classes ::: time, place, concept, noun,
children :::
branches ::: the Future

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:the Future
class:time
class:place
class:concept
word class:noun
wiki:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_emerging_technologies

future beings 1 ::: one day, in the Future, there will surely be a woman who is beyond all that has come before. imagine a future emanation of the Mother being able to meet such a person. The Mother born with access to the Internet, to my ideal e-school.

2020-03-04
future beings 2 ::: to think one day, there will be people perhaps like reincarnations of Avatars that are born much deeper into the information age. Brilliant Souls and Minds that will like have read so much. though I bet people brought books to Sri Aurobindo from around the world. true enough. but still. imagine Sri Aurobindo reading Sri Aurobindo at a young age.. like cmon. obviously.
future places ::: like VR school from ready player one. or online learning platforms. VR gardens.
but even if there are future beings, just as the "was" Sri Aurobindo, I still make such improper use of his works.




see also :::

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
A_Treatise_on_Cosmic_Fire
books_(by_alpha)
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Evolution_II
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Infinite_Library
josh_books
Kosmic_Consciousness
Let_Me_Explain
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_IV
Life_without_Death
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
Moral_Disengagement__How_Good_People_Can_Do_Harm_and_Feel_Good_About_Themselves
My_Burning_Heart
On_Education
On_Interpretation
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Savitri
The_Alchemy_of_Happiness
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Future_of_Man
The_Future_Poetry
The_Golden_Bough
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Lotus_Sutra
The_Phenomenon_of_Man
The_Red_Book_-_Liber_Novus
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Synthesis_Of_Yoga
The_Tarot_of_Paul_Christian
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Toward_the_Future
Vishnu_Purana
Words_Of_The_Mother_III

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
03.15_-_Towards_the_Future
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_The_Future_of_Man
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.raa_-_A_Holy_Tabernacle_in_the_Heart_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Circles_1_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Circles_2_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Circles_3_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Circles_4_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Their_mystery_is_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.rmr_-_The_Future
3.01_-_Towards_the_Future
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.07_-_THE_GREAT_EVENT_FORESHADOWED_-_THE_PLANETIZATION_OF_MANKIND
1.08_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_SPIRITUAL_REPERCUSSIONS_OF_THE_ATOM_BOMB
1.09_-_FAITH_IN_PEACE
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.11_-_FAITH_IN_MAN
1.12_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_RIGHTS_OF_MAN
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.16_-_THE_ESSENCE_OF_THE_DEMOCRATIC_IDEA
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.19_-_ON_THE_PROBABLE_EXISTENCE_AHEAD_OF_US_OF_AN_ULTRA-HUMAN
1.20_-_HOW_MAY_WE_CONCEIVE_AND_HOPE_THAT_HUMAN_UNANIMIZATION_WILL_BE_REALIZED_ON_EARTH?
1.21_-_FROM_THE_PRE-HUMAN_TO_THE_ULTRA-HUMAN,_THE_PHASES_OF_A_LIVING_PLANET
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0_0.01_-_Introduction
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.01f_-_FOREWARD
0.01_-_Life_and_Yoga
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Rationalism
01.03_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_his_School
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_Rabindranath_Tagore:_A_Great_Poet,_a_Great_Man
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.06_-_Vivekananda
01.07_-_The_Bases_of_Social_Reconstruction
01.09_-_The_Parting_of_the_Way
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.12_-_Three_Degrees_of_Social_Organisation
01.13_-_T._S._Eliot:_Four_Quartets
01.14_-_Nicholas_Roerich
0.14_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0_1956-09-14
0_1957-12-21
0_1958-02-03b_-_The_Supramental_Ship
0_1959-01-14
0_1959-06-25
0_1959-08-11
0_1959-11-25
0_1960-08-20
0_1960-12-17
0_1961-03-27
0_1961-04-07
0_1961-06-02
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-09-16
0_1961-09-30
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-05
0_1962-01-27
0_1962-02-27
0_1962-07-14
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-08-08
0_1962-08-11
0_1962-08-31
0_1962-11-17
0_1962-11-27
0_1962-11-30
0_1962-12-04
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-19
0_1963-03-06
0_1963-03-23
0_1963-07-27
0_1963-08-07
0_1963-08-10
0_1963-09-28
0_1963-11-23
0_1964-01-29
0_1964-01-31
0_1964-04-25
0_1964-07-18
0_1964-08-11
0_1964-10-14
0_1964-10-17
0_1964-10-24a
0_1964-10-30
0_1964-12-02
0_1965-04-07
0_1965-04-17
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-08-07
0_1965-08-28
0_1965-11-27
0_1966-08-10
0_1966-10-08
0_1966-10-12
0_1966-10-29
0_1967-01-21
0_1967-02-18
0_1967-03-29
0_1967-04-05
0_1967-04-15
0_1967-04-19
0_1967-04-24
0_1967-05-03
0_1967-05-20
0_1967-05-24
0_1967-06-17
0_1967-06-21
0_1967-07-08
0_1967-07-22
0_1967-11-08
0_1968-02-07
0_1968-02-28
0_1968-04-06
0_1968-04-20
0_1968-05-22
0_1968-08-28
0_1969-02-05
0_1969-02-08
0_1969-03-15
0_1969-03-26
0_1969-04-16
0_1969-05-24
0_1969-07-30
0_1969-08-23
0_1969-08-30
0_1969-10-08
0_1969-11-15
0_1969-11-22
0_1970-01-03
0_1970-03-28
0_1970-05-27
0_1970-10-28
0_1970-11-07
0_1970-11-21
0_1971-01-01
0_1971-05-08
0_1971-06-23
0_1971-08-04
0_1971-10-27
0_1971-11-27
0_1971-12-11
0_1971-12-29a
0_1972-01-02
0_1972-02-16
0_1972-03-10
0_1972-07-15
0_1972-07-22
0_1973-02-18
02.01_-_Our_Ideal
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness
02.09_-_The_Way_to_Unity
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.13_-_Rabindranath_and_Sri_Aurobindo
03.02_-_Aspects_of_Modernism
03.04_-_The_Other_Aspect_of_European_Culture
03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon
03.10_-_Hamlet:_A_Crisis_of_the_Evolving_Soul
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.13_-_Dynamic_Fatalism
03.14_-_From_the_Known_to_the_Unknown?
03.15_-_Towards_the_Future
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.01_-_To_the_Heights_I
04.02_-_A_Chapter_of_Human_Evolution
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.09_-_Values_Higher_and_Lower
05.02_-_Gods_Labour
05.03_-_Bypaths_of_Souls_Journey
05.03_-_Of_Desire_and_Atonement
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.07_-_Man_and_Superman
05.20_-_The_Urge_for_Progression
05.33_-_Caesar_versus_the_Divine
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.37_-_The_Psychic_Being,_Some_Mysteries
08.16_-_Perfection_and_Progress
09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice
1.008_-_The_Principle_of_Self-Affirmation
1.00a_-_DIVISION_A_-_THE_INTERNAL_FIRES_OF_THE_SHEATHS.
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00d_-_Introduction
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00_-_Introduction_to_Alchemy_of_Happiness
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_PROLOGUE_IN_HEAVEN
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
1.01_-_About_the_Elements
1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Appearance_and_Reality
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_On_renunciation_of_the_world
1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure
1.01_-_The_Castle
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_The_Path_of_Later_On
1.01_-_The_Unexpected
1.01_-_Who_is_Tara
1.024_-_Affiliation_With_Larger_Wholes
10.24_-_Savitri
1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication
1.02_-_Groups_and_Statistical_Mechanics
1.02_-_Karmayoga
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Skillful_Means
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_The_Age_of_Individualism_and_Reason
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics
1.02_-_The_Great_Process
1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_APPRENTICESHIP_AND_ENCULTURATION_-_ADOPTION_OF_A_SHARED_MAP
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_On_exile_or_pilgrimage
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_Tara,_Liberator_from_the_Eight_Dangers
1.03_-_THE_EARTH_IN_ITS_EARLY_STAGES
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_Phenomenon_of_Man
1.03_-_The_Tale_of_the_Alchemist_Who_Sold_His_Soul
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.04_-_Communion
1.04_-_Feedback_and_Oscillation
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_Te_Shan_Carrying_His_Bundle
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Nation-Soul
1.04_-_The_Future_of_Man
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Need_of_Guru
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_Wake-Up_Sermon
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.04_-_Yoga_and_Human_Evolution
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.052_-_Yoga_Practice_-_A_Series_of_Positive_Steps
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.05_-_Hsueh_Feng's_Grain_of_Rice
1.05_-_On_the_Love_of_God.
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Work_and_Teaching
1.06_-_A_Summary_of_my_Phenomenological_View_of_the_World
1.06_-_Five_Dreams
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_On_Induction
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_Psycho_therapy_and_a_Philosophy_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Desire_to_be
1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah
1.06_-_The_Objective_and_Subjective_Views_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_The_Third_Circle__The_Gluttonous._Cerberus._The_Eternal_Rain._Ciacco._Florence.
1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha
1.07_-_Past,_Present_and_Future
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_The_Ego_and_the_Dualities
1.07_-_The_Fire_of_the_New_World
1.07_-_THE_GREAT_EVENT_FORESHADOWED_-_THE_PLANETIZATION_OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_SPIRITUAL_REPERCUSSIONS_OF_THE_ATOM_BOMB
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_Stead_and_the_Spirits
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_3
1.094_-_Understanding_the_Structure_of_Things
1.097_-_Sublimation_of_Object-Consciousness
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_FAITH_IN_PEACE
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.09_-_On_remembrance_of_wrongs.
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_Stead_and_Maskelyne
1.09_-_The_Absolute_Manifestation
1.09_-_The_Greater_Self
1.09_-_The_Pure_Existent
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
11.02_-_The_Golden_Life-line
11.03_-_Cosmonautics
1.10_-_Aesthetic_and_Ethical_Culture
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_Farinata_and_Cavalcante_de'_Cavalcanti._Discourse_on_the_Knowledge_of_the_Damned.
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Roughly_Material_Plane_or_the_Material_World
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_FAITH_IN_MAN
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Influence_of_the_Sexes_on_Vegetation
1.1.2.02_-_Poetry_of_the_Material_or_Physical_Consciousness
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_Love_The_Creator
1.12_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_RIGHTS_OF_MAN
1.12_-_The_Astral_Plane
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_The_Strength_of_Stillness
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_And_Then?
1.13_-_Posterity_of_Dhruva
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.14_-_On_the_clamorous,_yet_wicked_master-the_stomach.
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.15_-_The_Supramental_Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Transformed_Being
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_ON_LOVE_OF_THE_NEIGHBOUR
1.16_-_THE_ESSENCE_OF_THE_DEMOCRATIC_IDEA
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_The_Triple_Status_of_Supermind
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_The_Seven-Headed_Thought,_Swar_and_the_Dashagwas
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED
1.19_-_ON_THE_PROBABLE_EXISTENCE_AHEAD_OF_US_OF_AN_ULTRA-HUMAN
1.200-1.224_Talks
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
12.05_-_The_World_Tragedy
1.20_-_HOW_MAY_WE_CONCEIVE_AND_HOPE_THAT_HUMAN_UNANIMIZATION_WILL_BE_REALIZED_ON_EARTH?
1.20_-_On_Time
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.2.1.11_-_Mystic_Poetry_and_Spiritual_Poetry
1.21_-_FROM_THE_PRE-HUMAN_TO_THE_ULTRA-HUMAN,_THE_PHASES_OF_A_LIVING_PLANET
1.21_-_The_Ascent_of_Life
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man
1.23_-_THE_MIRACULOUS
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Necromancy_and_Spiritism
1.24_-_The_Advent_and_Progress_of_the_Spiritual_Age
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.27_-_Succession_to_the_Soul
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.29_-_Concerning_heaven_on_earth,_or_godlike_dispassion_and_perfection,_and_the_resurrection_of_the_soul_before_the_general_resurrection.
1.29_-_The_Myth_of_Adonis
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
13.02_-_A_Review_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Life
1.33_-_Count_Ugolino_and_the_Archbishop_Ruggieri._The_Death_of_Count_Ugolino's_Sons.
1.3.5.04_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.439
1.44_-_Serious_Style_of_A.C.,_or_the_Apparent_Frivolity_of_Some_of_my_Remarks
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
15.03_-_A_Canadian_Question
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.60_-_Between_Heaven_and_Earth
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.65_-_Balder_and_the_Mistletoe
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
17.10_-_A_Hymn
1.72_-_Education
1.73_-_Monsters,_Niggers,_Jews,_etc.
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1914_02_21p
1914_03_03p
1914_03_04p
1914_06_24p
1914_08_18p
1915_03_03p
1917_03_30p
19.26_-_The_Brahmin
1929-05-05_-_Intellect,_true_and_wrong_movement_-_Attacks_from_adverse_forces_-_Faith,_integral_and_absolute_-_Death,_not_a_necessity_-_Descent_of_Divine_Consciousness_-_Inner_progress_-_Memory_of_former_lives
1929-06-09_-_Nature_of_religion_-_Religion_and_the_spiritual_life_-_Descent_of_Divine_Truth_and_Force_-_To_be_sure_of_your_religion,_country,_family-choose_your_own_-_Religion_and_numbers
1951-02-24_-_Psychic_being_and_entity_-_dimensions_-_in_the_atom_-_Death_-_exteriorisation_-_unconsciousness_-_Past_lives_-_progress_upon_earth_-_choice_of_birth_-_Consecration_to_divine_Work_-_psychic_memories_-_Individualisation_-_progress
1951-04-07_-_Origin_of_Evil_-_Misery-_its_cause
1953-07-29
1953-08-05
1953-09-30
1953-12-30
1954-05-26_-_Symbolic_dreams_-_Psychic_sorrow_-_Dreams,_one_is_rarely_conscious
1954-10-06_-_What_happens_is_for_the_best_-_Blaming_oneself_-Experiences_-_The_vital_desire-soul_-Creating_a_spiritual_atmosphere_-Thought_and_Truth
1954-12-29_-_Difficulties_and_the_world_-_The_experience_the_psychic_being_wants_-_After_death_-Ignorance
1955-06-01_-_The_aesthetic_conscience_-_Beauty_and_form_-_The_roots_of_our_life_-_The_sense_of_beauty_-_Educating_the_aesthetic_sense,_taste_-_Mental_constructions_based_on_a_revelation_-_Changing_the_world_and_humanity
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1956-01-04_-_Integral_idea_of_the_Divine_-_All_things_attracted_by_the_Divine_-_Bad_things_not_in_place_-_Integral_yoga_-_Moving_idea-force,_ideas_-_Consequences_of_manifestation_-_Work_of_Spirit_via_Nature_-_Change_consciousness,_change_world
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1956-11-21_-_Knowings_and_Knowledge_-_Reason,_summit_of_mans_mental_activities_-_Willings_and_the_true_will_-_Personal_effort_-_First_step_to_have_knowledge_-_Relativity_of_medical_knowledge_-_Mental_gymnastics_make_the_mind_supple
1957-03-13_-_Our_best_friend
1957-04-03_-_Different_religions_and_spirituality
1957-07-10_-_A_new_world_is_born_-_Overmind_creation_dissolved
1957-12-04_-_The_method_of_The_Life_Divine_-_Problem_of_emergence_of_a_new_species
1957-12-11_-_Appearance_of_the_first_men
1958-02-19_-_Experience_of_the_supramental_boat_-_The_Censors_-_Absurdity_of_artificial_means
1958-03-19_-_General_tension_in_humanity_-_Peace_and_progress_-_Perversion_and_vision_of_transformation
1958-03-26_-_Mental_anxiety_and_trust_in_spiritual_power
1960_03_23
1960_04_07?_-_28
1960_11_13?_-_50
1962_02_27
1965_05_29
1969_09_29
1969_10_01?_-_166
1969_11_08?
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_Happy_Dust
1.ami_-_Selfhood_can_demolish_the_magic_of_this_world_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Green_Meadow
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Transition_of_Juan_Romero
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1.fs_-_Cassandra
1.fs_-_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_A_Young_Man
1.fs_-_Fantasie_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Melancholy_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Four_Ages_Of_The_World
1.fs_-_The_Pilgrim
1.fs_-_The_Proverbs_Of_Confucius
1.fs_-_The_Sexes
1.hs_-_The_Garden
1.jda_-_Raga_Gujri
1.jlb_-_Cosmogonia_(&_translation)
1.jwvg_-_A_Legacy
1.jwvg_-_A_Symbol
1.jwvg_-_At_Midnight
1.jwvg_-_The_Rule_Of_Life
1.jwvg_-_Wont_And_Done
1.ki_-_now_begins
1.lovecraft_-_The_Cats
1.nrpa_-_Advice_to_Marpa_Lotsawa
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_(Excerpt)
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Is_It_That_In_Some_Brighter_Sphere
1.pbs_-_Ginevra
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Lines_--_Far,_Far_Away,_O_Ye
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_II.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_III.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VIII.
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_Ugolino
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_The_Bells
1.poe_-_To_One_In_Paradise
1.raa_-_A_Holy_Tabernacle_in_the_Heart_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Circles_1_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Circles_2_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Circles_3_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Circles_4_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.raa_-_Their_mystery_is_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.rb_-_Andrea_del_Sarto
1.rb_-_Never_the_Time_and_the_Place
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Popularity
1.rb_-_Rabbi_Ben_Ezra
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Pied_Piper_Of_Hamelin
1.rmr_-_Elegy_IV
1.rmr_-_Lament_(Whom_will_you_cry_to,_heart?)
1.rmr_-_The_Future
1.rmr_-_The_Grown-Up
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Freedom
1.rwe_-_Dmonic_Love
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Threnody
1.stl_-_My_Song_for_Today
1.stl_-_The_Divine_Dew
1.wby_-_All_Souls_Night
1.wby_-_A_Prayer_For_My_Daughter
1.wby_-_Easter_1916
1.whitman_-_Apostroph
1.whitman_-_As_A_Strong_Bird_On_Pinious_Free
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_Brother_Of_All,_With_Generous_Hand
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Words
1.whitman_-_Crossing_Brooklyn_Ferry
1.whitman_-_In_The_New_Garden_In_All_The_Parts
1.whitman_-_Kosmos
1.whitman_-_Mediums
1.whitman_-_One_Song,_America,_Before_I_Go
1.whitman_-_Poets_to_Come
1.whitman_-_Sing_Of_The_Banner_At_Day-Break
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_LI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Open_Road
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Redwood-Tree
1.whitman_-_Spirit_Whose_Work_Is_Done
1.whitman_-_Starting_From_Paumanok
1.whitman_-_The_Mystic_Trumpeter
1.whitman_-_To_A_Historian
1.whitman_-_To_Think_Of_Time
1.whitman_-_Turn,_O_Libertad
1.whitman_-_With_Antecedents
1.ww_-_After-Thought
1.ww_-_A_Whirl-Blast_From_Behind_The_Hill
1.ww_-_Laodamia
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1814_I._Suggested_By_A_Beautiful_Ruin_Upon_One_Of_The_Islands_Of_Lo
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Morning_Of_The_Day_Appointed_For_A_General_Thanksgiving._January_18,_1816
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_The_Attributes_of_Omega_Point_-_a_Transcendent_God
2.01_-_War.
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_The_Purified_Understanding
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.04_-_ON_PRIESTS
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_Two_Tales_of_Seeking_and_Losing
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_ON_THE_TARANTULAS
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_Memory,_Self-Consciousness_and_the_Ignorance
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.10_-_The_Lamp
2.10_-_The_Primordial_Kings__Their_Shattering
2.11_-_On_Education
2.11_-_The_Boundaries_of_the_Ignorance
2.11_-_The_Shattering_And_Fall_of_The_Primordial_Kings
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.1.3.3_-_Reading
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.1.4.1_-_Teachers
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.1.4.5_-_Tests
2.14_-_ON_THE_LAND_OF_EDUCATION
2.14_-_The_Bell
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.16_-_Fashioning_of_The_Vessel_
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.1.7.07_-_On_the_Verse_and_Structure_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.18_-_The_Evolutionary_Process_-_Ascent_and_Integration
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
22.07_-_The_Ashram,_the_World_and_The_Individual[^4]
2.20_-_Nov-Dec_1939
2.20_-_ON_REDEMPTION
2.20_-_The_Infancy_and_Maturity_of_ZO,_Father_and_Mother,_Israel_The_Ancient_and_Understanding
2.20_-_The_Lower_Triple_Purusha
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.2.2_-_The_Mandoukya_Upanishad
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_The_Higher_and_the_Lower_Knowledge
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.3.06_-_The_Mind
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.30_-_The_Uniting_of_the_Names_45_and_52
2.3.1_-_Svetasvatara_Upanishad
2.3.2_-_Desire
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
3.01_-_Natural_Morality
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_Towards_the_Future
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.03_-_Faith_and_the_Divine_Grace
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_The_Four_Foundational_Practices
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.05_-_Cerberus_And_Furies,_And_That_Lack_Of_Light
3.05_-_ON_VIRTUE_THAT_MAKES_SMALL
3.0_-_THE_ETERNAL_RECURRENCE
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.02_-_Asceticism_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.02_-_A_Theory_of_the_Human_Being
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.03_-_The_Trinity_of_Bengal
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
3.1.04_-_Transformation_in_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.05_-_A_Vision_of_Science
31.05_-_Vivekananda
3.10_-_ON_THE_THREE_EVILS
3.10_-_The_New_Birth
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.24_-_In_the_Moonlight
3.12_-_ON_OLD_AND_NEW_TABLETS
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
3.2.04_-_The_Conservative_Mind_and_Eastern_Progress
3.2.05_-_Our_Ideal
32.12_-_The_Evolutionary_Imperative
3.2.3_-_Dreams
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
33.08_-_I_Tried_Sannyas
33.10_-_Pondicherry_I
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.4.01_-_Evolution
34.05_-_Hymn_to_the_Mental_Being
34.09_-_Hymn_to_the_Pillar
3.4.2_-_The_Inconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.5.03_-_Reason_and_Society
3-5_Full_Circle
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.1.11_-_Rebirth_and_Karma
38.01_-_Asceticism_and_Renunciation
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_Circumstances
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.02_-_Autobiographical_Evidence
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_Humanity_in_Progress
4.02_-_The_Psychology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_Prayer_to_the_Ever-greater_Christ
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.08_-_THE_RELIGIOUS_PROBLEM_OF_THE_KINGS_RENEWAL
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
4.1.4_-_Resistances,_Sufferings_and_Falls
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.22_-_The_supramental_Thought_and_Knowledge
4.23_-_The_supramental_Instruments_--_Thought-process
4.2.3_-_Vigilance,_Resolution,_Will_and_the_Divine_Help
4.2.4.02_-_The_Psychic_Condition
4.2.4.11_-_Psychic_Intensity
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.2.4_-_Time_and_CHange_of_the_Nature
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.25_-_Towards_the_supramental_Time_Vision
4.4.4.02_-_Peace,_Calm,_Quiet_as_a_Basis_for_the_Descent
5.01_-_ADAM_AS_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.06_-_Supermind_in_the_Evolution
5.06_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.1.03_-_The_Hostile_Forces_and_Hostile_Beings
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.09_-_THE_THIRD_STAGE_-_THE_UNUS_MUNDUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.09_-_Right_Judgement
7.5.61_-_Because_Thou_Art
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
CASE_5_-_KYOGENS_MAN_HANGING_IN_THE_TREE
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XI
Deutsches_Requiem
Emma_Zunz
ENNEAD_01.05_-_Does_Happiness_Increase_With_Time?
ENNEAD_02.02_-_About_the_Movement_of_the_Heavens.
ENNEAD_02.03_-_Whether_Astrology_is_of_any_Value.
ENNEAD_02.05_-_Of_the_Aristotelian_Distinction_Between_Actuality_and_Potentiality.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.01_-_Concerning_Fate.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
Euthyphro
Gorgias
Kafka_and_His_Precursors
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
MoM_References
new_computer
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_01_15
r1912_02_06
r1912_07_01
r1912_07_20
r1912_07_22
r1912_12_08
r1913_01_02
r1913_01_18
r1913_09_13
r1913_12_07
r1913_12_13
r1914_03_22
r1914_03_28
r1914_04_14
r1914_04_16
r1914_07_10
r1914_10_05
r1914_11_18
r1914_12_01
r1914_12_22
r1914_12_23
r1915_01_04a
r1915_01_14
r1915_07_12
r1917_09_06
r1918_05_10
r1918_05_14
r1919_06_27
r1919_07_06
r1919_07_22
r1919_07_26
r1920_02_22
r1927_01_27
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_225-239
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Wisdom
The_Book_(short_story)
The_Circular_Ruins
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Fearful_Sphere_of_Pascal
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Great_Sense
The_Immortal
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Theologians
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

concept
place
time
SIMILAR TITLES
the Future
The Future of Man
The Future Poetry
Toward the Future

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH


TERMS ANYWHERE

17. they enter into the perception of gnosis that is unobstructed and unimpeded with respect to the future (S. anāgate 'dhvany asangam apratihataM jNānadarsanaM pravartate; T. ma 'ongs pa'i dus la ma chags ma thogs pa'i ye shes gzigs par 'jug pa; C. zhihui zhi weilaishi wu'ai 智慧知未來世無礙)

4. The heaven of the contented (TUsITA), where the BODHISATTVA sVETAKETU resided before descending to earth to be reborn as prince SIDDHĀRTHA and where the future buddha MAITREYA currently resides

A :::downtrend ::: occurs when the price of an asset moves lower over a period of time. While the price may move intermittently higher or lower, downtrends are characterized by lower peaks and lower troughs over time.  Notice how each successive peak and trough is lower than the previous one. For example, the low at Point 3 is lower than the low at Point 1. The downtrend will be deemed broken once the price closes above the high at Point 4.  An uptrend is the opposite of a downtrend, while markets that are moving sideways are known as ranging or range-bound markets.   BREAKING DOWN 'Downtrend'   Many traders seek to avoid downtrends because they can adversely affect the value of any investment. A downtrend can last for minutes, days, weeks, months or even years, so identifying a downtrend early is very important. Once a downtrend has been established (series of lower peaks) a trader should be very cautious about entering into any new long positions.  Short sellers seek to profit from downtrends by borrowing and then immediately selling shares with the agreement to repurchase them in the future. These are known as short positions or short selling. If the asset's price continues to decline, the trader profits from the difference between the immediate sale price and the lower future repurchase price.  Often times, traders use technical indicators and chart patterns to identify and confirm downtrends. Moving averages, for example, can be used to identify the overall trend. If the price is lower than a moving average, the stock is likely to be in a downtrend, and vice versa for an uptrend. Momentum indicators, such as the relative strength index (RSI), can also show the magnitude or strength of the downtrend at a given point in time, which can help when deciding whether or not to enter a short position.

abhiprAya. (T. dgongs pa; C. yiqu; J. ishu; K. ŭich'wi 意趣). In Sanskrit, "hidden intention" or "purpose"; a term used in hermeneutics to refer to the concealed intent the Buddha had in mind when he made a statement that was not literally true (see also ABHISAMDHI). In the MAHAYANASuTRALAMKARA, there are four abhiprAyas. (1) The Buddha may say that two things are the same when in fact they are similar in only one, albeit important, feature. Thus, sAKYAMUNI Buddha says that he is the past buddha VIPAsYIN, thinking of the fact that there is not the slightest difference in their DHARMAKAYAs. This is called the intention of sameness (samatAbhiprAya). (2) The Buddha may say one thing while intending something else (arthAntarAbhiprAya). This category is often invoked in YOGACARA exegesis to explain why the Buddha proclaimed the nonexistence of all phenomena in the PRAJNAPARAMITA sutras when he in fact did not intend this statement to be taken literally, thinking instead of the three natures (TRILAKsAnA) of all phenomena propounded by the YogAcAra. (3) The buddha may make a statement intending another time (kAlAntarAbhiprAya) than that suggested by his words. For example, he may assure lazy persons who are incapable of any virtuous practice whatsoever that they will be reborn in SUKHAVATĪ, the paradise of AMITABHA, if they will simply call on that buddha. He does this in order to encourage them to accumulate a modest amount of merit, although he knows that they will not be reborn there immediately or even in their next lifetime, but at some other time in the future. (4) The Buddha adjusts his teaching to the capacities of his students based on their dispositions (pudgalAntarAbhiprAya). For example, the Buddha will extol the benefits of the practice of charity (DANA) to a person who is disposed toward the accumulation of merit (PUnYA) but will underplay the importance of charity to a person who becomes complacently attached to that practice. See ABHISAMDHI; SANDHYABHAsA.

A bottom ::: is the lowest price reached by a financial security, commodity, index or economic cycle in a given time period. A specific time span is usually used to determine a bottom, and that timeframe can be a year, month or even intraday. To determine the future price of an investment, technical analysts determine the bottom for a particular security.

Accelerating change - a perceived increase in the rate of technological (and sometimes social and cultural) progress throughout history, which may suggest faster and more profound change in the future.

AdAnavijNAna. (T. len pa'i rnam par shes pa; C. atuona shi/xiangxu shi; J. adanashiki/sozokushiki; K. at'ana sik/sangsok sik 阿陀那識/相續識). In Sanskrit, "appropriating consciousness" or "retributory consciousness"; an alternate name for the ALAYAVIJNANA, the eighth consciousness in the YOGACARA analysis of consciousness, which serves as a repository (Alaya) of the seeds (BĪJA) of past action (KARMAN) until they can come to fruition (VIPAKA) in the future. Because that consciousness thus links the present with the future life, the AlayavijNAna also serves as the consciousness that "appropriates" a physical body at the moment of rebirth, hence, its name AdAnavijNAna.

againstrthe wiles of demons, and reveal the future.”

akashic record ::: the etheric writing (akasalipi) "that keeps the record of all things past, transcribes all that is in process in the present, writes out the future". akriy akriya a ud udasinata

akusalamula. (P. akusalamula; T. mi dge ba'i rtsa ba; C. bushangen; J. fuzenkon; K. pulson'gŭn 不善根). In Sanskrit, "unwholesome faculties," or "roots of evil"; these refer to the cumulative unwholesome actions performed by an individual throughout one's past lives, which lead that being toward the baleful destinies (DURGATI) of animals, hungry ghosts, and the denizens of hell. The Buddhist tradition offers various lists of these unwholesome faculties, the most common of which is threefold: craving or greed (LOBHA), aversion or hatred (DVEsA), and delusion (MOHA). These same three are also known in the sutra literature as the "three poisons" (TRIVIsA). These three factors thus will fructify as unhappiness in the future and provide the foundation for unfavorable destinies or rebirths (APAYA). These three unwholesome roots are the converse of the three wholesome faculties, or "roots of virtue" (KUsALAMuLA), viz., nongreed (alobha), nonhatred (advesa), and nondelusion (amoha), which lead instead to happiness or liberation (VIMOKsA). See also SAMUCCHINNAKUsALAMuLA.

aladr.s.t.i (trikaldrishti) ::: "the prophetic knowledge of the future", the kind of time-vision most often meant in the Record of Yoga by trikaladr.s.t.iG

All these methods were known to the ancients. Unfortunately, the Western lack of any true psychology leaves unexplained the rationale of these healing systems — whether by hypnotism, magnetism, mesmerism, or healing by faith as practiced by the Christian Scientists and faith-healers — and gives no hint of their end results. The potential dangers incurred, both physical and superphysical, are unsuspected. The magnetic healer’s emanation of his vitality and will-force inevitably carries and implants in the person it affects something of his own quality of mind, heart, and body. The germs of any latent disease, hidden vice, or mental bias will complicate any supposed cure. Moreover, the subtle infection on inner lines karmically links for the future both healer and patient in the outcome. Even diseased or evil-minded persons of strong will and animal vitality can displace a disease and, by driving it back onto some inner level of the sufferer’s constitution, can make a seeming cure. Howsoever it is displaced out of sight, it cannot be denied out of existence, and sooner or later it will reappear in a more untimely, unnatural, and probably a more dangerous form because of its suppression at the moment of its endeavor to exhaust itself in physical expression. Physical disease, originating in wrong thought in this or a former life, becomes visible on the most material level in working its way out of the system for good. It is positively pernicious for a healer to act upon the will, conscience, or moral integrity of the sick person by hypnotizing his mind, will, and conscience into believing that sickness does not exist, or that he is a victim of fate instead of suffering from his own past actions. Any such control of another’s conscious life is a form of suggestion or hypnotism, and falls under what was formerly called black magic.

already ::: 1. Core Meaning: an adverb indicating that something has happened before now. 2. Happened in the past before a particular time, or will have happened by or before a particular time in the future. 3. Unexpectedly early.

Ambamata (Sanskrit) Aṃbāmātā Mother of the mountain; Rajastani aspect of Kali or Durga, the great mother, “patroness and guardian of boys, the future warriors” (Caves and Jungles 623). Equivalent to mater montana, a title of Cybele or Vesta as guardian of children. ( )

Among its members W. Dubislav (1937), K. Grelling, O. Helmer, C. G. Hempel, A. Herzberg, K.. Korsch, H. Reichenbach (q.v.), M. Strauss. Many members of the following groups may be regarded as adherents of Scientific Empiricism: the Berlin Society for Scientific Philosophy, the W arsaw School, the Cambridge School for Analytic Philosophy (q.v.), further, in U. S. A., some of the representatives of contemporary Pragmatism (q.v.), especially C. W. Morris, of Neo-Realism (q.v.), and of Operationalism (q.v.).   Among the individual adherents not belonging to the groups mentioned: E. Kaila (Finland), J. Jörgensen (Denmark), A. Ness (Norway); A. J. Ayer, J. H. Woodger (England); M. Boll (France); K. Popper (now New Zealand); E. Brunswik, H. Gomperz, Felix Kaufmann, R. V. Mises, L. Rougier, E. Zilsel (now in U. S. A.); E. Nagel, W. V. Quine, and many others (in U.S.A.). The general attitude and the views of Scientific Empiricism are in esential agreement with those of Logical Empiricism (see above, 1). Here, the unity of science is especially emphasized, in various respects   There is a logical unity of the language of science; the concepts of different branches of science are not of fundamentally different kinds but belong to one coherent system. The unity of science in this sense is closely connected with the thesis of Physicahsm (q.v.).   There is a practical task in the present stage of development, to come to a better mutual adaptation of terminologies in different branches of science.   There is today no unity of the laws of science. It is an aim of the future development of science to come, if possible, to a simple set of connected, fundamental laws from which the special laws in the different branches of science, including the social sciences, can be deduced. Here also, the analysis of language is regarded as one of the chief methods of the science of science. While logical positivism stressed chiefly the logical side of this analysis, it is here carried out from various directions, including an analysis of the biological and sociological sides of the activities of language and knowledge, as they have been emphasized earlier by Pragmatism (q.v.), especially C. S. Peirce and G. H. Mead. Thus the development leads now to a comprehensive general theory of signs or semiotic (q.v.) as a basis for philosophy The following publications and meetings may be regarded as organs of this movement.   The periodical "Erkenntnis", since 1930, now continued as "Journal of Unified Science"   The "Encyclopedia of Unified Science", its first part ("Foundations of the Unity of Science", 2 vols.) consisting of twenty monographs (eight appeared by 1940). Here, the foundations of various fields of science are discussed, especially from the point of view of the unity of science and scientific procedure, and the relations between the fields. Thus, the work intends to serve as an introduction to the science of science (q.v.).   A series of International Congresses for the Unity of Science was started by a preliminary conference in Prague 1934 (see report, Erkenntnis 5, 1935). The congresses took place at Pans in 1935 ("Actes", Pans 1936; Erkenntnis 5, 1936); at Copenhagen in 1936 (Erkenntnis 6, 1937); at Paris in 1937; at Cambridge, England, in 1938 (Erkenntnis 7, 1938); at Cambridge, Mass., in 1939 (J. Unif. Sc. 9, 1941); at Chicago in 1941.   Concerning the development and the aims of this movement, see O. Neurath and C. W. Morris (for both, see above, I D), further H. Reichenbach, Ziele and Wege der heutigen Naturphilosophie, 1931; S. S. Stevens, "Psychology and the Science of Science", Psych. Bull. 36, 1939 (with bibliography). Bibliographies in "Erkenntnis": 1, 1931, p. 315, p. 335 (Polish authors); 2, 1931, p. 151, p. 189; 5, 1935, p. 185, p. 195 (American authors), p. 199 (Polish authors), p. 409, larger bibliography: in Encycl. Unif. Science, vol. II, No. 10 (to ippetr in 1942). -- R.C.

and the future. Under his sway, and ready to do

Angel of the Future—Teiaiel or Isiaiel ( q.v .).

An :::investment ::: is an asset or item acquired with the goal of generating income or appreciation. In an economic sense, an investment is the purchase of goods that are not consumed today but are used in the future to create wealth. In finance, an investment is a monetary asset purchased with the idea that the asset will provide income in the future or will later be sold at a higher price for a profit.

Anticipation: (Lat. ante, before + capere, to take) The foreknowledge of future events and experiences. Anticipation, in contrast to expectation, is allegedly immediate and non-inferential cognition of the future. See Expectation; Foreknowledge. -- L.W.

Ardhamatra (Sanskrit) Ardhamātra, Ardhamātrā [from ardha half + mātra or mātrā a metrical unit] Half a short syllable; the Nadabindu-Upanishad in speaking of Aum says that the syllable or character A is considered to be Kalahamsa’s right wing; U, the left wing; M, the tail of the Swan, and the ardhamatra its head (cf VS 5, 74-5). In the Mahabharata kalahamsa is the name of several species of the hamsa bird, a goose or swan. Ardhamatra is a mystical term for one of the portions of the swan of time — Brahma or the manifest or Third Logos of the universe, whose emanation or creative activity is hamsa-vahana (the vehicle or carrier of the swan). Ardhamatra, therefore, has reference to the egoic individuality of the cosmic Third Logos or Brahma (also called Purusha), considered to be “one-half the measure” of the eternal past and the eternal future — such egoic individuality being the product in space and time of the continuously reimbodying spirit of the universe, evolving and changing its nature by evolution as the cycles of time pass from the present into the past, and forwards into the future.

a religious official among the Romans, whose duty it was to predict future events and advise upon the course of public business, in accordance with omens derived from the flight, singing, and feeding of birds. Hence extended to: A soothsayer, diviner, or prophet, generally; one that foresees and foretells the future. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adjective.) augured.

"A Rishi is one who sees or discovers an inner truth and puts it into self-effective language — the mantra.” The Future Poetry

“A Rishi is one who sees or discovers an inner truth and puts it into self-effective language—the mantra.” The Future Poetry

Arupa-devas (Sanskrit) Arūpa-deva-s [from a not + rūpa form, body + deva divine being] Formless celestial beings; suggested in The Mahatma Letters (p. 107) to refer to beings who were once men as we now are, but who have graduated out of the human sage into one of the two main classes of dhyani-chohans. According to this scheme, there are men; those superior to men who nevertheless were formerly men, divided into the rupa and arupa; and beneath men two classes who will be men in the future, such as asuras (elementals having a more or less human form) and beasts or elementals of a less advanced class which can be called animal elementals.

Asanga. (T. Thogs med; C. Wuzhao; J. Mujaku; K. Much'ak 無著) (c. 320-c. 390 CE). a.k.a. Arya Asanga, Indian scholar who is considered to be a founder of the YOGACARA school of MAHAYANA Buddhism. In the Tibetan tradition, he is counted as one of the "six ornaments of JAMBUDVĪPA" ('dzam gling rgyan drug), together with VASUBANDHU, NAGARJUNA and ARYADEVA, and DIGNAGA and DHARMAKĪRTI. Born into a brAhmana family in Purusapura (modern-day Peshawar, Pakistan), Asanga originally studied under SARVASTIVADA (possibly MAHĪsASAKA) teachers but converted to the MahAyAna later in life. His younger brother was the important exegete Vasubandhu; it is said that he was converted to the MahAyAna by Asanga. According to traditional accounts, Asanga spent twelve years in meditation retreat, after which he received a vision of the future buddha MAITREYA. He visited Maitreya's abode in TUsITA heaven, where the bodhisattva instructed him in MahAyAna and especially YogAcAra doctrine. Some of these teachings were collected under the name MaitreyanAtha, and the Buddhist tradition generally regards them as revealed by Asanga through the power of the future buddha. Some modern scholars, however, have posited the existence of a historical figure named MAITREYANATHA or simply Maitreya. Asanga is therefore associated with what are known as the "five treatises of MaitreyanAtha" (the ABHISAMAYALAMKARA, the DHARMADHARMATAVIBHAGA, the MADHYANTAVIBHAGA, the MAHAYANASuTRALAMKARA, and the RATNAGOTRAVIBHAGA). Asanga was a prolific author, composing commentaries on the SAMDHINIRMOCANASuTRA and the VAJRACCHEDIKAPRAJNAPARAMITASuTRA. Among his independent treatises, three are particularly important. The ABHIDHARMASAMUCCAYA sets forth the categories of the ABHIDHARMA from a YogAcAra perspective. The MAHAYANASAMGRAHA is a detailed exposition of YogAcAra doctrine, setting forth such topics as the ALAYAVIJNANA and the TRISVABHAVA as well as the constituents of the path. His largest work is the compendium entitled YOGACARABHuMIsASTRA. Two of its sections, the sRAVAKABHuMI and the BODHISATTVABHuMI, circulated as independent works, with the former important for its exposition of the practice of DHYANA and the latter for its exposition of the bodhisattva's practice of the six PARAMITA; the chapter on sĪLA is particularly influential. These texts have had a lasting and profound impact on the development of Buddhism, especially in India, Tibet, and East Asia. Among the great figures in the history of Indian Buddhism, Asanga is rare for the breadth of his interests and influence, making significant contributions to philosophy (as the founder of YogAcAra), playing a key role in TATHAGATAGARBHA thought (through the RatnagotravibhAga), and providing significant expositions of Buddhist practice (in the YogAcArabhumi).

Asita. (T. Mdog nag po; C. Asituo; J. Ashida; K. Asat'a 阿私陀). Sanskrit and PAli name for an Indian brAhmana who, according to PAli sources, was chaplain to the BODHISATTVA's grandfather Sīhahanu (S. SiMhahanu) and teacher of the bodhisattva's father Suddhodana (S. sUDDHODANA). After his retirement from the world, Asita developed various supranormal powers through his mastery of meditation and used them to sojourn in the realm of the divinities (DEVA). Once while staying in TRAYASTRIMsA heaven, he learned that the future buddha SIDDHARTHA GAUTAMA had been born as the son of King suddhodana. Asita went to the palace to examine the infant and saw that the child was endowed with the thirty-two marks of a MAHAPURUsA, or great man. From these signs, he realized that SiddhArtha was destined to become a fully enlightened buddha. Despite his great joy, Asita was also dismayed to realize that, at his current age of ninety, he would not live long enough to witness this event. Instead, he would die and be reborn in the immaterial realm (ARuPYADHATU), where he would not be able to hear the Buddha preach and could not be liberated by his salvific message. Asita urged his nephew NAlaka to renounce the world in anticipation of the future buddha's enlightenment. The boy complied and later attained arhatship after reflecting on the sermon the Buddha delivered to him in the NAlakasutta.

As sesha means “remainder,” “what is left over,” the main significance is that during the pralayas Vishnu, representing the cosmic divinity, is conceived as sleeping upon the substance of a spiritual character remaining over after the dissolution of the worlds. Thus Adisesha (primeval substance or remainder) is the cosmic spatial ocean of consciousness-substance left over from the previous cosmic manvantara which acts as the mother-substance or chaos from and in which the future worlds of manifestation will be born when pralaya ends. See also ANANTA-SESHA

Astragalomancy: Foretelling the future by means of dice marked with letters of the alphabet.

astrology ::: Astrology A form of divination, astrology is the practice of revealing the future by interpreting the arrangement or alignment of stars and planets in relation to astrological theory and the Zodiac. Also used for determining human characteristics at birth by the position of the stars and planets at the time of birth.

Asvattha(Sanskrit) ::: The mystical tree of knowledge, the mystical tree of kosmical life and being, represented asgrowing in a reversed position: the branches extending downwards and the roots upwards. The branchestypify the visible kosmical universe, the roots the invisible world of spirit.The universe among the ancients of many nations was portrayed or figurated under the symbol of a tree,of which the roots sprang from the divine heart of things, and the trunk and the branches and thebranchlets and the leaves were the various planes and worlds and spheres of the kosmos. The fruit of thiskosmic tree contained the seeds of future "trees," being the entities which had attained through evolutionthe end of their evolutionary journey, such as men and the gods -- themselves universes in the small, anddestined in the future to become kosmic entities when the cycling wheel of time shall have turnedthrough long aeons on its majestic round. In fact, every living thing, and so-called inanimate things also,are trees of life, with their roots above in the spiritual realms, with their trunks passing through theintermediate spheres, and their branches manifesting in the physical realms.

Augur: A magician-priest of ancient Rome who predicted the future by the flight of birds.

augury ::: n. --> The art or practice of foretelling events by observing the actions of birds, etc.; divination.

An omen; prediction; prognostication; indication of the future; presage.
A rite, ceremony, or observation of an augur.


auspice ::: a. --> A divining or taking of omens by observing birds; an omen as to an undertaking, drawn from birds; an augury; an omen or sign in general; an indication as to the future.
Protection; patronage and care; guidance.


Austromancy: Foretelling the future by using the winds as sources of divinatory data.

avadAna. (P. apadAna; T. rtogs par brjod pa; C. apotuona/piyu; J. ahadana or apadana/hiyu; K. ap'adana/piyu 阿波陀那/譬喩). In Sanskrit, "tales" or "narrative"; a term used to denote a type of story found in both Buddhist and non-Buddhist literature. The precise meaning of the word has been the subject of much discussion. In the Indian BrAhmanas and srauta literature, the term denotes either something that is sacrificed or a portion of a sacrifice. The term avadAna was originally thought to mean "something cut off; something selected" and was presumed to derive from the prefix ava- + the Sanskrit root √dA. Feer, who published a French translation of the AVADANAsATAKA in 1891, tentatively translated it as "légende, action héroïque," while noting that the Tibetans, the Chinese, and the Mongols all employed differing translations of the word as well. (The Chinese use a transcription, apotuona, as well as a translation, piyu, meaning "simile." The Tibetan rtogs brjod has been rendered as "judgment" or "moral legend"; literally, it means the presentation or expression of the realizations [of an adept]. The Mongolian equivalent is domok.) Feer's rendering of avadAna is closer to its meaning of "heroic action" in classical Indian works such as the RaghuvaMsa and the KumArasambhava. AvadAnas are listed as the tenth of the twelvefold (DVADAsAnGA) division of the traditional genres of Buddhist literature, as classified by compositional style and content. The total corpus of the genre is quite extensive, ranging from individual avadAnas embedded in VINAYA texts, or separate sutras in the SuTRAPItAKA, to avadAnas that circulated either individually or in avadAna collections. These stories typically illustrate the results of both good and bad KARMAN, i.e., past events that led to present circumstances; in certain cases, however, they also depict present events that lead to a prediction (VYAKARAnA) of high spiritual attainment in the future. AvadAnas are closely related to JATAKAs, or birth stories of the Buddha; indeed, some scholars have considered jAtakas to be a subset of the avadAna genre, and some jAtaka tales are also included in the AVADANAsATAKA, an early avadAna collection. AvadAnas typically exhibit a three-part narrative structure, with a story of the present, followed by a story of past action (karman), which is then connected by identifying the past actor as a prior incarnation of the main character in the narrative present. In contrast to the jAtakas, however, the main character in an avadAna is generally not the Buddha (an exception is Ksemendra's eleventh-century BodhisattvAvadAnakalpalatA) but rather someone who is or becomes his follower. Moreover, some avadAnas are related by narrators other than the Buddha, such as those of the AsOKAVADANA, which are narrated by UPAGUPTA. Although the avadAna genre was once dismissed as "edifying stories" for the masses, the frequent references to monks as listeners and the directives to monks on how to practice that are embedded in these tales make it clear that the primary audience was monastics. Some of the notations appended to the stories in sura's [alt. Aryasura; c. second century CE] JATAKAMALA suggest that such stories were also used secondarily for lay audiences. On the Indian mainland, both mainstream and MAHAYANA monks compiled avadAna collections. Some of the avadAnas from northwestern India have been traced from kernel stories in the MuLASARVASTIVADA VINAYA via other mainstream Buddhist versions. In his French translation of the AvadAnasataka, Feer documented a number of tales from earlier mainstream collections, such as the AvadAnasataka, which were reworked and expanded in later MahAyAna collections, such as the RatnAvadAnamAlA and the KalpadrumAvadAnamAlA, which attests to the durability and popularity of the genre. Generally speaking, the earlier mainstream avadAnas were prose works, while the later MahAyAna collections were composed largely in verse.

Aversion Therapy ::: A type of behavioral treatment where an aversive stimuli is paired with a negative behavior in hopes that the behavior will change in the future to avoid the aversive stimuli.

Avesa. (T. 'bebs pa; C. aweishe; J. abisha; K. amisa 阿尾捨). In Sanskrit, "possession"; the possession of shamans and mediums by a spirit or divinity so they could serve as oracles. Specific rites are outlined in esoteric Buddhist materials to incite possession in young children of usually seven or eight years of age; once the children began to shake from their inhabitation by the possessing deity, they would be asked a series of questions regarding portents for the future. In China, the tantric master VAJRABODHI was said to have used two seven-year-old girls as oracles in the palace, who were claimed to have been possessed by two deceased princesses. In Tibet, some of the bodies (rten, sku rten) through which an oracle (lha) speaks attained considerable importance in the religious and even political affairs of the state; among them the GNAS CHUNG (Nechung) oracle, said to be the pre-Buddhist spirit PE HAR, who was tamed by PADMASAMBHAVA and tasked with protecting the Buddha's teaching, has the status of state oracle.

Ayalon-Nusseibeh Proposal ::: Plan proposed by Israeli Ami Ayalon (former head of the Shabak- the Israeli internal security agency), and Palestinian Sari Nusseibeh (President of Al Quds University) in 2003 during the Second Intifada. The proposal called for: two states based on the pre-1967 borders, all border modifications to be based on equal territorial concessions, the West Bank and Gaza to be demilitarized and connected, all Jews to be removed from the territory that would become the future Palestinian state, Jerusalem to be an open city and the joint capital with neither side in charge of holy sites, Palestinian refugees to be allowed to return only to the Palestinian state, an international fund to be set up to provide for Palestinian refugees, and a cessation of all violence.

babel ::: “The legend of the Tower of Babel speaks of the diversity of tongues as a curse laid on the race; but whatever its disadvantages, and they tend more and more to be minimised by the growth of civilisation and increasing intercourse, it has been rather a blessing than a curse, a gift to mankind rather than a disability laid upon it. The purposeless exaggeration of anything is always an evil, and an excessive pullulation of varying tongues that serve no purpose in the expression of a real diversity of spirit and culture is certainly a stumbling-block rather than a help: but this excess, though it existed in the past, is hardly a possibility of the future. The tendency is rather in the opposite direction. In former times diversity of language helped to create a barrier to knowledge and sympathy, was often made the pretext even of an actual antipathy and tended to a too rigid division. The lack of sufficient interpenetration kept up both a passive want of understanding and a fruitful crop of active misunderstandings. But this was an inevitable evil of a particular stage of growth, an exaggeration of the necessity that then existed for the vigorous development of strongly individualised group-souls in the human race. These disadvantages have not yet been abolished, but with closer intercourse and the growing desire of men and nations for the knowledge of each other’s thought and spirit and personality, they have diminished and tend to diminish more and more and there is no reason why in the end they should not become inoperative.” The Human Cycle

babel ::: "The reference is to the mythological story of the construction of the Tower of Babel, which appears to be an attempt to explain the diversity of human languages. According to Genesis, the Babylonians wanted to make a name for themselves by building a mighty city and tower ‘with its top in the heavens". God disrupted the work by so confusing the language of the workers that they could no longer understand one another. The tower was never completed and the people were dispersed over the face of the earth.” (Encyclopaedia Britannica) Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works     Sri Aurobindo: "The legend of the Tower of Babel speaks of the diversity of tongues as a curse laid on the race; but whatever its disadvantages, and they tend more and more to be minimised by the growth of civilisation and increasing intercourse, it has been rather a blessing than a curse, a gift to mankind rather than a disability laid upon it. The purposeless exaggeration of anything is always an evil, and an excessive pullulation of varying tongues that serve no purpose in the expression of a real diversity of spirit and culture is certainly a stumbling-block rather than a help: but this excess, though it existed in the past, is hardly a possibility of the future. The tendency is rather in the opposite direction. In former times diversity of language helped to create a barrier to knowledge and sympathy, was often made the pretext even of an actual antipathy and tended to a too rigid division. The lack of sufficient interpenetration kept up both a passive want of understanding and a fruitful crop of active misunderstandings. But this was an inevitable evil of a particular stage of growth, an exaggeration of the necessity that then existed for the vigorous development of strongly individualised group-souls in the human race. These disadvantages have not yet been abolished, but with closer intercourse and the growing desire of men and nations for the knowledge of each other"s thought and spirit and personality, they have diminished and tend to diminish more and more and there is no reason why in the end they should not become inoperative.” The Human Cycle

Bailian jiao. (白蓮教). In Chinese, "White Lotus teachings." As with the BAILIAN SHE, this name was used frequently during the Ming dynasty to refer pejoratively to various religious teachings and magical techniques deemed heretical or traitorous by local officials and Buddhist leaders. No specific religious group, however, seems to coincide precisely with this appellation. The White Lotus teachings are nonetheless often associated with millenarian movements that began to appear during the Mongol Yuan dynasty. Religious groups associated with these movements compiled their own scriptures, known as "precious scrolls" (BAOJUAN), which spoke of the future buddha MAITREYA and the worship of Wusheng Laomu ("Eternal Venerable Mother").

Bailian she. (J. Byakurensha; K. Paengnyonsa 白蓮社). In Chinese, "White Lotus Society." In the late fourth and early fifth centuries, the Chinese monk LUSHAN HUIYUAN assembled a group of 123 monks and laymen on LUSHAN and contemplated the image of the buddha AMITABHA; this group came to be known as the White Lotus Society. This name was also used by putatively heterodox lay Buddhist organizations that flourished during the Tang, Song, and early Yuan dynasties, as well as by monks mainly associated with the TIANTAI school. Inspired by Huiyuan's White Lotus Society and the repentance rituals of the Tiantai school, Mao Ziyuan (c. 1086-1166) constructed halls for repentance called White Lotus repentance halls and promoted the practice of NIANFO (see BUDDHANUSMṚTI) as a means of maintaining the five moral precepts (PANCAsĪLA). Mao Ziyuan's White Lotus Society was further popularized by the monk Pudu (1255-1330), who compiled an influential treatise known as the Lushan lianzong baojian ("Precious Mirror of the Lotus Tradition at Mt. Lu"). Despite ongoing governmental suppression, he and many other lay followers established cloisters and worship halls all over the country. There seems to be little if any connection between these later organizations and that of Lushan Huiyuan. These lay organizations primarily focused on the recitation of the name of AmitAbha in hopes of ensuring rebirth in his PURE LAND. During the early Ming, the name White Lotus Society was frequently associated with rebellious millenarian movements that worshipped the future buddha MAITREYA, which prompted the Ming government to ban any use of the name. Another more common name for these millenarian movements was BAILIAN JIAO. White Lotus societies also flourished in Korea during the Koryo dynasty, where they were called Paengnyon kyolsa (White Lotus retreat societies). Especially well known was the White Lotus Society (Paengnyonsa) established at Mandoksa in 1211 by WoNMYO YOSE (1163-1240), the mid-Koryo revitalizer of the Korean CH'oNT'AE (TIANTAI) tradition and a colleague of POJO CHINUL. See also JIESHE.

baojuan. (寶巻). In Chinese, "precious scrolls" or "treasure scrolls"; a genre of scripture produced mainly by popular religious sects with Buddhist orientations during the Ming and Qing dynasties. The baojuan are believed to have been divinely revealed to select beings who often became the leaders of these new religious movements (see also T. GTER MA). The earliest extant baojuan, which focuses on the worship of MAITREYA, the future buddha, is dated 1430, shortly after the fall of the Yuan dynasty. Lo Qing (1442-1527), a lay Buddhist, founded the Wuwei jiao ("Teachings of Noninterference"), for instance, for which he produced "five books and six volumes" of baojuan. Precious scrolls seem to share certain mythological elements, such as a new cosmogony of both the creation and demise of the world. Many of them also expound a new soteriology based on CHAN meditation and Daoist alchemy. The baojuan genre seems to be an evolutionary development from the earlier Buddhist vernacular narrative known as "transformation texts" (BIANWEN). Like bianwen, the baojuan were also employed for both popular entertainment and religious propagation.

beauty ::: “Beauty is the special divine Manifestation in the physical as Truth is in the Mind, Love in the heart, Power in the vital.” The Future Poetry

   "Beauty is Ananda taking form — but the form need not be a physical shape. One speaks of a beautiful thought, a beautiful act, a beautiful soul. What we speak of as beauty is Ananda in manifestation; beyond manifestation beauty loses itself in Ananda or, you may say, beauty and Ananda become indistinguishably one.” The Future Poetry

“Beauty is Ananda taking form—but the form need not be a physical shape. One speaks of a beautiful thought, a beautiful act, a beautiful soul. What we speak of as beauty is Ananda in manifestation; beyond manifestation beauty loses itself in Ananda or, you may say, beauty and Ananda become indistinguishably one.” The Future Poetry

"Beauty is not the same as Delight, but like love it is an expression, a form of Ananda, created by Ananda and composed of Ananda.” The Future Poetry

“Beauty is not the same as Delight, but like love it is an expression, a form of Ananda, created by Ananda and composed of Ananda.” The Future Poetry

   "Beauty is the way in which the physical expresses the Divine – but the principle and law of Beauty is something inward and spiritual and expresses itself through the form.” *The Future Poetry

“Beauty is the way in which the physical expresses the Divine—but the principle and law of Beauty is something inward and spiritual and expresses itself through the form.” The Future Poetry

belomancy ::: n. --> A kind of divination anciently practiced by means of marked arrows drawn at random from a bag or quiver, the marks on the arrows drawn being supposed to foreshow the future.

BeOS ::: (operating system) The operating system originally designed to run on the BeBox microcomputer. BeOS is good at both multitasking and real-time operation. a GUI front end (not X). A C++ compiler is supplied with the machine, and there are rumours of other languages being ported in the future.BeOs eventually became used on the x86 and standard PPC.Be, Inc. went bankrupt in 1999, after releasing the last upgrade of BeOS (R5.0.3), and was sold to Palm.Several groups are currently (2003) attempting to create an R6 version of the OS. The most likely to succeed are Yellowtab and OpenBeOS, which is likely to be renamed.(2003-05-30)

BeOS "operating system" The {operating system} originally designed to run on the {BeBox} {microcomputer}. BeOS is good at both {multitasking} and {real-time} operation. It has a {bash} command shell, with ports of many {GNU} programs by Be, Inc. It has a {GUI} front end (not {X}). A {C++} {compiler} is supplied with the machine, and there are rumours of other languages being ported in the future. BeOs eventually became used on the {x86} and standard {PPC}. Be, Inc. went bankrupt in 1999, after releasing the last upgrade of BeOS (R5.0.3), and was sold to {Palm}. Several groups are currently (2003) attempting to create an R6 version of the OS. The most likely to succeed are {Yellowtab} and {OpenBeOS}, which is likely to be renamed. (2003-05-30)

Bhaddekarattasutta. In PAli, "The Ideal Lover of Solitude," the 131st sutra in the MAJJHIMANIKAYA (there is no corresponding version in the Chinese translations of the AGAMAs); spoken at Jeta's Grove in SAvatthi (sRAVASTĪ); several related DHARMAGUPTAKA recensions appear in the Chinese translation of the MADHYAMAGAMA, although none with a corresponding title. The Buddha recites an enigmatic verse, in which he defines ideal solitude as letting go of everything involving the past or the future and dwelling solely in the present moment, discerning phenomena with wisdom as they appear. In his own exposition of the meaning of his verses, the Buddha explains that tracing back the past means not so much remembering the past but rather binding oneself to one's past aggregates (SKANDHA) through delighting in them; similarly, yearning for the future means the desire to have one's aggregates appear a certain way in the future. Instead, the religious should not identify with any of the five skandhas as being oneself; such a one is called an "ideal lover of solitude." The MajjhimanikAya collects subsequent expositions of these same verses by the Buddha's attendant ANANDA, MahAkaccAna (MAHAKATYAYANA), and Lomasakangiya. The term bhaddekaratta has given traditional PAli commentators difficulties and has sometimes been interpreted to mean "one who is happy [viz., auspicious?] for one night" (bhaddakassa ekarattassa) because he possesses insight, an interpretation that has its analogues in the Chinese translation of the Sanskrit title BHADRAKARATRĪ as shanye (a good night).

bhayatupatthAnANAna. In PAli, "knowledge arising from the awareness of terror"; according to the VISUDDHIMAGGA, the third of nine knowledges (NAna; JNANA) cultivated as part of "purity of knowledge and vision of progress along the path" (PAtIPADANAnADASSANAVISUDDHI). This latter category, in turn, constitutes the sixth and penultimate purity (VISUDDHI) to be developed along the path to liberation. Knowledge arising from the contemplation of terror is developed by noting how all conditioned formations (sankhAra; SAMSKARA) or mental and physical phenomena (NAMARuPA) of the past, present and future have either gone, are going, or are destined to go to destruction. A simile given in the Visuddhimagga is that of a woman whose three sons have offended the king. The woman, who has already witnessed the beheading of her eldest son, witnesses the beheading of her middle son. And having witnessed the beheadings of her two older sons, the woman is filled with terror at the knowledge that her youngest son will likewise be executed. In the same way, the practitioner observes how phenomena of the past have ceased, how phenomena of the present are ceasing, and how those of the future are likewise destined to cease. Seeing conditioned formations as destined to destruction in this way, that is, as impermanent (anicca; ANITYA), the practitioner is filled with terror. Similarly, the practitioner sees conditioned formations as suffering (dukkha; DUḤKHA), and as impersonal and nonself (anattA; ANATMAN) and is filled with terror. In this way, the practitioner comes to realize that all mental and physical phenomena, being characterized by the three universal marks of existence (tilakkhana; TRILAKsAnA), are frightful.

bhumisparsamudrA. (T. sa gnon gyi phyag rgya; C. chudi yin; J. sokujiin; K. ch'okchi in 觸地印). In Sanskrit, "gesture of touching the earth"; this MUDRA is formed by the right hand touching the ground with extended fingers, usually across the right knee, while the left hand remains resting in the lap. It is the most common mudrA depicted in seated images of sAKYAMUNI Buddha. The bhumisparsamudrA recalls a specific moment in sAkyamuni's biography. After MARA had sought to dislodge the future buddha from his seat under the BODHI TREE by attacking him with his minions and seducing him with his daughters, he ultimately tried to cause the Buddha to move by claiming that he had no right to occupy that spot. The bodhisattva then touched the earth, thereby calling on the goddess of the earth Pṛthivī or STHAVARA to bear witness to his practice of virtue over his many lifetimes on the bodhisattva path. The goddess responded affirmatively by causing the earth to quake. With that, MAra withdrew for good and the bodhisattva went on to achieve buddhahood that evening. In Southeast Asia, this scene is elaborated to include the goddess, called THORANI, emerging from the earth to wring from her hair all of the water that the Buddha had offered during his lifetimes as a BODHISATTVA. The water creates a flood that sweeps away MAra and his horde. The mudrA is also considered a gesture of immovability (acala) and is thus the mudrA associated with the buddha AKsOBHYA.

birds, knows the past and can foretell the future.”

Blyth, Reginald H. (1898-1964). An early English translator of Japanese poetry, with a particular interest in ZEN Buddhism. Blyth was born in Essex; his father was railway clerk. He was imprisoned for three years during the First World War as a conscientious objector. In 1925, he traveled to Korea, then a Japanese colony, where he taught English at Keijo University in Seoul. It was there that he developed his first interest in Zen through the priest Hanayama Taigi. After a brief trip to England, he returned to Seoul and then went to Japan, where he taught English in Kanazawa. With the outbreak of the Pacific War, Blyth was interned as an enemy alien, despite having expressed sympathy for the Japanese cause. Although he remained interned throughout the war, he was allowed to continue his studies, and in 1942 published his most famous work, Zen in English Literature and Oriental Classics, which sought to identify Zen elements in a wide range of literature. After the war, Blyth served as a liaison between the Japanese imperial household and the Allies, later becoming a professor of English at Gakushuin University, where one of his students was the future emperor Akihito (b. 1933). After the war, he published a four-volume collection of his translations of Japanese haiku poetry, which was largely responsible for European and American interest in haiku during the 1950s, among the Beat Poets and others, and the writing of haiku in languages other than Japanese. Subsequent scholarship has questioned the strong connection that Blyth saw between Zen and haiku. Blyth died in Japan and is buried in Kamakura next to his friend D. T. SUZUKI.

Boat of the Sun, Seker Boat, Hennu (Egyptian) Ḥennu. A frequent Egyptian representation is the boat in which the god Seker is seated. In its center is placed a large coffer, representing the covering of the dead body of the sun god Af or of Osiris. Oftentimes a hawk, a symbol of the sun, is represented hovering over it with outstretched wings, and the boat was said to be steered by the dead — a reference both to the spiritual power of those who have passed on to other planes and to the idea of cycles, in that the past or dead produces the present, which in its turn is both the parent and self of the future.

buddhapAda. (T. sangs rgyas kyi zhabs; C. fozu; J. bussoku; K. pulchok 佛足). In Sanskrit and PAli, lit. "the feet of the Buddha"; typically referring to "the Buddha's footprints," which became objects of religious veneration in early Buddhism. There are typically three kinds of footprints of the Buddha, all of which are treated as a type of relic (sARĪRA, DHATU). At the incipiency of the tradition, the Buddha's footprints were a popular aniconic representation of the Buddha; the oldest of these, from the BHARHUT reliquary mound (STuPA), dates to the second century BCE. The second are natural indentations in rock that are said to have been made by the Buddha's feet; an example is the Sri Lankan mountain known as srī PAda, or "Holy Foot," which is named after an impression in the rock of the mountain's summit that the Sinhalese people believe to be a footprint of GAUTAMA Buddha. Both these first and second types are concave images and are presumed to be a sign of the Buddha's former presence in a specific place. Such footprints are also often important as traditional evidence of a visit by the Buddha to a distant land. The third form of footprint are convex images carved in stone, metal, or wood (or in some cases painted), which represent the soles of the Buddha's feet in elaborate detail and are often covered with all manner of auspicious symbols. They may bear the specific physical marks (LAKsAnA) said to be present on the feet of a fully awakened being, such as having toes that are all the same length, or having dharma-wheels (DHARMACAKRA) inscribed on the soles (see MAHAPURUsALAKsAnA). In the PAli tradition, there is a practice of making buddhapAda in which the central wheel is surrounded by a retinue (parivAra) of 108 auspicious signs, called MAnGALA. Symbolically, the footprints point to the reality of the Buddha's erstwhile physical presence in our world. At the same time, the footprints also indicate his current absence and thus may encourage the observer to reflect on nonattachment. Veneration of the Buddha's footprints occurs throughout the Buddhist world but is particularly popular in Sri Lanka, Burma, and Thailand. Of his footprints, tradition reports that the Buddha said, "In the future, intelligent beings will see the scriptures and understand. Those of less intelligence will wonder whether the Buddha appeared in the world. In order to remove their doubts, I have set my footprints in stone."

BuddhavaMsa. In PAli, "The Chronicle of the Buddhas"; the fourteenth book of the KHUDDAKANIKAYA of the PAli SUTTAPItAKA. A work in verse, it contains the life histories of twenty-five buddhas, concluding with that of the historical Buddha, Gotama (S. GAUTAMA). Details of each buddha are given, such as the species of the BODHI TREE under which he sat at the time of attaining enlightenment, as well as the name that the future buddha Gotama assumed under each previous buddha. The final chapter concerns the distribution of the relics (sarīra; S. sARĪRA) of Gotama Buddha. According to TheravAda tradition, the BuddhavaMsa was preached at the request of the Buddha's disciple SAriputta (S. sARIPUTRA), following the Buddha's display of the "jeweled-walk" (ratanacankama) miracle, which is the name of the chronicle's first chapter. The MadhuratthavilAsinī is the PAli commentary to the BuddhavaMsa.

Budgetary accounting - Contrary to financial accounting, looks forward: it measures the cost of planned acquisitions and the use of economic resources in the future.

CakkavattisīhanAdasutta. (C. Zhuanlun shengwang xiuxing jing; J. Tenrinjoo shugyokyo; K. Chollyun songwang suhaeng kyong 轉輪聖王修行經). In PAli, "Discourse on the Lion's Roar of the Wheel-Turning Emperor"; the twenty-sixth sutta of the DĪGHANIKAYA (a separate DHARMAGUPTAKA recension appears as the sixth SuTRA in the Chinese translation of the DĪRGHAGAMA and a separate SarvAstivAda recension as the seventieth sutra in the Chinese translation of the MADHYAMAGAMA); the scripture is known especially for being the only sutta in the PAli canon that mentions the name of the Buddha's successor, Metteya (MAITREYA). Before a gathering of monks at the town of MAtulA in MAGADHA, the Buddha tells the story of a universal or wheel-turning monarch (cakkavattin; S. CAKRAVARTIN) named Dalhanemi, wherein he explains that righteousness and order are maintained in the world so long as kings observe their royal duties. Dalhanemi's successors, unfortunately, gradually abandoned their responsibilities, leading to immorality, strife, and the shortening of life spans from eighty thousand years to a mere ten; the sutta thus attributes the origins of evil in the world to the neglect of royal duty. Upon reaching this nadir, people finally recognize the error of their ways and begin anew to practice morality. The observance of morality leads to improved conditions, until eventually a universal monarch named Sankha appears, who will prepare the way for the advent of the future-Buddha Metteya (Maitreya).

cakravartin. (P. cakkavattin; T. 'khor lo sgyur ba'i rgyal po; C. zhuanlun wang; J. tenrin'o; K. chollyun wang 轉輪王). In Sanskrit, lit. "wheel-turning emperor" or "universal monarch"; a monarch who rules over the entire universe (CAKRAVAdA), commonly considered in Buddhism to be an ideal monarch who rules his subjects in accordance with the DHARMA. Just as with a buddha, only one cakravartin king can appear in a world system at any one time. Also like a buddha, a cakravartin is endowed with all the thirty-two major marks of a great man (MAHAPURUsALAKsAnA). Hence, when the future buddha GAUTAMA was born with these marks, seers predicted that he had two possible destinies: to become a cakravartin if he remained in the world, or a buddha if he renounced it. A cakravartin's power derives from a wheel or disc of divine attributes (CAKRA) that rolls across different realms of the earth, bringing them under his dominion. The ABHIDHARMAKOsABHAsYA lists four classes of cakravartin, depending on the basic element from which his disc is forged: (1) a suvarnacakravartin (referred to in some texts as a caturdvīpakacakravartin, or "cakravartin of four continents"), whose wheel is gold, who reigns over all the four continents of a world system (see CAKRAVAdA), and who conquers the world through the spontaneous surrender of all rival kings whose lands his wheel enters; (2) a rupyacakravartin, whose wheel is silver, who reigns over three continents (all except UTTARAKURU), and who conquers territory by merely threatening to move against his rivals; (3) a tAmracakravartin, whose wheel is copper, who reigns over two continents (JAMBUDVĪPA and VIDEHA), and who conquers territory after initiating battle with his rivals; (4) an ayascakravartin, whose wheel is iron, who reigns over one continent (Jambudvīpa only), and who conquers territory only after extended warfare with his rivals. Some texts refer to a balacakravartin or "armed cakravartin," who corresponds to the fourth category. The cakravartins discussed in the sutras typically refers to a suvarnacakravartin, who conquers the world through the sheer power of his righteousness and charisma. He possesses the ten royal qualities (rAjadharma) of charity, good conduct, nonattachment, straightforwardness, gentleness, austerity, nonanger, noninjury, patience, and tolerance. A cakravartin is also said to possess seven precious things (RATNA): a wheel (cakra), an elephant (HASTINAGA), a horse (asva), a wish-granting gem (MAnI), a woman (strī), a financial steward or treasurer (GṚHAPATI), and a counselor (parinAyaka). Various kings over the course of Asian history have been declared, or have declared themselves to be, cakravartins. The most famous is the Mauryan emperor AsOKA, whose extensive territorial conquests, coupled with his presumed support for the dharma and the SAMGHA, rendered him the ideal paradigm of Buddhist kingship.

capture-recapture sampling: A method for estimating total population (usually of animals) through 2 periods of capture (observation), assuming that the total number has reamined constant and that the probability of capture of any animal on any one visit is constant and equal. In implementing this method, a researcher captures a number of animals and mark them (or make sure that they can be identified in the future in some way) and releases them, they come back to capture a number of animals and count the proportion of animals that were captured both times. By assuming that the proportion of animals recaptured in an unbiased estimate of the proportion of animals marked in the first capture, combine this with the number of animals marked on the first visit, we can easily calculate the estimated number of the total population. In practice, it is difficult to ensure that the animal population remains constant (or roughly the same) while ensuring that the chance of recapture is truly equal amongst the population since the former requires the visits to be relatively close to each other so that the population does not change significantly and yet the latter condition requires the visits to be sufficiently space apart so that the locations of the animals are truly randomised.

caturnimitta. (P. catunimitta; T. mtshan ma bzhi; C. sixiang; J. shiso; K. sasang 四相). In Sanskrit, the "four signs," "sights," or "portents," which were the catalysts that led the future buddha SIDDHARTHA GAUTAMA to renounce the world (see PRAVRAJITA) and pursue liberation from the cycle of birth and death (SAMSARA): specifically, an old man, a diseased man, a dead man, and a religious mendicant (sRAMAnA). According to the many traditional biographies of the Buddha, eight brAhmana seers predicted at the time of his birth that, were Gautama to see all four of these portents, he would be led inexorably toward renunciation of his royal heritage. His father, sUDDHODANA, who wanted SiddhArtha to succeed him, sought to shield the prince from these sights. While distracting his son with all the sensual pleasures available in his palaces, the prince, at the age of twenty-nine, eventually became curious about the world beyond the palace and convinced his father to allow him to go out in his chariot, accompanied by the charioteer CHANDAKA. On four successive chariot rides, the prince saw an old man, a sick man, a corpse being taken to the charnel ground, and a mendicant. Gautama eventually determined to go forth (pravrajita) into homelessness after witnessing the four portents. The first three sights demonstrated to Gautama the vanity of life and the reality of suffering (DUḤKHA), and the sight of a religious mendicant provided him with the prospect of freedom of mind and a model to follow in finding a way leading to liberation. Some versions of the Buddha's biography refer only to the first three of these signs. In some versions, it is said that the four sights were not actually an old man, sick man, corpse, and mendicant, but apparitions of these created by the gods in order to spur the bodhisattva to renounce the world. In the LALITAVISTARA, it is the prince himself who creates the old man, the sick man, the corpse, and the mendicant, and then asks his charioteer who they are, pretending not to know the answer. Biographies of previous buddhas, such as VIPAsYIN, typically mention the role similar encounters played in their own renunciations.

Causa sui: Cause of itself; necessary existence. Causa sui conveys both a negative and a positive meaning. Negatively, it signifies that which is from itself (a se), that which does not owe its being to something else; i.e., absolute independence of being, causelessness (God as uncaused). Positively, causa sui means that whose very nature or essence involves existence; i.e., God is the ground of his own being, and regarded as "cause" of his own being, he is, as it were, efficient cause of his own existence (Descartes). Since existence necessarily follows from the very essence of that which is cause of itself, causa sui is defined as that whose nature cannot be conceived as not existing (Spinoza). -- A.G.A.B. Causality: (Lat. causa) The relationship between a cause and its effect. This relationship has been defined as a relation between events, processes, or entities in the same time series, such that   when one occurs, the other necessarily follows (sufficient condition),   when the latter occurs, the former must have preceded (necessary condition),   both conditions a and b prevail (necessary and sufficient condition),   when one occurs under certain conditions, the other necessarily follows (contributory, but not sufficient, condition) ("multiple causality" would be a case involving several causes which are severally contributory and jointly sufficient); the necessity in these cases is neither that of logical implication nor that of coercion; a relation between events, processes, or entities in the same time series such that when one occurs the other invariably follows (invariable antecedence), a relation between events, processes, or entities such that one has the efficacy to produce or alter the other; a relation between events, processes, or entities such that without one the other could not occur, as in the relation between   the material out of which a product is made and the finished product (material cause),   structure or form and the individual embodying it (formal cause),   a goal or purpose (whether supposed to exist in the future as a special kind of entity, outside a time series, or merely as an idea of the pur-poser) and the work fulfilling it (final cause),   a moving force and the process or result of its action (efficient cause); a relation between experienced events, processes, or entities and extra-experiential but either temporal or non-temporal events, processes, or entities upon whose existence the former depend; a relation between a thing and itself when it is dependent upon nothing else for its existence (self-causality); a relation between an event, process, or entity and the reason or explanation for its being; a relation between an idea and an experience whose expectation the idea arouses because of customary association of the two in this sequence; a principle or category introducing into experience one of the aforesaid types of order; this principle may be inherent in the mind, invented by the mind, or derived from experience; it may be an explanatory hypothesis, a postulate, a convenient fiction, or a necessary form of thought. Causality has been conceived to prevail between processes, parts of a continuous process, changing parts of an unchanging whole, objects, events, ideas, or something of one of these types and something of another. When an entity, event, or process is said to follow from another, it may be meant that it must succeed but can be neither contemporaneous with nor prior to the other, that it must either succeed or be contemporaneous with and dependent upon but cannot precede the other, or that one is dependent upon the other but they either are not in the same time series or one is in no time series at all.

Ch'oŭi Ŭisun. (草衣意恂) (1786-1866). Korean SoN master of the Choson period; also known as Ilchiam ("One-Finger Hermitage"). He received the full monastic precepts and the name Ch'oŭi from the monk Wanho Yunu (1758-1826). Ch'oŭi became Yunu's disciple, and made a name for himself as an influential Son master. Ch'oŭi is perhaps most renowned for his efforts to revitalize the art of tea in Korea. He developed the tea ceremony as a form of religious practice and is known for synthesizing the tea ceremony and Son practice, as exemplified in his slogan ta son ilmi ("tea and Son are a single taste"). Ch'oŭi also wrote several guides to growing, preparing, and drinking tea, such as the Tongdasong and the Tasin chon, which is based on the Chinese classic Wanbao quanshu. Ch'oŭi's other writings include a collection of his poetry, the Ch'oŭi shigo, and a biography of the eminent Korean monk Chinmuk Irok (1562-1633), the Chinmuk chosa yujokko. Among his writings, the Sonmun sabyon mano ("Prolix Discourse on Four Distinctive Types in the Son School") in particular played a major role in determining the future of Son discourse in Korea. The text was written as a critique of PAEKP'A KŬNGSoN's equally influential text, the Sonmun sugyong ("Hand Mirror on the Son School").

cittakasa. These may be transcriptions there or impresses of physical things, persons, scenes, happenings, whatever is, was or will be or may be in the ph^ical universe. These images are very variously seen and under all kinds of conditions ; in samadhi or in the waking stale, and in the latter with the bodily eyes closed or open, projected on or into a physical object or medium or seen as if materialised in the physical atmosphere or only in a psychical ether revealing itself through this grosser physical atmosphere ; seen through the physical eyes themselves as a secondary instrument and as if under the conditions of the physical vision or by the psychical vision alone and indepen- dently of the relations of our ordinary sight to space. The real agent is always the psychical sight and the power indicates that the consciousness is more or less awake, intermittently or nor- mally and more or less perfectly, in the psj’chical body. It is possible to see In this way the transcriptions or impressions of things at any distance beyond the range of the physical vision or the images of the past or the future.

Collective and Distributive Properties: A general term is taken in its collective sense when what is predicated of its applies to its designation as a whole, rather than to each of the individual members belonging to it; the distributive properties are those that apply only in the latter way. Colligation: (Lat. con + ligare, to bind) The assimilation of a number of separately observed facts to a unified conception or formula. The term was introduced by Whewcll who gives the eximple of the idea of an eliptical orbit which "unifies all observations made on the positions of a planet" (see Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences, I Aphorism 1). J. S. Mill appropriates the term and carefully differentiates it from induction: whereas colligation is a simple "description" of observed facts, induction is an extension to the unknown and to the future. See Logic, III, ii, § 4. -- L.W.

coming ::: p. pr & vb. n. --> of Come ::: a. --> Approaching; of the future, especially the near future; the next; as, the coming week or year; the coming exhibition.
Ready to come; complaisant; fond.


Contingent liability - Potential liability that may exist in the future depending on the outcome of a past event. Examples are an adverse tax court decision, lawsuit, and notes receivable discounted. Footnote disclosure is required of the circumstances for possible losses. Note that an estimated liability can be booked only if there is a proba­ble loss.

contract programmer "job, programming" A {programmer} who works on a fixed-length or temporary contract, and is often employed to write certain types of code or to work on a specific project. Despite the fact that contractors usually cost more than hiring a permanent employee with the same skills, it is common for organisations to employ them for extended periods, sometimes renewing their contracts for many years, due to lack of certainty about the future or simple lack of planning. A contract programmer may be independent or they may work in a supplier's {professional services} department, providing consultancy and programming services for the supplier's products. (2015-03-07)

Cryonics - the low-temperature preservation of humans who cannot be sustained by contemporary medicine, with the hope that healing and resuscitation may be possible in the future.

CuladhammasamAdAnasutta. (C. Shoufa jing; J. Juhokyo; K. Subop kyong 受法經). In PAli, "Shorter Discourse on Undertaking the Dharma"; the forty-fifth sutta of the MAJJHIMANIKAYA (a separate SARVASTIVADA recension appears as the 174th sutra in the Chinese translation of the MADHYAMAGAMA); preached by the Buddha to a gathering of monks in the JETAVANA Grove at SAvatthi (S. sRAVASTĪ). The Buddha describes four ways of undertaking things in this life and the good and bad consequences that accrue to one who follows these ways. The first way is to live happily in the present, but suffer a painful consequence in the future, e.g., when a person wantonly indulges in sensual pleasures in the present life and, as a result, is reborn into a woeful state later. The second way is to live a painful existence in the present, and suffer a painful consequence in the future; this is the case with ascetics who mortify their flesh only to be reborn in a woeful state. The third way is to live a painful existence in the present, but enjoy a happy consequence in the future; this is the case with a person who suffers in this life due to greed, hatred, and delusion but nevertheless strives to lead a blameless life and is consequently reborn in a happy existence as a human or lesser divinity (DEVA). The fourth way is to live happily in the present, and enjoy a happy consequence, as is the case with a person who cultivates the meditative absorptions (JHANA; S. DHYANA); he is happy in the present life and is rewarded with a happy rebirth as a BRAHMA divinity. An expanded version of this sermon is found in the MAHADHAMMASAMADANASUTTA, or "Longer Discourse on Undertaking the Dharma," also contained in the MajjhimanikAya.

cyberpunk /si:'ber-puhnk/ (Originally coined by SF writer Bruce Bethke and/or editor Gardner Dozois) A subgenre of SF launched in 1982 by William Gibson's epoch-making novel "Neuromancer" (though its roots go back through Vernor Vinge's "True Names" to John Brunner's 1975 novel "The Shockwave Rider"). Gibson's near-total ignorance of computers and the present-day hacker culture enabled him to speculate about the role of computers and hackers in the future in ways hackers have since found both irritatingly na"ive and tremendously stimulating. Gibson's work was widely imitated, in particular by the short-lived but innovative "Max Headroom" TV series. See {cyberspace}, {ice}, {jack in}, {go flatline}. Since 1990 or so, popular culture has included a movement or fashion trend that calls itself "cyberpunk", associated especially with the rave/techno subculture. Hackers have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, self-described cyberpunks too often seem to be shallow trendoids in black leather who have substituted enthusiastic blathering about technology for actually learning and *doing* it. Attitude is no substitute for competence. On the other hand, at least cyberpunks are excited about the right things and properly respectful of hacking talent in those who have it. The general consensus is to tolerate them politely in hopes that they'll attract people who grow into being true hackers. [{Jargon File}]

cyutyupapattijNAna. [alt. cyutyupapAdAnusmṛti] (P. cutupapAtaNAna; T. 'chi 'pho ba dang skye ba rjes su dran pa; C. shengsizhi; J. shojichi; K. saengsaji 生死智). In Sanskrit, lit., "recollection of the disappearance [in one life] and rebirth [in another]," viz., "insight into the future rebirth destinies" of all other beings, a by-product of the "divine eye" (DIVYACAKsUS), or clairvoyance, and the second of the "three knowledges" (TRIVIDYA). This recollection comes as a by-product of the enlightenment experience of a "worthy one" (ARHAT), and is an insight achieved by the Buddha during the second watch of the night of his own enlightenment. Through his enlightenment, the adept realizes not only that himself and all beings have been governed by the association between past actions (KARMAN) and their fruitions (VIPAKA) throughout all their past lives; but through this insight, he also realizes that all other beings continue to be governed by their actions, and he is able to observe where beings will be reborn in the future as well. Specifically, one who possesses this insight sees the disappearance and arising of beings as low or noble, beautiful or ugly, etc., according to their good and evil deeds (KARMAN) performed through body, speech, and mind. Those who revile the noble ones (ARYAPUDGALA), hold perverse views (MITHYADṚstI), and act in accordance with perverse views are observed to be reborn in lower realms of existence, e.g., in baleful destinies (APAYA; DURGATI) such as the hells. Those who honor the noble ones, hold right views, and act in accordance with right views are observed to be reborn in higher realms of existence, e.g., in pleasant destinies such as the heavens. This ability is also listed as one of the superknowledges (ABHIJNA).

damnation ::: n. --> The state of being damned; condemnation; openly expressed disapprobation.
Condemnation to everlasting punishment in the future state, or the punishment itself.
A sin deserving of everlasting punishment.


damn ::: v. t. --> To condemn; to declare guilty; to doom; to adjudge to punishment; to sentence; to censure.
To doom to punishment in the future world; to consign to perdition; to curse.
To condemn as bad or displeasing, by open expression, as by denuciation, hissing, hooting, etc. ::: v. i.


dAna. (T. sbyin pa; C. bushi; J. fuse; K. posi 布施). In Sanskrit and PAli, "giving," "generosity," or "charity"; one of the most highly praised of virtues in Buddhism and the foundational practice of the Buddhist laity, presumably because of its value in weaning the layperson from attachment to material possessions while providing essential material support to the SAMGHA. It is the chief cause of prosperity in future lives and rebirth as a divinity (DEVA) in one of the heavens of the sensuous realm (KAMADHATU). There are numerous stories in the AVADANA and JATAKA literatures that illustrate the virtues of giving, the most famous being that of Prince VisvaMtara (P. VESSANTARA), whose generosity was so profound that he gave away not only all his worldly possessions but even his wife and children. In other stories, BODHISATTVAs often give away their body or parts of their body (see DEHADANA; SHESHEN). The immediate karmic result of the practice of giving is said to be wealth in the future, especially as a divinity in one of the heavens. Giving, especially to the SAMGHA, is presumed to generate merit (PUnYA) that will accrue to the benefit of the donor in both this and future lifetimes; indeed, giving is the first in a standard list of meritorious acts, along with morality (sĪLA) and religious development (BHAVANA). In the "graduated discourse" (S. ANUPuRVIKATHA; P. ANUPUBBIKATHA) that the Buddha commonly used in instructing the laity, the discourse on giving (dAnakathA) was even more fundamental than the succeeding discourses on right conduct (sīlakathA) and the joys of rebirth in the heavens (svargakathA). Eight items are typically presumed to make appropriate offerings: food, water, clothing, vehicles, garlands, perfume, beds and dwellings, and lights. In yet another enumeration, there are three kinds of dAna: the "gift of material goods" (AMIsADANA); the gift of fearlessness (ABHAYADANA), and the "gift of the dharma" (DHARMADANA). Of all gifts, however, the greatest was said to be the "gift of the dharma" (dharmadAna), viz., spiritual instruction that will lead not just to better rebirths but to liberation from SAMSARA; it is this gift that the saMgha offers reciprocally to the laity. In MAHAYANA soteriology, giving is listed as the first of the six perfections (PARAMITA) cultivated on the bodhisattva path (see DANAPARAMITA). According to the PAli tradition, dAna is the first of ten perfections (P. pAramī). In some schools, a being who is incapable of even the modicum of detachment that is required to donate one's possessions through charity is thought to have eradicated his wholesome spiritual faculties (SAMUCCHINNAKUsALAMuLA; see also ICCHANTIKA) and to have lost for an indeterminate period any prospect of enlightenment.

Déjà vu: French for already seen. The feeling that one has seen somebody or something in the past, even though knowing that he could never have actually. The phenomenon is variously explained by occultists as memory from a previous incarnation, a “memory of the future,” etc. The term is extended to apply also to such feelings of familiarity with words or sounds (properly déjà entendu, “already heard”), etc.

::: "Delight is the soul of existence, beauty the intense expression, the concentrated form of delight.” The Future Poetry*

“Delight is the soul of existence, beauty the intense expression, the concentrated form of delight.” The Future Poetry

Delphic oracle: The famous oracle in ancient Greece, where the seeress Pythia, in a state of trance, answered questions about the future.

destine ::: v. t. --> To determine the future condition or application of; to set apart by design for a future use or purpose; to fix, as by destiny or by an authoritative decree; to doom; to ordain or preordain; to appoint; -- often with the remoter object preceded by to or for.

destiny ::: “Destiny in the rigid sense applies only to the outer being so long as it lives in the Ignorance. What we call destiny is only in fact the result of the present condition of the being and the nature and energies it has accumulated in the past acting on each other and determining the present attempts and their future results. But as soon as one enters the path of spiritual life, this old predetermined destiny begins to recede. There comes in a new factor, the Divine Grace, the help of a higher Divine Force other than the force of Karma, which can lift the sadhak beyond the present possibilities of his nature. One’s spiritual destiny is then the divine election which ensures the future.” Letters on Yoga

destiny ::: n. --> That to which any person or thing is destined; predetermined state; condition foreordained by the Divine or by human will; fate; lot; doom.
The fixed order of things; invincible necessity; fate; a resistless power or agency conceived of as determining the future, whether in general or of an individual.


Dga' ldan. (Ganden). The Tibetan translation of the Sanskrit TUsITA, the joyous, or contented, heaven (see DEVA), which is the abode of the future buddha MAITREYA. ¶ The short name for Dga' ldan rnam rgyal gling (Ganden Namgyal Ling), one of the three chief monasteries (known as the GDAN SA GSUM or "three seats") of the DGE LUGS sect of Tibetan Buddhism and one of the sect's principal monasteries, located twenty-eight miles (forty-five kilometers) east of LHA SA. Named after the tusita heaven, the monastery was established by the Dge lugs founder TSONG KHA PA in 1409 near a hill originally associated with the consecration rituals performed after the birth of the king SRONG BTSAN SGAM PO. A nearby ridge was the favored picnic ground of the king's royal wives. According to legend, the JO BO statue of Lha sa's JO KHANG temple miraculously confirmed the location's significance to Tsong kha pa. The great assembly hall was added in 1417, followed by the two colleges, Byang rtse (Jangtse) and Shar rtse (Shartse). Tsong kha pa died at Dga' ldan in 1419 and was entombed there in a STuPA. Following Tsong kha pa's death, the abbacy passed to two of his foremost disciples, first, RGYAL TSHAB DAR MA RIN CHEN, then twelve years later to MKHAS GRUB DGE LEGS DPAL BZANG. Thus, the tradition of the DGA' LDAN KHRI PA or Throne Holder of Dga' ldan was established. Because Dga' ldan was the seat of Tsong kha pa and his two chief disciples, his followers were initially called Dga' ldan pa'i lugs, "the system of Dga' ldan." This was shortened to Dga' lugs and eventually to Dge lugs. Dga' ldan monastery was traditionally said to have 3,300 monks, although over the course of its history it often housed twice that number, forming a vast monastic complex. It was completely destroyed by the Chinese in the 1960s but has since been partially rebuilt. It has also been reestablished in exile in southern India.

digital dashboard "software" A personalised desktop {portal} that focuses on {business intelligence} and {knowledge management}. {Microsoft}'s version has a launch screen including stock quotes, voice mail and e-mail messages, a calendar, a weather forecast, traffic information, access to news feeds, customer and sales data, and Internet conferences. A digital dashboard might previously have been thought of as an executive information system. In the future, digital dashboards could be available on {personal digital assistants} and mobile phones. ["Gates pitches 'digital dashboards' to bevy of top CEOs", Bob Trott, pub. InfoWorld Electric, 1999-05-19]. (1999-09-14)

digital dashboard ::: (software) A personalised desktop portal that focuses on business intelligence and knowledge management.Microsoft's version has a launch screen including stock quotes, voice mail and e-mail messages, a calendar, a weather forecast, traffic information, access to system. In the future, digital dashboards could be available on personal digital assistants and cellular phones.[Gates pitches 'digital dashboards' to bevy of top CEOs, Bob Trott, pub. InfoWorld Electric, 1999-05-19]. (1999-09-14)

Digital immortality - (or "virtual immortality", or "immortality in silico") is storing a person's personality in a more durable media, i.e., a computer, and allowing it to communicate with people in the future. See /r/Digital_Immortality

Divination: The use of occult, esoteric or spiritualistic means, skill or practices for gaining knowledge of the unknown or of the future.

Dorzhiev, Agvan. (T. Ngag dbang rdo rje) (1854-1938). Influential Mongol-Russian monk in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition; born in the Siberian region of Buryatia to a semi-nomadic Buddhist family. As a child, Dorzhiev was introduced to Buddhism at the monastery at Atsagat, receiving his first tantric empowerment (ABHIsEKA) at the age of thirteen. He continued his education in Urga after his father died in 1868, at which time there were thirteen thousand monks in the city. For a time he was married to a woman named Kholintsog and worked in the local government. In 1873, he began his first journey to LHA SA and spent a few months in eastern China. Because of his linguistic and academic prowess, he was sent to 'BRAS SPUNGS monastery, where he became a scholar at Sgo mang (Gomang) College. In 1880, he settled in Lha sa, and rapidly completed his DGE BSHES degree. By 1888, he was teaching logic, debate, and language at 'Bras spungs. At this time, the thirteenth DALAI LAMA was twelve or thirteen years old, and Dorzhiev became one of his religious teachers and political advisors. Dorzhiev displayed great ability in political diplomacy and served as the only emissary between Russia and Tibet for many years. He feared that British influence in Tibet could be detrimental to the future of the country, and advised the Dalai Lama to initiate relations between Lha sa and St. Petersburg as a counter. In 1898, Prince Ukhtomsky summoned him to St. Petersburg, where he met with Tsar Nicholas II. From there, he traveled to Paris, where he lectured on Buddhism at the Musée Guimet. He then went to Kalmykia and Buryatia before returning to Lha sa. Dorzhiev sought to improve the quality of Buddhist practice in Russia, specifically in Buryatia and Kalmykia, where he opened monasteries, initiated monks, and opened a school for Tibetan Buddhist doctors. In 1915 he opened a temple and monastery in St. Petersburg, the first in the West. Dorzhiev was arrested at the onset of the "Red Terror" of 1918, but was soon released. Buddhism remained comparatively inviolable over the next decade, although other Russian religions suffered. Dorzhiev wrote his memoirs in Tibetan around 1924. In 1922, an "All-Buryat Buddhist Congress" was held, followed by a 1927 "Congress of Soviet Buddhists" in Moscow. Russian Buddhism entered a bleak period after the death of Lenin in 1924; in 1930, an antireligion campaign began in Buryatia, during which the aged Dorzhiev was placed under house arrest. He wrote his will in 1937, at which time he left house arrest in Leningrad and traveled to Ulan Udé, Buryatia. In Ulan Udé, he was arrested and interrogated before being sent to the prison hospital, where he died in January of 1938.

Dpal ldan lha mo. (S. srīdevī). In Tibetan, "Glorious Goddess"; a literal translation of the Sanskrit name for a form of a female divinity ubiquitous in the northeast and mountainous regions of the Indian subcontinent. In her usual form, she has one face, is wrathful, holds a kadga (sword) and KAPĀLA (skull cup), and rides a barren mule above a churning ocean of blood. The mule has an eye in his rump, caused by an arrow shot by her husband after she killed their son and used his skin as a saddle. She is found in the retinue (parivāra) of the Sarvavighnavināyaka (Obstacle-Removing) MAHĀKĀLA, but as a central figure she is surrounded by a large retinue that includes the goddesses Ākāsāmbarā, Svayambhu-rājNī, and Nīlesvarī. She is always a supramundane (LOKOTTARA) being and is considered to be a protector of all Tibet; in this role she is seen as a wrathful form of TĀRĀ. In the DGE LUGS sect, she is an important protector, particularly as the main protectress of the DALAI LAMAS; she is propitiated daily in rituals and a THANG KA of her is always kept in the presence of the Dalai Lama. Each Dalai Lama would try to visit her sacred lake, LHA MO BLA MTSHO, at least once during his life to receive visions on the water's surface regarding his future activities and death, a tradition said to date back to the first Dalai Lama, DGE 'DUN GRUB. The lake is also believed to display signs concerning the future rebirth of the Dalai Lama and PAn CHEN LF. Most recently, in 1933 the regent of Tibet, Rwa sgreng Rin po che, saw visions in the lake that indicated the birthplace and circumstances of the fourteenth Dalai Lama. At Tibetan Buddhist temples, long lines of ordinary people are often seen at the chapel of Dpal ldan lha mo carrying small bottles of chang (barley beer) or black tea as offerings for her.

Dung dkar. (Dungkar). A valley in western Tibet (Mnga' ris) about thirty kilometers from THO LING with 1,150 caves, most of which were used as dwellings but twenty of which are cave temples with mural paintings. The area appears to have become the capital of the Pu rang GU GE kingdom at the beginning of the twelfth century, and the cave temples with mural paintings and mud sculptures were probably founded by the descendents of the Gu ge royal family during that period. Of the three main caves, the most important has statues of the seven buddhas of the past (SAPTATATHĀGATA) and the future buddha MAITREYA, a ceiling mural of the VAJRADHĀTU MAndALA, and walls covered with bodhisattvas. Another has a GUHYASAMĀJA MAndALA, suggesting development at a later period. The caves have been documented a number of times, first by GIUSEPPE TUCCI in the 1930s.

dynamic ::: same as tapomaya; (in 1919) having the nature of dynamic gnosis or pragmatic ideality, which gives "the tapas of the future, the will at work now and hereafter for effectuation".

Economic_forecasting ::: is the process of attempting to predict the future condition of the economy using a combination of important and widely followed indicators. Economic forecasting typically tries to come up with a future gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate, involving the building of statistical models with inputs of several key variables, or indicators. Some of the primary economic indicators include inflation, interest rates, industrial production, consumer confidence, worker productivity, retail sales and unemployment rates, to name several.

elderfuthark ::: Elder Futhark The Elder Futhark is the oldest of the runic alphabets, and consists of three sets of eight letters. The primary characteristic distinguishing runic alphabets from others is that each letter, or rune, has a specific meaning. Although runecasting is classed as 'divination', a runecaster does not see, or even attempt to see into the future. Instead, he/she examines the cause and effect and points out a probable outcome. Odin, the Norse God, supposedly hung upside down for nine days in order to gain 'the wisdom of the runes'.

emanations of God. The future extermination of

Epigenesis [from Greek epi upon + genesis production] A biological theory of generation which holds that the embryo is created from the original germinal elements by a process of gradual evolution, i.e., by a passage from a relatively homogeneous condition to a specialized condition through a process of differentiation. This replaced the older idea of encasement according to which the future organism existed entire, but of microscopic dimensions, within the ovum, and was afterwards merely enlarged; and it also replaced the idea that the organism was formed by a relatively sudden accretion of parts derived from the corresponding organs in the parents. It thus accommodated embryology to the modern theory of evolution. It is open to the objections that by attempting to view growth as a purely physical process, development is made to appear as a process of accretion or adding together, instead of as a process of unfolding; and suggests the notion that something entirely new can be formed by such an additive process. But nothing can be formed unless it has previously existed in entirety, though on a subtler plane of materiality; and the coming together of physical elements is merely the filling in of a plan that has already been sketched. The astral prototype of the physical organism, seeking incarnation, draws together the physical elements required, using the procreative processes as a means. The older theory of encasement contains as much truth as the epigenesis theory, though distorted by a too physical and theological view of the process. See also EMBRYO

Equated with Living Fire as “a figure of speech to denote deity, the ‘One’ life. A theurgic term, used later by the Rosicrucians. The symbol of the living fire is the sun, certain of whose rays develope the fire of life in a diseased body, impart the knowledge of the future to the sluggish mind, and stimulate to active function a certain psychic and generally dormant faculty in man” (TG 119).

ESOTERIC HISTORY AFTER 1875 The instrument the planetary hierarchy had chosen for the task of publicizing the knowledge which had been kept secret since Atlantis was H. P. Blavatsky (1831-1891). Blavatsky was enjoined not to give out any esoteric facts without special permission in each individual case. She was not to mention anything about the planetary hierarchy.

The truth, or the knowledge of reality, is only to be given gradually, with sparing facts, to a mankind unprepared to receive it. It is necessary to find connections to established fictions of which people have heard enough for them to believe that they comprehend what it all is about. A new, revolutionary system of ideas would be rejected off hand as a mere fantastic invention. It could not be comprehended, let alone understood, without careful preparation.

The most important reason, which probably only esotericians are able to understand, is the fact of the dynamic energy of ideas.

Once the esoteric knowledge was permitted to be published there was no longer any need of initiation into the old knowledge orders, nobody having been initiated into anyone of them since 1875. Although those initiated in previous incarnations were not given the opportunity to revive all their old knowledge, enough was made known, and besides hinted at, for them to be able to discover the most essential by themselves.

The most important esoteric facts to be found in the works of Sinnett, Judge, and
Hartmann &


eternity ::: n. --> Infinite duration, without beginning in the past or end in the future; also, duration without end in the future; endless time.
Condition which begins at death; immortality.


European Computer-Industry Research Centre GmbH ::: (body) (ECRC) A joint research organisation founded in 1984 on the initiative of three major European manufacturers: Bull (France), ICL (UK) and competitive ability of the European Information Technology industry and thus complement the work of national and international bodies.The Centre is intended to be the breeding ground for those ideas, techniques and products which are essential for the future use of electronic information processing. The work of the Centre will focus on advanced information processing technology for the next generation of computers.ECRC is an independent company, owned equally by its shareholders. The formal interface between ECRC and its shareholders consists of two bodies: The supervises their execution and the Scientific Advisory Board, which advises the Shareholders' Council in determining future research directions.There are many collaborations between ECRC and its shareholders' companies on specific projects (Technology Transfer, prospective studies etc). The Centre is the member companies, and others seconded from public research agencies and universities.Seminars are held which bring together specialists from the Centre and the member companies.ECRC's mission is to pursue research in fundamental areas of computer science. The aim is to develop the theory, methodologies and tools needed to build to both fundamental research and the process of delivering the results to industry.ECRC plays an important role in Europe and is involved in several European Community initiatives. It is regularly consulted by the Commission of the research plans, international co-operation and relationships between academia and industry.Address: ECRC GmbH, Arabellastrasse 17, D-81925 Munich, Germany. .Telephone: +49 (89) 926 99 0. Fax: +49 (89) 926 99 170. (1994-12-01)

European Computer-Industry Research Centre GmbH "body" (ECRC) A joint research organisation founded in 1984 on the initiative of three major European manufacturers: {Bull} (France), {ICL} (UK) and {Siemens} (Germany). Its activities were intended to enhance the future competitive ability of the European {Information Technology} industry and thus complement the work of national and international bodies. The Centre is intended to be the breeding ground for those ideas, techniques and products which are essential for the future use of electronic information processing. The work of the Centre will focus on advanced information processing technology for the next generation of computers. ECRC is an independent company, owned equally by its shareholders. The formal interface between ECRC and its shareholders consists of two bodies: The Shareholders' Council, which approves the Centre's programmes and budgets and supervises their execution and the Scientific Advisory Board, which advises the Shareholders' Council in determining future research directions. There are many collaborations between ECRC and its shareholders' companies on specific projects (Technology Transfer, prospective studies etc). The Centre is staffed by highly qualified scientists drawn from different countries. Research staff are hired directly by ECRC, as well as some who come on assignment from the member companies, and others seconded from public research agencies and universities. Seminars are held which bring together specialists from the Centre and the member companies. ECRC's mission is to pursue research in fundamental areas of computer science. The aim is to develop the theory, methodologies and tools needed to build innovative computer applications. ECRC contributes actively to the international effort that is expanding the frontiers of knowledge in computer science. It plays an important role in bridging the gap between research and industry by striving to work at the highest academic level with a strong industrial focus. ECRC constitutes an opportunity in Europe for the best scientists and offers young researchers the possibility to mature in an environment which exposes them to both fundamental research and the process of delivering the results to industry. ECRC plays an important role in Europe and is involved in several European Community initiatives. It is regularly consulted by the Commission of the European Communities on strategic issues, such as the definition of future research plans, international co-operation and relationships between academia and industry. Address: ECRC GmbH, Arabellastrasse 17, D-81925 Munich, Germany. {(http://ecrc.de/)}. Telephone: +49 (89) 926 99 0. Fax: +49 (89) 926 99 170. (1994-12-01)

Every individual’s Tree of Life is watered by these three springs and, after each death, the past life is evaluated at the well of Urd by its divine judge, its Odin, whose decrees are determined by the advice of Urd. Before each birth Urd also is instrumental in selecting the future life and destiny.

Every round brings about a new evolutionary development on every one of the globes of the earth-chain, and a fundamental change in the physical, psychic, mental, intellectual, and spiritual constitution of man. The manas principle (the fifth or intellectual principle) will be fully developed at the end of the fifth round, and corresponding aspects of the human constitution will be evolved in minor degree during the sixth and seventh root-races of the fourth round. Although the vast majority of human beings in that future round will be far more evolved than is the present-day or fourth round mankind, nevertheless during the fifth round on this globe will occur what theosophical literature calls the moment of choice. At that time the monads which will continue to rise on the ascending arc must have reached a certain point in their unfolding evolution enabling them successfully to pursue their upward evolutionary journey towards spirit. Those monads who shall not have reached this evolutionary status, and who therefore are not able to continue the upward arc, must perforce wait for the future manvantara, a loss in evolutionary opportunity and in time of many hundreds of millions of years.

evolutionary given(s) ::: Inherited forms of past manifestation. Forms created in temporal unfolding and handed to the future. Also known as “Kosmic habits.” See involutionary givens.

EVOLUTION, HOW IT WORKS The great cosmic evolution does not work according to a predetermined plan. Only the final goal is laid down: all monads acquiring omniscience about the whole cosmos... The evolution itself creates the conditions and possibilities of its growth. These conditions, however, depend on the individual character of every being, from atoms to planets, solar systems, etc... The past thereby limits the possibilities of the future. A rigid plan would set aside the law of freedom, according to which every monad has the right to the freedom (depending on insight and ability) it has once acquired and continues to apply lawfully. Evolution feels its way forward along every conceivable path in order to find the one most purposeful for each and all. K 5.36.6

expectation ::: n. --> The act or state of expecting or looking forward to an event as about to happen.
That which is expected or looked for.
The prospect of the future; grounds upon which something excellent is expected to happen; prospect of anything good to come, esp. of property or rank.
The value of any chance (as the prospect of prize or property) which depends upon some contingent event. Expectations are


Expectations – Beliefs about what will happen in the future. People's actions are influenced by their expectations. People respond just to what is happening now (such as a change in price), but to what anticipate will happen in the future.

Extratemporal perception (ETP): A newly coined and not as yet generally accepted term for extrasensory perception through time as well as distance in space; the ability to see into the past and the future.

farseeing ::: a. --> Able to see to a great distance; farsighted.
Having foresight as regards the future.


fate ::: “The Indian explanation of fate is Karma. We ourselves are our own fate through our actions, but the fate created by us binds us; for what we have sown, we must reap in this life or another. Still we are creating our fate for the future even while undergoing old fate from the past in the present. That gives a meaning to our will and action and does not, as European critics wrongly believe, constitute a rigid and sterilising fatalism. But again, our will and action can often annul or modify even the past Karma, it is only certain strong effects, called utkata karma, that are non-modifiable. Here too the achievement of the spiritual consciousness and life is supposed to annul or give the power to annul Karma. For we enter into union with the Will Divine, cosmic or transcendent, which can annul what it had sanctioned for certain conditions, new-create what it had created, the narrow fixed lines disappear, there is a more plastic freedom and wideness. Neither Karma nor Astrology therefore points to a rigid and for ever immutable fate.” Letters on Yoga

FATE. ::: Tlic Indian explanation of fate is karma. We our- selves arc our own fate through our actions, but the fate created by us binds us ; for what we have sown, we must reap in this life or another. Still, we arc creating our fate tor the future even while undergoing old fate from the past in the present,

Ferroelectric Random Access Memory "storage" (FRAM) A type of {non-volatile} read/write {random access} {semiconductor} memory. FRAM combines the advantages of {SRAM} - writing is roughly as fast as reading, and {EPROM} - non-volatility and in-circuit programmability. Current (Feb 1997) disadvantages are high cost and low density, but that may change in the future. Density is currently at most 32KB on a chip, compared with 512KB for SRAM, 1MB for EPROM and 8MB for DRAM. A ferroelectric memory cell consists of a ferroelectric {capacitor} and a {MOS} {transistor}. Its construction is similar to the storage cell of a {DRAM}. The difference is in the dielectric properties of the material between the capacitor's electrodes. This material has a high dielectric constant and can be polarized by an electric field. The polarisation remains until it gets reversed by an opposite electrical field. This makes the memory non-volatile. Note that ferroelectric material, despite its name, does not necessarily contain iron. The most well-known ferroelectric substance is BaTiO3, which does not contain iron. Data is read by applying an electric field to the capacitor. If this switches the cell into the opposite state (flipping over the electrical dipoles in the ferroelectric material) then more charge is moved than if the cell was not flipped. This can be detected and amplified by sense amplifiers. Reading destroys the contents of a cell which must therefore be written back after a read. This is similar to the {precharge} operation in DRAM, though it only needs to be done after a read rather than periodically as with DRAM {refresh}. In fact it is most like the operation of {ferrite core memory}. FRAM has similar applications to EEPROM, but can be written much faster. The simplicity of the memory cell promises high density devices which can compete with DRAM. {RAMTRON} is the company behind FRAM. (1997-02-17)

Ferroelectric Random Access Memory ::: (storage) (FRAM) A type of non-volatile read/write random access semiconductor memory. FRAM combines the advantages of SRAM - writing is roughly change in the future. Density is currently at most 32KB on a chip, compared with 512KB for SRAM, 1MB for EPROM and 8MB for DRAM.A ferroelectric memory cell consists of a ferroelectric capacitor and a MOS transistor. Its construction is similar to the storage cell of a DRAM. The ferroelectric material, despite its name, does not necessarily contain iron. The most well-known ferroelectric substance is BaTiO3, which does not contain iron.Data is read by applying an electric field to the capacitor. If this switches the cell into the opposite state (flipping over the electrical dipoles in the to be done after a read rather than periodically as with DRAM refresh. In fact it is most like the operation of ferrite core memory.FRAM has similar applications to EEPROM, but can be written much faster. The simplicity of the memory cell promises high density devices which can compete with DRAM.RAMTRON is the company behind FRAM. (1997-02-17)

Five-year plans - Economic plans set up by the central government in a country that plots the future course of its economic development.

Footnote: In this sense the power of prophecy has been aptly called a memory of the future.]” The Synthesis of Yoga

Foreknowledge: Knowledge of the future of which two types may be distinguished: (a) anticipation or prescience which professes to be immediate and non-inferential and (b) expectation, which is inferential prediction of the future on the basis of the remembered or recorded past. See Anticipation, Prescience, Expectation. -- L.W.

Foreknowledge: Knowledge of the future.

foresight ::: 1. Perception of the significance and nature of events before they have occurred. 2. Knowledge or insight gained by or as by looking forward; a view of the future; foreknowledge.

foresighted ::: a. --> Sagacious; prudent; provident for the future.

foresight ::: n. --> The act or the power of foreseeing; prescience; foreknowledge.
Action in reference to the future; provident care; prudence; wise forethought.
Any sight or reading of the leveling staff, except the backsight; any sight or bearing taken by a compass or theodolite in a forward direction.
Muzzle sight. See Fore sight, under Fore, a.


foretell the future. He is a throne angel and

Forex_training ::: is a type of instruction or mentorship that provides information on forex trading tactics, methods and successful practices. Forex, or the foreign exchange market, is the market where banks, companies, brokers, hedge funds, investors and other participants can buy, sell, exchange and speculate on currencies.   BREAKING DOWN 'Forex Training' Forex training is a guide for retail forex traders. Forex trading courses are often certified through a regulatory body or financial institution. In the United States, the SEC, the Chicago Board of Trade, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the National Futures Association, the Futures Industry Association and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission are some of the boards that certify courses. Mentors in forex training courses often help explain different strategies and risk management, as well as going through and placing actual trades.  The global forex market is massive in size, and it is the largest and most liquid financial market in the world. Because of this, there is a wealth of information available for traders who are looking to enhance their trading knowledge. https://www.investopedia.com/terms/forex/f/forex-currency-trading-training.asp

fortuneteller ::: Fortune Teller A fortune teller is someone who 'predicts the future', usually for an individual, through what appears to be mystical or supernatural means, normally for commercial gain. Fortune telling is often considered to be a form of divination. See also Soothsayer.

Fortune-telling: Divination; foretelling the future.

forward ::: adv. 1. Toward or tending to the front; facing frontward. 2. Fig. Directed or moving ahead. 3. Of continuous motion: Towards what is in front; (moving) onwards, on. forward-rippling, forward-striving. *adj. 4. At or near or directed towards a point ahead.* ::: to look forward. Expect or hope for something positive in the future.

Fotudeng. [alt. Fotucheng] (J. Butsutocho/Buttocho; K. Pultojing 佛圖澄) (232-348). A monk and thaumaturge, perhaps from the Central Asian kingdom of KUCHA, who was a pioneer in the transmission of Buddhism to China. According to his hagiography in the GAOSENG ZHUAN, Fotudeng was a foreign monk, whose surname was BO, the ethnikon used for Kuchean monks; in some sources, his name is transcribed as BuddhasiMha. He was talented at memorizing and expounding scriptures, as well as in debate. Fotudeng is said to have received training in Kashmir (see KASHMIR-GANDHĀRA) and to have arrived in China in 310 intending to spread the DHARMA. Fotudeng is described as a skilled magician who could command spirits and predict the future. Despite his initial failure to establish a monastery in the Chinese capital of Luoyang, Fotudeng was able to convert the tyrannical ruler of the state of Later Zhao, Shi Le (r. 319-333), with a demonstration of his thaumaturgic skills. Fotudeng's continued assistance of Shi Le won him the title Daheshang (Great Monk). After Shi Le's general Shi Hu (r. 334-339) usurped the throne, Fotudeng was elevated to the highest status at the palace, and he continued to play the important role of political and spiritual advisor to the ruler. During his illustrious career as royal advisor, Fotudeng also taught many Buddhist disciples and is said to have established hundreds of monasteries. Among his disciples Zhu Faya (d.u.), DAO'AN, and Chu Fatai (320-387) are most famous.

Four branches of astrology are now chiefly studied: 1) mundane, applying to meteorology, seismology, husbandry, etc.; 2) state or civic, regarding the future of nations and rulers; 3) horary, solving doubts arising on any subject; and 4) genethliacal, concerned with the future of individuals from birth to death.

Fu dashi. (J. Fu daishi; K. Pu taesa 傅大士) (497-569). In Chinese, "Great Layman Fu," his secular name was Xi and he is also known as Shanhui, Conglin, and Dongyang dashi. Fu dashi was a native of Wuzhou in present-day Zhejiang province. At fifteen, he married and had two sons, Pujian and Pucheng. Originally a fisherman, he abandoned his fishing basket after hearing a foreign mendicant teach the dharma and moved to SONGSHAN (Pine Mountain). After attaining awakening beneath a pair of trees, he referred to himself as layman Shanhui (Good Wisdom) of Shuanglin (Paired Trees). While continuing with his severe ascetic practices, Fu and his wife hired out their services as laborers during the day and he taught at night, ultimately claiming that he had come from TUsITA heaven, where the future buddha MAITREYA was currently residing. He is said to have been summoned to teach at court during the reign of the Liang-dynasty emperor Wudi (r. 502-549). In 539, Fu dashi is said to have established the monastery Shuanglinsi at the base of Songshan. His collected discourses, verses, and poetry are preserved in the Shanhui dashi yulu, in four rolls, which also includes his own biography as well as those of four other monks who may have been his associates. Fu is also credited with inventing the revolving bookcase for scriptures, which, like a prayer wheel (cf. MA nI 'KHOR LO), could yield merit (PUnYA) simply by turning it. This invention led to the common practice of installing an image of Fu and his family in monastic libraries. In painting and sculpture, Fu dashi is typically depicted as a tall bearded man wearing a Confucian hat, Buddhist raiments, and Daoist shoes and accompanied by his wife and two sons.

FUD "jargon" /fuhd/ An acronym invented by {Gene Amdahl} after he left {IBM} to found his own company: "FUD is the fear, uncertainty, and doubt that {IBM} sales people instill in the minds of potential customers who might be considering [Amdahl] products." The idea, of course, was to persuade them to go with safe IBM gear rather than with competitors' equipment. This implicit coercion was traditionally accomplished by promising that Good Things would happen to people who stuck with IBM, but Dark Shadows loomed over the future of competitors' equipment or software. [{Jargon File}] (1995-05-23)

FUD ::: (jargon) /fuhd/ An acronym invented by Gene Amdahl after he left IBM to found his own company: FUD is the fear, uncertainty, and doubt that IBM sales who stuck with IBM, but Dark Shadows loomed over the future of competitors' equipment or software.[Jargon File] (1995-05-23)

Fusion, Psychic: See Psychic Fusion. Future: That part of time which includes all the events which will happen; these events may be conceived as determined in advance, though unknown, or as an indefinite potentiality, not fixed in advance, but subject to chance, free choice, statistical determination, or Divine interference. In Aristotle, assertions about the future are always contingent or non-apodeictic. -- R.B.W.

futureless ::: a. --> Without prospect of betterment in the future.

Future price - A price agreed today at which an item (e.g. commodities) will be exchanged at some set date in the future. '

Future: That part of time which includes all the events which will happen. According to many occultists and esoteric philosophers, the future co-exists with the present and the past, time is indivisible, unchangeable, and past, present and future are merely concepts of the human mind which moves along a “time track” through the reality which is time; foreknowledge, prophecy, etc., can be explained as glimpses ahead along the time track.

future ::: v. i. --> That is to be or come hereafter; that will exist at any time after the present; as, the next moment is future, to the present. ::: a. --> Time to come; time subsequent to the present (as, the future shall be as the present); collectively, events that are to happen in time to come.

futurist ::: n. --> One whose chief interests are in what is to come; one who anxiously, eagerly, or confidently looks forward to the future; an expectant.
One who believes or maintains that the fulfillment of the prophecies of the Bible is to be in the future.


futurity ::: n. --> State of being that is yet to come; future state.
Future time; time to come; the future.
Event to come; a future event.


Gambit ::: (language) A variant of Scheme R3.99 supporting the future construct of Multilisp by Marc Feeleyfor Macintosh (with Toolbox and built-in editor) and Motorola 680x0 Unix systems and HP300, BBN GP100 and NeXT. Version 2.0 conforms to the IEEE Scheme standard.Gambit used PVM as its intermediate language. , . .Mailing list: (1998-02-10)

genethliacs ::: n. --> The science of calculating nativities, or predicting the future events of life from the stars which preside at birth.

gerundive ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or partaking of, the nature of the gerund; gerundial. ::: n. --> The future passive participle; as, amandus, i. e., to be loved.

Going concern – It is assumed for accounting purposes a business will continue indefinitely. If the concern is not liquid, the viability and therefore sustainability of that entity being able to continue its operations in the future may be doubt.

Gross domestic investment - The creation of capital goods, such as factories and machines, that can yield production and hence consumption in the future. Also included in this definition are changes in business stocks and repairs made to machines or buildings. Gross investment is total investment before depreciation.

Harivamsa, Harivansa (Sanskrit) Harivaṃśa The lineage of Hari, or Krishna. A celebrated poem of 16,374 verses, generally regarded as a part of the Mahabharata, but believed by some to be of much later date than the greater epic. It treats of the adventures of the family of Krishna, being divided into three parts: an introduction that traces the dynasty; the life and adventures of Krishna; and the conditions occurring during the kali yuga and the future condition of the world.

has knowledge of the future,” according to Budge,

...Hauras, gives tme answers about the future

"He [man] is a soul and not a body and his earthly life is a means by which he determines the future conditions of his spiritual being.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“He [man] is a soul and not a body and his earthly life is a means by which he determines the future conditions of his spiritual being.” The Synthesis of Yoga

hence ::: adv. --> From this place; away.
From this time; in the future; as, a week hence.
From this reason; as an inference or deduction.
From this source or origin. ::: v. t. --> To send away.


Her sisters are Urd (origin), irrevocable causes set in motion in the past; and Skuld (debt), who is created by her two sisters, the past and present. She is the debt of karma owed to the future, the inevitable result of past and present causes.

:::   ". . . Hiranyagarbha, the luminous mind of dreams, looking through [gross forms created by Virat] those forms to see his own images behind them.” *The Future Poetry

“… Hiranyagarbha, the luminous mind of dreams, looking through [gross forms created by Virat] those forms to see his own images behind them.” The Future Poetry

HYLOZOICS (Gr. hyle, &

Ieiaiel —angel of the future, sharing the office

improvident ::: a. --> Not provident; wanting foresight or forethought; not foreseeing or providing for the future; negligent; thoughtless; as, an improvident man.

Indicators ::: are statistics used to measure current conditions as well as to forecast financial or economic trends. Indicators can be broadly categorized into economic indicators and technical indicators. Economic indicators are statistical metrics used to measure the growth or contraction of the economy as a whole or sectors within the economy. In fundamental analysis, economic indicators that quantify current economic and industry conditions are used to provide insight into the future profitability potential of public companies. Technical indicators are used extensively in technical analysis to predict changes in stock trends or price patterns in any traded asset.

Inferential Statistics ::: The branch of statistics that focuses on describing in numerical format what might be happening or what might happen (estimation) in the future (probability). Inferential statistics required the testing of only a sample of the population. (Example: 100 students rather than all students).

Interagency Interim National Research and Education Network (IINREN) An evolving operating network system. Near term (1992-1996) research and development activities will provide for the smooth evolution of this networking infrastructure into the future gigabit {NREN}. (1994-12-06)

Interagency Interim National Research and Education Network ::: (IINREN) An evolving operating network system. Near term (1992-1996) research and development activities will provide for the smooth evolution of this networking infrastructure into the future gigabit NREN. (1994-12-06)

In The Egyptian Book of the Dead, the deceased must learn to master everything he encounters in the underworld, and does this through the instruction of Thoth, who also teaches the pilgrim the way of procedure. Finally when the deceased reaches the stage of judgment, it is Thoth who records the decree pointed out to him by the dog-headed ape on the balance, the scales of which weigh the heart against the feather. The gods receive the verdict from Thoth, who in turn announce it to Osiris, enabling the candidate to enter the realm of Osiris, as being one osirified. Thus Thoth is the inner spiritual recorder of the human constitution, who registers and records the karmic experiences and foretells the future destiny of the deceased, showing that each person is judged by himself — for Thoth here is the person’s own higher ego; as regards cosmic space, Thoth is not only the cosmic Logos, but its aspect as the intelligent creative urge inherent in that Intelligence.

In The Secret Doctrine chemistry is mentioned as being, together with biology, one of the magicians of the future, especially in its form of chemical physics, when it is no longer the mechanistic science into which it has degenerated. “In Esoteric Philosophy, every physical particle corresponds to and depends on its higher noumenon — the Being to whose essence it belongs; and above as below, the Spiritual evolves from the Divine, the psycho-mental from the Spiritual — tainted from its lower plane by the astral — the whole animate and (seemingly) inanimate Nature evolving on parallel lines, and drawing its attributes from above as well as from below” (SD 1:218).

Investment (Accounting) - Refers to the purchase of stocks, real property, collectible annuities, bonds, etc, with the reason being the firm expects to make a capital gain, income return or both, over the future.

Janus (Latin) [from janua a gate] Oldest and most exalted of the Roman gods, he was called the oldest of the gods and the beginning of all things, the origin of all organic life and especially human life; from him sprang all wells and rivers, and he had power also on the seas. He had no Greek counterpart, and may originally have been a god of sun and light, who opened and closed the day; later he was especially the god of beginnings and endings, such as the closing and opening of cycles, symbolized in his statues by his having two faces, one before and one behind, visioning the future and the past; also of all doors, entrances, and passages, he being pictured as a porter with a staff and key. He was saluted every morning, at the beginning of all the months (calends), and at the first of the year. When the Romans began their year near the winter solstice (153 BC), they called the month Januarius, the month of Janus, as the end of one cycle and the beginning of another. They connected the name Janus with Dianus, one aspect of the divine sun, whose feminine is Diana, the moon.

jarā. (T. rga ba; C. lao; J. ro; K. no 老). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "senescence," "aging," or "decay." Aging and death (JARĀMARAnA) are one of the varieties of the suffering (DUḤKHA) that is said to be inherent in the conditioned realm of existence and together constitute the last of the twelve links of dependent origination (PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA). The future buddha is said to have left the life of the householder in search of a state beyond birth, aging, sickness, and death. In the SARVĀSTIVĀDA ABHIDHARMA system, senescence is treated as a "conditioned force dissociated from thought" (CITTAVIPRAYUKTASAMSKĀRA), which functions as one of the four conditioned characteristics (SAMSKṚTALAKsAnA) that is associated with all conditioned objects. Because the ontology of the Sarvāstivāda school, as its name implies, postulated that "everything exists" in all three time periods (TRIKĀLA) of past, present, and future, there had to be some mechanism to account for the apparent change that conditioned objects underwent through time. Therefore, along with the other three characteristics of origination (JĀTI), continuance (STHITI), and desinence (ANITYATĀ; viz., death), aging was posited as a "conditioned force dissociated from thought," which causes the active functioning (kāritra) of a conditioned object to degenerate, initiating the process that leads to its inevitable death. The very definition of conditioned objects is that they are subject to these conditioned characteristics, including this process of decay and change; this is what ultimately distinguishes them from the unconditioned (ASAMSKṚTA), viz., NIRVĀnA.

Jaspers, Karl: (1883-) Inspired by Nietzsche's and Kierkegaard's psychology, but aiming at a strictly scientific method, the "existentialist" Jaspers analyzes the possible attitudes of man towards the world; the decisions which the individual must make in inescapable situations like death, struggle, change, guilt; and the various ways in which man meets these situations. Motivated by the boundless desire for clarity and precision, Jaspers earnestly presents as his main objective to awaken the desire for a fuller, more genuine philosophy, these three methods of philosophizing which have existed from te earliest times to the present: Philosophical world orientation consisting in an analysis of the limitations, incompleteness and relativity of the researches, methods, world pictures of all the sciences; elucidation of existence consisting of a cognitive penetration into reality on the basis of the deepest inner decisions experienced by the individual, and striving to satisfy the deepest demands of human nature; the way of metaphysics, the never-satisfied and unending search for truth in the world of knowledge, conduct of life and in the seeking for the one being, dimly seen through antithetic thoughts, deep existential conflicts and differently conceived metaphysical symbols of the past. Realizing the decisive problematic relation between philosophy and religion in the Middle Ages, Jaspers elevates psychology and history to a more important place in the future of philosophy.

jāti. (T. skye ba; C. sheng; J. sho; K. saeng 生). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "birth," "origination." Birth is one of the varieties of the suffering (DUḤKHA) that is inherent in the conditioned realm of existence and the eleventh of the twelve links in the chain of dependent origination (PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA). The future buddha is said to have left the life of the householder in search of a state beyond birth, aging, sickness, and death. In the SARVĀSTIVĀDA ABHIDHARMA system, origination is treated as a "conditioned force dissociated from thought" (CITTAVIPRAYUKTASAMSKĀRA), which functions as one of the four conditioned characteristics (SAMSKṚTALAKsAnA) that is associated with all conditioned objects. Because the ontology of the Sarvāstivāda school, as its name implies, postulated that "everything exists" in all three time periods (TRIKĀLA) of past, present, and future, there had to be some mechanism to account for the apparent change that conditioned objects underwent through time. Therefore, along with the other three characteristics of continuance (STHITI), senescence (JARĀ), and desinence (ANITYATĀ; viz., death), origination was posited as a "conditioned force dissociated from thought," which prepares an object to be produced and thus pulls that object out of the future and into the present. The very definition of conditioned objects is that they are subject to these conditioned characteristics, including this process of production, and this is what ultimately distinguishes them from the unconditioned (ASAMSKṚTA), viz., NIRVĀnA. In less technical contexts, beginning with the Buddha's first sermon (see DHAMMACAKKAPPAVATTANASUTTA), jāti appears in various lists of the sufferings of SAMSĀRA, with a variety of texts describing at length the pain experienced in the womb and during birth.

Kahan Commission (1982) ::: The commission appointed by the Israeli cabinet on September 28, 1982 to investigate the IDF’s role in the massacre at the Sabra and Shatila Refugee camps during the First Lebanon War. The commission recommended that Major General Yehoshua Saguy not continue as director of military intelligence, Brigadier General Amos Yaron acted improperly and should not serve as field commander, and that Defense Minister Ariel Sharon should not be given any “sensitive” position in the future.

kankhāvitaranavisuddhi. In Pāli, "the purity of overcoming doubt"; the fourth of seven "purities" (VISUDDHI) to be developed along the path to liberation, according to the VISUDDHIMAGGA. The purity of overcoming doubt refers to the understanding of the conditions that give rise to name and form (NĀMARuPA), viz., mentality and materiality, with reference to the three time periods (S. TRIKĀLA) of past, present, and future. The practitioner notes that no instance of name and form arisen in the present came into being through the will of a creator, nor did it arise spontaneously by itself without a cause. Rather, the practitioner understands that everything that has arisen has occurred because of a specific cause or condition. Thus, the practitioner understands, for example, that, due to the contact of the eye sense base with a visible object, a moment of visual consciousness arises. In the same way, the practitioner understands that what has arisen in the present because of causes and conditions (HETUPRATYAYA) becomes the cause and condition for something arising in the future. This knowledge encompasses knowledge of the relationship between volitional action (KARMAN) and its result (VIPĀKA) and that future existence within the cycle of rebirth occurs as a result of volitional action. In addition, the practitioner clearly understands the distinction between volitional action and its result, that is, that there is neither volitional action in the result nor result in the volitional action. In this way, the practitioner overcomes doubt regarding causality underlying the appearance of name and form in relation to the three times.

Kanthaka. [alt. Kanthaka] (T. Bsngags ldan; C. Jianzhi; J. Kenjoku; K. Konch'ok 犍陟). In Sanskrit and Pāli, the name of the horse that GAUTAMA rode when he departed from his father's palace in KAPILAVASTU and renounced the world (PRAVRAJITA). Kanthaka was born on the same day as Gautama, as was his groom CHANDAKA. Kanthaka was destined from birth to carry the future buddha from the household life into homelessness and was suitably magnificent in stature for that honor. Eighteen cubits in length, he was white, the color of a conch shell, and the sound of his neighing and gallop resounded throughout the kingdom of Kapilavastu. When he was saddled to carry his master into the wilderness, Kanthaka realized the significance of the event and neighed in exultation. Lest Gautama's father be forewarned and attempt to prevent his departure, the divinities muffled his neighing and the sound of his hoofs. The prince rode on Kanthaka's back, while Chandaka held onto his tail. Outside the city gates, Gautama turned to take a final look at his capital; a shrine (CAITYA) was later erected on the spot in commemoration. Between midnight and dawn, they traveled thirty leagues to the river Anomā. Kanthaka crossed the river in one jump and Gautama and Chandaka dismounted on the other side. There, the BODHISATTVA gave Chandaka his ornaments and directed him to take Kanthaka back to the palace; a shrine commemorating the event was later erected on the spot as well. Kanthaka continued to look at his master as he departed, and when he disappeared from view, Kanthaka died of a broken heart. He was immediately reborn in TRAYASTRIMsA heaven as a deity named Kanthakadevaputra and dwelled in a magnificent palace made of gems, where the ARHAT MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA later visited him.

Karma(Karman, Sanskrit) ::: This is a noun-form coming from the root kri meaning "to do," "to make." Literallykarma means "doing," "making," action. But when used in a philosophical sense, it has a technicalmeaning, and this technical meaning can best be translated into English by the word consequence. Theidea is this: When an entity acts, he acts from within; he acts through an expenditure in greater or lessdegree of his own native energy. This expenditure of energy, this outflowing of energy, as it impactsupon the surrounding milieu, the nature around us, brings forth from the latter perhaps an instantaneousor perhaps a delayed reaction or rebound. Nature, in other words, reacts against the impact; and thecombination of these two -- of energy acting upon nature and nature reacting against the impact of thatenergy -- is what is called karma, being a combination of the two factors. Karma is, in other words,essentially a chain of causation, stretching back into the infinity of the past and therefore necessarilydestined to stretch into the infinity of the future. It is unescapable, because it is in universal nature, whichis infinite and therefore everywhere and timeless; and sooner or later the reaction will inevitably be feltby the entity which aroused it.It is a very old doctrine, known to all religions and philosophies, and since the renascence of scientificstudy in the Occident has become one of the fundamental postulates of modern coordinated knowledge.If you toss a pebble into a pool, it causes ripples in the water, and these ripples spread and finally impactupon the bank surrounding the pool; and, so modern science tells us, the ripples are translated intovibrations, which are carried outward into infinity. But at every step of this natural process there is acorresponding reaction from every one and from all of the myriads of atomic particles affected by thespreading energy.Karma is in no sense of the word fatalism on the one hand, nor what is popularly known as chance, onthe other hand. It is essentially a doctrine of free will, for naturally the entity which initiates a movementor action -- spiritual, mental, psychological, physical, or other -- is responsible thereafter in the shape ofconsequences and effects that flow therefrom, and sooner or later recoil upon the actor or prime mover.Since everything is interlocked and interlinked and interblended with everything else, and no thing andno being can live unto itself alone, other entities are of necessity, in smaller or larger degree, affected bythe causes or motions initiated by any individual entity; but such effects or consequences on entities,other than the prime mover, are only indirectly a morally compelling power, in the true sense of the wordmoral.An example of this is seen in what the theosophist means when he speaks of family karma as contrastedwith one's own individual karma; or national karma, the series of consequences pertaining to the nationof which he is an individual; or again, the racial karma pertaining to the race of which the individual is anintegral member. Karma cannot be said either to punish or to reward in the ordinary meaning of theseterms. Its action is unerringly just, for being a part of nature's own operations, all karmic actionultimately can be traced back to the kosmic heart of harmony which is the same thing as saying pureconsciousness-spirit. The doctrine is extremely comforting to human minds, inasmuch as man may carvehis own destiny and indeed must do so. He can form it or deform it, shape it or misshape it, as he wills;and by acting with nature's own great and underlying energies, he puts himself in unison or harmonytherewith and therefore becomes a co-worker with nature as the gods are.

Karma, Karman: (Skr.) Action, movement, deed, a category e.g. in the Vaisesika (q.v.). In Indian philosophy generally thought of as a metaphysical entity carried by the individual along in samsara (q.v.). As law, karma would be identical with physical causation or causality while working with equal rigor in man's psychic and thought life. As such it is the unmitigated law of retribution working with equal precision in "good" and "evil" deeds and thoughts, thus determining the nature and circumstances of incarnation. Karma is classified into prarabdha (effects determining the unavoidable circumstances of man's life), samcita (effects able to be expiated or neglected, e.g., through jnana), and agami (effects currently generated and determining the future). Jainas (q.v.) enumerate 148 kinds of karma. -- K.F.L.

karma ::: n. --> One&

karman. (P. kamma; T. las; C. ye; J. go; K. op 業). In Sanskrit, "action"; in its inflected form "karma," it is now accepted as an English word; a term used to refer to the doctrine of action and its corresponding "ripening" or "fruition" (VIPĀKA), according to which virtuous deeds of body, speech, and mind produce happiness in the future (in this life or subsequent lives), while nonvirtuous deeds lead instead to suffering. In Vedic religion, karman referred especially to ritual actions. The term came to take on wider meanings among the sRAMAnA movements of wandering ascetics, to which Buddhism belonged. The JAINAs, for example, have a theory of karman as a physical substance created through unwholesome actions, which hinder the soul's ability to achieve liberation; in order to free the soul from the bonds created through past actions, the body had to be rigorously cleansed of this karmic substance through moral discipline and asceticism. Although the Buddhists accepted the notion of moral causality, as did the Jainas, they redefined karman instead as mental intention (CETANĀ) or intentional (cetayitvā) acts: the Buddha specifically says, "Action is volition, for after having intended something, one accomplishes action through body, speech, and mind." These actions are of four types: (1) wholesome (KUsALA), which lead to wholesome results (vipāka); (2) unwholesome (AKUsALA), which lead to unwholesome results; (3) mixed, with mixed results that may be partially harmful and partially beneficial; and (4) indeterminate (AVYĀKṚTA), which are actions done after enlightenment, which yield no result in the conditioned realm. The term karman describes both the potential and kinetic energy necessary to sustain a process; and, just as energy is not lost in a physical process, neither is it lost in the process of moral cause and effect. The Buddhists assert that there is a necessary relationship that exists between the action and its fruition, but this need not manifest itself in the present life; rather, when the complex of conditions and the appropriate time for their fruition come together, actions will bear their retributive fruit, even after an interval of hundreds of millions of eons (KALPA). The fruition of action is also received by the mental continuum (CITTASAMTĀNA) of the being who initially performed the action, not by another; thus, in mainstream Buddhism, one can neither receive the fruition of another's karman nor redeem another's actions. The physical universe (BHĀJANALOKA) and all experience within it are also said to be the products of karman, although in a passive, ethically neutral sense (viz., upapattibhava; see BHAVA). The goal of the Buddhist path is to be liberated from the effects of karman and the cycle of rebirth (SAMSĀRA) by destroying attachment to the sense of self (ĀTMAN). The doctrine of karman is meant to counter the errors of antinomianism (that morality is unnecessary to salvation), annihilationism, and materialism. Actions do, in fact, matter, even if there is ultimately no self that is the agent of action. Hence, karman as representing the continuity between action and result must be understood in conjunction with the teaching of discontinuity that is ANĀTMAN: there is indeed a causal chain connecting the initiator of action and the recipient of its result, but it is not the case that the person who performs the action is the same as the person who experiences the result (the wrong view of eternality) or that the agent is different from the experiencer (the wrong view of annihilationism). This connection is likened to milk changing to its different forms of curds, butter, and ghee: the milk and the ghee are neither identical nor different, but they are causally connected. The process that connects karmic cause and effect, as well as the process by which that connection is severed, is detailed in the twelvefold chain of dependent origination (PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA). Enlightened beings, such as a buddha or an ARHAT, have destroyed this chain and thus have eradicated all attachment to their past karmic continuums; consequently, after their enlightenment, they can still perform actions, but those will not lead to results that would lead to additional lifetimes in saMsāra. Although the Buddha acknowledges that the connections between karman and its effect may seem so complex as to appear unfathomable (why, for example, does the evil person who harms others live in wealth, while the good Samaritan who helps others lives in poverty?), he is adamant that those connections can be known, and known with perfect precision, through the experience of awakening (BODHI). Indeed, two of the three kinds of knowledge (TRIVIDYĀ; P. tevijja) and one of the superknowledges (ABHIJNĀ) that are by-products of enlightenment involve insight into the validity of the connection between karmic cause and effect for both oneself and for all beings: viz., the ability to remember one's own former lives (PuRVANIVĀSĀNUSMṚTI: P. pubbenivāsānunssati) in all their detail; and the insight into the karmic destinies of all other beings as well (CYUTYUPAPATTIJNĀNA; P. cutupapātānuNāna). Distinguish KARMAN, "ecclesiastical proceeding," s.v.; see also ĀNANTARYAKARMAN; ANINJYAKARMAN; ER BAO; KARMĀVARAnA.

Kāsyapīya. (P. Kassapīya/Kassapika; T. 'Od srung ba'i sde; C. Jiasheyibu/Yinguangbu; J. Kashoyuibu/Onksho; K. Kasobyubu/Ŭmgwangbu 迦遺部/飮光部). In Sanskrit, "Followers of Kāsyapa"; one of the eighteen traditional schools of the mainstream Indian Buddhist tradition. There have been several accounts of the identity of the founder Kāsyapa. PARAMĀRTHA and KUIJI presume he was the Indian sage Kāsyapa (MAHĀKĀsYAPA), while others opine that he was a Kāsyapa who was born some three centuries after the Buddha's death. DAOXUAN (596-667) in his Sifen lü kaizong ji says that Jiashe (Kāsyapa) was the personal name of the founder of the Kāsyapīya school and Shansui (SUVARsAKA) his surname. According to the tradition he is relating, Kāsyapa was one of the five disciples of UPAGUPTA, the fifth successor in the Buddha's lineage about one hundred years following his death. These five disciples established their own schools based on their differing views regarding doctrine and redacted the VINAYA into five distinct recensions (C. Wubu lü). The so-called *Prātimoksavinaya of the Kāsyapīya school is not extant, but it is known through the Prātimoksasutra (Jietuojie jing), a primer of the school's monastic discipline. There are several competing theories regarding the lineage of the Kāsyapīya school. The SAMAYABHEDOPARACANACAKRA posits that the Kāsyapīya split off from the SARVĀSTIVĀDA school about three hundred years after the Buddha's death and identifies it with the Suvarsaka school (C. Shansuibu). But other texts, such as the sariputraparipṛcchāsutra, state that the Kāsyapīya and Suvarsaka schools are distinct, with the former having descended from the STHAVIRANIKĀYA and the latter from the Sarvāstivāda school. (The name of the Suvarsaka school is, however, not attested in Pāli sources.) The MaNjusrīparipṛcchā instead claims that the school derived from the DHARMAGUPTAKA school, while the Tibetan tradition considers it as a collateral lineage of the VIBHAJYAVĀDA school. The most plausible scenario is that the Kāsyapīya, MAHĪsĀSAKA, and Dharmaguptaka were each subsections of the Vibhajyavāda, which was a loose umbrella term for all those schools (except the Sarvāstivāda) that split off from the Sthaviranikāya. Inscriptional evidence for all three schools survives in northwestern India. The doctrines of the Kāsyapīya tend to be closest to those ascribed to the Sarvāstivāda and Dharmaguptaka schools. The arrangement of its TRIPItAKA also seems to have paralleled that of the Dharmaguptaka school, and its ABHIDHARMAPItAKA in particular seems to have been similar in structure to the sāriputrābhidharmasāstra of the Dharmaguptakas. Some of the doctrines that are peculiar to the Kāsyapīyas are as follows: (1) Past KARMAN that has not yet borne fruit exists (but the rest of the past does not), the present exists, and some of the future exists. By limiting the existence of past objects, the Kāsyapīyas reject the Sarvāstivāda position that dharmas perdure in all three time periods. (2) All compounded things (SAMSKĀRA) are instantly destroyed. (3) Whatever is compounded (SAMSKṚTA) has its cause in the past, while the uncompounded (ASAMSKṚTA) has its cause in the future. This view also contrasts with that of the Sarvāstivāda, which holds that future actions can serve as either the retributive cause (VIPĀKAHETU) or the efficient or generic cause (KĀRAnAHETU) of compounded objects, such that every conditioned dharma serves as the generic, indirect cause for the creation of all other compounded things, except itself. (4) The worthy ones (ARHAT) perfect both the knowledge of cessation (KsAYAJNĀNA) and the knowledge of nonproduction (ANUTPĀDAJNĀNA), the two types of knowledge that accompany liberation from rebirth (SAMSĀRA); thus, they are no longer subject to the afflictions (KLEsA).

Kukkutapāda, Mount. (T. Ri bo bya rkang; C. Jizushan; J. Keisokusen; K. Kyejoksan 鶏足山). In Sanskrit, "Cock's Foot"; a mountain located in the ancient Indian state of MAGADHA; also known as Gurupādaka (Honored Foot); the present Kurkihar, sixteen miles northeast of BODHGAYĀ. The mountain is renowned as the site where the Buddha's senior disciple, MAHĀKĀsYAPA, is said to be waiting in trance for the advent of the future buddha MAITREYA. Once Maiteya appears, Mahākāsyapa will hand over to him the robe (CĪVARA) of sĀKYAMUNI, symbolizing that Maitreya is his legitimate successor in the lineage of the buddhas. The Chinese monk-pilgrim FAXIAN visited the mountain on his sojourn in India in the fifth century CE, describing the mountain as home to many dangerous predators, including tigers and wolves.

Kumil-Madan (Tamil) Blowing like a bubble; the elemental associated with water, called undine in the Occident. A merry imp in popular tales, assisting people in the proximity of water, even causing a rain shower. To those who resort to divination by water, the Kumil-Madan lends his aid by showing the present or the future.

kusalamula. (P. kusalamula; T. dge ba'i rtsa ba; C. shangen; J. zengon; K. son'gŭn 善根). In Sanskrit, the term "wholesome faculties," or "roots of virtue," refers to the cumulative meritorious deeds performed by an individual throughout his or her past lives. Different schools offer various lists of these wholesome faculties. The most common list is threefold: nongreed (ALOBHA), nonhatred (ADVEsA), and nondelusion (AMOHA)-all factors that encourage such wholesome actions (KARMAN) as giving (DĀNA), keeping precepts, and learning the dharma. These three factors thus will fructify as happiness in the future and will provide the foundation for liberation (VIMUKTI). These three wholesome roots are the converse of the three unwholesome faculties, or "roots of nonvirtue" (AKUsALAMuLA), viz., greed (LOBHA), hatred (DVEsA), and delusion (MOHA), which lead instead to unhappiness or even perdition. In place of this simple threefold list, the VAIBHĀsIKA school of ABHIDHARMA offers three separate typologies of kusalamulas. The first class is the "wholesome roots associated with merit" (punyabhāgīya-kusalamula), which lead to rebirth in the salutary realms of humans or heavenly divinities (DEVA). These include such qualities as faith, energy, and decency and modesty, the foundations of moral progress. Second are the "wholesome roots associated with liberation" (MOKsABHĀGĪYA-KUsALAMuLA), which eventually lead to PARINIRVĀnA. These are factors associated with the truth of the path (MĀRGASATYA) or various factors conducive to liberation. Third are the "wholesome roots associated with spiritual penetration" (NIRVEDHABHĀGĪYA-kusalamula), which are the four aspects of the direct path of preparation (PRAYOGAMĀRGA): heat (usMAN), summit (MuRDHAN), receptivity (KsĀNTI), and highest worldly dharmas (LAUKIKĀGRADHARMA). These nirvedhabhāgīyas open access to the path of vision (DARsANAMĀRGA), where the first stage of sanctity, stream-entry (SROTAĀPANNA), is won. The nirvedhabhāgīya differ so markedly from the two previous categories of wholesome roots that they are often listed independently as the four wholesome faculties (catvāri kusalamulāni). The wholesome roots may be dedicated toward a specific aim, such as rebirth in a heavenly realm; toward the benefit of a specific person, such as a parent or relative; or toward the achievement of buddhahood for the sake of all sentient beings.

Kyogyo shinsho. (教行信証). In Japanese, "Teaching, Practice, Faith, and Realization," composed by the Japanese JoDO SHINSHu teacher SHINRAN (1173-1263), also known as the Ken jodo shinjitsu kyogyosho monrui. The Kyogyo shinsho is considered one of the most important texts of the Jodo Shinshu tradition. The exact dates of its compilation are unknown, but it seems to have gradually developed into its current shape over the first half of the thirteenth century. Several other similar works were also composed during this period by disciples of HoNEN, largely in response to the monk MYoE KoBEN's criticism of exclusive nenbutsu (C. NIANFO), the hallmark of the Jodo traditions. The Kyogyo shinsho largely consists of citations of scriptural passages on the practice of nenbutsu or invocation of the name of the buddha AMITĀBHA. Perhaps the most important section of the Kyogyo shinsho is that on faith (shinjin; C. XINXIN), where Shinran attempted to demonstrate that faith is based on the practice of nenbutsu and comes not from the effort made by the practitioner but from Amitābha himself (see TARIKI). Citing the SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA's teachings on the original vows (hongan) of the BODHISATTVA DHARMĀKARA (the future Amitābha), Shinran also emphasized the importance of the "single nenbutsu" (ĪCHINENGI) in attaining rebirth in the PURE LAND. He also sought to legitimize the practice of nenbutsu through recourse to the notion of the "final age of the DHARMA" (J. mappo, C. MOFA) when other types of Buddhist practice were ineffective.

League for Programming Freedom "body, legal" (LPF) A grass-roots organisation of professors, students, businessmen, programmers and users dedicated to bringing back the freedom to write programs. Once programmers were allowed to write programs using all the techniques they knew, and providing whatever features they felt were useful. Monopolies, {software patents} and {interface copyrights} have taken away freedom of expression and the ability to do a good job. "{Look and feel}" lawsuits attempt to monopolise well-known command languages; some have succeeded. Copyrights on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition and stifle incremental improvements. {Software patents} are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pre-trial seizure. It is difficult and expensive to find out whether the techniques you consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future. The League is not opposed to the legal system that Congress intended -- {copyright} on individual programs. They aim to reverse the changes made by judges in response to special interests, often explicitly rejecting the public interest principles of the Constitution. The League works to abolish the monopolies by publishing articles, talking with public officials, boycotting egregious offenders and in the future may intervene in court cases. On 1989-05-24, the League picketed {Lotus} headquarters on account of their lawsuits, and then again on 1990-08-02. These marches stimulated widespread media coverage for the issue. The League's funds are used for filing briefs; printing handouts, buttons and signs and whatever will persuade the courts, the legislators and the people. The League is a non-profit corporation, but not considered a tax-exempt charity. {LPF Home (http://progfree.org/)}. (2007-02-28)

League for Programming Freedom ::: (body) (LPF) A grass-roots organisation of professors, students, businessmen, programmers and users dedicated to bringing back the freedom to interface copyrights, have taken away our freedom of expression and our ability to do a good job.Look and feel lawsuits attempt to monopolise well-known command languages; some have succeeded. Copyrights on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition, and stifle incremental improvements.Software patents are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pre-trial consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future.The League is not opposed to the legal system that Congress intended -- copyright on individual programs. Our aim is to reverse the recent changes made by judges in response to special interests, often explicitly rejecting the public interest principles of the Constitution.The League works to abolish the new monopolies by publishing articles, talking with public officials, boycotting egregious offenders, and in the future may stimulated widespread media coverage for the issue. We welcome suggestions for other activities, as well as help in carrying them out.Membership dues in the League are $42 per year for programmers, managers and professionals; $10.50 for students; $21 for others. The League's funds will be is a non-profit corporation, but not considered a tax-exempt charity. However, for those self-employed in software, the dues can be a business expense.The League needs both activist members and members who only pay their dues. We also greatly need additional corporate members; contact us for information.Jack Larsen is President, Chris Hofstader is Secretary, and Steve Sisak is Treasurer. .Telephone: +1 (617) 243 4091.E-mail: .Address: League for Programming Freedom, 1 Kendall Square

Lha mo bla mtsho. (Lhamo latso). An important oracular lake located in central Tibet, southeast of LHA SA. It is considered to be the receptacle for the life force (bla) of the DALAI LAMAs and considered sacred to the Buddhist protective deity DPAL LDAN LHA MO (srīdevī), protectress of the Dalai Lamas. Each Dalai Lama would try to visit the lake at least once during his life to receive visions on the water's surface regarding his future activities and death. The lake is also believed to display signs concerning the future rebirth of the Dalai and PAn CHEN LAMAs. Most recently, in 1933, the regent Rwa sgreng Rin po che saw visions in the lake that indicated the birthplace and circumstances of the fourteenth Dalai Lama.

Lipika (Sanskrit) Lipika [from the verbal root lip to write] A scribe; divine beings connected with karma, recorders who impress on the astral light a record of every act and thought, great or small, in the phenomenal universe. The lipika are active cosmic karmic intelligences, the highest class of architects, which lay down from manvantara to manvantara the tracks of karmic evolution to be followed by all evolving entities within the manvantara about to begin; and these tracks are rigidly begun, and their direction controlled, by the endpoint of the paths of karmic achievement in the preceding manvantara. They “project into objectivity from the passive Universal Mind the ideal plan of the universe, upon which the ‘Builders’ reconstruct the Kosmos after every Pralaya, . . . it is they who are the direct amanuenses of the Eternal Ideation — or, as called by Plato, the ‘Divine Thought’ ” (SD 1:104). The lipika thus are in every sense the agents of karmic destiny, for they are both the vehicles of divine ideation in their work, and yet the expressions of karmic law arising in the past and projected on the background of the future. Their intelligence and vitality permeate their particular universe and all the beings in it, so that the lipikas are stamped with whatever takes place.

lobha. (T. chags pa; C. tan; J. ton; K. t'am 貪). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "craving," or "greed," a synonym of RĀGA ("sensuality" or "desire") and the opposite of "absence of craving" or "absence of greed" (ALOBHA). Lobha is one of the most ubiquitous of the defilements (KLEsA) and is listed among six fundamental afflictions (KLEsAMAHĀBHuMIKA), ten fetters (SAMYOJANA), ten proclivities (ANUsAYA), five hindrances (ĀVARAnA), three poisons (TRIVIsA), and three unwholesome faculties (AKUsALAMuLA). Lobha is also one of the forty-six mental factors (see CAITTA) according to the VAIBHĀsIKA school of SARVĀSTIVĀDA abhidharma, one of the fifty-one according to the YOGACĀRA school, and one of the fifty-two in the Pāli abhidhamma. When sensory contact with objects is made "without proper comprehension" or "without introspection" (ASAMPRAJANYA), craving (lobha), aversion (DVEsA), and delusion (MOHA) arise. In the case of craving-which is a psychological reaction associated with the pursuing, possessing, or yearning for a pleasing stimulus and discontent with unpleasant stimuli-this greed could target a host of possible objects. Scriptural accounts list these objects of craving as sensual pleasures, material belongings, loved ones, fame, the five aggregates (SKANDHA), speculative views (DṚstI), the meditative absorptions (DHYĀNA) of the "subtle-materiality" and "immaterial" realms (see TRILOKADHĀTU), the future "becoming" (BHAVA) of the "self" (S. bhavarāga), and the future "annihilation" of the "self" (S. abhavarāga), among other things. According to the ĀGAMAs and the ABHIDHARMAKOsABHĀsYA, craving is the self-imposed "yoking together" of the subject and its object, whereby the mind is "mired," "bonded," and "burdened" by desire. As one of the three unwholesome faculties (AKUsALAMuLA), craving is said to be the common ground or source of a variety of unwholesome mental states, such as possessiveness (MĀTSARYA) and pride (MADA).

luohan. (J. rakan; K. nahan 羅漢). In Chinese, ARHAT, referring to groups of venerated disciples of the Buddha who in their popular forms served as objects of cultic worship in East Asia. Countless paintings and statues of arhats were created, and legends and miracle stories concerning them circulated throughout the East Asian region. The arhats were commonly worshipped in groups of sixteen, eighteen, and five hundred, the last two of which developed without a canonical basis. Especially important was the cult of sixteen (later sometimes expanded to eighteen) arhat disciples (see sOdAsASTHAVIRA), whom the Buddha ordered to forgo PARINIRVĀnA and to continue to dwell in this world in order to preserve the Buddhist teachings until the coming of the future buddha, MAITREYA. Each of these arhats was assigned a residence and a retinue of disciples. Once Maitreya had advented on earth, the arhats would be charged with gathering the remaining relics of the current buddha sĀKYAMUNI and erecting one last STuPA to hold them, after which they would finally pass into PARINIRVĀnA. In China, arhat cults were popular particularly during the medieval period. Statues and paintings of arhats were enshrined throughout the land and Buddhists made offerings before those images. The Wuyue court even sponsored an annual summoning ritual of the five hundred arhats from the tenth century onward. The Song-dynasty court continued to sponsor the same ritual to pray for the welfare of the court and to ward off the evils. In Korea, the Koryo (918-1392) court performed a ritual for the five hundred arhats more than twenty-five times between 1053 and the end of the dynasty. The ritual was principally intended to pray for precipitation and protection from foreign invasion. This ritual even continued into the early Choson (1392-1910) period. Still today, most of the larger Korean monasteries will have on their campus an arhat hall (nahan chon), which enshrines paintings and/or images, typically of the group of sixteen. In Japan, the arhat cults were especially connected with the ZEN school. In particular, many monasteries associated with the SoToSHu have a hall dedicated to the arhats, which usually enshrines images of the sixteen, and the tradition engages in monthly and semiannual rituals dedicated to the arhats. In the Soto tradition, arhats are believed to play both salvific and apotropaic roles.

Madhav: “Moment is the sequence of Time. Each moment records what is happening at that point. It relates to the present. The Ray of the Eternal interrupts the movement of Time for a while and lights up things that are not yet manifest. It gives a peep into the future. The Ray of the Eternal is able to do it because the future is already present in the vision of the Eternal.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “Our time is divided into past, present, future, but there is a level where Time is continuous. The past, the present and the future are spread out as a map, undivided; in one glance one can see everything.” Sat-Sang Vol. IX

Maggid: Hebrew for preacher. (Plural: Maggidim.) “The Maggidim were partly itinerant preachers, partly regularly appointed community preachers; some of the latter at times served as wandering preachers. The term also refers to a spirit that appears to the select and reveals to them secrets of the teachings and the future.” (M. Buber.)

Mahāparinibbānasuttanta. (S. MAHĀPARINIRVĀnASuTRA; C. Youxing jing/Da banniepan jing; J. Yugyokyo/Daihatsunehangyo; K. Yuhaeng kyong/Tae panyolban kyong 遊行經/大般涅槃經). In Pāli, the "Discourse on the Great Decease" or the "Great Discourse on the Final Nirvāna"; the sixteenth sutta of the Pāli DĪGHANIKĀYA and longest discourse in the Pāli canon. (There were also either Sanskrit or Middle Indic recensions of this mainstream Buddhist version of the scripture, which should be distinguished from the longer MAHĀYĀNA recension of the scripture that bears the same title; see MAHĀPARINIRVĀnASuTRA.) There are six different Chinese translations of this mainstream version of the text, including a DHARMAGUPTAKA recension in the Chinese translation of the DĪRGHĀGAMA and an independent translation in three rolls by FAXIAN. This scripture recounts in six chapters the last year of Buddha's life, his passage into PARINIRVĀnA, and his cremation. In the text, the Buddha and ĀNANDA travel from Rājagaha (S. RĀJAGṚHA) to Kusināra (S. KUsINAGARĪ) in fourteen stages, meeting with different audiences to whom the Buddha gives a variety of teachings. The narrative contains numerous sermons on such subjects as statecraft, the unity of the SAMGHA, morality, the FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS, and the four great authorities (MAHĀPADEsA) for determining the authenticity of Buddhist doctrines following the Buddha's demise. The Buddha crosses a river using his magical powers and describes to the distraught where their deceased loved ones have been reborn. Becoming progressively more ill, the Buddha decides to spend his final rains retreat (P. vassa; S. VARsĀ) with Ānanda meditating in the forest near VEnUGRĀMAKA, using his powers of deep concentration to hold his disease in check. He is eighty years old and describes his body as being like an old cart held together by straps. When the Buddha expresses his wish to address the saMgha, Ānanda assumes that there is a teaching that the Buddha has not yet taught. The Buddha replies that he was not one who taught with a "teacher's fist" (P. ācariyamutthi) or "closed fist," holding back some secret teaching, but that he has in fact already revealed everything. The Buddha also says that he is not the head of the saMgha and that after his death each monk should "be an island unto himself" with the DHARMA as his island (P. dīpa; S. dvīpa) and his refuge. ¶ While meditating at the CĀPĀLACAITYA, the Buddha mentions to Ānanda three times that a TATHĀGATA has the power to live for an eon or until the end of an eon. (The Pāli commentaries take "eon" here to mean "his full allotted lifespan," not a cosmological period.) Ānanda, however, misses the hint and does not ask him to do so. MĀRA then appears to remind the Buddha of what he told him at the time of his enlightenment: that he would not enter nibbāna (NIRVĀnA) until he had trained monks and disciples who were able to teach the dhamma (S. DHARMA). Māra tells the Buddha that that task has now been accomplished, and the Buddha eventually agrees, "consciously and deliberately" renouncing his remaining lifespan and informing Māra that he will pass away in three months' time. The earth then quakes, causing the Buddha to explain to Ānanda the eight reasons for an earthquake, one of which is that a tathāgata has renounced his life force. It is only at that point that Ānanda implores the Buddha to remain until the end of the eon, but the Buddha tells him that the appropriate time for his request has passed, and recalls fifteen occasions on which he had told Ānanda of this remarkable power and how each time Ānanda had failed to ask him to exercise it. The Buddha then explains to a group of monks the four great authorities (MAHĀPADEsA), the means of determining the authenticity of a particular doctrine after the Buddha has died and is no longer available to arbitrate. He then receives his last meal from the smith CUNDA. The dish that the Buddha requests is called SuKARAMADDAVA, lit., "pig's delight." There has been a great deal of scholarly discussion on the meaning of this term, centering upon whether it is a pork dish, such as mincemeat, or something eaten by pigs, such as truffles or mushrooms. At the meal, the Buddha announces that he alone should be served the dish and what was left over should be buried, for none but a buddha could survive eating it. Shortly after finishing the dish, the Buddha is afflicted with the dysentery from which he would eventually die. The Buddha then converts a layman named Pukkusa, who offers him gold robes. Ānanda notices that the color of the robes pales next to the Buddha's skin, and the Buddha informs him that the skin of the Buddha is particularly bright on two occasions, the night when he achieves enlightenment and the night that he passes away. Proceeding to the outskirts of the town of Kusinagarī, the Buddha lies down on his right side between twin sāla (S. sĀLA) trees, which immediately bloom out of season. Shortly before dying, the Buddha instructs Ānanda to visit Cunda and reassure him that no blame has accrued to him; rather, he should rejoice at the great merit he has earned for having given the Buddha his last meal. Monks and divinities assemble to pay their last respects to the Buddha. When Ānanda asks how monks can pay respect to the Buddha after he has passed away, the Buddha explains that monks, nuns, and laypeople should visit four major places (MAHĀSTHĀNA) of pilgrimage: the site of his birth at LUMBINĪ, his enlightenment at BODHGAYĀ, his first teaching at ṚsIPATANA (SĀRNĀTH), and his PARINIRVĀnA at Kusinagarī. Anyone who dies while on pilgrimage to one of these four places, the Buddha says, will be reborn in the heavens. Scholars have taken these instructions as a sign of the relatively late date of this sutta (or at least this portion of it), arguing that this admonition by the Buddha is added to promote pilgrimage to four already well-established shrines. The Buddha instructs the monks to cremate his body in the fashion of a CAKRAVARTIN. He says that his remains (sARĪRA) should be enshrined in a STuPA to which the faithful should offer flowers and perfumes in order to gain happiness in the future. The Buddha then comforts Ānanda, telling him that all things must pass away and praising him for his devotion, predicting that he will soon become an ARHAT. When Ānanda laments the fact that the Buddha will pass away at such a "little mud-walled town, a backwoods town, a branch township," rather than a great city, the Buddha disabuses him of this notion, telling him that Kusinagarī had previously been the magnificent capital of an earlier cakravartin king named Sudarsana (P. Sudassana). The wanderer SUBHADRA (P. Subhadda) then becomes the last person to be ordained by the Buddha. When Ānanda laments that the monks will soon have no teacher, the Buddha explains that henceforth the dharma and the VINAYA will be their teacher. As his last disciplinary act before he dies, the Buddha orders that the penalty of brahmadanda (lit. the "holy rod") be passed on CHANDAKA (P. Channa), his former charioteer, which requires that he be completely shunned by his fellow monks. Then, asking three times whether any of the five hundred monks present has a final question, and hearing none, the Buddha speaks his last words, "All conditioned things are subject to decay. Strive with diligence." The Buddha's mind then passed into the first stage of meditative absorption (P. JHĀNA; S. DHYĀNA) and then in succession through the other three levels of the subtle-materiality realm (RuPADHĀTU) and then through the four levels of the immaterial realm (ĀRuPYADHĀTU). He then passed back down through the same eight levels to the first absorption, then back up to the fourth absorption, and then passed away, at which point the earth quaked. Seven days later, his body was prepared for cremation. However, the funeral pyre could not be ignited until the arrival of MAHĀKĀsYAPA (P. Mahākassapa), who had been away at the time of the Buddha's death. After he arrived and paid his respects, the funeral pyre ignited spontaneously. The relics (sARĪRA) of the Buddha remaining after the cremation were taken by the Mallas of Kusinagarī, but seven other groups of the Buddha's former patrons also came to claim the relics. The brāhmana DROnA (P. Dona) was called upon to decide the proper procedure for apportioning the relics. Drona divided the relics into eight parts that the disputing kings could carry back to their home kingdoms for veneration. Drona kept for himself the urn he used to apportion the relics; a ninth person was given the ashes from the funeral pyre. These ten (the eight portions of relics, the urn, and the ashes) were each then enshrined in stupas. At this point the scripture's narrative ends. A similar account, although with significant variations, appears in Sanskrit recensions of the Mahāparinirvānasutra.

Mahāthupa. In Pāli, "great STuPA"; the great reliquary mound built by the Sinhalese king DUttHAGĀMAnĪ in the first century BCE, erected after he had vanquished the Damilas and reunited the island kingdom under his rule. The Mahāthupa was erected in the MAHĀMEGHAVANA grove near ANURĀDHAPURA at a spot visited by all four of the buddhas who had been born thus far in the present auspicious eon (P. bhaddakappa; S. BHADRAKALPA). The monument, which was 120 cubits high and designed in the shape of a water drop, was crowned with a richly adorned relic chamber that housed physical relics (S. sARĪRA) of the Buddha acquired from the NĀGA MAHĀKĀLA. The arahant MAHINDA is said to have once indicated to King DEVĀNAMPIYATISSA the site where the Mahāthupa was to be built. DevānaMpiyatissa wished to construct the shrine himself, but Mahinda informed him that that honor was to go the future king, Dutthagāmanī. To commemorate that prophecy, DevānaMpiyatissa had it inscribed on a pillar at the site. It was the discovery of that pillar that prompted Dutthagāmanī to take up the task. Thousands of saints from various parts of the island and JAMBUDVĪPA (meaning India in this case) gathered at the Mahāmeghavana to celebrate the construction of the Mahāthupa. Dutthagāmanī fell ill and died just before the monument was completed. The royal umbrella was raised above the Mahāthupa by his brother and successor, Saddhatissa.

Mahdi: An Arabic word, literally meaning the guided one. The future leader of the Mohammedans who is to appear as a Messiah, to establish the better age.

Mahinda. (S. Mahendra; T. Dbang chen; C. Moshentuo; J. Mashinda; K. Masinda 摩哂陀). Pāli proper name of the son of Asoka (S. AsOKA), who converted the Sinhalese king, DEVĀNAMPIYATISSA, to Buddhism in the third century BCE, thus inaugurating the Buddhist religion in Sri Lanka. The story of Mahinda is first recorded in the DĪPAVAMSA (c. fourth century CE) and is elaborated in the MAHĀVAMSA (c. fifth century CE) and BUDDHAGHOSA's VINAYA commentary, SAMANTAPĀSĀDIKĀ. In each of these works, Mahinda's story is preceded by a narrative that begins with the legend of Asoka's conversion to Buddhism, through the convention of the third Buddhist council (see COUNCIL, THIRD) under the direction of MOGGALIPUTTATISSA, to the dispatch of Buddhist missions to nine adjacent lands (paccantadesa). Mahinda was chosen to lead the mission sent to Sri Lanka. Mahinda, together with his sister SAnGHAMITTĀ, was ordained at the age of twenty at the request of his father, Asoka. He attained arahantship immediately upon his ordination. Mahinda was swift in learning the doctrine, and was placed in charge of Moggaliputtatissa's one thousand disciples when the latter retired to Ahoganga due to a dispute within the SAMGHA. Mahinda had been a monk for twelve years when the third Buddhist council was convened to celebrate the resolution of the dispute. Shortly thereafter, he was sent along with four other monks, a novice, and a layman to Sri Lanka for the purpose of converting its king. Mahinda preached the CulAHATTHIPADOPAMASUTTA to DevānaMpiyatissa, whereupon the king requested to be accepted as a lay disciple. The next day, he preached to the king's sister-in-law, Anulā, and five hundred women of the court, all of whom became stream-enterers. Preaching to them a second time, they became once-returners. When they asked be ordained, he said that monks could not ordain women, and suggested that his sister, the nun Sanghamittā, be invited, which was done. She came to Sri Lanka, bringing with her a branch of the BODHI TREE. The king offered to Mahinda the MAHĀMEGHAVANA, a royal pleasure garden that was to be the future site of the MAHĀTHuPA. In the garden, which was on the outskirts of the Sinhalese capital, ANURĀDHAPURA, Mahinda established the SĪMĀ boundary for the MAHĀVIHĀRA monastery, which thenceforth became the headquarters of the Theravāda fraternity on the island. At Mahinda's prompting, relics of the Buddha were received from Asoka and Sakka (S. sAKRA), king of the gods, which were interred in the Cetiyagiri and Thupārāma. Under Mahinda's direction, a council was held where MAHĀRIttHA, a native son of Sri Lanka, recited the vinaya. According to the Samantapāsādikā, this recital marked the firm establishment of the religion on the island. The Saddhammasangaha reckons the recitation of the vinaya by Mahārittha as the fourth Buddhist council (see COUNCIL, FOURTH). Mahinda died at the age of sixty and was cremated and his ashes interred in a shrine near the Mahāthupa.

Maitreyanātha. (T. Byams mgon; C. Cizun; J. Jison; K. Chajon 慈尊). In Sanskrit, the "Protector Maitreya"; an epithet of MAITREYA, the future buddha. The Sanskrit compound can also be read as "Protected by Maitreya," and scholars have presumed that this is the name of an Indian scholar and contemporary of ASAnGA (fourth century CE), whom they credit with the authorship of some or all of the "five books of Maitreya," the ABHISAMAYĀLAMKĀRA, the MAHĀYĀNASuTRĀLAMKĀRA, the RATNAGOTRAVIBHĀGA, the MADHYĀNTAVIBHĀGA, and the DHARMADHARMATĀVIBHĀGA; all of which, according to tradition, were presented to Asanga in the TUsITA heaven by the BODHISATTVA Maitreya.

mantra ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The mantra as I have tried to describe it in The Future Poetry is a word of power and light that comes from the Overmind inspiration or from some very high plane of Intuition. Its characteristics are a language that conveys infinitely more than the mere surface sense of the words seems to indicate, a rhythm that means even more than the language and is born out of the Infinite and disappears into it, and the power to convey not merely the mental, vital or physical contents or indications or values of the thing uttered, but its significance and figure in some fundamental and original consciousness which is behind all these and greater.” *The Future Poetry

mantra ::: Sri Aurobindo: “The mantra as I have tried to describe it in The Future Poetry is a word of power and light that comes from the Overmind inspiration or from some very high plane of Intuition. Its characteristics are a language that conveys infinitely more than the mere surface sense of the words seems to indicate, a rhythm that means even more than the language and is born out of the Infinite and disappears into it, and the power to convey not merely the mental, vital or physical contents or indications or values of the thing uttered, but its significance and figure in some fundamental and original consciousness which is behind all these and greater.” The Future Poetry

mantra ::: : “The mantra as I have tried to describe it in The Future Poetry is a word of power and light that comes from the Overmind inspiration or from some very high plane of Intuition. Its characteristics are a language that conveys infinitely more than the mere surface sense of the words seems to indicate, a rhythm that means even more than the language and is born out of the Infinite and disappears into it, and the power to convey not merely the mental, vital or physical contents or indications or values of the thing uttered, but its significance and figure in some fundamental and original consciousness which is behind all these and greater.” The Future Poetry

Marketing plan – A detailed plan of the companies marketing at present, what it wants it to be in the future and how it intends to change it

Market_timing ::: is the act of moving in and out of the market or switching between asset classes based on using predictive methods such as technical indicators or economic data. Because it is extremely difficult to predict the future direction of the stock market, investors who try to time the market, especially mutual fund investors, tend to underperform investors who remain invested.

Mātṛceta. (T. Ma khol; C. Moxilizhizha; J. Machiriseita; K. Majillijet'a 摩咥里制) (c. third century CE). An Indian monk regarded as one of the great Sanskrit poets of the Buddhist tradition. It is said that at the time of the Buddha he was an oriole who, upon seeing the Buddha, sang a beautiful song. Hearing the song, the Buddha predicted that the bird would be reborn as a great poet in the future. Mātṛceta was a Hindu poet and a devotee of siva. He was a skilled orator, defeating many Buddhists in debate. The monks of NĀLANDĀ monastery appealed to NĀGĀRJUNA for assistance and ĀRYADEVA volunteered to represent his teacher. Mātṛceta and Āryadeva engaged in a famous debate, with Āryadeva eventually defeating Mātṛceta and converting him to Buddhism. His most famous work is the satapaNcāsatakastotra ("Praise in One Hundred Fifty Stanzas"), a work that praises the qualities and deeds of the Buddha in thirteen sections. A second work in praise of the Buddha is his Catuḥsataka ("Four Hundred Verses," also known as the Varnārhavarnastotra, not to be confused with the CATUḤsATAKA by Āryadeva). YIJING, who visited India in the seventh century, reported that the two hymns were taught to all monks, whether HĪNAYĀNA or MAHĀYĀNA, immediately after ordination, and were regularly chanted at assemblies. Yijing translated the former work into Chinese. Mātṛceta is also known for his hymns in praise of TĀRĀ. In addition, he was the author of the Mahārājakaniskalekha ("Letter to King Kaniska"); he was invited to court by the king but, pleading old age, sent a letter of advice instead. If the reign of KANIsKA is placed in the second century, it is possible that the letter is addressed to Kaniska II. In some Tibetan sources, Mātṛceta is identified with Āryasura.

Māyā. [alt. Māyādevī; Mahāmāyā] (T. Sgyu 'phrul ma; C. Moye; J. Maya; K. Maya 摩耶). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "Illusion"; the mother of GAUTAMA Buddha. Her father was ANjana, king of Devadaha, and her mother was Yasodharā. Māyā and her sister MAHĀPRAJĀPATĪ were both married to the Buddha's father sUDDHODANA, the king of KAPILAVASTU. Māyā was between forty and fifty when the future buddha was conceived. At that time, the future buddha was a BODHISATTVA residing in TUsITA heaven, where he surveyed the world and selected his future parents. On the night of his conception, Māyā dreamed that four great gods transported her to the Himalayas, where goddesses bathed her in the waters of the Anotatta Lake and clad her in divine raiment. As she lay on a couch prepared for her, the future buddha, in the form of a white elephant holding a white lotus in its trunk, entered into her right side. After ten lunar months, during which time she remained chaste, Māyā set out to visit her parents in Devadaha. Along the way she stopped at the LUMBINĪ grove, where she gave birth to the prince and future buddha while holding onto a branch of a sĀLA tree; according to some accounts, he emerged from her right side. Seven days later, Māyā died. Varying reasons are provided for her demise, including that she died from joy at having given birth to the future buddha and that she died after seven days because she would have died from a broken heart when Prince SIDDHĀRTHA subsequently renounced the world at the age of twenty-nine. It is also said that the mothers of all buddhas die shortly after their birth because it is not suitable that any other child be conceived in the womb that had been occupied by a future buddha. Māyā was reborn as a male divinity named Māyādevaputra in the TUsITA heaven. After her death, Māyā's sister Mahāprājāpatī raised the future buddha as her own child. Because his mother's death had prevented her from benefiting from his teachings, the Buddha once spent a rainy season in TRĀYASTRIMsA heaven atop Mount SUMERU, during which time he preached the ABHIDHARMA to his mother, who had come from tusita heaven to listen, along with the other assembled divinities. These teachings, which the Buddha later recounted to sĀRIPUTRA, would become the ABHIDHARMAPItAKA. The Buddha's descent from the heaven at SĀMKĀsYA at the conclusion of his teachings is one of the most commonly depicted scenes in Buddhist art. The entry of the future Buddha into his mother's womb, and by extension into the human realm of existence, is a momentous event in Buddhist history, and elaborate descriptions of that descent and of that womb appear in a number of texts. One of the most famous is found in the forty-fourth chapter of the GAndAVYuHA, a MAHĀYĀNA SuTRA dating from perhaps the second century of the Common Era. In the sutra, SUDHANA goes in search of enlightenment. During his journey, he encounters all manner of exalted beings, each of whom provides him with instruction. One of the teachers he meets is Māyā. She describes in elaborate detail how her son entered her womb, revealing that it was able to accommodate much more than a white elephant, without for a moment distorting her form. She reveals that it was not only the bodhisattva SIDDHĀRTHA who descended from the tusita and entered her womb; in fact, countless other bodhisattvas accompanied him to become buddhas simultaneously in millions of similar universes. She reveals as well that she is the mother not only of all the buddhas of the present, but of all the buddhas of the past and that she will also be the mother of the next buddha, MAITREYA.

Mein Kampf ::: This autobiographical book (My Struggle) by Hitler was written while he was imprisoned in the Landsberg fortress after the "Beer-Hall Putsch" in 1923. In this book, Hitler propounds his ideas, beliefs, and plans for the future of Germany. Everything, including his foreign policy, is permeated by his "racial ideology." The Germans, belonging to the "superior" Aryan race, have a right to "living space" (Lebensraum) in the East, which is inhabited by the "inferior" Slavs. Throughout, he accuses Jews of being the source of all evil, equating them with Bolshevism and, at the same time, with international capitalism. Unfortunately, those people who read the book (except for his admirers) did not take it seriously but considered it the ravings of a maniac. (see Hitler, Adolf).

Metensomatosis(Greek) ::: A compound word of which the significance may perhaps be briefly rendered thus: "changingbody after body." The reference is to a reimbodying entity which does not necessarily use human bodiesof flesh only, in which respect this word differs from reincarnation, but bodies of appropriate yetdifferent physical material concordant with the evolutionary stage which the human race may havereached at any time, and with the plane or sphere of nature on which the reimbodiment takes place. Thisword, because of the intricate ideas involved, is very difficult to explain properly or even to hint at in afew words, but perhaps it may be made more clear by the following observation: In far past ages thehuman race had bodies, but not bodies of flesh; and in far distant ages of the future, the human race willlikewise have bodies, but not necessarily bodies of flesh. Actually, our teaching in this respect is that inthose far-distant periods of the future, human bodies of that time will be compact of ether or, what comesto much the same thing, of luminous matter which may very properly be called concreted light.

Mithraism The worship of Mithras, a remarkable and highly mystical religion which existed long before Zoroaster as the Society of the Magi (the Great Brotherhood of Man) giving its secret teachings to qualified candidates, the future initiates. Although supposedly a worship of the sun, originating in Persia, Mithraism was “really a religious philosophy based upon the Divine, Inner, and Invisible Sun, a vortex so to say of the Divine Spiritual Fire of the Universe, of the Heart of Things” (ET 609 3rd & rev ed). Mithraism spread throughout the Greco-Roman world, especially during the 2nd and 3rd centuries and for a time threatened to supersede Christianity. A number of the liturgical rites and ceremonies of Christianity are probably of Mithraic origin. For example, rites associated with Deo Soli Invicto Mithrae (to the Unconquered God-sun, Mithras), were held at the time of the winter solstice, especially the Night of Light — now Christmas — known as the birthday of Mithras, represented as having been born in a cave or grotto, hence often called the rock-born god. Exceedingly popular in the Roman armies as well as with the rulers of the Roman Empire, Mithraism was regularly established by Trajan about 100 AD in the Empire, and the Emperor Commodus was himself initiated into its mysteries. Sacred caves or grottoes were the principal places of worship, where the Mysteries for which Mithraism was famed were enacted.

mofa. (J. mappo; K. malpop 末法). In Chinese, "final dharma" period. The dispensation of Buddhism, like all compounded things, is presumed to be impermanent and subject to decay and eventually dissolution. This process of eschatological decline was believed to occur in stages, often calculated at either five hundred or one thousand years at each stage (although there were many variations), and began with the passage of the Buddha into PARINIRVĀnA. In East Asia, the notion of decline was formalized into an influential doctrinal system, consisting of three stages or periods named "true dharma" (zhengfa; see SADDHARMA), "semblance dharma" (XIANGFA), and "final dharma" (mofa). This tripartite system was not inherited from Indian Buddhism. The term mofa is not the translation of the Sanskrit SADDHARMAVIPRALOPA ("destruction of the dharma"), but is instead a neologism derived from moshi, the Chinese translation of term PAsCIMAKĀLA ("latter time"). The notion of the period of the final dharma spawned a large and influential exegetical tradition in East Asia. The date of the onset of the final period was variously calculated (and was generally assumed to have already begun soon after Buddhism's introduction into East Asia). This assumption was widely employed as doctrinal justification for certain practices, such as the invocation of the name of the buddha AMITĀBHA (NIANFO) or the cult of the future buddha MAITREYA. In such contexts, it was claimed that during the period of the final dharma, beings lacked the capacity to successfully follow the standard path to liberation set forth by the Buddha and instead should rely on the efficacious powers of Amitābha or the prospect of an easier practice regimen after the advent of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha's successor, Maitreya. The notion of the age of the final dharma was espoused in many indigenous scriptures (see APOCRYPHA) written in East Asia. It also played an important role in the formation of such traditions as PURE LAND, JoDOSHu, JoDO SHINSHu, NICHIRENSHu, NICHIREN SHOSHu, and others. See also SADDHARMAVIPRALOPA.

Moggaliputtatissa. (C. Mujianlianzidixu; J. Mokukenrenshiteishu; K. Mokkollyonjajesu目犍連子帝須). According to Pāli sources, the monk who served as head of the third Buddhist council (SAMGĪTI; see COUNCIL, THIRD) convened at Pātaliputta (S. PĀtALIPUTRA) in the third century BCE. In a previous life, Moggaliputtatissa had been a divinity who, at the behest of a delegation of arahants (S. ARHAT), took human rebirth so that he could assist in the future purification of the Buddhist teaching. Fully trained in the TIPItAKA and its commentaries (AttHAKATHĀ) as a novice, he became an arahant shortly after being ordained as a monk. King AsOKA's lavish support of the Buddhist SAMGHA prompted many non-Buddhist mendicants and brāhmanas to don the robes of Buddhist monks merely as a livelihood. With the orthodox saMgha unable to forcibly remove the bogus monks from their midst, the ordination ceremony (P. uposatha; S. UPOsADHA) was suspended. When this situation had persisted for seven years, Moggaliputtatissa, at Asoka's request, taught the DHARMAVINAYA to the king so that he might intervene on behalf of the legitimate party. Asoka interrogated the saMgha and, drawing on the authority of the state (ānācakka), defrocked those monks found to be improperly ordained. With the saMgha thus purified of its corrupting influences, Moggaliputtatissa convened the third Buddhist council to rehearse the Buddha's teachings as preserved in the Pāli tipitaka and its commentaries. At that time Moggaliputtatissa composed the KATHĀVATTHU, the seventh and last book of the ABHIDHAMMAPItAKA, to refute heretical views. At the conclusion of the council, Moggaliputtatissa dispatched missionaries to nine adjacent lands (paccantajanapada) to propagate the newly purified teaching.

Moira (Greek) Plural morai or morae. One’s allotted share; destiny. As a proper name, there was originally only one Moira, but later there were three: Lachesis, Clotho, and Atropos. Lachesis is from a root lach, as in lagchano “to obtain that which has already been determined or fixed”; she is depicted as a grave maiden holding a staff pointing to a horoscope, signifying that which man has built in the past is now unfolding. She was occultly connected with the earth. Clotho or Klotho is from a verb meaning “to spin,” and is represented as a woman holding a spindle, spinning thread which is man’s destiny, that which he is at present weaving for the future, and is connected with the future in that what we weave now determines what our future shall be. Thus it is linked with the psychological part of human nature, and connected occultly with the moon. Atropos is from a verb meaning “impossible to set aside or evade,” and therefore is translated as “inevitable, ineluctable.” It was often represented as a woman pointing to a sundial signifying that as the sun brings its light to the earth, so the future shall bring its destiny to man, as the flying hours unfold what comes to us out of the womb of time. Thus we have Lachesis representing the ineluctable destiny coming to us in our present life on earth from our past; Clotho, the present spinning of our future destiny because of the actions and reactions, mental and emotional, by which we are now weaving the web of fate which someday will become the present; and Atropos, the ineluctable and inescapable future represented as held in store, every thread of which has been woven by ourselves in past and present. Their respective functions are sometimes interchanged. Equivalent to the Latin Parcae and Fata, and the Scandinavian Norns.

More generally, the winged wheel or globe suggests cyclic time unrolling its mysterious destiny, emerging from the darkness of the mists of the past, passing through the present, and pursuing its equally mysterious but always karmic courses into the future. In a more restricted sense, it applies to the reimbodying monads, the egg, wheel, or disk representing the monad or consciousness-center, and its wings suggesting its passage through not only duration but space. See also WHEEL

MultiLisp "language" A {parallel} extension of {Scheme} with explicit {concurrency}. The form (future X) immediately returns a "{future}", and creates a {task} to evaluate X. When the evaluation is complete, the future is resolved to be the value. ["MultiLisp: A Language for Concurrent Symbolic Computation", R. Halstead, TOPLAS pp.501-538 (Oct 1985)]. [Did MultiLisp use {PVM} as its intermediate language?] (1998-02-10)

MultiLisp ::: (language) A parallel extension of Scheme with explicit concurrency. The form (future X) immediately returns a future, and creates a task to evaluate X. When the evaluation is complete, the future is resolved to be the value.[MultiLisp: A Language for Concurrent Symbolic Computation, R. Halstead, TOPLAS pp.501-538 (Oct 1985)].[Did MultiLisp use PVM as its intermediate language?] (1998-02-10)

Mysteria Specialia [from mysteria mystery + specialia particular, specific] Particular mystery; used by European Medieval alchemico-mystical philosophers, such as Paracelsus. Mysterium is used by Paracelsus to denote the germinal state of a being, which is afterwards produced in the differentiated state; thus the seed is the mysterium of the future plant. Specialia implies that each organism pre-exists in its own special mysterium. Thus is indicated an intermediate state of differentiation, between the condition of undifferentiated chaos and that of separate and developed organisms.

Necyomancy: Foretelling the future by examining the nerves of the dead.

Nehashim (Hebrew) Nĕḥāshīm [from nāḥash to whisper, secrecy, silence, to practice magic, divine the future] Serpents, serpent’s works; the study and practice of occult wisdom and magic. According to the Zohar (iii 302): “ ‘It is called nehhaschim, because the magicians (practical Kabalists) work surrounded by the light of the primordial serpent, which they perceive in heaven as a luminous zone composed of myriads of small stars’ . . . which means simply the astral light, so called by the Martinists, by Elephas Levi, and now by all the modern Occultists” (SD 2:409) — but it likewise shows the luminous zone as the Milky Way. The astral light is often referred to as the great deceiving serpent.

Nephelomancy: Foretelling the future by using the clouds as divinatory signs.

Nephthys (Greek) Nebt-het (Egyptian) Nebt-ḥet. Lady of the house; an Egyptian deity, especially associated with the Underworld. Generally regarded as the daughter of Seb and Nut, sister of Osiris, Isis, and Set. In earliest times she is always Set’s consort, giving birth of Anubis (Anpu). But more often she is mentioned with Isis, as the faithful sister. She was the personification of darkness; while Isis symbolized birth, growth, development, and vigor, Nephthys typified death, immobility, and the fountain of all. As in the case of Mut and Hathor, the darkness spoken of was the darkness of spirit as the womb of cosmic space, and hence the association of her name and attributes with death and the afterlife — death being the reservoir of all that has lived, and therefore the fountain of all that shall live in the future, the reproductions of the former. Isis represented the part of the world that is visible — hence the light or manifested part or day; Nephthys, or Neith, the part which is invisible — hence mystical, holy, and everlasting night, the precursor of day, and dark only because its mysteries in their fullness are utterly inscrutable to human intelligence. Thus one was associated with the things which are in manifestation, the other with those which are to come, or which forever are and produce what is to come.

Nichiren Shoshu. (日蓮正宗). In Japanese, "Orthodox School of Nichiren"; one of the principal Japanese Buddhist schools based on the teachings of NICHIREN (1222-1282). Nichiren Shoshu is descended from Nichiren through Nichiko (1246-1332), the alleged sole heir of Nichiren among his six chief disciples. Nichiko was a loyal student and archivist of Nichiren's writings, who established in 1290 what was then called the Fuji school at TAISEKIJI, a monastery on Mt. Fuji in Shizuoka prefecture. Nichiko's school later divided into eight subbranches, known collectively as the Fuji Monryu (Fuji schools) or Nichiko Monryu (Nichiko schools). The monk Nichikan (1665-1726), a noted commentator and teacher, was instrumental in resurrecting the observance of Nichiren's teachings at Taisekiji. He was also the person who systematized and established many of the innovative features of the school, particularly the school's unique view that Nichiren was the Buddha (see below). The eight associated temples that remained in the Fuji school reunited in 1876 as the Komon sect, later adopting a new name, the Honmon. However, in 1899, Taisekiji split from the other temples and established an independent sect, renaming itself Nichiren Shoshu in 1912. In 1930, MAKIGUCHI TSUNESABURO and Toda Josei established the SoKA GAKKAI (then called Soka Kyoiku Gakkai), a lay organization for the promotion of Nichiren Shoshu thought, but quickly ran afoul of the Japanese government's promotion of the cult of state Shintoism. Makiguchi refused to comply with government promulgation of Shinto worship and was imprisoned for violating the Peace Preservation Law; he died in prison in 1944. Toda was eventually released, and he devoted himself after World War II to promoting Soka Gakkai and Nichiren Shoshu, which at that time were closely connected. The two groups acrimoniously separated in 1991, Nichiren Shoshu accusing Soka Gakkai of forming a personality cult around their leader IKEDA DAISAKU (b. 1928) and of improper modifications of Nichiren practice; Soka Gakkai accusing the Nichiren Shoshu leader Abe Nikken of trying to dominate both organizations. The two groups now operate independently. Nichiren Shoshu has grown to over seven hundreds temples in Japan, as well as a few temples in foreign countries. Nichiren Shoshu distinguishes itself from the other Nichiren schools by its unique view of the person of Nichiren: it regards the founder as the true buddha in this current degenerate age of the dharma (J. mappo; C. MOFA), a buddha whom sĀKYAMUNI promised his followers would appear two thousand years in the future; therefore, they refer to Nichiren as daishonin, or great sage. Other Nichiren schools instead regard the founder as the reincarnation of Jogyo Bosatsu (the BODHISATTVA VIsIstACĀRITRA). Nichiren Shoshu's claim to orthodoxy is based on two documents, not recognized by other Nichiren schools, in which Nichiren claims to transfer his dharma to Nichiko, viz., the Minobu sojosho ("Minobu Transfer Document") and the Ikegami sojosho ("Ikegami Transfer Document"), which are believed to have been written in 1282 by Nichiren, the first at Minobu and the second on the day of his death at Ikegami. Nichiren Shoshu practice is focused on the dai-gohonzon mandala, the ultimate object of devotion in the school, which Nichiren created. The DAI-GOHONZON (great object of devotion), a MAndALA (here, a cosmological chart) inscribed by Nichiren in 1279, includes the DAIMOKU (lit., "title"), viz., the phrase "NAMU MYoHoRENGEKYo" (Homage to the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA), which is considered to be the embodiment of Nichiren's enlightenment and the ultimate reason for his advent in this world. The gohonzon is placed in a shrine or on a simple altar in the homes of devotees of the sect. This veneration of the gohonzon to the exclusion of all other deities and images of the Buddha distinguishes Nichiren Shoshu from other Nichiren schools. The school interprets the three jewels (RATNATRAYA) of the Buddha, DHARMA, and SAMGHA to refer, respectively, to Nichiren (the buddha); to namu Myohorengekyo and the gohonzon (the dharma); and to his successor Nichiko (the saMgha). By contrast, other Nichiren schools generally consider sākyamuni to be the Buddha and Nichiren the saMgha, and do not include the gohonzon in the dharma, since they question its authenticity. All schools of Nichiren thought accept Nichiren's acknowledgment of the buddhahood that is latent in all creatures and the ability of all human beings of any class to achieve buddhahood in this lifetime.

nimitta. (T. mtshan ma; C. xiang/ruixiang; J. so/zuiso; K. sang/sosang 相/瑞相). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "mark" or "sign," in the sense of a distinguishing characteristic, or a meditative "image." Among its several denotations, three especially deserve attention. (1) In Buddhist epistemology, nimitta refers to the generic appearance of an object, in distinction to its secondary characteristics, or ANUVYANJANA. Advertence toward the generic sign and secondary characteristics of an object produces a recognition or perception (SAMJNĀ) of that object, which may in turn lead to clinging or rejection and ultimately suffering. Thus nimitta often carries the negative sense of false or deceptive marks that are imagined to inhere in an object, resulting in the misperception of that object as real, intrinsically existent, or endowed with self. Thus, the apprehension of signs (nimittagrāha) is considered a form of ignorance (AVIDYĀ), and the perception of phenomena as signless (ĀNIMITTA) is a form of wisdom that constitutes one of three "gates to deliverance" (VIMOKsAMUKHA), along with emptiness (suNYATĀ) and wishlessness (APRAnIHITA). (2) In the context of THERAVĀDA meditation practice (BHĀVANĀ), as set forth in such works as the VISUDDHIMAGGA, nimitta refers to an image that appears to the mind after developing a certain degree of mental concentration (SAMĀDHI). At the beginning of a meditation exercise that relies, e.g., on an external visual support (KASInA), such as a blue circle, the initial mental image one recalls is termed the "preparatory image" (PARIKAMMANIMITTA). With the deepening of concentration, the image becomes more refined but is still unsteady; at that stage, it is called the "acquired image" or "eidetic image" (UGGAHANIMITTA). When one reaches access or neighborhood concentration (UPACĀRASAMĀDHI), a clear, luminous image appears to the mind, which is called the "counterpart image" or "representational image" (PAtIBHĀGANIMITTA). It is through further concentration on this stable "representational image" that the mind finally attains "full concentration" (APPANĀSAMĀDHI), i.e, meditative absorption (P. JHĀNA; S. DHYĀNA). (3) The term also appears in CATURNIMITTA, the "four signs," "sights," or "portents," which were the catalysts that led the future buddha SIDDHĀRTHA GAUTAMA to renounce the world (see PRAVRAJITA) and pursue liberation from the cycle of birth and death (SAMSĀRA): specifically, the sight of an old man, a sick man, a dead man, and a religious mendicant (sRAMAnA).

niyāma. [alt. niyama] (T. nges par 'gyur ba; C. jueding; J. ketsujo; K. kyolchong 決定). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "constraint," "certainty," referring to the certainty of what is to come or the fixedness of things. Laws governing the universe are referred to as the five certainties (paNcaniyāma). According to the Pāli commentaries, these five certainties are (1) the certainty of the seasons (utuniyāma), which includes such aspects of the natural environment as the regular progression of the seasons, the rise and fall in temperature, etc.; (2) the certainty of seeds (bījaniyāma), which refers to botany, viz., that specific seeds produce specific plants, that certain fruits have certain flavors, and so on; (3) the certainty of action (kammaniyāma), which refers to the fact that virtuous actions lead to happiness in the future and nonvirtuous actions lead to suffering; (4) the certainty of mind (cittaniyāma), which includes the processes and constituents of consciousness; and (5) the certainty of the dharma (dhammaniyāma), which refers, among other things, to certain events that occur in the lives of all buddhas. ¶ In the MAHĀYĀNA, nyāma, a BUDDHIST HYBRID SANSKRIT word that is probably an alternate form of niyāma, has a different meaning, referring to the development of compassion that overcomes the faults of the HĪNAYĀNA and is unique to the bodhisattva path. It has been translated into English as "the fixed condition" of a bodhisattva or a bodhisattva's "distinctive way of salvation."

Norns [from Icelandic, Scandinavian] In the Norse Edda the three Norns, sometimes called the weird sisters, are the spinners of destiny, symbolizing past, present, and future. The first, named Urd (origin), represents the past which causes all that follows; the second, Verdandi (becoming), is the ever-changing present. These two fashion the third, Skuld (debt), all that is as yet unresolved and which determines the future. Thus the actions of past and present determine what is yet to come.

Now A fundamental concept of the theosophical philosophy is the Eternal Now. The past lingers in the memory and the future is ever vanishing from the present into the past: only Now eternally exists. In the case of man, at any given moment he is the result of what he has fashioned himself to be out of all preceding moments; his future will therefore be the working out of his previous thoughts and actions, and one by one these disappear into what to us is the past, and yet is always present. These philosophical reflections apply universally.

Of all the gods, only Vali and Vidar survive the destruction of the world, Ragnarok, when the gods return to their ground, thus preparing the seed for the future world, the child and successor of the present one.

‘Olam (Hebrew) ‘Ōlām Ulom (Phoenician) [from ‘ālam to hide, conceal] Also oulom. Long duration, long past time, great antiquity, hence occasionally used for the future; again, the world. Parallel to the Gnostic Aeon, which signifies a time period, something secret and esoteric, and the world which exists in the time period; also parallels the Sanskrit kala. Sometimes mistranslated as eternity. Frequently used in the plural (‘olamin).

Omen [from Latin os mouth, as the voice of a god] As in augury and divination, the laws of correspondences and of the interrelation of all parts of the cosmos imply that it is possible to interpret the invisible and to forecast the future by observing visible signs. The right interpretation of omens demands knowledge and skill, and the subject affords a fertile field for self-deception and quackery. As with astrology, an undue concern with influences tends to subject a person to them; it is advisable to discriminate between what might happen and what must happen.

Omniscience: In philosophy and theology it means the complete and perfect knowledge of God, of Himself and of all other beings, past, present, and future, or merely possible, as well as all their activities, real or possible, including the future free actions of human beings. (The adjective is: omniscient.)

Oomancy [from Greek oon egg + manteia divination] The ancient art of divination by eggs was taught to mankind by Orpheus (SD 1:362); and the diviner was able by inspecting the contents of the egg to perceive whatever the bird born from it would have seen, had it ever been born. The possibility of divination is a logical deduction from the principle of universal correspondences and the interrelation and interpenetration of all parts of the universe. It is therefore only a question of esoteric knowledge and skill. The germ of the future lies concealed in the present, making prediction possible by one whose spiritual faculties have been awakened.

oracular ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to an oracle; uttering oracles; forecasting the future; as, an oracular tongue.
Resembling an oracle in some way, as in solemnity, wisdom, authority, obscurity, ambiguity, dogmatism.


Orlog (Icelandic) [from or, ur primal + log law] In Norse mythology, the primal law of all existence, corresponding to karma, the beginningless and endless succession of causes and effects constantly modifying each being’s fate or destiny as a result of its own actions. The agents of Orlog are the three norns that represent the past (Urd, origin), present (Verdandi, becoming), and future (Skuld, debt). It is the inescapable result of all that has gone before and is presently creating the future, whether of universal gods or human beings.

Padma gling pa. (Pema Lingpa) (1450-1521). An esteemed Bhutanese treasure revealer (GTER STON), famous for unearthing treasure in public and responsible for promulgating numerous important religious traditions, including forms of ritual monastic dance ('CHAM). He is counted as the fourth of the so-called five kingly treasure revealers (GTER STON RGYAL PO LNGA) and the last of the five pure incarnations of the royal princess PADMA GSAL. He is also regarded as the mind incarnation of the translator VAIROCANA and an incarnation of KLONG CHEN RAB 'BYAMS. Padma gling pa was born into a humble family of blacksmiths in the Bum thang region of Bhutan and studied the craft from the age of nine. Many examples of Padma gling pa's craftsmanship, in the form of swords and chain mail, still exist. Padma gling pa's life is somewhat unusual in that he did not undertake a traditional course of study with a spiritual master; it is recorded that he once declared, "I have no master and I am not a disciple." Rather, his religious training was achieved almost entirely through visionary revelation. At the age of twenty-six, he had a vision of PADMASAMBHAVA, who bestowed on him a roster of 108 treasure texts that he would unearth in the future. The next year, amid a large public gathering, he made his first treasure discovery at ME 'BAR MTSHO, a wide pool of water in a nearby river. Surrounded by a multitude of people gathered along the riverside, Padma gling pa dove in the waters holding a burning butter lamp in his hand. When he reemerged, he held a great treasure chest under his arm, and, to the crowd's amazement, the lamp in his hand was unextinguished; from that point on the pool was called "Burning Flame Lake." This feat marked the beginning of Padma gling pa's prolific career as treasure revealer and teacher. Between the years 1501 and 1505, he founded his seat at GTAM ZHING monastery in Bum thang. Padma gling pa composed a lengthy autobiography recording many of his activities in great detail. He was a controversial figure in his time (some of the treasure texts he discovered contain condemnations of those who doubted their authenticity), and the historicity of his deeds has been the subject of scholarly critique. However, Padma gling pa remains an important figure in the religious and cultural life of Bhutan, where he is considered both a saint and a national hero. He never received monastic ordination and fathered several sons who continued to transmit Padma gling pa's spiritual lineage, especially at SGANG STENG monastery in central Bhutan. Several incarnation lineages of Padma gling pa were also recognized, such as the gsung sprul ("speech incarnation") based at LHA LUNG Monastery in southern Tibet. Both the sixth DALAI LAMA TSHANGS DBYANGS RGYA MTSHO and the Bhutanese royal family are said to be descendants of Padma gling pa's familial lineage.

Padma (Sanskrit) Padma The lotus, a flower which has been held sacred from remotest antiquity by the Aryan Hindus, as well as revered in other lands such as Egypt. Mystically, it was looked upon as an emblem of productive nature growing between the spiritual sunlight above and the water or the astral light below; or in a more general sense between spirit and matter. It has also other meanings, such as in India, of the prolific earth, and even of Mount Meru. The lotus is “a very ancient and favourite simile for the Kosmos itself, and also for man. The popular reasons given are, firstly, . . . that the Lotus-seed contains within itself a perfect miniature of the future plant, which typifies the fact that the spiritual prototypes of all things exist in the immaterial world before those things become materialised on Earth. Secondly, the fact that the Lotus plant grows up through the water, having its root in the Ilus, or mud, and spreading its flower in the air above. The Lotus thus typifies the life of man and also that of the Kosmos; . . . The root of the Lotus sunk in the mud represents material life, the stalk passing up through the water typifies existence in the astral world, and the flower floating on the water and opening to the sky is emblematical of spiritual being” (SD 1:57-8).

paisunya. (P. pisuna; T. phra ma; C. lijianyu; J. rikengo; K. igano 離間語). In Sanskrit, "slander," or "malicious speech" (and sometimes rendered as "backbiting"); one of the ten unwholesome courses of action (dasākusalakarmapatha; see KARMAPATHA) that lead to suffering in the future; also written as paisunyavāda (P. pisunavācā). These ten unwholesome actions are classified into three negative physical deeds, four negative verbal deeds, and three negative verbal deeds. Slander falls into the second category, together with lying (mṛsāvāda), offensive or harsh speech (PĀRUsYA), and frivolous prattle (SAMBHINNAPRALĀPA). Slander is speech intended to cause dissension and divisiveness between two parties. It has the effect of creating dissension between friends or greater dissension between enemies. It may be motivated by greed, hatred, or ignorance.

parusia ::: n. --> A figure of speech by which the present tense is used instead of the past or the future, as in the animated narration of past, or in the prediction of future, events.

pārusya. (P. pharusavācā; T. tshig rtsub; C. ekou; J. akuku; K. akku 惡口). In Sanskrit, "harsh speech," one of the ten unsalutary ways of action (AKUsALA-KARMAPATHA) that lead to suffering in the future. The ten are classified into three negative physical deeds, four negative verbal deeds, and three negative verbal deeds. Harsh speech falls into the second category, together with lying (mṛsāvāda), slander (PAIsUNYA) and senseless speech (SAMBHINNAPRALĀPA). Harsh speech would include insults, abusive speech, and sarcasm intended to hurt another person. It may be directed against a living being or a physical object. Harsh speech is typically motivated by hatred, but it can also be motivated by jealousy or ignorance.

Passages in holy scriptures, such as 1 Samuel, have misled many Europeans into believing that such methods of attempting to peer into the future were proper and considered morally permissible by the wise of ancient days. Yet one has but to read this chapter to see that the woman knew her practice was done against the law then prevailing, which apparently made necromantic intercourse of this type punishable with death (cf 28:9). Traffic with the dead was not infrequently resorted to in ancient times, but was censured as unholy, if not evil. Such raisings of the dead have been common in all ages by necromancers, sorcerers, and traffickers in lower magic; although it is quite true that ancient legend and story provides a number of instances where people of prominence resorted in moments of desperation to such methods in an attempt to gain foreknowledge of events coming to pass: for example, the incident related by Homer of the raising of the shade of the seer Teiresias by Odysseus (Odyssey bk 11) and again the necromantic practices of Sextus, the son of Pompey, through the “witch” Erictho on the plains of Thessaly, as described by Lucan (Pharsalia Bk 6, vv. 570-820).

Personality ::: Theosophists draw a clear and sharp distinction, not of essence but of quality, between personality andindividuality. Personality comes from the Latin word persona, which means a mask, through which theactor, the spiritual individuality, speaks. The personality is all the lower man: all the psychical and astraland physical impulses and thoughts and tendencies, and what not. It is the reflection in matter of theindividuality; but being a material thing it can lead us downwards, although it is in essence a reflection ofthe highest. Freeing ourselves from the domination of the person, the mask, the veil, through which theindividuality acts, then we show forth all the spiritual and so-called superhuman qualities; and this willhappen in the future, in the far distant aeons of the future, when every human being shall have become abuddha, a christ. Such is the destiny of the human race.In occultism the distinction between the personality and the immortal individuality is that drawn betweenthe lower quaternary or four lower principles of the human constitution and the three higher principles ofthe constitution or higher triad. The higher triad is the individuality; the personality is the lowerquaternary. The combination of these two into a unity during a lifetime on earth produces what we nowcall the human being. The personality comprises within its range all the characteristics and memories andimpulses and karmic attributes of one physical life; whereas the individuality is the aeonic ego,imperishable and deathless for the period of a solar manvantara. It is the individuality through its ray orhuman astral-vital monad which reincarnates time after time and thus clothes itself in one personalityafter another personality.

Phra Malai. (P. Māleyya). A legendary arahant (S. ARHAT) and one of the most beloved figures in Thai Buddhist literature. According to legend, Phra Malai lived on the island of Sri Lanka and was known for his great compassion and supramundane abilities, including the power to fly to various realms of the Buddhist universe. On one of his visits to the hells, he alleviated the suffering of hell beings and then returned to the human realm to advise their relatives to make merit on their behalf. One day as he was on his alms round, he encountered a poor man who presented him with eight lotus blossoms. Phra Malai accepted the offering and then took the flowers to tāvatimsa (S. TRĀYASTRIMsA) heaven to present them at the Culāmani cetiya (S. caitya), where the hair relic of the Buddha is enshrined. Phra Malai then met the king of the gods, INDRA, and asked him various questions: why he had built the caitya, when the future buddha Metteya (S. MAITREYA) would come to pay respects to it, and how the other deities coming to worship had made sufficient merit to be reborn at such a high level. The conversation proceeded as one divinity after another arrived, with Indra's explanation of the importance of making merit by practicing DĀNA (generosity), observing the precepts and having faith. Eventually Metteya himself arrived and, after paying reverence to the chedi, asked Phra Malai about the people in the human realm. Phra Malai responded that there is great diversity in their living conditions, health, happiness, and spiritual faculties, but that they all hoped to meet Metteya in the future and hear him preach. Metteya in response told Phra Malai to tell those who wished to meet him to listen to the recitation of the entire VESSANTARA-JĀTAKA over the course of one day and one night, and to bring to the monastery offerings totaling a thousand flowers, candles, incense sticks, balls of rice, and other gifts. In the northern and northeastern parts of Thailand, this legend is recited in the local dialects (Lānnā Thai and Lao, respectively) as a preface to the performance or recitation of the Vessantara-Jātaka at an annual festival. In central and south Thailand, a variant of the legend emphasizing the suffering of the hell denizens was customarily recited at funeral wakes, a practice that is becoming less common in the twenty-first century.

Phra Pathom Chedi. In Thai, lit. "Noble First Shrine," said to be the tallest Buddhist CAITYA (P. cetī) in the world at over 394 feet (120 meters); located in the Thai town of Nakhon Pathom. The original stupa, located in the region where the first Buddhist missionaries taught in Thailand, may date from the fourth century CE. The stupa was rebuilt in the Khmer style in the eleventh century and eventually fell into ruins. These ruins were visited by Prince Mongkut (the future RĀMA IV) during his years as a monk. After Mongkut ascended the throne, he ordered that a new stupa be constructed at the site, which was completed in 1870 after seventeen years of construction.

Planetary Spirit(s) ::: Every celestial body in space, of whatever kind or type, is under the overseeing and directing influenceof a hierarchy of spiritual and quasi-spiritual and astral beings, who in their aggregate are generalizedunder the name of celestial spirits. These celestial spirits exist therefore in various stages or degrees ofevolution; but the term planetary spirits is usually restricted to the highest class of these beings whenreferring to a planet.In every case, and whatever the celestial body may be, such a hierarchy of ethereal beings, when themost advanced in evolution of them are considered, in long past cycles of kosmic evolution had evolvedthrough a stage of development corresponding to the humanity of earth. Every planetary spirit therefore,wherever existent, in those far past aeons of kosmic time was a man or a being equivalent to what wehumans on earth call man. The planetary spirits of earth, for instance, are intimately linked with theorigin and destiny of our present humanity, for not only are they our predecessors along the evolutionarypath, but certain classes of them are actually the spiritual guides and instructors of mankind. We humans,in far distant aeons of the future, on a planetary chain which will be the child or grandchild of the presentearth-chain, will be the planetary spirits of that future planetary chain. It is obvious that as H. P.Blavatsky says: "Our Earth, being as yet only in its Fourth Round, is far too young to have produced highPlanetary Spirits"; but when the seventh round of this earth planetary chain shall have reached its end,our present humanity will then have become dhyanchohans of various grades, planetary spirits of onegroup or class, with necessary evolutionary differences as among themselves. The planetary spirits watchover, guide, and lead the hosts of evolving entities inferior to themselves during the various rounds of aplanetary chain. Finally, every celestial globe, whether sun or planet or other celestial body, has as thesummit or acme of its spiritual hierarchy a supreme celestial spirit who is the hierarch of its ownhierarchy. It should not be forgotten that the humanity of today forms a component element or stage ordegree in the hierarchy of this (our) planetary chain.

Planetary Spirits Every celestial body is under the directing influence of a hierarchy of beings, spiritual, quasi-spiritual, and astral, the higher of which may be called celestial spirits; the term planetary spirits is usually restricted to the highest class of these beings pertaining to planets, although the phrase is also used in other senses. These planetary spirits have evolved through past cosmic cycles of evolution from a state equivalent to the human; and the general hierarchy pertaining to each planet is closely linked with the destinies of the present various life-waves of that planet. We ourselves are destined in the future to become planetary spirits of a planetary chain that will be a later imbodiment of our present earth-chain. This earth, being only in its fourth round, has not yet produced high planetary spirits; but it will have begun to do so at the end of the seventh round. At the summit of the hierarchy of planetary spirits is a supreme hierarch.

"Poetry is the rhythmic voice of life, but it is one of the inner and not one of the surface voices.” The Future Poetry

“Poetry is the rhythmic voice of life, but it is one of the inner and not one of the surface voices.” The Future Poetry

POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE. ::: The negative part is tempo- raiy and transitional and will riisappear, the positive alone counts for the ideal and for the future.

Positive Reinforcement ::: Something positive provided after a response in order to increase the probability of that response occurring in the future.

Post date - Is when a date from the future is paced on a cheque or other document. This means the document does not become valid until that date e.g. a post dated cheque can not be cashed until on or after the date on the cheque.

prahāna. [alt. pradhāna] (P. padrāna; T. spang ba; C. duan/si zhengqin; J. dan/shishogon; K. tan/sa chonggŭn 斷/四正勤). In Sanskrit, "abandonment," "relinquishment," "exertions," "right effort"; the effort that a practitioner must apply to ridding himself of the afflictions (KLEsA) and wrong views (MITHYĀDṚstI) that bind one to suffering (DUḤKHA). Because the term implies the abandonment of the causes that bring about suffering, prahāna can also mean something that heals, thus an "antidote." Prahāna is commonly used to indicate the practice of meditation, through which afflictions and wrong views are abandoned; in the context of the Abhisamācārikā Dharmāḥ, for instance, the term is used when explaining how meditation is to be performed. ¶ Prahāna also has a second denotation of "strenuous exertion" or "right effort." This denotation is seen in a common list of four "exertions" (catvari prahānāni), also called the four "right efforts" (SAMYAKPRADHĀNA), viz., the practitioner exerts himself (1) to bring about the nonproduction [in the future] of evil and unwholesome dharmas that have not yet been produced; (2) to eradicate evil and unwholesome dharmas that have already been produced; (3) to bring about the production of wholesome dharmas that have not yet been produced; (4) to enhance those wholesome dharmas that have already been produced.

pranidhāna. (P. panidhāna; T. smon lam; C. yuan; J. gan; K. won 願). In Sanskrit, "vow" or "aspiration"; a statement expressing the solemn wish that a specific aim be achieved. The most famous type of pranidhāna is the vow the BODHISATTVA takes to become a buddha in order to liberate all sentient beings from suffering (see PuRVAPRAnIDHĀNA). Pranidhāna is also listed as one of the ten perfections (PĀRAMITĀ) and as one of the ten powers (BALA) of a bodhisattva. A vow may take the form of an oath, in which one promises to achieve an aim, or the form of a prayer, in which one asks that an aim be fulfilled, often through dedicating merit toward that aim. The term occurs also in purvapranidhāna, or "prior vow," a vow made in the past that has either been fulfilled in the present or will be fulfilled in the future, typically in conjunction with the aspiration to attain buddhahood. The term purvapranidhāna is used specifically in the MAHĀYĀNA to denote the vow made in the past by a bodhisattva to become a buddha himself, often specifying the place, the time, and the retinue that will be associated with that event. Since the buddhas succeeded in achieving their goal of buddhahood, their prior vows are therefore all considered to have been fulfilled. The most famous of all purvapranidhāna are the forty-eight vows that the monk DHARMĀKARA made before the buddha LOKEsVARARĀJA, which ultimately led to his becoming the buddha AMITĀBHA and creating the pure land of SUKHĀVATĪ; these vows are described in the SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA and are foundational to the PURE LAND traditions of East Asia.

Prarabhda (Sanskrit) Prārabhda [from pra-ā-rabh to begin, undertake] That which has commenced or been undertaken; that karma arising from the past which is already ripe and which begins to work itself out in the present incarnation. That class of karma which is in the making and will exhaust itself in the future is called sanchita-karma. Prarabhda-karma parallels the Greek idea of the Moira Lachesis; whereas sanchita-karma corresponds to Atropos; Clotho, third of the Moirae, is the spinner of the present, the karma or destiny which we are now spinning for ourselves. See also LIPIKA

precognition ::: Precognition A term applied to having knowledge of something that has not yet happened, to see into the future, especially by ESP (clairvoyance).

PREDICTION Everything that happens is the result of causes that can lie however far back in time. In order to be able to foresee the future, one must have knowledge of those factors in the past which have not yet been released. The uncertainty consists in not knowing about factors that may arise between the moment of prediction and the definite event itself. The future most often appears as a manifoldness of different possibilities. Which of these is to be realized is uncertain. K 3.5.20

Prenex normal form: See Logic, formal, §3. Prescience: Supposedly direct acquaintance with the future in contrast to fore-knowledge which is usually considered to be descriptive and inferential (see Fore-Knowledge) Prescience is usually attributed only to God. -- L.W.

preparation ::: any proceeding, experience or the like considered as a mode of preparing for the future.

presage ::: v. t. --> Something which foreshows or portends a future event; a prognostic; an omen; an augury.
Power to look the future, or the exercise of that power; foreknowledge; presentiment.
To have a presentiment of; to feel beforehand; to foreknow.
To foretell; to predict; to foreshow; to indicate.


present ::: adj. 1. Being, existing, occurring, or going on now, current. 2. Existing or in use at, or belonging to, the particular time under consideration n. 3. The present time, the time that now is (as opposed to the past and the future). present"s.

Present value (PV) – The value today of a sum of money in the future. It is the discounted value of an individual payment or possibly a stream or flow of payments to be received at sometime in the future, applying a specific interest or specific discount rate e.g. inflation rate. Present value is the representation of future cash flows expressed in the value of today's dollar amount.

Pretyabhava (Sanskrit) Pretyabhāva [from pretya having died, having departed + bhāva existence] The state after death; hence the future state. A very general term, referring in a vague way to the future after death, or more particularly to the temporary sojourn of a departed being in the astral light.

Prevision Foresight, seeing an event with the inner eye before or at the time of its occurrence. As the inner eye is independent of the time sequence on which our physical eyes and minds act, it is aware of things which to our physical perceptions belong to the future. Hence, if a contact is established between our consciousness and this inner sense, we may obtain a picture of events which have not yet come into the present. Events on the physical plane are the effects of causes which are preparing on invisible planes. The effect follows the cause — not infallibly, but with varying degrees of probability. Theosophy teaches an objective idealism, that while the universe in its phenomenal or manifested attributes is a product of maya, yet for all beings within such universe and subject to the sway of maya, events, manifestations, and similar things which occur are relatively real to their consciousness. Thus to the eye of the spirit — the awakened eye of Siva as it is called in the Orient — all events whatsoever, past, present, or future, appear as in an eternal Now, a shadow cast up from the waves of maya to the consciousness of the said seeing eye, and it is this underlying fact which gives the power of prevision, true premonition, foresight, etc. See also PROPHECY; PREMONITION

Project MAC "project" A project suggested by J C R Licklider; its founding director was {MIT} Prof. Robert M Fano. MAC stood for Multiple Access Computers on the 5th floor of Tech Square, and Man and Computer on the 9th floor. The major efforts were Corbato's {Multics} development and {Marvin Minsky}'s {Artificial Intelligence} Laboratory. In 1963 Project MAC hosted a summer study, which brought many well-known computer scientists to Cambridge to use {CTSS} and to discuss the future of computing. Funding for Project MAC was provided by the Information Processing Techniques Office of the {Advanced Research Projects Agency} (ARPA) of the US Department of Defense. See also {Early PL/I}, {MacLisp}, {MACSYMA}, {MDL}, {Multipop-68}, {OCAL}. (1997-01-29)

Project MAC ::: (project) A project suggested by J C R Licklider; its founding director was MIT Prof. Robert M Fano. MAC stood for Multiple Access Computers on the 5th well-known computer scientists to Cambridge to use CTSS and to discuss the future of computing.Funding for Project MAC was provided by the Information Processing Techniques Office of the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) of the US Department of Defense.See also Early PL/I, MacLisp, MACSYMA, MDL, Multipop-68, OCAL. (1997-01-29)

prolepsis: A figure of speech where an event in the future is referred to and anticipated. See flashback and in media res.

Prophecy: Foretelling the future. According to occult teachings anyone who is able to prophesy accurately must be psychically equipped to read the Akashic, or astral, records (cf. Akasha). When there is faulty interpretation it is not the astral light which falters but the adept who is not in tune with the vibratory beam.

prophecy ::: “If this higher buddhi {{understanding in the profoundest sense] could act pure of the interference of these lower members, it would give pure forms of the truth; observation would be dominated or replaced by a vision which could see without subservient dependence on the testimony of the sense-mind and senses; imagination would give place to the self-assured inspiration of the truth, reasoning to the spontaneous discernment of relations and conclusion from reasoning to an intuition containing in itself those relations and not building laboriously upon them, judgment to a thought-vision in whose light the truth would stand revealed without the mask which it now wears and which our intellectual judgment has to penetrate; while memory too would take upon itself that larger sense given to it in Greek thought and be no longer a paltry selection from the store gained by the individual in his present life, but rather the all-recording knowledge which secretly holds and constantly gives from itself everything that we now seem painfully to acquire but really in this sense remember, a knowledge which includes the future(1) no less than the past.

Prophecy The power of predicting the future, either by mystic vision or by a knowledge of the laws of cycles. Those versed in the latter can predict future cataclysms, racial events, etc., as surely as astronomers can predict eclipses, and astrology insofar as it concerns prediction, comes under this head. Prophet originally meant one who speaks for another, usually the deity, as in the view of the Hebrews expressed in the Old Testament. See also PREVISION; PREMONITION

prophet ::: 1. A person who speaks by divine inspiration or as the interpreter through whom the will of a god is expressed. 2. A person who predicts the future. prophet"s, prophets. (Sri Aurobindo often employs the word as an adjective.) prophet-passion, prophet-speech.

prospective ::: n. --> Of or pertaining to a prospect; furnishing a prospect; perspective.
Looking forward in time; acting with foresight; -- opposed to retrospective.
Being within view or consideration, as a future event or contingency; relating to the future: expected; as, a prospective benefit.
The scene before or around, in time or in space; view;


Protean is often used as epithet for anything that is changing and multiform, as for example the material basis of nature, which appears in so infinite a variety of forms. Human nature likewise is a protean monster; and he who would find his real spiritual self must be prepared to meet its many illusory phantoms and withstand them all, being neither seduced nor terrified. Thus Proteus may be described as ever-changing nature, the child of the waters of space; nature assuming all forms because of innate impulses and according to inherent laws, can give to the one who consults and controls it, intimations of the future as well as of the past.

provident ::: a. --> Foreseeing wants and making provision to supply them; prudent in preparing for future exigencies; cautious; economical; -- sometimes followed by of; as, aprovident man; an animal provident of the future.

Provision – The allowance made in accounts for depreciation. Or 2) Is to prepare in advance for an event that is projected to place in the future. In accounting, it is an amount charged against profits for a specific liability (for example: bad debts, depreciation or taxes). A liability may be known, but the amount is often uncertain. This uncertainty may lead to an adjustment in a later income statement once the final amount of the liability is ascertained.

prudent ::: careful in providing for the future; provident; economical, thrifty, frugal.

punya. (P. puNNa; T. bsod nams; C. fu; J. fuku; K. pok 福). In Sanskrit, "merit," the store of wholesome KARMAN created by the performance of virtuous deeds, which fructify in the form of happiness in the future. This merit may be accumulated (see PUnYASAMBHĀRA) over many lifetimes and dedicated toward a specific outcome (see PARInĀMANĀ), such as a favorable rebirth for oneself or another, or the achievement of buddhahood. The accumulation of merit, especially through charity (DĀNA) to the SAMGHA, is one of the central practices of Buddhism across cultures and traditions, and numerous techniques for accumulating merit, increasing the store of merit, and protecting the store of merit from depletion or destruction are set forth in Buddhist texts. Pāli sources, for example, delineate three specific "grounds for producing merit" (puNNakiriyavatthuni): giving (dāna), morality (P. sīla, S. sĪLA), and meditative practice (BHĀVANĀ). Merit can be dedicated toward a specific end, whether it is rebirth in the next lifetime, rebirth in the retinue of the future buddha MAITREYA, or the achievement of buddhahood for the welfare of all sentient beings.

purvapranidhāna. (T. sngon gyi smon lam; C. benyuan; J. hongan; K. ponwon 本願). In Sanskrit, "prior vow," a vow made in the past that has either been fulfilled in the present or will be fulfilled in the future, typically in conjunction with the attainment of buddhahood. The term purvapranidhāna is used specifically in the MAHĀYĀNA to denote the vow made in the past by a BODHISATTVA to become a buddha himself, often specifying the place, the time, and the retinue that will be associated with that achievement. Since the buddhas have perforce succeeded in achieving their goal of buddhahood, their prior vows are therefore all considered to have been fulfilled. The most famous of all prior vows are the forty-eight vows described in the SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA, in which the bodhisattva DHARMĀKARA makes a series of forty-eight vows to create the PURE LAND of SUKHĀVATĪ. These vows are narrated by the Buddha, who explains that the bodhisattva fulfilled all the vows and became the buddha AMITĀBHA. The exegesis of the vows of Dharmākara was an important element of JoDOSHu and JoDO SHINSHu buddhology in Japan. (The Chinese translation of this term literally means "original vow," and this English rendering is commonly seen in Western translations of PURE LAND works.) The compound *pubbepanidhāna is unattested in Pāli sources, but the term panidhāna is used to refer to this aspiration made in a previous life.

Qedem (Hebrew) Qēdem The east, the eastern country; applied to the east wind. Also used for former times, antiquity, as that which precedes the present and the future, just as the east is the quarter where the sun begins its heavenly journey before it reaches midheaven and sinks into the west.

rāga. (T. 'dod chags; C. tan; J. ton; K. t'am 貪). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "passion," or "desire," one of the six root afflictions (MuLAKLEsA) and typically listed along with aversion (DVEsA) and ignorance (MOHA) as one of the three poisons (TRIVIsA) that cause suffering. Rāga is defined as a mental factor that perceives an internal or external contaminated phenomenon to be pleasant and then seeks it. It is closely synonymous with "greed" (LOBHA). In this denotation, rāga is also sometimes called KĀMARĀGA. In Buddhist psychology, when contact with objects is made "without proper comprehension" or "without introspection" (ASAMPRAJANYA), passion, aversion, and delusion arise. Passion-which is a psychological reaction that is associated with the pursuing, possessing, or yearning for a pleasing stimulus and with being discontent with unpleasant stimuli-may target a host of possible objects. Scriptural accounts list these objects of passion as sensual pleasures, material belongings, loved ones, fame, the five aggregates (SKANDHA), ideologies and views (DṚstI), the meditative absorptions (DHYĀNA) of the "subtle materiality" and "immaterial" realms, the future "rebecoming" of the "self" (S. bhavarāga), and "nonexistence," viz., the future "annihilation" of the "self" (S. abhavarāga). It is noteworthy that the object of desire must be contaminated (SĀSRAVA), which in this context means that the object must be one whose observation results in an increase in such afflictions as hatred, ignorance, pride, and jealousy. This fact is relevant in light of the common question about whether the desire for enlightenment is a form of desire: it is not, because the object of that desire-NIRVĀnA or buddhahood-is not a contaminated object. See also RuPARĀGA.

Rāhula. (T. Sgra gcan 'dzin; C. Luohouluo; J. Ragora; K. Rahura 羅睺羅). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "Fetter"; proper name of the ARHAT who was the Buddha's only child, born on the day his father renounced the world. According to the Pāli account, as soon as Prince SIDDHARTHA learned of the birth of his son, he immediately chose to become a mendicant, for he saw his son as a "fetter" binding him ever more tightly to the household life. In a famous scene, the prince looks at his sleeping wife and infant son before departing from the palace to seek enlightenment. He wishes to hold his son one last time but fears that he will awaken his wife and lose his resolve. In the MuLASARVĀSTIVĀDA VINAYA version of the story, Rāhula was conceived on the night of his father's departure from the palace and remained in gestation for a full six years, being born on the night that his father achieved buddhahood. After his enlightenment, when the Buddha accepted an invitation to visit his father's palace, Rāhula's mother (RĀHULAMĀTĀ) YAsODHARĀ sent her son to her former husband to ask for his inheritance, whereupon the Buddha ordered sĀRIPUTRA to ordain the boy. Rāhula thus became the first novice (sRĀMAnERA) to enter the order. Knowing Yasodharā's grief at the loss of her son, the Buddha's father, King sUDDHODANA, requested that in the future no child should be ordained without the consent of his parents; the Buddha accepted his request and a question about parental consent was incorporated into the ordination procedure. Rāhula is described as dutiful and always in search of instruction. In one sermon to the young boy, the Buddha warns him never to lie, even in jest. Rāhula often accompanied the Buddha or sāriputra on their alms rounds (PIndAPĀTA). The meditation topic the Buddha assigned to Rāhula was intended to counter the novice's strong carnal nature. When his mind was ready, the Buddha taught him the Cula-Rāhulovādasutta, at the end of which Rāhula attained arhatship. Rāhula was meticulous in his observation of the monastic regulations, and the Buddha declared him foremost among his disciples in his eagerness for training. According to Chinese sources, Rāhula was also renowned for his patience. One day in sRĀVASTĪ, he was harshly beaten and was bleeding badly from a head wound, but he bore his injury with composure and equanimity, which led the Buddha to praise him. Rāhula was also foremost in "practicing with discretion" (C. mixing diyi), meaning that he applied himself at all times in religious practice but without making a display of it. Rāhula passed away before both sāriputra and the Buddha during a sojourn in TRĀYASTRIMsA heaven. In previous lives, Rāhula had many times been the son of the bodhisattva. He was called "lucky Rāhula" by his friends and Rāhula himself acknowledged his good fortune both for being the Buddha's son and for attaining arhatship. In the MAHĀYĀNA, Rāhula appears in a number of sutras, such as the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, where his father predicts that he will become a buddha. Rāhula is also traditionally listed as eleventh of the sixteen ARHAT elders (sOdAsASTHAVIRA), who were charged by the Buddha with protecting his dispensation until the advent of the next buddha, MAITREYA. He is said to reside in Biliyangqu zhou (a Sanskrit transcription that supposedly means "land of chestnuts and grains") with 1,100 disciples. In CHANYUE GUANXIU's standard Chinese depiction, Rāhula is portrayed sitting on a rock in wide-eyed meditation, with his right finger held above his chest, pointing outward, and his left hand resting on his left knee.

Rama ::: the seventh avatara of Vis.n.u, "the divinely-natured man",Rama destroyer of Ravan.a; his work was "to fix for the future the possibility of an order proper to the sattwic civilised human being . . . in a world still occupied by anarchic forces".

Ratnagotravibhāga. [alt. Ratnagotravibhanga] (T. Dkon mchog gi rigs rnam par dbye ba; C. Jiujing yisheng baoxing lun; J. Kukyo ichijo hoshoron; K. Kugyong ilsŭng posong non 究竟一乘寶性論). In Sanskrit, "Analysis of the Lineage of the [Three] Jewels," a seminal Indian MAHĀYĀNA sĀSTRA on the doctrine of the "embryo of the tathāgatas" (TATHĀGATAGARBHA), probably dating from the fourth century CE. Its full title is Ratnagotravibhāga-Mahāyāna-Uttaratantra and the treatise is often referred to simply as the Uttaratantra, or "Sublime Continuation." The Sanskrit recension is extant, along with Chinese and Tibetan translations. (RATNAMATI's Chinese translation was finished in 508.) The Chinese tradition attributes the work to Sāramati (C. Jianyi), while the Tibetan tradition attributes the core verses of the text to MAITREYA/MAITREYANĀTHA and its prose commentary entitled the Uttaratantravyākhyā to ASAnGA. It is one of the "five books of Maitreya," which, according to legend, were presented by the future buddha Maitreya to Asanga during the latter's visit to the TUsITA heaven. The primary subject of the Ratnagotravibhāga is the tathāgatagarbha or buddha-nature; this is the element (DHĀTU) or lineage (GOTRA) of the buddhas, which is present in all beings. The text offers an extensive overview of the tathāgatagarbha doctrine as set forth in such sutras as the TATHĀGATAGARBHASuTRA and the sRĪMĀLĀDEVĪSIMHANĀDASuTRA. Like the srīmālā Sutra, the treatise describes the tathāgatagarbha as being both empty (sunya) of the afflictions (KLEsA) but nonempty (asunya) of the buddhas' infinite virtues. In ordinary beings, the tathāgatagarbha may be obscured by adventitious defilements, but when those defilements are removed, the state of enlightenment is restored. In proving this claim, the treatise examines in detail the "body of the tathāgata," an alternate name for the buddha-nature, which is said to have four perfect virtues (GUnAPĀRAMITĀ): permanence, bliss, selfhood, and purity. Those who have not realized the buddha-nature make two fundamental mistakes about emptiness (suNYATĀ): either viewing emptiness as annihilation (see UCCHEDADṚstI), assuming that the experience of NIRVĀnA requires the extinction of the phenomenal world; or substantiating emptiness by presuming that it is something distinct from materiality (RuPA). Instead, the Ratnagotravibhāga asserts that the tathāgatagarbha is free from all the various types of afflictions, but fully contains the myriad inconceivable attributes of a buddha. The treatise also examines the specific deeds the buddhas perform for the welfare of all sentient beings. See also FOXING.

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal ::: (humour) Back in the good old days - the Golden Era of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called Real Men and out that Real Men don't relate to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.)But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with TRASH-80s.There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings).LANGUAGESThe easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use Fortran. Quiche Eaters use need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a keypunch, a Fortran IV compiler, and a beer.Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran.Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran.Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran.Real Programmers do Artificial Intelligence programs in Fortran.If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in assembly language. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing.STRUCTURED PROGRAMMINGThe academics in computer science have gotten into the structured programming rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming:Real Programmers aren't afraid to use GOTOs.Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused.Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting.Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 nanoseconds in the middle of a tight loop.Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious.Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using assigned GOTOs.Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name.OPERATING SYSTEMSWhat kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M.Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right systems: they send jokes around the world on UUCP-net and write adventure games and research papers.No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte core dump without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.)OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken.PROGRAMMING TOOLSWhat kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer.One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies.In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse.Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - Emacs and VI being two. The the Real Programmer wants a you asked for it, you got it text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise.It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine.For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary object Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called job security.Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers:Fortran preprocessors like MORTRAN and RATFOR. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming.Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps.Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient.Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5].THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORKWhere does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real or sorting mailing lists for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!).Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers.Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions.It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies.Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles.Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter.The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances.As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language.The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs.THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAYGenerally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room:At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it.At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper.At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand.At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary.In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time.THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITATWhat sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done.The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are:Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office.Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush.Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages.Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969.Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine.Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions.Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.)The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general:No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night).Real Programmers don't wear neckties.Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes.Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9].A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire ASCII (or EBCDIC) code table.Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee.THE FUTUREWhat of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers?From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be.Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal "humour" Back in the good old days - the "Golden Era" of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called "Real Men" and "Quiche Eaters" in the literature). During this period, the Real Men were the ones that understood computer programming, and the Quiche Eaters were the ones that didn't. A real computer programmer said things like "DO 10 I=1,10" and "ABEND" (they actually talked in capital letters, you understand), and the rest of the world said things like "computers are too complicated for me" and "I can't relate to computers - they're so impersonal". (A previous work [1] points out that Real Men don't "relate" to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.) But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow Real Men out of the water playing Asteroids and Pac-Man, and anyone can buy and even understand their very own Personal Computer. The Real Programmer is in danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with {TRASH-80s}. There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is made clear, it will give these kids something to aspire to -- a role model, a Father Figure. It will also help explain to the employers of Real Programmers why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings). LANGUAGES The easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use {Fortran}. Quiche Eaters use {Pascal}. Nicklaus Wirth, the designer of Pascal, gave a talk once at which he was asked how to pronounce his name. He replied, "You can either call me by name, pronouncing it 'Veert', or call me by value, 'Worth'." One can tell immediately from this comment that Nicklaus Wirth is a Quiche Eater. The only parameter passing mechanism endorsed by Real Programmers is call-by-value-return, as implemented in the {IBM 370} {Fortran-G} and H compilers. Real programmers don't need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a {keypunch}, a {Fortran IV} {compiler}, and a beer. Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran. Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran. Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran. Real Programmers do {Artificial Intelligence} programs in Fortran. If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in {assembly language}. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing. STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING The academics in computer science have gotten into the "structured programming" rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily understood if the programmer uses some special language constructs and techniques. They don't all agree on exactly which constructs, of course, and the examples they use to show their particular point of view invariably fit on a single page of some obscure journal or another - clearly not enough of an example to convince anyone. When I got out of school, I thought I was the best programmer in the world. I could write an unbeatable tic-tac-toe program, use five different computer languages, and create 1000-line programs that WORKED. (Really!) Then I got out into the Real World. My first task in the Real World was to read and understand a 200,000-line Fortran program, then speed it up by a factor of two. Any Real Programmer will tell you that all the Structured Coding in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming: Real Programmers aren't afraid to use {GOTOs}. Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused. Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting. Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 {nanoseconds} in the middle of a tight loop. Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious. Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using {assigned GOTOs}. Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Wirth (the above-mentioned Quiche Eater) actually wrote an entire book [2] contending that you could write a program based on data structures, instead of the other way around. As all Real Programmers know, the only useful data structure is the Array. Strings, lists, structures, sets - these are all special cases of arrays and can be treated that way just as easily without messing up your programing language with all sorts of complications. The worst thing about fancy data types is that you have to declare them, and Real Programming Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name. OPERATING SYSTEMS What kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M. Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right down to it, Unix is a glorified video game. People don't do Serious Work on Unix systems: they send jokes around the world on {UUCP}-net and write adventure games and research papers. No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great programmer can write JCL without referring to the manual at all. A truly outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte {core dump} without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.) OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is encouraged. The best way to approach the system is through a keypunch. Some people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken. PROGRAMMING TOOLS What kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back in the days when computers had front panels, this was actually done occasionally. Your typical Real Programmer knew the entire bootstrap loader by memory in hex, and toggled it in whenever it got destroyed by his program. (Back then, memory was memory - it didn't go away when the power went off. Today, memory either forgets things when you don't want it to, or remembers things long after they're better forgotten.) Legend has it that {Seymore Cray}, inventor of the Cray I supercomputer and most of Control Data's computers, actually toggled the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer. One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had crashed in the middle of saving some important work. Jim was able to repair the damage over the phone, getting the user to toggle in disk I/O instructions at the front panel, repairing system tables in hex, reading register contents back over the phone. The moral of this story: while a Real Programmer usually includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies. In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a single keypunch. The Real Programmer in this situation has to do his work with a "text editor" program. Most systems supply several text editors to select from, and the Real Programmer must be careful to pick one that reflects his personal style. Many people believe that the best text editors in the world were written at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center for use on their Alto and Dorado computers [3]. Unfortunately, no Real Programmer would ever use a computer whose operating system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse. Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - {Emacs} and {VI} being two. The problem with these editors is that Real Programmers consider "what you see is what you get" to be just as bad a concept in Text Editors as it is in women. No the Real Programmer wants a "you asked for it, you got it" text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise. It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining games to play with TECO is to type your name in as a command line and try to guess what it does. Just about any possible typing error while talking with TECO will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine. For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary {object code} directly, using a wonderful program called SUPERZAP (or its equivalent on non-IBM machines). This works so well that many working programs on IBM systems bear no relation to the original Fortran code. In many cases, the original source code is no longer available. When it comes time to fix a program like this, no manager would even think of sending anything less than a Real Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called "job security". Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers: Fortran preprocessors like {MORTRAN} and {RATFOR}. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming. Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps. Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient. Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5]. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORK Where does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real Programmer would be caught dead writing accounts-receivable programs in {COBOL}, or sorting {mailing lists} for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!). Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers. Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions. It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies. Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles. Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft by heart. With a combination of large ground-based Fortran programs and small spacecraft-based assembly language programs, they are able to do incredible feats of navigation and improvisation - hitting ten-kilometer wide windows at Saturn after six years in space, repairing or bypassing damaged sensor platforms, radios, and batteries. Allegedly, one Real Programmer managed to tuck a pattern-matching program into a few hundred bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter. The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances. As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, however, a black cloud has formed on the Real Programmer horizon. It seems that some highly placed Quiche Eaters at the Defense Department decided that all Defense programs should be written in some grand unified language called "ADA" ((C), DoD). For a while, it seemed that ADA was destined to become a language that went against all the precepts of Real Programming - a language with structure, a language with data types, {strong typing}, and semicolons. In short, a language designed to cripple the creativity of the typical Real Programmer. Fortunately, the language adopted by DoD has enough interesting features to make it approachable -- it's incredibly complex, includes methods for messing with the operating system and rearranging memory, and Edsgar Dijkstra doesn't like it [6]. (Dijkstra, as I'm sure you know, was the author of "GoTos Considered Harmful" - a landmark work in programming methodology, applauded by Pascal programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language. The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing there's enough money in it. There are several Real Programmers building video games at Atari, for example. (But not playing them - a Real Programmer knows how to beat the machine every time: no challenge in that.) Everyone working at LucasFilm is a Real Programmer. (It would be crazy to turn down the money of fifty million Star Trek fans.) The proportion of Real Programmers in Computer Graphics is somewhat lower than the norm, mostly because nobody has found a use for computer graphics yet. On the other hand, all computer graphics is done in Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAY Generally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be doing for fun anyway (although he is careful not to express this opinion out loud). Occasionally, the Real Programmer does step out of the office for a breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room: At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it. At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper. At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand. At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying "Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary." In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time. THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITAT What sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done. The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are: Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office. Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush. Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages. Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969. Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine. Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions. Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.) The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time doesn't bother the Real Programmer - it gives him a chance to catch a little sleep between compiles. If there is not enough schedule pressure on the Real Programmer, he tends to make things more challenging by working on some small but interesting part of the problem for the first nine weeks, then finishing the rest in the last week, in two or three 50-hour marathons. This not only impresses the hell out of his manager, who was despairing of ever getting the project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general: No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night). Real Programmers don't wear neckties. Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes. Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9]. A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire {ASCII} (or EBCDIC) code table. Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee. THE FUTURE What of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same outlook on life as their elders. Many of them have never seen a computer with a front panel. Hardly anyone graduating from school these days can do hex arithmetic without a calculator. College graduates these days are soft - protected from the realities of programming by source level debuggers, text editors that count parentheses, and "user friendly" operating systems. Worst of all, some of these alleged "computer scientists" manage to get degrees without ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers? From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, despite all the efforts of Pascal programmers the world over. Even more subtle tricks, like adding structured coding constructs to Fortran have failed. Oh sure, some computer vendors have come out with Fortran 77 compilers, but every one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be. Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real Programmer - two different and subtly incompatible user interfaces, an arcane and complicated teletype driver, virtual memory. If you ignore the fact that it's "structured", even 'C' programming can be appreciated by the Real Programmer: after all, there's no type checking, variable names are seven (ten? eight?) characters long, and the added bonus of the Pointer data type is thrown in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

rebirth. An English term that does not have an exact correlate in Buddhist languages, rendered instead by a range of technical terms, such as the Sanskrit PUNARJANMAN (lit. "birth again") and PUNARBHAVA (lit. "re-becoming"), and, less commonly, the related PUNARMṚTYU (lit. "redeath"). The Sanskrit term JĀTI ("birth") also encompasses the notion of rebirth. The doctrine of rebirth is central to Buddhism. It was not an innovation of the Buddha, being already common to a number of philosophical schools of ancient India by the time of his appearance, especially those connected with the sRAMAnA movement of religious mendicants. Rebirth (sometimes called metempsychosis) is described as a beginningless process in which a mental continuum (see SAMTĀNA) takes different (usually) physical forms lifetime after lifetime within the six realms (GATI) of SAMSĀRA: divinities (DEVA), demigods (ASURA), humans (MANUsYA), animals (TIRYAK), ghosts (PRETA), and hell denizens (NĀRAKA). The cycle of rebirth operates through the process of activity (KARMAN), with virtuous (KUsALA) actions serving as the cause for salutary rebirths among the divinities and human beings, and unvirtuous (AKUsALA) actions serving as the cause of unsalutary rebirths (DURGATI; APĀYA) among demigods, animals, ghosts, and hell denizens. The goal of the Buddhist path has been traditionally described as the cessation of the cycle of rebirth through the eradication of its causes, which are identified as the afflictions (KLEsA) of greed, hatred, and ignorance and the actions motivated by those defilements. Despite this ultimate goal, however, much traditional Buddhist practice has been directed toward securing rebirth as a human or divinity for oneself and one's family members, while avoiding rebirth in the evil realms. The issue of how Buddhism reconciles the doctrine of rebirth with its position that there is no perduring self (ANĀTMAN) has long been discussed within the tradition. Some schools of mainstream Buddhism, such as the VĀTSĪPUTRĪYA or PUDGALAVĀDA, have gone so far as to posit that, while there may be no perduring "self," there is an "inexpressible" (avācya) "person" (PUDGALA) that is neither the same as nor different from the five aggregates (SKANDHA), which transmigrates from lifetime to lifetime. A more widely accepted view among the traditions sees the person as simply a sequence of mental and physical processes, among which is the process called consciousness (VIJNĀNA). Consciousness, although changing every moment, persists as a continuum over time. Death is simply the transfer of this conscious continuum (SAMTĀNA) from one impermanent mental and physical foundation to the next, just as the light from one candle may be transferred to the next in a series of candles. The exact process by which rebirth occurs is variously described in the different Buddhist traditions, with some schools asserting that rebirth occurs in the moments immediately following death, with other schools positing the existence of an "intermediate state" (ANTARĀBHAVA) between death in one lifetime and rebirth in another, with that period lasting as long as forty-nine days (see SISHIJIU [RI] ZHAI). This state, translated as BAR DO in Tibetan, became particularly important in Tibet in both funerary rituals and in tantric practice, especially that of the RNYING MA sect. The reality of rebirth is one of the cardinal doctrines of Buddhism, which the religion claims can be empirically validated through direct spiritual insight (see YOGIPRATYAKsA). Indeed, understanding the validity of this cycle of rebirth is associated with two of the three types of knowledge (TRIVIDYĀ) that are experienced through the enlightenment of an ARHAT or a buddha: the ability to remember one's own former lives (PuRVANIVĀSĀNUSMṚTI) in all their detail and insight into the future rebirth destinies of all other beings based on their own actions (S. CYUTYUPAPĀDĀNUSMṚTI). See also SAMSĀRA.

Recurrence of doubts ::: In the nature of these recurrences there is usually a constant return of the same adverse experiences, the same adverse resistance, thoughts destructive of all belief and faith and confidence in the future of the sadhana, frustrating doubts of what one has known as the truth, urgings to abandon- ment of the yoga or to other disastrous counsels of decheance.

"Religion is the first attempt of man to get beyond himself and beyond the obvious and material facts of his existence. Its first essential work is to confirm and make real to him his subjective sense of an Infinite on which his material and mental being depends and the aspiration of his soul to come into its presence and live in contact with it. Its function is to assure him too of that possibility of which he has always dreamed, but of which his ordinary life gives him no assurance, the possibility of transcending himself and growing out of bodily life and mortality into the joy of immortal life and spiritual existence. It also confirms in him the sense that there are worlds or planes of existence other than that in which his lot is now cast, worlds in which this mortality and this subjection to evil and suffering are not the natural state, but rather bliss of immortality is the eternal condition. Incidentally, it gives him a rule of mortal life by which he shall prepare himself for immortality. He is a soul and not a body and his earthly life is a means by which he determines the future conditions of his spiritual being.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“Religion is the first attempt of man to get beyond himself and beyond the obvious and material facts of his existence. Its first essential work is to confirm and make real to him his subjective sense of an Infinite on which his material and mental being depends and the aspiration of his soul to come into its presence and live in contact with it. Its function is to assure him too of that possibility of which he has always dreamed, but of which his ordinary life gives him no assurance, the possibility of transcending himself and growing out of bodily life and mortality into the joy of immortal life and spiritual existence. It also confirms in him the sense that there are worlds or planes of existence other than that in which his lot is now cast, worlds in which this mortality and this subjection to evil and suffering are not the natural state, but rather bliss of immortality is the eternal condition. Incidentally, it gives him a rule of mortal life by which he shall prepare himself for immortality. He is a soul and not a body and his earthly life is a means by which he determines the future conditions of his spiritual being.” The Synthesis of Yoga

Ricardian neutrality - The proposition that the financing of a government deficit has no current effect because private saving will just offset any government dissaving. Hence, if the government increases the national debt, private agents will save enough to cover the future taxes required to repay the increased debt, leaving national saving and aggregate demand unchanged.

Rnying ma. (Nyingma). In Tibetan, "Ancient," the name of one of the four major sects of Tibetan Buddhism. The name derives from the sect's origins during the "early dissemination" (SNGA DAR) of Buddhism in Tibet and its reliance on translations of TANTRAs made during that period; this is in distinction to the new (GSAR MA) sects of BKA' BRGYUD, SA SKYA, and DGE LUGS, all of which arose during the later dissemination (PHYI DAR) and make use of newer translations. The Rnying ma is thus "ancient" in relation to the new sects and only began to be designated as such after their appearance. The sect traces its origins back to the teachings of the mysterious figure of PADMASAMBHAVA, who visited Tibet during the eighth century and is said to have hidden many texts, called "treasures" (GTER MA), to be discovered in the future. In addition to the Buddhist canon accepted by all sects of Tibetan Buddhism, the Rnying ma adds another collection of tantras (the RNYING MA'I RGYUD 'BUM) as well as the discovered "treasure" (GTER MA) texts to their canonical corpus, works that in many cases the other sects regard as APOCRYPHA, i.e., not of Indian origin. Rnying ma identifies nine vehicles among the corpus of Buddhist teachings, the highest of which is known as ATIYOGA or, more commonly, the "great perfection" (RDZOGS CHEN). These teachings describe the mind as the primordial basis, characterized by qualities such as presence, spontaneity, luminosity, original purity, unobstructed freedom, expanse, clarity, self-liberation, openness, effortlessness, and intrinsic awareness. It is not accessible through conceptual elaboration or logical analysis. Rather, the primordial basis is an eternally pure state free from the dualism of subject and object, infinite and perfect from the beginning, and ever complete. The technique for the discovery of the ubiquitous original purity and self-liberation is to engage in a variety of practices designed to eliminate karmic obstructions, at which point the mind eliminates all thoughts and experiences itself, thereby recognizing its true nature. The rdzogs chen doctrine does not seem to derive directly from any of the Indian philosophical schools; its precise connections to the Indian Buddhist tradition have yet to be established. Some scholars have claimed an historical link and doctrinal affinity between rdzogs chen and the CHAN tradition of Chinese Buddhism, but the precise relationship between the two remains to be fully investigated. It is noteworthy that certain of the earliest extant rdzogs chen texts specifically contrast their own tradition with that of Chan. In comparison to the Dge lugs, Bka' brgyud, and Sa skya, the Rnying ma (with some important exceptions, notably at the time of the fifth DALAI LAMA) remained largely uninvolved in state politics, both within Tibet and in foreign relations. Although they developed great monasteries, such as SMIN GROL GLING, RDZOGS CHEN, and RDO RJE BRAG, the Rnying ma also maintained a strong local presence as lay tantric practitioners (sngags pa) who performed a range of ritual functions for the community. The Rnying ma produced many famous scholars and visionaries, such as KLONG CHEN RAB 'BYAMS, 'JIGS MED GLING PA, and MI PHAM. In the nineteenth century, Rnying ma scholars played a key role in the so-called nonsectarian movement (RIS MED) in eastern Tibet, which produced many important new texts.

Round, Fifth The fifth circling of the monadic hosts around the globes of a planetary chain. As mankind is now in the fifth root-race of the fourth round, on the fourth or globe D of the seven manifested globes of the earth-chain, the period before the beginning of the fifth round is hundreds of millions of years in the future. Nevertheless a few fifth rounders have been able to manifest on our globe as forerunners, the most evolved individuals of the human life-wave. Sixth rounders, however, are excessively rare.

sadvārgika. (P. chabbaggiya; T. drug sde; C. liuqun [biqiu]; J. rokugun [biku]; K. yukkun [pigu] 六群[比丘]). In Sanskrit, the "group of six," a notorious group of six mischievous monks (BHIKsU), whose misbehavior led to the promulgation of many rules of conduct for the Buddhist order. According to the tradition, the rules of the VINAYA were not formulated hypothetically. Instead, when a monk acted in an inappropriate way, the Buddha would then make a rule prohibiting that action in the future. Thus, for each infraction, the vinaya provides an account of the circumstances that led to its formulation. The names of these six monks, individually and collectively, figure prominently in an inordinate number of those accounts. They are also often portrayed as actively resisting the enforcement of the rules of discipline. The names of the members of this infamous group of malefactors differ in Sanskrit and Pāli sources. In Sanskrit, they are usually listed as Nanda, Upananda, Udāyin (alt. Kālodāyin), Chanda, Asvaka, and Punarvasu. The Pāli typically gives instead Assaji, Punabhasu, Panduka, Lohitaka, Mettiya, and Bhummajaka. According to Pāli sources, prior to their ordination, they were acquaintances of each other, living in sRĀVASTĪ. Unable to earn a living, they decided to enter the order. Deciding that it was unwise to remain together, they divided into three groups of two (Assaji and Punabhasu, Panduka and Lohitaka, and Mettiya and Bhummajaka). Each pair attracted a following of five hundred monks. The followers of Panduka and Lohitaka, living at JETAVANA, were the most virtuous, remaining near the Buddha and accompanying him in his travels. Some sources also offer a salutary motivation behind their frequent transgressions: to provide a wide range of test cases leading to specific monastic rules, so that the SAMGHA would be protected against future unscrupulous behavior.

sakuna (shakuna) ::: omen; an external sign interpreted as giving an sakuna indication about the future.

Samantabhadra. (T. Kun tu bzang po; C. Puxian; J. Fugen; K. Pohyon 普賢). The Sanskrit name of both an important bodhisattva in Indian and East Asian Buddhism and of an important buddha in Tibetan Buddhism. As a bodhisattva, Samantabhadra is a principal bodhisattva of the MAHĀYĀNA pantheon, who is often portrayed as the personification of the perfection of myriad good works and spiritual practices. He is one of the AstAMAHOPAPUTRA, and an attendant of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha, standing opposite MANJUsRĪ at the Buddha's side. In the PANCATATHĀGATA configuration, he is associated with the buddha VAIROCANA. Samantabhadra figures prominently in the AVATAMSAKASuTRA. In a chapter named after him, he sets forth ten SAMĀDHIs. In the GAndAVYuHA (the final chapter of the AvataMsakasutra), the bodhisattva SUDHANA sets out in search of a teacher, encountering fifty-two beings (twenty of whom are female), including the Buddha's mother Mahāmāyā (MĀYĀ), the future buddha MAITREYA, as well as AVALOKITEsVARA and MANJUsRĪ. His final teacher is the bodhisattva Samantabhadra, who sets forth the ten vows in his famous BHADRACARĪPRAnIDHĀNA. In China, the center of Samantabhadra's worship is EMEISHAN in Sichuan province, which began to develop in the early Tang. According to legend, Samantabhadra arrived at the mountain by flying there on his white elephant, his usual mount. As a buddha, Samantabhadra is the primordial buddha (ĀDIBUDDHA) according to the RNYING MA sect of Tibetan Buddhism. He is depicted naked, blue, and in sexual union with his consort Samantabhadrī. He is embodiment of the original purity of all phenomena of SAMSĀRA and NIRVĀnA. Called the "primordial basis" (ye gzhi), he is regarded as the eternal union of awareness (RIG PA) and emptiness (suNYATĀ), of emptiness and appearance, and of the nature of the mind and compassion. As such he is the wellspring of the ATIYOGA teachings.

Samba (Sanskrit) Sāmba, Śāmba The reputed son of Krishna by Jambavati. According to esoteric tradition Krishna had no son; therefore Samba is symbolic of some power attained by Krishna. Through a curse of some holy sages, Samba was condemned to produce offspring in the shape of a terrific iron club for the destruction of the race of Yadu. Samba accordingly brought forth as iron club which was pounded and cast into the sea. But one piece which could not be crushed was subsequently found in the belly of a fish, and was used to tip an arrow used by the hunter Jaras (old age) to unintentionally kill Krishna. Thus old age finally overtakes and gathers in all things; and our future karma flows forth from our emotional and mental offspring, and sooner or later overtakes us all through time or old age. The iron club may represent the blows of destiny, based upon the kama of which iron is often a symbol; we may attempt to destroy the effects of our feelings and thoughts, but always there will be one little portion which cannot be crushed, and which is the seed of the future destiny, at least of our lower self.

Sambhala(Sanskrit) ::: A place-name of highly mystical significance. Many learned occidental Orientalists haveendeavored to identify this mystical and unknown locality with some well-known modern district ortown, but unsuccessfully. The name is mentioned in the Puranas and elsewhere, and it is stated that out ofSambhala will appear in due course of time the Kalki-Avatara of the future. The Kalki-Avatara is one ofthe manifestations or avataras of Vishnu. Among the Buddhists it is also stated that out of Sambhala willcome in due course of time the Maitreya-Buddha or next buddha.Sambhala, however, although no erudite Orientalist has yet succeeded in locating it geographically, is anactual land or district, the seat of the greatest brotherhood of spiritual adepts and their chiefs on earthtoday. From Sambhala at certain times in the history of the world, or more accurately of our own fifthroot-race, come forth the messengers or envoys for spiritual and intellectual work among men.This Great Brotherhood has branches in various parts of the world, but Sambhala is the center or chieflodge. We may tentatively locate it in a little-known and remote district of the high tablelands of centralAsia, more particularly in Tibet. A multitude of airplanes might fly over the place without "seeing" it, forits frontiers are very carefully guarded and protected against invasion, and will continue to be so until thekarmic destiny of our present fifth root-race brings about a change of location to some other spot on theearth, which then in its turn will be as carefully guarded as Sambhala now is.

sanju. (J. sanku; K. samgu 三句). In Chinese, "three propositions," a unique set of precepts taught by CHoNGJUNG MUSANG (680-756, alt. 684-762) in the JINGZHONG ZONG lineage of the early CHAN school. Musang sought to summarize the method of practice taught by the founder of Chinese Chan school, BODHIDHARMA, in three propositions, which he described as "no-recollection" (wuyi), which he equated with morality (sĪLA); "no-thought" (WUNIAN), which corresponded to concentration (SAMĀDHI); and "not-forgetting" (mowang), which was the equivalent of wisdom (PRAJNĀ). In other Jingzhong zong texts, Musang's successor BAOTANG WUZHU later claims that he was in fact the creator of these three propositions and makes the explicit connection between them and the three trainings (TRIsIKsĀ) of mainstream Buddhism. GUIFENG ZONGMI later explains the first proposition, "no-recollection," as not tracing back the past; the second "no-thought," as not yearning for the future; and the third "not-forgetting" as "always conforming to this knowledge without confusion or mistake."

sāriputra. (P. Sāriputta; T. Shā ri bu; C. Shelifu; J. Sharihotsu; K. Saribul 舍利弗). In Sanskrit, "Son of sārī"; the first of two chief disciples of the Buddha, along with MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA. sāriputra's father was a wealthy brāhmana named Tisya (and sāriputra is sometimes called Upatisya, after his father) and his mother was named sārī or sārikā, because she had eyes like a sārika bird. sārī was the most intelligent woman in MAGADHA; she is also known as sāradvatī, so sāriputra is sometimes referred to as sāradvatīputra. sāriputra was born in Nālaka near RĀJAGṚHA. He had three younger brothers and three sisters, all of whom would eventually join the SAMGHA and become ARHATs. sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana were friends from childhood. Once, while attending a performance, both became overwhelmed with a sense of the vanity of all impermanent things and resolved to renounce the world together. They first became disciples of the agnostic SANJAYA VAIRĀtĪPUTRA, although they later took their leave of him and wandered through India in search of the truth. Finding no solution, they parted company, promising one another that whichever one should succeed in finding the truth would inform the other. It was then that sāriputra met the Buddha's disciple, AsVAJIT, one of the Buddha's first five disciples (PANCAVARGIKA) and already an arhat. sāriputra was impressed with Asvajit's countenance and demeanor and asked whether he was a master or a disciple. When he replied that he was a disciple, sāriputra asked him what his teacher taught. Asvajit said that he was new to the teachings and could only provide a summary, but then uttered one of the most famous statements in the history of Buddhism, "Of those phenomena produced through causes, the TATHĀGATA has proclaimed their causes (HETU) and also their cessation (NIRODHA). Thus has spoken the great renunciant." (See YE DHARMĀ s.v.). Hearing these words, sāriputra immediately became a stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA) and asked where he could find this teacher. In keeping with their earlier compact, he repeated the stanza to his friend Mahāmaudgalyāyana, who also immediately became a streamenterer. The two friends resolved to take ordination as disciples of the Buddha and, together with five hundred disciples of their former teacher SaNjaya, proceeded to the VEnUVANAVIHĀRA, where the Buddha was in residence. The Buddha ordained the entire group with the EHIBHIKsUKĀ ("Come, monks") formula, whereupon all except sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana became arhats. Mahāmaudgalyāyana was to attain arhatship seven days after his ordination, while sāriputra reached the goal after a fortnight upon hearing the Buddha preach the Vedanāpariggahasutta (the Sanskrit recension is entitled the Dīrghanakhaparivrājakaparipṛcchā). The Buddha declared sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana his chief disciples the day they were ordained, giving as his reason the fact that both had exerted themselves in religious practice for countless previous lives. sāriputra was declared chief among the Buddha's disciples in wisdom, while Mahāmaudgalyāyana was chief in mastery of supranormal powers (ṚDDHI). sāriputra was recognized as second only to the Buddha in his knowledge of the dharma. The Buddha praised sāriputra as an able teacher, calling him his dharmasenāpati, "dharma general" and often assigned topics for him to preach. Two of his most famous discourses were the DASUTTARASUTTA and the SAnGĪTISUTTA, which the Buddha asked him to preach on his behalf. Sāriputra was meticulous in his observance of the VINAYA, and was quick both to admonish monks in need of guidance and to praise them for their accomplishments. He was sought out by others to explicate points of doctrine and it was he who is said to have revealed the ABHIDHARMA to the human world after the Buddha taught it to his mother, who had been reborn in the TRĀYASTRIMsA heaven; when the Buddha returned to earth each day to collect alms, he would repeat to sāriputra what he had taught to the divinities in heaven. sāriputra died several months before the Buddha. Realizing that he had only seven days to live, he resolved to return to his native village and convert his mother; with this accomplished, he passed away. His body was cremated and his relics were eventually enshrined in a STuPA at NĀLANDĀ. sāriputra appears in many JĀTAKA stories as a companion of the Buddha, sometimes in human form, sometimes in animal form, and sometimes with one of them a human and the other an animal. sāriputra also plays a major role in the MAHĀYĀNA sutras, where he is a common interlocutor of the Buddha and of the chief BODHISATTVAs. Sometimes he is portrayed as a dignified arhat, elsewhere he is made the fool, as in the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA when a goddess turns him into a woman, much to his dismay. In either case, the point is that the wisest of the Buddha's arhat disciples, the master of the abhidharma, does not know the sublime teachings of the Mahāyāna and must have them explained to him. The implication is that the teachings of the Mahāyāna sutras are therefore more profound than anything found in the canons of the MAINSTREAM BUDDHIST SCHOOLS. In the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀHṚDAYA ("Heart Sutra"), it is sāriputra who asks AVALOKITEsVARA how to practice the perfection of wisdom, and even then he must be empowered to ask the question by the Buddha. In the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, it is sāriputra's question that prompts the Buddha to set forth the parable of the burning house. The Buddha predicts that in the future, sāriputra will become the buddha Padmaprabha.

sāsrava. (P. sāsava; T. zag bcas; C. youlou; J. uro; K. yuru 有漏). In Sanskrit, lit. "with outflows," hence, "contaminated," "tainted." Just as a leaky roof lets in rain that destroys a residence and all its contents, the edifice of the five aggregates (SKANDHA) is a ruin dampened by the afflictions (KLEsA) of greed, hatred, and delusion and riddled with the rot of KARMAN (viz., the formative forces left by the actions motivated by the afflictions). Sāsrava is similar in meaning to SAMKLIstA (defilement, affliction), although wider in application because unwholesome (AKUsALA) and wholesome (KUsALA) states are sāsrava if they lead to a future state with outflows, even if that is a fortunate state of happiness in this lifetime or the next. In this sense, sāsrava is a common designation for the aggregates (skandha) and refers to those objects that may serve as an occasion for the increase of klesa. Thus, even an inanimate object can be considered "contaminated" in the sense that it can serve as a cause for the increase of the afflictions, such as greed. According to the ABHIDHARMAKOsABHĀsYA, only four dharmas are uncontaminated. Three of these are permanent: space (ĀKĀsA), nonanalytical cessation (APRATISAMKHYĀNIRODHA), and analytical cessation (PRATISAMKHYĀNIRODHA), which would include NIRVĀnA. The only impermanent dharma that is uncontaminated is the truth of the path or true path (MĀRGASATYA); technically, this would refer to the equipoise of nonperception (ASAMJNĀSAMĀPATTI) when absorbed in a perfect vision of the FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS, or, in the MAHĀYĀNA, in the perfect vision of the emptiness (suNYATĀ) of all dharmas. The SĀSRAVASKANDHA (contaminated aggregates) is the entire heap of dharmas that make up a person (PUDGALA), with the sole exception of the NIRVĀnA element, or in Mahāyāna the pure element (DHĀTU) that locates the lineage (GOTRA) of all beings destined for the final perfect enlightenment. The ABHIDHARMASAMUCCAYA gives six meanings for sāsrava, which it says can be (1) a contaminant (ĀSRAVA) itself, i.e., an actual klesa, (2) the other parts of the mind that are necessarily present when obscuration (ĀVARAnA) is present, (3) the aggregates when klesa is operating, (4) the future contaminated aggregates that arise from the earlier cause, (5) the higher stages of the path because, although not governed by klesa, they are tied up with thought construction, and (6) even the very final stage of the bodhisattva path, because it is affected by residual impressions left by earlier contaminated states.

sbas yul. (beyul). In Tibetan, "hidden land," often translated as "hidden valley," a paradisaical land whose existence is not often known until the land is "opened" by a lama (BLA MA). Such lands are typically located in southern Tibet, northern Nepal, and Sikkim and are associated especially with the RNYING MA sect as sites where PADMASAMBHAVA hid treasure texts (GTER MA). After converting the local gods to Buddhism, Padmasambhava "sealed" the lands so that they could be discovered at a time in the future and serve as a refuge from the vicissitudes of the world; the weather is clement, the harvests are good, and there is no disease or conflict. They are special places for the practice of TANTRA during the degenerate age of the dharma, where an adept can make rapid progress on the path; in this regard, they are akin to Buddhist PURE LANDs, even though they are located on earth. Hidden lands are considered safe havens, inaccessible to the enemies of the dharma and of Tibet, where one may live a long and peaceful life. According to some traditions, there are 108 hidden lands. In addition to concealing treasure texts in the hidden lands, Padmasambhava also left guidebooks for their discovery. One of the most famous of the hidden lands is PADMA BKOD.

science fiction: A genre of literature that features an alternative society that is founded on the imagined technology of the future. The genre stretches the imagination by rooting the fantasy of the future in recognizable elements of modern life. This type of fantasy literature, typically takes the form of a short story or novel.

scrying ::: Scrying A form of divination which involves gazing into a crystal, a bowl of water, a black mirror, or similar surface to obtain 'visions'. Nostradamus (1503-1566) used scrying as his method of foretelling the future, gazing into a scrying bowl.

Senzar The name given to the ancient mystery-language unknown to modern philologists, that was known to all initiates of the inhabited and civilized world; the secret sacerdotal language or mystery-speech of the adepts of whatever class belonging to or owing allegiance to the chief esoteric brotherhood, “still used and studied unto this day in the secret communities of the Eastern adepts, and called by them — according to the locality — Zend-zar and Brahma or Deva-Bashya” (BCW 4:518n). In this language, besides its common use as a universal means of intercommunication, were written the secret works preserving the history of the archaic continents and races, as well as prophecies of the future. It was used in the secret commentaries and stanzas forming the basis for The Secret Doctrine, wherein they are called the Stanzas of Dzyan or the Book of Dzyan.

Se ra. A large monastic complex counted among the "three seats" (GDAN SA GSUM) of the DGE LUGS sect of Tibetan Buddhism, located at the north end of the LHA SA valley. TSONG KHA PA wrote Rtsa she tik chen rigs pa'i rgya mtsho, his commentary on NĀGĀRJUNA's MuLAMADHYAMAKAKĀRIKĀ, in a hermitage above the future site of the monastery and predicted that it would become a great seat of learning. Foundations for the complex were laid in 1419 by Byams chen chos rje Shākya ye shes (Jamchen Choje Shākya Yeshe, 1354-1435), a disciple of Tsong kha pa. Begun as a center for tantric studies, four colleges were later established, which were later consolidiated into two: Se ra smad (Sera Me) and Se ra byes (Sera Je). Se ra byes, the larger of the two, was constructed by Kun mkhyen blo gros rin chen seng ge (Künkyen Lodro Rinchen Senge, fl. fifteenth century), a disciple of both Tsong kha pa and Byams chen chos rjes. A third college, the Sngags pa drwa tshang (Ngakpa Dratsang) or tantric college, was established in the eighteenth century, most likely under the patronage of the Mongolian ruler Lha bzang Khan. Traditionally said to house 5,500 monks, Se ra was home to roughly eight thousand monks at its peak, with some thirty-five regional dormitories (khams tshan). Monks from Se ra participated in the 1959 uprising against the Chinese People's Liberation Army, which led to the monastery being closed and used as an army barracks. It also suffered significant damage during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. After that, it reopened as a monastery, but with a much smaller monastic population. Following the exodus of Tibetans into exile after 1959, a new Se ra monastery was also established in south India, near the town of Bylakuppe.

Sesha (Sanskrit) Śeṣa [from the verbal root śiṣ to leave a remainder or residue] Remainder; the karmic remainders of the preceding cosmic manvantara which become the basis for the manifestation of the present manvantara. Also the name of the seven-headed serpent of space on which Vishnu rests during pralaya, representing the seven principles of the cosmos in which the spiritual or unmanifested universe remains until the period for its new manifestation arrives, thereafter to become manifest by degrees. Sesha or Ananta, the couch of Vishnu, is an abstraction symbolizing ever-continuing cosmic life in space, which contains the remainders or germs of the future manvantara, and throws off periodically the efflorescence of these germs as the manifested universe. But during a solar pralaya, the cosmic spirit from which all flows forth, reposes sleeping upon Sesha, the serpent of eternity, in the midst of the kosmic Deep. Hence Sesha is considered Vishnu’s first vahana (vehicle) in the primordial water of space, before manvantaric activity begins.

Shin Upagot. A semi-immortal ARHAT who, according to Burmese (Myanmar) and Thai popular tradition, dwells in a gilded palace beneath the southern ocean. Shin Upagot (P. Upagutta, S. UPAGUPTA) is endowed with extraordinarily long life and is destined to survive until the coming of the future buddha, MAITREYA. According to Burmese legend, Shin Upagot was ordered by the Buddha not to pass into PARINIRVĀnA until Maitreya had appeared so that he might protect the Buddha's religion during times of crisis. Shin Upagot is renowned for assisting King AsOKA to construct eighty-four thousand STuPAs, and for vanquishing MĀRA and converting him to Buddhism. The earliest known record of the legend of Shin Upagot as it is known in Southeast Asia is found in the LokapaNNatti, a Pāli cosmological text said to have been written at Thaton in the twelfth century. That recension of the legend, in turn, is based on Sanskrit Buddhist antecedents found in such works as the AsOKĀVADĀNA, all of which recount the exploits of the Upagupta. The legend of Shin Upagot is celebrated in the Burmese royal chronicles (yazawin), Mahayazawin-gyi (c. 1730) and Hmannan Mahayazawin-daw-gyi (1829), while the story is omitted from all Burmese ecclesiastical chronicles (thathanawin), presumably because it is not attested in Pāli sources. Shin Upagot is regarded as a protector of sailors, and because of his powers to control the weather, he is propitiated to prevent rainfall at inopportune times. He is depicted iconographically as a monk seated cross-legged, looking skyward, with his right hand reaching into his alms bowl.

shortsighted ::: a. --> Not able to see far; nearsighted; myopic. See Myopic, and Myopia.
Fig.: Not able to look far into futurity; unable to understand things deep; of limited intellect.
Having little regard for the future; heedless.


Skandha(s)(Sanskrit) ::: Literally "bundles," or groups of attributes, to use H. P. Blavatsky's definition. When deathcomes to a man in any one life, the seeds of those causes previously sown by him and which have not yetcome forth into blossom and full-blown flower and fruit, remain in his interior and invisible parts asimpulses lying latent and sleeping: lying latent like sleeping seeds for future flowerings into action in thenext and succeeding lives. They are psychological impulse-seeds lying asleep until their appropriatestage for awakening into action arrives at some time in the future.In the case of the cosmic bodies, every solar or planetary body upon entering into its pralaya, itsprakritika-pralaya -- the dissolution of its lower principles -- at the end of its long life cycle, exists inspace in the higher activity of its spiritual principles, and in the dispersion of its lowest principles, whichlatter latently exist in space as skandhas in a laya-condition.When a laya-center is fired into action by the touch of wills and consciousnesses on their downward way,becoming the imbodying life of a solar system, or of a planet of a solar system, the center manifests firston its highest plane, and later on its lower plane. The skandhas are awakened into life one after another:first the highest ones, next the intermediate ones, and lastly the inferior ones, cosmically and qualitativelyspeaking.The term skandhas in theosophical philosophy has the general significance of bundles or groups ofattributes, which together form or compose the entire set of material and also mental, emotional, andmoral qualities. Exoterically the skandhas are "bundles" of attributes five in number, but esoterically theyare seven. These unite at the birth of man and constitute his personality. After the death of the body theskandhas are separated and so remain until the reincarnating ego on its downward path into physicalincarnation gathers them together again around itself, and thus reforms the human constitutionconsidered as a unity.In brief, the skandhas can be said to be the aggregate of the groups of attributes or qualities which makeeach individual man the personality that he is; but this must be sharply distinguished from theindividuality.

Skuld (Icelandic) A debt, due; the third of the three norns who determine the fate of heroes in Norse mythology and who parallel the Greek Moirai. Skuld represents the future or unexpended karma, that which is due and owing. Her sister norns are named Urd (origin) and Verdandi (becoming). Skuld is said to be created by her two sisters: by the causes set in motion in the past (Urd) and the decisions and actions taken in the present (Verdandi). Hence she is the inevitable consequence of what has gone before.

sodasasthavira. (T. gnas brtan bcu drug; C. shiliu zunzhe; J. jurokusonja; K. simnyuk chonja 十六尊者). In Sanskrit, "the sixteen elders" (most commonly known in the East Asian tradition as the "sixteen ARHATs"); a group of sixteen venerated arhat (C. LUOHAN) disciples of the Buddha whom the Buddha orders to forgo NIRVĀnA and to continue to dwell in this world in order to preserve the Buddhist teachings until the coming of the future buddha, MAITREYA. Each of these arhats is assigned an (often mythical) residence and a retinue of disciples. With Maitreya's advent, they will gather the relics of the current buddha sĀKYAMUNI and erect one last STuPA to hold them, after which they will finally pass into PARINIRVĀnA. The sāriputraparipṛcchā ("Sutra on sāriputra's Questions"), which was translated at least by the Eastern Jin dynasty (317-420 CE) but may date closer to the beginning of the millennium, mentions four great monks (mahā-BHIKsU) to whom the Buddha entrusted the propagation of the teachings after his death: MAHĀKĀsYAPA, PIndOLA, Kundovahan (C. Juntoupohan, "Holder of the Mongoose," apparently identical to BAKKULA), and RĀHULA. The MILE XIASHENG JING ("Sutra on the Advent of Maitreya"), translated in 303 CE by DHARMARAKsA, states instead that the Buddha instructed these same four monks to wait until after the buddhadharma of the current dispensation was completely extinct before entering PARINIRVĀnA. The sāriputraparipṛcchā's account is also found in the FAHUA WENJU by TIANTAI ZHIYI (538-597) of the Sui dynasty. The Mahāyānāvatāra (C. Ru dasheng lun; "Entry into the Mahāyāna"), a treatise written by Sāramati (C. Jianyi) and translated into Chinese c. 400 CE by Daotai of the Northern Liang dynasty (397-439) first mentions "sixteen" great disciples (mahā-sRĀVAKA) who disperse throughout the world to preserve the Buddha's teachings after his death, but does not name them. Indeed, it is not until the Tang dynasty that the full list of sixteen disciples who preserve the buddhadharma is first introduced into the Chinese tradition. This complete list first appears in the Nandimitrāvadāna (Da aluohan Nantimiduo luo suoshuo fazhu ji, abbr. Fazhu ji, "Record of the Duration of the Dharma Spoken by the Great Arhat NANDIMITRA"), which was translated by XUANZANG in 654 CE. (Nandimitra [C. Qingyou zunzhe] was born in the second century CE in Sri Lanka.) This text tells the story of the Buddha's special charge to this group of elders and offers each of their names, residences, and numbers of disciples. JINGQI ZHANRAN's (711-782) Fahua wenju ji, a commentary to TIANTAI ZHIYI's (538-597) FAHUA WENJU, also cites an account from the apocryphal Ratnameghasutra (Bao yun jing) that the Buddha charged sixteen "worthy ones" (S. arhat; C. luohan) with preserving the BUDDHADHARMA until the advent of Maitreya, after which they could then enter parinirvāna. Zhanran's citation of this sutra gives the names of each of the sixteen arhats, along with their residence and the number of their followers; but while Pindola's and Rāhula's names are included in the sixteen, Mahākāsyapa is not mentioned. According to the Xuanhe huapu ("The Xuanhe Chronology of Painting"), the earliest Chinese iconography showing a group of sixteen disciples probably dates to the Liang dynasty (502-557), when ZHANG SENGYAO (d.u.; fl c. 502-549) first painted a rendering of the sodasasthavira. After the Nandimitrāvadāna was translated into Chinese in the middle of the seventh century, the group of sixteen elders became so universally revered within China that many verses, paintings, and sculptures were dedicated to them. As a group, they appear frequently in East Asian monastic art, each arhat specifically identified by his unique (and often wildly exaggerated) physical characteristics. The most renowned such painting was made at the end of the ninth century by the monk CHANYUE GUANXIU (832-912); his work became the standard presentation of the sixteen. His vivid portrayal of the arhats offers an extreme, stylized rendition of how the Chinese envisioned "Indians" (fan) or "Westerners" (hu). He gives each of his subjects a distinctive bearing and deportment and unique phrenological features and physical characteristics; these features are subsequently repeated routinely in the Chinese artistic tradition. The standard roster of arhats now recognized in the East Asian tradition, in their typical order, are (1) PIndOLA BHĀRADVĀJA; (2) KANAKAVATSA; (3) KANAKA BHĀRADVĀJA; (4) SUBINDA [alt. Suvinda]; (5) BAKKULA [alt. Bākula, Nakula]; (6) BHADRA; (7) KĀLIKA [alt. Karīka]; (8) VAJRAPUTRA; (9) JĪVAKA; (10) PANTHAKA; (11) RĀHULA; (12) NĀGASENA; (13) AnGAJA; (14) VANAVĀSIN; (15) AJITA; (16) CudAPANTHAKA. Sometime before the Song dynasty, the Chinese occasionally added two extra arhats to the roster, possibly in response to Daoist configurations of teachers, giving a total of eighteen. The most common of these additional members were Nandimitra (the putative subject of the text in which the protectors are first mentioned by name) and Pindola Bhāradvāja (another transcription of the arhat who already appears on the list), although Mahākāsyapa also frequently appears. The Tibetan tradition adds still other figures. In a standard form of the Tibetan ritual, the sixteen elders are listed as Angaja, Ajita, Vanavāsin, Kālika, Vajraputra, Bhadra, Kanakavatsa, Kanaka Bhāradvāja, Bakkula, Rāhula, Cudapanthaka, Pindola Bhāradvāja, Panthaka, Nāgasena, GOPAKA (Sbed byed), and Abheda (Mi phyed pa). They are visualized together with sākyamuni Buddha whose teaching they have been entrusted to protect, their benefactor the layman (UPĀSAKA) Dharmatāla [alt. Dharmatāra, Dharmatrāta], and the four great kings (CATURMAHĀRĀJA) VAIsRAVAnA [alt. Kubera], DHṚTARĀstRA, VIRudHAKA, and VIRuPĀKsA. Each of the elders is described as having a particular scroll, begging bowl, staff, and so on, and in a particular posture with a set number of arhats. They come miraculously from their different sacred abodes, assemble, are praised, and worshipped with the recitation of the bodhisattva SAMANTABHADRA's ten vows in the BHADRACARĪPRAnIDHĀNA. Then, with solemn requests to protect the dispensation by watching over the lives of the gurus, they are requested to return to their respective homelands. In other rituals, one finds BUDAI heshang (Cloth-Bag Monk, viz., AnGAJA), the Buddha's mother, Queen MĀYĀ, and his successor, Maitreya; or the two ancient Indian Buddhist sages "Subduer of Dragons" (C. Xianglong) and "Subduer of Lions" (C. Fuhu). See also LUOHAN; and individual entries on each of the sixteen arhats/sthaviras.

software law ::: (legal) Software may, under various circumstances and in various countries, be restricted by patent or copyright or both. Most commercial software is sold under some kind of software license.A patent normally covers the design of something with a function such as a machine or process. Copyright restricts the right to make and distribute copies data structures it uses and it could also be considered as a recording which can be copied and performed (run).Look and feel lawsuits attempt to monopolize well-known command languages; some have succeeded. Copyrights on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition, and stifle incremental improvements.Software patents are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pretrial consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future.The proper use of copyright is to prevent software piracy - unauthorised duplication of software. This is completely different from copying the idea behind the program in the same way that photocopying a book differs from writing another book on the same subject.Usenet newsgroup: misc.legal.computing.[The Software Developer's and Marketer's Legal Companion, Gene K. Landy, 1993, AW, 0-201-62276-9]. (1994-11-16)

software law "legal" Software may, under various circumstances and in various countries, be restricted by patent or {copyright} or both. Most commercial software is sold under some kind of {software license}. A patent normally covers the design of something with a function such as a machine or process. Copyright restricts the right to make and distribute copies of something written or recorded, such as a song or a book of recipies. Software has both these aspects - it embodies functional design in the {algorithms} and data structures it uses and it could also be considered as a recording which can be copied and "performed" (run). "{Look and feel}" lawsuits attempt to monopolize well-known command languages; some have succeeded. {Copyrights} on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition, and stifle incremental improvements. {Software patents} are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pretrial seizure. It is difficult and expensive to find out whether the techniques you consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future. The proper use of {copyright} is to prevent {software piracy} - unauthorised duplication of software. This is completely different from copying the idea behind the program in the same way that photocopying a book differs from writing another book on the same subject. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:misc.legal.computing}. ["The Software Developer's and Marketer's Legal Companion", Gene K. Landy, 1993, AW, 0-201-62276-9]. (1994-11-16)

soothsayer ::: Soothsayer In olden times, a prophet, someone able to see the future, and who made a living from it. The word is no longer in common usage. See also Fortune Teller.

Sortes Sanctorum (Latin) [from sors lot + sanctum holy] Divination of the holy ones; the oracular responses, sayings, or prophecies of the oracles. In a more popular sense, the mere casting of lots, or the attempt to ascertain the future by methods which have been popular throughout the ages. Divination was sometimes resorted to in the early Christian Church, and sanctioned even by Augustine, with the proviso that it must be used only for pure and lofty purposes. One manner probably consisted in picking a passage in holy writ, after praying for divine guidance. In the ancient sanctuaries, however, a genuine divination was practiced by actual seers who based their operations upon mathematics and on the fact that nature foreshadows what is to come to pass, because all her processes are regulated by law, and are consistent sequences of phenomena connected in a causal chain from spiritual originants. Thus the ancient seer or forecaster, taking almost any natural occurrence, or a series of them, could from his trained faculties, forecast what the present series of events in nature were inevitably leading towards. To do this successfully one would have to be a genuine seer, which means employing the awakened intuition and spiritual clairvoyance which lie latent in most human beings.

Specious Present: (Lat speciosus, from species, look or apprehend) The psychological or felt present is a spread of duration embraced within the mind's momentary experience. Contrasts with the physical present which is an ideal limit or boundary between the past and the future. -- L.W.

Specious present: The psychological or felt present, a spread of duration embraced within the mind’s momentary experience. Contrasts with the physical present which is an ideal limit or boundary between the past and the future.

srāvaka. (P. sāvaka; T. nyan thos; C. shengwen; J. shomon; K. songmun 聲聞). In Sanskrit, lit. "listener"; viz., a direct "disciple" of the Buddha who "listened" to his teachings (and sometimes seen translated over-literally from the Chinese as "sound-hearer"). In the MAHĀYĀNA, the term was used to describe those who (along with PRATYEKABUDDHAs) sought their own liberation from suffering as an ARHAT by following the HĪNAYĀNA path (see ER SHENG), and was contrasted (negatively) to the BODHISATTVAs who seeks buddhahood for the sake of all beings. There is an issue in the Mahāyāna concerning whether srāvakas will eventually enter the bodhisattva path and become buddhas, or whether arhatship is a final state where no further progress along the path (MĀRGA) will be possible (see sRĀVAKAGOTRA). The SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, for example, declares that they will, and in the sutra the Buddha makes prophecies about the future buddhahood of several famous srāvakas. In many Mahāyāna sutras, srāvakas are often described as being in the audience of the Buddha's teaching, and certain srāvakas, such as sĀRIPUTRA, play important roles as interlocutors. In the third chapter of the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, a series of srāvakas explain why they are reluctant to visit the bodhisattva VIMALAKĪRTI, because of the insurmountable challenge his profound understanding of the dharma will present to them.

Sri Aurobindo: "Beauty is the special divine Manifestation in the physical as Truth is in the Mind, Love in the heart, Power in the vital.” *The Future Poetry

Sri Aurobindo: "Destiny in the rigid sense applies only to the outer being so long as it lives in the Ignorance. What we call destiny is only in fact the result of the present condition of the being and the nature and energies it has accumulated in the past acting on each other and determining the present attempts and their future results. But as soon as one enters the path of spiritual life, this old predetermined destiny begins to recede. There comes in a new factor, the Divine Grace, the help of a higher Divine Force other than the force of Karma, which can lift the sadhak beyond the present possibilities of his nature. One"s spiritual destiny is then the divine election which ensures the future.” *Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "If this higher buddhi {{understanding in the profoundest sense] could act pure of the interference of these lower members, it would give pure forms of the truth; observation would be dominated or replaced by a vision which could see without subservient dependence on the testimony of the sense-mind and senses; imagination would give place to the self-assured inspiration of the truth, reasoning to the spontaneous discernment of relations and conclusion from reasoning to an intuition containing in itself those relations and not building laboriously upon them, judgment to a thought-vision in whose light the truth would stand revealed without the mask which it now wears and which our intellectual judgment has to penetrate; while memory too would take upon itself that larger sense given to it in Greek thought and be no longer a paltry selection from the store gained by the individual in his present life, but rather the all-recording knowledge which secretly holds and constantly gives from itself everything that we now seem painfully to acquire but really in this sense remember, a knowledge which includes the future(1) no less than the past. ::: Footnote: In this sense the power of prophecy has been aptly called a memory of the future.]” *The Synthesis of Yoga

*Sri Aurobindo: "The Indian explanation of fate is Karma. We ourselves are our own fate through our actions, but the fate created by us binds us; for what we have sown, we must reap in this life or another. Still we are creating our fate for the future even while undergoing old fate from the past in the present. That gives a meaning to our will and action and does not, as European critics wrongly believe, constitute a rigid and sterilising fatalism. But again, our will and action can often annul or modify even the past Karma, it is only certain strong effects, called utkata karma, that are non-modifiable. Here too the achievement of the spiritual consciousness and life is supposed to annul or give the power to annul Karma. For we enter into union with the Will Divine, cosmic or transcendent, which can annul what it had sanctioned for certain conditions, new-create what it had created, the narrow fixed lines disappear, there is a more plastic freedom and wideness. Neither Karma nor Astrology therefore points to a rigid and for ever immutable fate.” Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: “The legend of the Tower of Babel speaks of the diversity of tongues as a curse laid on the race; but whatever its disadvantages, and they tend more and more to be minimised by the growth of civilisation and increasing intercourse, it has been rather a blessing than a curse, a gift to mankind rather than a disability laid upon it. The purposeless exaggeration of anything is always an evil, and an excessive pullulation of varying tongues that serve no purpose in the expression of a real diversity of spirit and culture is certainly a stumbling-block rather than a help: but this excess, though it existed in the past, is hardly a possibility of the future. The tendency is rather in the opposite direction. In former times diversity of language helped to create a barrier to knowledge and sympathy, was often made the pretext even of an actual antipathy and tended to a too rigid division. The lack of sufficient interpenetration kept up both a passive want of understanding and a fruitful crop of active misunderstandings. But this was an inevitable evil of a particular stage of growth, an exaggeration of the necessity that then existed for the vigorous development of strongly individualised group-souls in the human race. These disadvantages have not yet been abolished, but with closer intercourse and the growing desire of men and nations for the knowledge of each other’s thought and spirit and personality, they have diminished and tend to diminish more and more and there is no reason why in the end they should not become inoperative.” The Human Cycle. Babel-builders’.

Sri Aurobindo: "The word is a sound expression of the idea. In the supra-physical plane when an idea has to be realised, one can by repeating the word-expression of it, produce vibrations which prepare the mind for the realisation of the idea. That is the principle of the Mantras and of Japa. One repeats the name of the Divine and the vibrations created in the consciousness prepare the realisation of the Divine. It is the same idea that is expressed in the Bible: ‘God said, Let there be Light, and there was Light". It is creation by the Word.” *The Future Poetry

Sthāvarā. (T. Sa'i lha mo; C. Anzhu dishen; J. Anjujijin; K. Anju chisin 安住地神). In Sanskrit, "Immovable," the goddess of the earth, also known as PṚTHIVĪ. She plays an important role in the story of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha's enlightenment. After MĀRA and his armies were unable to unseat the BODHISATTVA, Māra challenged his right to occupy the space beneath the BODHI TREE, claiming that he, Māra, had a greater right since, as a god, he had greater merit; his army boisterously attested to Māra's claim. The bodhisattva responded that his merit was greater because he had practiced the ten perfections (PĀRAMITĀ) for many lifetimes. When Māra asked who would attest to the Bodhisattva's claim, he touched the earth with his right hand in the famous "earth-touching gesture" (BHuMISPARsAMUDRĀ), calling on the goddess of the earth to attest to the truth of his statement. She responded by causing a tremor; in some versions, she emerges from the earth to bear witness. In the GAndAVYuHA (the final chapter of the AVATAMSAKASuTRA), the bodhisattva SUDHANA sets out in search of a teacher, encountering fifty-two beings (twenty of whom are female), including the Buddha's mother MAHĀMĀYĀ, the future buddha MAITREYA, as well as AVALOKITEsVARA and MANJUsRĪ. The thirtieth being he encounters is Sthāvarā, whom he meets at BODHGAYĀ. She also bears witness to his practice of virtue and predicts that he will achieve buddhahood. See also THORANI.

sthavira. (P. thera; T. gnas brtan; C. shangzuo; J. joza; K. sangjwa 上座). In Sanskrit, "elder," a term of respect for a senior monk, and typically one with at least a decade of seniority as a fully ordained monk or nun (BHIKsU, BHIKsUnĪ), with seniority measured not by age but by the length of time since the monk or nun's full ordination (UPASAMPADĀ). One's years of ordination as a novice monk or nun (sRĀMAnERA, sRĀMAnERIKĀ) do not count in determining one's seniority within the order. The term also refers to sixteen (or in some lists, eighteen) ARHAT-disciples of the Buddha and were entrusted by him with preserving the teaching until the coming of the future buddha, MAITREYA. These monks became objects of devotion, especially in Tibet and East Asia; see sOdAsASTHAVIRA.

Subtle Bodies In Vedantic philosophy, the five kosas or sheaths, whether of the cosmos, man, or any other being, through which the atman as sutratman (thread-self) passes. In a more restricted and biological sense, the chhayas (shadows) or astral bodies emanated by original humanity to become the vehicles of the future humanities. Those who projected or emanated these chhayas or subtle bodies were the pitris (fathers, progenitors).

suddhodana. (P. Suddhodana; T. Zas gtsang; C. Jingfan wang; J. Jobon o; K. Chongban wang 淨飯王). In Sanskrit, lit. "Pure Rice"; the royal father of GAUTAMA Buddha. suddhodana was the son of SiMhahanu (P. Sīhahanu), a king of the sĀKYA clan, and ruled in KAPILAVASTU (P. Kapilavatthu) in the foothills of the Himālayas, in present-day Nepal. suddhodana's wife was MAHĀMĀYĀ, who died seven days after giving birth to prince Gautama. According to some accounts of the Buddha's life, suddhodana was also already married to, or subsequently married, MAHĀPRAJĀPATĪ, Māyā's sister and thus Gautama's aunt, who raised the infant and eventually became the first woman to be ordained as a Buddhist nun (BHIKsUnĪ). At the time of the bodhisattva's birth, his father asked eight priests to examine the child and predict his future. There are several versions of this event, but in the Pāli NIDĀNAKATHĀ, seven predict that he will become either a CAKRAVARTIN or a buddha, while one, KondaNNa (S. KAUndINYA; see ĀJNĀTAKAUndINYA), predicts that it is certain that he will become a buddha, and will do so after seeing four portents (CATURNIMITTA)-viz., of a sick man, an old man, a corpse, and a religious mendicant. KondaNNa and the sons of four of the eight court priests would eventually become the group of five ascetics (S. PANCAVARGIKA, P. paNcavaggiyā) who would be the Buddha's first disciples. In order to prevent his son's exposure to the sufferings of life, the king built three palaces filled only with youth and beauty. His father paid homage to his young son on two occasions, first when the ascetic Asita bowed to the infant and second, when, during a ploughing festival, he saw his young son meditating under a tree; the sun had stopped its course across the sky in order that the child would remain in shadow of a jambu tree. Despite his attempts to distract his son with all manner of sensual pleasures in his three palaces, the king's efforts were ultimately in vain and the prince eventually determined to leave behind the household life (PRAVRAJITA) after witnessing each of the portents. His father sought unsuccessfully to dissuade him, saying that it was not the right time for the prince, now with a wife and child, to renounce the world. Years later, when Gautama returned to Kapilavastu as an enlightened buddha, suddhodana became a devoted follower of his son. However, he objected to the Buddha's ordination of his young son RĀHULA, causing the Buddha to promulgate a rule that in the future, parents must give permission before their son is ordained. The king became a stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA) himself, his success at meditation initially hindered by his excessive joy that his son was the Buddha. Shortly before his death, the king became an ARHAT.

Sudhana. (T. Nor bzang; C. Shancai; J. Zenzai; K. Sonjae 善財). A youth who is the major protagonist of the GAndAVYuHA, the final section of the AVATAMSAKASuTRA. The story of Sudhana's search is related in the AvataMsakasutra's massive final chapter, the "Entrance into the Dharmadhātu" (C. Ru fajie pin), which also circulated independently as the GAndAVYuHA. On the instructions of the BODHISATTVA MANJUsRĪ, Sudhana sets out to the south in search of a spiritual mentor (KALYĀnAMITRA), ultimately encountering fifty-two beings (sometimes counted as fifty-three, because MaNjusrī is repeated) including the future buddha MAITREYA, as well as the bodhisattvas AVALOKITEsVARA and MaNjusrī; twenty of his teachers are female, including the Buddha's mother MAHĀMĀYĀ. His final teacher is the bodhisattva SAMANTABHADRA, who sets forth in the famous BHADRACARĪPRAnIDHĀNA the ten vows he took to realize and access the DHARMADHĀTU, which thereby enable him to benefit sentient beings. After this encounter, Sudhana attains enlightenment and roams freely himself in the dharmadhātu. Sudhana's pilgrimage has been the inspiration for much East Asian Buddhist art and his statue often appears at the side of Buddhist altars as a boy bowing to the Buddha.

Sumedha. [alt. Sumegha] (C. Shanhui; J. Zen'e; K. Sonhye 善慧). Sanskrit and Pāli name of the BODHISATTVA who would become GAUTAMA Buddha. He was an ascetic at the time of DĪPAMKARA Buddha. Sumedha was born into a wealthy brāhmana family of AMARĀVATĪ. Disenchanted with the vanities of the householders' life, he renounced the world and took up his abode in the Himalaya mountains as an ascetic. There, he practiced assiduously and ultimately gained great yogic power. Once, when flying over the town of Ramma Nagara, he saw a crowd. He landed and asked a member of the crowd why they had gathered and was told that DīpaMkara Buddha was approaching. When he heard the word "buddha," he was overcome with joy. Seeing that people of the town were festooning the road DīpaMkara would be using with decorations, Sumedha decided to prepare and decorate a portion of the road himself. The Buddha arrived before his work was completed and, seeing that the Buddha was walking toward a mud puddle, Sumedha lay facedown and spread his long matted locks over the mud. While lying in the mud, Sumedha realized that, were he to follow DīpaMkara's teachings, he could become an ARHAT in that very lifetime. However, he resolved instead to achieve enlightenment at a time when there was no other buddha in the world, vowing to become a fully enlightened buddha (SAMYAKSAMBUDDHA) like DīpaMkara himself. DīpaMkara, using his supranormal powers, looked into the future and confirmed that Sumedha's vow (PuRVAPRAnIDĀNA) would be fulfilled and he would one day become GAUTAMA Buddha, the fourth of five perfect buddhas of the present age. It was with this vow, and with this confirmation by DīpaMkara Buddha, that the bodhisattva began the path to buddhahood, which, according to the Pāli tradition, he would complete four innumerable plus one hundred thousand eons later.

Taaut (Phoenician) A Phoenician deity described as having four eyes, two in front and two in back, and four wings. “The eyes denote that the god sees in sleep, and sleeps in waking; the position of the wings that he flies in rest, and rests in flying” (Sanchoniathon quoted in IU 2:235). Taaut is in some respects equivalent to the Greek Kronos or Saturn; yet there are elements in what is known of him reminiscent of the Roman Janus, seeing with two faces, and seeing both the past and the future which coalesce in the Eternal Now.

Tai Si tu incarnations. An influential incarnation (SPRUL SKU) lineage in the KARMA BKA' BRGYUD sect of Tibetan Buddhism. The Tai Si tu incarnations are traditionally venerated as emanations of the future buddha MAITREYA and, according to Tibetan sources, early members of the line include the Indian MAHĀSIDDHA dOMBĪ HERUKA and the Tibetans MAR PA CHOS KYI BLO GROS and TĀRANĀTHA. As one of the leading incarnate lamas of the Karma bka' brgyud, the Si tu incarnations traditionally maintained a close relationship with the KARMA PAs, the sect's spiritual leader; indeed, the two often alternated as guru and disciple. The first of the line, Chos kyi rgyal mtshan (Chokyi Gyaltsen, 1377-1448), trained under the fifth Karma pa and in 1407 received the honorary title from the Ming Emperor Yongle (r. 1403-1425). Perhaps most famous in the lineage is the eighth Si tu, CHOS KYI 'BYUNG GNAS, who is renowned for his erudition and literary accomplishments. The Tai Si tu lineage includes:

Tathagata (Sanskrit) Tathāgata [from tathā thus + gata gone; or + agata arrived, come] Thus come or thus gone; a title given to the long serial line of the Buddhas of Compassion as they appear each after his predecessor among mankind; likewise a title of Gautama Buddha, the last of this line of buddhas to have appeared thus far. It is a beautifully exact expression illustrating the common spiritual character of the great ones who have gone before ourselves as well as of those destined to come in the future. As a title of the buddhas, it signifies also “one who has followed the inward way, the inner pathway, the still small path coming down, so to say, from the universal self, passing through the human constitution onward until it disappears again in the heart of being from which we came” (Fund 625).

Teleology: (Gr. telos, end, completion) The theory of purpose, ends, goals, final causes, values, the Good (s.). The opposite of Mechanism. As opposed to mechanism, which explains the present and the future in terms of the past, teleology explains the past and the present in terms of the future. Teleology as such does not imply personal consciousness, volition, or intended purpose (q.v.). Physics, Biology: See Vitalism. Psychology: See Hormic, Instinct, Hedonism, Voluntarism. Epistemology: the view that mind is guided or governed by purposes, values, interests, "instinct", as well as by "factual", "objective" or logical evidence in its pursuit of truth (see Fideism, Voluntarism, Pragmatism, Will-to-believe, Value judgment). Metaphysics: The doctrine that reality is ordered by goals, ends, purposes, values, formal or final causes (q.v.). Ethics: The view that the standard of human life is value, the Good, rather than duty, law, or formal decorum.

temporal logic "logic" An extension of {predicate calculus} which includes notation for arguing about *when* statements are true. Time is discrete and extends indefinitely into the future. Three {prefix} operators, represented by a circle, square and diamond mean "is true at the next time instant", "is true from now on" and "is eventually true". x U y means x is true until y is true. x P y means x precedes y. There are two types of formula: "state formulae" about things true at one point in time, and "path formulae" about things true for a sequence of steps. An example of a path formula is "x U y", and example of a state formula is "next x" or a simple atomic formula such at "waiting". "true until" in this context means that a state formula holds at every point in time up to a point when another formula holds. "x U y" is the "strong until" and implies that there is a time when y is true. "x W y" is the "weak until" in which it is not necessary that y holds eventually. There are two types of temporal logic used: branching time and linear time. The basic propositional temporal logic cannot differentiate between the two, though. Linear time considers only one possible future, in branching time you have several alternative futures. In branching temporal logic you have the extra operators "A" (for "all futures") and "E" (for "some future"). For example, "A(work U go_home)" means "I will work until I go home" and "E(work U go_home)" means "I may work until I go home". (1997-01-21)

  “The Akasa is the eternal divine consciousness which cannot differentiate, have qualities, or act; action belongs to that which is reflected or mirrored from it. The unconditioned and infinite can have no relation with the finite and conditioned. . . . We may compare the Akasa and the Astral Light . . . to the germ in the acorn. The latter, besides containing in itself the astral form of the future oak, conceals the germ from which grows a tree containing millions of forms. These forms are contained in the acorn potentially, yet the development of each particular acorn depends upon extraneous circumstances, physical forces, etc.” (TBL 75-6; also IU 1:197).

The conditions of the future birth arc determined fundamental- ly not during the stay in the psychic world but at the time of death — the psychic being then chooses what it should work out in the next appearance and the conditions arrange themselves accordingly.

The Eden in Genesis is a marvelous fusion of many meanings into one narrative, where the Adams of the various root-races are made into one. Eden was an ancient name for Mesopotamia and adjacent regions; and under that one name are comprised the meanings of an abode of initiates, a sacred land from which races emerged, and a goal of bliss in the future. The Eden of the Hebrew books, which Judaism, Christianity, and Islam alike have located in Mesopotamia and in the now sandy lands of Persia and Afghanistan, refers also to what was in prehistoric times a great and highly developed center of culture and the civilization which there had its seat, including a number of Mystery schools. When the changing cycles brought about a degeneration and final breakup of this seat of archaic wisdom, it was represented as the loss by the then human Adam — the then race — of the Paradise in which he had dwelt. Edens and Paradises always contain trees; and these, by one interpretation, signify the initiates in the sacred land, and by another they are the Tree of Life and the Tree of Wisdom for man himself. In the Qabbalah, Eden is a place of initiation.

The existing anthropoid apes, however, are truly the closest of the animals or semi-animals to the human stock, actually having originated from a miscegenation by very early, quasi-mindless humans (actually undeveloped savages of those far distant times) with what then were fairly evolved simian types. Thus the present-day anthropoids are a somewhat, if slightly, advanced stock over their earlier forefathers who were the original anthropoids produced by the “sin” of unevolved and savage Atlantean tribes with simians. Precisely because the anthropoids have some human ancestry they will attract to incarnation in the future human egos as yet in a low state of unfolded spiritual and intellectual powers and capacities, and who will thus, as the cycles roll on, finally evolve into a low type of thinking and sensitive human being.

The mantra as I have tried to describe it in The Future Poetry is a word of power and light that comes from the Overmind inspiration or from some very high plane of Intuition. Its characteristics are a language that conveys infinitely more than the mere surface sense of the words seems to indicate, a rhythm that means even more than the language and is born out of the Infinite and disappears into it, and the power to convey not merely the mental, vital or physical contents or indications or values of the thing uttered, but its significance and figure in some fundamental and original consciousness which is behind all these and greater.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 27, Page: 26-27


The Negroes or people of chocolate-tinted skin are nevertheless not to be understood as being the seventh or last subrace of the fourth root-race, for the Chinese were these last. The chocolate-skinned men arose as a racial group at the very close of the Atlantean cycle, and are thus racially not degenerated from a previous higher evolutionary state, but are a human seed-stock born at the end of Atlantean development, destined in time through racial miscegenation to be one of the racial contributories to the humanity of the future. See also YELLOW RACE

The Norns dwell under one of the three roots of Yggdrasil, the Tree of Life, which is watered by the spring of Urd (past causes). So also is every individual tree of life, large or little, watered by the causes created in the past, modified by the choices of the present, and helping to create the future.

The process of evolution cannot be considered as ending. Just as below human beings there are less evolved kingdoms, so above are beings in whom fuller self-consciousness has been achieved than we have yet achieved, and still more of the divine potentialities realized. All evolution beneath humankind tends towards humanhood as its objective; but humanity itself has ever greater heights still before it to attain in the future.

There are innumerable instances of sevening — the seven days of the week, the seven colors of the spectrum, the seven notes of the musical scale — while special emphasis is placed upon the seven human and cosmic principles; the seven senses (five senses now in manifestation and two more to be attained in the future through evolutionary unfolding); the seven cosmic elements; the seven root-races and seven subraces; the seven kingdoms, human and below; the seven rounds; the seven lokas and talas; the seven manifested globes of the planetary chain; the seven sacred planets; the seven racial buddhas; the seven dhyani-bodhisattvas and -buddhas; the seven Logoi; etc.

  “There are records which show Egyptian priests — Initiates — journeying in a North-Westerly direction, by land, via what became later the Straits of Gibraltar; turning North and travelling through the future Phoenician settlements of Southern Gaul; then still further North, until reaching Carnac (Morbihan) they turned to the West again and arrived, still travelling by land, on the North-Western promontory of the New Continent.

*”…there is a spiritual mind which, can admit us to a greater and more comprehensive vision. *The Future Poetry*

“…there is a spiritual mind which, can admit us to a greater and more comprehensive vision. The Future Poetry

There is, however, greater difficulty in making freedom of the will compatible with divine prescience of human action. The question arises, does God know beforehand what man will do or not? If he does, it follows that the action is determined, or if man can choose, His knowledge is not true. Various answers were proposed by Jewish philosophers to this difficult problem. Saadia says that God's knowledge is like gazing in a mirror of the future which does not influence human action. He knows the ultimate result. Maimonides says that God's knowledge is so totally different from human that it remains indefinable, and consequently He may know things beforehand, and yet not impair the possibility of man to choose between two actions. Ibn Daud and Gersonides limit God's knowledge and say that He only knows that certain actions will be present to man for choice but not the way he will choose. Crescas is more logical and comes to the conclusion that action is possible only per se, i.e., when looked upon singly, but is necessary through the causes. Free will is in this case nominal and consist primarily in the fact that man is ignorant of the real situation and he is rewarded and punished for his exertion to do good or for his neglect to exert himself.

The relation between the atonement and the intellectual and moral evolution of mankind may be explained as follows: “The Higher Manas or ego is essentially divine, and therefore pure; . . . Yet by the very fact that, though dual and during life the Higher is distinct from the Lower, ‘the Father and Son’ are one, and because that in reuniting with the parent Ego, the Lower Soul fastens and impresses upon it of all its bad as well as good actions, the Higher Ego — though innocent and without blemish — has to bear the punishment of the misdeeds committed by the lower Self together with it in their future incarnation. The whole doctrine of atonement is built upon this old esoteric tenet; . . . The Secret Doctrine shows that the Manasa-Putras or incarnating Egos have taken upon themselves, voluntarily and knowingly, the burden of all the future sins of their future personalities. . . . It is, then, true to say that when we remain deaf to the Voice of our Conscience, we crucify the Christos within us” (TBL 55-6). See also VICARIOUS ATONEMENT

There was in ancient times a fairly exact and, when properly practiced, accurate science of divination based on omens. Since the kosmos is an organism, an organic whole — every part intimately interconnected with every other part, so that the smallest atom can affect a star as well as a star affect the smallest atom — logically whatever happens takes place because of a chain of events; so if one knew enough and were wise enough to interpret what one knew, it would be a fairly simple matter not merely to understand the invisible from the appearances of the visible, but likewise to foretell the future.

The similarity of this allegory to Hebrew and certain Hindu writings is obvious, and from the standpoint of humanity on earth, “Those ‘men’ in the ‘Vara’ are the ‘Progenitors,’ the heavenly men or Dhyani, the future Egos who are commissioned to inform mankind. For ‘Vara,’ or the ‘Ark’ (or again the Vehicle) simply means man. . . .

The speculations of the later Qabbalists were chiefly concerned with the doctrine of emanation, but in order to complete the picture, one might add that just as the whirling motion of fohatic life in evolving, or centrifugal movement, brought the Sephiroth into being, so in the far-distant aeons of the future by means of involuting or centripetal motion, the manifested universe (or Sephiroth) will be gathered again into the Boundless Light.

  “The three periods — the Present, the Past, and the Future — are in the esoteric philosophy a compound time; for the three are a composite number only in relation to the phenomenal plane, but in the realm of noumena have no abstract validity” (SD 1:43).

The tree has three roots watered by three wells. One is in Asgard, home of the gods, where it is watered by the three norns: the past (Urd, origin), the present (Verdandi, becoming), and the future which is created by them — owing (Skuld, debt). A second root penetrates the world of matter, where it is watered from the well of the giant Mimer whose waters are experience of life. Odin gave one eye as forfeit in order to receive a draft of that well, while Mimer has the use of Odin’s eye which is sunk in the bottom of the well. The third root is watered by Hvergelmir, source of all the rivers of lives (kingdoms of nature) which rises in Niflheim, the world of mists (nebulae) where worlds are born.

This descent of the ray tip into, and selection of, suitable earth of matter, has been the basis of all the various methods of procreation. The process began in the huge ovoid form of the ethereal first root-race by simple division of this human cell, as the embryo today repeats in beginning its rapid review of racial records. “One infinitesimal cell, out of millions of others at work in the formation of an organism, determining alone and unaided, by means of constant segmentation and multiplication, the correct image of the future man (or animal) in its physical, mental, and psychic characteristics. . . . those germinal cells do not have their genesis at all in the body of the individual, but proceed directly from the ancestral germinal cell passed from father to son through long generations” (SD 1:223n). See also HEREDITY; PROCREATION; REPRODUCTION

Thorani. In Thailand and Laos, Phra Mae (Mother) Thorani or Nang (Lady) Thorani; a female deity depicted in mural depictions of the life of the Buddha. The name Thorani is the Thai and Lao pronunciation of the Sanskrit term DHĀRAnĪ, which, in addition to its common Buddhist denotation of "code" or "spell," also means "the earth," "soil," or "ground." In a variation of the story of STHĀVARĀ, as the future Buddha sat in meditation about to attain enlightenment, he was attacked by MĀRA and his minions. Māra taunted him, saying that the bodhisattva had no one to attest to his worthiness of becoming a buddha, whereas his vast retinue was present to attest that he, Māra, should be acknowledged as the awakened one. The Buddha then touched the earth with his right hand and summoned the earth to bear witness to his meritorious acts (see BHuMISPARsAMUDRĀ), particularly acts of giving (DĀNA), that he had performed in past existences. Lady Thorani then appeared from out of the earth in the form of a beautiful woman with long wet hair. As she wrung out her hair, all the water that had accumulated on the earth each time the Buddha offered donative libations during his myriad past lives became such a torrential deluge that it swept away Māra and all his minions. (Pouring a ceremonial libation of water is a common way to conclude many ceremonies and offering rituals in Southeast Asian Buddhism.) In paintings, Lady Thorani stands beneath the VAJRĀSANA of the Buddha while Māra and his retinue are off to either side, caught in the floodwaters. Central city shrines to Lady Thorani can be found in both Laos and northeastern Thailand, and in the past, it was common for households in northeastern Thailand to have a small shrine dedicated to Lady Thorani in their household compounds.

Three senses of "Ockhamism" may be distinguished: Logical, indicating usage of the terminology and technique of logical analysis developed by Ockham in his Summa totius logicae; in particular, use of the concept of supposition (suppositio) in the significative analysis of terms. Epistemological, indicating the thesis that universality is attributable only to terms and propositions, and not to things as existing apart from discourse. Theological, indicating the thesis that no tneological doctrines, such as those of God's existence or of the immortality of the soul, are evident or demonstrable philosophically, so that religious doctrine rests solely on faith, without metaphysical or scientific support. It is in this sense that Luther is often called an Ockhamist.   Bibliography:   B. Geyer,   Ueberwegs Grundriss d. Gesch. d. Phil., Bd. II (11th ed., Berlin 1928), pp. 571-612 and 781-786; N. Abbagnano,   Guglielmo di Ockham (Lanciano, Italy, 1931); E. A. Moody,   The Logic of William of Ockham (N. Y. & London, 1935); F. Ehrle,   Peter von Candia (Muenster, 1925); G. Ritter,   Studien zur Spaetscholastik, I-II (Heidelberg, 1921-1922).     --E.A.M. Om, aum: (Skr.) Mystic, holy syllable as a symbol for the indefinable Absolute. See Aksara, Vac, Sabda. --K.F.L. Omniscience: In philosophy and theology it means the complete and perfect knowledge of God, of Himself and of all other beings, past, present, and future, or merely possible, as well as all their activities, real or possible, including the future free actions of human beings. --J.J.R. One: Philosophically, not a number but equivalent to unit, unity, individuality, in contradistinction from multiplicity and the mani-foldness of sensory experience. In metaphysics, the Supreme Idea (Plato), the absolute first principle (Neo-platonism), the universe (Parmenides), Being as such and divine in nature (Plotinus), God (Nicolaus Cusanus), the soul (Lotze). Religious philosophy and mysticism, beginning with Indian philosophy (s.v.), has favored the designation of the One for the metaphysical world-ground, the ultimate icility, the world-soul, the principle of the world conceived as reason, nous, or more personally. The One may be conceived as an independent whole or as a sum, as analytic or synthetic, as principle or ontologically. Except by mysticism, it is rarely declared a fact of sensory experience, while its transcendent or transcendental, abstract nature is stressed, e.g., in epistemology where the "I" or self is considered the unitary background of personal experience, the identity of self-consciousness, or the unity of consciousness in the synthesis of the manifoldness of ideas (Kant). --K.F.L. One-one: A relation R is one-many if for every y in the converse domain there is a unique x such that xRy. A relation R is many-one if for every x in the domain there is a unique y such that xRy. (See the article relation.) A relation is one-one, or one-to-one, if it is at the same time one-many and many-one. A one-one relation is said to be, or to determine, a one-to-one correspondence between its domain and its converse domain. --A.C. On-handedness: (Ger. Vorhandenheit) Things exist in the mode of thereness, lying- passively in a neutral space. A "deficient" form of a more basic relationship, termed at-handedness (Zuhandenheit). (Heidegger.) --H.H. Ontological argument: Name by which later authors, especially Kant, designate the alleged proof for God's existence devised by Anselm of Canterbury. Under the name of God, so the argument runs, everyone understands that greater than which nothing can be thought. Since anything being the greatest and lacking existence is less then the greatest having also existence, the former is not really the greater. The greatest, therefore, has to exist. Anselm has been reproached, already by his contemporary Gaunilo, for unduly passing from the field of logical to the field of ontological or existential reasoning. This criticism has been repeated by many authors, among them Aquinas. The argument has, however, been used, if in a somewhat modified form, by Duns Scotus, Descartes, and Leibniz. --R.A. Ontological Object: (Gr. onta, existing things + logos, science) The real or existing object of an act of knowledge as distinguished from the epistemological object. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ontologism: (Gr. on, being) In contrast to psychologism, is called any speculative system which starts philosophizing by positing absolute being, or deriving the existence of entities independently of experience merely on the basis of their being thought, or assuming that we have immediate and certain knowledge of the ground of being or God. Generally speaking any rationalistic, a priori metaphysical doctrine, specifically the philosophies of Rosmini-Serbati and Vincenzo Gioberti. As a philosophic method censored by skeptics and criticists alike, as a scholastic doctrine formerly strongly supported, revived in Italy and Belgium in the 19th century, but no longer countenanced. --K.F.L. Ontology: (Gr. on, being + logos, logic) The theory of being qua being. For Aristotle, the First Philosophy, the science of the essence of things. Introduced as a term into philosophy by Wolff. The science of fundamental principles, the doctrine of the categories. Ultimate philosophy; rational cosmology. Syn. with metaphysics. See Cosmology, First Principles, Metaphysics, Theology. --J.K.F. Operation: "(Lit. operari, to work) Any act, mental or physical, constituting a phase of the reflective process, and performed with a view to acquiring1 knowledge or information about a certain subject-nntter. --A.C.B.   In logic, see Operationism.   In philosophy of science, see Pragmatism, Scientific Empiricism. Operationism: The doctrine that the meaning of a concept is given by a set of operations.   1. The operational meaning of a term (word or symbol) is given by a semantical rule relating the term to some concrete process, object or event, or to a class of such processes, objectj or events.   2. Sentences formed by combining operationally defined terms into propositions are operationally meaningful when the assertions are testable by means of performable operations. Thus, under operational rules, terms have semantical significance, propositions have empirical significance.   Operationism makes explicit the distinction between formal (q.v.) and empirical sentences. Formal propositions are signs arranged according to syntactical rules but lacking operational reference. Such propositions, common in mathematics, logic and syntax, derive their sanction from convention, whereas an empirical proposition is acceptable (1) when its structure obeys syntactical rules and (2) when there exists a concrete procedure (a set of operations) for determining its truth or falsity (cf. Verification). Propositions purporting to be empirical are sometimes amenable to no operational test because they contain terms obeying no definite semantical rules. These sentences are sometimes called pseudo-propositions and are said to be operationally meaningless. They may, however, be 'meaningful" in other ways, e.g. emotionally or aesthetically (cf. Meaning).   Unlike a formal statement, the "truth" of an empirical sentence is never absolute and its operational confirmation serves only to increase the degree of its validity. Similarly, the semantical rule comprising the operational definition of a term has never absolute precision. Ordinarily a term denotes a class of operations and the precision of its definition depends upon how definite are the rules governing inclusion in the class.   The difference between Operationism and Logical Positivism (q.v.) is one of emphasis. Operationism's stress of empirical matters derives from the fact that it was first employed to purge physics of such concepts as absolute space and absolute time, when the theory of relativity had forced upon physicists the view that space and time are most profitably defined in terms of the operations by which they are measured. Although different methods of measuring length at first give rise to different concepts of length, wherever the equivalence of certain of these measures can be established by other operations, the concepts may legitimately be combined.   In psychology the operational criterion of meaningfulness is commonly associated with a behavioristic point of view. See Behaviorism. Since only those propositions which are testable by public and repeatable operations are admissible in science, the definition of such concepti as mind and sensation must rest upon observable aspects of the organism or its behavior. Operational psychology deals with experience only as it is indicated by the operation of differential behavior, including verbal report. Discriminations, or the concrete differential reactions of organisms to internal or external environmental states, are by some authors regarded as the most basic of all operations.   For a discussion of the role of operational definition in phvsics. see P. W. Bridgman, The Logic of Modern Physics, (New York, 1928) and The Nature of Physical Theory (Princeton, 1936). "The extension of operationism to psychology is discussed by C. C. Pratt in The Logic of Modem Psychology (New York. 1939.)   For a discussion and annotated bibliography relating to Operationism and Logical Positivism, see S. S. Stevens, Psychology and the Science of Science, Psychol. Bull., 36, 1939, 221-263. --S.S.S. Ophelimity: Noun derived from the Greek, ophelimos useful, employed by Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) in economics as the equivalent of utility, or the capacity to provide satisfaction. --J.J.R. Opinion: (Lat. opinio, from opinor, to think) An hypothesis or proposition entertained on rational grounds but concerning which doubt can reasonably exist. A belief. See Hypothesis, Certainty, Knowledge. --J.K.F- Opposition: (Lat. oppositus, pp. of oppono, to oppose) Positive actual contradiction. One of Aristotle's Post-predicaments. In logic any contrariety or contradiction, illustrated by the "Square of Opposition". Syn. with: conflict. See Logic, formal, § 4. --J.K.F. Optimism: (Lat. optimus, the best) The view inspired by wishful thinking, success, faith, or philosophic reflection, that the world as it exists is not so bad or even the best possible, life is good, and man's destiny is bright. Philosophically most persuasively propounded by Leibniz in his Theodicee, according to which God in his wisdom would have created a better world had he known or willed such a one to exist. Not even he could remove moral wrong and evil unless he destroyed the power of self-determination and hence the basis of morality. All systems of ethics that recognize a supreme good (Plato and many idealists), subscribe to the doctrines of progressivism (Turgot, Herder, Comte, and others), regard evil as a fragmentary view (Josiah Royce et al.) or illusory, or believe in indemnification (Henry David Thoreau) or melioration (Emerson), are inclined optimistically. Practically all theologies advocating a plan of creation and salvation, are optimistic though they make the good or the better dependent on moral effort, right thinking, or belief, promising it in a future existence. Metaphysical speculation is optimistic if it provides for perfection, evolution to something higher, more valuable, or makes room for harmonies or a teleology. See Pessimism. --K.F.L. Order: A class is said to be partially ordered by a dyadic relation R if it coincides with the field of R, and R is transitive and reflexive, and xRy and yRx never both hold when x and y are different. If in addition R is connected, the class is said to be ordered (or simply ordered) by R, and R is called an ordering relation.   Whitehcid and Russell apply the term serial relation to relations which are transitive, irreflexive, and connected (and, in consequence, also asymmetric). However, the use of serial relations in this sense, instead ordering relations as just defined, is awkward in connection with the notion of order for unit classes.   Examples: The relation not greater than among leal numbers is an ordering relation. The relation less than among real numbers is a serial relation. The real numbers are simply ordered by the former relation. In the algebra of classes (logic formal, § 7), the classes are partially ordered by the relation of class inclusion.   For explanation of the terminology used in making the above definitions, see the articles connexity, reflexivity, relation, symmetry, transitivity. --A.C. Order type: See relation-number. Ordinal number: A class b is well-ordered by a dyadic relation R if it is ordered by R (see order) and, for every class a such that a ⊂ b, there is a member x of a, such that xRy holds for every member y of a; and R is then called a well-ordering relation. The ordinal number of a class b well-ordered by a relation R, or of a well-ordering relation R, is defined to be the relation-number (q. v.) of R.   The ordinal numbers of finite classes (well-ordered by appropriate relations) are called finite ordinal numbers. These are 0, 1, 2, ... (to be distinguished, of course, from the finite cardinal numbers 0, 1, 2, . . .).   The first non-finite (transfinite or infinite) ordinal number is the ordinal number of the class of finite ordinal numbers, well-ordered in their natural order, 0, 1, 2, . . .; it is usually denoted by the small Greek letter omega. --A.C.   G. Cantor, Contributions to the Founding of the Theory of Transfinite Numbers, translated and with an introduction by P. E. B. Jourdain, Chicago and London, 1915. (new ed. 1941); Whitehead and Russell, Princtpia Mathematica. vol. 3. Orexis: (Gr. orexis) Striving; desire; the conative aspect of mind, as distinguished from the cognitive and emotional (Aristotle). --G.R.M.. Organicism: A theory of biology that life consists in the organization or dynamic system of the organism. Opposed to mechanism and vitalism. --J.K.F. Organism: An individual animal or plant, biologically interpreted. A. N. Whitehead uses the term to include also physical bodies and to signify anything material spreading through space and enduring in time. --R.B.W. Organismic Psychology: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, an instrument) A system of theoretical psychology which construes the structure of the mind in organic rather than atomistic terms. See Gestalt Psychology; Psychological Atomism. --L.W. Organization: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, work) A structured whole. The systematic unity of parts in a purposive whole. A dynamic system. Order in something actual. --J.K.F. Organon: (Gr. organon) The title traditionally given to the body of Aristotle's logical treatises. The designation appears to have originated among the Peripatetics after Aristotle's time, and expresses their view that logic is not a part of philosophy (as the Stoics maintained) but rather the instrument (organon) of philosophical inquiry. See Aristotelianism. --G.R.M.   In Kant. A system of principles by which pure knowledge may be acquired and established.   Cf. Fr. Bacon's Novum Organum. --O.F.K. Oriental Philosophy: A general designation used loosely to cover philosophic tradition exclusive of that grown on Greek soil and including the beginnings of philosophical speculation in Egypt, Arabia, Iran, India, and China, the elaborate systems of India, Greater India, China, and Japan, and sometimes also the religion-bound thought of all these countries with that of the complex cultures of Asia Minor, extending far into antiquity. Oriental philosophy, though by no means presenting a homogeneous picture, nevertheless shares one characteristic, i.e., the practical outlook on life (ethics linked with metaphysics) and the absence of clear-cut distinctions between pure speculation and religious motivation, and on lower levels between folklore, folk-etymology, practical wisdom, pre-scientiiic speculation, even magic, and flashes of philosophic insight. Bonds with Western, particularly Greek philosophy have no doubt existed even in ancient times. Mutual influences have often been conjectured on the basis of striking similarities, but their scientific establishment is often difficult or even impossible. Comparative philosophy (see especially the work of Masson-Oursel) provides a useful method. Yet a thorough treatment of Oriental Philosophy is possible only when the many languages in which it is deposited have been more thoroughly studied, the psychological and historical elements involved in the various cultures better investigated, and translations of the relevant documents prepared not merely from a philological point of view or out of missionary zeal, but by competent philosophers who also have some linguistic training. Much has been accomplished in this direction in Indian and Chinese Philosophy (q.v.). A great deal remains to be done however before a definitive history of Oriental Philosophy may be written. See also Arabian, and Persian Philosophy. --K.F.L. Origen: (185-254) The principal founder of Christian theology who tried to enrich the ecclesiastic thought of his day by reconciling it with the treasures of Greek philosophy. Cf. Migne PL. --R.B.W. Ormazd: (New Persian) Same as Ahura Mazdah (q.v.), the good principle in Zoroastrianism, and opposed to Ahriman (q.v.). --K.F.L. Orphic Literature: The mystic writings, extant only in fragments, of a Greek religious-philosophical movement of the 6th century B.C., allegedly started by the mythical Orpheus. In their mysteries, in which mythology and rational thinking mingled, the Orphics concerned themselves with cosmogony, theogony, man's original creation and his destiny after death which they sought to influence to the better by pure living and austerity. They taught a symbolism in which, e.g., the relationship of the One to the many was clearly enunciated, and believed in the soul as involved in reincarnation. Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Plato were influenced by them. --K.F.L. Ortega y Gasset, Jose: Born in Madrid, May 9, 1883. At present in Buenos Aires, Argentine. Son of Ortega y Munillo, the famous Spanish journalist. Studied at the College of Jesuits in Miraflores and at the Central University of Madrid. In the latter he presented his Doctor's dissertation, El Milenario, in 1904, thereby obtaining his Ph.D. degree. After studies in Leipzig, Berlin, Marburg, under the special influence of Hermann Cohen, the great exponent of Kant, who taught him the love for the scientific method and awoke in him the interest in educational philosophy, Ortega came to Spain where, after the death of Nicolas Salmeron, he occupied the professorship of metaphysics at the Central University of Madrid. The following may be considered the most important works of Ortega y Gasset:     Meditaciones del Quijote, 1914;   El Espectador, I-VIII, 1916-1935;   El Tema de Nuestro Tiempo, 1921;   España Invertebrada, 1922;   Kant, 1924;   La Deshumanizacion del Arte, 1925;   Espiritu de la Letra, 1927;   La Rebelion de las Masas, 1929;   Goethe desde Adentio, 1934;   Estudios sobre el Amor, 1939;   Ensimismamiento y Alteracion, 1939;   El Libro de las Misiones, 1940;   Ideas y Creencias, 1940;     and others.   Although brought up in the Marburg school of thought, Ortega is not exactly a neo-Kantian. At the basis of his Weltanschauung one finds a denial of the fundamental presuppositions which characterized European Rationalism. It is life and not thought which is primary. Things have a sense and a value which must be affirmed independently. Things, however, are to be conceived as the totality of situations which constitute the circumstances of a man's life. Hence, Ortega's first philosophical principle: "I am myself plus my circumstances". Life as a problem, however, is but one of the poles of his formula. Reason is the other. The two together function, not by dialectical opposition, but by necessary coexistence. Life, according to Ortega, does not consist in being, but rather, in coming to be, and as such it is of the nature of direction, program building, purpose to be achieved, value to be realized. In this sense the future as a time dimension acquires new dignity, and even the present and the past become articulate and meaning-full only in relation to the future. Even History demands a new point of departure and becomes militant with new visions. --J.A.F. Orthodoxy: Beliefs which are declared by a group to be true and normative. Heresy is a departure from and relative to a given orthodoxy. --V.S. Orthos Logos: See Right Reason. Ostensible Object: (Lat. ostendere, to show) The object envisaged by cognitive act irrespective of its actual existence. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ostensive: (Lat. ostendere, to show) Property of a concept or predicate by virtue of which it refers to and is clarified by reference to its instances. --A.C.B. Ostwald, Wilhelm: (1853-1932) German chemist. Winner of the Nobel prize for chemistry in 1909. In Die Uberwindung des wissenschaftlichen Materialistmus and in Naturphilosophie, his two best known works in the field of philosophy, he advocates a dynamic theory in opposition to materialism and mechanism. All properties of matter, and the psychic as well, are special forms of energy. --L.E.D. Oupnekhat: Anquetil Duperron's Latin translation of the Persian translation of 50 Upanishads (q.v.), a work praised by Schopenhauer as giving him complete consolation. --K.F.L. Outness: A term employed by Berkeley to express the experience of externality, that is the ideas of space and things placed at a distance. Hume used it in the sense of distance Hamilton understood it as the state of being outside of consciousness in a really existing world of material things. --J.J.R. Overindividual: Term used by H. Münsterberg to translate the German überindividuell. The term is applied to any cognitive or value object which transcends the individual subject. --L.W. P

time ::: 1. Duration regarded as belonging to the present life as distinct from the life to come or from eternity; finite duration. 2. A nonspatial continuum in which events occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future. 3. A period in the existence or history of the world; an age, an era. Time, time-born, time-bound, time-constructed, time-driven, time-field, time-flakes, time-inn, time-loop, time-made, time-plan, time-vexed, time-walk, world-time, World-Time"s.

Time-Arrow: The general direction of change in time, is supposed to point toward the future. The concept was suggested by A. S. Eddington. -- R.B.W.

  “Time is only an illusion produced by the succession of our states of consciousness as we travel through eternal duration, and it does not exist where no consciousness exists in which the illusion can be produced; but ‘lies asleep.’ The present is only a mathematical line which divides that part of eternal duration which we call the future, from that part which we call the past. Nothing on earth has real duration, for nothing remains without change — or the same — for the billionth part of a second; and the sensation we have of the actuality of the division of ‘time’ known as the present, comes from the blurring of that momentary glimpse, or succession of glimpses, of things that our senses give us, as those things pass from the region of ideals which we call the future, to the region of memories that we name the past” (SD 1:37).

T'ime: The general medium in which all events take place in succession or appear to take place in succession. All specific and finite periods of time, whether past, present or future, constitute merely parts of the entire and single Time. Common-sense interprets Time vaguely as something moving toward the future or as something in which events point in that direction. But the many contradictions contained in this notion have led philosophers to postulate doctrines purporting to eliminate some of the difficulties implied in common-sense ideas. The first famous but unresolved controversy arose in Ancient Greece, between Parmenides, who maintained that change and becoming were irrational illusions, and Heraclitus, who asserted that there was no permanence and that change characterized everything without exception. Another great controversy arose centuries later between disciples of Newton and Leibniz. According to Newton, time was independent of, and prior to, events; in his own words, "absolute time, and mathematical time, of itself, and from its own nature, flows equably without regard to anything external." According to Leibniz, on the other hand, there can be no time independent of events: for time is formed by events and relations among them, and constitutes the universal order of succession. It was this latter doctrine which eventually gave rise to the doctrine of space-time, in which both space and time are regarded as two systems of relations, distinct from a perceptual standpoint, but inseparably bound together in reality. All these controversies led many thinkers to believe that the concept of time cannot be fully accounted for, unless we distinguish between perceptual, or subjective, time, which is confined to the perceptually shifting 'now' of the present, and conceptual, or objective, time, which includes til periods of time and in which the events we call past, present and future can be mutually and fixedly related. See Becoming, Change, Duration, Persistence, Space-Time. -- R.B.W.

TIME Time simply means continuation, continued existence. Time is various ways of measuring motion, various kinds of processes of manifestation. Physical time is determined by the rotation of the earth and its circling round the sun. K
1.8.5

Time lacks dimension. Using a line to symbolize time was a failure, a thoroughly badly chosen simile which has given raise to many misconceptions. Only space has dimension. Time is that unity which links the past to the present and the future. Time is durability, continued existence, duration. Objective time is always connected with space in a succession of events. It is a measure of processes and therefore can be divided into periods, or time-cycles. Time is both objective and subjective. The cosmos (in primordial matter) consists of manifestational matter and is that which we can term space in which all worlds exist. Time is a way of measuring the total process in which all events occur.
Space as well as time can be divided into units however small and, for us, are ways of measuring and grading.

The past exists in the present. To a causal self, there is no past of the planetary atomic worlds 47-49, nor is there to a 43-self of the systemic atomic worlds 43-49.
K 5.36.3,5


Trend analysis – Is a forecasting technique that relies primarily on historical time series data to predict the future.

Trend_analysis ::: is a technique used in technical analysis that attempts to predict the future stock price movements based on recently observed trend data. Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an idea of what will happen in the future. There are three main types of trends: short-, intermediate- and long-term.

trikaladr.s.t.i (trikaladrishti; trikaldrishti; trikaldristi) ::: literally "the trikaladrsti vision of the three times", i.e., "the direct knowledge of the past, the intuitive knowledge of the present and the prophetic knowledge of the future", the second member of the vijñana catus.t.aya. It is a special faculty of jñana "by which that general power is applied to the actuality of things"; its essence is a consciousness of "the Infinite deploying in itself and organising all things in time", making possible "a total view of the three times as one movement singly and indivisibly seen even in their succession of stages, periods, cycles".

trikāla. (P. tikāla; T. dus gsum; C. sanshi; J. sanze; K. samse 三世). In Sanskrit, the "three times," used to refer collectively to the three time periods of past, present, and future; often mistakenly translated from the Chinese as "three worlds" (the Chinese term shi in this compound means an "age" or "generation"). The term often occurs in such phrases as trikāla-buddha, "the buddhas of the past, present, and future." Trikāla is also used to refer to the three periods of one day-dawn, daylight, and dusk. There are a range of views on the ontological status of the three temporal dimensions of the past, present, and future. One of the more common arguments is that, while the past no longer exists and the future does not yet exist, the present exists as an endless series of instances or moments in which a host of mental and physical constituents arise and cease instantaneously (see KsAnIKAVĀDA). On the other hand, the SARVĀSTIVĀDA school argued that dharmas exist, and can thus exert specific types of causal efficacy, in all three time periods, requiring a special set of "dissociated forces" (CITTAVIPRAYUKTASAMSKĀRA) to account for the process of change (see CATURLAKsAnA; SAMSKṚTALAKsAnA), essentially moving a dharma from past mode, to present and future modes.

trividyā. [alt. traividyā] (P. tevijjā; T. rig gsum; C. sanming; J. sanmyo; K. sammyong 三明). In Sanskrit, lit. "three knowledges"; three specific types of knowledge (VIDYĀ) that are the products of the enlightenment experience of an ARHAT or buddha, and a sequential set of insights achieved by the Buddha during the three watches of the night of his own enlightenment. They are: (1) the ability to remember one's own former lives (PuRVANIVĀSĀNUSMṚTI; P. pubbenivāsānunssati) in all their detail, due to direct insight into the inexorable connection between action (KARMAN) and its fruition (VIPĀKA), viz., karmic cause and effect; (2) insight into the future rebirth destinies of all other beings (S. CYUTYUPAPATTIJNĀNA [alt. cyutyupapādānusmṛti]; P. cutupapātaNāna), a by-product of the "divine eye" (DIVYACAKsUS); (3) knowledge of the extinction of the contaminants (ĀSRAVAKsAYA; P. āsavakhaya), which ensures complete liberation from the cycle of rebirth (SAMSĀRA). The first and third types are also included in the superknowledges (ABHIJNĀ; P. abhiNNā). At various points in the literature of the MAINSTREAM BUDDHIST SCHOOLS (e.g., the Pāli ITIVUTTAKA), the Buddha describes the above list as the three knowledges of a true brāhmana; in such accounts, the Buddha is intentionally contrasting his three knowledges (vidyā) with that of brāhmana priests who have merely memorized the traditional three Vedas of Brahmanical religion. See also TEVIJJASUTTA.

trivisa. (P. tivisa; T. dug gsum; C. sandu; J. sandoku; K. samdok 三毒). In Sanskrit, "three poisons"; the three primary afflictions (MuLAKLEsA) of sensuality, desire, or greed (RĀGA or LOBHA), hatred or aversion (DVEsA), and delusion or ignorance (MOHA), regarded as poisons because of the harm they cause to those who ingest them or the way they poison the mind. This same list of three is also known as the three "unwholesome faculties" (AKUsALAMuLA), which will fructify as unhappiness in the future and provide the foundation for unfavorable rebirths (APĀYA). In the "wheel of existence" (BHAVACAKRA) that the Buddha is said to have instructed to be painted at the entrances of monasteries, showing the six realms of rebirth (sAdGATI) as well as the twelve links of dependent origination (PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA), the three poisons are often depicted at the center of painting, suggesting their role as root causes of cycle of rebirth, with greed represented by a rooster, hatred by a snake, and delusion by a pig in a circle, each biting the tail of the other.

Tsong kha pa Blo bzang grags pa. (Tsong kha pa Losang Drakpa) (1357-1419). A Tibetan scholar and teacher venerated as the founder of the DGE LUGS sect of Tibetan Buddhism; typically known simply as Tsong kha pa. Born in the Tsong kha region of A mdo in northeastern Tibet, he received his initial lay vows under the fourth KARMA PA and began his religious education in the BKA' GDAMS tradition. In 1372, he traveled to central Tibet for further study. He became a disciple of the SA SKYA scholar Red mda' ba Gzhon nu blo gros (Rendawa Shonu Lodro, 1349-1412) but went on to study under many of the leading scholars of the day, including masters of various schools and sectarian affiliations. Another influential teacher was the lama Dbu ma pa (Umapa), from whom he received instructions on the KĀLACAKRATANTRA. He distinguished himself as a brilliant scholar and exegete of both SuTRA and TANTRA. According to his traditional biographies, Tsong kha pa experienced visions of Indian masters such as NĀGĀRJUNA and BUDDHAPĀLITA, who helped to clarify difficult points of doctrine. He is also said to have maintained a special relationship with MANJUsRĪ, the bodhisattva of wisdom, who appeared in visions throughout Tsong kha pa's life offering instruction and advice; Tsong kha pa is sometimes called 'Jam mgon, or "protected by MaNjusrī." Tsong kha pa's biographies speak of four major deeds undertaken during his lifetime. The first, in 1399, was his restoration of an image of the future buddha, MAITREYA. The second was a council to reform the code of VINAYA, convened in 1403 and attended by monks representing all sects of Tibetan Buddhism. The third was the Great Prayer Festival (SMON LAM CHEN MO) inaugurated in 1409 at the JO KHANG in LHA SA, in which he offered the ornaments of a SAMBHOGAKĀYA to the famous statue of JO BO SHĀKYAMUNI, celebrating the Buddha's performance of the sRĀVASTĪ MIRACLES. The festival became an important annual event, drawing thousands of participants from all quarters of the Tibetan Buddhist world. The fourth was the founding in 1409 of DGA' LDAN monastery, which would become one of principal religious institutions in the Lha sa region and seat of the leader of the Dge lugs sect. Tsong kha pa was an original and penetrating philosopher, who saw reason and intellectual development as key aspects of the path to enlightenment. Born during a period when the Tibetan Buddhist canon had been newly formulated, he sought a comprehensive explanation of the Buddhist path, with the PRĀSAnGIKA-MADHYAMAKA of BUDDHAPĀLITA and CANDRAKĪRTI as the highest philosophical view. His works are marked with a concern with systematic consistency, whether it be between sutra and tantra or PRAMĀnA and MADHYAMAKA. A prolific author, Tsong kha pa's works fill eighteen volumes. Among his best known writings are the LAM RIM CHEN MO ("Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment"), composed in 1402 at RWA SGRENG monastery, the SNGAGS RIM CHEN MO ("Great Treatise on the Stages of Mantra"), and the Drang nges LEGS BSHAD SNYING PO ("Essence of Eloquence on the Definitive and Interpretable"). Tsong kha pa called his system of religious practice the Bka' gdams gsar ma, or "New Bka' gdams," after the sect founded by the Bengali master ATIsA DĪPAMKARAsRĪJNĀNA. His followers were later known as Dga' ldan pa (Gandenpa), "those of Dga' ldan," after the monastic seat established by Tsong kha pa. This was sometimes abbreviated as Dga' lugs pa, "those of the system of Dga' ldan," eventually evolving into the current name Dge lugs pa, "those of the system of virtue." Tsong kha pa's fame was greatly elevated through the political power of the Dge lugs sect after the establishment of the institution of the DALAI LAMA. His tomb at Dga' ldan became an important site of pilgrimage prior to its destruction during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Tsong kha pa's fame in Tibet was sufficiently great that he is commonly known simply as Rje rin po che, the "precious leader."

tusita. (P. tusita; T. dga' ldan; C. doushuai tian; J. tosotsuten; K. tosol ch'on 兜率天). In Sanskrit, "contentment"; in Buddhist cosmology, the fourth highest of six heavens within the sensuous realm (KĀMADHĀTU). This heaven is of particular importance to the Buddhist tradition because it is understood that BODHISATTVAs are born here before taking their final birth in the human world and attaining buddhahood. It was from this heaven that the deity sVETAKETU (the future sĀKYAMUNI) departed to enter MĀYĀ's womb for his final rebirth, and it is understood that the bodhisattva MAITREYA currently resides in the tusita heaven awaiting his own final rebirth when he will in turn achieve buddhahood. Consequently, many Buddhists throughout history have aspired for rebirth in the tusita heaven so that they may learn from Maitreya and accompany him when he takes his final birth as a buddha. Beings reborn in tusita enjoy unimaginable pleasure and live for hundreds of thousands of years. One day in this heaven is equal to four hundred earth years. In some texts, this heaven is described as having an inner and outer courtyard, the former of which is said to be utterly indestructible.

unconcerned ::: a. --> Not concerned; not anxious or solicitous; easy in mind; carelessly secure; indifferent; as, to be unconcerned at what has happened; to be unconcerned about the future.

universalism ::: n. --> The doctrine or belief that all men will be saved, or made happy, in the future state.

Upananda. (T. Nye dga' po; C. Youbonantuo; J. Upananda; K. Ubanant'a 優波難陀). Sanskrit and Pāli proper name of a monk disciple of the Buddha, who was regularly chastised for his greed. There are numerous stories in the VINAYA of his attempts to procure the best and most of all offerings made to monks, and especially of robes and food. The Buddha typically rebukes Upananda for his misconduct, and then goes on to promulgate a new rule of conduct in order to deter monks from committing such transgressions in the future.

upapadyavedanīyakarman. (P. upapajjavedanīyakamma; T. skyes nas myong 'gyur gyi las; C. shunci shengshou ye; J. junjishojugo; K. sunch'a saengsu op 順次生受業). In Sanskrit, "action experienced upon birth," a category of deed whose karmic effect is experienced in the immediately following lifetime, as opposed to the present life or some other lifetime in the future.

Upasena. (T. Nye sde; C. Youbosina; J. Upashina; K. Ubasana 優波斯那). Sanskrit and Pāli proper name of an eminent ARHAT declared by the Buddha to be foremost among his monk disciples in being altogether charming; also known in Pāli as Upasena Vangantaputta. According to Pāli accounts, he was born into a brāhmana family in Nālaka and was the younger brother of sĀRIPUTRA. His father was Vanganta, hence his name Vangantaputta. Like his brother, Upasena was learned in the three Vedas. He was converted when he heard the Buddha preach and immediately entered the order. When he had been a monk for only one year, he ordained a new monk, for which offense he was severely rebuked by the Buddha. Chastened by the criticism, Upasena took up the practice of insight in earnest and attained arahantship. Upasena became a skilled and charismatic preacher who won many converts to the religion. He engaged in various ascetic practices (DHUTAnGA) and convinced many followers to do likewise. Each of his followers was charming in his own way, with Upasena the most charming of all. Upasena had resolved to attain such preeminence during the time of the previous buddha Padumuttara, when, as a householder of HaMsavatī, he overheard a monk so praised and wished the same for himself in the future. Upasena's death was attended by a miracle. He was sitting at the mouth of a cave after his morning meal, mending his robe amid a pleasant breeze. At that time two snakes were in the vines above the cave door when one fell on his shoulder and bit him. As the venom coursed through his body, he requested sāriputra and other monks near him to carry him outside so that he could die in the open. In a few moments he died, and his body immediately scattered in the breeze like chaff.

Urd, Urdr (Scandinavian, Icelandic) [cf Swedish ur original, fundamental; Anglo-Saxon wyrd, English weird] Also Urdar. The principal of the three norns (Fates) in Norse mythology, representing the past in the sense of causation: all that has gone before, giving rise to the present. Her sister norns are Verdande (becoming), usually translated as the present; and Skuld (debt), obligations yet to be repaid. The past and present create the third sister, norn of the future, which is suggestive of karma, where the future is the outcome of all past and present acts.

VajracchedikāprajNāpāramitāsutra. (T. Rdo rje gcod pa shes rab kyi pha rol tu phyin pa'i mdo; C. Jingang jing; J. Kongokyo; K. Kŭmgang kyong 金剛經). In Sanskrit, the "Diamond-Cutter Perfection of Wisdom Sutra"; known in English as the "Diamond Sutra" (deriving from its popular abbreviated Chinese title Jingang jing, as above), one of the most famous, widely read, and commented upon of all MAHĀYĀNA sutras, together with two others that are also known by their English titles, the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra") and the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀHṚDAYASuTRA ("Heart Sutra"). The "Diamond Sutra" was composed in Sanskrit, probably sometime between the second and fourth centuries CE. Despite its fame, much of its meaning remains elusive, beginning with the title. In Sanskrit, it is VajracchedikāprajNāpāramitā. The Sanskrit term VAJRA refers to a kind of magical weapon, sometimes described as a thunderbolt or a discus, and is said to be hard and unbreakable, like a diamond or adamant. Thus, the title might be rendered into English as "The Perfection of Wisdom That Cuts like a Diamond/Thunderbolt." The sutra opens with the Buddha residing in the JETAVANA with 1,250 monks and a large number of bodhisattvas. After returning from his begging round (PIndAPĀTA) and eating his meal, the Buddha is approached by the great ARHAT SUBHuTI, who asks him about the practice of the BODHISATTVA. The Buddha says that a bodhisattva must vow to lead all beings in the universe into NIRVĀnA, while fully recognizing that there are in fact no beings to be led into nirvāna. "If, Subhuti, a bodhisattva were to have the (mis)perception (SAMJNĀ) of a self (ĀTMAN), a being (SATTVA), a living entity (JĪVA), or a person (PUDGALA), he is not to be called 'a bodhisattva.'" This is one of many famous statements in the sutra, regarded by commentators as setting forth the doctrine of emptiness (although the technical term suNYATĀ does not appear in the sutra), i.e., that all phenomena are falsely imagined to have a self, a soul, and an "own-being," qualities that they, in fact, lack. Any meritorious deed, from the giving of a gift to the vow to free all beings, is not an authentic bodhisattva deed if it is tainted with the (mis)perception (saMjNā) of a sign (NIMITTA) of selfhood: thus the perfection of the act of charity (DĀNAPĀRAMITĀ) means that true bodhisattva giving occurs when there is no conception of there being a donor, recipient, or gift-for that kind of giving would produce immeasurable merit. The Buddha asks Subhuti whether the Buddha is to be seen through the possession of the thirty-two physical marks of a superman (MAHĀPURUsALAKsAnA) that adorn his body. Subhuti says that he is not, because what the Buddha has described as the possession of marks (LAKsAnA) is in fact the nonpossession of no-marks. This formula of question and response, with the correct answer being, "A is in fact not A, therefore it is called A" is repeated throughout the text. The sutra is not simply a radical challenge to the ordinary conception of the world, of language, and of thought; it is also a polemical Mahāyāna sutra, seeking, like other such sutras, to declare its supremacy and to promise rewards to those who exalt it. It is noteworthy that here, as in many other perfection of wisdom (PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ) sutras, the Buddha's interlocutor is not a bodhisattva, but an arhat, the wise Subhuti, suggesting that even those who have completed the path to nirvāna still have more to learn. The Buddha predicts that this sutra will be understood far into the future, even into the final five hundred years that the Buddha's teaching remains in the world. At that time, anyone who has even a moment of faith in this sutra will be honored by millions of buddhas. Indeed, even now, long before this point in the distant future, anyone who would teach just four lines of this sutra to others would earn incalculable merit. In a statement that appears in other perfection of wisdom sutras, the Buddha declares, "On whatever piece of ground one will proclaim this sutra, that piece of ground will become an object of worship. That piece of ground will become for the world together with its gods, humans, and demigods a true shrine to be revered and circumambulated." Scholars have seen in this statement the possibility that the perfection of wisdom sutras were something of a "cult of the book," in which the sutra itself was worshipped, serving as a substitute for more traditional sites of worship, such as reliquaries (STuPA). The sutra suggests that such practices were not always condoned by others; the Buddha goes on to say that those who worship the sutra will be ridiculed for doing so, but by suffering ridicule they will destroy the great stores of negative KARMAN accumulated over many lifetimes. The Buddha's exhortations seem to have been taken to heart. The recitation and copying of the sutra was widely practiced across Asia; many copies of the sutra were discovered at DUNHUANG, and the earliest printed book in the world is a xylographic print of the Chinese translation of the VajracchedikāprajNāpāramitā dated May 11, 868, that was found in the Dunhuang cache. On a rock cliff on the Chinese sacred mountain of Taishan, there is a massive carving of the VajracchedikāprajNāpāramitā covering some 2,100 Sinographs in 21,000 square feet (2,000 sq. m.). Miracle tales of the benefits of reciting and copying the sutra were also told across Asia. The VajracchedikāprajNāpāramitā also played an important role in the CHAN traditions of East Asia: e.g., it was the scripture that the fifth patriarch HONGREN expounded to HUINENG, bringing him to enlightenment and enabling Huineng to be his successor as the sixth patriarch (LIUZU) of Chan.

vākkarman. (P. vacīkamma; T. ngag gi las; C. yuye; J. gogo; K. oop 語業). In Sanskrit, lit. "verbal action"; verbal deeds that create wholesome or unwholesome effects in the future. Speech (vāk) is one of the three conduits or "doors" (TRIDVĀRA) through which action (KARMAN) occurs, along with the body (KĀYA) and the mind (CITTA). According to the ABHIDHARMA, physical actions, words, and thoughts are all capable of producing karman that is either virtuous (KUsALA) or unvirtuous (AKUsALA). Unvirtuous verbal deeds include lying, divisive speech, harsh speech, and senseless speech. Virtuous verbal deeds include speaking truthfully, speaking harmoniously, speaking kindly, and speaking sensibly.

Vali, Vale (Icelandic, Scandinavian) In Norse mythology, a son of Odin who avenges the death of the sun god Balder; also a son of Loki. This paradox may be resolved in that the son of Loki (mind), being also the offspring of Allfather Odin as all beings are, is the future human race in its character as a redeemer and consummation of human evolution. He also may be a personification of karma-nemesis.

Verdandi (Icelandic) [from verda to become] In Norse mythology, the second of the three norns who determine the fate of heroes. All beings are subject to these three Fates, who correspond to the Greek Moirai. They have been described as Past, Present, and Future, though their names imply much more. Verdandi, the present, literally means “becoming,” the ever-renewed present moment wherein all things are possible and the future is determined.

Vessantara. (S. Visvantara/VisvaMtara; T. Thams cad sgrol; C. Xudana; J. Shudainu/Shudaina; K. Sudaena 須大拏). Pāli name of a prince who is the subject of the most famous of all JĀTAKA tales; he was the BODHISATTVA's final existence before he took rebirth in TUsITA heaven, where he awaited the moment when he would descend into Queen MĀYĀ's womb to be born as Prince SIDDHĀRTHA and eventually become GAUTAMA Buddha. During his lifetime as Prince Vessantara, the bodhisattva (P. bodhisatta) fulfilled the perfection (P. pāramī; S. PĀRAMITĀ) of generosity (DĀNA; see also DĀNAPĀRAMITĀ). The story is found in Sanskrit in Āryasura's JĀTAKAMĀLĀ and Ksemendra's Avadānakalpalatā, with the same main features as in the Pāli version. The story enjoys its greatest popularity in Southeast Asia, so the Pāli version is described here. ¶ The bodhisattva was born as the crown prince of Sivirattha, the son of King SaNjaya and Queen Phusatī of the kingdom of Jetuttara. On the day of his birth, a white elephant named Paccaya was also born, who had the power to make rain. When Vessantara was sixteen, he married a maiden named Maddī, with whom he had a son and a daughter, Jāli and Kanhajinā. Once, when Kalinga was suffering a severe drought, brāhmanas from that kingdom requested that Vessantara give them his white elephant to alleviate their plight. Vessantara complied, handing over to them his elephant along with its accessories. The citizens of Jetuttara were outraged that he should deprive his own kingdom of such a treasure and demanded his banishment to the distant mountain of Vankagiri. His father, King SaNjaya, consented and ordered Vessantara to leave via the road frequented by highwaymen. Before his departure, Vessantara held a great almsgiving, in which he distributed seven hundred of every type of thing. Maddī insisted that she and her children accompany the prince, and they were transported out of the city on a grand carriage pulled by four horses. Four brāhmanas begged for his horses, which he gave. Gods then pulled his carriage until a brāhmana begged for his carriage. Thereafter, they traveled on foot. Along the way crowds gathered, some even offering their kingdoms for him to rule, so famous was he for his generosity. At Vankagiri, they lived in two hermitages, one for Vessantara and the other for his wife and children. These had been constructed for them by Vissakamma, architect of the gods. There, they passed four months until one day an old brāhmana named Jujaka arrived and asked for Jāli and Kanhajinā as slaves. Vessantara expected this to occur, so he sent his wife on an errand so that she would not be distressed at the sight of him giving their children away. Jujaka was cruel, and the children ran away to their father, only to be returned so that Vessantara's generosity could be perfected. When Maddī returned, she fainted at the news. Then, Sakka (sAKRA), king of the gods, assumed the form of a brāhmana and asked for Maddī; Vessantara gave his wife to the brāhmana. The earth quaked at the gift. Sakka immediately revealed his identity and returned Maddī, granting Vessantara eight boons. In the meantime, Jujaka, the cruel brāhmana, traveled to Jetuttara, where King SaNjaya bought the children for a great amount of treasure, including a seven-storied palace. Jujaka, however, died of overeating and left no heirs, so the treasure was returned to the king. Meanwhile, the white elephant was returned because the kingdom of Kalinga could not maintain him. A grand entourage was sent to Vankagiri to fetch Vessantara and Maddī, and when they returned amid great celebration they were crowned king and queen of Sivirattha. In order that Vessantara would be able to satisfy all who came for gifts, Sakka rained down jewels waist deep on the palace. When Vessantara died, he was born as a god in tusita heaven, where he awaited his last rebirth as Siddhattha Gotama, when he would become a buddha. ¶ As a depiction of the virtue of dāna, the story of Vessantara is one of the most important Buddhist tales in Thailand and throughout Southeast Asia and is depicted on murals throughout the region. Thai retellings of the Vessantara-Jātaka, known also as the Mahāchat, or "Great Jātaka," are found in the many Thai dialects and consist of thirteen chapters. The story is popular in Thailand's north and especially in the northeast, where virtually every monastery (excluding forest monasteries) holds a festival known as the Bun Phra Wet, usually in February or March, at which the entire story is recited in one day and one night. Laypeople assist in decorating their local monastery with trunks and branches of banana trees to represent the forest to which Vessantara was banished after giving away his kingdom's auspicious elephant. They also present offerings of flowers, hanging decorations, balls of glutinous rice, and money. The festival includes, among other things, a procession to the monastery that includes local women carrying long horizontal cloth banners on which the Vessantara story is painted. The merit earned by participating in the festival is linked to two beliefs: (1) that the participant will be reborn at the time of the future buddha, MAITREYA, known in Thai as Phra Si Ariya Mettrai (P. Ariya Metteyya), and (2) that the community, which remains primarily agricultural, will be blessed with sufficient rainfall.

vinayapitaka. (T. 'dul ba'i sde snod; C. lüzang; J. ritsuzo; K. yulchang 律藏). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "basket of discipline" or the "collection of discipline"; one of the three "baskets" (TRIPItAKA), or divisions of Buddhist scripture, together with the SuTRAPItAKA and the ABHIDHARMAPItAKA. Although typically presumed to include just the rules and regulations of monastic conduct, the vinayapitaka is actually one of the richest sources for understanding Buddhist practice and institutions in India. It is said that the Buddha instituted a new rule only after the commission of some form of misconduct that he sought to prevent in the future, so the vinayas are careful to recount in great detail the circumstances leading up to the Buddha's promulgation of the rule. The vinayapitaka is therefore composed largely of narratives, some of considerable length; one of the earliest biographies of the Buddha appears in the vinaya of the MuLASARVĀSTIVĀDA school (see MuLASARVĀSTIVĀDA VINAYA). According to tradition, the redaction of the vinayapitaka occurred at the first Buddhist council (SAMGĪTI; see COUNCIL, FIRST), shortly after the Buddha's death, when a group of ARHATs assembled to recite the Buddha's teachings. There, the monk UPĀLI, considered an expert in the monastic code, was called upon to recite the vinaya. However, assuming that such a recitation occurred, disputes soon arose over what was allowable conduct according to the rules and regulations included in the vinayapitaka. At the time of his death, the Buddha told ĀNANDA that, after his death, the minor rules could be disregarded. At the first council, he was asked what those minor rules were, and Ānanda admitted that he had failed to ask. All rules were therefore retained, and his failure to ask was one of his errors requiring a confession of wrongdoing. The eventual division into the traditional eighteen MAINSTREAM BUDDHIST SCHOOLS often centered on questions of vinaya practice and conduct. There is, therefore, no single vinayapitaka, but a number of vinayapitakas, with the precise content determined by the specific Indian school. To give one example, the Pāli vinayapitaka, which was perhaps redacted around the first century CE, is composed of the following three major divisions: (1) SUTTAVIBHAnGA (S. sutravibhanga; cf. VINAYAVIBHAnGA), which includes the pātimokkha (S. PRĀTIMOKsA) code with explanations and commentary, including the mahāvibhanga with the rules for monks and the bhikkhunīvibhanga with the rules for nuns; (2) KHANDHAKA (S. skandhaka; cf. VINAYAVASTU), which is subdivided between the MAHĀVAGGA, which includes chapters on such topics as the procedure for the ordination of monks, the fortnightly observances (P. uposatha; S. UPOsADHA), the rains retreat, the use of clothing, food, medicine, and so forth, and the CulAVAGGA, which includes a variety of judicial rules, procedures for the ordination of nuns, and accounts of the first and second Buddhist councils; and (3) PARIVĀRA, an appendix that provides a summary and classification of the rules of monastic conduct. ¶ Numerous vinaya texts were translated into Chinese, including complete (or near-complete) vinayapitakas associated with five of the mainstream schools of Indian Buddhism. In the order of their translation dates, these five are (1) "Ten-Recitations Vinaya" (C. Shisong lü; C. *Dasabhānavāravinaya; *Dasādhyāyavinaya) of the SARVĀSTIVĀDA school, perhaps composed sometime between the first and third centuries CE and translated into Chinese between 404 and 409 CE; (2) DHARMAGUPTAKA vinaya, the renowned "Four-Part Vinaya" (SIFEN LÜ), translated between 410 and 412 CE, which becomes the definitive recension of the vinaya in the East Asian traditions and the focus of scholarship in the different East Asian vinaya schools (see NANSHAN LÜ ZONG, DONGTA LÜ ZONG, RISSHu); (3) MAHĀSĀMGHIKA vinaya (Mohesengji lü), composed between 100 and 200 CE and translated between 416 and 418; (4) MAHĪMsĀSAKA vinaya, or the "Five-Part Vinaya" (Wufen lü), perhaps composed in the first century BCE and translated between 422 and 423; and (5) the MuLASARVĀSTIVĀDA vinaya, perhaps composed in the fourth or fifth century CE and translated into Chinese between 703 and 713. (The complete Tibetan translation of this vinaya becomes definitive for Tibetan Buddhism). ¶ It is important to note that the texts contained in the vinayapitaka of any school have served as just one source of the monastic code. In China, no complete recension of any Indian vinaya was translated until the beginning of the fifth century. (Indeed, none of the surviving recensions of the vinayas of any Buddhist school can be dated prior to the fifth century CE.) When the Indian vinayas were translated into Chinese, for example, their regulations were viewed as being so closely tied to the customs and climate of India that they were sometimes found either incomprehensible or irrelevant to the Chinese. This led to the composition of indigenous Chinese monastic codes, called guishi ("regulations") or QINGGUI ("rules of purity"), which promulgated rules of conduct for monks and nuns that accorded more closely with the realities of life in East Asian monasteries. In Tibet, the VINAYASuTRA by GUnAPRABHA, a medieval Indian summary of the much larger Mulasarvāstivāda vinaya, was the primary source for the monastic code, but each monastery also had its own regulations (BCA' YIG) that governed life there. See also PRĀTIMOKsASuTRA.

vinaya. (T. 'dul ba; C. lü; J. ritsu; K. yul 律). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "discipline"; the corpus of monastic regulations, especially that directed at fully ordained monks (BHIKsU) and nuns (BHIKsUnĪ). The term is used by extension for those texts in which these codes are set forth, which form the "basket of the discipline" (VINAYAPItAKA) in the Buddhist canon (TRIPItAKA). According to an account in the Sifen lü kaizongji, by the Chinese vinaya master DAOXUAN (596-667), UPAGUPTA, the fifth successor in the Buddha's lineage about a century following his death, had five major disciples, who were said to have established their own schools based on their differing views regarding doctrine; these five also redacted separate recensions of the VINAYA, which the Chinese refer to as "five recensions of the vinaya" (Wubu lü). These five vinayas are (1) the "Four-Part Vinaya" (C. SIFEN LÜ; S. *Cāturvargīyavinaya) of the DHARMAGUPTAKA school; (2) the "Ten-Recitations Vinaya" (C. Shisong lü; S. *Dasādhyāyavinaya; [alt. *Dasabhānavāravinaya]) of the SARVĀSTIVĀDA school; (3) the "Five-Part Vinaya" (C. Wufen lü; S. *PaNcavargikavinaya) of the MAHĪsĀSAKA school and the *Prātimoksavinaya of the KĀsYAPĪYA school; (4) the *MAHĀSĀMGHIKA VINAYA of the MAHĀSĀMGHIKA school; and (5) the MuLASARVĀSTIVĀDA VINAYA. All five of these recensions are extant in Chinese translation, but the Sifen lü ("Four-Part Vinaya") of the Dharmaguptakas came to dominate the conduct of ecclesiastical affairs in East Asian Buddhism. The only vinaya to survive intact in an Indian language is the Pāli vinaya used in the STHAVIRANIKĀYA tradition; this vinaya compilation was unknown to the Chinese Tradition. The largest vinaya of them all, the Mulasarvāstivāda vinaya, is a massive collection that is some four times longer than any of the other recensions. The entire collection is available in its Tibetan translation; portions of this vinaya were also translated in Chinese, and substantial fragments of its original Sanskrit version have survived. ¶ The vinayas are a rich source of Buddhist history because they describe the occasion surrounding the formulation of each of the myriads of rules of conduct and deportment promulgated by the Buddha. It is said that the Buddha made a new rule only after the commission of an infraction that would need to be prevented in the future, so the vinayas are careful to recount, in sometimes embarrassing detail, the specific events leading up to the Buddha's formulation of the rule. These accounts therefore provide important insights into issues facing the monastic institutions of India. The principal rules of monastic life are contained in the PRĀTIMOKsA, which presents rosters of offenses of varying gravity, with penalties ranging from expulsion from the order for the most serious to mere confession for the more minor ones. The most serious offenses, called PĀRĀJIKA, or "defeat," and requiring expulsion according to some vinaya traditions, were four for monks: sexual misconduct (defined in the case of a monk as the penetration of an orifice to the depth of a mustard seed), theft, the killing of a living being, and lying about spiritual attainments. (Even for such serious misdeeds, however, some vinayas prescribe procedures for possible reinstatement; see sIKsĀDATTAKA.) In the Mulasarvāstivāda vinaya, there were 253 total rules to be followed by monks, 364 for nuns. The majority of these rules were matters of etiquette and decorum meant to ensure harmonious relations within the monastic institution and with lay patrons. The prātimoksa was recited fortnightly in the UPOsADHA ceremony. A second major part of the vinaya is the VIBHAnGA, or explanation of each rule, explaining the circumstances of its formulation and the conditions under which a violation does and does occur. A third part was called the VINAYAVASTU or KHANDAKA, separate sections (ranging between seventeen and twenty in number) on various topics such as ordination, the rains retreats, bedding, robes, and the use of medicine. Although sometimes regarded simply as a collection of regulations, the various vinaya texts are an essential part of Buddhist literature. Many of the vinayas, but especially the Mulasarvāstivāda vinaya, also include enormous numbers of narrative tales and ancillary materials, including texts that in other traditions would have been collected in the SuTRAPItAKA.

  ". . . Virat, the seer and creator of gross forms, . . . .” The Future Poetry

“… Virat, the seer and creator of gross forms, …” The Future Poetry

Virgin Birth Often applied to any kind of reproduction which is not sexual, including that of human races before the separation of the sexes. In a mystical sense, it applies to some of the rites of initiation, where the candidate has to go through by an anticipatory process the experiences which mankind will live through in the course of the next two root-races. Among these was the experience of the mystical virgin birth. The corresponding fact concerning mankind of the future is, that there will be in due course of evolutionary time no more sexual birth, which will then have run its course and will have disappeared, but instead, reproduction will be by the power of kriyasakti: by thought and will.

Vishnu Purana (Sanskrit) Viṣṇu Purāṇa One of the most celebrated of the 18 principal Puranas, conforming more than any other to the definition of pancha-lakshana (five distinguishing marks) assigned as being the character of a complete Purana by Amara-Simha, an ancient Sanskrit lexicographer. It consists of six books: the first treats of the creation of the universe from cosmic prakriti, and the peopling of the world by the prajapatis or spiritual ancestors; the second book gives a list of kings with many geographical and astronomical details; the third treats of the Vedas and caste; the fourth continues the chronicle of dynasties; the fifth gives the life of Krishna; and the sixth book describes the dissolution of the world, and the future re-issuing of the world after pralaya.

Vital mind ::: The function of this mind is not to think and reason, to perceive, consider and find out or value things, for that is the function of the thinking mind proper, buddhi, — but to plan or dream or imagine what can be done. It makes forma- tions for the future which the will can try to carry out if oppor* tunity and circumstances become favourable or even it can work to make them favourable.

Voluspa (Icelandic) [from volva, vala sibyl + spa see clairvoyantly] The foremost lay of the poetic or Elder Edda, sung by the “wise sibyl” in response to Odin’s quest for knowledge. The vala represents the indelible record of the past, which here is consulted by the god Odin. Odin Allfather is the central character in Norse myths, and represents evolving consciousness, whether human, solar, planetary, or cosmic. Odin questions the vala and she responds with an account of creation and foretells the future destiny of conscious beings. From this record of the past history of the world, Odin learns about our planet’s destiny and of nine former worlds that preceded the present one. The entire process of cosmic evolution is here comprised in a thumbnail sketch, which is all but incomprehensible unless amplified by the other lays of the Elder Edda.

Wasting asset - 1. a natural resource such as oil, coal, and timber, having a limited use­ful life and subject to depletion. Such assets decrease in worth primarily due to the extraction of the valued commodity held by these assets. Or 2. a fixed asset with limited life and subject to depreciation. It there­ fore excludes land. Or 3. security whose value expires at a specified time in the future.

Wat Bowonniwet. [alt. Wat Bovoranives]. In Thai, "Monastery of Excellent Abode" (P. Pavaranivesa); the royal monastery that is the Bangkok headquarters of the THAMMAYUT sect of Thai Buddhism. Built in 1829, it is most famous as the monastery where Prince Mongkut, the future king RĀMA IV and leader of the Thammayut reform movement, served as abbot, beginning in 1836, before he ascended the throne in 1851. The future king lived as a monk (his ordination name was VajiraNāna) for twenty-seven years, fourteen of which he spent as abbot of this monastery, before he returned to lay life in order to assume the throne of the Chakri dynasty. Subsequent members of the royal family have served the traditional period of temporary ordination as monks of this monastery; his son, the eminent scholar-monk VAJIRANĀnAVARORASA (1860-1921), was the long-time abbot of the monastery. The main temple enshrines the buddha image called Phra Phuttha Chinnasi (Buddhajinasrī), said to date from 1357. Wat Bowonniwet is also the home of Mahamakut Buddhist University, one of Thailand's two public Buddhist universities.

::: "We have to face the future"s offer of death as well as its offer of life, and it need not alarm us, for it is by constant death to our old names and forms that we shall live most vitally in greater and newer forms and names.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

“We have to face the future’s offer of death as well as its offer of life, and it need not alarm us, for it is by constant death to our old names and forms that we shall live most vitally in greater and newer forms and names.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

weikza. [alt. weikza-do]. In Burmese, a "wizard," deriving from the Pāli vijjādhara (S. VIDYĀDHARA). In Burmese popular religion, the weikza is portrayed as a powerful thaumaturge possessed of extraordinarily long life, whose abilities derive from a mastery of tranquillity meditation (P. samatha; S. sAMATHA) and a variety of occult sciences such as alchemy (B. ekiya), incantations (P. manta; S. MANTRA), and runes (B. ing, aing). Collectively, these disciplines are called weikza-lam or "the path of the wizard." Training in this path is esoteric, requiring initiation by a master (B. saya), and votaries typically are organized into semisecret societies called weikza-gaing (P. vijjāgana). Although concerned with the acquisition of supernatural powers and an invulnerable body, these attributes are ultimately dedicated to the altruistic purpose of assisting good people in times of need and protecting the Buddha's religion from evil forces. In this regard, weikza practitioners often act as healers and exorcists, and in the modern era weikza-sayas with large followings are among the country's notables, who have built monumental pagodas and restored national shrines. The perfected weikza has the ability to live until the advent of the future buddha Metteya (S. MAITREYA), at which time he can choose to pass into nibbāna (S. NIRVĀnA) as an enlightened disciple (P. sāvaka arahant; S. sRĀVAKA ARHAT), vow to become himself a solitary buddha (P. paccekabuddha; S. PRATYEKABUDDHA) or a perfect buddha (P. sammāsambuddha; S. SAMYAKSAMBUDDHA), or simply continue living as a weikza. Weikza practitioners typically eschew the practice of insight meditation (P. VIPASSANĀ; S. VIPAsYANĀ) on the grounds that this might cause them to attain nibbāna too quickly. Although largely domesticated to the prevailing worldview of Burmese THERAVĀDA orthodoxy, weikza practice and orientation ultimately derive from outside the Pāli textual tradition and show striking similarities to the Buddhist MAHĀSIDDHA tradition of medieval Bengal.

When it enters the psychic world, it begins to assimilate the essence of its experience and by that assimilation is formed the future psychic personality in accordance with the fixation already made. When this assimilation is over, it is ready for a new birth ; but' the less developed beings do not work out the whole thing for themselves, there are beings and forces of the higher world who have that svork.

William Gibson "person" Author of {cyberpunk} novels such as Neuromancer (1984), Count Zero (1986), Mona Lisa Overdrive, and Virtual Light (1993). Neuromancer, a novel about a computer {hacker}/criminal "cowboy" of the future helping to free an {artificial intelligence} from its programmed bounds, won the Hugo and Nebula science fiction awards and is credited as the seminal cyberpunk novel and the origin of the term "{cyberspace}". Gibson does not have a technical background and supposedly purchased his first computer in 1992. (1996-06-11)

William Gibson ::: (person) Author of cyberpunk novels such as Neuromancer (1984), Count Zero (1986), Mona Lisa Overdrive, and Virtual Light (1993).Neuromancer, a novel about a computer hacker/criminal cowboy of the future helping to free an artificial intelligence from its programmed bounds, won the Hugo and Nebula science fiction awards and is credited as the seminal cyberpunk novel and the origin of the term cyberspace.Gibson does not have a technical background and supposedly purchased his first computer in 1992. (1996-06-11)

Within its sacred precincts, the Aesir and Asynjor (gods and goddesses) meet to assess the previous life of the world tree and to determine their course for the future. The Lay of Odin’s Corpse give insight into the gods’ council following the death of a planet, and their difficulty in extracting the essence of that experience.

With the advent of each root-race a new cosmic element comes into proportionate manifestation, and a new physical sense apparatus appears: thus humanity in the sixth root-race will develop what is meant by a sixth sense. The fifth cosmic element (often named aether or akasa-tattva) will reach a development proportionate to the evolution of mankind during the fifth root-race in this fourth round; and after the same manner, a sixth cosmic element will make its appearance during the course of human evolution during the sixth root-race. Furthermore, just as a manushya-buddha comes to lead mankind in each root-race, so will one appear during the sixth root-race of the future.

Word ::: “The word is a sound expression of the idea. In the supra-physical plane when an idea has to be realised, one can by repeating the word-expression of it, produce vibrations which prepare the mind for the realisation of the idea. That is the principle of the Mantras and of Japa. One repeats the name of the Divine and the vibrations created in the consciousness prepare the realisation of the Divine. It is the same idea that is expressed in the Bible: ‘God said, Let there be Light, and there was Light’. It is creation by the Word.” The Future Poetry

worldly-minded ::: a. --> Devoted to worldly interests; mindful of the affairs of the present life, and forgetful of those of the future; loving and pursuing this world&

XEROX PARC ::: /zee'roks park'/ Xerox Corporation's Palo Alto Research Center.For more than a decade, from the early 1970s into the mid-1980s, PARC yielded an astonishing volume of ground-breaking hardware and software innovations. The company, so much so that it became a standard joke to describe PARC as a place that specialised in developing brilliant ideas for everyone else.The stunning shortsightedness and obtusity of XEROX's top-level suits has been well described in the reference below.[Fumbling The Future: How XEROX Invented, Then Ignored, the First Personal Computer by Douglas K. Smith and Robert C. Alexander (William Morrow & Co., 1988, ISBN 0-688-09511-9)].[Jargon File] (1995-01-26)

XEROX PARC /zee'roks park'/ {Xerox Corporation}'s Palo Alto Research Center. For more than a decade, from the early 1970s into the mid-1980s, PARC yielded an astonishing volume of ground-breaking hardware and software innovations. The modern mice, windows, and icons ({WIMP}) style of software interface was invented there. So was the {laser printer} and the {local-area network}; {Smalltalk}; and PARC's series of D machines anticipated the powerful {personal computers} of the 1980s by a decade. Sadly, the prophets at PARC were without honour in their own company, so much so that it became a standard joke to describe PARC as a place that specialised in developing brilliant ideas for everyone else. The stunning shortsightedness and obtusity of XEROX's top-level {suits} has been well described in the reference below. ["Fumbling The Future: How XEROX Invented, Then Ignored, the First Personal Computer" by Douglas K. Smith and Robert C. Alexander (William Morrow & Co., 1988, ISBN 0-688-09511-9)]. [{Jargon File}] (1995-01-26)

Yongsanjae. (山齋). In Korean, "Vulture Peak Ceremony"; a Korean Buddhist rite associated with the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), which has been performed in Korea since the mid to late Koryo dynasty (918-1392). This elaborate ritual is a loose reenactment of the Saddharmapundarīkasutra and is intended to depict the process by which all beings, both the living and the dead, are led to enlightenment. Its performance often occurs in conjunction with the forty-ninth day ceremony (K. sasipku [il] chae; C. SISHIJIU [RI] ZHAI), which sends a deceased being in the intermediate transitional state (ANTARĀBHAVA) on to the next rebirth. The Yongsanjae is renowned for including the most complete repertoire of Buddhist chant and dance preserved in the Korean tradition. The rite may last for between one day and a week, although it is rare nowadays to see it extend beyond a single day; briefer productions lasting a couple of hours are sometimes staged for tourists. The Yongsanjae is protected through the Korean Cultural Property Protection Law as an intangible cultural asset (Muhyong Munhwajae, no. 50), and the group responsible for protecting and preserving the rite for the future consists of monks at the monastery of PONGWoNSA in Seoul, the headquarters of the T'AEGO CHONG. The monks at the monastery also train monks and nuns from other orders of Buddhism, as well as laypeople, in different components of the rite. In recent years, the dominant CHOGYE CHONG of Korean Buddhism has also begun to perform the Yongsanjae again, thanks to training from the Pongwonsa specialists in the tradition. ¶ The Yongsanjae is held in front of a large KWAEBUL (hanging painting) scroll depicting sĀKYAMUNI teaching at Vulture Peak (GṚDHRAKutAPARVATA), delivering the Saddharmapundarīkasutra to his followers. A day-long version of the ceremony starts with bell ringing and a procession escorting the attending spirits in a palanquin, which then proceeds to a ceremonial raising of the kwaebul. The rest of the day is made up of the following sequence of events: chanting spells (DHĀRAnĪ) to the bodhisattva AVALOKITEsVARA (K. Kwanseŭm posal); the cymbal dance, or PARACH'UM, as monks chant the Ch'onsu kyong (C. QIANSHOU JING) dedicated to the thousand-handed incarnation of Avalokitesvara (see SĀHASRABHUJASĀHASRANETRĀVALOKITEsVARA); PoMP'AE; purification of the ritual site (toryanggye), during which the butterfly dance, or NABICH'UM, is performed to entice the dead to attend the ceremony while the pomp'ae chants entreat the three jewels (RATNATRAYA) and dragons (NĀGA) to be present; the dharma drum dance, or PoPKOCH'UM, during which a large drum is beaten to awaken all sentient beings; a group prayer to the Buddha and bodhisattvas, where everyone in attendance has the chance to take refuge in the three jewels (ratnatraya); an offering of flowers and incense (hyanghwagye) to the Buddha and bodhisattvas is made by the nabich'um dancers, followed by offering chants; a chant hoping that the food offerings on the altar will be sufficient as the parach'um is performed again together with four dhāranī chants; placing the offerings on the altar while chanting continues; culminating in a transfer of merit (kongdokkye) to all the people in attendance, including sending off the spiritual guests of the ceremony. The siktang chakpop, an elaborate ceremonial meal, is then consumed. A recitation on behalf of the lay donors who funded the ceremony (hoehyang ŭisik) concludes the rite.

zushi. (J. soshi; K. chosa 祖師). In Chinese, "patriarch" (lit. "ancestral teacher"), referring to eminent teachers in lineages that are claimed to trace back to sĀKYAMUNI Buddha or even earlier buddhas. Indian Sanskrit texts dating from the 2nd century CE onward refer to a tradition of five "masters of the dharma" (dharmācārya) who succeeded the Buddha as head of the SAMGHA: MAHĀKĀsYAPA, ĀNANDA, MADHYĀNTIKA, sĀnAKAVĀSIN, and UPAGUPTA . Later sources expand this list into a roster of nine eminent masters who "handed down the lamplight of wisdom successively through the generations." Often, these genealogies were extended as far back as the seven buddhas of antiquity (SAPTATATHĀGATA). It is widely presumed that this notion of dharma-transmission lineages developed from the earlier VINAYA concept of the "preceptor" (UPĀDHYĀYA), a senior monk who confers the lower ordination (pravrajyā, see PRAVRAJITA) to new novices (sRĀMAnERA) and higher ordination (UPASAMPADĀ) to monks (BHIKsU). This personal connection between preceptor and disciple created incipient ordination families connected to specific preceptors, connections that later could be extended to dharma transmission as well. ¶ In East Asia, these lists of Indian dharma masters continued to be expanded and elaborated upon so that they also included the preeminent indigenous figures within each lineage, thus connecting the Chinese patriarchs of each lineage with their Indian predecessors. Most of the indigenous traditions of East Asian Buddhism, including the CHAN ZONG, TIANTAI ZONG, JINGTU ZONG, and HUAYAN ZONG, draw their legitimacy at least partially from their claims that their teachings and practices derive from an unbroken lineage of authoritative teachers that can be traced back geographically to India and temporally to the person of the Buddha himself. The specific names and numbers of patriarchs recognized within each lineage typically change over time and vary widely between the different traditions. Of these lists, the list of patriarchs recognized in the Chan school has received the lion's share of scholarly attention in the West. This Chan list varies widely, but a well-established roster includes twenty-eight Indian and six Chinese patriarchs. These six Chinese patriarchs (liu zu)-BODHIDHARMA, HUIKE, SENGCAN, DAOXIN, HONGREN, and HUINENG-are credited by the classical tradition with the development and growth of Chan in China, but early records of the Chan school, such as the LENGQIE SHIZU JI and LIDAI FABAO JI, reveal the polemical battles fought between disparate contemporary Chan communities to place their own teachers on this roster of patriarchal orthodoxy. It is important to note that all of these various lists of patriarchs, in all the different traditions, are created retrospectively as a way of legitimizing specific contemporary lineages or teachers and verifying the authenticity of their teachings; thus their accounts of the chronology and history of their lineages must be used critically. The compound zushi can mean either "patriarch" (lit., ancestral teacher) or in other contexts "patriarchs and teachers," as in the stock phrase "all the buddhas of the three time-periods and patriarchs and teachers throughout successive generations" (sanshi zhufo lidai zushi), which explicitly traces a school's ancestral lineage from the past to the present and into the future. Some modern Buddhists, especially in the West, deplore the sexism inherent in the term "patriarch," preferring instead to render it with the gender-neutral term "ancestor." See also CHUANDENG LU; FASI; PARAMPARĀ; YINKE.



QUOTES [238 / 238 - 1500 / 15263]


KEYS (10k)

  122 Sri Aurobindo
   8 The Mother
   5 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   4 Elon Musk
   4 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   4 Jorge Luis Borges
   3 Jordan Peterson
   2 William S Burroughs
   2 Sogen
   2 Seneca
   2 Ken Wilber
   2 Joseph Campbell
   2 James George Frazer
   2 Henri Bergson
   2 Friedrich Nietzsche
   2 Buddha
   2 Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
   2 Lao Tzu
   1 Voltaire
   1 Vladimir Voevodsky
   1 Unknown
   1 Umar ibn al-Khattab
   1 T S Eliot
   1 Tolstoi
   1 Thomas Jefferson
   1 Taneda Santoka 1882-1940
   1 Swami Chinmayananda
   1 SWAMI BRAHMANANDA
   1 Stanislav Grof
   1 Sri Aurobindo
   1 Soren Kierkegaard
   1 Sogyal Rinpoche
   1 Saul Williams
   1 Saint Thérèse de Lisieux
   1 Saint Isidore of Seville
   1 Saint Francis de Sales
   1 Saint Cyril of Jerusalem
   1 Richard Feynman
   1 Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange
   1 Pope John Paul II
   1 Philip K Dick
   1 Peace Pilgrim
   1 Paramahamsa Yogananda
   1 Omar Khayyam
   1 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   1 Nirodbaran
   1 Michio Kaku
   1 Marcus Aurelius
   1 Mahatma Gandhi
   1 Louis Bouyer
   1 Lord Krishna
   1 Letter of Barnabas
   1 Kahlil Gibran
   1 Joko Beck
   1 Jim Rohn
   1 Jean Gebser
   1 James Clear
   1 Jalaluddin Rumi
   1 Hermes Trismegistus
   1 Georges Van Vrekhem
   1 George Orwell
   1 George Harrison
   1 Emil Cioran
   1 Eleanor Roosevelt
   1 Earl Nightingale
   1 Dian Fossey
   1 Dalai Lama XIV
   1 Dalai Lama
   1 Confucius
   1 Claudio Naranjo
   1 Cheng Yen
   1 Chamtrul Rinpoche
   1 Buddhist Text
   1 Barbara Max Hubbard
   1 Awaghosha
   1 Anthony Robbins
   1 Alfred Korzybski
   1 Albert Einstein
   1 Alan Watts
   1 Sri Ramakrishna
   1 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   1 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   1 Epictetus
   1 Aleister Crowley

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   20 Anonymous
   18 John Green
   11 Chuck Palahniuk
   10 Mehmet Murat ildan
   8 William Gibson
   8 Peter Drucker
   8 Albert Camus
   7 Victor Hugo
   7 Niels Bohr
   6 Stephen Hawking
   6 Rainer Maria Rilke
   6 Peter Thiel
   6 Paulo Coelho
   6 John C Maxwell
   6 Eckhart Tolle
   5 Winston Churchill
   5 Tony Robbins
   5 Toba Beta
   5 Ray Bradbury
   5 Mark Twain

1:The past doesn't equal the future. ~ Anthony Robbins,
2:You choose the future with your actions each day." ~ James Clear,
3:It is said that the present is pregnant with the future.
   ~ Voltaire,
4:I never think of the future - it comes soon enough." ~ Albert Einstein,
5:I'm just trying to think about the future and not be sad.
   ~ Elon Musk,
6:The future is a race between education and catastrophe. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
7:The past, the future, Snow light faintly glows. ~ Taneda Santoka 1882-1940,
8:When you cut into the present, the future leaks out. ~ William S Burroughs,
9:Look after the present and the future will look after itself. ~ Swami Chinmayananda,
10:I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
11:We should be excited about the future and striving to go beyond the horizon." ~ Elon Musk,
12:The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
13:THE FUTURE EXISTS FIRST IN IMAGINATION, THEN IN WILL, THEN IN REALITY
   ~ Barbara Max Hubbard,
14:The past is already gone, the future is not yet here. There's only one moment for you to live." ~ Buddha,
15:Our anxiety does not come from thinking about the future, but from wanting to control it. ~ Kahlil Gibran,
16:Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment. ~ Buddha,
17:He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past. ~ George Orwell,
18:The young grasp at the future. The old grasp at the past. The wise remain in the present. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
19:Happiness is not something you postpone for the future; it is something you design for the present." ~ Jim Rohn,
20:Proper preparation for the future consists of forming good personal habits. ~ Epictetus,
21:The inmost is the infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Power of the Spirit,
22:The highest wisdom is never to worry about the future but to resign ourselves entirely to his will. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
23:As Aurobindo and Teilhard de Chardin knew, the future of humankind is God-consciousness.
   ~ Ken Wilber, Up From Eden,
24:A mind that worries about the past is distracted, and a mind that worries about the future is delusional." ~ Cheng Yen,
25:The most painful state of being is remembering the future, particularly the one you'll never have. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
26:The very existence of libraries affords the best evidence that we may yet have hope for the future of man. ~ T S Eliot,
27:The future is more beautiful than all the pasts. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
28:Hold tight to your own time, hour after hour; you will not depend on the future if you grasp the present in hand. ~ Seneca,
29:Slowly drink your tea without a thought of the future. ~ Sogen, @BashoSociety
30:The past cannot bind the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, The Call and the Capacity,
31:Rhythm is the subtle soul of poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Recent English Poetry - I,
32:The intellectual ages sing less easily. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Form and the Spirit,
33:The past has revealed to me the structure of the future. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
34:Sight is the essential poetic gift. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
35:The pure intellect cannot create poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
36:The past must be abandoned to God's mercy, the present to our fidelity, the future to divine providence. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
37:Slowly drink your tea without a thought of the future.
~ Sogen, @BashoSociety
38:Engage yourself in the living present. The future will take care of itself. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
39:Poetry like everything else in man evolves. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
40:All great poetic utterance is discovery. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
41:The pure present is an ungraspable advance of the past devouring the future. In truth, all sensation is already memory. ~ Henri Bergson,
42:Space is a stillness of God building his earthly abode. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Trance of Waiting,
43:This is a constructive way of feeling which leads straight to the future.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
44:The lyric is a moment of heightened soul experience. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Form and the Spirit,
45:Vision is the characteristic power of the poet. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
46:When you realize the value of all life, you dwell less on what is past and concentrate more on the preservation of the future." ~ Dian Fossey,
47:Faith is a brief foretaste of the knowledge we will have in the future ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (DV 14.2ad9).,
48:Mukti [Liberation] is not to be gained in the future. It is there forever, here and now. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
49:The lyric which is poetry's native expression. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Course of English Poetry - II,
50:In this immoral and imperfect world even sin has sometimes its rewards. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Mantra,
51:The stumbling-block of romanticism is falsity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Movement of Modern Literature - I,
52:It is the seeing mind that is the master of poetic utterance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Word and the Spirit,
53:Sheer objectivity brings us down from art to photography. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
54:The one thing that man sees above the intellect is the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Power of the Spirit,
55:We have not understood the present. Why should we seek to know the future? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day By Day, 10-2-46,
56:Learn to enjoy every minute of your life. Be happy now. Don't wait for something outside of yourself to make you happy in the future." ~ Earl Nightingale,
57:The mighty perish in their might;
The slain survive the slayer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Tiger and the Deer,
58:The business of poetry is to express the soul of man to himself. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Ideal Spirit of Poetry,
59:The supreme greatness cannot come in poetry without the supreme beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Victorian Poets,
60:Rhythm is the most potent, founding element of poetic expression. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Recent English Poetry - II,
61:Rise with the world in thy bosom,
O Word gathered into the heart of the Ineffable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ascent,
62:Spiritual power in the present creates material power in the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II, One More for the Altar,
63:The poet is a magician who hardly knows the secret of his own spell. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Word and the Spirit,
64:The root of the past is the source from which the future draws its sap. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II, The One Thing Needful,
65:INDIA MUST BE REBORN, BECAUSE HER REBIRTH IS DEMANDED BY THE FUTURE OF THE WORLD. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, Bhawani Mandir,
66:But opinions, judgments, memories, dreaming about the future—ninety percent of the thoughts spinning around in our heads have no essential reality." ~ Joko Beck,
67:Poetry is a highly charged power of aesthetic expression of the soul of man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
68:Poetry too is an interpreter of truth, but in the forms of an innate beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
69:God knows the past, present and future. He will determine the future for you and accomplish the work.
   ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, [T5],
70:It is the spirit within and not the mind without that is the fount of poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
71:The psychotic drowns in the same waters in which the mystic swims with delight. ~ Stanislav Grof, Psychology of the Future: Lessons from Modern Consciousness Research,
72:The lyrical impulse is the original and spontaneous creator of the poetic form, ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Form and the Spirit,
73:We are the future's greatness, therefore owe
Some duty to the grandeurs of the past. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
74:In all very great drama the true movement and result is psychological. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Course of English Poetry - II,
75:The exceptional individual is the future type, the forerunner. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Necessity of the Spiritual Transformation,
76:How can I know anything about the past or the future, when the light of the Beloved shines only Now? ~ Jalaluddin Rumi, @Sufi_Path
77:I am timeless being. I am free of desire or fear, because I do not remember the past or imagine the future. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
78:The future is in the hands of those who can give tomorrow's generations valid reasons to live and hope. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
79:(Darshan Message)
   Sri Aurobindo's message is an immortal sunlight radiating over the future. 15 August 1972
   *
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I,
80:The native power of poetry is in its sight, not in its intellectual thought-matter. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
81:There is nothing that can be set down as impossible in the chances of the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, Internationalism and Human Unity,
82:The virtue of a man who has attained to the height of perfection, extends even to a foreknowledge of the future. ~ Confucius, the Eternal Wisdom
83:What the poet sees and feels, not what he opines, is the real substance of his poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Poets of the Dawn - II,
84:The poetic word is a vehicle of the spirit, the chosen medium of the soul's self-expression. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Word and the Spirit,
85:The too developed intellect cannot often keep or recover life's first fine careless rapture. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Form and the Spirit,
86:Time is always moving on; nothing can stop it. We can't change the past, but we can learn from it to shape the future. Let's work together to create a happier future." ~ Dalai Lama,
87:I f you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present. ~ Lao Tzu,
88:Only the past fulfilled can conjure room to the future that presses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Descent of Ahana,
89:The nature of poetry is to soar on the wings of the inspiration to the highest intensities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Recent English Poetry - I,
90:Evolution means a bringing out of new powers which lay concealed in the seed or the first form. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
91:If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present." ~ Lao Tzu,
92:In the economy of Nature opposite creates itself out of opposite and not only like from like. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Ideal Spirit of Poetry,
93:The poet's first concern and his concern always is with living beauty and reality, with life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Breath of Greater Life,
94:Drama is the poet's vision of some part of the world-act in the life of the human soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Course of English Poetry - II,
95:The greatness of the ideals of the past is a promise of greater ideals for the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India, "Is India Civilised?" - III,
96:The past is our foundation, the present our material, the future our aim and summit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
97:Poetry and art are born mediators between the immaterial and the concrete, the spirit and life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Ideal Spirit of Poetry,
98:The new dawns repeat the old and lean forward in light to join the dawns of the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, The Doctrine of the Mystics,
99:It is always preferable to have one's face turned towards the future than towards the past. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, Time and Change of the Nature,
100:The more we are afflicted in this world, the greater is our assurance in the next; the more we sorrow in the present, the greater will be our joy in the future." ~ Saint Isidore of Seville,
101:Poetry is the rhythmic voice of life, but it is one of the inner and not one of the surface voices. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Breath of Greater Life,
102:I think we should take the set of actions that are most likely to make the future better, and then reevaluate those actions to make sure that its true. ~ Elon Musk, Joe Rogan Experience, 1169,
103:A poet's largeness and ease of execution,—succeeds more amply on the inferior levels of his genius. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Poets of the Dawn - II,
104:The high gods look on man and watch and choose
Today's impossibles for the future's base. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Vision and the Boon,
105:The nature of art is to strive after a nobler beauty and more sustained perfection than life can give. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Recent English Poetry - I,
106:Nature creates perfectly because she creates directly out of life and is not intellectually self-conscious. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Form and the Spirit,
107:What is not real or vital to thought, imagination and feeling cannot be powerfully creative. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Movement of Modern Literature - II,
108:Into the Silence, into the Silence,
Arise, O Spirit immortal,
Away from the turning Wheel, breaking the magical Circle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ascent,
109:The nearer we get to the absolute Ananda, the greater becomes our joy in man and the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
110:We are creating new fate for the future even while undergoing old fate from the past in the present. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I, Fate, Free Will and Prediction,
111:The expression of the spiritual through the aesthetic sense is the constant sense of Indian art. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
112:The life values are only poetic when they have come out heightened and changed into soul values. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
113:Time voyages with Thee upon its prow,—
And all the future's passionate hope is Thou. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Because Thou Art,
114:What is the most important moment in life?

   The present moment. For the past no longer exists and the future does not yet exist.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III,
115:Delight is the soul of existence, beauty the intense impression, the concentrated form of delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
116:Mere force of language tacked on to the trick of the metrical beat does not answer the higher description of poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Rhythm and Movement,
117:A growing register of calamities
Is the past's account, the future's book of Fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
118:Our human state cradles the future god,
Our mortal frailty an immortal force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
119:The day when we get back to the ancient worship of delight and beauty, will be our day of salvation ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
120:The future is in your hearts and in your hands. God is entrusting to you the task, at once difficult and uplifting, of working with Him in the building of the civilization of love." ~ Pope John Paul II,
121:When the reward is withheld and endlessly lengthens the labour,
Weary of fruitless toil grows the transient heart of the mortal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
122:The whole future of the Earth, as of religion, seems to me to depend on the awakening of our faith in the future. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Future of Man,
123:The Mantra in other words is a direct and most heightened, an intensest and most divinely burdened rhythmic word. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Ideal Spirit of Poetry,
124:The future is for those who have the soul of a hero. The stronger and more sincere our faith, the more powerful and effective will be the help received.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
125:The enlightening power of the poet's creation is vision of truth, its moving power is a passion of beauty and delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Breath of Greater Life,
126:Realism is in its essence an attempt to see man and his world as they really are without veils and pretences. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Movement of Modern Literature - I,
127:The principal work of life is love. And one cannot love in the past or in the future: one can only love in the present, at this hour, at this minute. ~ Tolstoi, the Eternal Wisdom
128:Whatever happened, was good, what's happening, it's going well, whatever will happen, will also be good. You need not have any regrets for the past. Do not worry for the future. Live in Present.
   ~ Lord Krishna,
129:The rediscovery of the soul is the last stage of the round described by this age of the intellect and reason. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Movement of Modern Literature - II,
130:Building of the Soul
For the most part we are much too busy living and thinking to have leisure to be silent and see. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
131:The future like the past presents itself to knowledge in the supermind as a memory of the preknown. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Supramental Instruments - Thought-Process,
132:Personality, force, temperament can do unusual miracles, but the miracle cannot always be turned into a method or a standard. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Recent English Poetry - I,
133:The Christian religion is not simply a doctrine, it is a fact, an action, and an action, not of the past, but of the present, where the past is recovered and the future draws near. ~ Louis Bouyer, The Paschal Mystery,
134:A perfect rhythm will often even give immortality to work which is slight in vision and very far from the higher intensities of style. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Rhythm and Movement,
135:Leader here with his uncertain mind,
Alone who stares at the future's covered face,
Man lifted up the burden of his fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Symbol Dawn,
136:Leave to the night its phantoms, leave to the future its curtain!
Only today Heaven gave to mortal man for his labour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
137:The idea of the future, pregnant with an infinity of possibilities, is thus more fruitful than the future itself, and this is why we find more charm in hope than in possession, in dreams than in reality.
   ~ Henri Bergson,
138:If the philosopher makes his thought substance of poetry, he ceases to be a philosophic thinker and becomes a poet-seer of Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
139:Realistic art does not and cannot give us a scientifically accurate presentation of life, because Art is not and cannot be Science. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
140:The essence of religion is an aspiration and adoration of the soul towards the Divine, the Self, the Supreme, the Eternal, the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Sun of Poetic Truth,
141:He who has conquered the desire of the present life and of the future life, who has vanquished all fear and broken all chain, he is indeed a man of religion. ~ Buddhist Text, the Eternal Wisdom
142:It needs the eye of genius to dispense with the necessity of experience and see truth with a single intuitive glance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, The Man of the Past and the Man of the Future,
143:The divine Self in things is the sustaining Spirit of the present, the withdrawing Spirit of the past, the creative Spirit of the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita, God in Power of Becoming,
144:If I did not simply live from one moment to another, it would be impossible for me to be patient, but I only look at the present, I forget the past, and I take good care not to forestall the future." ~ Saint Thérèse de Lisieux,
145:The truth which poetry expresses takes two forms, the truth of life and the truth of that which works in life, the truth of the inner spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
146:Revolutions are distracting things, but they are often good for the human soul; for they bring a rapid unrolling of new horizons. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Character of English Poetry - II,
147:...everything really depends on the Divine Grace and we should look towards the future with confidence and serenity, at the same time progressing as fast as we can.
   ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms,
148:Zen is a liberation from time. For if we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality." ~ Alan Watts,
149:This apparent paradox of a development draped in the colours of revolt is a constant psychological feature of all human evolution. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Movement of Modern Literature - I,
150:It is not sufficient for poetry to attain high intensities of word and rhythm; it must have, to fill them, an answering intensity of vision. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
151:Reason and taste, two powers of the intelligence, are rightly the supreme gods of the prose stylist, while to the poet they are only minor deities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Essence of Poetry,
152:I thought of a labyrinth of labyrinths, of one sinuous spreading labyrinth that would encompass the past and the future and in some way involve the stars.~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden Of Forking Paths,
153:The attempt to diminish the subjective view to the vanishing-point so as to get an accurate presentation is proper to science, not to poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
154:Intuition and inspiration are not only spiritual in their essence, they are the characteristic means of all spiritual vision and utterance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Course of English Poetry - V,
155:The intellect moves naturally between two limits, the abstractions or solving analyses of the reason and the domain of positive and practical reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
156:One should always have one's look turned forwards to the future—retrospection is seldom healthy as it turns one towards a past consciousness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, Time and Change of the Nature,
157:The poet really creates out of himself and not out of what he sees outwardly: that outward seeing only serves to excite the inner vision to its work. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
158:No amount of guilt can change the past and no amount of worrying can change the future. Go easy on yourself, for the outcome of all affairs is determined by Allah's Decree." ~ Umar ibn al-Khattab, @Sufi_Path
159:Action is being truly observant of your own thoughts, good and bad, looking into the true nature of whatever thoughts may arise, neither tracing the past nor inviting the future, …" ~ Sogyal Rinpoche, "The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying,", (1994).,
160:For the most part our psychological account of others is only an account of the psychological impressions of them they produce in our own mentality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Movement of Modern Literature - II,
161:All my cells thrill swept by a surge of splendour,
Soul and body stir with a mighty rapture,
Light and still more light like an ocean billows
    Over me, round me. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Descent,
162:Enter not into questions of the vicissitudes of this world, ask not of things to come. Regard as booty won the present moment; trouble not thyself with the past, question not of the future. ~ Omar Khayyam, the Eternal Wisdom
163:Busy the gods are always, Thrasymachus son of Aretes,
Weaving Fate on their looms, and yesterday, now and tomorrow
Are but the stands they have made with Space and Time for their timber, ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
164:They leap out like stars in their brightness,
Lights that we think our own, yet they are but tokens and counters,
Signs of the Forces that flow through us serving a Power that is secret. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
165:The most vital issue of the age is whether the future progress of humanity is to be governed by the modern economic and materialistic mind of the West or by a nobler pragmatism guided, uplifted and enlightened by spiritual culture and knowledge.... ~ Sri Aurobindo,
166:In a chance happening, fate's whims and the blind workings or dead drive of a brute Nature,
In her dire Titan caprice, strength that to death drifts and to doom, hidden a Will labours. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Lost Boat,
167:The dirt of the mind is washed away if one can think of the Lord and meditate on Him; if one can cry unto Him with repentance, saying, "Lord! forgive me. I will not do wrong in the future." At once the magnet of God draws the needle of the mind. ~ SWAMI BRAHMANANDA,
168:Live each present moment completely and the future will take care of itself. Fully enjoy the wonder and beauty of each instant. Practice the presence of peace. The more you do that, the more you will feel the presence of that power in your life. ~ Paramahamsa Yogananda,
169:If humans do not understand a proof, then it doesn't count as maths, says Voevodsky. 'The future of mathematics is more a spiritual discipline than an applied art. One of the important functions of mathematics is the development of the human mind.'
   ~ Vladimir Voevodsky,
170:Live in the present, Do all the things that need to be done. Do all the good you can each day. The future will unfold." ~ Peace Pilgrim, (1908 - 1981), b. Mildred Norman, American non-denominational spiritual teacher, mystic, vegetarian activist and peace activist. Wikipedia,
171:Something they forge there sitting unknown in the silence eternal,
Whether of evil or good it is they who shall choose who are masters
Calm, unopposed; they are gods and they work out their iron caprices. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
172:We must seek out with much research the things that can save us. Let us flee perfectly from all the works of lawlessness, in case the works of law­lessness overtake us, and let us hate the deception of this pre­sent time, so that in the future we may be loved. ~ Letter of Barnabas,
173:Whatever relates to our Lord Jesus Christ has two aspects: There is a birth from God before the ages and a birth from a virgin at the fullness of time. There is a hidden coming, like that of rain on fleece, and a coming before all eyes, still in the future. ~ Saint Cyril of Jerusalem,
174:In the region of politics faith is the result of imagination working in the light of history; it takes its stand on reason and experience and aspires into the future from the firm ground of the past. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, The Leverage of Faith,
175:We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on. ~ Richard Feynman,
176:It's being here now that's important. There's no past and there's no future. Time is a very misleading thing. All there is ever, is the now. We can gain experience from the past, but we can't relive it; and we can hope for the future, but we don't know if there is one. ~ George Harrison,
177:Make of us the hero warriors we aspire to become. May we fight successfully the great battle of the future that is to be born, against the past that seeks to endure, so that the new things may manifest and we be ready to receive them.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
178:Sentiment which is an indulgence of the intelligent observing mind in the aesthesis, the rasa of feeling, passion, emotion, sense thinning them away into a subtle, at the end almost unreal fineness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Breath of Greater Life,
179:The present issues from the past, and the future from the present. Everything is made one by this continuity. Time is like a circle, where all the points are so linked that one cannot say where it begins or ends, for all points precede and follow one another for ever.
   ~ Hermes Trismegistus,
180:The Passion of Christ discloses the miseries of this life; the Resurrection of Christ points to the happiness of the life to come. At present, let us labor; let us hope for the future. Now is the time for work; then, for reward. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
181:There is no peace for the man who is troubled with thought for the future, makes himself unhappy before even unhappiness comes to him and claims to assure till the end of his life his possession of the objects to which he is attached. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
182:At every moment, whatever happens now, is for the best. It may appear painful and ugly, a suffering bitter and meaningless, yet considering the past and the future it is for the best, as the only way out of a disastrous situation. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
183:Dead is the past; the void has possessed it; its drama is ended,
Finished its music. The future is dim and remote from our knowledge;
Silent it lies on the knees of the gods in their luminous stillness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
184:Sri Aurobindo does not belong to the past nor to history.
   Sri Aurobindo is the Future advancing towards its realisation.
   Thus we must shelter the eternal youth required for a speedy advance, in order not to become laggards on the way. 2 April 1967
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 210,
185:The great and rare mystics of the past (from Buddha to Christ, from al-Hallaj to Lady Tsogyal, from Hui-neng to Hildegard) were, in fact, ahead of their time, and are still ahead of ours. In other words, they most definitely are not figures of the past. They are figures of the future. ~ Ken Wilber, Sex Ecology Spirituality,
186:Weight of the event and its surface we bear, but the meaning is hidden.
Earth sees not; life's clamour deafens the ear of the spirit:
Man knows not; least knows the messenger chosen for the summons.
Only he listens to the voice of his thoughts, his ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
187:All that is born and destroyed is reborn in the sweep of the ages;
Life like a decimal ever recurring repeats the old figure;
Goal seems there none for the ball that is chased throughout Time by the Fate-teams;
Evil once ended renews and no issue co ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
188:Dawn in her journey eternal compelling the labour of mortals,
Dawn the beginner of things with the night for their rest or their ending,
Pallid and bright-lipped arrived from the mists and the chill of the Euxine.
Earth in the dawn-fire delivered fr ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
189:Death, panic and wounds and disaster,
Glory of conquest and glory of fall, and the empty hearth-side,
Weeping and fortitude, terror and hope and the pang of remembrance,
Anguish of hearts, the lives of the warriors, the strength of the nations
Thr ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
190:he disciple should think that all things in this world are subject to a constant transformation...that all things in the past are like a dream, that all in the present are like a flash of lightning and all in the future like images that arrive spontaneously into existence. ~ Awaghosha, the Eternal Wisdom
191:The thought came over me that never would one full and absolute moment, containing all the others, justify my life, that all of my instants would be provisional phases, annihilators of the past turned to face the future, and that beyond the episodic, the present, the circumstantial, we were nobody.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
192:Matter is like a stream in perpetual flow; the actions of Nature manifest by continual mutations and endless transformations. There is hardly anything that is stable. Behold near thee this immense abyss of the times that no longer are and the future in which all things will disappear. ~ Marcus Aurelius, the Eternal Wisdom
193:Man surprised me most about humanity. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
194:A DEVOTEE: "You say that your spiritual experiences are for others to refer to. Tell us what we should do."
MASTER: "If you want to realize God, then you must cultivate intense dispassion. You must renounce immediately what you feel to be standing in your way. You should not put it off till the future. 'Woman and gold' is the obstruction. The mind must be withdrawn from it. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
195:Our natural being is a part of cosmic Nature and our spiritual being exists only by the supreme Transcendence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine: The Ascent towards Supermind
Inter-Relation
The brooding philosopher or the discovering scientist cannot indeed do without the aid of a greater power, intuition. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Sun of Poetic Truth,
196:The future of the earth depends on a change of consciousness.
   The only hope for the future is in a change of man's consciousness and the change is bound to come.
   But it is left to men to decide if they will collaborate for this change or if it will have to be enforced upon them by the power of crashing circumstances. So, wake up and collaborate! Blessings.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III, August 1964,
197:Man, still a child in Nature's mighty hands,
In the succession of the moments lives;
To a changing present is his narrow right;
His memory stares back at a phantom past,
The future flees before him as he moves;
He sees imagined garments, not a face.
Armed with a limited precarious strength,
He saves his fruits of work from adverse chance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 1:4,
198:Place your burden at the feet of the Lord of the universe who is ever victorious and accomplishes everything. Remain all the time steadfast in the heart, in the Transcendental Absolute. God knows the past, present and future. He will determine the future for you and accomplish the work. What is to be done will be done at the proper time. Don't worry. Abide in the heart and surrender your acts to the Divine. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
199:A might no human will nor force can gain,
A knowledge seated in eternity,
A bliss beyond our struggle and our pain
Are the high pinnacles of our destiny. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems: Evolution - II
Man's destiny
The Mantra is born through the heart and shaped or massed by the thinking mind into a chariot of that godhead of the Eternal of whom the truth seen is a face or a form. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Ideal Spirit of Poetry,
200:The colossal labour Sri Aurobindo put forth to build this unique structure reminds me of one of those majestic ancient temples like Konarak or of a Gothic architecture like Notre Dame before which you stand and stare in speechless ecstasy, your soul takes a flight beyond time and space.

As it is, Savitri is, I suppose, the example par excellence of the future poetry he speaks of in his book The Future Poetry. Generation after generation will drink in its soul's nectar from this perennial source. ~ Nirodbaran,
201:I would say that my most interesting experience with the earlier techniques was the realization that when you make cut-ups you do not get simply random juxtapositions of words, that they do mean something, and often that these meanings refer to some future event. I've made many cut-ups and then later recognized that the cut-up referred to something that I read later in a newspaper or a book, or something that happened... Perhaps events are pre-written and pre-recorded and when you cut word lines the future leaks out. ~ William S Burroughs,
202:The life of God is above the past, the present, and the future; it is measured by the single instant of immobile eternity... [However] forgetfulness of God leaves us in this banal and horizontal view of things on the line of time which passes; the contemplation of God is like a vertical view of things which pass, and of their bond with God who does not pass. To be immersed in time, is to forget the value of time, that is to say, its relation to eternity. ~ Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, The Three Ages of the Interior Life: Prelude of Eternal Life,
203:For strength of character in the race as in the individual consists mainly in the power of sacrificing the present for the future, of disregarding the immediate temptations of ephemeral pleasure for more distant and lasting sources of satisfaction. The more the power is exercised the higher and stronger becomes the character; till the height of heroism is reached in men who renounce the pleasures of life and even life itself for the sake of winning for others, perhaps in distant ages, the blessings of freedom and truth. ~ James George Frazer, The Golden Bough,
204:It's easy to imagine that, in the future, telepathy and telekinesis will be the norm; we will interact with machines by sheer thought. Our mind will be able to turn on the lights, activate the internet, dictate letters, play video games, communicate with friends, call for a car, purchase merchandise, conjure any movie-all just by thinking. Astronauts of the future may use the power of their minds to pilot their spaceships or explore distant planets. Cities may rise from the desert of Mars, all due to master builders who mentally control the work of robots. ~ Michio Kaku,
205:Elon Musks Reading List
   J. E. Gordon - Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down
   Walter Isaacson - Benjamin Franklin: An American Life
   Walter Isaacson - Einstein: His Life and Universe
   Nick Bostrom - Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies
   Erik M. Conway & Naomi Oreskes - Merchants of Doubt
   William Golding - Lord of the Flies
   Peter Thiel - Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future
   Isaac Asimov - The Foundation Trilogy
   ~ Elon Musk, CNBC,
206:The Mantra in other words is a direct and most heightened, an intensest and most divinely burdened rhythmic word which embodies an intuitive and revelatory inspiration and ensouls the mind with the sight and the presence of the very self, the inmost reality of things and with its truth and with the divine soul-forms of it, the Godheads which are born from the living Truth. Or, let us say, it is a supreme rhythmic language which seizes hold upon all that is finite and brings into each the light and voice of its own infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry,
207:Hence the strong attraction which magic and science alike have exercised on the human mind; hence the powerful stimulus that both have given to the pursuit of knowledge. They lure the weary enquirer, the footsore seeker, on through the wilderness of disappointment in the present by their endless promises of the future: they take him up to the top of an exceeding high mountain and show him, beyond the dark clouds and rolling mists at his feet, a vision of the celestial city, far off, it may be, but radiant with unearthly splendour, bathed in the light of dreams. ~ James George Frazer, The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion, Volume 1,
208:So one of the things I do when a client comes is I just do a rough walk through of those dimensions its like does anybody care if youre alive or dead, you know, do you have any friends, do you have anybody that loves you, do you have an intimate relationship, how are things going with your family, do you have a job, are you as educated as you are intelligent, do you have any room for advancement in the future, do you do anything interesting outside of your job and if the answer to all of those is no.. its like your not depressed my friend you just are screwed. really. ~ Jordan Peterson, 015 Maps of Meaning 4: Narrative, Neuropsychology & Mythology II / Part 1,
209:What we call destiny is only in fact the result of the present condition of the being and the nature and energies it has accumulated in the past acting on each other and determining the present attempts and their future results. But as soon as one enters the path of spiritual life, this old predetermined destiny begins to recede. There comes in a new factor, the Divine Grace, the help of a higher Divine Force other than the force of Karma, which can lift the sadhak beyond the present possibilities of his nature. One's spiritual destiny is then the divine election which ensures the future.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I, [T1],
210:Therefore the coming of a spiritual age must be preceded by the appearance of an increasing number of individuals who are no longer satisfied with the normal intellectual, vital and physical existence of man, but perceive that a greater evolution is the real goal of humanity and attempt to effect it in themselves, to lead others to it and to make it the recognised goal of the race. In proportion as they succeed and to the degree to which they carry this evolution, the yet unrealised potentiality which they represent will become an actual possibility of the future.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Advent and Progress of the Spiritual Age, 263,
211:Only, in all he sees God, sees the supreme reality, and his motive of work is to help mankind towards the knowledge of God and the possession of the supreme reality. He sees God through the data of science, God through the conclusions of philosophy, God through the forms of Beauty and the forms of Good, God in all the activities of life, God in the past of the world and its effects, in the present and its tendencies, in the future and its great progression. Into any or all of these he can bring his illumined vision and his liberated power of the spirit. The lower knowledge has been the step from which he has risen to the higher; the higher illumines for him the lower and makes it part of itself, even if only its lower fringe and most external radiation.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Higher and the Lower Knowledge,
212:The condition of today's world cannot be transformed by technocratic rationality, since both technocracy and rationality are apparently nearing their apex.

Nor can it be transcended by preaching or admonishing a return to ethics and morality, or in fact, by any form of return to the past.

We have only one option: in examining the manifestations of our age, we must penetrate them with sufficient breadth and depth that we do not come under the demonic and destructive spell.

We must not focus our view merely on these phenomena, but rather on the humus of the decaying world beneath, where the seedlings of the future are growing, immeasurable in their potential and vigor.

Since our insight into the energies pressing toward development aids their unfolding, the seedlings and inceptive beginnings must be made visible and comprehensible." ~ Jean Gebser,
213:From these two incontrovertible premises he deduced that the Library is total and that its shelves register all the possible combinations of the twenty-odd orthographical symbols (a number which, though extremely vast, is not infinite): in other words, all that it is given to express, in all languages. Everything: the minutely detailed history of the future, the archangels' autobiographies, the faithful catalogue of the Library, thousands and thousands of false catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of those catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of the true catalogue, the Gnostic gospel of Basilides, the commentary on that gospel, the commentary on the commentary on that gospel, the true story of your death, the translation of every book in all languages, the interpolations of every book in all books. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel,
214:I am the sort of man who has changed completely under the effect of suffering, even though this transformation may simply be the intensification of elements already there. Thus amplified, they gave an entirely new perspective on life. I believe frenetically and fanatically, in the virtues of suffering and of anxiety, and I believe in them especially since, though I've suffered greatly and despaired much, I nevertheless acquired through them a sense of my own destiny, a sort of weird enthusiasm for my mission. On the heights of the most terrifying despair, I experience the joy of having a destiny, of living a life of successive deaths and transfigurations, of turning every moment into a cross-road. And I am proud that my life begins with death, unlike the majority of people, who end with death. I feel as if my death were in the past, and the future looks to me like a sort of personal illumination.
   ~ Emil Cioran,
215:At first cautiously, later indifferently, at last desperately, I wandered up the stairs and along the pavement of the inextricable palace. (Afterwards I learned that the width and height of the steps were not constant, a fact which made me understand the singular fatigue they produced). 'This palace is a fabrication of the gods,' I thought at the beginning. I explored the uninhabited interiors and corrected myself: ' The gods who built it have died.' I noted its peculiarities and said: 'The gods who built it were mad.' I said it, I know, with an incomprehensible reprobation which was almost remorse, with more intellectual horror than palpable fear...
   ...'This City' (I thought) 'is so horrible that its mere existence and perdurance, though in the midst of a secret desert, contaminates the past and the future and in some way even jeopardizes the stars.~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths, Selected Stories and Other Writings,
216:Few poets can keep for a very long time a sustained level of the highest inspiration. The best poetry does not usually come by streams except in poets of a supreme greatness though there may be in others than the greatest long-continued wingings at a considerable height. The very best comes by intermittent drops, though sometimes three or four gleaming drops at a time. Even in the greatest poets, even in those with the most opulent flow of riches like Shakespeare, the very best is comparatively rare. All statements are subject to qualification. What Lawrence states1 is true in principle, but in practice most poets have to sustain the inspiration by industry. Milton in his later days used to write every day fifty lines; Virgil nine which he corrected and recorrected till it was within half way of what he wanted. In other words he used to write under any conditions and pull at his inspiration till it came. Usually the best lines, passages, etc. come like that.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Inspiration and Effort - II,
217:3. Meeting the Mentor:For those who have not refused the call, the first encounter of the hero journey is with a protective figure (often a little old crone or old man) who provides the adventurer with amulets against the dragon forces he is about to pass. What such a figure represents is the benign, protecting power of destiny. The fantasy is a reassurance-promise that the peace of Paradise, which was known first within the mother womb, is not to be lost; that it supports the present and stands in the future as well as in the past (is omega as well as alpha); that though omnipotence may seem to be endangered by the threshold passages and life awakenings, protective power is always and ever present within or just behind the unfamiliar features of the world. One has only to know and trust, and the ageless guardians will appear. Having responded to his own call, and continuing to follow courageously as the consequences unfold, the hero finds all the forces of the unconscious at his side. Mother Nature herself supports the mighty task. And in so far as the hero's act coincides with that for which his society is ready, he seems to ride on the great rhythm of the historical process. ~ Joseph Campbell,
218:So what is Rifts? It is a post-apocalyptic roleplaying game set hundreds of years into the future which combines big robots, magic, psionics, and bruising combat on an incredible scale. It is a roleplaying game in which Glitter Boys piloting big mecha suits, chemically enhanced Juicers, psionic Cyber-Knights, ley-commanding Ley Walkers, Techno-Wizards, Dragons, psionic Mind Melters, and more combat the 'Dead Boy' soldiers in their deaths head armour, Spider-Skull Walkers, and Sky Cycles of the evil Coalition States as well as supernatural monsters, D-Bees (Dimensional beings), and the instectoid Xiticix from other dimensions. It is a future in which a golden age was destroyed by nuclear conflagration as billions died, their Potential Psychic Energy-or P.P.E.-was unleashed as surges into the Earth's many, long forgotten ley lines, coming together at nexus points and causing rifts in time and space to be ripped open. As the planet buckled under the psychic onslaught, millions more died and fed more energy into the now pulsing ley lines, causing a feedback loop which would grow and grow. The oceans were driven from their beds to wash over the lands, Atlantis rose again after millennia, alien beings flooded through the rifts, and magic returned to the planet. " ~ Unknown,
219:Because I have called, and ye refused . . . I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh; when your fear cometh as desolation, and your destruction cometh as a whirlwind; when distress and anguish cometh upon you." "For the turning away of the simple shall slay them, and the prosperity of fools shall destroy them."

Time Jesum transeuntem et non revertentem: "Dread the passage of Jesus, for he does not return."

The myths and folk tales of the whole world make clear that the refusal is essentially a refusal to give up what one takes to be one's own interest. The future is regarded not in terms of an unremitting series of deaths and births, but as though one's present system of ideals, virtues, goals, and advantages were to be fixed and made secure. King Minos retained the divine bull, when the sacrifice would have signified submission to the will of the god of his society; for he preferred what he conceived to be his economic advantage. Thus he failed to advance into the liferole that he had assumed-and we have seen with what calamitous effect. The divinity itself became his terror; for, obviously, if one is oneself one's god, then God himself, the will of God, the power that would destroy one's egocentric system, becomes a monster. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces,
220:The supramental memory is different from the mental, not a storing up of past knowledge and experience, but an abiding presence of knowledge that can be brought forward or, more characteristically, offers itself, when it is needed: it is not dependent on attention or on conscious reception, for the things of the past not known actually or not observed can be called up from latency by an action which is yet essentially a remembrance. Especially on a certain level all knowledge presents itself as a remembering, because all is latent or inherent in the self of supermind. The future like the past presents itself to knowledge in the supermind as a memory of the preknown. The imagination transformed in the supermind acts on one side as a power of true image and symbol, always all image or index of some value or significance or other truth of being, on the other as an inspiration or interpretative seeing of possibilities and potentialities not less true than actual or realised things. These are put in their place either by an attendant intuitive or interpretative judgment or by one inherent in the vision of the image, symbol or potentiality, or by a supereminent revelation of that which is behind the image or symbol or which determines the potential and the actual and their relations and, it may be, overrides and overpasses them, imposing ultimate truths and supreme certitudes.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
221:Inspiration is always a very uncertain thing; it comes when it chooses, stops suddenly before it has finished its work, refuses to descend when it is called. This is a well-known affliction, perhaps of all artists, but certainly of poets. There are some who can command it at will; those who, I think, are more full of an abundant poetic energy than careful for perfection; others who oblige it to come whenever they put pen to paper but with these the inspiration is either not of a high order or quite unequal in its levels. Again there are some who try to give it a habit of coming by always writing at the same time; Virgil with his nine lines first written, then perfected every morning, Milton with his fifty epic lines a day, are said to have succeeded in regularising their inspiration. It is, I suppose, the same principle which makes Gurus in India prescribe for their disciples a meditation at the same fixed hour every day. It succeeds partially of course, for some entirely, but not for everybody. For myself, when the inspiration did not come with a rush or in a stream,-for then there is no difficulty,-I had only one way, to allow a certain kind of incubation in which a large form of the thing to be done threw itself on the mind and then wait for the white heat in which the entire transcription could rapidly take place. But I think each poet has his own way of working and finds his own issue out of inspiration's incertitudes.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Inspiration and Effort - I,
222:On a thousand bridges and paths they shall throng to the future, and ever more war and inequality shall divide them: thus does my great love make me speak.

In their hostilities they shall become inventors of images and ghosts, and with their images and ghosts they shall yet fight the highest fight against one another. Good and evil, and rich and poor, and high and low, and all the names of values-arms shall they be and clattering signs that life must overcome itself again and again.

Life wants to build itself up into the heights with pillars and steps; it wants to look into vast distances and out toward stirring beauties: therefore it requires height. And because it requires height, it requires steps and contradiction among the steps and the climbers.

Life wants to climb and to overcome itself climbing.

And behold, my friends: here where the tarantula has its hole, the ruins of an ancient temple rise; behold it with enlightened eyes Verily, the man who once piled his thoughts to the sky in these stones-he, like the wisest, knew the secret of all life. That struggle and inequality are present even in beauty, and also war for power and more power: that is what he teaches us here in the plainest parable. How divinely vault and arches break through each other in a wrestling match; how they strive against each other with light and shade, the godlike strivers-with such assurance and beauty let us be enemies too, my friends Let us strive against one another like gods. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, trans. Fred Kaufmann,
223:I have spoken of Sri Aurobindo's life as a series of radical turns that changed the movement, the mode of life, almost radically every time the turn came. The turn meant a break with the past and a moving into the future. We have a word for this phenomenon of radical and unforeseen change. You know the word, it is intervention. Intervention means, as the Mother has explained to us more than once, the entry of a higher, a greater force from another world into the already existent world. Into the familiar established mode of existence that runs on the routine of some definite rules and regulations, the Law of the present, there drops all on a sudden another mode of being and consciousness and force, a Higher Law which obliterates or changes out of recognition the familiar mode of living; it is thus that one rises from level to level, moves out into wider ranges of being, otherwise one stands still, remains for ever what he is, stagnant, like an unchanging clod or at the most a repetitive animal. The higher the destiny, the higher also the source of intervention, that is to say, more radical - more destructive yet more creative - destructive of the past, creative of the future.

   I have spoken of the passing away of Sri Aurobindo as a phenomenon of intervention, a great decisive event in view of the work to be done. Even so we may say that his birth too was an act of intervention, a deliberate divine intervention. The world needed it, the time was ripe and the intervention happened and that was his birth as an embodied human being - to which we offer our salutation and obeisance today. ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta,
224:[4:131] A human being is a material system which time, a form of energy, enters. Probably time enters him also as noos-Mind. Time, the future, contains in it all the events which are going to occur. Therefore when time enters a person as energy, and acting as noos to him, it brings with it in potentium all that will happen to him, like a window shade unrolling to display an unfolding pattern. Events in the future pop into being, into actualization, the present, but until they do, they are not truly real-not yet actualized-but there in an encoded form, like the grooves of an LP before the needle reaches it; the only "music" is where the needle touches-ahead lies only an encoded wiggle along a helical spiral. Thus, dreams deal with the future lying direct ahead, as during the night, the next series of encoded future events begin to move toward actualization: i.e., the present. What is hard to realize is that in a certain very real way these events are inside the person, within his head, so to speak; but only in their potential, encoded form; the arena in which they are actualized is that of space; time, in the present, flows out to fill space-i.e., the spatial universe. This is why we experience déjà vu. We have somehow caught a glimpse now and then of the script unrolling in our head-caught a glimpse in advance, so we feel "I know exactly what I'm going to say next, and what gestures he'll make," etc. Sure; they're encoded-encased, waiting-in time, and time, being energy, has entered you; is burning bright inside, like Blake's tyger. Tyger, tyger, burning bright In the forests of the night. . . . Who framed thy awful symmetry?
   ~ Philip K Dick, Exegesis Of Philip K Dick,
225:It is not very easy for the customary mind of man, always attached to its past and present associations, to conceive of an existence still human, yet radically changed in what are now our fixed circumstances.We are in respect to our possible higher evolution much in the position of the original Ape of the Darwinian theory. It would have been impossible for that Ape leading his instinctive arboreal life in primeval forests to conceive that there would be one day an animal on the earth who would use a new faculty called reason upon the materials of his inner and outer existence, who would dominate by that power his instincts and habits, change the circumstances of his physical life, build for himself houses of stone, manipulate Nature's forces, sail the seas, ride the air, develop codes of conduct, evolve conscious methods for his mental and spiritual development. And if such a conception had been possible for the Ape-mind, it would still have been difficult for him to imagine that by any progress of Nature or long effort of Will and tendency he himself could develop into that animal. Man, because he has acquired reason and still more because he has indulged his power of imagination and intuition, is able to conceive an existence higher than his own and even to envisage his personal elevation beyond his present state into that existence. His idea of the supreme state is an absolute of all that is positive to his own concepts and desirable to his own instinctive aspiration,-Knowledge without its negative shadow of error, Bliss without its negation in experience of suffering, Power without its constant denial by incapacity, purity and plenitude of being without the opposing sense of defect and limitation. It is so that he conceives his gods; it is so that he constructs his heavens. But it is not so that his reason conceives of a possible earth and a possible humanity. His dream of God and Heaven is really a dream of his own perfection; but he finds the same difficulty in accepting its practical realisation here for his ultimate aim as would the ancestral Ape if called upon to believe in himself as the future Man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Ego and the Dualities,
226:But usually the representative influence occupies a much larger place in the life of the sadhaka. If the Yoga is guided by a received written Shastra, - some Word from the past which embodies the experience of former Yogins, - it may be practised either by personal effort alone or with the aid of a Guru. The spiritual knowledge is then gained through meditation on the truths that are taught and it is made living and conscious by their realisation in the personal experience; the Yoga proceeds by the results of prescribed methods taught in a Scripture or a tradition and reinforced and illumined by the instructions of the Master. This is a narrower practice, but safe and effective within its limits, because it follows a well-beaten track to a long familiar goal.

For the sadhaka of the integral Yoga it is necessary to remember that no written Shastra, however great its authority or however large its spirit, can be more than a partial expression of the eternal Knowledge. He will use, but never bind himself even by the greatest Scripture. Where the Scripture is profound, wide, catholic, it may exercise upon him an influence for the highest good and of incalculable importance. It may be associated in his experience with his awakening to crowning verities and his realisation of the highest experiences. His Yoga may be governed for a long time by one Scripture or by several successively, - if it is in the line of the great Hindu tradition, by the Gita, for example, the Upanishads, the Veda. Or it may be a good part of his development to include in its material a richly varied experience of the truths of many Scriptures and make the future opulent with all that is best in the past. But in the end he must take his station, or better still, if he can, always and from the beginning he must live in his own soul beyond the limitations of the word that he uses. The Gita itself thus declares that the Yogin in his progress must pass beyond the written Truth, - sabdabrahmativartate - beyond all that he has heard and all that he has yet to hear, - srotavyasya srutasya ca. For he is not the sadhaka of a book or of many books; he is a sadhaka of the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Four Aids,
227:If we analyse the classes of life, we readily find that there are three cardinal classes which are radically distinct in function. A short analysis will disclose to us that, though minerals have various activities, they are not "living." The plants have a very definite and well known function-the transformation of solar energy into organic chemical energy. They are a class of life which appropriates one kind of energy, converts it into another kind and stores it up; in that sense they are a kind of storage battery for the solar energy; and so I define THE PLANTS AS THE CHEMISTRY-BINDING class of life.
   The animals use the highly dynamic products of the chemistry-binding class-the plants-as food, and those products-the results of plant-transformation-undergo in animals a further transformation into yet higher forms; and the animals are correspondingly a more dynamic class of life; their energy is kinetic; they have a remarkable freedom and power which the plants do not possess-I mean the freedom and faculty to move about in space; and so I define ANIMALS AS THE SPACE-BINDING CLASS OF LIFE.
   And now what shall we say of human beings? What is to be our definition of Man? Like the animals, human beings do indeed possess the space-binding capacity but, over and above that, human beings possess a most remarkable capacity which is entirely peculiar to them-I mean the capacity to summarise, digest and appropriate the labors and experiences of the past; I mean the capacity to use the fruits of past labors and experiences as intellectual or spiritual capital for developments in the present; I mean the capacity to employ as instruments of increasing power the accumulated achievements of the all-precious lives of the past generations spent in trial and error, trial and success; I mean the capacity of human beings to conduct their lives in the ever increasing light of inherited wisdom; I mean the capacity in virtue of which man is at once the heritor of the by-gone ages and the trustee of posterity. And because humanity is just this magnificent natural agency by which the past lives in the present and the present for the future, I define HUMANITY, in the universal tongue of mathematics and mechanics, to be the TIME-BINDING CLASS OF LIFE. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
228:The one high and reasonable course for the individual human being, - unless indeed he is satisfied with pursuing his personal purposes or somehow living his life until it passes out of him, - is to study the laws of the Becoming and take the best advantage of them to realise, rationally or intuitionally, inwardly or in the dynamism of life, its potentialities in himself or for himself or in or for the race of which he is a member; his business is to make the most of such actualities as exist and to seize on or to advance towards the highest possibilities that can be developed here or are in the making. Only mankind as a whole can do this with entire effect, by the mass of individual and collective action, in the process of time, in the evolution of the race experience: but the individual man can help towards it in his own limits, can do all these things for himself to a certain extent in the brief space of life allotted to him; but, especially, his thought and action can be a contribution towards the present intellectual, moral and vital welfare and the future progress of the race. He is capable of a certain nobility of being; an acceptance of his inevitable and early individual annihilation does not preclude him from making a high use of the will and thought which have been developed in him or from directing them to great ends which shall or may be worked out by humanity. Even the temporary character of the collective being of humanity does not so very much matter, - except in the most materialist view of existence; for so long as the universal Becoming takes the form of human body and mind, the thought, the will it has developed in its human creature will work itself out and to follow that intelligently is the natural law and best rule of human life. Humanity and its welfare and progress during its persistence on earth provide the largest field and the natural limits for the terrestrial aim of our being; the superior persistence of the race and the greatness and importance of the collective life should determine the nature and scope of our ideals. But if the progress or welfare of humanity be excluded as not our business or as a delusion, the individual is there; to achieve his greatest possible perfection or make the most of his life in whatever way his nature demands will then be life's significance.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, [T1],
229:The poet-seer sees differently, thinks in another way, voices himself in quite another manner than the philosopher or the prophet. The prophet announces the Truth as the Word, the Law or the command of the Eternal, he is the giver of the message; the poet shows us Truth in its power of beauty, in its symbol or image, or reveals it to us in the workings of Nature or in the workings of life, and when he has done that, his whole work is done; he need not be its explicit spokesman or its official messenger. The philosopher's business is to discriminate Truth and put its parts and aspects into intellectual relation with each other; the poet's is to seize and embody aspects of Truth in their living relations, or rather - for that is too philosophical a language - to see her features and, excited by the vision, create in the beauty of her image.

   No doubt, the prophet may have in him a poet who breaks out often into speech and surrounds with the vivid atmosphere of life the directness of his message; he may follow up his injunction "Take no thought for the morrow," by a revealing image of the beauty of the truth he enounces, in the life of Nature, in the figure of the lily, or link it to human life by apologue and parable. The philosopher may bring in the aid of colour and image to give some relief and hue to his dry light of reason and water his arid path of abstractions with some healing dew of poetry. But these are ornaments and not the substance of his work; and if the philosopher makes his thought substance of poetry, he ceases to be a philosophic thinker and becomes a poet-seer of Truth. Thus the more rigid metaphysicians are perhaps right in denying to Nietzsche the name of philosopher; for Nietzsche does not think, but always sees, turbidly or clearly, rightly or distortedly, but with the eye of the seer rather than with the brain of the thinker. On the other hand we may get great poetry which is full of a prophetic enthusiasm of utterance or is largely or even wholly philosophic in its matter; but this prophetic poetry gives us no direct message, only a mass of sublime inspirations of thought and image, and this philosophic poetry is poetry and lives as poetry only in so far as it departs from the method, the expression, the way of seeing proper to the philosophic mind. It must be vision pouring itself into thought-images and not thought trying to observe truth and distinguish its province and bounds and fences.

   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry,
230:The modern distinction is that the poet appeals to the imagination and not to the intellect. But there are many kinds of imagination; the objective imagination which visualises strongly the outward aspects of life and things; the subjective imagination which visualises strongly the mental and emotional impressions they have the power to start in the mind; the imagination which deals in the play of mental fictions and to which we give the name of poetic fancy; the aesthetic imagination which delights in the beauty of words and images for their own sake and sees no farther. All these have their place in poetry, but they only give the poet his materials, they are only the first instruments in the creation of poetic style. The essential poetic imagination does not stop short with even the most subtle reproductions of things external or internal, with the richest or delicatest play of fancy or with the most beautiful colouring of word or image. It is creative, not of either the actual or the fictitious, but of the more and the most real; it sees the spiritual truth of things, - of this truth too there are many gradations, - which may take either the actual or the ideal for its starting-point. The aim of poetry, as of all true art, is neither a photographic or otherwise realistic imitation of Nature, nor a romantic furbishing and painting or idealistic improvement of her image, but an interpretation by the images she herself affords us, not on one but on many planes of her creation, of that which she conceals from us, but is ready, when rightly approached, to reveal.

   This is the true, because the highest and essential aim of poetry; but the human mind arrives at it only by a succession of steps, the first of which seems far enough from its object. It begins by stringing its most obvious and external ideas, feelings and sensations of things on a thread of verse in a sufficient language of no very high quality. But even when it gets to a greater adequacy and effectiveness, it is often no more than a vital, an emotional or an intellectual adequacy and effectiveness. There is a strong vital poetry which powerfully appeals to our sensations and our sense of life, like much of Byron or the less inspired mass of the Elizabethan drama; a strong emotional poetry which stirs our feelings and gives us the sense and active image of the passions; a strong intellectual poetry which satisfies our curiosity about life and its mechanism, or deals with its psychological and other "problems", or shapes for us our thoughts in an effective, striking and often quite resistlessly quotable fashion. All this has its pleasures for the mind and the surface soul in us, and it is certainly quite legitimate to enjoy them and to enjoy them strongly and vividly on our way upward; but if we rest content with these only, we shall never get very high up the hill of the Muses.

   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry,
231:Zarathustra, however, looked at the people and wondered. Then he spoke thus: Man is a rope stretched between animal and overman - a rope over an abyss. A dangerous crossing, a dangerous on-the-way, a dangerous looking back, a dangerous trembling and stopping. What is great in man is that he is a bridge and not a goal: what can be loved in man is that he is an over-going and a down-going. I love those who know not how to live except as down-goers, for they are the over-goers. I love the great despisers, because they are the great reverers, and arrows of longing for the other shore. I love those who do not first seek a reason beyond the stars for going down and being sacrifices, but sacrifice themselves to the earth, that the earth of the overman may some day arrive. I love him who lives in order to know, and seeks to know in order that the overman may someday live. Thus he seeks his own down-going. I love him who works and invents, that he may build a house for the overman, and prepare for him earth, animal, and plant: for thus he seeks his own down-going. I love him who loves his virtue: for virtue is the will to down-going, and an arrow of longing. I love him who reserves no drop of spirit for himself, but wants to be entirely the spirit of his virtue: thus he walks as spirit over the bridge. I love him who makes his virtue his addiction and destiny: thus, for the sake of his virtue, he is willing to live on, or live no more. I love him who does not desire too many virtues. One virtue is more of a virtue than two, because it is more of a knot for ones destiny to cling to. I love him whose soul squanders itself, who wants no thanks and gives none back: for he always gives, and desires not to preserve himself. I love him who is ashamed when the dice fall in his favor, and who then asks: Am I a dishonest player? - for he is willing to perish. I love him who scatters golden words in front of his deeds, and always does more than he promises: for he seeks his own down-going. I love him who justifies those people of the future, and redeems those of the past: for he is willing to perish by those of the present. I love him who chastens his God, because he loves his God: for he must perish by the wrath of his God. I love him whose soul is deep even in being wounded, and may perish from a small experience: thus goes he gladly over the bridge. I love him whose soul is so overfull that he forgets himself, and all things are in him: thus all things become his down-going. I love him who is of a free spirit and a free heart: thus is his head only the entrails of his heart; his heart, however, drives him to go down. I love all who are like heavy drops falling one by one out of the dark cloud that hangs over man: they herald the coming of the lightning, and perish as heralds. Behold, I am a herald of the lightning, and a heavy drop out of the cloud: the lightning, however, is called overman.
   ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra,
232:Eternal, unconfined, unextended, without cause and without effect, the Holy Lamp mysteriously burns. Without quantity or quality, unconditioned and sempiternal, is this Light.
It is not possible for anyone to advise or approve; for this Lamp is not made with hands; it exists alone for ever; it has no parts, no person; it is before "I am." Few can behold it, yet it is always there. For it there is no "here" nor "there," no "then" nor "now;" all parts of speech are abolished, save the noun; and this noun is not found either in {106} human speech or in Divine. It is the Lost Word, the dying music of whose sevenfold echo is I A O and A U M.
Without this Light the Magician could not work at all; yet few indeed are the Magicians that have know of it, and far fewer They that have beheld its brilliance!

The Temple and all that is in it must be destroyed again and again before it is worthy to receive that Light. Hence it so often seems that the only advice that any master can give to any pupil is to destroy the Temple.

"Whatever you have" and "whatever you are" are veils before that Light. Yet in so great a matter all advice is vain. There is no master so great that he can see clearly the whole character of any pupil. What helped him in the past may hinder another in the future.

Yet since the Master is pledged to serve, he may take up that service on these simple lines. Since all thoughts are veils of this Light, he may advise the destruction of all thoughts, and to that end teach those practices which are clearly conductive to such destruction.

These practices have now fortunately been set down in clear language by order of the A.'.A.'..

In these instructions the relativity and limitation of each practice is clearly taught, and all dogmatic interpretations are carefully avoided. Each practice is in itself a demon which must be destroyed; but to be destroyed it must first be evoked.

Shame upon that Master who shirks any one of these practices, however distasteful or useless it may be to him! For in the detailed knowledge of it, which experience alone can give him, may lie his opportunity for crucial assistance to a pupil. However dull the drudgery, it should be undergone. If it were possible to regret anything in life, which is fortunately not the case, it would be the hours wasted in fruitful practices which might have been more profitably employed on sterile ones: for NEMO<> in tending his garden seeketh not to single out the flower that shall be NEMO after him. And we are not told that NEMO might have used other things than those which he actually does use; it seems possible that if he had not the acid or the knife, or the fire, or the oil, he might miss tending just that one flower which was to be NEMO after him! ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, The Lamp,
233:Our culture, the laws of our culture, are predicated on the idea that people are conscious. People have experience; people make decisions, and can be held responsible for them. There's a free will element to it. You can debate all that philosophically, and fine, but the point is that that is how we act, and that is the idea that our legal system is predicated on. There's something deep about it, because you're subject to the law, but the law is also limited by you, which is to say that in a well-functioning, properly-grounded democratic system, you have intrinsic value. That's the source of your rights. Even if you're a murderer, we have to say the law can only go so far because there's something about you that's divine.

Well, what does that mean? Partly it means that there's something about you that's conscious and capable of communicating, like you're a whole world unto yourself. You have that to contribute to everyone else, and that's valuable. You can learn new things, transform the structure of society, and invent a new way of dealing with the world. You're capable of all that. It's an intrinsic part of you, and that's associated with the idea that there's something about the logos that is necessary for the absolute chaos of the reality beyond experience to manifest itself as reality. That's an amazing idea because it gives consciousness a constitutive role in the cosmos. You can debate that, but you can't just bloody well brush it off. First of all, we are the most complicated things there are, that we know of, by a massive amount. We're so complicated that it's unbelievable. So there's a lot of cosmos out there, but there's a lot of cosmos in here, too, and which one is greater is by no means obvious, unless you use something trivial, like relative size, which really isn't a very sophisticated approach.

Whatever it is that is you has this capacity to experience reality and to transform it, which is a very strange thing. You can conceptualize the future in your imagination, and then you can work and make that manifest-participate in the process of creation. That's one way of thinking about it. That's why I think Genesis 1 relates the idea that human beings are made in the image of the divine-men and women, which is interesting, because feminists are always criticizing Christianity as being inexorably patriarchal. Of course, they criticize everything like that, so it's hardly a stroke of bloody brilliance. But I think it's an absolute miracle that right at the beginning of the document it says straightforwardly, with no hesitation whatsoever, that the divine spark which we're associating with the word, that brings forth Being, is manifest in men and women equally. That's a very cool thing. You got to think, like I said, do you actually take that seriously? Well, what you got to ask is what happens if you don't take it seriously, right? Read Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. That's the best investigation into that tactic that's ever been produced. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series, 1,
234:The Mother once described the characteristics of the unity-body, of the future supramental body, to a young Ashramite: 'You know, if there is something on that window-sill and if I [in a supramental body] want to take it, I stretch out my hand and it becomes - wow! - long, and I have the thing in my hand without even having to get up from my chair ... Physically, I shall be able to be here and there at the same time. I shall be able to communicate with many people at the same time. To have something in my hand, I'll just have to wish for it. I think about something and I want it and it is already in my hand. With this transformed body I shall be free of the fetters of ignorance, pain, of mortality and unconsciousness. I shall be able to do many things at the same time. The transparent, luminous, strong, light, elastic body won't need any material things to subsist on ... The body can even be lengthened if one wants it to become tall, or shrunk when one wants it to be small, in any circumstances ... There will be all kinds of changes and there will be powers without limit. And it won't be something funny. Of course, I am giving you somewhat childish examples to tease you and to show the difference. 'It will be a true being, perfect in proportion, very, very beautiful and strong, light, luminous or else transparent. It will have a supple and malleable body endowed with extraordinary capacities and able to do everything; a body without age, a creation of the New Consciousness or else a transformed body such as none has ever imagined ... All that is above man will be within its reach. It will be guided by the Truth alone and nothing less. That is what it is and more even than has ever been conceived.'895 This the Mother told in French to Mona Sarkar, who noted it down as faithfully as possible and read it out to her for verification. The supramental body will not only be omnipotent and omniscient, but also omnipresent. And immortal. Not condemned to a never ending monotonous immortality - which, again, is one of our human interpretations of immortality - but for ever existing in an ecstasy of inexhaustible delight in 'the Joy that surpasses all understanding.' Moment after moment, eternity after eternity. For in that state each moment is an eternity and eternity an ever present moment. If gross matter is not capable of being used as a permanent coating of the soul in the present phase of its evolution, then it certainly is not capable of being the covering of the supramental consciousness, to form the body that has, to some extent, been described above. This means that the crux of the process of supramental transformation lies in matter; the supramental world has to become possible in matter, which at present still is gross matter. - Sri Aurobindo and the Mother were supramentalized in their mental and vital, but their enormous problem was the supramentalization of the physical body, consisting of the gross matter of the Earth. As the Mother said: 'It is matter itself that must change so that the Supramental may manifest. A new kind of matter no longer corresponding with Mendeleyev's periodic table of the elements? Is that possible?
   ~ Georges Van Vrekhem,
235:There's an idea in Christianity of the image of God as a Trinity. There's the element of the Father, there's the element of the Son, and there's the element of the Holy Spirit. It's something like the spirit of tradition, human beings as the living incarnation of that tradition, and the spirit in people that makes relationship with the spirit and individuals possible. I'm going to bounce my way quickly through some of the classical, metaphorical attributes of God, so that we kind of have a cloud of notions about what we're talking about, when we return to Genesis 1 and talk about the God who spoke chaos into Being.

There's a fatherly aspect, so here's what God as a father is like. You can enter into a covenant with it, so you can make a bargain with it. Now, you think about that. Money is like that, because money is a bargain you make with the future. We structured our world so that you can negotiate with the future. I don't think that we would have got to the point where we could do that without having this idea to begin with. You can act as if the future's a reality; there's a spirit of tradition that enables you to act as if the future is something that can be bargained with. That's why you make sacrifices. The sacrifices were acted out for a very long period of time, and now they're psychological. We know that you can sacrifice something valuable in the present and expect that you're negotiating with something that's representing the transcendent future. That's an amazing human discovery. No other creature can do that; to act as if the future is real; to know that you can bargain with reality itself, and that you can do it successfully. It's unbelievable.

It responds to sacrifice. It answers prayers. I'm not saying that any of this is true, by the way. I'm just saying what the cloud of ideas represents. It punishes and rewards. It judges and forgives. It's not nature. One of the things weird about the Judeo-Christian tradition is that God and nature are not the same thing, at all. Whatever God is, partially manifest in this logos, is something that stands outside of nature. I think that's something like consciousness as abstracted from the natural world. It built Eden for mankind and then banished us for disobedience. It's too powerful to be touched. It granted free will. Distance from it is hell. Distance from it is death. It reveals itself in dogma and in mystical experience, and it's the law. That's sort of like the fatherly aspect.

The son-like aspect. It speaks chaos into order. It slays dragons and feeds people with the remains. It finds gold. It rescues virgins. It is the body and blood of Christ. It is a tragic victim, scapegoat, and eternally triumphant redeemer simultaneously. It cares for the outcast. It dies and is reborn. It is the king of kings and hero of heroes. It's not the state, but is both the fulfillment and critic of the state. It dwells in the perfect house. It is aiming at paradise or heaven. It can rescue from hell. It cares for the outcast. It is the foundation and the cornerstone that was rejected. It is the spirit of the law.

The spirit-like aspect. It's akin to the human soul. It's the prophetic voice. It's the still, small voice of conscience. It's the spoken truth. It's called forth by music. It is the enemy of deceit, arrogance, and resentment. It is the water of life. It burns without consuming. It's a blinding light.

That's a very well-developed set of poetic metaphors. These are all...what would you say...glimpses of the transcendent ideal. That's the right way of thinking about it. They're glimpses of the transcendent ideal, and all of them have a specific meaning. In part, what we're going to do is go over that meaning, as we continue with this series. What we've got now is a brief description, at least, of what this is. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series, 1,
236:I have never been able to share your constantly recurring doubts about your capacity or the despair that arises in you so violently when there are these attacks, nor is their persistent recurrence a valid ground for believing that they can never be overcome. Such a persistent recurrence has been a feature in the sadhana of many who have finally emerged and reached the goal; even the sadhana of very great Yogis has not been exempt from such violent and constant recurrences; they have sometimes been special objects of such persistent assaults, as I have indeed indicated in Savitri in more places than one - and that was indeed founded on my own experience. In the nature of these recurrences there is usually a constant return of the same adverse experiences, the same adverse resistance, thoughts destructive of all belief and faith and confidence in the future of the sadhana, frustrating doubts of what one has known as the truth, voices of despondency and despair, urgings to abandonment of the Yoga or to suicide or else other disastrous counsels of déchéance. The course taken by the attacks is not indeed the same for all, but still they have strong family resemblance. One can eventually overcome if one begins to realise the nature and source of these assaults and acquires the faculty of observing them, bearing, without being involved or absorbed into their gulf, finally becoming the witness of their phenomena and understanding them and refusing the mind's sanction even when the vital is still tossed in the whirl or the most outward physical mind still reflects the adverse suggestions. In the end these attacks lose their power and fall away from the nature; the recurrence becomes feeble or has no power to last: even, if the detachment is strong enough, they can be cut out very soon or at once. The strongest attitude to take is to regard these things as what they really are, incursions of dark forces from outside taking advantage of certain openings in the physical mind or the vital part, but not a real part of oneself or spontaneous creation in one's own nature. To create a confusion and darkness in the physical mind and throw into it or awake in it mistaken ideas, dark thoughts, false impressions is a favourite method of these assailants, and if they can get the support of this mind from over-confidence in its own correctness or the natural rightness of its impressions and inferences, then they can have a field day until the true mind reasserts itself and blows the clouds away. Another device of theirs is to awake some hurt or rankling sense of grievance in the lower vital parts and keep them hurt or rankling as long as possible. In that case one has to discover these openings in one's nature and learn to close them permanently to such attacks or else to throw out intruders at once or as soon as possible. The recurrence is no proof of a fundamental incapacity; if one takes the right inner attitude, it can and will be overcome. The idea of suicide ought never to be accepted; there is no real ground for it and in any case it cannot be a remedy or a real escape: at most it can only be postponement of difficulties and the necessity for their solution under no better circumstances in another life. One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time he conceals himself, and then in his own right time he will reveal his Presence.
   I have tried to dispel all the misconceptions, explain things as they are and meet all the points at issue. It is not that you really cannot make progress or have not made any progress; on the contrary, you yourself have admitted that you have made a good advance in many directions and there is no reason why, if you persevere, the rest should not come. You have always believed in the Guruvada: I would ask you then to put your faith in the Guru and the guidance and rely on the Ishwara for the fulfilment, to have faith in my abiding love and affection, in the affection and divine goodwill and loving kindness of the Mother, stand firm against all attacks and go forward perseveringly towards the spiritual goal and the all-fulfilling and all-satisfying touch of the All-Blissful, the Ishwara.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
237:Coded Language

Whereas, breakbeats have been the missing link connecting the diasporic community to its drum woven past

Whereas the quantised drum has allowed the whirling mathematicians to calculate the ever changing distance between rock and stardom.

Whereas the velocity of the spinning vinyl, cross-faded, spun backwards, and re-released at the same given moment of recorded history , yet at a different moment in time's continuum has allowed history to catch up with the present.

We do hereby declare reality unkempt by the changing standards of dialogue.

Statements, such as, "keep it real", especially when punctuating or anticipating modes of ultra-violence inflicted psychologically or physically or depicting an unchanging rule of events will hence forth be seen as retro-active and not representative of the individually determined is.

Furthermore, as determined by the collective consciousness of this state of being and the lessened distance between thought patterns and their secular manifestations, the role of men as listening receptacles is to be increased by a number no less than 70 percent of the current enlisted as vocal aggressors.

Motherfuckers better realize, now is the time to self-actualize

We have found evidence that hip hops standard 85 rpm when increased by a number as least half the rate of it's standard or decreased at ¾ of it's speed may be a determining factor in heightening consciousness.

Studies show that when a given norm is changed in the face of the unchanging, the remaining contradictions will parallel the truth.

Equate rhyme with reason, Sun with season

Our cyclical relationship to phenomenon has encouraged scholars to erase the centers of periods, thus symbolizing the non-linear character of cause and effect

Reject mediocrity!

Your current frequencies of understanding outweigh that which as been given for you to understand.

The current standard is the equivalent of an adolescent restricted to the diet of an infant.

The rapidly changing body would acquire dysfunctional and deformative symptoms and could not properly mature on a diet of apple sauce and crushed pears

Light years are interchangeable with years of living in darkness.

The role of darkness is not to be seen as, or equated with, Ignorance, but with the unknown, and the mysteries of the unseen.

Thus, in the name of:

ROBESON, GOD'S SON, HURSTON, AHKENATON, HATHSHEPUT, BLACKFOOT, HELEN
LENNON, KHALO, KALI, THE THREE MARIAS, TARA, LILITH, LOURDE, WHITMAN
BALDWIN, GINSBERG, KAUFMAN, LUMUMBA, GHANDI, GIBRAN, SHABAZZ, SIDDHARTHA
MEDUSA, GUEVARA, GURDJIEFF, RAND, WRIGHT, BANNEKER, TUBMAN, HAMER, HOLIDAY
DAVIS, COLTRANE, MORRISON, JOPLIN, DUBOIS, CLARKE, SHAKESPEARE, RACHMANINOV
ELLINGTON, CARTER, GAYE, HATHAWAY, HENDRIX, KUTI, DICKINSON, RIPPERTON
MARY, ISIS, THERESA, HANSBURY, TESLA, PLATH, RUMI, FELLINI, MICHAUX, NOSTRADAMUS, NEFERTITI
LA ROCK, SHIVA, GANESHA, YEMAJA, OSHUN, OBATALA, OGUN, KENNEDY, KING, FOUR
LITTLE GIRLS, HIROSHIMA, NAGASAKI, KELLER, BIKO, PERÓN, MARLEY, MAGDALENE, COSBY
SHAKUR, THOSE WHO BURN, THOSE STILL AFLAME, AND THE COUNTLESS UNNAMED

We claim the present as the pre-sent, as the hereafter.

We are unraveling our navels so that we may ingest the sun.

We are not afraid of the darkness, we trust that the moon shall guide us.

We are determining the future at this very moment.

We now know that the heart is the philosophers' stone

Our music is our alchemy

We stand as the manifested equivalent of 3 buckets of water and a hand full of minerals, thus realizing that those very buckets turned upside down supply the percussion factor of forever.

If you must count to keep the beat then count.

Find you mantra and awaken your subconscious.

Curve you circles counterclockwise

Use your cipher to decipher, Coded Language, man made laws.

Climb waterfalls and trees, commune with nature, snakes and bees.

Let your children name themselves and claim themselves as the new day for today we are determined to be the channelers of these changing frequencies into songs, paintings, writings, dance, drama, photography, carpentry, crafts, love, and love.

We enlist every instrument: Acoustic, electronic.

Every so-called race, gender, and sexual preference.

Every per-son as beings of sound to acknowledge their responsibility to uplift the consciousness of the entire fucking World.

Any utterance will be un-aimed, will be disclaimed - two rappers slain

Any utterance will be un-aimed, will be disclaimed - two rappers slain
~ Saul Williams,
238:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step.

But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort.

Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.

*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection.

You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, *I am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: *I have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages.

In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything.

It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM.

My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga.

All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.

These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness.

And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed.

And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen.

My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal.

Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967

~ The Mother, Sweet Mother, The Mother to Mona Sarkar, [T0],

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:For the future. For the unborn. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
2:The future belongs to the free. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
3:The future is plump with promise. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
4:The future belongs to the competent ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
5:The future of marketing is leadership ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
6:Sound will be the medicine of the future. ~ edgar-cayce, @wisdomtrove
7:The future is bought with the present. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
8:The best prophet of the future is the past. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
9:You can never plan the future by the past. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
10:You were the dead; theirs was the future. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
11:A wise God shrouds the future in obscure darkness. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
12:Study the past, if you would define the future. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
13:Well, we must wait for the future to show. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
14:If you want to predict the future create it. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
15:I go to school the youth to learn the future. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
16:Study the past if you want to define the future. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
17:We celebrate the past to awaken the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
18:The doctor of the future will be oneself. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
19:Who heeds not the future will find sorrow at hand ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
20:I go to school - to youth - to learn the future ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
21:When you make a choice, you change the future. ~ deepak-chopra, @wisdomtrove
22:Anyone who fights for the future, lives in it today. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
23:The future is not to be forecast, but created. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
24:The present is big with the future. ~ gottfried-wilhelm-leibniz, @wisdomtrove
25:The future is no more uncertain than the present. ~ walt-whitman, @wisdomtrove
26:The future of computer power is pure simplicity. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
27:The visions we offer our children shape the future. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
28:Within the child lies the fate of the future. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
29:The future depends on what we do in the present. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
30:The medicine of the future will be music and sound. ~ edgar-cayce, @wisdomtrove
31:The present is great with the future. ~ gottfried-wilhelm-leibniz, @wisdomtrove
32:There is nothing like a dream to create the future. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
33:If you don't think of the future, you won't have one. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
34:Do not live in the future, only the present is real ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
35:The best way to predict the future is to create it. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
36:The future is best decided by ballots, not bullets. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
37:Nothing so dates an era as its conception of the future. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
38:I never think of the future - it comes soon enough. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
39:Seize the day, trusting as little as possible in the future. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
40:The future belongs to those who prepare for it. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
41:The past is over and gone. The future is not guaranteed. ~ wayne-dyer, @wisdomtrove
42:We are the dead. Our only true life is in the future. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
43:Wishes are recollections coming from the future. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
44:You cannot predict the future, but you can create it. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
45:Be not dismayed; in the future lies the Promised Land. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
46:Enjoy the present day, trust the least possible to the future. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
47:There's great release, really, in not seeing into the future. ~ gangaji, @wisdomtrove
48:Always choose the future over the past. What do we do now? ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
49:Either you defend the status quo, or you invent the future. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
50:The past does not equal the future unless you live there. ~ tony-robbins, @wisdomtrove
51:We cannot predict the future but we can influence it. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
52:The empires of the future are the empires of the mind. ~ winston-churchill, @wisdomtrove
53:What would the future of man be if it were devoid of memory? ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
54:Promises are the uniquely human way of ordering the future. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
55:A dream is your creative vision for your life in the future. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
56:The future is as irrevocable as an inflexible yesterday. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
57:Even the smallest person can change the course of the future. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
58:He was alone. The past was dead, the future was unimaginable. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
59:Fantasizing about the future is one of my favorite pastimes. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
60:Simply be in the moment, don’t think about the past or the future. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
61:The entire plan for the future has its key in the resurrection. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
62:The future belongs to the risk-takers, not the comfort-seekers . ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
63:When did the future switch from being a promise to a threat? ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
64:Don't try to innovate for the future. Innovate for the present! ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
65:The future you shall know when it has come; before then, forget it. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
66:Past Future, Fear Of The Future, Future And Present ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
67:The price we pay for anticipation of the future is anxiety about it ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
68:Evolution is a myth. God creates the future the way he wants it. ~ james-redfield, @wisdomtrove
69:He promises a lamp unto our feet, not a crystal ball into the future. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
70:If you want to know what the future is, be part of its development. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
71:Take that veil from off of your eyes, look into the future of realize. ~ bob-marley, @wisdomtrove
72:The future destiny of a child is always the work of the mother ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
73:The past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
74:The science of the future will be based on sympathetic vibrations. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
75:We take care of the future best by taking care of the present now. ~ jon-kabat-zinn, @wisdomtrove
76:It is not for us to forecast the future, but to shape it. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
77:The past is in memory, the future - in imagination. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
78:We can have faith in the future only if we have faith in ourselves. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
79:If time travel is possible, where are the tourists from the future? ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
80:Naps are a way of traveling painlessly through time into the future. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
81:The only thing we know about the future is that it will be different. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
82:God alone knows the future, but only an historian can alter the past. ~ ambrose-bierce, @wisdomtrove
83:The future of this republic is in the hands of the American voter. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
84:Faith can give us courage to face the uncertainties of the future. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
85:Investing is laying out money now to get more money back in the future. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
86:The future doesn't belong to the light-hearted. It belongs to the brave. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
87:The future is dark, which is the best thing the future can be, I think. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
88:The value of a business is the cash it's going to produce in the future. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
89:Continuous personal and professional development is your key to the future. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
90:Do your duty and a little more and the future will take care of itself. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
91:The laws of science do not distinguish between the past and the future. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
92:I haven't been faithful to my own advice in the past. I will in the future. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
93:It is a peculiarity of man that he can only live by looking to the future. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
94:Hold fast to the best of the past and move fast to the best of the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
95:I dread the events of the future, not in themselves but in their results. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
96:Our concern for the future can be tested by how well we support our libraries. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
97:The future seems to be in good hands, it's the past I'm worried about. ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
98:..Yet if today has no meaning, the past was a Blank and the future is a Chaos. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
99:Look to the future, because that is where you'll spend the rest of your life. ~ george-burns, @wisdomtrove
100:The past is over... forget it. The future holds hope... reach for it. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
101:What I'm trying to do is to maximise the probability of the future being better. ~ elon-musk, @wisdomtrove
102:Whoso neglects learning in his youth, loses the past and is dead for the future. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
103:For me it was never about money, but solving problems for the future of humanity. ~ elon-musk, @wisdomtrove
104:In the future every human shall see a hidden divinity in every fellow human. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
105:It is man's consolation that the future is to be a sunrise instead of a sunset. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
106:Man cannot change or escape his time. The eye sees the present and the future ~ salvador-dali, @wisdomtrove
107:The future of this nation depends on the Christian training of our youth. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
108:The future you have, tomorrow, won't be the same future you had, yesterday. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
109:I am in the present. I don't think of the past. I don't think of the future. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
110:The cause of today is the effect of the past and the cause for the future. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
111:The past is your LESSON. The present is your GIFT. The future is your MOTIVATION. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
112:The valid research for the future is on the inner side, on the spiritual side. ~ peace-pilgrim, @wisdomtrove
113:As for the future, your task is not to foresee it, but to enable it. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
114:For whatever the future holds, one thing is certain... It just won't be the same. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
115:How paramount the future is to the present when one is surrounded by children. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
116:Nobody can predict the future; the idea is to have a firm grasp of the present. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
117:To make the future demands courage. It demands work. But it also demands faith. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
118:I look to the future because that's where I'm going to spend the rest of my life. ~ george-burns, @wisdomtrove
119:I rejoice when I meet gifted young people... I feel the future is in good hands. ~ oliver-sacks, @wisdomtrove
120:Let the past hold on to itself and let the present move forward into the future. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
121:Nothing we do can change the past, but everything we do changes the future. ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
122:The best way to take care of the future is to take care of the present moment. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
123:The present is saturated with the past and pregnant with the future. ~ gottfried-wilhelm-leibniz, @wisdomtrove
124:While we're talking, envious time is fleeing: pluck the day, put no trust in the future ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
125:You realize that our mistrust of the future makes it hard to give up the past. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
126:Our task is not to fix blame for the past, but to fix the course for the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
127:The present is determined by our past actions, and the future by the present. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
128:Children are the world's most valuable resource and its best hope for the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
129:.. offers no redress for the present, and makes no preparation for the future. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
130:The man of action has the present, but the thinker controls the future. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-jr, @wisdomtrove
131:I always like to see enlightened parents like that; it gives me hope for the future. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
132:I was a peripheral visionary. I could see the future, but only way off to the side. ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
133:While I take inspiration from the past, like most Americans, I live for the future. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
134:The stupid speak of the past, the wise of the present, and fools of the future. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
135:As Aurobindo and Teilhard de Chardin knew, the future of humankind is God-consciousness. ~ ken-wilber, @wisdomtrove
136:Don't neglect the future in times of plenty, for tomorrow you may need what you wasted today. ~ aesop, @wisdomtrove
137:The future isn't so much about absorbing or tolerating change, it's about making change. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
138:Every small positive change we make in ourselves repays us in confidence in the future. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
139:If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face - forever. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
140:It's hard letting go of the past, when there are no firm handholds in the future. ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
141:The future is inevitable and precise, but it may not occur. God lurks in the gaps. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
142:The organizations of the future are filled with smart, fast, flexible people on a mission ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
143:Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
144:Happiness is the ability to move forward, knowing the future will be better than the past. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
145:I can face anything, except the future, and certain parts of the past and present. ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
146:I live not in dreams but in contemplation of a reality that is perhaps the future. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
147:It isn't the past which holds us back, it's the future; and how we undermine it, today. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
148:Two persons love in one another the future good which they aid one another to unfold. ~ margaret-fuller, @wisdomtrove
149:What is history? An echo of the past in the future; a reflex from the future on the past. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
150:Wisdom is the abstract of the past, but beauty is the promise of the future. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-sr, @wisdomtrove
151:The child, making use of all that he finds around him, shapes himself for the future. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
152:There is no smooth road into the future: but we go round, or scramble over the obstacles. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
153:Cease to inquire what the future has in store, and take as a gift whatever the day brings forth. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
154:I know I can't change the past, but I change the future. I can change, too. And I will. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
155:It is bad enough to know the past; it would be intolerable to know the future. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
156:Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment. ~ buddha, @wisdomtrove
157:Each moment contains the whole of the past and creates the whole of the future. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
158:Only we humans worry about the future, regret the past, and blame ourselves for the present. ~ rick-hanson, @wisdomtrove
159:The only way we have of influencing the future is to own the present, however we find it. ~ jon-kabat-zinn, @wisdomtrove
160:Among the things Billy Pilgrim could not change were the past, the present, and the future. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
161:Every organization must be prepared to abandon everything it does to survive in the future. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
162:How can I know anything about the past or the future, when the light of the Beloved shines only Now. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
163:If we examine our thoughts, we shall find them always occupied with the past or the future. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
164:The future enters into us, in order to transform itself in us, long before it happens. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
165:Cease to inquire what the future has in store, and to take as a gift whatever the day brings forth. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
166:The only significance of analyzing the past is that it does give us some key to the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
167:I do not want to go back to the past; I want to go back to the past way of facing the future. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
168:It is very hard to perceive the future on a regular basis simply because the future changes. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
169:Strangely enough, this is the past that somebody in the future is longing to go back to. ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
170:The future for me is already a thing of the past - You were my first love and you will be my last ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
171:Be happy now. Don’t wait for something outside of yourself to make you happy in the future. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
172:Happiness is not something you postpone for the future; it is something you design for the present. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
173:If we open a quarrel between past and present, we shall find that we have lost the future. ~ winston-churchill, @wisdomtrove
174:I've noticed a terrible thing, which is I will agree to anything if it's far enough in the future. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
175:Nothing makes the future look so rosy as to contemplate it through a glass of Chambertin. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
176:The only people who become wealthy by being concerned with the future are insurance companies. ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
177:There are two ways to face the future. One way is with apprehension; the other is with anticipation ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
178:What man is really anti-progressive? For he is only anti-certain-people's-visions-for-the-future. ~ criss-jami, @wisdomtrove
179:What you give becomes an investment that will return to you multiplied at some point in the future. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
180:HELPED are those whose every act is a prayer for peace; on them depends the future of the world. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
181:If we tried To sink the past beneath our feet, be sure The future would not stand. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
182:The fool’s life is empty of gratitude and full of fears; its course lies wholly toward the future. ~ epicurus, @wisdomtrove
183:The one fact about the future of which we can be certain is that it will be utterly fantastic. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
184:The function of science fiction is not always to predict the future but sometimes to prevent it. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
185:Times and conditions change so rapidly that we must keep our aim constantly focused on the future. ~ walt-disney, @wisdomtrove
186:Trust the past to the mercy of God, the present to His love, and the future to His providence. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
187:We know so little about the future that to worry about it would be the height of foolishness. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
188:Atrocity never balances or rectifies the past. Atrocity merely arms the future for more atrocity. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
189:Forecasts may tell you a great deal about the forecaster; they tell you nothing about the future. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
190:Hope spurs humans everywhere to work harder to endure more now that the future may be better. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
191:Look closely at the present you are constructing: it should look like the future you are dreaming. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
192:Someone is going to develop a plan that will take them into the future of their dreams. Let it be you. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
193:The future promise of any nation can be directly measured by the present prospects of its youth. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
194:The truth brings the past into the present and prepares us for the future. That's what truth does. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
195:You need not strain towards the future - the future will come to you on its own. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
196:A failure is like fertilizer; it stinks to be sure, but it makes things grow faster in the future. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
197:One way to sell a consumer something in the future is simply to get his or her permission in advance. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
198:Everyone here has the sense that right now is one of those moments when we are influencing the future. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
199:Our hope in Christ for the future is the mainspring and the mainstay of our joy down here today. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
200:The concept of progress acts as a protective mechanism to shield us from the terrors of the future. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
201:The failures of the past must not be an excuse for the inaction of the present and the future. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
202:The future does not get better by hope, it gets better by plan. And to plan for the future we need goals. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
203:I am an optimist. Anyone interested in the future has to be otherwise he would simply shoot himself. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
204:The past was great no doubt, but I sincerely believe that the future will be more glorious still. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
205:The very existence of libraries affords the best evidence that we may yet have hope for the future of man ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
206:We’re always thinking about the future (goals) instead of the present. I prefer to live in the present. ~ leo-babauta, @wisdomtrove
207:You should always take the best from the past, leave the worst back there and go forward into the future. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
208:The future has no other reality than as present hope, and the past is no more than present memory. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
209:The most painful state of being is remembering the future, particularly the one you'll never have. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
210:Everyone rushes elsewhere and into the future, because no one wants to face one's own inner self. ~ michel-de-montaigne, @wisdomtrove
211:I have always sought to guide the future-but it is very lonely sometimes trying to play God. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-jr, @wisdomtrove
212:Imagination judges the future by the past, but concerns itself with the future more than with the past. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
213:The future will one day be the present and will seem as unimportant as the present does now. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
214:The unhappy person is never present to themself because they always live in the past or the future. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
215:Which part of the future is real and which is not? The unexpected and unpredictable is real. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
216:I will live in the past, the present, and the future. The spirits of all three shall strive within me. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
217:Losers live in the past. Winners learn from the past and enjoy working in the present toward the future. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
218:The sons of all of us will pay in the future if we of the present do not do justice in the present. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
219:When you look at the possibilities instead of the problems, the future is filled with endless opportunities ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
220:It is impossible to live in the past, difficult to live in the present and a waste to live in the future. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
221:Not less of love, but expanding Of love beyond desire, and so liberation From the Future as well as the past. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
222:Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
223:Every person needs to take one day away. A day in which one consciously separates the past from the future. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
224:Our children are our only hope for the future, but we are their only hope for their present and their future. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
225:The future of publishing is about having connections to readers and the knowledge of what those readers want. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
226:Winners live each day as if their last. Not in the future, nor in the past, and someday . . . becomes now! ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
227:Free from attachments to the past and worries about the future, a child expresses him/herself fully. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
228:Selfless giving has a lot to do with what happens to you in the future. There is karma, both good and bad. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
229:My call is not to those who believe they belong to the past. My call is to those who believe in the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
230:Science fiction seldom attempts to predict the future. More often than not, it tries to prevent the future. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
231:Your body exists in the past and your mind exists in the future. In yoga, they come together in the present. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
232:Difficult and painful as it is, we must walk on in the days ahead with an audacious faith in the future. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
233:Dreams come from the past, not from the future. Dreams shouldn't control you&
234:Every man's life lies within the present; for the past is spent and done with, and the future is uncertain. ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
235:HELPED are those who lose their fear of death; theirs is the power to envision the future in a blade of grass. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
236:How very near us stand the two vast gulfs of time, the past and the future, in which all things disappear.  ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
237:If you get up in the morning and think the future is going to be better, it is a bright day. Otherwise, it’s not. ~ elon-musk, @wisdomtrove
238:I think the teaching profession contributes more to the future of our society than any other single profession. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
239:Live quietly in the moment and see the beauty of all before you. The future will take care of itself. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
240:Look back over the past, with its changing empires that rose and fell, and you can foresee the future, too. ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
241:All unnecessary vows are folly, because they suppose a prescience of the future, which has not been given us. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
242:Happiness isn’t in the future, it’s not somewhere else. It’s available right inside us, right now, all the time. ~ leo-babauta, @wisdomtrove
243:I can't see the future, but it's grim. The depletion of resources - we're living in this dine-and-dash economy. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
244:In hindsight, I realized I could see into the future. Which is kind of like having premonitions of flashbacks. ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
245:In the future no human being is to find peace in the enjoyment of happiness if others beside him are unhappy. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
246:The future is something which everyone reaches at the rate of 60 minutes an hour, whatever he does, whoever he is. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
247:Take time to gather up the past so that you will be able to draw from your experience and invest them in the future. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
248:While we're talking, time will have meanly run on... pick today's fruits, not relying on the future in the slightest. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
249:The future is literally in our hands to mold as we like. But we cannot wait until tomorrow. Tomorrow is now. ~ eleanor-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
250:Hope is sweet-minded and sweet-eyed. It draws pictures; it weaves fancies; it fills the future with delight. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
251:Life is a preparation for the future; and the best preparation for the future is to live as if there were none. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
252:Live in the present. Do the things that need to be done. Do all the good you can each day. The future will unfold ~ peace-pilgrim, @wisdomtrove
253:The increase of disorder or entropy is what distinguishes the past from the future, giving a direction to time. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
254:The more you take responsibility for your past and present, the more you are able to create the future you seek. ~ celestine-chua, @wisdomtrove
255:The only thing we know about the future is that it will be faster changing and more unpredictable than the present. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
256:We must never get into the habit of being preoccupied with the future. There is no reason to do so. God is there. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
257:A man who is fighting for the future of mankind is not waiting for torture, he's waiting for - the Revolution. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
258:Historians in the future, in my opinion, will congratulate us on very little other than our clowning and our jazz. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
259:We have our ambition for the future and God. And thus we put God as a plus sign after something else we want. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
260:You can't insure against the future, except by really believing in the best bit of you, and in the power beyond it. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
261:Because I have confidence in the power of truth, and of the spirit, I have confidence in the future of mankind. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
262:You can wish for things in the future to be different, but in this moment, you have to accept things as they are.   ~ deepak-chopra, @wisdomtrove
263:&
264:If you are deliberately trying to create a future that feels safe, you will willfully ignore the future that is likely. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
265:The future is that period of time in which our affairs prosper, our friends are true, and our happiness is assured. ~ ambrose-bierce, @wisdomtrove
266:The secret of leadership is simple: Do what you believe in. Paint a picture of the future. Go there. People will follow. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
267:But the less a man knows about the past and the present the more insecure must prove to be his judgment of the future. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
268:Children of the future AgeReading this indignant page,Know that in a former timeLove! sweet Love! was thought a crime. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
269:To know the future absolutely it to be trapped into that future absolutely. It collapses time. Present becomes future. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
270:Visualization is the human being's vehicle to the future - good, bad, or indifferent. It's strictly in our control. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
271:Children of the future age Reading this indignant page Know that in a former time Love, sweet love, was thought a crime ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
272:Here between the hither and the farther shore While time is withdrawn, consider the future And the past with an equal mind. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
273:Just as man cannot live without dreams, he cannot live without hope. If dreams reflect the past, hope summons the future. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
274:The past is already gone, the future is not yet here. There's only one moment for you to live, and that is the present moment. ~ buddha, @wisdomtrove
275:Every writer creates his own precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
276:Live more and more in the Present, which is ever beautiful and stretches away beyond the limits of the past and the future. ~ meher-baba, @wisdomtrove
277:Our children long for realistic maps of the future that they can be proud of. Where are the cartographers of human purpose? ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
278:The past and present are only our means; the future is always our end. Thus we never really live, but only hope to live. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
279:The leader of the past was a person who knew how to tell. The leader of the future will be a person who knows how to ask. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
280:The pure present is an ungraspable advance of the past devouring the future. In truth, all sensation is already memory. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
281:This is the first age that's ever paid much attention to the future, which is a little ironic since we may not have one. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
282:We gave the Future to the winds, and slumbered tranquilly in the Present, weaving the dull world around us into dreams. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
283:We must remember that life begins at home and we must also remember that the future of humanity passes through the family ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
284:You can’t control the future, but you can affect the present moment. If you want to have a better future, create it now. ~ celestine-chua, @wisdomtrove
285:All cravings are the mind seeking salvation or fulfillment in external things and in the future as a substitute for being. ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
286:If humanity is to live in the future in a socially right way, humanity must educate its children in a socially right way. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
287:Neither a wise nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
288:The leaders of the future will be those who dare to claim their irrelevance in the contemporary world as a divine vocation. ~ henri-nouwen, @wisdomtrove
289:If you're not living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space. The best way to predict the future is to create it. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
290:I shall soon be six-and-twenty. Is there anything in the future that can possibly console us for not being always twenty-five? ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
291:The present is big with the future, the future might be read in the past, the distant is expressed in the near. ~ gottfried-wilhelm-leibniz, @wisdomtrove
292:To abandon the present in order to look for things in the future is to throw away the substance and hold onto the shadow. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
293:Your goal is not to know every detail of the future. Your goal is to hold the hand of the One who does and never, ever let go. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
294:The reason why most people face the future with apprehension instead of anticipation is because they don't have it well designed! ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
295:This monster of a land, this mightiest of nations, this spawn of the future, turns out to be the macrocosm of microcosm me. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
296:To make no mistakes is not in the power of man; but from their errors and mistakes the wise and good learn wisdom for the future. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
297:Capital formation is shifting from the entrepreneur who invests in the future to the pension trustee who invests in the past. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
298:If you understood a business perfectly and the future of the business, you need very little in the way of a margin of safety. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
299:The supposition that the future resembles the past, is not founded on arguments of any kind, but is derived entirely from habit. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
300:Fear? What has a man to do with fear? Chance rules our lives, and the future is all unknown. Best live as we may, from day to day. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
301:If ... the past may be no Rule for the future, all Experience becomes useless and can give rise to no Inferences or Conclusions. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
302:I resolve never to make any resolutions because all resolutions are restrictions for the future. All resolutions are imprisonments. ~ rajneesh, @wisdomtrove
303:Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
304:Prolong not the past Invite not the future Do not alter your innate wakefulness Fear not appearances There in nothing more than this ~ ram-das, @wisdomtrove
305:Sorrow is properly that state of the mind in which our desires are fixed upon the past without looking forward to the future. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
306:The thought of the future life with its prerogatives and joys helps to make the trials of the present seem light and transient. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
307:For I dipped into the future, far as human eye could see, Saw the Vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be. ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
308:The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will involve the patient in the proper use of food, fresh air and exercise. ~ thomas-edison, @wisdomtrove
309:This is not my phrase, but if you're stuck in the past, then you're depressed. If you're stuck in the future, then you're anxious. ~ tim-ferris, @wisdomtrove
310:A brave, frank, clean-hearted, courageous and aspiring youth is the only foundation on which the future nation can be built. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
311:For economic safety for the future, you must have multiple skills and languages. Success is basically being the best that you can be. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
312:Then he thought himself unhappy, but happiness was all in the future; now he felt that the best happiness was already in the past. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
313:It's the nature of the beast within us to keep going back to the familiar rather than to strap on faith and face the future. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
314:Some little part of themselves for someone in the future to discover. Maybe a thought. We were here. We built this. A reminder. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
315:The goal of the future is full unemployment, so we can play. That's why we have to destroy the present politico-economic system. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
316:A dying people tolerates the present, rejects the future, and finds its satisfactions in past greatness and half remembered glory ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
317:The future has several names. For the weak, it is impossible; for the fainthearted, it is unknown; but for the valiant, it is ideal. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
318:We never know which lives we influence, or when, or why. Not until the future eats the present, anyway. We know when it's too late. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
319:After all, the wrong is done. It is past and cannot be changed. We have only the present and the future upon which to move forward. ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
320:The fuel of the future is going to come from fruit like that sumach out by the road, or from apples, weeds, sawdust - almost anything. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
321:Too often we spend our time in the past or the future. We need to learn to live now - mentally as well as physically and spiritually. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
322:Trying to predict the future is like trying to drive down a country road at night with no lights while looking out the back window. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
323:We can let our past [difficulties and failures] beat us or teach us [to be more knowledgeable, competent and realistic in the future]! ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
324:All cravings are the mind seeking salvation or fulfilment in external things and in the future as a substitute for the joy of Being. ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
325:A story may be about the past, the present, or the future; it may be about what things should be, what they could be, or why they are. ~ byron-katie, @wisdomtrove
326:Every time you are tempted to react in the same old way, ask if you want to be a prisoner of the past or a pioneer of the future.    ~ deepak-chopra, @wisdomtrove
327:History is a relentless master. It has no present, only the past rushing into the future. To try to hold fast is to be swept aside. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
328:I see little more important to the future of our country and our civilization than the full recognition of the place of the artist. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
329:Of this I am quite sure, that if we open a quarrel between the past and the present, we shall find that we have lost the future. ~ winston-churchill, @wisdomtrove
330:Affirmation statements are going beyond the reality of the present into the creation of the future through the words you use in the now. ~ louise-hay, @wisdomtrove
331:Only where love and need are one, And the work is play for mortal stakes Is the deed ever truly done For Heaven and the future's sakes ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
332:Stop acting as if life is a rehearsal. Live this day as if it were your last. The past is over and gone. The future is not guaranteed.   ~ wayne-dyer, @wisdomtrove
333:The past gives you an identity and the future holds the promise of salvation, of fulfillment in whatever form. Both are illusions.    ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
334:Training yourself to live in the present - without regretting the past or fearing the future - is a recipe for a happy life. ~ jonathan-lockwood-huie, @wisdomtrove
335:If people tell you that you should live your life preparing for the future, do not believe them. Real Life is found only in the present. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
336:It's all part of taking a chance and expanding man's horizons. The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
337:There cannot be a cause without an effect, the present must have had its cause in the past and will have its effect in the future. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
338:Learn from the past, set vivid, detailed goals for the future,and live in the only moment of time over which you have any control: now. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
339:Life is waiting everywhere, the future is flowering everywhere, but we only see a small part of it and step on much of it with our feet ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
340:The future belongs to the competent. It belongs to those who are very, very good at what they do. It does not belong to the well meaning. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
341:The future looks extremely bright indeed, with lots of possibilities ahead - big possibilities. Like the song says, We've just begun. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
342:It is the patient building of character, the intense struggle to realize the truth, which alone will tell in the future of humanity. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
343:I've never watched any of the adaptations of my books. I've never wanted to, and there's absolutely no chance of me doing so in the future. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
344:Let us not worry about the future. Let us only do the right thing Today, At this moment, Here and now. Let the future take care of itself. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
345:I believe in God&
346:But I don't think of the future, or the past, I feast on the moment. This is the secret of happiness, but only reached now in middle age. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
347:If you are truly present and know how to take care of the present moment as best you can, you are doing your best for the future already. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
348:Promises are the uniquely human way of ordering the future, making it predictable and reliable to the extent that this is humanly possible. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
349:I do not want to foresee the future. I am concerned with taking care of the present. God has given me no control over the moment following. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
350:Most of all, perhaps, we need an intimate knowledge of the past. Not that the past has anything magical about it, but we cannot study the future. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
351:Network marketing is the big wave of the future. It's taking the place of franchising, which now requires too much capital for the average person. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
352:The past is gone, the future is not yet here, and if we do not go back to ourselves in the present moment, we cannot be in touch with life. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
353:If a man examines carefully his thoughts he will be surprised to find how much he lives in the future.  His well- being is always ahead. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
354:If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present. ~ lao-tzu, @wisdomtrove
355:The question is not what I should do in the future to get it, but rather, what am I presently doing that prevents me from realizing it right now? ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
356:Parents are like shuttles on a loom. They join the threads of the past with threads of the future and leave their own bright patterns as they go. ~ fred-rogers, @wisdomtrove
357:You know most people live ninety per cent in the past, seven per cent in the present, and that only leaves them three per cent for the future. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
358:Don't hurry anything. Don't worry about the future. Don't worry about what progress you're making. Just be entirely content to be aware of what is. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
359:How sure I feel, how warm and strong and happy For the future! How sure the future is within me; I am like a seed with a perfect flower enclosed. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
360:Never let the future disturb you.  You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.  ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
361:The only woman to whom it has been given to touch what is decisive in the present world and to have a presentiment of the world of the future. ~ margaret-fuller, @wisdomtrove
362:Universities won't survive. The future is outside the traditional campus, outside the traditional classroom. Distance learning is coming on fast. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
363:For if Freedom and Communism were to compete for mans allegiance in a world at peace, I would look to the future with ever increasing confidence. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
364:It is extraordinary that whole populations have no projects for the future, none at all. It certainly is extraordinary, but it is certainly true. ~ gertrude-stein, @wisdomtrove
365:The future has many names: For the weak, it means the unattainable. For the fearful, it means the unknown. For the courageous, it means opportunity. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
366:Unfortunately, the clock is ticking, the hours are going by. The past increases, the future recedes. Possibilities decreasing, regrets mounting. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
367:Do not brood over your past mistakes and failures as this will only fill your mind with grief, regret and depression. Do not repeat them in the future. ~ sivananda, @wisdomtrove
368:Drink your tea slowly and reverently, as if it is the axis on which the world earth revolves - slowly, evenly, without rushing toward the future. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
369:Fortune raises up and fortune brings low both the man who fares well and the one who fares badly; and there is no prophet of the future for mortal men. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
370:My goal is to try to do useful things, try to maximize the probability the future is good, and make the future exciting. Something you look forward to. ~ elon-musk, @wisdomtrove
371:The present is never the mark of our designs. We use both past and present as our means and instruments, but the future only as our object and aim. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
372:When you invoke the agent of change called acceptance, you must accept all that you are, all that you've been and all that you will be in the future. ~ debbie-ford, @wisdomtrove
373:History is the depository of great actions, the witness of what is past, the example and instructor of the present, and monitor to the future. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
374:How could you make appeal to the future when not a trace of you, not even an anonymous word scribbled on a piece of paper, could physically survive? ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
375:I got the blues thinking of the future, so I left off and made some marmalade. It's amazing how it cheers one up to shred orange and scrub the floor. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
376:On the other hand, permanent causes produce helplessness far into the future, and universal causes spread helplessness through all your endeavors. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
377:The visions we offer our children shape the future. It _matters_ what those visions are. Often they become self-fulfilling prophecies. Dreams are maps. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
378:In the future, however, we may see real gaps in physical and cognitive abilities opening between an upgraded upper class and the rest of society. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
379:The love that saves us is not a love that might come to us in the future,  but rather the love we can give  to whomever is around us  right now. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
380:What is there to fear in this very moment of now? Is your fear about something in the future? Then focus on being present now, and let go of the fear. ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
381:An evil man is a saint of the future. See good in everything. Destroy the evil-finding quality. Develop the good-finding quality. Rise above good and evil. ~ sivananda, @wisdomtrove
382:Farewell has a sweet sound of reluctance. Good-by is short and final, a word with teeth sharp to bite through the string that ties past to the future. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
383:The power of memories and expectations is such that for most human beings, the past and the future are not as real, but rather more real than the present. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
384:The river is everywhere at the same time . . . everywhere and the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past, nor the shadow of the future. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
385:People like us who believe in physics know that the distinction between the past, the present and the future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
386:Remember that the future is neither ours nor wholly not ours, so that we may neither count on it as sure to come nor abandon hope of it as certain not to be. ~ epicurus, @wisdomtrove
387:The general rule is that my life is focused on the present, and very little on the past. If anything, I'm a little bit more focused toward the future. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
388:We differ only in the contents of our dreams. You are after perfection - in the future. We are intent on finding it - in the now. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
389:We look forward to a speedy conclusion to the takeover and working with Paul Little and the Toll group to map out the future direction of Virgin Blue. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
390:For time and the world do not stand still. Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
391:Live each day as if was your last, not in the future, not in the past. You may not get what you want, but, in the long run, you will get what you expect. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
392:America is therefore the land of the future, where, in the ages that lie before us, the burden of the World's History shall reveal itself. ~ georg-wilhelm-friedrich-hegel, @wisdomtrove
393:The dreams of golden glory in the future will not come true unless, high of heart and strong of hand, by our own mighty deeds we make them come true. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
394:There need to be things that make you look forward to waking up in the morning. You wake up in the morning you look forward to the day, forward to the future. ~ elon-musk, @wisdomtrove
395:Because if the manifestations that happen in the present moment are beautiful and good, their continuation in the future will be also good and beautiful. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
396:Check up each week on the progress you are making. Ask yourself what mistakes you have made, what improvement, what lessons you have learned for the future. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
397:Our world is constantly changing but the needs of our hearts remain the same, and so does God's power to transform our lives and give us hope for the future. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
398:Professors of the Dismal Science, I perceive the length of your tether is now pretty well run; and I must request you to talk a little lower in the future. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
399:The wave of the future is not the conquest of the world by a single dogmatic creed but the liberation of the diverse energies of free nations and free men. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
400:And as every state of a simple substance is a natural consequence of its preceding state, so that the present state of it is big with the future. ~ gottfried-wilhelm-leibniz, @wisdomtrove
401:I'm 65 years old. Everyday the future looks a little bit darker. But the past, even the grimy parts of it, well, it just keeps on getting brighter all the time. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
402:Life wouldn’t be worth living if I worried over the future as well as the present. When things are at their worst I find something always happens. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
403:The mind that is cheerful in its present state, will be averse to all solicitude as to the future, and will meet the bitter occurrences of life with a placid smile. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
404:The time is now, the place is here. Stay in the present. You can do nothing to change the past, and the future will never come exactly as you plan or hope for. ~ dan-millman, @wisdomtrove
405:Youth, hope, and love: To build a new life on a ruined life, To make the future fairer than the past, And make the past appear a troubled dream. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
406:Los Angeles gives one the feeling of the future more strongly than any city I know of. A bad future, too, like something out of Fritz Lang's feeble imagination. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
407:I don't think the human mind can comprehend the past and the future. They are both just illusions that can manipulate you into thinking there's some kind of change. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
408:With our eyes fixed on the future, but recognizing the realities of today, we will achieve our destiny to be as a shining city on a hill for all mankind to see. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
409:I am real for I am always now, in the present, and what is with me now shares in my reality. The past is in memory, the future - in imagination. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
410:Practice being present. You can practice being in the moment at any time during the day. Simply focus on what you’re doing right now, not on the past or the future. ~ leo-babauta, @wisdomtrove
411:Carrying the past in to the present, we program the future to continue the past. Letting go the past in the present, we free the future to be something else. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
412:I firmly believe that the future of civilization is absolutely dependent upon finding some way of resolving international differences without resorting to war. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
413:We must welcome the future, remembering that soon it will be the past; and we must respect the past, remembering that it was once all that was humanly possible. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
414:When there is hope in the future, there is power in the present, and since hope is the foundational quality of all change, there is considerable reason to be excited. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
415:These are things that put pure socialism so far into the future. If men will not act for themselves, what will they do when the benefit of their effort is for all? ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
416:Historians exercise great power and some of them know it. They recreate the past, changing it to fit their own interpretations. Thus, they change the future as well. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
417:Let's forgive the past and who we were then. Let's embrace the present and who we're capable of becoming. Let's surrender the future and watch miracles unfold. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
418:The future is never clear; you pay a very high price in the stock market for a cheery consensus. Uncertainty actually is the friend of the buyer of long-term values. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
419:Through my obedience to God, He has been able to use my life to help others. It's been a great journey and I'm looking forward to all the things God has in the future. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
420:Is she not more self-sacrificing, has she not greater courage? Without her, man would not be. If nonviolence is to be the law of our being, the future is with women. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
421:No work or love will flourish out of guilt, fear, or hollowness of heart, just as no valid plans for the future can be made by those who have no capacity for living now. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
422:Solitude is not something you must hope for in the future. Rather, it is a deepening of the present, and unless you look for it in the present you will never find it. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
423:The sooner our society admits that the Negro Revolution is no momentary outburst soon to subside into placid passivity, the easier the future will be for us all. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
424:A dream is your creative vision for your life in the future. You must break out of your current comfort zone and become comfortable with the unfamiliar and the unknown. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
425:Political sovereignty is but a mockery without the means of meeting poverty and illiteracy and disease. Self-determination is but a slogan if the future holds no hope. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
426:The future is greatly different than your life now, the actions that you take must also be greatly different. You cannot do the same thing and get something different. ~ steve-maraboli, @wisdomtrove
427:Why ponder thus the future to foresee, and jade thy brain to vain perplexity? Cast off thy care, leave Allah’s plans to him – He formed them all without consulting thee. ~ omar-khayyam, @wisdomtrove
428:It was one thing, after all, to know his feelings for Amanda hadn't changed; it was another thing entirely to face the future with the certainty that they never would. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
429:Our world is fast succumbing to the activities of men and women who would stake the future of our species on beliefs that should not survive an elementary school education. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
430:People who can put themselves in the place of other people, who can understand the workings of their minds, need never worry about what the future has in store for them. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
431:There is nothing that is so wonderfully created as the human soul. There is something of God in it. We are infinite in the future, though we are finite in the past. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
432:I hope the people on Wall Street will pay attention to the people on Main Street. If they do, they will see there is a rising tide of confidence in the future of America. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
433:I'm not sure what we're running from. Nobody. Or the future. Fate. Growing up. Getting old. Picking up the pieces. As if running we won't have to get on with our lives. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
434:The secret of health for both mind and body is not to mourn for the past, worry about the future, or anticipate troubles, but to live in the present moment wisely and earnestly. ~ buddha, @wisdomtrove
435:I must say that though other days may not be so bright, as we look toward the future, that the brightest days will continue to be those we spent with you here in Ireland. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
436:Let be the future: mind the present need and leave the rest to whom the rest concerns ... present tasks claim our care: the ordering of the future rests where it should rest. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
437:My hope of the future lies in the youths of character, intelligent, renouncing all for the service of others, and obedient - good to themselves and the country at large ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
438:The secret of health for both mind and body is not to mourn for the past, worry about the future, or anticipate troubles, but to live in the present moment wisely and earnestly.   ~ buddha, @wisdomtrove
439:We face the future with our past and our present as guarantors of our promises; and we are content to stand or to fall by the record which we have made and are making. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
440:Why ponder thus the future to foresee, and jade thy brain to vain perplexity? Cast off thy care, leave Allah’s plans to him – He formed them all without consulting thee. ~ omar-khayyam, @wisdomtrove
441:Don't let failure or disappointment cut you off from God or make you think that the future is hopeless. When God closes one door, He often opens another door - if we seek it. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
442:For example, the tiny ant, a creature of great industry, drags with its mouth whatever it can, and adds it to the heap which she is piling up, not unaware nor careless of the future. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
443:Every day is an opportunity for a new life. Every day you stand at the tipping point of your life. And on any one day you can change the future – through the way that you feel. ~ rhonda-byrne, @wisdomtrove
444:If you want to have sustained joy, you have to not only make sure that you think right, but you also have to make decisions now that are going to guarantee some joy in the future. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
445:What is going on right now? And what can you do Right Now to make Now better? Make each Now better and the future will take care of itself, while the past will not matter. ~ neale-donald-walsch, @wisdomtrove
446:And I will show that there is no imperfection in the present, and can be none in the future, And I will show that whatever happens to anybody it may be turn'd to beautiful results. ~ walt-whitman, @wisdomtrove
447:We are the dead. Our only true life is in the future. We shall take part in it as handfuls of dust and splinters of bone. But how far away that future may be, there is no knowing. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
448:Forget the past, for it is gone from your domain! forget the future, for it is beyond your reach! control the present! Live supremely well now! This is the way of the wise. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
449:Most of us have spent our lives caught up in plans, expectations, ambitions for the future; in regrets, guilt or shame about the past. To come into the present is to stop the war. ~ jack-kornfield, @wisdomtrove
450:The present moment is the substance with which the future is made. Therefore, the best way to take care of the future is to take care of the present moment. What else can you do? ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
451:I can feel guilty about the past, apprehensive about the future, but only in the present can I act. The ability to be in the present moment is a major component of mental wellness. ~ abraham-maslow, @wisdomtrove
452:It all happened so fast. The ghetto. The deportation. The sealed cattle car. The fiery altar upon which the history of our people and the future of mankind were meant to be sacrificed. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
453:Love doesn't mean anything if you're not willing to make a commitment, and you have to think not only about what you want, but about what he wants. Not just now, but in the future. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
454:The past is no more; the future not yet. Nothing exists except the here and now. Our grand business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at our hands. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
455:The past was gone and the future had yet to unfold, and he knew he should focus his life on the present. Yet his day-to-day existence suddenly struck him as endless and unbearable. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
456:Love, thine is the future. Death, I use thee, but I hate thee. Citizens, there shall be in the future neither darkness nor thunderbolts; neither ferocious ignorance nor blood for blood. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
457:We want the active and zealous help of every man far-sighted enough to realize the importance from the standpoint of the nation's welfare in the future of preserving the forests. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
458:Most power is lost in one's own mind by thinking negative thoughts, by worrying about the future, by focusing on the past, as opposed to thinking positive, strong, and happy thoughts. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
459:What is the future? What is the past? What are we? What is the magic fluid that surrounds us and conceals the things we most need to know? We live and die in the midst of marvels. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
460:Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
461:Life can be found only in the present moment. The past is gone, the future is not yet here, and if we do not go back to ourselves in the present moment, we can't be in touch with life. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
462:Were we able to extract from any man a complete answer to the question, "What comes into your mind when you think about God?" we might predict with certainty the future of that man. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
463:If happiness always depends on something expected in the future, we are chasing a will-o'-the-wisp that ever eludes our grasp, until the future, and ourselves, vanish into the abyss of death. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
464:Muslim moderates, wherever they are, must be given every tool necessary to win a war of ideas with their co-religionists. Otherwise, we will have to win some very terrible wars in the future. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
465:Psychic development is not a fanatical, freaky study, predicting the future, talking to UFOs, and being able to find out curious facts that are basically irrelevant to one's time in life. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
466:He felt as though he were wandering in the forests of the sea bottom, lost in a monstrous world where he himself was the monster. He was alone. The past was dead, the future was unimaginable ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
467:Practically nothing we do ever stands by itself. If it is good, it will serve some good purpose in the future. If it is evil, it may haunt us and handicap our efforts in unimagined ways. ~ eleanor-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
468:I think the health of our civilization, the depth of our awareness about the underpinnings of our culture, and our concern for the future, can all be tested by how well we support our libraries. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
469:It may be observed in general that the future is purchased by the present. It is not possible to secure distant or permanent happiness but by the forbearance of some immediate gratification. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
470:[Memory] is a passion no less powerful or pervasive than love. It is [the ability] to live in more than one world, to prevent the past from fading, and to call upon the future to illuminate it. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
471:Every gathering of Americans-whether a few on the porch of a crossroads store or massed thousands in a great stadium-is the possessor of a potentially immeasurable influence on the future. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
472:Legitimacy, when challenged, bases itself on an appeal to the past, while justification relates to an end that lies in the future. Violence can be justifiable, but it never will be legitimate. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
473:The Future is, of all things, the thing least like eternity. It is the most temporal part of time&
474:Never confuse yourself by visions of an entire lifetime at once... remember that it is not the weight of the future or the past that is pressing upon you, but ever that of the present alone. ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
475:We are a people. A people do not throw their geniuses away. If they do, it is our duty as witnesses for the future to collect them again for the sake of our children. If necessary, bone by bone. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
476:I fancy the character of a poet is in every country the same,&
477:England will still be England, an everlasting animal, stretching into the future and the past and like all living things having the power to change out of all recognition and yet remain the same. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
478:Even my desire to become free or enlightened is just another craving for fulfilment or completion in the future. So don’t seek to become free of desire or “achieve” enlightenment. Become present. ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
479:One might as well attempt to calculate mathematically the contingent forms of the tinkling bits of glass in a kaleidoscope as to look through the tube of the future and foretell its pattern. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
480:Start with a picture of your goal as already achieved in the future, and work back to the present. Imagine the steps that you would have taken to get from where you are now to where you want to be. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
481:As you walk, you touch the ground mindfully, and every step can bring you solidity and joy and freedom. Freedom from your regret concerning the past, and freedom from your fear about the future. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
482:The things that unite us-America's past of which we are so proud, our hopes and aspirations for the future of the world and this much loved country-these things far outweigh what little divides us. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
483:Going from PayPal, I thought: &
484:One hurries through, even though there's time; the past, the continent, is behind; the future is the glowing mouth in the side of the ship; the dim, turbulent alley is too confusedly the present. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
485:There is no future. There is only now, a continuous now. We have become so wrapped up in the past and the future that we don't see the continuous now. There is no future. It is an idea that you have. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
486:To me, a leader is a visionary that energizes others. This definition of leadership has two key dimensions: a) creating the vision of the future, and b) inspiring others to make the vision a reality. ~ vince-lombardi, @wisdomtrove
487:What I am telling you about is neither in the past nor in the future. Nor is it in the daily life as it flows in the now. It is timeless and the total timelessness of it is beyond the mind. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
488:The negro cannot win the respect of the white people of the south or the peoples of the world if he is willing to sell the future of his children for his personal and immediate comfort and safety. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
489:When we look in to the long avenue of the future, and see the good there is for each one of us to do, we realize, after all, what a beautiful thing it is to work, and to live, and to be happy. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
490:I'm not worried they're all about the investments we make. I mean, listen, this country - we've got $46,000 or $47,000 of GDP per capita. Now, we've done pretty darn well. We'll do better in the future. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
491:People want pretty much the same things: They wanted to be happy. Most young people seemed to think that those things lay somewhere in the future, while most older people believed they lay in the past. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
492:Conservatism discards Prescription, shrinks from Principle, disavows Progress; having rejected all respect for antiquity, it offers no redress for the present, and makes no preparation for the future. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
493:The great and rare mystics of the past . . . were, in fact, ahead of their time, and are still ahead of ours. In other words, they most definitely are not figures of the past. They are figures of the future. ~ ken-wilber, @wisdomtrove
494:A single message from space will show that it is possible to live through technological adolescence. . . . It is possible that the future of human civilization depends on the receipt of interstellar messages. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
495:I think that scientific persons of the future will scoff at scientific persons of the present. They will scoff because scientific persons of the present thought so many important things were superstitious. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
496:Let it be told to the future world, that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive, the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet and to repulse it. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
497:Life is like music for its own sake. We are living in an eternal now, and when we listen to music we are not listening to the past, we are not listening to the future, we are listening to an expanded present. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
498:To complain of the age we live in, to murmur at the present possessors of power, to lament the past, to conceive extravagant hopes of the future, are the common dispositions of the greatest part of mankind. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
499:I don't think there is such a thing as as a real prophet. You can never predict the future. We know why now, of course; chaos theory, which I got very interested in, shows you can never predict the future. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
500:The fossil record implies trial and error, an inability to anticipate the future, features inconsistent with an efficient Great Designer (although not with a Designer of a more remote and indirect temperament) ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:I missed the future. ~ John Green,
2:the future, Hugues ~ Danielle Steel,
3:The future is personal. ~ Bill Jensen,
4:The future is disorder. ~ Tom Stoppard,
5:"The future is now." ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
6:Back to the future of print ~ Anonymous,
7:The future is unwritten. ~ Joe Strummer,
8:Life has become the future. ~ John Green,
9:The future has no lobbyists. ~ Anonymous,
10:The Past Is Not the Future ~ David Niven,
11:The future is unpredictable. ~ John Green,
12:Dreams told the future. ~ Kathryn Stockett,
13:Only lie about the future. ~ Johnny Carson,
14:The future did not arrive. ~ John C Wright,
15:The future is a door. ~ Chuck Wendig,
16:The future belongs to crowds. ~ Don DeLillo,
17:The future is a blank canvas. ~ Suzy Kassem,
18:We are the echo of the future. ~ W S Merwin,
19:Don't worry about the future. ~ Baz Luhrmann,
20:I'm married to the future. ~ Robert Ferrigno,
21:Impossible to see, the future is. ~ Frank Oz,
22:Sex × Technology = the Future. ~ J G Ballard,
23:We can't predict the future. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
24:Director of Ensuring the Future ~ Dave Eggers,
25:expect nothing from the future ~ Stefan Zweig,
26:The future has an ancient heart. ~ Carlo Levi,
27:The future is a devious thing. ~ Brian Lumley,
28:The future is in good hands. ~ Nikki Giovanni,
29:You can't predict the future, ~ Jay Van Andel,
30:Anxiety beclouds the future. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
31:Elections are about the future. ~ Nancy Pelosi,
32:New talents are the future. ~ Delphine Arnault,
33:The future has no shelf life ~ Warren G Bennis,
34:The land belongs to the future. ~ Willa Cather,
35:...and shivered like the future. ~ Markus Zusak,
36:DIE in the past. Live in the future. ~ Mina Loy,
37:For the future. For the unborn. ~ George Orwell,
38:Plans let past drives the future. ~ Jason Fried,
39:Sometimes the future is overrated. ~ Kim Holden,
40:Study the past to define the future ~ Confucius,
41:The future belongs to the free. ~ Ronald Reagan,
42:The future is not Google-able. ~ William Gibson,
43:And now life has become the future. ~ John Green,
44:I am very excited about the future. ~ Thia Megia,
45:In the future, there is no future. ~ John Cusack,
46:The future belongs to socialism ~ Erich Honecker,
47:The future is plump with promise. ~ Maya Angelou,
48:The future of business is social. ~ Barry Libert,
49:The past can be changed by the future. ~ Yoshiki,
50:you cannot cope with the future. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
51:You cannot predict the future. ~ Stephen Hawking,
52:A unicorn is a donkey from the future ~ Joe Rogan,
53:History is rooted in the future ~ Terence McKenna,
54:I wouldn't say I fear the future. ~ Vince Staples,
55:The future ain't what it used to be. ~ Yogi Berra,
56:The future is bright at Ohio State. ~ Urban Meyer,
57:The past is certain, the future obscure. ~ Thales,
58:Wake up and ponder the future ~ Hunter S Thompson,
59:evolution is blind to the future ~ Richard Dawkins,
60:History is the seed bed of the future. ~ Leo Booth,
61:The future of marketing is leadership ~ Seth Godin,
62:The future of rock belongs to women. ~ Kurt Cobain,
63:The future will be a better tomorrow. ~ Dan Quayle,
64:The future will be better tomorrow ~ George W Bush,
65:The past does not equal the future. ~ Tony Robbins,
66:The past doesn't equal the future. ~ Tony Robbins,
67:The past is the past, the future is now. ~ Unknown,
68:Who knows what the future holds. ~ Terry Pratchett,
69:You can't stop the future from coming ~ John Green,
70:Dreams sometimes foretell the future. ~ Mickey Hart,
71:Faith is always about the Future. ~ Michael Pfleger,
72:Genius appeals to the future. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
73:I'm a lousy predictor of the future. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
74:In grief, the future seems impossible. ~ Mira T Lee,
75:I think the future deserves our faith. ~ John Green,
76:Obamaism is the future of America. ~ Jonathan Chait,
77:One faces the future with one's past ~ Pearl S Buck,
78:Strategy is about shaping the future. ~ Max McKeown,
79:The future belongs to the curious. ~ John C Maxwell,
80:The future is in the skies. ~ Mustafa Kemal Atat rk,
81:The future is in the skies. ~ Mustafa Kemal Ataturk,
82:The future of profit is purpose. ~ Simon Mainwaring,
83:The future would take care of itself. ~ Mary Balogh,
84:Education is our passport to the future. ~ Malcolm X,
85:Fear is finding fault with the future. ~ Ajahn Brahm,
86:I'm sad but excited for the future. ~ Warren Spector,
87:Inhale the future, exhale the past. ~ Samantha Chase,
88:I think the future takes care of itself. ~ Pam Bondi,
89:Leadership is the art of the future. ~ Leonard Sweet,
90:My business is to prevent the future. ~ Ray Bradbury,
91:One faces the future with one's past. ~ Pearl S Buck,
92:The future is always here in the past ~ Amiri Baraka,
93:The future of marketing is philanthropy. ~ Biz Stone,
94:The future's written in water. ~ Carolyn MacCullough,
95:We loved life more than the future. ~ Rachel Kushner,
96:We read the future by the past. ~ Alexander Crummell,
97:He who controls the past controls the future. ~ Laozi,
98:I've seen the future and it's murder. ~ Leonard Cohen,
99:Libraries are the future of reading. ~ Courtney Milan,
100:My divine sign indicates the future to me. ~ Socrates,
101:New Zealand looks like the future to me ~ Paula Scher,
102:People are optimistic about the future. ~ Helen Clark,
103:Sex times technology equals the future. ~ J G Ballard,
104:The future is always a dystopia in movies. ~ Alex Cox,
105:The future is created through memory. ~ Dacia Maraini,
106:The future starts today, not tomorrow. ~ John Paul II,
107:The past does not equal the future. ~ Anthony Robbins,
108:The past doesn't equal the future. ~ Anthony Robbins,
109:There's nothing as scary as the future. ~ John Irving,
110:To hope is to contradict the future. ~ Emile M Cioran,
111:didn’t dare to peer into the future. ~ Sophie Kinsella,
112:Etch out the future on your own design. ~ Thomas Dolby,
113:Evolution never looks to the future. ~ Richard Dawkins,
114:History is the best guide to the future. ~ Bill Dedman,
115:I don't know what the future holds. ~ Andrew Kreisberg,
116:It was always summer and the future called ~ Meat Loaf,
117:One need not fear for the future of music. ~ John Cage,
118:Painkillers are the drugs of the future ~ Steve Aylett,
119:The car is the cigarette of the future. ~ Jaime Lerner,
120:The future does not belong to men. ~ Charles de Gaulle,
121:The future is the shape of things to come. ~ H G Wells,
122:The future looks a bit bleak to me. ~ Paolo Bacigalupi,
123:The future of rock n roll is Justin Bieber. ~ Iggy Pop,
124:The past, the future: - two eternities! ~ Thomas Moore,
125:To change yourself means to change the future. ~ CLAMP,
126:To me, the future is personalization . ~ Marissa Mayer,
127:Why is the future always … in the future? ~ David Brin,
128:Will the future bring your wisdom to me? ~ Nostradamus,
129:You can't let your past write the future ~ Janny Wurts,
130:You have to invent the future you want. ~ Vinod Khosla,
131:You never know what the future brings. ~ Randy Jackson,
132:a dream is only a memory of the future ~ Steve Erickson,
133:Get ready for the future: it is murder. ~ Leonard Cohen,
134:I sat in a garage and invented the future. ~ Steve Jobs,
135:of the future costs and benefits counts. ~ Rolf Dobelli,
136:Only a fool walks into the future backward. ~ Anonymous,
137:Sound will be the medicine of the future. ~ Edgar Cayce,
138:Take a look at my face, I am the future. ~ Alice Cooper,
139:The future is a monotonous instrument ~ Francis Picabia,
140:The future is bought with the present. ~ Samuel Johnson,
141:The future is unclear. But it’s still mine. ~ Jenny Han,
142:The future of advertising is the Internet. ~ Bill Gates,
143:The future of architecture is culture. ~ Philip Johnson,
144:We cannot ignore our gift of the future. ~ Jimmy Carter,
145:Well, could even a Jedi know the future? ~ James Luceno,
146:World will suffice for me in the future. ~ Mary Cassatt,
147:Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia ~ John Green,
148:Journalism is an act of faith in the future. ~ Ann Curry,
149:Live now. The future is a dream. Triste ~ Brian Staveley,
150:Not yet do you feel it. Wait for the future. ~ Euripides,
151:Present thinking people kill the future. ~ Ken Blanchard,
152:Remembering the Life that Changed the Future ~ Anonymous,
153:The best prophet of the future is the past. ~ Lord Byron,
154:The future comes like an unwelcome guest. ~ Edmund Gosse,
155:The future is born, put the past in a casket ~ Lil Wayne,
156:The future is much simpler than you think. ~ K K Barrett,
157:The future is purchased by the present. ~ Samuel Johnson,
158:The future was to be a laborious business. ~ L P Hartley,
159:We cannot know the mystery of the future. ~ Jimmy Carter,
160:We’re still here. It’s not the future yet. * ~ Jenny Han,
161:will definitely correct that in the future. ~ Kate White,
162:You just use the future to escape the past. ~ John Green,
163:ADDENDUM: SOMETIMES THE FUTURE IS BULLSHIT ~ Warren Ellis,
164:As I've always said: The future lies ahead. ~ Pat Paulsen,
165:Composing is like making love to the future. ~ Lukas Foss,
166:Do not regret the past. Look to the future. ~ Soyen Shaku,
167:I am optimistic about the future of music. ~ George Crumb,
168:Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia. ~ John Green,
169:Not even the wisest man knows the future. ~ Chris Dietzel,
170:The future depends on what you do today. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
171:the future is unmade, and we must create it. ~ Ed Catmull,
172:The future of India lies in its villages ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
173:We all use the future to escape the present. ~ John Green,
174:You can never plan the future by the past. ~ Edmund Burke,
175:You were the dead; theirs was the future. ~ George Orwell,
176:Bio-technology is the science of the future. ~ Nita Ambani,
177:Deep Web advertising, wave of the future, ~ Thomas Pynchon,
178:Don’t think about the future. Just be here now. ~ Ram Dass,
179:Have faith in yourself and in the future. ~ Edward Kennedy,
180:I mean the future has become old fashioned. ~ Baz Luhrmann,
181:I'm not making any bets on the future. ~ Michelle Williams,
182:Innovation is the calling card of the future. ~ Anna Eshoo,
183:No one can say what the future will hold. ~ Brian Rathbone,
184:Predition is risky, especially of the future. ~ Niels Bohr,
185:Science is the future of mankind. ~ Claude Cohen Tannoudji,
186:Study the past if you would define the future. ~ Confucius,
187:The future belongs to freedom, not to fear. ~ John F Kerry,
188:The future exists only in our imagination ~ Dawna Markova,
189:The future starts today, not tomorrow. ~ Pope John Paul II,
190:The future though imminent is obscure. ~ Winston Churchill,
191:The future will belong to the nature-smart. ~ Richard Louv,
192:the past is history, the future's a mystery ~ Stephen King,
193:The song of the future must transcend creed. ~ E M Forster,
194:To deny the past is to deny the future. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
195:We invent the past and remember the future. ~ Isak Dinesen,
196:We'll handle the future one thing at a time. ~ Sara Raasch,
197:You just use the future to escape the present ~ John Green,
198:A wise God shrouds the future in obscure darkness. ~ Horace,
199:Everything psychic is pregnant with the future. ~ Carl Jung,
200:Garlic bread - it's the future, I've tasted it. ~ Peter Kay,
201:Libraries really are the gates to the future. ~ Neil Gaiman,
202:No one predicts the future. No one tries to. ~ Bruce Willis,
203:Not the past, not the future, life is now. ~ Rickson Gracie,
204:Recruit for the future not just for the gap. ~ John Gregory,
205:Send message to the future by writing it today! ~ Toba Beta,
206:Study the past, if you would divine the future. ~ Confucius,
207:The future belongs to those who prepare for it. ~ Jim Moran,
208:The future has a way of arriving unannounced. ~ George Will,
209:The future is just wasted on some people. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
210:The future is unwritten. What will be will be. ~ James Frey,
211:The future just isn't what it used to be ~ Jonathan Tropper,
212:The future never comes. Life is always now. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
213:The past is all we know of the future. ~ Barbara Kingsolver,
214:The past is always tense, the future perfect. ~ Zadie Smith,
215:The past is history, the future's a mystery. ~ James Toback,
216:We are writing the future in Letters of Fire. ~ Neil Gaiman,
217:We can influence the future but not see it. ~ Stewart Brand,
218:Well, we must wait for the future to show. ~ Virginia Woolf,
219:You just use the future to escape the present. ~ John Green,
220:Your eyes are to be my stars for the future. ~ Thomas Hardy,
221:You want to know the future, love? Then wait: ~ Neil Gaiman,
222:Hamsters like to stash food for the future. ~ Betty G Birney,
223:If you want to predict the future create it. ~ Peter Drucker,
224:I go to school the youth to learn the future. ~ Robert Frost,
225:I love silent films. The future is unwritten. ~ Jim Jarmusch,
226:Live in the future, then build what's missing. ~ Paul Graham,
227:Mapping out a campus that can embrace the future ~ Anonymous,
228:Prediction is difficult, especially the future. ~ Niels Bohr,
229:Remember the past - and await the future. ~ Deborah Harkness,
230:Right then, the future was barely an hour long. ~ Tim Lebbon,
231:Smile to the future and it will smile back to you ~ Yoko Ono,
232:Study the past if you want to define the future. ~ Confucius,
233:The best of prophets of the future is the past. ~ Lord Byron,
234:The engineers of the future will be poets. ~ Terence McKenna,
235:The future has taken root in the present. ~ Nicol Williamson,
236:The future is a process, not a destination. ~ Bruce Sterling,
237:The future is fixed.
The past ever-changing ~ Lynda Barry,
238:The future is what I create today. Every day. ~ Chris Brogan,
239:The future of American film lies on television. ~ David Hare,
240:The future's unwritten. It's what we make of it. ~ Doc Brown,
241:The future will soon be a thing of the past. ~ George Carlin,
242:The past is only the future with the lights on ~ Mark Hoppus,
243:The present is the past biting into the future. ~ Edwin Land,
244:We cannot build the future by avenging the past. ~ T H White,
245:We celebrate the past to awaken the future. ~ John F Kennedy,
246:what is now in the past was once in the future’. ~ Anonymous,
247:What is now in the past was once in the future ~ Victor Hugo,
248:Worry is fearing the future without God present. ~ Dan Walsh,
249:You’re the future of the club. I’m the past. ~ Susan Fanetti,
250:Any authentic creation is a gift to the future ~ Albert Camus,
251:Dedicated to the future, with honor to the past. ~ Neil Peart,
252:Go for it now. The future is promised to no one. ~ Wayne Dyer,
253:Im sitting in a chair but in the future its a throne. ~ Drake,
254:I stopped predicting the future a long time ago. ~ Fred Durst,
255:longing for the future and weariness of the present. ~ Seneca,
256:Look to the past to see what the future holds. ~ Celia Conrad,
257:Only a fool walks into the future backwards. ~ Terry Goodkind,
258:Stories are for joining the past to the future. ~ Tim O Brien,
259:The doctor of the future will be oneself. ~ Albert Schweitzer,
260:The future cannot be divorced from the past. ~ Erika Johansen,
261:The future had become a fierce, wild creature. ~ Daniel Price,
262:The future is 1/39 as long as the past. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
263:The future is a blank page, but not a mystery. ~ Lisa Wingate,
264:The future is a convenient place for dreams. ~ Anatole France,
265:The future is a dark place. We all die there. ~ Mark Lawrence,
266:The future is a much bigger deal than the past, ~ Stephen Fry,
267:The future is as dark, as unreal, as the past. ~ John Gardner,
268:The future is but the obsolete in reverse. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
269:The future is only scary if we try to avoid it. ~ Simon Sinek,
270:The future never just happened. It was created. ~ Will Durant,
271:The future of humanity belongs to the hardcore. ~ Rick Yancey,
272:The future of marketing is not about technology ~ Brian Solis,
273:The future projects light, the past only clouds ~ Eileen Gray,
274:The optimist regards the future as uncertain. ~ Eugene Wigner,
275:There is no hope for the future, said Death ~ Terry Pratchett,
276:What is the future you're creating right now? ~ Erwin McManus,
277:Who heeds not the future will find sorrow at hand ~ Confucius,
278:You either kiss the future or the past goodbye. ~ Ringo Starr,
279:At this rate, we'll never get to the future. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
280:Guilt lies in the past, worry lies in the future. ~ Wayne Dyer,
281:He alone, who owns the youth, gains the future. ~ Adolf Hitler,
282:He wrote the future onto my face with his lips. ~ Camilla Gibb,
283:I'm comfortable and confident about the future. ~ Lance Burton,
284:In the future history will be made only by us. ~ George W Bush,
285:I saw the future, I did, and in it I was alive. ~ Neil Hilborn,
286:It looks like the future's really bright. ~ Michael P Anderson,
287:I was too curious about the future to look back. ~ Patti Smith,
288:Planning is bringing the future into the present. ~ Mike Vance,
289:Predictions are hard, especially abot the future. ~ Niels Bohr,
290:Somewhere in the future I am remembering today. ~ David Berman,
291:The best way to predict the future is to invent it. ~ Alan Kay,
292:The future is as bright as the promise of God. ~ William Carey,
293:The future of content marketing is in your hands. ~ David Hahn,
294:The future's comin' at ya' like a freight train. ~ Lila McCann,
295:To hell with the future. It's a man-eating idol. ~ Ivan Illich,
296:To the past: Thanks.
To the future: Yes. ~ Dag Hammarskj ld,
297:We are Americans, and the future belongs to us. ~ Donald Trump,
298:We cannot predict the future, but we can invent it. ~ Alan Kay,
299:Whatever the future holds I'm not really sure. ~ Sherilyn Fenn,
300:When you make a choice, you change the future. ~ Deepak Chopra,
301:While all the future, for thy purer soul, ~ William Wordsworth,
302:Anyone who fights for the future, lives in it today. ~ Ayn Rand,
303:For the future, the motto is, "No days unalert. ~ Robert Greene,
304:Go for it now. The future is promised to no one. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
305:I thought of the future, and spoke of the past. ~ Truman Capote,
306:It is difficult to predict, especially the future. ~ Niels Bohr,
307:It's easier to invent the future than to predict it. ~ Alan Kay,
308:Kill your appetite and save for the future! ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
309:Let go of the past and go for the future. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
310:That was in the past - we're in the future now. ~ David Beckham,
311:The future is a blue sky and a full tank of gas. ~ Neil Hilborn,
312:The future is an infinite succession of presents. ~ Howard Zinn,
313:The future is not a destination—it is a direction. ~ Ed Catmull,
314:The present is big with the future. ~ Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz,
315:The very long tail of the future is already here. ~ Kevin Kelly,
316:To young people the future is still long. ~ Ivy Compton Burnett,
317:With goals you can create the future in advance. ~ Tony Robbins,
318:Don’t fear the future. Only endure the present. ~ Pepper Winters,
319:Everything is drawn inexorably toward the future. ~ Kip S Thorne,
320:Forget the future. I'd worship someone who could do that. ~ Rumi,
321:For the future, the motto is, "No days unalert." ~ Robert Greene,
322:Hope is the positive mode of awaiting the future. ~ Emil Brunner,
323:I’m not asking for the future. I want the now. ~ L E Modesitt Jr,
324:It is not the past that matters,but the future ~ Agatha Christie,
325:– it is the future that causes one inquietude. ~ Agatha Christie,
326:I traveled into the future to get back in time. ~ Marilyn Manson,
327:I write with my past, about the future, for the present ~ Eyedea,
328:past is immutable. Only the future can be written. ~ Chloe Neill,
329:patience is the art of courting the future. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
330:The best way to predict the future is to invent it. ~ Ed Catmull,
331:The best way to predict the future is to invent it. ~ Mark Cuban,
332:The copy price of the future is the copyright. ~ Mathias Dopfner,
333:The Future belongs to those who can spread ideas. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
334:The future is destroying me, not the past. ~ Svetlana Alexievich,
335:The future is no more uncertain than the present. ~ Walt Whitman,
336:The future is not a gift-it is an achievement. ~ Albert Einstein,
337:The future is not to be forecast, but created. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
338:The future is sooner and stranger than you think. ~ Reid Hoffman,
339:The future is the result of what we do right now. ~ Pema Chodron,
340:The future of computer power is pure simplicity. ~ Douglas Adams,
341:The Present is the womb of the future. ~ Chinmayananda Saraswati,
342:The visions we offer our children shape the future. ~ Carl Sagan,
343:those who forget the past tend to regret the future ~ Anne Tyler,
344:To believe in a child is to believe in the Future. ~ Henry James,
345:We change the future with every choice we make, ~ Kiersten White,
346:We found the future, like birds fly into windows. ~ Austin Kleon,
347:Within the child lies the fate of the future. ~ Maria Montessori,
348:WTF?: What’s the Future and Why It’s Up to Us. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
349:You can't see the future through a rearview mirror ~ Peter Lynch,
350:...Any authentic creation is a gift to the future. ~ Albert Camus,
351:Critics write words but they don't write the future. ~ Jon Gordon,
352:Even in the future, beware of the big, bad wolf.. ~ Marissa Meyer,
353:Greatness starts with a clear vision of the future. ~ Simon Sinek,
354:He took comfort in not knowing about the future. ~ Gloria Steinem,
355:It’s easier to invent the future than to predict it. ~ Brad Stone,
356:Jazz will be the classical music of the future. ~ Dizzy Gillespie,
357:Live life to the fullest, for the future is scarce. ~ Nick Carter,
358:Never make predictions, especially about the future. ~ Yogi Berra,
359:Our eyes are always blind when they view the future. ~ Kelly Link,
360:Spurs fans are feeling very boyish about the future ~ Alan Brazil,
361:The calendar is full but the future is blank. ~ Tomas Transtr mer,
362:The future belongs to the learners-not the knowers. ~ Eric Hoffer,
363:The future belongs to those who prepare for it today. ~ Malcolm X,
364:The future depends on what we do in the present. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
365:The future happens. No matter how much we scream. ~ Derek Walcott,
366:The future happens, no matter how much we scream. ~ Derek Walcott,
367:...the future is an infinite succession of presents ~ Howard Zinn,
368:-the future is but the present a little farther on. ~ Jules Verne,
369:The future is far less knowable than you think. ~ Steven D Levitt,
370:The future is not a destination - it is a direction. ~ Ed Catmull,
371:The future lay before him, inevitable but invisible. ~ John Green,
372:The medicine of the future will be music and sound. ~ Edgar Cayce,
373:The present is great with the future. ~ Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz,
374:There is nothing like a dream to create the future. ~ Victor Hugo,
375:To be impatient is to be hooked on the future. ~ Gerald Jampolsky,
376:We serve the future by protecting the present. ~ Maria Montessori,
377:What is now in the past was once in the future ~ Ramachandra Guha,
378:Are you God? In words of ~ The MotherAre you imagining the future?,
379:Do not let the future be held hostage by the past ~ Neal A Maxwell,
380:Even in the future, beware of the big, bad wolf... ~ Marissa Meyer,
381:For all for children
To whom we entrust the future ~ Lois Lowry,
382:Hope is the lies we tell ourselves about the future. ~ Brent Weeks,
383:I cannot let the fear of the past color the future. ~ Julie Kagawa,
384:I figured something out. The future is unpredictable. ~ John Green,
385:If you don't think of the future, you won't have one. ~ Henry Ford,
386:I go to scale the Future's possibilities! Farewell! ~ Henrik Ibsen,
387:In the future, all robots will act like Don Knotts. ~ Cesar Romero,
388:I regret how much I believed in the future. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer,
389:I've seen the future, and I survived the test of time. ~ Mike Caro,
390:Mult-Tenancyi is really the future of our industry. ~ Marc Benioff,
391:No truth can be determined that concerns the future. ~ C W Gortner,
392:Oh, could we lift the future's sable shroud. ~ Philip James Bailey,
393:That's the beauty of the future. We get to change it. ~ Mira Grant,
394:The fight for the future of Texas is just beginning. ~ Wendy Davis,
395:The future is made of the same stuff as the present. ~ Simone Weil,
396:The future is not a gift. It is an achievement. ~ Robert F Kennedy,
397:The future isn't just unwritten, it's unsearched. ~ Bruce Sterling,
398:The future is uncertain but the end is always near. ~ Jim Morrison,
399:The future waited for him to keep his appointment. ~ Anthony Doerr,
400:The hard work of the future will be pushing buttons ~ Nikola Tesla,
401:The only way you can predict the future is to build it. ~ Alan Kay,
402:There is nothing like a dream to create the future.. ~ Victor Hugo,
403:We must build bridges to the future, not the past. ~ David Axelrod,
404:Why do we remember the past, but not the future? ~ Stephen Hawking,
405:Windows 8 is key to the future, the Surface computer. ~ Bill Gates,
406:Be a voice for the future and a voice for the planet. ~ Paul Watson,
407:Do not live in the future, only the present is real ~ B K S Iyengar,
408:Don't compete for the moment, compete for the future. ~ Brian Solis,
409:do was do better in the future. She went downstairs and ~ Lis Wiehl,
410:For every minute, the future is becoming the past. ~ Thor Heyerdahl,
411:having enough for now, while not harming the future. ~ Adam Werbach,
412:If you want to know the future, look at the past. ~ Albert Einstein,
413:In the future, everybody will be anonymous for 15 minutes. ~ Banksy,
414:I think the future is whatever I'm willing to make it. ~ David Cook,
415:It is said that the present is pregnant with the future. ~ Voltaire,
416:It's the future, love, it's always changing. ~ Carrie Hope Fletcher,
417:It's too late to leave the future to the futurists. ~ Sherry Turkle,
418:Kiss away the past as you head towards the future. ~ Imania Margria,
419:Let us turn to the future and not deal with the past. ~ Ivica Dacic,
420:Music is the weapon. Music is the weapon of the future. ~ Fela Kuti,
421:Nothing is as bleak as the future, except the past. ~ Arthur Golden,
422:Taste refers to the past, imagination to the future. ~ Mason Cooley,
423:The best way to predict the future is to create it. ~ Peter Drucker,
424:The future ain’t what it used to be,” Berra ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
425:The future is a fabulous place to bury your success. ~ Chris Murray,
426:The future is best decided by ballots, not bullets. ~ Ronald Reagan,
427:The future is bulletproof, the aftermath is secondary. ~ Gerard Way,
428:The future is the worst thing about the present. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
429:The future's here, we are it, we are on our own ~ John Perry Barlow,
430:The future started yesterday, and we're already late. ~ John Legend,
431:The future will be a battle over mobilization. The ~ Jeremy Heimans,
432:The golden age has not passed; it lies in the future. ~ Paul Signac,
433:The nation that has the schools has the future. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
434:The past cannot be found in the future where it is not ~ Gene Wolfe,
435:Well, the future of the Internet is... Reality. ~ Daniel Keys Moran,
436:Fear of the future is worse than one's present fortune. ~ Quintilian,
437:Fertility of the soil is the future of civilization. ~ Albert Howard,
438:History teaches everything, even the future. ~ Alphonse de Lamartine,
439:If you told humans what the future held, it wouldn ~ Terry Pratchett,
440:I look more to the future. That's where my head is at. ~ Flavor Flav,
441:I'm excited to doing more scoring work in the future. ~ Mike Shinoda,
442:Kirk Cousins is the future of the Washington Redskins. ~ Bill Cowher,
443:My hope for the future is that we learn wisdom again. ~ Jane Goodall,
444:Nothing so dates an era as its conception of the future. ~ Brian Eno,
445:Ron Paul's revolution isn't a fluke. It's the future. ~ Gary Johnson,
446:Studying the past sometimes helps us make the future. ~ Jeff Wheeler,
447:The best way to predict the future is to invent it ~ Walter Isaacson,
448:The future gains peace, In the resolution of the past. ~ Caris Roane,
449:The future of work consists of learning a living. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
450:The future stands in need of you in order to be born. ~ Martin Buber,
451:The past and the future are entirely different things, ~ J D Hawkins,
452:The past overshadows the present foreshadows the future. ~ Tami Hoag,
453:Tuesday? My whole concept of the future had crumpled. ~ Iris Murdoch,
454:We grow in time to trust the future for our answers. ~ Ruth Benedict,
455:We hope for the future, then we reach for the past. ~ Geri Halliwell,
456:Wisdom corresponds to the future; it is philosophy. ~ Herbie Hancock,
457:Be not dismayed; in the future lies the Promised Land. ~ Helen Keller,
458:Fear not for the future, weep not for the past ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
459:Have a drink,” he said. “Helps the future go down easier. ~ Anonymous,
460:How can I see the future if it didn't already exist? ~ Clyde Bruckman,
461:I have seen the future, and it is still in the future. ~ James Gleick,
462:I have seen the future, Martin, and it’s a better past! ~ Scott Meyer,
463:I never think of the future - it comes soon enough. ~ Albert Einstein,
464:Innovation: Imagine the future and fill in the gaps. ~ Brian Halligan,
465:I've never been able to predict the future of anything. ~ Bob Edwards,
466:Nobody knows what the future is, except for wizards. ~ Gillian Jacobs,
467:Republicans look to find the future and they find radio. ~ Bill Maher,
468:Seize the day, trusting as little as possible in the future. ~ Horace,
469:Some names to look forward to - perhaps in the future ~ David Coleman,
470:The best way to predict the future is to create it. ~ Frederic Laloux,
471:The best way to predict the future is to invent it. ~ Walter Isaacson,
472:The only way to predict the future is to create it. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
473:The past doesn’t always have to write the future. ~ Loreth Anne White,
474:The past places no absolute limit on the future. ~ Lin Manuel Miranda,
475:There is no getting into the future except by waiting. ~ James Gleick,
476:Though things change, the future's still inside of me. ~ Tupac Shakur,
477:Tis only in the future you can prove your true worth. ~ Emmuska Orczy,
478:We are the dead. Our only true life is in the future. ~ George Orwell,
479:We have looked into the future and the future is ours. ~ Cesar Chavez,
480:What’s done is done. But in the future, do better. She ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
481:Why do we remember the past but not the future? The ~ Stephen Hawking,
482:Wishes are recollections coming from the future. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
483:You cannot predict the future, but you can create it. ~ Peter Drucker,
484:Aim high! The future you see, is the person you will be ~ Jim Cathcart,
485:But for now, the future, like the past, means nothing. ~ Lauren Oliver,
486:But I’m a nostalgic with a fascination for the future. ~ Michael Palin,
487:But the past is long, and the future is short. ~ Karen Thompson Walker,
488:Education is the Jewel casting brilliance into the future ~ Mari Evans,
489:Every nation has a moral obligation to safeguard the future. ~ Al Gore,
490:Fear not for the future, weep not for the past. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
491:Good historians...have the future in their bones ~ Edward Hallett Carr,
492:History is really a study of the future, not the past. ~ Arundhati Roy,
493:I can't speak for the future. I have no crystal ball. ~ Michael Jordan,
494:Indemnity for the past and security for the future. ~ Bertrand Russell,
495:I see the future of Brazil as the future of the planet. ~ Gilberto Gil,
496:I think in the future I will end up doing a gospel album. ~ Jonny Lang,
497:I think the future and the past are equally hypothetical. ~ Dan Mangan,
498:It is said that the present is pregnant with the future.
   ~ Voltaire,
499:Life is a series of collisions with the future. ~ Jose Ortega y Gasset,
500:My fear of the future, she says, has not yet failed. ~ Jenny Erpenbeck,
501:So I was a poodle of the future; I made prophecies. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
502:That's the beauty of the future. We get to change it. ~ Seanan McGuire,
503:The best way to predict the future is to create it. ~ James Scott Bell,
504:The cradle of the future is the grave of the past. ~ Franz Grillparzer,
505:The future awaits those with the courage to create it. ~ Erwin McManus,
506:The future isn’t ahead of us. It has already happened. ~ Philip Kotler,
507:The future must enter you long before it happens. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
508:The future of nutrition is found in the oceans ~ Jacques Yves Cousteau,
509:The future of the world depends on how well we meet it. ~ Peter Singer,
510:The future? The future was the clay in their hands. ~ Colson Whitehead,
511:The future was cloudy, but tonight the moon was bright. ~ Stephen King,
512:The mind that is anxious about the future is miserable. ~ Jeff Wheeler,
513:The past has to be viewed as a springboard to the future. ~ Jon Gordon,
514:Vision is a picture of the future that produces passion. ~ Bill Hybels,
515:We can’t change history, but we can create the future. ~ Erwin McManus,
516:We walk into the future in God-glorifying confidence, ~ Kevin DeYoung,
517:When the past controls the present, the future is a rerun. ~ Anonymous,
518:All hopes are lies, all expectations of the future are lies. ~ Rajneesh,
519:Always remember that the future comes one day at a time. ~ Dean Acheson,
520:Enjoy the present day, trust the least possible to the future. ~ Horace,
521:Government rules the present. Literature rules the future. ~ Lord Acton,
522:Have a drink,” he said. “Helps the future go down easier. ~ Peter Watts,
523:He cried for the future, and he cried because of the past. ~ R J Ellory,
524:I'd love to have a family -- sometime in the future. ~ Robert Pattinson,
525:I don't try to describe the future. I try to prevent it. ~ Ray Bradbury,
526:If you can connect people, you can create the future. ~ Scott Heiferman,
527:I know of no way of judging the future but by the past. ~ Patrick Henry,
528:In the future, there will be fewer but better Russians. ~ Joseph Stalin,
529:In the future, you will always encounter the past! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
530:I study history because I am interested in the future. ~ Peter Rachleff,
531:It is today that we create the world of the future. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
532:Love forgets wrongs so that there is hope for the future. ~ John Bevere,
533:Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future. ~ Niels Bohr,
534:The best preparation for the future is a well-spent today. ~ John Dewey,
535:The future, higher evolution will belong to those ~ Torkom Saraydarian,
536:The future is uncertain, but that can be a good thing. ~ Jennifer Niven,
537:The future is very much in our hands--in our actions. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche,
538:The future of a nation lies in the hands of mothers. ~ Honore de Balzac,
539:The future struggles that it may not become the past. ~ Publilius Syrus,
540:The future was with Fate. The present was our own. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
541:The past and the future are always present within us. ~ Thornton Wilder,
542:The past is unchangeable, but the future is unwritten. ~ Jenna Petersen,
543:There's great release, really, in not seeing into the future. ~ Gangaji,
544:though the future only could show how strange it was to be. ~ Anonymous,
545:Value the future on a timescale longer than your own. ~ Richard Dawkins,
546:When a man loses his vision of the future he dies. ~ Richard Paul Evans,
547:When you are in the future, the past looks different. ~ Richard Mottram,
548:You'll always know more in the future than you know now. ~ Taylor Swift,
549:Always choose the future over the past. What do we do now? ~ Brian Tracy,
550:And then we were gone, cascading back to the future. ~ Lisa Tawn Bergren,
551:But then, war is about taking the future away from people. ~ Yoon Ha Lee,
552:Designers may be the true intellectuals of the future. ~ Paola Antonelli,
553:Desire and hope will push us on toward the future. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
554:Either you defend the status quo, or you invent the future. ~ Seth Godin,
555:I don't know. I can't tell the future I just work there. ~ Steven Moffat,
556:I'll come out with policy on that and make on the future. ~ Donald Trump,
557:I'm always working on concepts and ideas for the future. ~ Perry Farrell,
558:I'm just trying to think about the future and not be sad.
   ~ Elon Musk,
559:It held an eye to the future and a tongue to the past. ~ Matthew Skelton,
560:Music is the sole art which evokes nostalgia for the future. ~ Ned Rorem,
561:Study the past if you would define the future. --CONFUCIUS ~ Steve Berry,
562:the choices we made today were templates for the future. ~ Richelle Mead,
563:The future always comes too fast and in the wrong order. ~ Alvin Toffler,
564:The future is a blank canvas. - Rise Up and Salute the Sun ~ Suzy Kassem,
565:The future is an imagined Now, a projection of the mind. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
566:The future is not out there in front of us, but inside us. ~ Joanna Macy,
567:The future of work revolution begins one person at a time. ~ Bill Jensen,
568:The mind that is anxious about the future is miserable. — ~ Jeff Wheeler,
569:The past does not equal the future unless you live there. ~ Tony Robbins,
570:The past had a perfection that the future could never hold ~ Nick Cutter,
571:The past is the present, isn't it? It's the future too. ~ Eugene O Neill,
572:The past must be let go before the future can be grasped. ~ Lisa Wingate,
573:The programmers of tomorrow are the wizards of the future. ~ Gabe Newell,
574:This story is true and happened once in the future long ago. ~ Ali Smith,
575:Wizard's Seventh Rule Life is the future, not the past. ~ Terry Goodkind,
576:Yeah, well, the future is never fair. Just inevitable. ~ Brian K Vaughan,
577:A library is a path to the future--find yours there. ~ Mary Higgins Clark,
578:Do not let the ghosts of the past rob the future of its joys. ~ Anonymous,
579:Doors of the future are open to those who know how to push them ~ Coluche,
580:Funny, isn't it, how quickly the future becomes the past. ~ Lauren Oliver,
581:How the past perishes is how the future becomes. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
582:If you control the children, you control the future. ~ Michel Houellebecq,
583:I have not the most definite designs on the future. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
584:Instead of reflecting on the past, predict the future. ~ Chris Guillebeau,
585:It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future. ~ Yogi Berra,
586:Leave the past behind you so the future can find you ~ Brittainy C Cherry,
587:Memory is set up to use the past to imagine the future. ~ Daniel Schacter,
588:Only people unhappy in the present seek to know the future. ~ Kate Morton,
589:Probing the womb of the future is bad for the child. ~ Walter M Miller Jr,
590:Science fiction is a kind of archaeology of the future. ~ Clifton Fadiman,
591:The future bears a resemblance to the past, only more so. ~ Faith Popcorn,
592:The future for Commander Tool Belt was not looking so hot. ~ Rick Riordan,
593:The future is always scary to those who cling to the past. ~ Tim O Reilly,
594:The Future is hidden even from those who are forging it. ~ Anatole France,
595:The future is not set. There is no fate but what we make. ~ James Cameron,
596:The future of business is marketing with people, not at them. ~ Anonymous,
597:The future was getting here faster than I'd expected. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
598:The past had a perfection that the future could never hold. ~ Nick Cutter,
599:This is Christian hope, that the future is in God's hands. ~ Pope Francis,
600:When you cut into the present the future leaks out. ~ William S Burroughs,
601:When you cut into the present, the future leaks out ~ William S Burroughs,
602:You have to look backward to see the future." (p. 128) ~ Susannah Cahalan,
603:Youth is the future smiling at a stranger, which is itself. ~ Victor Hugo,
604:All schools will end up using game metrics in the future. ~ Nolan Bushnell,
605:Be of good cheer. The future is as bright as your faith. ~ Thomas S Monson,
606:Conformity to the present is invisibility to the future. ~ Stefan Molyneux,
607:Declare the past, diagnose the present, foretell the future. ~ Hippocrates,
608:Even in the Future the Story Begins with Once Upon a Time. ~ Marissa Meyer,
609:For I dipt into the future, far as human eye could see, ~ Alfred the Great,
610:Go for it now. The future is promised to no one. -Wayne Dyer ~ Donya Lynne,
611:I feel really good about the future and working with people. ~ Angel Olsen,
612:If the future and the past really exist, where are they? ~ Saint Augustine,
613:I know not what the future holds, but I know who holds the future. ~ Homer,
614:I stay in the present, so I don't know about the future. ~ Malachy McCourt,
615:It is the business of the future to be dangerous. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
616:It may sound trite, but young people really are the future. ~ Jane Goodall,
617:Its more fun to think of the future than dwell on the past. ~ Sara Shepard,
618:Leave the past behind you so the future can find you. ~ Brittainy C Cherry,
619:Memories are the key not to the past, but to the future. ~ Corrie ten Boom,
620:Out of the chaos, the future emerges in harmony and beauty. ~ Emma Goldman,
621:See things in the present, even if they are in the future. ~ Larry Ellison,
622:The empires of the future are the empires of the mind. ~ Winston Churchill,
623:The future belongs to those who are passionate and work hard. ~ Al Franken,
624:The future is a choice between Utopia and oblivion. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
625:The future of marketing isn't big data, it's big understanding. ~ Jay Baer,
626:The periphery is where the future reveals itself. J.G. Ballard ~ Anonymous,
627:What would the future of man be if it were devoid of memory? ~ Elie Wiesel,
628:You will see, in the future I will live by my watercolors. ~ Winslow Homer,
629:Acceptance and validation are the fuels of the future. ~ Kevin James Breaux,
630:Don't tie yourself in knots trying to predict the future. ~ Jennifer Fallon,
631:Every authentic work of art is a gift offered to the future. ~ Albert Camus,
632:Gift of time in me enclosed the future suddenly exposed ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
633:History is an angel being blown backwards into the future ~ Laurie Anderson,
634:History shows you don't know what the future brings. ~ G Richard Wagoner Jr,
635:I believe you can remember the future as much as the past ~ Meredith Brooks,
636:I don't want to go to the future. I'm scared of the future! ~ Chris Carmack,
637:I need to live in the moment. The future I cannot control. ~ Pepper Winters,
638:In the future, those who are not coaches will not be promoted. ~ Jack Welch,
639:I require distance from the past in order to grasp the future. ~ Sylvia Day,
640:I've seen the future! It's a bald-headed man from New York! ~ Albert Brooks,
641:I was not predicting the future, I was trying to prevent it. ~ Ray Bradbury,
642:Just don’t forsake the present for the unknowns of the future. ~ Kim Holden,
643:Only God knows what the future has in store for us all. ~ Scerina Elizabeth,
644:Only the minute and the future are interesting in fashion. ~ Karl Lagerfeld,
645:Promises are the uniquely human way of ordering the future. ~ Hannah Arendt,
646:Small thoughts fear the future. Big thoughts are the future. ~ Michael Port,
647:Sooner or later, the future always circles back to the past. ~ Lisa Wingate,
648:Thank God we can't see the future, we'd never get out of bed. ~ Tracy Letts,
649:The future doesn't just happen - it's shaped by decisions. ~ Paul Tagliabue,
650:The future is a messy, motley business, little girl. ~ Catherynne M Valente,
651:The future is a race between education and catastrophe. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
652:The future is finally something that we can now put into focus. ~ Lou Gramm,
653:The future never happens; there will always be a future. ~ Stephen Richards,
654:The future's here already. It's just unevenly distributed. ~ William Gibson,
655:The longer I live in time, the less I believe in the future. ~ Sarah Gerard,
656:The Present is where the Past shakes hands with the Future. ~ Deborah Cooke,
657:The promises of the future cannot undo the harm of the past. ~ Sharon Shinn,
658:Traveling to the past or the future will not help you now. ~ James Altucher,
659:We don't have time to catch up with the future that is here. ~ Pauline Kael,
660:We drive into the future using only our rearview mirror. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
661:We know not of the future and cannot plan for it much. ~ Joshua Chamberlain,
662:What good is the present if you cannot change the future? ~ Robert Liparulo,
663:When you cut into the present, the future leaks out. ~ William S Burroughs,
664:With high hope for the future, no prediction is ventured. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
665:You don't destroy what you want to acquire in the future. ~ Suzanne Collins,
666:you see the magic in a fairy tale, you can face the future ~ Danielle Steel,
667:Anxiety is simply living out the future before it gets here. ~ Kevin DeYoung,
668:Before I can face the future, I must first deal with the past. ~ D J MacHale,
669:Change is the process by which the future invades our lives. ~ Alvin Toffler,
670:Don't shortchange the future, because of fear in the present. ~ Barack Obama,
671:I believe in the future a new Dante will write a new Divine Comedy. ~ Ba Jin,
672:If you can feel the future, then you are about to experience it. ~ Toba Beta,
673:If you do not think about the future, you cannot have one. ~ John Galsworthy,
674:It’s easier to invent the future than to predict it.” —Alan Kay ~ Brad Stone,
675:It's not about the past or the future, it's about right now. ~ Gunnar Nelson,
676:kids, thinking of the future that she would never see. And ~ Nicholas Sparks,
677:Learn from the past, enjoy the now, and prepare for the future. ~ Kailin Gow,
678:Many men hoard for the future husbands of their wives. ~ Solomon Ibn Gabirol,
679:Money is a guarantee that we can have what we want in the future ~ Aristotle,
680:Never be afraid of the future, for it brings wonderful things. ~ Erin Hunter,
681:No matter what happens, I feel very good about the future. ~ Chen Guangcheng,
682:Nothing is bleaker than the future, except perhaps the past. ~ Arthur Golden,
683:Now is the only time. How we relate to it creates the future. ~ Pema Chodron,
684:One of my few shortcomings is that I can't predict the future. ~ Lars Ulrich,
685:Only by not forgetting the past can we be the master of the future. ~ Ba Jin,
686:People don't realize that the future is just now, but later. ~ Russell Brand,
687:Reason shapes the future, but superstition infects the present. ~ Iain Banks,
688:Seeing the future was not a gift afforded to the Archangels. ~ Ashlan Thomas,
689:Since the future's so iffy, I'll turn my attention to the past. ~ Manil Suri,
690:Thank God we can't tell the future. We'd never get out of bed. ~ Tracy Letts,
691:Thank God we can’t tell the future. We’d never get out of bed. ~ Tracy Letts,
692:The empires of the future are the empires of the mind. ~ Winston S Churchill,
693:The future is as irrevocable as an inflexible yesterday. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
694:The future is going to take care of itself, like it always has. ~ Andy Grove,
695:The future of history belongs to the poor and exploited. ~ Gustavo Gutierrez,
696:The future would end up finding out the truth about the past. ~ Paulo Coelho,
697:The past is closed and limited; the future is open and free. ~ Deepak Chopra,
698:The past no longer exists, and the future is not here yet. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
699:There is certainly more in the future now than back in 1964. ~ Roger Daltrey,
700:We did not come to fear the future. We came here to shape it. ~ Barack Obama,
701:We form the future by being caretakers of our past. ~ Terry Tempest Williams,
702:We must prove our predictions about the future with action. ~ George Jackson,
703:You can analyse the past, but you have to design the future ~ Edward de Bono,
704:You can see the future best through peripheral vision. ~ Nicholas Negroponte,
705:You can't live in history. You've got to build for the future. ~ Ruud Gullit,
706:A poor start in life did not dictate the acts of the future. ~ Angela Marsons,
707:But the future must be met, however stern and iron it be. ~ Elizabeth Gaskell,
708:Climate action is central for the future of our planet. ~ Jose Manuel Barroso,
709:Dreams about the future are always filled with gadgets. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
710:Each generation is responsible to make the future of the next. ~ Nancy Pelosi,
711:Education is the investment our generation makes in the future. ~ Mitt Romney,
712:Even the smallest person can change the course of the future. ~ J R R Tolkien,
713:Forget not your past, for in the future it may help you grow ~ James M Barrie,
714:He was alone. The past was dead, the future was unimaginable. ~ George Orwell,
715:History is the ship carrying living memories to the future. ~ Stephen Spender,
716:I can see that spark coming back when he talks about the future. ~ H W Brands,
717:If great lecture is theatre, the future of learning is games. ~ Anant Agarwal,
718:If we are to better the future we must disturb the present. ~ Catherine Booth,
719:I never think of the future. I never imagine what comes next. ~ Jessica Lange,
720:In the future, 3hree voices will be followed by 4our and 5ive voices. ~ Junsu,
721:It had neither memories of the past nor hope for the future. ~ Anthony Powell,
722:saying, with a metaphoric hand wave to the future, ‘Hey, ~ Dawn DeVries Sokol,
723:Serving targeted masses of niches—as Google does—is the future. ~ Jeff Jarvis,
724:she’d done her best to block it out. Back then, the future had ~ Shannon Hale,
725:The future and eternity are two entirely different things. ~ Douglas Coupland,
726:The future belongs to the common man with uncommon determination. ~ Baba Amte,
727:The future has to be lived before it can be written about. ~ Jawaharlal Nehru,
728:The future is more beautiful than all the pasts. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
729:The future stands firm... but we move in infinite space. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
730:The future will be different if we make the present different. ~ Peter Maurin,
731:The goal of the future is full unemployment, so we can play ~ Arthur C Clarke,
732:Time keeps on... slippin'... slippin'... slippin' into the future. ~ J R Ward,
733:We can't change out pasts. All we can change is the future. ~ Sylvain Reynard,
734:What is always in front of you But cannot be seen?   The Future. ~ C L Bevill,
735:When I look into the future, it's so bright it burns my eyes. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
736:Your past will not determine the future that God has for you. ~ Joseph Prince,
737:Be mindful of the future. But not at the expense of the moment. ~ George Lucas,
738:Every ignorant is an obstacle for the future of humanity! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
739:Fantasizing about the future is one of my favorite pastimes. ~ Richard Branson,
740:Gift of time in me enclosed
the future suddenly exposed ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
741:If you want to know the future, look at what is in your mind ~ Matthieu Ricard,
742:I hope people will think very carefully about the future. ~ Queen Elizabeth II,
743:I'm not white. Why should I care about the future of white societies ~ Roosh V,
744:Let go of the past. Live today and look forward to the future, ~ Carolyn Brown,
745:Losing the future is the best thing that ever happened to me. ~ Marilyn French,
746:Love doesn't erase the past, but it makes the future different. ~ Gary Chapman,
747:Nothing ages so quickly as yesterday's vision of the future. ~ Richard Corliss,
748:Reason shapes the future, but superstition infects the present. ~ Iain M Banks,
749:She is connected to the future of your Clan. Guard her well. ~ Danielle Monsch,
750:The entire plan for the future has its key in the resurrection. ~ Billy Graham,
751:The future awaits those with the courage to create it. ~ Erwin Raphael McManus,
752:The future belongs to those who are creative collaborators ~ William J Clinton,
753:The future has never worried itself about a human being. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
754:The future is deterministic in principle, but not in practice. ~ David Gilmour,
755:The future is more beautiful than all the pasts. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
756:The future is uncertain, but that can be a good thing" -Finch ~ Jennifer Niven,
757:The future remains unwritten, but I'm writing as fast as I can! ~ Bill DeSmedt,
758:The meanings of today may not be the meanings of the future. ~ Donald A Norman,
759:The most reliable way to predict the future is to create it. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
760:The people have already atoned
For the past and the future ~ gota Krist f,
761:Too many are focused on rewriting the past, invent the future! ~ Philippe Kahn,
762:When did the future switch from being a promise to a threat? ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
763:Whoever thought the future would feel so much like the present? ~ Ed Robertson,
764:Why should the killers of the world be "the future" and not us? ~ Alice Walker,
765:You cannot do this in the future. You do it now or not at all. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
766:You don't destroy what you want to
acquire in the future. ~ Suzanne Collins,
767:Any man who is a bear on the future of this country will go broke. ~ J P Morgan,
768:Don't try to innovate for the future. Innovate for the present! ~ Peter Drucker,
769:Everyone learned to treat the future as fundamentally indefinite, ~ Peter Thiel,
770:Finally, I thought, I had reached the future that was no future. ~ Alice Sebold,
771:He was like a sponge, erasing the past, soaking up the future. ~ Sidney Sheldon,
772:Hope is hearing the music of the future. Faith is to dance to it. ~ Rubem Alves,
773:how are people to live when the future can no longer be imagined? ~ John N Gray,
774:I can not travel into my past,
without consent of the future me. ~ Toba Beta,
775:I didn't dare think of the future; the past was still happening. ~ John Grisham,
776:If you can't invent the future, the next best thing is to fund it. ~ John Doerr,
777:I have memories - but only a fool stores his past in the future ~ David Gerrold,
778:I like what the future holds. I don't like thinking about the past. ~ John Cale,
779:I neither complain of the past, nor do I fear the future. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
780:In George Bush you get experience, and with me you get the future. ~ Dan Quayle,
781:Integrator.” One sees the future, and the other makes it happen. ~ Gino Wickman,
782:I've always been more interested in the future than in the past. ~ Grace Hopper,
783:I've got two young kids. I don't know what the future holds. ~ Robbie Coltraine,
784:Prediction is difficult- particularly when it involves the future. ~ Mark Twain,
785:Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future. ~ Niels Bohr,
786:The future is the only transcendental value for men without God. ~ Albert Camus,
787:The future is unknowable, but the past should give us hope. ~ Winston Churchill,
788:The future you shall know when it has come; before then, forget it. ~ Aeschylus,
789:Vote bank politics has put the future of our youth in darkness. ~ Narendra Modi,
790:What sense is there in continuing when one has seen the future? ~ Alan Lightman,
791:What's the future of mankind? How do I know, I got left behind. ~ Ozzy Osbourne,
792:Whether you have sight or not, I see the future in your eyes." -Beth ~ J R Ward,
793:You can not change the past but you can change the future. ~ Immortal Technique,
794:Bird memories are therefore a tree's dream of the future. ~ David George Haskell,
795:Children are extremely important. They are the future of the world. ~ Elton John,
796:Don't hang on to the past so tightly that you taint the future. ~ Katherine Reay,
797:Don't worry about the past and don't try to solve the future. ~ Garrison Keillor,
798:Everything born has to die, in order to make room for the future. ~ Joan D Vinge,
799:Happiness is present time, it has nothing to do with the future. ~ Robert Holden,
800:Hemp will be the future of all mankind, or there won't be a future. ~ Jack Herer,
801:I can’t take back the past, but I can fight for the future. ~ Shannon A Thompson,
802:I have memories - but only a fool stores his past in the future. ~ David Gerrold,
803:I have no idea what's going to happen with America in the future. ~ Jackie Mason,
804:I have seen the future of pop music and it is a band called Queen. ~ Jac Holzman,
805:In the future, everybody will be world famous for fifteen minutes. ~ Andy Warhol,
806:It's not the future I'm talking about, I'm talking about tomorrow. ~ John Gummer,
807:I wish to God that Apple and Google were partners in the future. ~ Steve Wozniak,
808:Knowing the future is the flower of the Way, and the beginning of folly. ~ Laozi,
809:Maybe we can't predict the future, but we can predict some things. ~ Nicola Yoon,
810:My greatest regret was how much I believed in the future. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer,
811:Never be afraid of the future, for it brings wonderful things.” As ~ Erin Hunter,
812:So ahead of my time even when i rhyme about the future I be reminiscing ~ J Cole,
813:The best thing about the future is that it comes one day at a time, ~ Terri Reid,
814:the best way to predict the future is to create it yourself, ~ Peter H Diamandis,
815:The future had started to seem like a challenge he could conquer. ~ Jill Mansell,
816:The future is already upon us, it is just unevenly distributed. ~ William Gibson,
817:The future is sending back good wishes and waiting with open arms. ~ Kobi Yamada,
818:The future universal cannot be anything else but the hyperpersonal. ~ Ilia Delio,
819:"The only material that the future is made of is the present." ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
820:The past is made out of facts... I guess the future is just hope. ~ Isaac Marion,
821:The past is over; the present is fleeting; we live in the future. ~ Ray Kurzweil,
822:The price we pay for anticipation of the future is anxiety about it ~ Carl Sagan,
823:the voice you believe will determine the future you experience. ~ Steven Furtick,
824:We don't let the past determine the future unless we allow it too. ~ Drew Pinsky,
825:Without wisdom, the future has no meaning, no valuable purpose. ~ Herbie Hancock,
826:You can't change the past so change something you can. the future! ~ Erin Merryn,
827:A kiss does not make the future. Love alone does not make a life ~ Alethea Kontis,
828:Big Data processes codify the past. They do not invent the future. ~ Cathy O Neil,
829:Everything that looks to the future elevates human nature. ~ Walter Savage Landor,
830:Everything we do seeds the future. No action is an empty one. ~ Joan D Chittister,
831:Evolution is a myth. God creates the future the way he wants it. ~ James Redfield,
832:From there, the future is a place that looks darker every day. ~ Geraldine Brooks,
833:Her hoarse laughter could make anyone worry about the future. ~ Jussi Adler Olsen,
834:How can we prepare for the future if we won’t acknowledge the past? ~ N K Jemisin,
835:I don't want to know what the future will be. I want to live it. ~ Elisa Sednaoui,
836:I'm just enjoying life more and thinking about the future. ~ Sebastian Janikowski,
837:Knowing the future is different from being told what I like. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
838:Men who long for the past are already dead. Look to the future, Owen. ~ Eli Brown,
839:Nobody can see into the future. Nobody knows what going to go on. ~ Don Mattingly,
840:[P]resent misfortune presupposes good luck in the future. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
841:The future influences the present just as much as the past. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
842:The future is here - it just has not been uniformly distributed. ~ William Gibson,
843:The future is trapped in a cage opened only by the key of genius. ~ Chloe Thurlow,
844:The goal of female education must invariably be the future mother. ~ Adolf Hitler,
845:The older generations have eaten the future of the younger ones. ~ Giuliano Amato,
846:The past is a ghost, the future a dream and all we ever have is now. ~ Bill Cosby,
847:The past is history. The future is a mystery. The present is a gift. ~ Lisa Unger,
848:The sending of a letter constitutes a magic grasp upon the future. ~ Iris Murdoch,
849:Those who are unwilling to invest in the future haven't earned one ~ Harold Lewis,
850:Time stops for no one, no matter how unsure we are of the future. ~ Rebekah Crane,
851:We are either architects OF the future or artifacts IN the future. ~ Kristen Lamb,
852:We need to have faith in the future to make sense of the present. ~ Charles Handy,
853:"We've discovered the future, as a place you can bargain with." ~ Jordan Peterson,
854:You can't really predict the future. All you can do is invent it. ~ Frederik Pohl,
855:Young is the one that plunges in the future and never looks back. ~ Milan Kundera,
856:Do not worry so much of the future that you let today pass you by. ~ R A Salvatore,
857:Economic tough times are great times to be investing in the future. ~ Reid Hoffman,
858:Fears of the future [are] almost always rooted in the past. (175) ~ Jonathan Nasaw,
859:Go for today, don't worry about the future, it'll come eventually ~ Greyson Chance,
860:He promises a lamp unto our feet, not a crystal ball into the future. ~ Max Lucado,
861:Home. Mason was home. He was family. He was the future.He was my soulmate. ~ Tijan,
862:I believe children are the future...which is why they must be stopped now! ~ Homer,
863:I could not look toward the future if I lived in the past. ~ Jennifer L Armentrout,
864:If computers are the wave of the future, displays are the surfboards. ~ Ted Nelson,
865:I feel blessed I can address students who are the future of India. ~ Narendra Modi,
866:I have a great belief in the future of my people and my country. ~ Marian Anderson,
867:I invested. I wanted to cushion the future. Im a financial success! ~ Joanna Kerns,
868:I know too well how
good-bye can steal more than just the future. ~ Talia Vance,
869:Imagining the future may be more important than analysing the past. ~ C K Prahalad,
870:I'm much more optimistic about the future than I probably was. ~ Norman Pearlstine,
871:It’s a choice, my darling, to not allow the past to ruin the future. ~ Marie Force,
872:I went through a period of insecurity and fear for the future. It ~ Jake Remington,
873:Make no mistake: peaceful madmen are ahead of the future. ~ Gabriel Garc a M rquez,
874:Make no mistake: peaceful madmen are ahead of the future. ~ Gabriel Garcia Marquez,
875:NOEL: You can get excited about the future. The past won't mind. ~ Hillary DePiano,
876:Something ordinary in the past becomes valuable in the future ~ Barbara Ann Kipfer,
877:Sometimes it was harder to change the past than it was the future. ~ Kate Atkinson,
878:Steve Jobs: “The best way to predict the future is to invent it. ~ Walter Isaacson,
879:That's l'amour: we willingly walk into the future blindfolded. ~ Danielle Trussoni,
880:The best way to predict the future is to invent it." – Alan Kay ~ James Scott Bell,
881:The future is always present, as a promise, a lure and a temptation. ~ Karl Popper,
882:The future offers everything. Reach out and take whatever you want. ~ Rosie Thomas,
883:The future should grow from the past, not obliterate it. ~ William Least Heat Moon,
884:The online world has subsumed the physical one. We live in the future. ~ Dan Wells,
885:The past is a ghost, the future a dream, and all we ever have is now. ~ Bill Cosby,
886:The past is for the present, the present for the future. ~ William Least Heat Moon,
887:There is no improving the future without disturbing the present. ~ Catherine Booth,
888:Those who fear the future are likely to fumble the present. ~ Suzanne Woods Fisher,
889:Tomorrow, we would figure out the future. Tonight, Tommy breathed. ~ Rebecca Royce,
890:Yeah, that's what I'm working for. The couture house of the future ~ John Galliano,
891:You can make the future, but it starts with leaving the past. ~ Immortal Technique,
892:you need to understand the past in order to be a part of the future ~ Morgan Wylie,
893:You never have to be scared to look to the future for opportunity. ~ Justin Vernon,
894:A dream is an inspiring picture of the future that energizes your ~ John C Maxwell,
895:Always dip your toe in the past before stepping into the future ~ Benny Bellamacina,
896:China is twelve hours ahead, she tells me. It is always in the future. ~ Weike Wang,
897:For the life and the future,it's more important to learn than to hate ~ Jan Guillou,
898:For the majority of us, the past is a regret, the future an experiment ~ Mark Twain,
899:Guilt can eat away at you and destroy the future as well as the past. ~ Mary Balogh,
900:I believe in the salvation of humanity, in the future of cyanide... ~ Emil M Cioran,
901:I can see the future. Oh look! I see us! There we are. We look great. ~ Kate Scelsa,
902:If non-violence is the Law of our being, the future is with Women. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
903:If you want to know what the future is, be part of its development. ~ Peter Drucker,
904:Give my effort to the present, let God handle the future. ~ Jane Kirkpatrick,
905:I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past.... ~ Anonymous,
906:I'm not trying to PREDICT the future. I'm just trying to PREVENT it. ~ Ray Bradbury,
907:In the future, he will try to say her name enough, but he never can. ~ Ann Patchett,
908:In the future, I want a movie career, kids and a happy marriage. ~ Vendela Kirsebom,
909:Learn from the past, prepare for the future, live in the present. ~ Thomas S Monson,
910:Let gratitude for the past inspire us with trust for the future. ~ Francois Fenelon,
911:Photography is an art of teleporting the past into the future. ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
912:Plots set in the future are about what people fear in the present. ~ Lionel Shriver,
913:Real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present. ~ Albert Camus,
914:Simply admit that the future is far less knowable than you think. ~ Steven D Levitt,
915:Sometimes hope for the future is found in the ashes of yesterday. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
916:Take that veil from off of your eyes, look into the future of realize. ~ Bob Marley,
917:The future destiny of a child is always the work of the mother ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
918:The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed ~ William Gibson,
919:The future must not belong to those who slander the Prophet of Islam ~ Barack Obama,
920:The Future of Money: Creating New Wealth, Work, and a Wiser World ~ Bernard Lietaer,
921:The future was only disasters of the past, waiting to happen anew. ~ Erika Johansen,
922:The past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality. ~ Alan Watts,
923:The past, the present, and the future walked into a bar. It was tense. ~ Lex Martin,
924:The science of the future will be based on sympathetic vibrations. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
925:The sending of a letter constitutes a magical grasp upon the future. ~ Iris Murdoch,
926:The wise man guards against the future as if it were the present. ~ Publilius Syrus,
927:We take care of the future best by taking care of the present now. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
928:"We've discovered the future, as a place you can bargain with." ~ Jordan B Peterson,
929:What if I left my memory in the future and I have to catch up to it? ~ Warren Ellis,
930:With my eyes turned to the past, I walk backwards into the future. ~ Yohji Yamamoto,
931:Alan Kay quips, “The best way to predict the future is to invent it. ~ Satya Nadella,
932:And I don’t have to see the future to tell you what to do now, do I ? ~ Rick Riordan,
933:Any company that cannot imagine the future won't be around to enjoy it. ~ Gary Hamel,
934:A work of art has value only if tremors of the future run through it. ~ Andre Breton,
935:Don't worry about the past and don't try to figure out the future ~ Garrison Keillor,
936:Fear of the future no longer exists when the past has been healed. ~ David R Hawkins,
937:FLOWERS ARE IN THE GROUND, WHERE WE CANNOT SEE THE FUTURE WONDERMENT ~ Matthew Quick,
938:GUILT COULD NOT change the past. Worry could not change the future. ~ Gena Showalter,
939:I don’t know what the future holds, but I do know who holds my future. ~ Lee Strobel,
940:If apple is the language of the future, then art must be the core. ~ Elliot W Eisner,
941:If it's not happening now, it doesn't mean it won't happen in the future. ~ Noringai,
942:I'm always looking to the future and what will next be on the horizon. ~ Jose Andres,
943:It is not for us to forecast the future, but to shape it. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
944:life of anticipating the future with joy instead of rehashing the past ~ Ken Dickson,
945:Many times the reading of a book has made the future of a man. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
946:My life seemed so wretched, the future so hopeless, the past so black! ~ Leo Tolstoy,
947:My vision for the future? ... a world completely free from poverty. ~ Muhammad Yunus,
948:Possibility of everything is the greatest beauty of the future! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
949:Prediction is a very difficult business, particularly about the future ~ Fred Singer,
950:Real generosity towards the future lies in giving all to the present. ~ Albert Camus,
951:she spoke as if the future were a hypothetical problem to be solved. ~ John Williams,
952:Since the future is unknown, no path can take you to the known! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
953:The frontiers of the future will be the ruins of the unsustainable. ~ Bruce Sterling,
954:The future destiny of a child is always the work of the mother. ~ Napol on Bonaparte,
955:The future doesn’t belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. ~ Ben Lerner,
956:The future doesn't matter if I don't enjoy what's going on right now. ~ Cam Gigandet,
957:The future interests me - I'm going to spend the rest of my life there. ~ Mark Twain,
958:The future is already here – it’s just not very evenly distributed. ~ William Gibson,
959:The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed. ~ William Gibson,
960:The future is better dealt with using assumptions than forecasts. ~ Russell L Ackoff,
961:The future is completely open and we are writing it moment to moment. ~ Pema Chodron,
962:The future's another country, man... And I still ain't got a passport. ~ Zadie Smith,
963:The Internet: transforming society and shaping the future through chat. ~ Dave Barry,
964:The painter of the future will be a colorist unlike anything yet. ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
965:The past has but one path, the present has many and the future none. ~ Stephen Leigh,
966:The sun is the past, the earth is the present, the moon is the future. ~ Paul Auster,
967:To look into the mirror is to see the future, in blood and rubies. ~ Gregory Maguire,
968:Trump's not the future; his ideas and his coalition are a dead end. ~ Jonathan Chait,
969:We are threatened by the now so we jump to the past or the future. ~ Chogyam Trungpa,
970:We can have faith in the future only if we have faith in ourselves. ~ John F Kennedy,
971:What were once only hopes for the future have now come to pass. ~ Queen Elizabeth II,
972:When did the future switch from being a promise to being a threat? ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
973:You just seem to have folded up the future."

"It is folded up. ~ Iris Murdoch,
974:You never know what the future holds or where my life will take me. ~ Kim Kardashian,
975:An artist has to look at the future, to see what we can do better. ~ Marina Abramovic,
976:Be in The Present; Learn from The Past; and Help Create The Future. ~ Spencer Johnson,
977:Facing the backside of the future is the only way to move forward ~ Benny Bellamacina,
978:Forecasts are difficult to make-particularly those about the future. ~ Samuel Goldwyn,
979:God has gone before us so we can walk in the future He has for us. ~ Priscilla Shirer,
980:He was nearsighted. The future lay before him, inevitable but invisible. ~ John Green,
981:I don’t know what the future holds, but I know who holds the future. ~ Janice Cantore,
982:If the future depends on stories, then our future looks bright indeed. ~ Pawan Mishra,
983:If time travel is possible, where are the tourists from the future? ~ Stephen Hawking,
984:If you can intuit well, you're essentially meeting the future faster. ~ Peter Buffett,
985:In a time of drastic change, it is the learners who inherit the future. ~ Eric Hoffer,
986:Keep pace with the present. Take a trip to the moon. envision the future. ~ Uta Hagen,
987:Modern man lives increasingly in the future and neglects the present. ~ Loren Eiseley,
988:My focus, my life, my world is now. You just can't plan the future. ~ Juliette Lewis,
989:Naps are a way of traveling painlessly through time into the future. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
990:Tell me what your vision of the future and I will tell you what you are. ~ Fred Polak,
991:The best thing about the future is that it comes one day at a time. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
992:The day you stop dreaming, you stop creating the future as well! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
993:The Future belongs to the competent get good, get better, be the best ! ~ Brian Tracy,
994:the future is a product, and you only get to vote with your money now, ~ Warren Ellis,
995:The future is green energy, sustainability, renewable energy. ~ Arnold Schwarzenegger,
996:The future is ours to win. But to get there we can't just stand still. ~ Barack Obama,
997:The future of Windows is to let the computer see, listen and even learn. ~ Bill Gates,
998:The lesson here is that it is very dangerous to bet against the future. ~ Michio Kaku,
999:...the movies are most people's exposure to ideas about the future. ~ Gregory Benford,
1000:The only thing we know about the future is that it will be different. ~ Peter Drucker,
1001:The only way to write about right now is to write about the future. ~ Gary Shteyngart,
1002:The past has revealed to me the structure of the future. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
1003:The past, the present and the future were having an argument. It was tense. ~ Various,
1004:The past was done, and the future wasn’t created yet. All we had is now. ~ Emma Scott,
1005:The present is theirs; the future, for which I really worked, is mine. ~ Nikola Tesla,
1006:The wave of the future is coming and there is no fighting it. ~ Anne Morrow Lindbergh,
1007:To prophesy is extremely difficult—especially with respect to the future. ~ Anonymous,
1008:To see the future you have to travel on the rough edge of experience. ~ Harriet Rubin,
1009:"Unless one is able to live fully in the present, the future is a hoax." ~ Alan Watts,
1010:We are called to be architects of the future, not its victims. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
1011:We can only die in the future, I thought; right now we are always alive. ~ Amy Hempel,
1012:We have the future to make up for the hurts we’ve caused each other. ~ Laurelin Paige,
1013:We should also start taking care of the future, not just the heritage. ~ Gilberto Gil,
1014:we should assume that present-day obstacles can be overcome in the future; ~ Amy Webb,
1015:We were all runing from something. Vaginoplasty. Aging. The future. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1016:When the past is hard to explain, it’s best to concentrate on the future. ~ Nell Zink,
1017:Whoever controls the education of our children controls the future. ~ Wilma Mankiller,
1018:You can be diagnosed and treated early. And there is hope for the future. ~ Teri Garr,
1019:You just use the future to escape the present.” I guess that made sense. ~ John Green,
1020:You will give birth to more in the future than you’ve lost in the past. ~ Joel Osteen,
1021:Americans have a penchant for the future and tend to disregard the past. ~ Alan Dundes,
1022:Education is the passport to the future. Visit Educationhelm to learn more ~ Anonymous,
1023:God alone knows the future, but only an historian can alter the past. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
1024:If you don't understand the past, the future won't make much sense either. ~ DJ Spooky,
1025:imagination in looking to the future. Memory is the ground of dreaming. ~ Gerald G May,
1026:It made her—a bizarre trick—long for a past that was still in the future. ~ Alan Furst,
1027:It seems like for the last 10 years, I've just been investing in the future. ~ Tao Lin,
1028:Let go of the past. Live today and look forward to the future,” Bonnie ~ Carolyn Brown,
1029:Life is hopefully long, so I don't know what the future will bring. ~ Bethenny Frankel,
1030:No one is more important to the future of our state than our teachers. ~ Mike Huckabee,
1031:Our faith in the present dies out long before our faith in the future. ~ Ruth Benedict,
1032:People look to the future for salvation, but the future never arrives. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
1033:Republicans are men of narrow vision, who are afraid of the future.
~ Jimmy Carter,
1034:Roosevelt: “Please for the sake of the future, nail every Communist ~ William L Shirer,
1035:settling for the present, you sacrifice the potential of the future. ~ Juliette Harper,
1036:She couldn't alter the past but this was her chance to change the future. ~ Max Lucado,
1037:The future came and went in the mildly discouraging way that futures do. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1038:The future has already arrived. It's just not evenly distributed yet. ~ William Gibson,
1039:"The future is completely open and we are writing it moment to moment." ~ Pema Chödrön,
1040:The future is dark, with a darkness as much of the womb as the grave. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
1041:The future of Indo-Pak cricket will depend on how the peace process goes. ~ Imran Khan,
1042:The future of television is what our competitors have been doing for years. ~ Tim Cook,
1043:The Gods are unkind and deny us knowledge of what the future holds ~ Peter L Bernstein,
1044:The human being is the only animal that thinks about the future. ~ Daniel Todd Gilbert,
1045:The only way to predict the future is to have power to shape the future. ~ Eric Hoffer,
1046:THE PAST DOES NOT EQUAL THE FUTURE. BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. CREATE MIRACLES. ~ Evan Osnos,
1047:The past has revealed to me the structure of the future. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
1048:The Past, the Future, O dear, is from you; you should regard both these as one. ~ Rumi,
1049:The past, the present and the future walk into a bar. Then things get tense. ~ Various,
1050:The plan, a memory of the future, tries on reality to see if it fits. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
1051:The present is the closest that you will ever get to the future. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
1052:The trouble with our times is that the future is not what it used to be. ~ Paul Val ry,
1053:They make a secret pact with themelves never to think about the future. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1054:To communicate the truths of history is an act of hope for the future. ~ Daisaku Ikeda,
1055:"We are threatened by the now so we jump to the past or the future." ~ Chögyam Trungpa,
1056:We can speculate. Last time I checked, the future doesn't take my advice. ~ Junot Diaz,
1057:We had to drive to the past so that we could face the future. ~ Shaun David Hutchinson,
1058:We live in uncertain times when it comes to the future of life on Earth. ~ Jeff Corwin,
1059:We think the future is robots and hovercars and maybe it’s really here. ~ Chuck Wendig,
1060:We will not go quietly away. If in the future that requires violence ~ Richard Dawkins,
1061:woman who can rise above what is and see the future of what can be. ~ Bette Lee Crosby,
1062:anyone can create the future but only a wise man can create the past ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1063:A revolution is a struggle to the death between the future and the past. ~ Fidel Castro,
1064:Children bring chaos and clutter and an infinite potential for the future ~ Dan Simmons,
1065:Confront your past, live in the present, and look forward to the future. ~ Mary A P rez,
1066:Do not wait for the future to be happy. You are happy now, or you are not. ~ Alan Cohen,
1067:Forecasts are difficult to make—particularly those about the future. ~ Burton G Malkiel,
1068:Fully secure systems don't exist today and they won't exist in the future. ~ Adi Shamir,
1069:He who does not contemplate the future is destined to be overwhelmed by it. ~ H G Wells,
1070:I am a firm believer in marriage. In the future I will be married. ~ Elisabetta Canalis,
1071:I craved for the past, resented the present, and dreaded the future. ~ Wilfred Thesiger,
1072:I didn’t know what the future held in store for me, but I felt hopeful. ~ Padma Lakshmi,
1073:If you give the future all your attention, the present will pass you by. ~ Phil Jackson,
1074:If you stuck in the past, you won’t be able to step in the future! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1075:I have the general philosophy of creating the future you want to see. ~ Peter Diamandis,
1076:I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1077:I'm working on bringing the instant film camera back as part of the future. ~ Lady Gaga,
1078:In religion the Future is behind us. In art the Present is the eternal. ~ Kakuz Okakura,
1079:Keeping things 'just in case' indicates a lack of trust in the future. ~ Karen Kingston,
1080:Let the past rest. Let the future unfold. Let the present be a gift. I ~ Lauren Blakely,
1081:Living for the future is more important than trying to avenge the past. ~ Kentaro Miura,
1082:Maybe who we were in the past informed who we chose to be in the future. ~ Jodi Picoult,
1083:Must we not protect children with all we are? And so the future. ~ David Clement Davies,
1084:Never, in peace or war, commit your virtue or your happiness to the future. ~ C S Lewis,
1085:Now is all you've got. The past is memory. The future is wish. Now is real. ~ Anonymous,
1086:One of these days the future will be here, and you won't be ready for it. ~ Paul Bowles,
1087:Perhaps the future belongs to magic, and it's we women who control magic. ~ J G Ballard,
1088:Poverty and wealth inequality are a form of instability into the future. ~ Tavis Smiley,
1089:Proper preparation for the future consists of forming good personal habits. ~ Epictetus,
1090:The American future is here, and there's great news: the future votes. ~ Rosario Dawson,
1091:The Christian of the future will be a mystic or he will not exist at all. ~ Karl Rahner,
1092:The future had a way of breaking your heart if you expected too much. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1093:The future is not set in stone, and even if it was, stone can be broken. ~ Melanie Rawn,
1094:The future’s too bright to dwell on the past. Life moves fast, run faster. ~ Frank Iero,
1095:The past doesn't have anything to do with the future, only if you let it. ~ Dom Kennedy,
1096:The problem with the future is that it keeps turning into the present. ~ Bill Watterson,
1097:There's a lot of despair in the USA. Young people are afraid for the future. ~ Ted Cruz,
1098:The VCs did not care to make these sort of colossal bets on the future. ~ Michael Lewis,
1099:...the wicked lie, that the past is always tense and the future, perfect. ~ Zadie Smith,
1100:To talk about the future is useful only if it leads to action now. ~ Ernst F Schumacher,
1101:We can't change the past. But maybe we can figure out the future. ~ Katherine Applegate,
1102:With Judger mindset, the future can only be a recycled version of the past. ~ Anonymous,
1103:Working for peace in the future is to work for peace in the present moment. ~ Nhat Hanh,
1104:Worrying about the future is a thing of the past. I don't think about it. ~ Pat Paulsen,
1105:A president cannot make decision on what someone might know in the future. ~ Marco Rubio,
1106:Because the voice you believe will determine the future you experience. ~ Steven Furtick,
1107:Biodiversity starts in the distant past and it points toward the future. ~ Frans Lanting,
1108:Bryan Robson, well, he does what he does and his future is in the future ~ Ron Greenwood,
1109:Don't waste your prayers on the past, when the future is where you're going. ~ Ginn Hale,
1110:For me poems are acts re-done, and that can vibrate well into the future. ~ Anne Waldman,
1111:Full of life and light; blissfully unaware of all the future had in store. ~ Kate Morton,
1112:I am afraid of the future; it seems to be a big box waiting for me. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
1113:I am in the present. I don't think of the past. I don't think of the future. ~ Nhat Hanh,
1114:‎I cannot alter the past, but the future is very much in my hands. ~ Mary Lydon Simonsen,
1115:I don’t know what the future is. I don’t know-what I’m supposed to want. ~ Arthur Miller,
1116:If you wanted to see into the future, you just had to look to the past. ~ Matthew Mather,
1117:I look forward to the future - and going into the studio to make new music. ~ Diana Ross,
1118:In this [fashion] business you're living in the future a lot of the time. ~ Karen Walker,
1119:Investing is laying out money now to get more money back in the future. ~ Warren Buffett,
1120:I would like to direct in the future, but I am in no hurry with that. ~ Jonathan Brandis,
1121:Modern economics and the welfare state borrowed heavily on the future. ~ Gregory Benford,
1122:My hope of the future lies in the youths of character, intelligent, ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1123:Objects in the mirror of the future appear larger than they really are. ~ Steve Chandler,
1124:Only our company and a handful of others are poised to write the future. ~ Steve Ballmer,
1125:People ask me to predict the future, when all I want to do is prevent it. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1126:Proper preparation for the future consists of forming good personal habits. ~ Epictetus,
1127:Real generosity toward the future consists in giving all to what is present. ~ Anonymous,
1128:The future doesn't belong to the light-hearted. It belongs to the brave. ~ Ronald Reagan,
1129:The future is beyond knowing, but the present is beyond belief. ~ William Irwin Thompson,
1130:The future is dark, which is the best thing the future can be, I think. ~ Virginia Woolf,
1131:The future is not something we enter. The future is something we create. ~ Leonard Sweet,
1132:The future lies with those companies who see the poor as their customers. ~ C K Prahalad,
1133:The future of this republic is in the hands of the American voter. ~ Dwight D Eisenhower,
1134:The inmost is the infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Power of the Spirit,
1135:The problem about the future is that it keeps turning into the present. ~ Bill Watterson,
1136:We do not know enough about how the present will lead into the future. ~ Gregory Bateson,
1137:We lived a dot-to-dot life, never thinking too much about the future. ~ Jennifer Clement,
1138:[W]e must never allow the future to collapse under the burden of memory. ~ Milan Kundera,
1139:What we do accumulates; the future is the result of what we do right now. ~ Pema Ch dr n,
1140:Where there is no hope in the future, there is no power in the present. ~ John C Maxwell,
1141:Without a saving faith in the future, no one would ever invest at all. ~ Benjamin Graham,
1142:All of the great empires of the future will be empires of the mind. ~ Winston S Churchill,
1143:Because we cannot predict the future, we diversify. —Paul Samuelson ~ William J Bernstein,
1144:Bliss cannot be found by remembering the past or anticipating the future. ~ Deepak Chopra,
1145:day we fret about the future is the day we leave our childhood behind. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
1146:Do your duty and a little more and the future will take care of itself. ~ Andrew Carnegie,
1147:Fortune tellers live in the future. So do people who want to put things off. ~ Ed Seykota,
1148:He thought about the future and it was a vibrating darkness. He felt fear. ~ Iris Murdoch,
1149:I believe in having a vision for the future but living each day at a time. ~ Miranda Kerr,
1150:I can't predict the future and I don't have respect for people who try to. ~ Jackie Mason,
1151:I don't know what the future may hold, but I know who holds the future. ~ Ralph Abernathy,
1152:If the past sits in judgment on the present, the future will be lost. ~ Winston Churchill,
1153:I know that the future is scary at times. But there's just no escaping it. ~ Ernest Cline,
1154:In the future, marketing will be like sex: Only the losers pay for it. ~ Chris Guillebeau,
1155:It's funny how you can run from the future and the past simultaneously. ~ Kirsten Hubbard,
1156:It's not enough what I did in the past - there is also the future. ~ Rita Levi Montalcini,
1157:Love interrupts the past and opens the future to new probabilities. ~ Marianne Williamson,
1158:Mobile is the future, and there's no such thing as communication overload. ~ Eric Schmidt,
1159:My goal as a parent is to prepare you for the future, not to make you like me. ~ Amy Chua,
1160:Nobody — not even “a musician of the future” — can live upon future products. ~ Karl Marx,
1161:Perseverance may be just as important as speed in the battle for the future. ~ Gary Hamel,
1162:The future belongs to science and those who make friends with science. ~ Jawaharlal Nehru,
1163:The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
1164:The future can ever promise but one thing and one thing only: surprises. ~ Steven Erikson,
1165:The future is not really the future. It's just a present that looks good. ~ Steven Heller,
1166:The future is not set; there is no fate but what we make for ourselves. ~ Barbara Freethy,
1167:The future is the lie with which we justify the brutality of the present. ~ Anthony Marra,
1168:The future science of government should be called 'la cybernétique'. ~ Andre Marie Ampere,
1169:The laws of science do not distinguish between the past and the future. ~ Stephen Hawking,
1170:The past and the future are complicated. It's the present that's simple. ~ David Levithan,
1171:The past had shown him many times that the future would be its own solution. ~ Ian McEwan,
1172:The past has come apart
events are vagueing
the future is inexploitable ~ Mina Loy,
1173:The plan, a memory of the future, tries on reality to see if it fits. ~ Laurence Gonzales,
1174:The value of a business is the cash it's going to produce in the future. ~ Warren Buffett,
1175:Use your imagination only on the future, never on the present or the past. ~ Adam Johnson,
1176:We are called to be the architects of the future, not its victims. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
1177:We are the ancestors of the future and what we do now will have an impact. ~ Luisah Teish,
1178:We assume, falsely, that how we feel now is how we will feel in the future ~ Paulo Coelho,
1179:We have glimpsed in it the future of high society: wealth without class. ~ Anna Godbersen,
1180:We're also confident that gamers are going to love our vision of the future. ~ Larry Hryb,
1181:We remember the past, live in the present, and write the future. ~ Shaun David Hutchinson,
1182:What a comfort the past is," Mimen said, "when the future offers none. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
1183:What the future holds for you depends on your state of consciousness now. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
1184:When people are worried about the future, they don't take trips to Hawaii. ~ Linda Lingle,
1185:When there is no hope in the future, the present appears atrociously bitter. ~ mile Zola,
1186:You can't worry about the future so much that you miss out on the present. ~ Molly Harper,
1187:Faith can give us courage to face the uncertainties of the future. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
1188:He can't live with knowing the future and not being able to save anyone. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1189:I am captivated more by dreams of the future then history of the past. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
1190:If I could somehow know the future,
then now should not be like this time. ~ Toba Beta,
1191:If you don't heal the wounds of your childhood, you bleed into the future. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
1192:I haven't been faithful to my own advice in the past. I will in the future. ~ Billy Graham,
1193:I'm a big laser believer - I really think they are the wave of the future. ~ Courteney Cox,
1194:Indeed, the direction of the future is only there in order to elude us. ~ Georges Bataille,
1195:Is it well or ill for us I wonder, that the future is hidden from our knowledge? ~ Various,
1196:It’s never too early to think about the future, so I’d recommend Divination. ~ J K Rowling,
1197:Leave aside your regrets of the past and anxieties of the future ~ Chinmayananda Saraswati,
1198:Protecting the future is more important than righting the wrongs of the past. ~ Sarah Fine,
1199:Sometimes you have to put the present through hell to get the future you want. ~ Dan Wells,
1200:The art of prophecy is very difficult, especially with respect to the future. ~ Mark Twain,
1201:The best way to take care of the future is to take care of the present moment. ~ Nhat Hanh,
1202:The Future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
1203:The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
1204:The future is not about what you do, it's about what you stand for. ~ Nicolas Winding Refn,
1205:The future is not something to be predicted, it's something to be achieved. ~ Don Tapscott,
1206:The future is terrifying because it's full of stuff, not because it's empty. ~ Alexis Hall,
1207:The future is uncertain and you will never know less than you know right now. ~ Sandi Metz,
1208:The future not being born, my friend, we will abstain from baptizing it. ~ George Meredith,
1209:The future sneaks up on us. It leaks in through the small, ordinary things. ~ Warren Ellis,
1210:The future you have tomorrow won't be the same future you had yesterday. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1211:The great revolution of the future will be Nature's revolt against man. ~ Holbrook Jackson,
1212:The main goal of the future is to stop violence. The world is addicted to it. ~ Bill Cosby,
1213:The only way to deal with the future is to make sure the present is okay. ~ David Levithan,
1214:The past never changes—and from what I can see, neither does the future. ~ Neal Shusterman,
1215:The past resembles the future more than one drop of water resembles another. ~ Ibn Khaldun,
1216:The present is the instant in which the future crumbles into the past. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
1217:Toffler’s Law, I guess: the future arrives too soon and in the wrong order. ~ John Brunner,
1218:We assume (falsely) that how we feel now is how we will feel in the future. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1219:We can pay our debts to the past by putting the future in debt to ourselves. ~ John Buchan,
1220:We can’t change the past, and the details of the future have yet to be seen, ~ Jamie Magee,
1221:we don’t know which of our acts in the present will shape the future. But ~ Gloria Steinem,
1222:you cannot let the pain of the past destroy the happiness of the future. ~ Tracie Peterson,
1223:You have to be constantly reinventing yourself and investing in the future. ~ Reid Hoffman,
1224:You’ll be paid in the future based on how well you work with robots.”7 ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
1225:your sisters are the keepers of your memories and hopes for the future. ~ Philippa Gregory,
1226:All I’m saying is that the past is nothing but a springboard for the future. ~ Jodi Picoult,
1227:Expect the most wonderful things to happen, not in the future but right now. ~ Eileen Caddy,
1228:Germany represented the future because it carried no colonial ballast, ~ Mario Vargas Llosa,
1229:He who would be a great soul in the future, must be a great soul now. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1230:Hold fast to the best of the past and move fast to the best of the future. ~ John F Kennedy,
1231:Hope enough to remove all anxious fears concerning the future. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1232:How dare we be pessimistic? Maybe the future is better than it used to be. ~ Peter Schwartz,
1233:I don't believe in predestined fate. The future is what we choose to create. ~ Jim Davidson,
1234:I don't think in the past. I don't think in the future. You grasp the moment. ~ Eli Manning,
1235:I dread the events of the future, not in themselves but in their results. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
1236:Insecure people often falsify the past, in order to make the future pure. ~ Shannon L Alder,
1237:It is a peculiarity of man that he can only live by looking to the future ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1238:It is our responsibility to leave the people of the future a free hand. ~ Richard P Feynman,
1239:Life has become the future. Every moment of your life is lived for the future. ~ John Green,
1240:Like her, he cared more for the future than the past, more for hope than anger. ~ John Hart,
1241:Nobody can live in the past or the future without being something of a nut. ~ Evelyn Nesbit,
1242:One should not worry about the future, particularly if it hasn't happened yet. ~ Mel Gibson,
1243:Our concern for the future can be tested by how well we support our libraries. ~ Carl Sagan,
1244:She could no longer borrow from the future to ease her present grief. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne,
1245:The choices we make now affect the opportunities available in the future ~ Chris Guillebeau,
1246:The future belongs to the companies and people that turn data into products ~ Mike Loukides,
1247:the future stands still dear Mr Kappus, but we move in infinite space. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
1248:The Past is the textbook of tyrants; the Future is the Bible of the Free. ~ Herman Melville,
1249:The past stands in the path of the future, knowing it will be crushed. ~ Alaya Dawn Johnson,
1250:There is no better boost in the present than an invitation to the future. ~ Caroline Kepnes,
1251:This cult of the future is not only a weakness but a cowardice of the age. ~ G K Chesterton,
1252:This is the future,” Lycan said. “Connecting people to each other directly. ~ Will McIntosh,
1253:Time glides with undiscover'd haste; The future but a length behind the past. ~ John Dryden,
1254:To bask in the present, care nothing about the future, and forget the past. ~ R A Salvatore,
1255:Uncomfortable thoughts must be got rid of by good intentions for the future, ~ George Eliot,
1256:Uncomfortable thoughts must be got rid of by good intentions for the future. ~ George Eliot,
1257:We alter the past for the sake of the future, memories bending like light. ~ Matt Gallagher,
1258:We are prisoners of the future because we will be ensnared by our past. ~ Peter L Bernstein,
1259:We are unjust towards these great men who attempt the future, when they fail. ~ Victor Hugo,
1260:What else does anxiety about the future bring you but sorrow upon sorrow? ~ Thomas a Kempis,
1261:What was given to us by the past is adapted to the possibilities of the future. ~ Carl Jung,
1262:While the mind lives in the past and the future, the body lives in the now. ~ Deepak Chopra,
1263:With the past, I have nothing to do; nor with the future. I live now. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1264:..Yet if today has no meaning, the past was a Blank and the future is a Chaos. ~ Henry Ford,
1265:Building the future, and keeping the past alive - are one and the same thing. ~ Hideo Kojima,
1266:Concentrate on the here and now. The future can take care of itself. ~ Christopher G Nuttall,
1267:estimates that stretch weeks, months, and years into the future are fantasies. ~ Jason Fried,
1268:For all we know, we might’ve already slipped into the future without noticing it. ~ Joe Hill,
1269:God will turn the might have been into a wonderful culture for the future. ~ Oswald Chambers,
1270:great business is defined by its ability to generate cash flows in the future. ~ Peter Thiel,
1271:He’s a creature of today—not haunted by the past or fearful of the future! ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1272:Hope is not a prediction of the future, it's a declaration of what's possible. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
1273:In charting our course to the future, we are mindful of our path from the past. ~ Brad Henry,
1274:In the future, violence would clearly become a valuable form of social cement. ~ J G Ballard,
1275:It is a peculiarity of man that he can only live by looking to the future. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1276:It is a peculiarity of man that he can only live by looking to the future— ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1277:It is because of faith that we exchange the present for the future. ~ Fidelis of Sigmaringen,
1278:It’s like the future is a building you put up on the foundations of the past. ~ John Marsden,
1279:Mye, do you ever think of the future?’

‘Do I get to have a future? ~ Frances Hardinge,
1280:No one knew what the future would bring, just that there was no stopping it. ~ Audrey Carlan,
1281:POZZO: I am blind. (Silence.) ESTRAGON: Perhaps he can see into the future. ~ Samuel Beckett,
1282:She was so busy forgetting, she couldn't take a single step into the future. ~ Alice Hoffman,
1283:Sifting through regrets failed to help the present or brighten the future. ~ Pepper D Basham,
1284:Sometimes, I think, our impulses come not from the past, but from the future. ~ Mary Stewart,
1285:Terror of the future can be put out to pasture with psychedelic shamanism. ~ Terence McKenna,
1286:The best way to predict the future is to create it. You do that by study. ~ James Scott Bell,
1287:The best way to predict the future is to study the past, or prognosticate. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
1288:The day we fret about the future is the day we leave our chilhood behind. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
1289:The future is already here—it’s just unevenly distributed.”—William Gibson ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1290:The future is here. It’s just not widely distributed yet. —WILLIAM GIBSON, ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1291:The future is not a good place to start lying and cheating all over again. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1292:The future was cloudy, but tonight the moon was bright. All was as it should be. ~ Anonymous,
1293:The future will be owned and operated by the entrepreneurial ly minded. ~ Mark Victor Hansen,
1294:The old has gone, the new has come, and the future couldn’t be more beautiful. ~ Chip Gaines,
1295:The only way to engineer the future tomorrow is to have lived in it yesterday. ~ Bill Buxton,
1296:The past is what we have to learn about how to direct America to the future. ~ Rudy Giuliani,
1297:The past, the present and the future are really one: they are today. ~ Harriet Beecher Stowe,
1298:The past, the present, and the future are really one: they are today ~ Harriet Beecher Stowe,
1299:There is no better boost in the presence than an invitation to the future. ~ Caroline Kepnes,
1300:The very relationship with the other is the relationship with the future. ~ Emmanuel Levinas,
1301:We have no control over the future. We can only make the most of the present. ~ Jody Hedlund,
1302:We marked men were not at all worried about the shape the future would take. ~ Hermann Hesse,
1303:What I'm trying to do is to maximise the probability of the future being better. ~ Elon Musk,
1304:Whoso neglects learning in his youth, loses his past and is dead for the future. ~ Euripides,
1305:Whoso neglects learning in his youth, loses the past and is dead for the future. ~ Euripides,
1306:All I would have to do was not exist below the waist, and the future was mine. ~ Paul Monette,
1307:And let to-day embrace the past with remembrance and the future with longing. ~ Khalil Gibran,
1308:As a mother you have got to have a view for now and a view for the future. ~ Vanessa Redgrave,
1309:Design creates culture. Culture shapes values. Values determine the future. ~ Robert L Peters,
1310:Disconnecting from change does not recapture the past. It loses the future. ~ Kathleen Norris,
1311:Energy Policy will be and should be driven by environmental policy in the future. ~ Tim Wirth,
1312:Fear is always about something in the future. Fear never exists in the present moment. ~ Osho,
1313:For me it was never about money, but solving problems for the future of humanity. ~ Elon Musk,
1314:Giving voice to the truth of her past meant opening the door to the future. ~ Nicholas Sparks,
1315:How can you expect to handle the future if you can’t even handle the present? ~ Daniel Suarez,
1316:I am a forward-looking person and live in the moment to build for the future. ~ Hugh Masekela,
1317:I could definitely see myself making a serious movie or a drama in the future. ~ Adam Carolla,
1318:If you don’t remember the past, you don’t deserve to be remembered by the future. ~ Bob Doyle,
1319:I hold that man is in the right who is most closely in league with the future. ~ Henrik Ibsen,
1320:In the future every human shall see a hidden divinity in every fellow human. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
1321:In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders. ~ Sheryl Sandberg,
1322:Is it alright to believe in the future where everyone can live in happiness? ~ Hiromu Arakawa,
1323:It is man's consolation that the future is to be a sunrise instead of a sunset. ~ Victor Hugo,
1324:It's natural for me to step into the beat-making side of things next in the future. ~ Kid Ink,
1325:It's no good going back over the past. It's the future one has to live for. ~ Agatha Christie,
1326:Live life expecting the worst, hoping for the best, and living for the future! ~ Jerry Garcia,
1327:Man cannot change or escape his time. The eye sees the present and the future ~ Salvador Dali,
1328:Most of a tech company’s value will come at least 10 to 15 years in the future. ~ Peter Thiel,
1329:Our modern states are preparing for war without even knowing the future enemy. ~ Alfred Adler,
1330:Real generosity toward the future consists in giving all to what is present. ~ Robin S Sharma,
1331:The day we fret about the future is the day we leave our childhood behind. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
1332:The future is all around here.' It's a place, anyplace where we don't exist. ~ Rae Armantrout,
1333:The future is bound to surprise us, but we don't have to be dumbfounded. ~ Kenneth E Boulding,
1334:The future is not an inheritance, it is an opportunity and an obligation. ~ William J Clinton,
1335:The future is usually just like the past- right up to the moment when it isn't. ~ George Will,
1336:The future of this nation depends on the Christian training of our youth. ~ George Washington,
1337:The future you have, tomorrow, won't be the same future you had, yesterday. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1338:The more you know about the past, the easier it is to divine the future. ~ Michael J Sullivan,
1339:The past was a ghost, insubstantial, unaffecting. Only the future had weight. ~ Tara Westover,
1340:The power of noble deeds is to be preserved and passed on to the future. ~ Joshua Chamberlain,
1341:The present is an eternal attempt to separate the past from the future. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
1342:The pure present is an ungraspable advance of the past devouring the future ~ Haruki Murakami,
1343:there is no future in any job. The future lies in the man who holds the job. ~ John C Maxwell,
1344:Traditionalists are pessimists about the future and optimists about the past. ~ Lewis Mumford,
1345:We need them. We need scientifically literate voters and taxpayers for the future. ~ Bill Nye,
1346:We remember the past, live in the present, and write the future. The ~ Shaun David Hutchinson,
1347:We sort the past in an attempt to sort the present and anticipate the future. ~ Michael Perry,
1348:You always romanticize the past as soon as the future begins to frighten you. ~ Rick Remender,
1349:You're about to enter the future gate.
Come in now, or later will be too late. ~ Toba Beta,
1350:You've got to give up who you are now for who you want to be in the future. ~ Jeremy Stephens,
1351:a great business is defined by its ability to generate cash flows in the future. ~ Peter Thiel,
1352:Because If you ever think of me in the future I want you to remember me smiling ~ Eiichiro Oda,
1353:But no matter how many trends can be traced, the future won't happen on its own. ~ Peter Thiel,
1354:Focus on the future for 50%, on the present for 40%, and on the past for 10% ~ Masaaki Hatsumi,
1355:Foresight is not about predicting the future, it's about minimizing surprise. ~ Karl Schroeder,
1356:For whatever the future holds, one thing is certain... It just won't be the same. ~ Alan Moore,
1357:If the present is shitty and the future is worse, the past is all you've got ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1358:If time travel were possible we'd be inundated with tourist from the future. ~ Stephen Hawking,
1359:I have made good judgments in the past. I have made good judgments in the future. ~ Dan Quayle,
1360:I’m always interested in the future. I plan to spend the rest of my life there. ~ Kathy Reichs,
1361:I never have plans for the future as you never know how things will turn out. ~ Nigella Lawson,
1362:I prefer to focus on the future. There are a lot of new stories to be heard. ~ Gugu Mbatha Raw,
1363:It is very difficult to make an accurate prediction, especially about the future. ~ Niels Bohr,
1364:Let go of the past and live the future . . . Live the life you imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1365:Life goes on, regardless of the future, each day was precious all by itself. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
1366:Perhaps we know each other in the future and you’re only remembering backward. ~ Marissa Meyer,
1367:She is clothed in strength and dignity, and she laughs without fear of the future. ~ Anonymous,
1368:The cause of today is the effect of the past and the cause for the future. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1369:THE FUTURE EXISTS FIRST IN IMAGINATION, THEN IN WILL, THEN IN REALITY
   ~ Barbara Max Hubbard,
1370:The moment I began searching for the egg, the future no longer seemed so bleak. ~ Ernest Cline,
1371:The only reason people want to be masters of the future is to change the past. ~ Milan Kundera,
1372:The past is gone-the future is not come. And we are here together, you and I. ~ Diana Gabaldon,
1373:They had their past to remember, the present to live in and the future to fear. ~ Jos Saramago,
1374:To envision the future; you must forget the past and make the present a memory ~ Jeremy Aldana,
1375:True generosity toward the future consists in giving everything to the present. ~ Albert Camus,
1376:True happiness is...to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future. ~ Seneca,
1377:What kind of town do we want in the future, and how are we going to plan on that? ~ Peter Berg,
1378:What you believe about the future shapes, informs, and determines how you live now. ~ Rob Bell,
1379:All that baggage has one thing in common: it all involves the past or the future. ~ Ken Dickson,
1380:As for the future, your task is not to foresee it, but to enable it. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
1381:Don't regret the past or fear the future. Both bring misery through self-doubt. ~ Deepak Chopra,
1382:For once you have fallen low. Let us see, in the future, how you can rise. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1383:How paramount the future is to the present when one is surrounded by children. ~ Charles Darwin,
1384:I don't want to be the one to break it to you, but the future ain't that funny. ~ Albert Brooks,
1385:I eat the same way Doc Brown fuels the DeLorean at the end of Back to the Future. ~ Kyle Kinane,
1386:If you focus too much on the future, you’ll forget to have fun in the present. ~ Deborah Bladon,
1387:I'm looking forward to the future, which is a good thing, because it's coming. ~ James W Loewen,
1388:I'm not sure what the future holds but I do know that I'm going to be positive. ~ Nicole Kidman,
1389:In the future, I see me as being my own artist and definitely not a ballad singer! ~ Thia Megia,
1390:In the future, women, rather than men, will be the ones to change the world. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1391:I rejoice when I meet gifted young people... I feel the future is in good hands. ~ Oliver Sacks,
1392:It is said that the future narrows once we cease to believe it is eternal... ~ Catherine Millet,
1393:It's far too late for anything but magick, as the future is clearly up for grabs. ~ Antero Alli,
1394:It takes far less courage to cling to the past than it does to face the future". ~ Sandra Brown,
1395:Let the future remain uncertain, for that is the canvas to receive our desires. ~ Brian Herbert,
1396:Maybe that’s what innocence is, having no way to predict the pain of the future. ~ Tayari Jones,
1397:Nobody can predict the future; the idea is to have a firm grasp of the present. ~ Peter Drucker,
1398:Of course we all would like to foretell the future and make contact with the gods. ~ Carl Sagan,
1399:One must plan for the future and anticipate the future without fearing the future. ~ Robin Hobb,
1400:Replace what you don't know about the future with what you do know about God! ~ Christine Caine,
1401:Right actions in the future are the best apologies for bad actions in the past. ~ Tryon Edwards,
1402:Since the future is unknown, in every step forward we walk to the unknown! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1403:Society just doesn't care about young people anymore, even if we are the future. ~ Erin Gruwell,
1404:States should invest in science so that the future can be calmly contemplated. ~ Timothy Snyder,
1405:The future can not blame the present, just as the present cannot blame the past. ~ Susan Cooper,
1406:The future is always bright; it isn't until you get there that you realize it isn't. ~ H M Ward,
1407:The future is a trickster rabbit, full of surprises. Only the past is predictable. ~ James Howe,
1408:The most tragic thing about the future is that it may not come into being! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1409:There have been many Buddhas before me and will be many Buddhas in the future. ~ Gautama Buddha,
1410:They might in the future more than ever before engage in hunting beavers. ~ Samuel de Champlain,
1411:To make the future demands courage. It demands work. But it also demands faith. ~ Peter Drucker,
1412:Whatever we had gone through could still be an asset to us in the future. And ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1413:When one is striding bravely into the future one cannot watch one's footing. ~ Elizabeth Peters,
1414:Without a saving faith in the future, no one would ever invest at all.” P 535 ~ Benjamin Graham,
1415:You always have to try to move forward with a positive connotation in the future. ~ Miesha Tate,
1416:You believe in the future now. It's easy for you, because you love the present. ~ Matthew Quick,
1417:You don't destroy what you want to acquire in the future. - Katniiss Everdeen ~ Suzanne Collins,
1418:you don't need to go that far in the future, you just have to go 2000 years ago, ~ Paulo Coelho,
1419:A happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell too much on the future. ~ Albert Einstein,
1420:All Christian language about the future is a set of signposts pointing into a mist. ~ N T Wright,
1421:All the beauty of the future is not knowing what comes out from the corner! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1422:beyond that, I couldn’t say. There’s no point thinking about the future. That ~ Banana Yoshimoto,
1423:But the only bad thing about hanging onto the past was the sacrifice of the future. ~ James Hunt,
1424:Change your life today. Don't gamble on the future, act now, without delay. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
1425:Declare the past, diagnose the present, foretell the future; practice these acts. ~ Hippocrates,
1426:Everybody's got a past. The past does not equal the future unless you live there. ~ Tony Robbins,
1427:EXTINCTION, n. The raw material out of which theology created the future state. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
1428:Hardly anyone knows how much is gained by ignoring the future. ~ Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle,
1429:If the past is a wall with some holes, the future is a hole with no walls. ~ Daniel Todd Gilbert,
1430:If you want to change the future, you must change what you're doing in the present. ~ Mark Twain,
1431:I get really excited imagining what we can do in the future with broadband. ~ Julius Genachowski,
1432:I know the future is scary at times, sweetheart. But there’s just no escaping it. ~ Ernest Cline,
1433:In the future we'll all have 15 minutes of fame and 15 minutes of healthcare. ~ Nicole Hollander,
1434:It’s hard to find motivation in the moment when there is no hope in the future. ~ John C Maxwell,
1435:It would be wonderful to think that the future is unknown and sort of surprising. ~ Alan Rickman,
1436:Let the past be what it was, the present what it is, the future the best it can be. ~ R J Ellory,
1437:Let the past hold on to itself and let the present move forward into the future. ~ Douglas Adams,
1438:Life has a way of talking to the future. It’s called memory. It’s called genes. ~ Richard Powers,
1439:Nothing we do can change the past, but everything we do changes the future. ~ Ashleigh Brilliant,
1440:Our imagination is the only limit to what we can hope to have in the future. ~ Charles Kettering,
1441:The best way to take care of the future is to take care of the present moment. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1442:The future belongs to us. I think that art is a force that can change the world. ~ Shahin Najafi,
1443:The future is a map drawn in the sand, and the tide can wash it away in a moment. ~ Terry Brooks,
1444:The future is an ever-shifting maze of possibilities until it becomes the present ~ Terry Brooks,
1445:The future is a thing to be shaped," Scytale said. "Hold that thought, Princess. ~ Frank Herbert,
1446:The future is like heaven-everyone exalts it but no one wants to go there now. ~ James A Baldwin,
1447:The future of narrative? Built in, part of the human template. Not going away. ~ Margaret Atwood,
1448:The organizations that compete internally will not be successful in the future. ~ Daniel Goleman,
1449:The past attracts me, the present frightens me, because the future is death. ~ Guy de Maupassant,
1450:The past was gone, after all, and the future was the only thing they had left. ~ Nicholas Sparks,
1451:The present is saturated with the past and pregnant with the future. ~ Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz,
1452:The reason God knows the future is because he plans the future and accomplishes it. ~ John Piper,
1453:There is no future in any job. The future lies in the person who holds the job. ~ John C Maxwell,
1454:There is only one thing you have to know about the future: everything gets worse. ~ Tobias Wolff,
1455:the state of the future will need to function more like the human immune system ~ Niall Ferguson,
1456:...this is the room where the future pours into the past via the pinch of now. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1457:Today is the day I stop listening to the future and start living it instead. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
1458:We yearned for the future. How did we learn it, that talent for insatiability? ~ Margaret Atwood,
1459:What we wish upon the future is very often the image of some lost, imagined past. ~ Graham Swift,
1460:When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. ~ H G Wells,
1461:While we're talking, envious time is fleeing: pluck the day, put no trust in the future ~ Horace,
1462:Who has gone hungry learns to think of the future and of the children. ~ Carolina Maria de Jesus,
1463:You must give birth to your images. They are the future waiting to be born. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
1464:You realize that our mistrust of the future makes it hard to give up the past. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1465:A man devoid of hope and conscious of being so has ceased to belong to the future. ~ Albert Camus,
1466:Ask not from whence I came for the gravity of the future pulls me ever forward. ~ Jessica Simpson,
1467:As to forming any plan for the future, I could as soon have formed an elephant. ~ Charles Dickens,
1468:At some point the future becomes reality. And then it quickly becomes the past. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1469:But the future is uncertain, and he can't get up enough enthusiasm even to masurbate. ~ M R Carey,
1470:Children are the future, because mankind is moving more and more towards infancy. ~ Milan Kundera,
1471:Children are the world's most valuable re source and its best hope for the future. ~ John Kennedy,
1472:composed of all the innocence of the present, and of all the passion of the future. ~ Victor Hugo,
1473:Engage yourself in the living present. The future will take care of itself. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
1474:Even people capable of living in the past don't really know what the future holds. ~ Stephen King,
1475:Even people capable of living in the past don’t really know what the future holds. ~ Stephen King,
1476:From the experience of the past we derive instructive lessons for the future. ~ John Quincy Adams,
1477:Have you never heard what the wise men say: all of the future exists in the past. ~ Truman Capote,
1478:I am for who i was in the beginning but now is present and i exist in the future. ~ Frank McCourt,
1479:I feel stupid for thinking the future was going to be easy and simple and ours. ~ Corey Ann Haydu,
1480:If he died tomorrow, it would be because God was not willing to change the future. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1481:If I bind the future I bind my will. If I bind my will I strangle creation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1482:If the present tries to sit in judgment of the past, it will lose the future. ~ Winston Churchill,
1483:If you wanted to see into the future, you just had to look to the past. Reaching ~ Matthew Mather,
1484:I had not, I said to myself, come into the future to carry on a miniature flirtation. ~ H G Wells,
1485:I just believe that if I work hard and do well, who knows what the future holds? ~ Joaquin Castro,
1486:I live in the present. I only remember the past, and anticipate the future. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1487:I never think too far into the future. I'm too busy thinking about tomorrow's news. ~ Matt Drudge,
1488:In the most minimal sense, the future is simply the set of all moments yet to come. ~ Peter Thiel,
1489:I think the future deserves our faith. But it is hard to argue with Emily Dickinson. ~ John Green,
1490:Mortality is but a stepping-stone to a more glorious existence in the future. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
1491:One could not change the past anyway. Why let it blight the present and the future? ~ Mary Balogh,
1492:Our task is not to fix blame for the past, but to fix the course for the future. ~ John F Kennedy,
1493:People tend to glorify the past, especially when they are struggling with the future. ~ T D Jakes,
1494:Progress imposes not only new possibilities for the future but new restrictions. ~ Norbert Wiener,
1495:The future always looks good in the golden land, because no one remembers the past. ~ Joan Didion,
1496:The future is much like the past; it is mostly set, but can always be altered— ~ Stephanie Garber,
1497:The future is needed as a space to project your desires. To project, future is needed. ~ Rajneesh,
1498:The future is only a thought form. Work with the present moment. Be with what is. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
1499:The future may require not so much having a new idea as stopping having an old idea. ~ Edwin Land,
1500:The iPad is the clearest expression of our vision of the future of personal computing. ~ Tim Cook,

IN CHAPTERS [300/875]



  334 Integral Yoga
  128 Poetry
   81 Christianity
   48 Philosophy
   45 Occultism
   30 Science
   29 Psychology
   27 Fiction
   25 Yoga
   12 Integral Theory
   10 Education
   8 Mythology
   6 Sufism
   5 Theosophy
   5 Mysticism
   5 Kabbalah
   5 Cybernetics
   5 Baha i Faith
   3 Philsophy
   3 Hinduism
   2 Buddhism
   1 Thelema
   1 Alchemy


  176 Sri Aurobindo
  168 The Mother
  128 Satprem
   62 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   46 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   23 Walt Whitman
   22 Carl Jung
   20 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   15 H P Lovecraft
   14 Plotinus
   14 James George Frazer
   13 Percy Bysshe Shelley
   13 Friedrich Nietzsche
   13 Aleister Crowley
   12 Sri Ramakrishna
   12 Robert Browning
   12 Jorge Luis Borges
   11 Saint John of Climacus
   11 A B Purani
   10 Friedrich Schiller
   8 Aldous Huxley
   7 William Wordsworth
   7 Swami Krishnananda
   7 Plato
   7 George Van Vrekhem
   6 Rudolf Steiner
   6 Rabbi Abraham Abulafia
   6 Nirodbaran
   6 Jordan Peterson
   6 Al-Ghazali
   5 Swami Vivekananda
   5 Rabbi Moses Luzzatto
   5 Norbert Wiener
   5 Joseph Campbell
   5 Baha u llah
   4 Thubten Chodron
   4 Rainer Maria Rilke
   4 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   3 William Butler Yeats
   3 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   3 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   3 Paul Richard
   3 Ovid
   3 Franz Bardon
   3 Edgar Allan Poe
   3 Alice Bailey
   2 Saint Therese of Lisieux
   2 Rabindranath Tagore
   2 Patanjali
   2 Mahendranath Gupta
   2 Ken Wilber
   2 Jean Gebser


   33 Record of Yoga
   23 Whitman - Poems
   22 The Future of Man
   19 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   19 The Life Divine
   17 City of God
   16 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01
   15 Lovecraft - Poems
   15 Agenda Vol 08
   14 The Golden Bough
   14 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   13 Shelley - Poems
   13 Savitri
   13 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   12 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   12 Browning - Poems
   12 Agenda Vol 10
   11 The Phenomenon of Man
   11 The Ladder of Divine Ascent
   11 Labyrinths
   11 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   11 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02
   11 Agenda Vol 03
   10 The Human Cycle
   10 Schiller - Poems
   10 On Education
   10 Letters On Yoga IV
   10 Collected Poems
   10 Agenda Vol 05
   9 Thus Spoke Zarathustra
   9 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   9 On the Way to Supermanhood
   9 Agenda Vol 04
   9 Agenda Vol 01
   8 The Perennial Philosophy
   8 Questions And Answers 1957-1958
   8 On Thoughts And Aphorisms
   8 Magick Without Tears
   8 Let Me Explain
   8 Agenda Vol 12
   8 Agenda Vol 02
   7 Wordsworth - Poems
   7 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   7 The Practice of Psycho therapy
   7 Preparing for the Miraculous
   7 Prayers And Meditations
   6 Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 The Alchemy of Happiness
   6 Mysterium Coniunctionis
   6 Maps of Meaning
   6 Letters On Yoga I
   6 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03
   6 Agenda Vol 13
   6 Agenda Vol 11
   6 Agenda Vol 09
   6 Agenda Vol 06
   5 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   5 The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious
   5 Talks
   5 Questions And Answers 1956
   5 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 03
   5 Hymn of the Universe
   5 General Principles of Kabbalah
   5 Essays On The Gita
   5 Essays Divine And Human
   5 Cybernetics
   5 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05
   5 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04
   5 5.1.01 - Ilion
   4 Twilight of the Idols
   4 The Blue Cliff Records
   4 Rilke - Poems
   4 Questions And Answers 1953
   4 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 02
   4 Letters On Yoga II
   4 Letters On Poetry And Art
   4 How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator
   4 Aion
   4 Agenda Vol 07
   3 Yeats - Poems
   3 Words Of The Mother III
   3 Words Of Long Ago
   3 The Red Book Liber Novus
   3 The Divine Comedy
   3 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   3 The Book of Certitude
   3 Some Answers From The Mother
   3 Questions And Answers 1954
   3 Poe - Poems
   3 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 01
   3 Metamorphoses
   3 Liber ABA
   3 Letters On Yoga III
   3 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   3 Initiation Into Hermetics
   3 Goethe - Poems
   3 Emerson - Poems
   3 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 08
   3 A Treatise on Cosmic Fire
   2 Words Of The Mother II
   2 Words Of The Mother I
   2 The Secret Of The Veda
   2 The Problems of Philosophy
   2 Theosophy
   2 The Lotus Sutra
   2 The Ever-Present Origin
   2 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   2 Tagore - Poems
   2 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   2 Raja-Yoga
   2 Questions And Answers 1955
   2 Questions And Answers 1950-1951
   2 Questions And Answers 1929-1931
   2 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04
   2 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   2 Kena and Other Upanishads
   2 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   2 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah