not compel all the facts of life into its image. There is thus an absolute, a high imperative of intellectual truth and reason sought for by our intellectual being; there is an absolute, an imperative of right and conduct aimed at by the ethical conscience; there is an absolute, an imperative of love, sympathy, compassion, oneness yearned after by our emotional and psychic nature; there is an absolute, an imperative of delight and beauty quivered to by the aesthetic soul; there is an absolute, an imperative of inner self-mastery and control of life laboured after by the dynamic will; all these are there together and impinge upon the absolute, the imperative of possession and pleasure and safe embodied existence insisted on by the vital and physical mind. And the human intelligence, since it is not able to realise entirely any of these things, much less all of them together, erects in each sphere many standards and dharmas, standards of truth and reason, of right and conduct, of delight and beauty, of love, sympathy and oneness, of self-mastery and control, of selfpreservation and possession and vital efficiency and pleasure, and tries to impose them on life. The absolute shining ideals stand far above and beyond our capacity and rare individuals approximate to them as best they can: the mass follow or profess to follow some less magnificent norm, some established possible and relative standard. Human life as a whole undergoes the attraction and yet rejects the ideal. Life resists in the strength of some obscure infinite of its own and wears down or breaks down any established mental and moral order. And this must be either because the two are quite different and disparate though meeting and interacting principles or because mind has not the
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   persuaded to the acceptance of useful social duty and current law of social conduct, popularised by cult and ceremony and image is the outward substance of the world's greater religions.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   impersonal spirit. The mind moves under the limiting compulsion of the triple lower nature, it erects its standards in obedience to the tamasic, rajasic or at highest the sattwic qualities; but the destiny of the soul is a divine perfection and liberation and that can only be based in the freedom of our highest self, can only be found by passing through its vast impersonality and universality beyond mind into the integral light of the immeasurable

2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays On The Gita
   according to that he must act and he can no other.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   human life taken up by the equal spirit and done for the sake of
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   this does not mean that in his supreme eternity he is unconnected with all that happens here, cut off from world and Nature, aloof from all these beings. He is the supreme ineffable Brahman, he is impersonal self, he is all personal existences. Spirit here and life and matter, soul and Nature and the works of Nature are aspects and movements of his infinite and eternal existence. He is the supreme transcendent Spirit and all comes into manifestation from him and are his forms and his self-powers. As the one self he is here all-pervasive and equal and impersonal in man and animal and thing and object and every force of Nature. He is the supreme Soul and all souls are tireless flames of this one Soul. All living beings are in their spiritual personality deathless portions of the one Person or Purusha. He is the eternal Master of all manifested existence, Lord of the worlds and their creatures.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   the created mind in the deceptive workings of his own Nature.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and fix yourself by concentration of the will and intelligence on that which is higher than either will or intelligence, higher than mind and heart and sense and body. And first of all you must turn to your own eternal and immutable self, impersonal and the same in all creatures. So long as you live in ego and mental personality, you will always spin endlessly in the same rounds and there can be no real issue. Turn your will inward beyond the heart and its desires and the sense and its attractions; lift it upward beyond the mind and its associations and attachments and its bounded wish and thought and impulse. Arrive at something within you that is eternal, ever unchanged, calm, unperturbed, equal, impartial to all things and persons and happenings, not affected by any action, not altered by the figures of Nature. Be that, be the eternal self, be the Brahman. If you can become that by a permanent spiritual experience, you will have an assured basis on which you can stand delivered from the limitations of your mind-created personality, secure against any fall from peace and knowledge, free from ego.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   result and whatever outcome of the world's labour.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   narrow cell of personality, blinded and chained to your viewpoint of the ego and its desires. For you can wholly respond to it only when you are impersonalised by knowledge and widened to see all things in the self and in God and the self and God in all things. All becomes here by the power of the Spirit; all do their works by the immanence of God in things and his presence in the heart of every creature. The Creator of the worlds is not limited by his creations; the Lord of works is not bound by his works; the divine Will is not attached to its labour and the results of its labour: for it is omnipotent, all-possessing and allblissful. But still the Lord looks down on his creations from his transcendence; he descends as the Avatar; he is here in you; he rules from within all things in the steps of their nature. And you too must do works in him, after the way and in the steps of the divine nature, untouched by limitation, attachment or bondage.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   your every act to be shaped through you by the divine Will in its immaculate sovereignty is the highest degree of the perfection that comes by doing works in Yoga. That done, your nature will follow its cosmic walk in a complete and constant union with the Supreme, express the highest Self, obey the Ishwara.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   and deep rapture, not the petty ardour of egoistic desire but the ocean of an infinite Ananda. It will bring the moving sense and the pure and divine passion of the presence of the Beloved into your works; there will be an insistent joy of labour for God in yourself and for God in all beings. Love is the crown of works and the crown of knowledge.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   of his life and action. His tamasic, material, sensational mind subject to inertia and fear and ignorance either obeys partly the compulsion of its environment and partly the spasmodic impulses of its desires or finds a protection in the routine following of a dull customary intelligence. The rajasic mind of desire struggles with the world in which it lives and tries to possess always new things, to command, battle, conquer, create, destroy, accumulate. Always it goes forward tossed between success and failure, joy and sorrow, exultation or despair. But in all, whatever law it may seem to admit, it follows really only the law of the lower self and ego, the restless, untired, self-devouring and alldevouring mind of the Asuric and Rakshasic nature. The sattwic intelligence surmounts partly this state, sees that a better law than that of desire and ego must be followed and erects and imposes on itself a social, an ethical, a religious rule, a Dharma, a Shastra. This is as high as the ordinary mind of man can go, to erect an ideal or practical rule for the guidance of the mind and will and as faithfully as possible observe it in life and conduct.
  --
  
  Essays On The Gita
   you will have accomplished the expression of the Godhead, and your soul, even though it has descended into mind and body, will already be living in the vast eternity of the Spirit.

Agenda_Vol_2, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  What have you reread?
  'Essays On The Gita.'
  Oh, what a treasure that is - a gold mine!
  --
  But I don't remember seeing anything that satisfied me.
  Isn't it in the Essays On The Gita? He explains what Krishna says and how the two [descent and
  evolution] are combined. I read it not long ago because I was interested in this very question. And I

Agenda_Vol_6, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  August 25, 1965
  (Mother reads a passage from "Essays On The Gita," which she wants to publish in the next Bulletin:)
  "No real peace can be till the heart of man deserves peace; the law of Vishnu cannot
  --
  the sword of the Hero of the struggle and the word of its prophet."
  (Essays On The Gita, XIII.372)
  It is the exact portrait of the situation.
  --
  for years and years I didn't read Sri Aurobindo's books; it was only before coming here that I had read
  The Life Divine, The Synthesis of Yoga, and another one, too. For instance, Essays On The Gita I had
  never read, Savitri I had never read, I read it very recently (that is to say, some ten years ago, in 1954 or
  --
  (Then Mother gathers the texts that will make up the next "Bulletin," among which is Sri Aurobindo's
  quotation from "Essays On The Gita": "... It is Rudra who still holds the world in the hollow of his
  hand...." See conversation of August 25.)

Agenda_Vol_8, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  the subject (Synthesis of Yoga: in the "Yoga of Knowledge" he deals with religions; the first chapters of
  Essays On The Gita; Foundations of Indian Culture; Thoughts and Aphorisms, and many others too).
  Therefore start reading first.
  --
  but to the noons of the future."
  (Essays On The Gita)
  

Evening_Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo, #Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  In his Essays On The Gita, Sri Aurobindo says about the Avatar: He may on the other hand descend as an incarnation of divine life, the divine personality and power in its characteristic action, for a mission ostensibly social, ethical and political, as is represented in the story of Rama and Krishna; but always then his descent becomes in the soul of the race a permanent power for the inner and Spiritual {{0}}rebirth.[[Essays On The Gita, P. 258]]
  
  He comes as the divine power and love which calls men to itself, so that they may take refuge in that and no longer in the insufficiency of their human wills and the strife of their human fear, wrath and passion, and liberated from all the unquiet and suffering may live in the calm and bliss of the {{0}}Divine.[[Essays On The Gita, p. 258]]
  
  The Avatar comes to reveal the divine nature in men above their lower nature and to show what are the divine works, free, unegoistic, disinterested, impersonal, universal, full of the divine light, the divine power and the divine loves. He comes as a divine personality, which shall fill the consciousness of the human being, to replace the limited egoistic personality, so that it shall be liberated out of ego into infinity and universality, out of birth into {{0}}immortality,[[Essays On The Gita, p. 258]]
  
  --
  
  He can read the first few chapters of the Essays On The Gita and try to understand Karma yoga. Some sort of Karma yoga is the best preparation for this yoga. He cannot get the current of the higher Power now; he must make himself fit for the higher Power. The Real Shakti-Power cannot come unless the Adhar the receptacle is purified. She can force the way, but in that case there will be all confusion and Adhar may break.
  
  --
  
  Disciple: Sometimes we had discussions about Ahimsa non-violence and I pointed out the sixth chapter of the Essays On The Gita to my friends of the Sabarmati Ashram at Ahmedabad and I found they could not reply to it.
  
  --
  
  Sri Aurobindo: I believe Gandhi does not know what actually happens to the mans nature when he takes to Satyagraha or non-violence. He thinks that men get purified by it. But when men suffer, or subject them selves to voluntarily suffering, what happens is that their vital being gets strengthened. These movements affect the vital being only and not any other part. Now, when you cannot oppose the force that oppresses, you say that you will suffer. That suffering is vital and it gives strength. When the man who has thus suffered gets power he becomes a worse oppressor. That is what I have written in the Essays On The Gita that when a nation gets freedom by the suffering of its leaders and other men, it oppresses other nations in its turn. It is almost always the case with those who suppress their vital being. It allows the pressure on itself, gets strong and then finds vent in some other direction. The same thing happened to the Puritans in England. Cromwell and his men came to power and became the worst oppressors. In Christianity the principle of non violence is there but it is meant to be practised for religious and spiritual development. It may be partial but it can certainly develop certain types of spiritual temperaments. What one can do is to transform the spirit of violence. But in this practice of Satyagraha it is not transformed. When you insist on such a one-sided principle what happens is that cant, hypocrisy and dishonesty get in and there is no purification at all. Purification can come by the transformation of the impulse of violence, as I said. In that respect the old system in India was much better. The man who had the fighting spirit became the Kshatriya and then the fighting spirit was raised above the ordinary vital influence. The attempt was to spiritualise it. It succeeded in doing what passive resistance cannot and will not achieve. The Kshatriya was the man who would not allow any oppression, who would fight it out and he was the man who would not oppress anybody. That was the ideal.
  

Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  through some difficulty. S came to him and told him about the voice. A admitted his difficulty but said it would get all right. Some time later A came
  by a copy of your Essays On The Gita and when he was reading it he was
  possessed by some power and he felt that you alone could give him guidance. By the time S came to give him the Rama Mantra which had been

Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2, #Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  DR. MANILAL: If it was not true and if Krishna and Arjuna didn't exist,
  you would not have written Essays On The Gita, Sir.
  SRI AUROBINDO: Why not? Whether they existed or not I would still
  --
  years ago. A relation of his sent him to consult this man about her son. A had
  your book Essays On The Gita with him, and on seeing it, the astrologer
  made the gesture of namaskar. On being asked why he did so and whether it

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