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branches ::: succeed

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object:succeed
word class:verb

see also :::

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Evolution_II
Faust
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Life_without_Death
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Process_and_Reality
Savitri
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Golden_Bough
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Tarot_of_Paul_Christian
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Toward_the_Future
Twilight_of_the_Idols

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
0_0.02_-_Topographical_Note
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life
0.05_-_Letters_to_a_Child
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Object_of_the_Integral_Yoga
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.12_-_Goethe
0.13_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0_1954-08-25_-_what_is_this_personality?_and_when_will_she_come?
0_1958-07-06
0_1958-10-04
0_1958-11-27_-_Intermediaries_and_Immediacy
0_1958-12-24
0_1959-01-27
0_1959-05-28
0_1959-06-03
0_1959-06-25
0_1960-04-07
0_1960-07-12_-_Mothers_Vision_-_the_Voice,_the_ashram_a_tiny_part_of_myself,_the_Mothers_Force,_sparkling_white_light_compressed_-_enormous_formation_of_negative_vibrations_-_light_in_evil
0_1960-09-20
0_1960-10-25
0_1960-10-30
0_1960-12-17
0_1961-02-11
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-03-04
0_1961-03-21
0_1961-04-18
0_1961-06-06
0_1961-07-12
0_1961-07-15
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-08-05
0_1961-11-05
0_1962-01-21
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-04-03
0_1962-05-18
0_1962-06-02
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-09-05
0_1962-09-08
0_1962-11-17
0_1962-12-12
0_1963-02-23
0_1963-06-29
0_1963-07-06
0_1963-10-16
0_1963-11-20
0_1963-12-11
0_1964-01-18
0_1964-05-14
0_1964-08-14
0_1964-09-30
0_1964-11-14
0_1965-02-27
0_1965-06-05
0_1965-06-23
0_1965-08-18
0_1965-09-25
0_1965-11-13
0_1965-12-15
0_1965-12-31
0_1966-02-16
0_1966-04-20
0_1966-06-25
0_1966-10-12
0_1966-11-26
0_1967-05-24
0_1967-07-05
0_1967-07-19
0_1968-01-12
0_1968-04-06
0_1968-05-18
0_1968-06-15
0_1968-09-28
0_1968-10-26
0_1968-11-09
0_1968-11-23
0_1969-04-19
0_1969-04-23
0_1969-08-09
0_1969-10-11
0_1969-10-25
0_1969-11-12
0_1969-11-22
0_1969-12-31
0_1970-01-17
0_1970-02-07
0_1970-03-18
0_1970-09-12
0_1970-10-14
0_1971-01-27
0_1971-04-14
0_1971-05-12
0_1971-05-15
0_1971-06-09
0_1971-06-23
0_1971-08-07
0_1971-09-01
0_1971-12-11
0_1971-12-25
0_1972-01-15
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.03_-_An_Aspect_of_Emergent_Evolution
02.05_-_Robert_Graves
02.10_-_Independence_and_its_Sanction
02.12_-_The_Ideals_of_Human_Unity
03.01_-_The_Malady_of_the_Century
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.11_-_Modernist_Poetry
03.11_-_True_Humility
03.12_-_The_Spirit_of_Tapasya
03.13_-_Human_Destiny
04.02_-_Human_Progress
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.07_-_Matter_Aspires
05.01_-_Man_and_the_Gods
05.29_-_Vengeance_is_Mine
05.30_-_Theres_a_Divinity
06.09_-_How_to_Wait
06.10_-_Fatigue_and_Work
06.11_-_The_Steps_of_the_Soul
06.17_-_Directed_Change
07.13_-_Divine_Justice
07.18_-_How_to_get_rid_of_Troublesome_Thoughts
07.19_-_Bad_Thought-Formation
07.24_-_Meditation_and_Meditation
07.26_-_Offering_and_Surrender
07.31_-_Images_of_Gods_and_Goddesses
07.32_-_The_Yogic_Centres
08.13_-_Thought_and_Imagination
08.34_-_To_Melt_into_the_Divine
09.06_-_How_Can_Time_Be_a_Friend?
09.11_-_The_Supramental_Manifestation_and_World_Change
09.13_-_On_Teachers_and_Teaching
10.01_-_A_Dream
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00c_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00d_-_DIVISION_D_-_KUNDALINI_AND_THE_SPINE
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00f_-_DIVISION_F_-_THE_LAW_OF_ECONOMY
1.00_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks
1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
1.01_-_About_the_Elements
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_Hatha_Yoga
1.01_-_Historical_Survey
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_NIGHT
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_The_First_Steps
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Rape_of_the_Lock
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
1.02.4.1_-_The_Worlds_-_Surya
1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication
10.28_-_Love_and_Love
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_In_the_Beginning
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_Prana
1.02_-_Prayer_of_Parashara_to_Vishnu
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Self-Consecration
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_The_7_Habits__An_Overview
1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES
1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_THE_WITHIN_OF_THINGS
1.02_-_To_Zen_Monks_Kin_and_Koku
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
10.32_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Five_Elements
10.36_-_Cling_to_Truth
1.037_-_Preventing_the_Fall_in_Yoga
1.038_-_Impediments_in_Concentration_and_Meditation
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_Tara,_Liberator_from_the_Eight_Dangers
1.03_-_The_Coming_of_the_Subjective_Age
1.03_-_The_Desert
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_Phenomenon_of_Man
1.03_-_The_Psychic_Prana
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.03_-_YIBHOOTI_PADA
1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind
1.045_-_Piercing_the_Structure_of_the_Object
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_A_Leader
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Of_other_imperfections_which_these_beginners_are_apt_to_have_with_respect_to_the_third_sin,_which_is_luxury.
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Nation-Soul
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Origin_and_Development_of_Poetry.
1.04_-_The_Qabalah__The_Best_Training_for_Memory
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_To_the_Priest_of_Rytan-ji
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.04_-_Wherefore_of_World?
1.056_-_Lack_of_Knowledge_is_the_Cause_of_Suffering
1.05_-_ADVICE_FROM_A_CATERPILLAR
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.05_-_Pratyahara_and_Dharana
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_THE_MASTER_AND_KESHAB
1.05_-_The_Second_Circle__The_Wanton._Minos._The_Infernal_Hurricane._Francesca_da_Rimini.
1.05_-_True_and_False_Subjectivism
1.060_-_Tracing_the_Ultimate_Cause_of_Any_Experience
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_Quieting_the_Vital
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Desire_to_be
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Objective_and_Subjective_Views_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Three_Mothers_or_the_First_Elements
1.06_-_The_Transformation_of_Dream_Life
1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government
1.07_-_A_STREET
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.07_-_Medicine_and_Psycho_therapy
1.07_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_envy_and_sloth.
1.07_-_Past,_Present_and_Future
1.07_-_Samadhi
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.080_-_Pratyahara_-_The_Return_of_Energy
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Civilisation_and_Barbarism
1.08_-_Introduction_to_Patanjalis_Yoga_Aphorisms
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_SPIRITUAL_REPERCUSSIONS_OF_THE_ATOM_BOMB
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Methods_of_Vedantic_Knowledge
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_A_System_of_Vedic_Psychology
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_FAITH_IN_PEACE
1.09_-_Legend_of_Lakshmi
1.09_-_(Plot_continued.)_Dramatic_Unity.
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_Taras_Ultimate_Nature
1.09_-_The_Absolute_Manifestation
1.09_-_The_Chosen_Ideal
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
1.1.04_-_Philosophy
1.107_-_The_Bestowal_of_a_Divine_Gift
1.10_-_Aesthetic_and_Ethical_Culture
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_Foresight
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Methods_and_the_Means
1.10_-_The_Roughly_Material_Plane_or_the_Material_World
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
1.1.1.06_-_Inspiration_and_Effort
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_Powers
1.1.1_-_The_Mind_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
1.11_-_The_Reason_as_Governor_of_Life
1.11_-_The_Second_Genesis
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Dhruva_commences_a_course_of_religious_austerities
1.1.2_-_Intellect_and_the_Intellectual
1.12_-_Love_The_Creator
1.12_-_Sleep_and_Dreams
1.12_-_The_Astral_Plane
1.12_-_The_Divine_Work
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_Truth_and_Knowledge
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_The_Divine_Maya
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.14_-_Descendants_of_Prithu
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.15_-_The_Supramental_Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.16_-_Advantages_and_Disadvantages_of_Evocational_Magic
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_ON_THE_WAY_OF_THE_CREATOR
1.17_-_The_Burden_of_Royalty
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_Evocation
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_ON_THE_PROBABLE_EXISTENCE_AHEAD_OF_US_OF_AN_ULTRA-HUMAN
1.19_-_Tabooed_Acts
1.19_-_The_Act_of_Truth
1.19_-_The_Practice_of_Magical_Evocation
1.200-1.224_Talks
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
1.2.03_-_Purity
1.2.06_-_Rejection
12.06_-_The_Hero_and_the_Nymph
1.2.08_-_Faith
1.20_-_Death,_Desire_and_Incapacity
1.20_-_Talismans_-_The_Lamen_-_The_Pantacle
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.2.10_-_Opening
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_Families_of_the_Daityas
1.21_-_WALPURGIS-NIGHT
1.22_-_OBERON_AND_TITANIA's_GOLDEN_WEDDING
1.22_-_On_the_many_forms_of_vainglory.
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.2.2_-_The_Place_of_Study_in_Sadhana
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.2.3_-_The_Power_of_Expression_and_Yoga
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Necromancy_and_Spiritism
1.2.4_-_Speech_and_Yoga
1.24_-_The_Advent_and_Progress_of_the_Spiritual_Age
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.25_-_The_Knot_of_Matter
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_Sacrifice_of_the_Kings_Son
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_Succession_to_the_Soul
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.29_-_The_Myth_of_Adonis
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.3.4.01_-_The_Beginning_and_the_End
1.34_-_The_Tao_1
1.3.5.05_-_The_Path
1.35_-_The_Tao_2
1.36_-_Quo_Stet_Olympus_-_Where_the_Gods,_Angels,_etc._Live
1.37_-_Oriential_Religions_in_the_West
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
1.4.02_-_The_Divine_Force
14.08_-_A_Parable_of_Sea-Gulls
1.42_-_This_Self_Introversion
1.439
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.45_-_The_Corn-Mother_and_the_Corn-Maiden_in_Northern_Europe
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.48_-_Morals_of_AL_-_Hard_to_Accept,_and_Why_nevertheless_we_Must_Concur
1.48_-_The_Corn-Spirit_as_an_Animal
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
1.51_-_Homeopathic_Magic_of_a_Flesh_Diet
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_Mother-Love
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.58_-_Do_Angels_Ever_Cut_Themselves_Shaving?
1.59_-_Geomancy
1.60_-_Between_Heaven_and_Earth
1.60_-_Knack
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.64_-_Magical_Power
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.68_-_The_Golden_Bough
1.70_-_Morality_1
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.79_-_Progress
1914_05_27p
1914_11_08p
1915_01_02p
1929-04-14_-_Dangers_of_Yoga_-_Two_paths,_tapasya_and_surrender_-_Impulses,_desires_and_Yoga_-_Difficulties_-_Unification_around_the_psychic_being_-_Ambition,_undoing_of_many_Yogis_-_Powers,_misuse_and_right_use_of_-_How_to_recognise_the_Divine_Will_-_Accept_things_that_come_from_Divine_-_Vital_devotion_-_Need_of_strong_body_and_nerves_-_Inner_being,_invariable
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1950-12-23_-_Concentration_and_energy
1950-12-25_-_Christmas_-_festival_of_Light_-_Energy_and_mental_growth_-_Meditation_and_concentration_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams_-_Playing_a_game_well,_and_energy
1951-01-08_-_True_vision_and_understanding_of_the_world._Progress,_equilibrium._Inner_reality_-_the_psychic._Animals_and_the_psychic.
1951-01-15_-_Sincerity_-_inner_discernment_-_inner_light._Evil_and_imbalance._Consciousness_and_instruments.
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-01-27_-_Sleep_-_desires_-_repression_-_the_subconscient._Dreams_-_the_super-conscient_-_solving_problems._Ladder_of_being_-_samadhi._Phases_of_sleep_-_silence,_true_rest._Vital_body_and_illness.
1951-02-05_-_Surrender_and_tapasya_-_Dealing_with_difficulties,_sincerity,_spiritual_discipline_-_Narrating_experiences_-_Vital_impulse_and_will_for_progress
1951-02-08_-_Unifying_the_being_-_ideas_of_good_and_bad_-_Miracles_-_determinism_-_Supreme_Will_-_Distinguishing_the_voice_of_the_Divine
1951-02-12_-_Divine_force_-_Signs_indicating_readiness_-_Weakness_in_mind,_vital_-_concentration_-_Divine_perception,_human_notion_of_good,_bad_-_Conversion,_consecration_-_progress_-_Signs_of_entering_the_path_-_kinds_of_meditation_-_aspiration
1951-02-15_-_Dreams,_symbolic_-_true_repose_-_False_visions_-_Earth-memory_and_history
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1951-03-05_-_Disasters-_the_forces_of_Nature_-_Story_of_the_charity_Bazar_-_Liberation_and_law_-_Dealing_with_the_mind_and_vital-_methods
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-03-10_-_Fairy_Tales-_serpent_guarding_treasure_-_Vital_beings-_their_incarnations_-_The_vital_being_after_death_-_Nightmares-_vital_and_mental_-_Mind_and_vital_after_death_-_The_spirit_of_the_form-_Egyptian_mummies
1951-03-14_-_Plasticity_-_Conditions_for_knowing_the_Divine_Will_-_Illness_-_microbes_-_Fear_-_body-reflexes_-_The_best_possible_happens_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_True_knowledge_-_a_work_to_do_-_the_Ashram
1951-03-19_-_Mental_worlds_and_their_beings_-_Understanding_in_silence_-_Psychic_world-_its_characteristics_-_True_experiences_and_mental_formations_-_twelve_senses
1951-03-22_-_Relativity-_time_-_Consciousness_-_psychic_Witness_-_The_twelve_senses_-_water-divining_-_Instinct_in_animals_-_story_of_Mothers_cat
1951-03-24_-_Descent_of_Divine_Love,_of_Consciousness_-_Earth-_a_symbolic_formation_-_the_Divine_Presence_-_The_psychic_being_and_other_worlds_-_Divine_Love_and_Grace_-_Becoming_consaious_of_Divine_Love_-_Finding_ones_psychic_being_-_Responsibility
1951-03-26_-_Losing_all_to_gain_all_-_psychic_being_-_Transforming_the_vital_-_physical_habits_-_the_subconscient_-_Overcoming_difficulties_-_weakness,_an_insincerity_-_to_change_the_world_-_Psychic_source,_flash_of_experience_-_preparation_for_yoga
1951-03-29_-_The_Great_Vehicle_and_The_Little_Vehicle_-_Choosing_ones_family,_country_-_The_vital_being_distorted_-_atavism_-_Sincerity_-_changing_ones_character
1951-03-31_-_Physical_ailment_and_mental_disorder_-_Curing_an_illness_spiritually_-_Receptivity_of_the_body_-_The_subtle-physical-_illness_accidents_-_Curing_sunstroke_and_other_disorders
1951-04-05_-_Illusion_and_interest_in_action_-_The_action_of_the_divine_Grace_and_the_ego_-_Concentration,_aspiration,_will,_inner_silence_-_Value_of_a_story_or_a_language_-_Truth_-_diversity_in_the_world
1951-04-17_-_Unity,_diversity_-_Protective_envelope_-_desires_-_consciousness,_true_defence_-_Perfection_of_physical_-_cinema_-_Choice,_constant_and_conscious_-_law_of_ones_being_-_the_One,_the_Multiplicity_-_Civilization-_preparing_an_instrument
1951-04-19_-_Demands_and_needs_-_human_nature_-_Abolishing_the_ego_-_Food-_tamas,_consecration_-_Changing_the_nature-_the_vital_and_the_mind_-_The_yoga_of_the_body__-_cellular_consciousness
1951-04-23_-_The_goal_and_the_way_-_Learning_how_to_sleep_-_relaxation_-_Adverse_forces-_test_of_sincerity_-_Attitude_to_suffering_and_death
1951-04-26_-_Irrevocable_transformation_-_The_divine_Shakti_-_glad_submission_-_Rejection,_integral_-_Consecration_-_total_self-forgetfulness_-_work
1951-04-28_-_Personal_effort_-_tamas,_laziness_-_Static_and_dynamic_power_-_Stupidity_-_psychic_and_intelligence_-_Philosophies-_different_languages_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_Surrender_of_ones_being_and_ones_work
1951-05-05_-_Needs_and_desires_-_Discernment_-_sincerity_and_true_perception_-_Mantra_and_its_effects_-_Object_in_action-_to_serve_-_relying_only_on_the_Divine
1951-05-11_-_Mahakali_and_Kali_-_Avatar_and_Vibhuti_-_Sachchidananda_behind_all_states_of_being_-_The_power_of_will_-_receiving_the_Divine_Will
1951-05-12_-_Mahalakshmi_and_beauty_in_life_-_Mahasaraswati_-_conscious_hand_-_Riches_and_poverty
1953-05-13
1953-05-20
1953-06-10
1953-06-17
1953-07-01
1953-07-22
1953-08-05
1953-08-12
1953-08-19
1953-09-02
1953-09-09
1953-09-16
1953-09-30
1953-10-07
1953-10-14
1953-10-21
1953-10-28
1953-11-04
1953-11-25
1953-12-09
1953-12-16
1953-12-23
1954-02-03_-_The_senses_and_super-sense_-_Children_can_be_moulded_-_Keeping_things_in_order_-_The_shadow
1954-02-10_-_Study_a_variety_of_subjects_-_Memory_-Memory_of_past_lives_-_Getting_rid_of_unpleasant_thoughts
1954-02-17_-_Experience_expressed_in_different_ways_-_Origin_of_the_psychic_being_-_Progress_in_sports_-Everything_is_not_for_the_best
1954-03-24_-_Dreams_and_the_condition_of_the_stomach_-_Tobacco_and_alcohol_-_Nervousness_-_The_centres_and_the_Kundalini_-_Control_of_the_senses
1954-05-19_-_Affection_and_love_-_Psychic_vision_Divine_-_Love_and_receptivity_-_Get_out_of_the_ego
1954-06-16_-_Influences,_Divine_and_other_-_Adverse_forces_-_The_four_great_Asuras_-_Aspiration_arranges_circumstances_-_Wanting_only_the_Divine
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-07-21_-_Mistakes_-_Success_-_Asuras_-_Mental_arrogance_-_Difficulty_turned_into_opportunity_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Conversion_of_men_governed_by_adverse_forces
1954-07-28_-_Money_-_Ego_and_individuality_-_The_shadow
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-08-18_-_Mahalakshmi_-_Maheshwari_-_Mahasaraswati_-_Determinism_and_freedom_-_Suffering_and_knowledge_-_Aspects_of_the_Mother
1954-08-25_-_Ananda_aspect_of_the_Mother_-_Changing_conditions_in_the_Ashram_-_Ascetic_discipline_-_Mothers_body
1954-09-08_-_Hostile_forces_-_Substance_-_Concentration_-_Changing_the_centre_of_thought_-_Peace
1954-09-22_-_The_supramental_creation_-_Rajasic_eagerness_-_Silence_from_above_-_Aspiration_and_rejection_-_Effort,_individuality_and_ego_-_Aspiration_and_desire
1954-09-29_-_The_right_spirit_-_The_Divine_comes_first_-_Finding_the_Divine_-_Mistakes_-_Rejecting_impulses_-_Making_the_consciousness_vast_-_Firm_resolution
1954-11-03_-_Body_opening_to_the_Divine_-_Concentration_in_the_heart_-_The_army_of_the_Divine_-_The_knot_of_the_ego_-Streng_thening_ones_will
1954-11-10_-_Inner_experience,_the_basis_of_action_-_Keeping_open_to_the_Force_-_Faith_through_aspiration_-_The_Mothers_symbol_-_The_mind_and_vital_seize_experience_-_Degrees_of_sincerity_-Becoming_conscious_of_the_Divine_Force
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-08_-_Cosmic_consciousness_-_Clutching_-_The_central_will_of_the_being_-_Knowledge_by_identity
1954-12-22_-_Possession_by_hostile_forces_-_Purity_and_morality_-_Faith_in_the_final_success_-Drawing_back_from_the_path
1954-12-29_-_Difficulties_and_the_world_-_The_experience_the_psychic_being_wants_-_After_death_-Ignorance
1955-02-09_-_Desire_is_contagious_-_Primitive_form_of_love_-_the_artists_delight_-_Psychic_need,_mind_as_an_instrument_-_How_the_psychic_being_expresses_itself_-_Distinguishing_the_parts_of_ones_being_-_The_psychic_guides_-_Illness_-_Mothers_vision
1955-03-09_-_Psychic_directly_contacted_through_the_physical_-_Transforming_egoistic_movements_-_Work_of_the_psychic_being_-_Contacting_the_psychic_and_the_Divine_-_Experiences_of_different_kinds_-_Attacks_of_adverse_forces
1955-03-30_-_Yoga-shakti_-_Energies_of_the_earth,_higher_and_lower_-_Illness,_curing_by_yogic_means_-_The_true_self_and_the_psychic_-_Solving_difficulties_by_different_methods
1955-04-13_-_Psychoanalysts_-_The_underground_super-ego,_dreams,_sleep,_control_-_Archetypes,_Overmind_and_higher_-_Dream_of_someone_dying_-_Integral_repose,_entering_Sachchidananda_-_Organising_ones_life,_concentration,_repose
1955-05-04_-_Drawing_on_the_universal_vital_forces_-_The_inner_physical_-_Receptivity_to_different_kinds_of_forces_-_Progress_and_receptivity
1955-05-18_-_The_Problem_of_Woman_-_Men_and_women_-_The_Supreme_Mother,_the_new_creation_-_Gods_and_goddesses_-_A_story_of_Creation,_earth_-_Psychic_being_only_on_earth,_beings_everywhere_-_Going_to_other_worlds_by_occult_means
1955-06-01_-_The_aesthetic_conscience_-_Beauty_and_form_-_The_roots_of_our_life_-_The_sense_of_beauty_-_Educating_the_aesthetic_sense,_taste_-_Mental_constructions_based_on_a_revelation_-_Changing_the_world_and_humanity
1955-06-08_-_Working_for_the_Divine_-_ideal_attitude_-_Divine_manifesting_-_reversal_of_consciousness,_knowing_oneself_-_Integral_progress,_outer,_inner,_facing_difficulties_-_People_in_Ashram_-_doing_Yoga_-_Children_given_freedom,_choosing_yoga
1955-06-22_-_Awakening_the_Yoga-shakti_-_The_thousand-petalled_lotus-_Reading,_how_far_a_help_for_yoga_-_Simple_and_complicated_combinations_in_men
1955-07-06_-_The_psychic_and_the_central_being_or_jivatman_-_Unity_and_multiplicity_in_the_Divine_-_Having_experiences_and_the_ego_-_Mental,_vital_and_physical_exteriorisation_-_Imagination_has_a_formative_power_-_The_function_of_the_imagination
1955-07-20_-_The_Impersonal_Divine_-_Surrender_to_the_Divine_brings_perfect_freedom_-_The_Divine_gives_Himself_-_The_principle_of_the_inner_dimensions_-_The_paths_of_aspiration_and_surrender_-_Linear_and_spherical_paths_and_realisations
1955-08-03_-_Nothing_is_impossible_in_principle_-_Psychic_contact_and_psychic_influence_-_Occult_powers,_adverse_influences;_magic_-_Magic,_occultism_and_Yogic_powers_-Hypnotism_and_its_effects
1955-08-17_-_Vertical_ascent_and_horizontal_opening_-_Liberation_of_the_psychic_being_-_Images_for_discovery_of_the_psychic_being_-_Sadhana_to_contact_the_psychic_being
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1955-10-05_-_Science_and_Ignorance_-_Knowledge,_science_and_the_Buddha_-_Knowing_by_identification_-_Discipline_in_science_and_in_Buddhism_-_Progress_in_the_mental_field_and_beyond_it
1955-10-19_-_The_rhythms_of_time_-_The_lotus_of_knowledge_and_perfection_-_Potential_knowledge_-_The_teguments_of_the_soul_-_Shastra_and_the_Gurus_direct_teaching_-_He_who_chooses_the_Infinite...
1955-11-02_-_The_first_movement_in_Yoga_-_Interiorisation,_finding_ones_soul_-_The_Vedic_Age_-_An_incident_about_Vivekananda_-_The_imaged_language_of_the_Vedas_-_The_Vedic_Rishis,_involutionary_beings_-_Involution_and_evolution
1955-11-16_-_The_significance_of_numbers_-_Numbers,_astrology,_true_knowledge_-_Divines_Love_flowers_for_Kali_puja_-_Desire,_aspiration_and_progress_-_Determining_ones_approach_to_the_Divine_-_Liberation_is_obtained_through_austerities_-_...
1955-12-14_-_Rejection_of_life_as_illusion_in_the_old_Yogas_-_Fighting_the_adverse_forces_-_Universal_and_individual_being_-_Three_stages_in_Integral_Yoga_-_How_to_feel_the_Divine_Presence_constantly
1956-01-25_-_The_divine_way_of_life_-_Divine,_Overmind,_Supermind_-_Material_body__for_discovery_of_the_Divine_-_Five_psychological_perfections
1956-03-14_-_Dynamic_meditation_-_Do_all_as_an_offering_to_the_Divine_-_Significance_of_23.4.56._-_If_twelve_men_of_goodwill_call_the_Divine
1956-04-18_-_Ishwara_and_Shakti,_seeing_both_aspects_-_The_Impersonal_and_the_divine_Person_-_Soul,_the_presence_of_the_divine_Person_-_Going_to_other_worlds,_exteriorisation,_dreams_-_Telling_stories_to_oneself
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
1956-07-04_-_Aspiration_when_one_sees_a_shooting_star_-_Preparing_the_bodyn_making_it_understand_-_Getting_rid_of_pain_and_suffering_-_Psychic_light
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1956-09-12_-_Questions,_practice_and_progress
1956-09-19_-_Power,_predominant_quality_of_vital_being_-_The_Divine,_the_psychic_being,_the_Supermind_-_How_to_come_out_of_the_physical_consciousness_-_Look_life_in_the_face_-_Ordinary_love_and_Divine_love
1956-09-26_-_Soul_of_desire_-_Openness,_harmony_with_Nature_-_Communion_with_divine_Presence_-_Individuality,_difficulties,_soul_of_desire_-_personal_contact_with_the_Mother_-_Inner_receptivity_-_Bad_thoughts_before_the_Mother
1956-10-03_-_The_Mothers_different_ways_of_speaking_-_new_manifestation_-_new_element,_possibilities_-_child_prodigies_-_Laws_of_Nature,_supramental_-_Logic_of_the_unforeseen_-_Creative_writers,_hands_of_musicians_-_Prodigious_children,_men
1956-11-14_-_Conquering_the_desire_to_appear_good_-_Self-control_and_control_of_the_life_around_-_Power_of_mastery_-_Be_a_great_yogi_to_be_a_good_teacher_-_Organisation_of_the_Ashram_school_-_Elementary_discipline_of_regularity
1956-12-12_-_paradoxes_-_Nothing_impossible_-_unfolding_universe,_the_Eternal_-_Attention,_concentration,_effort_-_growth_capacity_almost_unlimited_-_Why_things_are_not_the_same_-_will_and_willings_-_Suggestions,_formations_-_vital_world
1956-12-26_-_Defeated_victories_-_Change_of_consciousness_-_Experiences_that_indicate_the_road_to_take_-_Choice_and_preference_-_Diversity_of_the_manifestation
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-03-15_-_Reminiscences_of_Tlemcen
1957-03-20_-_Never_sit_down,_true_repose
1957-03-22_-_A_story_of_initiation,_knowledge_and_practice
1957-04-17_-_Transformation_of_the_body
1957-04-24_-_Perfection,_lower_and_higher
1957-06-05_-_Questions_and_silence_-_Methods_of_meditation
1957-06-19_-_Causes_of_illness_Fear_and_illness_-_Minds_working,_faith_and_illness
1957-07-10_-_A_new_world_is_born_-_Overmind_creation_dissolved
1957-07-17_-_Power_of_conscious_will_over_matter
1957-07-24_-_The_involved_supermind_-_The_new_world_and_the_old_-_Will_for_progress_indispensable
1957-11-27_-_Sri_Aurobindos_method_in_The_Life_Divine_-_Individual_and_cosmic_evolution
1958-01-22_-_Intellectual_theories_-_Expressing_a_living_and_real_Truth
1958-05-21_-_Mental_honesty
1958-07-23_-_How_to_develop_intuition_-_Concentration
1958-07-30_-_The_planchette_-_automatic_writing_-_Proofs_and_knowledge
1958-08-06_-_Collective_prayer_-_the_ideal_collectivity
1958-08-27_-_Meditation_and_imagination_-_From_thought_to_idea,_from_idea_to_principle
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958_09_19
1958-10-08_-_Stages_between_man_and_superman
1958_10_24
1960_05_04
1960_07_06
1961_05_20
1961_05_21?_-_62
1962_02_27
1969_10_18
1969_11_16
1969_12_21
1970_05_12
1.ac_-_A_Birthday
1f.lovecraft_-_Ashes
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_From_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_Hypnos
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_Sweet_Ermengarde
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Curse_of_Yig
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.fs_-_Honor_To_Woman
1.fs_-_Ode_To_Joy_-_With_Translation
1.fs_-_The_Agreement
1.fs_-_The_Hostage
1.fs_-_The_Ring_Of_Polycrates_-_A_Ballad
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_Sonnet._If_By_Dull_Rhymes_Our_English_Must_Be_Chaind
1.jk_-_Stanzas._In_A_Drear-Nighted_December
1.jlb_-_Plainness
1.pbs_-_Bereavement
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Marenghi
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Song._Hope
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.rb_-_A_Serenade_At_The_Villa
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_By_The_Fire-Side
1.rb_-_Life_In_A_Love
1.rb_-_Love_In_A_Life
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_III_-_Evening
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_I_-_Morning
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_IV_-_Night
1.rb_-_Rabbi_Ben_Ezra
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_The_Last_Ride_Together
1.rmr_-_As_Once_the_Winged_Energy_of_Delight
1.rmr_-_Self-Portrait
1.rmr_-_The_Apple_Orchard
1.rt_-_This_Dog
1.rwe_-_Hamatreya
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_To_Laugh_Often_And_Much
1.whitman_-_Manhattan_Streets_I_Saunterd,_Pondering
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Open_Road
1.ww_-_A_Character
1.ww_-_An_Evening_Walk
1.ww_-_Artegal_And_Elidure
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Brave_Schill!_By_Death_Delivered
1.ww_-_Character_Of_The_Happy_Warrior
1.ww_-_Composed_At_The_Same_Time_And_On_The_Same_Occasion
1.ww_-_November,_1806
1.ww_-_The_Longest_Day
1.ww_-_Written_in_London._September,_1802
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_The_Therapeutic_value_of_Abreaction
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.02_-_Atomic_Motions
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.05_-_Universal_Love_and_how_it_leads_to_Self-Surrender
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_Two_Tales_of_Seeking_and_Losing
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_The_Cup
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.08_-_Three_Tales_of_Madness_and_Destruction
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Sadhana
2.1.02_-_Combining_Work,_Meditation_and_Bhakti
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.1.1.04_-_Reading,_Yogic_Force_and_the_Development_of_Style
2.11_-_On_Education
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.12_-_The_Origin_of_the_Ignorance
2.12_-_The_Realisation_of_Sachchidananda
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_The_Difficulties_of_the_Mental_Being
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_On_Movements
2.1.4_-_The_Lower_Vital_Being
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_Power_of_Right_Attitude
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_The_Evolutionary_Process_-_Ascent_and_Integration
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.19_-_Union,_Gestation,_Birth
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.02_-_Becoming_Conscious_in_Work
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.21_-_1940
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.22_-_1941-1943
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.22_-_THE_MASTER_AT_COSSIPORE
2.22_-_Vijnana_or_Gnosis
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.2.4_-_Sentimentalism,_Sensitiveness,_Instability,_Laxity
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_Mercies_and_Judgements_of_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.01_-_Concentration_and_Meditation
2.3.01_-_The_Planes_or_Worlds_of_Consciousness
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.08_-_The_Mother's_Help_in_Difficulties
2.3.1_-_Ego_and_Its_Forms
2.4.1_-_Human_Relations_and_the_Spiritual_Life
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
29.06_-_There_is_also_another,_similar_or_parallel_story_in_the_Veda_about_the_God_Agni,_about_the_disappearance_of_this
30.01_-_World-Literature
3.00.2_-_Introduction
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_The_Mercurial_Fountain
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Soul_in_the_Soul_World_after_Death
3.03_-_On_Thought_-_II
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Mind_
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.03_-_The_Soul_Is_Mortal
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.05_-_The_Formula_of_I.A.O.
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
3.1.02_-_Asceticism_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
3.1.04_-_Transformation_in_the_Integral_Yoga
31.10_-_East_and_West
3.11_-_Of_Our_Lady_Babalon
3.11_-_Spells
3.13_-_Of_the_Banishings
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.16.1_-_Of_the_Oath
3.16.2_-_Of_the_Charge_of_the_Spirit
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
3.2.04_-_The_Conservative_Mind_and_Eastern_Progress
3.2.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Bhagavad_Gita
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
3.2.10_-_Christianity_and_Theosophy
32.12_-_The_Evolutionary_Imperative
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
33.02_-_Subhash,_Oaten:_atlas,_Russell
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
33.04_-_Deoghar
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.3.2_-_Doctors_and_Medicines
3.3.3_-_Specific_Illnesses,_Ailments_and_Other_Physical_Problems
3.4.1.01_-_Poetry_and_Sadhana
3.4.1_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.5.02_-_Thoughts_and_Glimpses
3-5_Full_Circle
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
3.7.1.02_-_The_Reincarnating_Soul
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.2.03_-_Mind_Nature_and_Law_of_Karma
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
40.01_-_November_24,_1926
4.01_-_Introduction
4.01_-_Prayers_and_Meditations
4.01_-_Sweetness_in_Prayer
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.03_-_Mistakes
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION_OF_THE_KING
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.05_-_THE_MAGICIAN
4.05_-_The_Passion_Of_Love
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
4.1.1.04_-_Foundations_of_the_Sadhana
4.1.2_-_The_Difficulties_of_Human_Nature
4.12_-_The_Way_of_Equality
4.1.3_-_Imperfections_and_Periods_of_Arrest
4.13_-_ON_THE_HIGHER_MAN
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.1.04_-_The_Psychic_and_the_Mental,_Vital_and_Physical_Nature
4.21_-_The_Gradations_of_the_supermind
4.2.2.02_-_Conditions_for_the_Psychic_Opening
4.2.2_-_Steps_towards_Overcoming_Difficulties
4.22_-_The_supramental_Thought_and_Knowledge
4.23_-_The_supramental_Instruments_--_Thought-process
4.2.3_-_Vigilance,_Resolution,_Will_and_the_Divine_Help
4.2.4_-_Time_and_CHange_of_the_Nature
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.2_-_Karma
4.3.3_-_Dealing_with_Hostile_Attacks
4.3_-_Bhakti
4.4.2.09_-_Ascent_and_Change_of_the_Lower_Nature
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.01_-_THE_ALCHEMICAL_VIEW_OF_THE_UNION_OF_OPPOSITES
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7.01_-_The_Soul_(the_Psychic)
7.03_-_Cheerfulness
7.14_-_Modesty
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Apology
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
A_Secret_Miracle
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
Cratylus
DM_2_-_How_to_Meditate
DS2
DS3
ENNEAD_01.04_-_Whether_Animals_May_Be_Termed_Happy.
ENNEAD_01.06_-_Of_Beauty.
ENNEAD_01.08_-_Of_the_Nature_and_Origin_of_Evils.
ENNEAD_02.01_-_Of_the_Heaven.
ENNEAD_02.03_-_Whether_Astrology_is_of_any_Value.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_03.08b_-_Of_Nature,_Contemplation_and_Unity.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_Of_the_Hypostases_that_Mediate_Knowledge,_and_of_the_Superior_Principle.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_Is_Everywhere_Present_As_a_Whole.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.09_-_Of_the_Good_and_the_One.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
IS_-_Chapter_1
I._THE_ATTRACTIVE_POWER_OF_GOD
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.03_-_INVOCATION
Meno
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_01_27
r1912_12_03
r1912_12_03b
r1912_12_04
r1912_12_06
r1912_12_07
r1912_12_31
r1913_01_10
r1913_01_12
r1913_01_13
r1913_01_14
r1913_01_17
r1913_01_27
r1913_02_05
r1913_07_01
r1913_07_05
r1913_09_05b
r1913_09_16
r1913_11_14
r1913_11_25
r1913_12_15
r1913_12_25
r1913_12_26
r1913_12_31
r1914_03_20
r1914_03_24
r1914_04_22
r1914_05_22
r1914_06_12
r1914_06_13
r1914_06_18
r1914_07_11
r1914_08_17
r1914_09_13
r1914_11_11
r1914_11_20
r1914_11_23
r1914_11_30
r1914_12_29
r1915_01_05b
r1915_05_31
r1916_03_07
r1917_02_11
r1917_02_16
r1918_05_14
r1918_05_18
r1918_05_24
r1919_08_18
r1919_08_21
r1920_03_01
r1920_03_13
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_151-175
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Circular_Ruins
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Gold_Bug
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

SIMILAR TITLES
succeed

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

succeeds ::: comes next in time or succession; follows after another; replaces another in an office or a position.


TERMS ANYWHERE

accidentalism ::: Any system of thought that denies the causal nexus and maintains that events succeed one another haphazardly or by chance (not in the mathematical but in the popular sense). In metaphysics, accidentalism denies the doctrine that everything occurs or results from a definite cause. In this connection it is synonymous with tychism (ruxi, chance), a term used by Charles Sanders Peirce for the theories that make chance an objective factor in the process of the Universe.

achieve ::: 1. To bring to a successful end, to carry out successfully (an enterprise); to accomplish, perform. 2. To succeed in gaining, to acquire by effort, to obtain, win. achieves, achieved, achieving.

achieve ::: v. t. --> To carry on to a final close; to bring out into a perfected state; to accomplish; to perform; -- as, to achieve a feat, an exploit, an enterprise.
To obtain, or gain, as the result of exertion; to succeed in gaining; to win.
To finish; to kill.


Adibhuta (Sanskrit) Ādibhūta [from ādi first, original + bhūta element from the verbal root bhū to be, become] The first, original, or primordial element in nature; the “primeval, uncreated cause of all worlds” (VP 4:1), sometimes called the Nameless in theosophical writings. Cause and source of the succeeding seven cosmic bhutas, it is the seed from which they emanate.

Adinidana (Sanskrit) Ādinidāna [from ādi first + nidāna binding from ni down + dāna band, rope from the verbal root da to bind on, fasten] A binding, halter, fetter; the first and supreme causality or originating link in the succeeding chain of nidanas, called in Buddhist writings the twelve causes of manifested existence; otherwise a chain or concatenation of cause and effect throughout the range of manifested being.

after ::: a. --> Next; later in time; subsequent; succeeding; as, an after period of life.
Hinder; nearer the rear.
To ward the stern of the ship; -- applied to any object in the rear part of a vessel; as the after cabin, after hatchway. ::: prep.


afterpains ::: n. pl. --> The pains which succeed childbirth, as in expelling the afterbirth.

afterward ::: adv. --> At a later or succeeding time.

A gati is the path or sphere of existence entered upon by entities impelled because of past karma. If a person lives a noble and upright life, his gati will be the path or sphere of humanity in its higher aspects. If he deliberately lives an evil, degenerate existence, his course or next sphere of existence will be a rebirth in some degenerate human form or sphere of activity. Similarly with the divinities and all other entities: they find their succeeding spheres of life and action strictly according to karma. For karma is universal; and what one makes himself to be, that in very truth he shall become. The becoming in every instance and sphere of the manifested universe is according to the persisting karmic conditions impelling, and occasionally compelling, an entity into this, that, or some other of the gatis.

  “A globe when a Life-wave leaves it does not remain in obscuration or continuously dormant until the same Life-wave returns to it in the next Round. The Life-waves succeed each other in regular file, and each Life-wave as it enters a globe has its period of beginning, its efflorescence, and its decay, and then leaves the globe in obscuration so far as that particular Life-wave is concerned. But the globe within a relatively short time receives a succeeding Life-wave, which runs through its courses and leaves the globes again in obscuration so far as this last Life-wave is concerned, etc. It is obvious, therefore, that a period of obscuration on any globe of the Planetary Chain is much shorter than the term of a full Planetary Round” (OG 118).

Ajita (Sanskrit) Ajita [from a not + the verbal root ji to conquer, triumph] The invisible, unsurpassed; in the Vayu-Purana, the highest of twelve gods, named jayas, who were created by Brahma to aid him at the beginning of the manvantara. But because they neglected his directives, Brahma “cursed” them to be born in each succeeding manvantara until the seventh, the Vaivasvata-manvantara (cf VP 1:15; n2, p. 26). These twelve jayas are the Hindu equivalent of the twelve great gods of Greco-Roman mythology. Because of their all-permeant character, on a lower scale these divinities are identical with the manasa, the jnana-devas, the rudras, and other classes of manifested deities. In these lower manifestations of their functions, they are identical with those dhyani-chohanic groups which “refuse to incarnate,” spoken of in The Secret Doctrine.

Alaungpaya. Burmese king (r. 1752-1760) and founder of the Konbaung dynasty (1752-1885), the last Burmese royal house before the British conquest. He was born the son of the village headman of Mokesoebo in Upper Burma in 1711. Originally named Aungzeyya, he succeeded his father as headman and early on showed charismatic signs of leadership. By this time, the then Burmese empire of Taungoo, which had been founded in 1531, was on the verge of collapse. The Mon of Lower Burma, whose capital was Pegu, rebelled and soon swept northward, eventually capturing the Burmese capital, AVA, and executing its king. When emissaries from the Mon king, Binnya-dala, demanded the allegiance of Mokesoebo, Aungzeyya beheaded them and organized a rebellion to restore Burmese sovereignty. Gathering around him a loyal cohort of local chiefs and soldiers from Ava, he crowned himself king and established Mokesoebo as his first capital, which he renamed Shwebo. A brilliant tactician and masterful propagandist, he assumed the title Alaungpaya, meaning "Future Buddha," and waged war on the Mon as a BODHISATTVA intent on restoring the purity of the Buddha's religion and ushering in a golden age. In 1753, he recaptured Ava and subdued the Shan chieftains on his northern flank. In 1755, he captured the strategic port town of Dagon, which he renamed Yangon (Rangoon), meaning "End of Strife." In 1757, after a protracted siege, he destroyed Pegu, the last stronghold of Mon resistance, executing its king, Binnya-dala, and massacring its population. After consolidating Burmese control over the central provinces, Alaungpaya marched his armies against the Hindu kingdom of Manipur, which had taken advantage of the civil war to pillage Burma's western territories. Having vanquished Manipur, in 1760, he moved against the Thai kingdom of AYUTHAYA in the east in retaliation for fomenting anti-Burmese rebellions along the border. The Burmese seized Moulmein, Tavoy, and Tenasserim, but Alaungpaya was mortally wounded during the siege of Ayuthaya and died during the subsequent Burmese retreat. The empire created by Alaungpaya expanded under his sons and their descendants, eventually bringing it into conflict with the British East India Company.

alliteration ::: n. --> The repetition of the same letter at the beginning of two or more words immediately succeeding each other, or at short intervals; as in the following lines: -

alternate ::: a. --> Being or succeeding by turns; one following the other in succession of time or place; by turns first one and then the other; hence, reciprocal.
Designating the members in a series, which regularly intervene between the members of another series, as the odd or even numbers of the numerals; every other; every second; as, the alternate members 1, 3, 5, 7, etc. ; read every alternate line.
Distributed, as leaves, singly at different heights of


alternately ::: adv. --> In reciprocal succession; succeeding by turns; in alternate order.
By alternation; when, in a proportion, the antecedent term is compared with antecedent, and consequent.


Anastasis (Greek) Rising up; used in referring to the dead and to resurrection. However, this ancient mystical term was originally used for the rising of the initiant when, having completed the dread trials of initiation, he rose a new man, one who was reborn, or what in India was called a dvija (twice-born). Another significance belonging from earliest times to the cycle of initiation is that when a person through severe training, initiation, and a complete turning away from things of matter to things of spirit, had succeeded in becoming at one with his inner god at least on occasions, he was then considered to have arisen or to have become resurrected out of all the lower ranges of kosmic life, and to have attained self-conscious existence in the spirit. Having attained anastasis, he took his place in the hierarchy of light or compassion as one of the co-laborers with the gods.

Angiras (Sanskrit) Aṅgiras [from the verbal root aṅg to go, move tortuously (cf agni)] One of the Saptarshis (seven rishis) or manasaputras (mind-born sons of Brahma) of the first manvantara; a secondary projection of Brahma’s mind and will because his first “mind-engendered progeny . . . did not multiply themselves (VP 1:7; SD 2:78). Hence Angiras is one of the prajapatis or progenitors whose sons and daughters people the earth in succeeding manvantaras, mankind included in their progeny.

Apperception Perception involving self-consciousness; cognition through the relating of new ideas to familiar ideas. Used by Leibniz to denote a stage higher or more subtle than perception. The impressions received through perception are apprehended by the mind and are related to other impressions which the memory holds, so that complex ideas are formed. Apperception may be called perception accompanied by awareness and an interpretative power. In contrast to the theory that the higher faculties of mind are built up synthetically from the lower, Leibniz’s views support the theory that the intuitive or original inner powers are primary. “Nascent apperception, which is the Mahat of the lower kingdoms, especially developed in the third order of Elementals . . . [is] succeeded by the objective kingdom of minerals, in which latter that apperception is entirely latent, to re-develop only in the plants”; and “that which is meant by ‘animals,’ in primary Creation, is the germ of awakening consciousness or of apperception, that which is faintly traceable in some sensitive plants on Earth and more distinctly in the protistic monera. . . . Neither plant nor animal, but an existence between the two” (SD 1:454-5&n; cf ET 505 3rd & rev ed ).

A profound lore of numbers, measures, and their relation to the cosmic plan impelled their architects to build their records according to these now forgotten mathematical principles. Many investigators have discovered fragments of this lore but have not succeeded in reconstructing the whole out of the fragments.

Aquarius (Latin) Pertaining to water; the water-bearer, the 11th sign of the zodiac. In astrology an airy, fixed, masculine sign, the principal house of Saturn, though sometimes said to by ruled by Uranus. In about 1898, the equinoctial point passed from Pisces to Aquarius of the stellar (movable) zodiac, thus initiating a new Messianic cycle succeeding that of Pisces — the fish-man, associated with Jesus Christ. The Gnostic sun god is depicted as a man covered with breasts, having a fish on his head and a sea monster at his feet, which plainly indicates the group of three signs — Pisces, Aquarius, and Capricorn — and points to a fourfold division of the zodiac, each division embracing three signs; Taurus perhaps represented by the Egyptian bull Apis, standing for the triad of signs which preceded Aquarius.

Arcanum: An old term almost identical with occultism, its recent equivalent. Arcana were originally used to cover the sacred objects, such as the Playthings of Dionysus in the Eleusinian rites, and a cognate is ark, as in the Ark of the Covenant. Arcesilaus: (315-241 B.C.) Greek philosopher from Pitane in Aeolis. He succeeded Crates in the chair of the Platonic Academy and became the founder of the second or so-called middle academy. In opposition to both Stoicism and Epicureanism, he advocated a scepticism that was not so extreme as that of Pyrrho although he despaired of man's attaining truth. Suspended judgment was to him the best approach. -- L.E.D.

Aristotelianism. In this group there are two broad currents of thought. The first attempted to harmonize Aristotle with St. Augustine and the Church's dogmas. This line was founded by St. Albert the Great (+1280), who amassed the then known Aristotelian literature but failed to construct any coherent synthesis. His pupil, St. Thomas Aquinas (+1274) succeeded to a remarkable degree. From the standpoint of clarity and formularization, St. Thomas marks the apex of medieval Scholasticism. Pupils and adherents worthy of note among Albert's, Hugo and Ulrich of Strassburg, this latter (+c. 1277), together with Dietrich of Freiberg (+c. 1310) revealing marked Neo-platonic tendencies; among Thomas', Aegidius of Lessines (+1304), Herveus Natalis (Herve Nedelec, +1318), John (de Regina) of Naples (+c. 1336), Aegidius Romanus (+1316), Godfrey of Fontaines ( + 1306 or 1309), quite independent in his allegiance, and the great Dante Alighieri (+1321).

As long as the entity does not sink by attraction into the Eighth Sphere, or Sphere of Death, it still has within it the possibility of regaining its foothold on the ascending evolutionary ladder and rising again. Rare indeed are those who succeed in so rising, but the case is not absolutely hopeless. And finally, an entity may be in avichi not only after death, but also during life on earth, as avichi is a state and not a place per se.

As the study or science of things which are hid and secret, occultism is a generalizing term because what is hid or secret in one age may readily be in a succeeding age more or less commonly known and open to public investigation. Many things that in medieval Europe were distinctly secret and therefore occult, are today the field of scientific investigation; and what is now considered to be occult, if science continues in its progress and research, may in the succeeding age in its turn become open and matter of common knowledge. Occultism then will simply have shifted its field of investigation and study to matters still more secret, still more recondite, still more deeply hid in fields of nature which are now scarcely suspected.

Asuka. (飛鳥). Japan's first historical epoch, named after a region in the plains south of modern NARA. Until the eighth century (710) when the capital was moved to Nara, a new palace, and virtually a new capital, was built every time a new ruler succeeded to the throne. One of the earliest capitals was located in the region of Asuka. The Asuka period is characterized by the rise of powerful aristocratic clans such as the Soga and Mononobe and attempts such as the Taika reform (646) to counteract the rise of these clans and to strengthen the authority of the emperor. According to the NIHON SHOKI ("Historical Records of Japan"), the inception of Buddhism occurred in the Japanese isles during this period, when Emperor Kimmei (r. 532-571) received an image of the Buddha from the King Songmyong of the Korean kingdom of Paekche in 552 (var. 538). Buddhism became the central religion of the Asuka court with the support of such famous figures as Prince SHoTOKU, Empress Suiko (r. 593-628), and Empress Jito (r. 686-697). After the establishment of the grand monastery ASUKADERA by the descendants of a Korean clan, other temples modeled after early Chinese monastery campuses, such as HoRYuJI, were also constructed during this period. These temples enshrined the magnificent sculptures executed by Tori Busshi.

At death the essence of the human soul is united to the human ego, which in its turn at the second death is reunited with the upper duad (atma-buddhi); and the human ego thereupon enters into the state of consciousness called devachan. Having become at one with its spiritual parent, at least for the duration of devachan, the ego rests and digests its garnered store of wisdom, knowledge, and experience, and upon the completion of this period of devachanic recuperation it issues forth again when the karmic hour strikes, once more to become the human ego at its succeeding birth.

Automatic Writing The practice in which a person takes pen and paper, makes his mind blank, and waits for his pen to write by some involuntary impulse. Sometimes the pen is replaced by a mechanical device such as an ouija board. The results vary from purely negative ones, through the stage of illegible scrawls, up to elaborate consecutive messages or even quotations from rare books. The ability of different persons to succeed in this practice varies, a minority being specially apt; and the aptitude can be developed by practice. The usual spiritualistic explanation is that these writings are communications from those “on the other side.” But in every case it is necessary for the automatic writer to resign the control of his own will over his physical and vital-astral body and to surrender these to the use of influences unknown to him.

A vanilla_strategy ::: is a common or popular approach to investing or decision making in business. Although the concept is relatively basic, some investors and businesses excel because they stick with an ordinary, "vanilla" strategy, while others succeed through innovation. For example, in derivatives trading, a vanilla strategy is the use of two different plain vanilla instruments, such as swaps, at the same time.

Azrael, succeeded; and because of this feat he was

Baal-worshipping Jair succeeded Abimelech to the

Baubo The Matron Baubo, the enchantress “before she succeeds in reconciling the soul — Demeter, to its new position, finds herself obliged to assume the sexual forms of an infant. Baubo is matter, the physical body; and the intellectual, as yet pure astral soul can be ensnared into its new terrestrial prison but by the display of innocent babyhood. Until then, doomed to her fate, Demeter, or Magna-mater, the Soul, wonders and hesitates and suffers; but once having partaken of the magic potion prepared by Baubo, she forgets her sorrows; for a certain time she parts with that consciousness of higher intellect that she was possessed of before entering the body of a child. Thenceforth she must seek to rejoin it again; and when the age of reason arrives for the child, the struggle — forgotten for a few years of infancy — begins again” (IU 2:112).

BBC Microcomputer ::: A series of 6502-based personal computers launched by Acorn Computers Ltd. in January 1982, for use in the British Broadcasting Corporation's educational for easy expansion. The 6502-based computers were succeeded in 1987 by the Acorn Archimedes family.xbeeb is a BBC Micro emulator for Unix and X11.

BBC Microcomputer A series of {6502}-based personal computers launched by {Acorn Computers} Ltd. in January 1982, for use in the British Broadcasting Corporation's educational programmes on computing. The computers are noted for their reliability (many are still in active service in 1994) and both hardware and software were designed for easy expansion. The 6502-based computers were succeeded in 1987 by the Acorn {Archimedes} family. {xbeeb} is a BBC Micro {emulator} for {Unix} and {X11}.

BeOS ::: (operating system) The operating system originally designed to run on the BeBox microcomputer. BeOS is good at both multitasking and real-time operation. a GUI front end (not X). A C++ compiler is supplied with the machine, and there are rumours of other languages being ported in the future.BeOs eventually became used on the x86 and standard PPC.Be, Inc. went bankrupt in 1999, after releasing the last upgrade of BeOS (R5.0.3), and was sold to Palm.Several groups are currently (2003) attempting to create an R6 version of the OS. The most likely to succeed are Yellowtab and OpenBeOS, which is likely to be renamed.(2003-05-30)

BeOS "operating system" The {operating system} originally designed to run on the {BeBox} {microcomputer}. BeOS is good at both {multitasking} and {real-time} operation. It has a {bash} command shell, with ports of many {GNU} programs by Be, Inc. It has a {GUI} front end (not {X}). A {C++} {compiler} is supplied with the machine, and there are rumours of other languages being ported in the future. BeOs eventually became used on the {x86} and standard {PPC}. Be, Inc. went bankrupt in 1999, after releasing the last upgrade of BeOS (R5.0.3), and was sold to {Palm}. Several groups are currently (2003) attempting to create an R6 version of the OS. The most likely to succeed are {Yellowtab} and {OpenBeOS}, which is likely to be renamed. (2003-05-30)

Bhutavat (Sanskrit) Bhūtavat [from the verbal root bhū to be, become] What has become; applicable to those seeds of cosmic being which through evolutionary unfolding in previous manvantaras remain as crystallized seeds through the cosmic pralaya, to blossom forth into the unfolding universe at the opening of the succeeding manvantara. As the term has reference to what is not pure unevolved spirit, in archaic mythology it often bears the meaning of limitation or restriction, and therefore is frequently looked upon as being evil because it is not pure spirit.

birthday ::: n. --> The day in which any person is born; day of origin or commencement.
The day of the month in which a person was born, in whatever succeeding year it may recur; the anniversary of one&


birthnight ::: n. --> The night in which a person is born; the anniversary of that night in succeeding years.

Bitachon (&

Bodhiruci. (C. Putiliuzhi; J. Bodairushi; K. Poriryuji 菩提流支) (fl. sixth century). A renowned Indian translator and monk (to be distinguished from a subsequent Bodhiruci [s.v.] who was active in China two centuries later during the Tang dynasty). Bodhiruci left north India for Luoyang, the Northern Wei capital, in 508. He is said to have been well versed in the TRIPItAKA and talented at incantations. Bodhiruci stayed at the monastery of YONGNINGSI in Luoyang from 508 to 512 and with the help of BuddhasAnta (d.u.) and others translated over thirty MAHAYANA sutras and treatises, most of which reflect the latest developments in Indian MahAyAna, and especially YOGACARA. His translations include the DHARMASAMGĪTI, SHIDIJING LUN, LAnKAVATARASuTRA, VAJRACCHEDIKAPRAJNAPARAMITASuTRA, and the WULIANGSHOU JING YOUPOTISHE YUANSHENG JI, attributed to VASUBANDHU. Bodhiruci's translation of the Shidijing lun, otherwise known more simply as the Di lun, fostered the formation of a group of YOGACARA specialists in China that later historians retroactively call the DI LUN ZONG. According to a story in the LIDAI FABAO JI, a jealous Bodhiruci, assisted by a monk from SHAOLINSI on SONGSHAN named Guangtong (also known as Huiguang, 468-537), is said to have attempted on numerous occasions to poison the founder of the CHAN school, BODHIDHARMA, and eventually succeeded. Bodhiruci is also said to have played an instrumental role in converting the Chinese monk TANLUAN from Daoist longevity practices to the PURE LAND teachings of the GUAN WULIANGSHOU JING.

bodhisattva. (P. bodhisatta; T. byang chub sems dpa'; C. pusa; J. bosatsu; K. posal 菩薩). In Sanskrit, lit. "enlightenment being." The etymology is uncertain, but the term is typically glossed to mean a "being (SATTVA) intent on achieving enlightenment (BODHI)," viz., a being who has resolved to become a buddha. In the MAINSTREAM BUDDHIST SCHOOLS, the Buddha refers to himself in his many past lifetimes prior to his enlightenment as a bodhisattva; the word is thus generally reserved for the historical Buddha prior to his own enlightenment. In the MAHAYANA traditions, by contrast, a bodhisattva can designate any being who resolves to generate BODHICITTA and follow the vehicle of the bodhisattvas (BODHISATTVAYANA) toward the achievement of buddhahood. The MahAyAna denotation of the term first appears in the AstASAHASRIKAPRAJNAPARAMITA, considered one of the earliest MahAyAna sutras, suggesting that it was already in use in this sense by at least the first century BCE. Schools differ on the precise length and constituent stages of the bodhisattva path (MARGA), but generally agree that it encompasses a huge number of lifetimes-according to many presentations, three incalculable eons of time (ASAMKHYEYAKALPA)-during which the bodhisattva develops specific virtues known as perfections (PARAMITA) and proceeds through a series of stages (BHuMI). Although all traditions agree that the bodhisattva is motivated by "great compassion" (MAHAKARUnA) to achieve buddhahood as quickly as possible, Western literature often describes the bodhisattva as someone who postpones his enlightenment in order to save all beings from suffering. This description is primarily relevant to the mainstream schools, where an adherent is said to recognize his ability to achieve the enlightenment of an ARHAT more quickly by following the teachings of a buddha, but chooses instead to become a bodhisattva; by choosing this longer course, he perfects himself over many lifetimes in order to achieve the superior enlightenment of a buddha at a point in the far-distant future when the teachings of the preceding buddha have completely disappeared. In the MahAyAna, the nirvAna of the arhat is disparaged and is regarded as far inferior to buddhahood. Thus, the bodhisattva postpones nothing, instead striving to achieve buddhahood as quickly as possible. In both the mainstream and MahAyana traditions, the bodhisattva, spending his penultimate lifetime in the TUsITA heaven, takes his final rebirth in order to become a buddha and restore the dharma to the world. MAITREYA is the bodhisattva who will succeed the dispensation (sASANA) of the current buddha, GAUTAMA or sAKYAMUNI; he is said to be waiting in the tusita heaven, until the conditions are right for him to take his final rebirth and become the next buddha in the lineage. In the MahAyAna tradition, many bodhisattvas are described as having powers that rival or even surpass those of the buddhas themselves, and come to symbolize specific spiritual qualities, such as AVALOKITEsVARA (the bodhisattva of compassion), MANJUsRĪ (the bodhisattva of wisdom), VAJRAPAnI (the bodhisattva of power), and SAMANTABHADRA (the bodhisattva of extensive practice). In Western literature, these figures are sometimes referred to as "celestial bodhisattvas." ¶ In Korea, the term posal also designates laywomen residents of monasteries, who assist with the menial chores of cooking, preserving food, doing laundry, etc. These posal are often widows or divorcées, who work for the monastery in exchange for room and board for themselves and their children. The posal will often serve the monastery permanently and end up retiring there as well.

bodhisattvapranidhAna. (T. byang chub sems pa'i smon lam; C. pusa yuan; J. bosatsugan; K. posal won 菩薩願). In Sanskrit, "bodhisattva vow"; the vow to achieve buddhahood in order to liberate all beings from suffering. Following the BODHICARYAVATARA, the MAHAYANA commentarial tradition considers this vow to be the point at which one makes a public pronouncement of one's aspiration to achieve buddhahood (PRAnIDHICITTOTPADA), which is distinguished from the subsequent practice of this aspiration (PRASTHANACITTOTPADA), i.e., cultivating specific bodhisattva precepts (see BODHISATTVASAMVARA) and mastering the six perfections (PARAMITA). In MahAyAna sutras, which tend to be less systematized, this vow is typically made before a buddha, who then offers a prediction (VYAKARAnA) that the aspirant will succeed in his quest; the person is then called one who will not turn back, or "irreversible" (AVAIVARTIKA). The recitation of the bodhisattva vow is a central component in many MahAyAna liturgies. See also BODHICITTOTPADA.

Boycott Apple "legal" Some time before 1989, {Apple Computer, Inc.} started a lawsuit against {Hewlett-Packard} and {Microsoft}, claiming they had breeched Apple's {copyright} on the {look and feel} of the {Macintosh user interface}. In December 1989, {Xerox} failed to sue {Apple Computer}, claiming that the software for Apple's {Lisa} computer and {Macintosh} {Finder}, both copyrighted in 1987, were derived from two {Xerox} programs: {Smalltalk}, developed in the mid-1970s and {Star}, copyrighted in 1981. Apple wanted to stop people from writing any program that worked even vaguely like a {Macintosh}. If such {look and feel} lawsuits succeed they could put an end to {free software} that could substitute for commercial software. In the weeks after the suit was filed, {Usenet} reverberated with condemnation for Apple. {GNU} supporters {Richard Stallman}, {John Gilmore} and Paul Rubin decided to take action against Apple. Apple's reputation as a force for progress came from having made better computers; but The {League for Programming Freedom} believed that Apple wanted to make all non-Apple computers worse. They therefore campaigned to discourage people from using Apple products or working for Apple or any other company threatening similar obstructionist tactics (e.g. {Lotus} and {Xerox}). Because of this boycott the {Free Software Foundation} for a long time didn't support {Macintosh} {Unix} in their software. In 1995, the LPF and the FSF decided to end the boycott. [Dates? Other events? Why did Xerox's case against Apple fail?] (1995-04-18)

Boycott Apple ::: Some time before 1989, Apple Computer, Inc. started a lawsuit against Hewlett-Packard and Microsoft, claiming they had breeched Apple's copyright on Xerox programs: Smalltalk, developed in the mid-1970s and Star, copyrighted in 1981.Apple wanted to stop people from writing any program that worked even vaguely like a Macintosh. If such look and feel lawsuits succeed they could put an end to free software that could substitute for commercial software.In the weeks after the suit was filed, Usenet reverberated with condemnation for Apple. GNU supporters Richard Stallman, John Gilmore, and Paul Rubin decided to or any other company threatening similar obstructionist tactics (e.g. Lotus and Xerox).Because of this boycott the Free Software Foundation for a long time didn't support Macintosh Unix in their software. In 1995, the LPF and the FSF decided to end the boycott.[Dates? Other events? Why did Xerox's case against Apple fail?] (1995-04-18)

succeeds ::: comes next in time or succession; follows after another; replaces another in an office or a position.

Bundle, Theory of Self: The conception of the self as a mere aggregate of mental states. The designation is an allusion to Hume's famous description of the self as: "a bundle or collection of different perceptions which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement." (A Treatise on Human Nature, Part LV, § 6.)-- L.W.

Burnouf, Eugène. (1801-1852). French orientalist and seminal figure in the development of Buddhist Studies as an academic discipline. He was born in Paris on April 8, 1801, the son of the distinguished classicist Jean-Louis Burnouf (1775-1844). He received instruction in Greek and Latin from his father and studied at the Lycée Louis-le-Grand. He entered the École des Chartes in 1822, receiving degrees in both letters and law in 1824. He then turned to the study of Sanskrit, both with his father and with Antoine Léonard de Chézy (1773-1832). In 1826, Burnouf published, in collaboration with the young Norwegian-German scholar Christian Lassen (1800-1876), Essai sur le pali ("Essay on PALI"). After the death of Chézy, Burnouf was appointed to succeed his teacher in the chair of Sanskrit at the Collège de France. His students included some of the greatest scholars of day; those who would contribute to Buddhist studies included Philippe Edouard Foucaux (1811-1894) and FRIEDRICH MAX MÜLLER. Shortly after his appointment to the chair of Sanskrit, the Société Asiatique, of which Burnouf was secretary, received a communication from BRIAN HOUGHTON HODGSON, British resident at the court of Nepal, offering to send Sanskrit manuscripts of Buddhist texts to Paris. The receipt of these texts changed the direction of Burnouf's scholarship for the remainder his life. After perusing the AstASAHASRIKAPRAJNAPARAMITA and the LALITAVISTARA, he decided to translate the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA. Having completed the translation, he decided to precede its publication with a series of studies. He completed only the first of these, published in 1844 as Introduction à l'histoire du Buddhisme indien. This massive work is regarded as the foundational text for the academic study of Buddhism in the West. It contains Burnouf's highly influential analyses of various aspects of Sanskrit Buddhism as he understood them from the works received from Hodgson. It also contains hundreds of pages of translations of previously unknown works, drawn especially from the DIVYAVADANA and the AVADANAsATAKA. Burnouf died, apparently of kidney failure, on May 28, 1852. His translation of the Saddharmapundarīka, Le Lotus de la bonne loi, appeared that same year.

But since no human system has this endless receptivity and unfailing capacity, the supramental Yoga can succeed only if the

Byang chub 'od. (Jangchup Ö) (late tenth century). Grandnephew of King YE SHES 'OD who successfully invited the Indian Buddhist monk and scholar ATIsA DĪPAMKARAsRĪJNANA to Tibet. During the second half of the tenth century, Ye shes 'od (also known as Song nge) became the king of Mnga' ris (Ngari), now the far western region of Tibet. He sent a number of Tibetans to Kashmir (see KASHMIR-GANDHARA) to study Buddhism, among them the translator RIN CHEN BZANG PO whose return to Tibet in 978 marks the beginning of the later spread of Buddhism (PHYI DAR). (Others date the beginning to the start of the second MuLASARVASTIVADA ordination line, which began at about the same period.) According to a well-known story, Ye shes 'od wanted to invite the foremost Indian Buddhist scholar of the day, Atisa, to Tibet and traveled to the Qarluq (T. gar log) kingdom (probably to KHOTAN in present-day Chinese Xianjiang province), to raise funds. He was captured by the chieftain and held for ransom. Ye shes 'od sent a letter to his nephew Byang chub 'od, saying that rather than use money for a ransom to free him, he should use any money collected for his release to invite Atisa. Ye shes 'od died in captivity, but Byang chub 'od succeeded in convincing Atisa to come to Tibet where he had a great influence, particularly on the earlier followers of the BKA' GDAMS sect. The history of this period becomes more important in later Tibetan history when TSONG KHA PA, the founder of the DGE LUGS sect, described Atisa as the perfect teacher in his seminal work the LAM RIM CHEN MO. In the seventeenth century, when the Dge lugs rose to political power under the fifth DALAI LAMA and his supporters, Byang chub 'od and Atisa were incorporated into a complex founding myth legitimating Dge lugs ascendancy and the DGA' LDAN PHO BRANG government.

Cadmus, Cadmilus (Greek) Son of Agenor, king of Phoenicia, and brother of Europa, husband of Harmonia, and father of Semele; legendary founder of Thebes, who slew the dragon, planted its teeth, and built the city with the help of some of the soldiers that sprang from the teeth. He and his wife were finally turned into serpents by the gods. Said to have introduced into Greece an alphabet, possibly based upon 16 characters derived from either Egypt or Phoenicia. He belongs to the class of heroes, who succeeded the reigns of the gods and demigods on earth and who were parents and instructors of mortals.

caturnimitta. (P. catunimitta; T. mtshan ma bzhi; C. sixiang; J. shiso; K. sasang 四相). In Sanskrit, the "four signs," "sights," or "portents," which were the catalysts that led the future buddha SIDDHARTHA GAUTAMA to renounce the world (see PRAVRAJITA) and pursue liberation from the cycle of birth and death (SAMSARA): specifically, an old man, a diseased man, a dead man, and a religious mendicant (sRAMAnA). According to the many traditional biographies of the Buddha, eight brAhmana seers predicted at the time of his birth that, were Gautama to see all four of these portents, he would be led inexorably toward renunciation of his royal heritage. His father, sUDDHODANA, who wanted SiddhArtha to succeed him, sought to shield the prince from these sights. While distracting his son with all the sensual pleasures available in his palaces, the prince, at the age of twenty-nine, eventually became curious about the world beyond the palace and convinced his father to allow him to go out in his chariot, accompanied by the charioteer CHANDAKA. On four successive chariot rides, the prince saw an old man, a sick man, a corpse being taken to the charnel ground, and a mendicant. Gautama eventually determined to go forth (pravrajita) into homelessness after witnessing the four portents. The first three sights demonstrated to Gautama the vanity of life and the reality of suffering (DUḤKHA), and the sight of a religious mendicant provided him with the prospect of freedom of mind and a model to follow in finding a way leading to liberation. Some versions of the Buddha's biography refer only to the first three of these signs. In some versions, it is said that the four sights were not actually an old man, sick man, corpse, and mendicant, but apparitions of these created by the gods in order to spur the bodhisattva to renounce the world. In the LALITAVISTARA, it is the prince himself who creates the old man, the sick man, the corpse, and the mendicant, and then asks his charioteer who they are, pretending not to know the answer. Biographies of previous buddhas, such as VIPAsYIN, typically mention the role similar encounters played in their own renunciations.

Causa sui: Cause of itself; necessary existence. Causa sui conveys both a negative and a positive meaning. Negatively, it signifies that which is from itself (a se), that which does not owe its being to something else; i.e., absolute independence of being, causelessness (God as uncaused). Positively, causa sui means that whose very nature or essence involves existence; i.e., God is the ground of his own being, and regarded as "cause" of his own being, he is, as it were, efficient cause of his own existence (Descartes). Since existence necessarily follows from the very essence of that which is cause of itself, causa sui is defined as that whose nature cannot be conceived as not existing (Spinoza). -- A.G.A.B. Causality: (Lat. causa) The relationship between a cause and its effect. This relationship has been defined as a relation between events, processes, or entities in the same time series, such that   when one occurs, the other necessarily follows (sufficient condition),   when the latter occurs, the former must have preceded (necessary condition),   both conditions a and b prevail (necessary and sufficient condition),   when one occurs under certain conditions, the other necessarily follows (contributory, but not sufficient, condition) ("multiple causality" would be a case involving several causes which are severally contributory and jointly sufficient); the necessity in these cases is neither that of logical implication nor that of coercion; a relation between events, processes, or entities in the same time series such that when one occurs the other invariably follows (invariable antecedence), a relation between events, processes, or entities such that one has the efficacy to produce or alter the other; a relation between events, processes, or entities such that without one the other could not occur, as in the relation between   the material out of which a product is made and the finished product (material cause),   structure or form and the individual embodying it (formal cause),   a goal or purpose (whether supposed to exist in the future as a special kind of entity, outside a time series, or merely as an idea of the pur-poser) and the work fulfilling it (final cause),   a moving force and the process or result of its action (efficient cause); a relation between experienced events, processes, or entities and extra-experiential but either temporal or non-temporal events, processes, or entities upon whose existence the former depend; a relation between a thing and itself when it is dependent upon nothing else for its existence (self-causality); a relation between an event, process, or entity and the reason or explanation for its being; a relation between an idea and an experience whose expectation the idea arouses because of customary association of the two in this sequence; a principle or category introducing into experience one of the aforesaid types of order; this principle may be inherent in the mind, invented by the mind, or derived from experience; it may be an explanatory hypothesis, a postulate, a convenient fiction, or a necessary form of thought. Causality has been conceived to prevail between processes, parts of a continuous process, changing parts of an unchanging whole, objects, events, ideas, or something of one of these types and something of another. When an entity, event, or process is said to follow from another, it may be meant that it must succeed but can be neither contemporaneous with nor prior to the other, that it must either succeed or be contemporaneous with and dependent upon but cannot precede the other, or that one is dependent upon the other but they either are not in the same time series or one is in no time series at all.

CENT, There is no connection between the Christian concep- tion (of the Kingdom of Heaven) and the idea of the Supra- mental descent. The Christian conception supposes a state of things brought about by religious emotion' and d'mdral'purifica- tion but ' these things are no more"capable of changing the world, 'whatever value they may base for the individual, than mental idealism or any bther power yet called upon for the pur- pose] The Christian proposes to substitute the sattsic religious ego for the rajasic and tamasic cgo| but although this can be donc-as an individual achievement, it has never succeeded and win never succeed in • accomplishing itself in the mass. It has no higher spiritual or psjchological knowledge behind it and ignores the' foundation -of htimao character and the source of the difBculty — the duality 6f mind, ‘life and body. Unless there is a descent of a new Power of Consdousness, not subject to the dualities but still dynamic which will preside a new foundation and a lifting of the centre of consciousness above the mind, the

cheve ::: v. i. --> To come to an issue; to turn out; to succeed; as, to cheve well in a enterprise.

childe ::: n. --> A cognomen formerly prefixed to his name by the oldest son, until he succeeded to his ancestral titles, or was knighted; as, Childe Roland.

Chin'gak Hyesim. (眞覺慧諶) (1178-1234). Korean SoN master during the Koryo dynasty, also known as Yongŭl and Muŭija. Although he sought to ordain as a monk at an early age, his mother adamantly opposed his wish and he instead studied to become a Confucian literatus. It was not until 1202, after his mother's death, that he finally was able to join the SUSoNSA community established by POJO CHINUL and become his principal disciple. Hyesim was known for his intense style of practice: he is said, for example, to have been so absorbed in his meditation while he was at CHIRISAN that snow had piled up to his head. Although Chinul had decided to pass the leadership of his community on to Hyesim in 1208, Hyesim declined and went into hiding on Chirisan. In 1210, when Chinul passed away, some of his disciples notified the king of their master's death and he issued a royal decree, ordering Hyesim to return to Susonsa and succeed Chinul. Hyesim thus became the second teacher of the Susonsa community. He spent the rest of his life building the community and teaching the kanhwa Son (see KANHUA CHAN), or "questioning meditation," technique that Chinul had first championed in Korea. Hyesim compiled the first indigenous kongan (C. GONG'AN) collection, the SoNMUN YoMSONG CHIP, and the emphasis on kanhwa Son in subsequent Korean Buddhist practice owes much to his fervent advocacy of the technique. Hyesim passed away at the age of fifty-seven and received the posthumous title Chin'gak kuksa (State Preceptor Authentic Enlightenment). His other works include the CHOGYE CHIN'GAK KUKSA oROK and the Sonmun gangyo.

Chinhŭng wang. (眞興王) (534/540-576). Twenty-fourth king of the Korean Silla dynasty; his secular name was Kim Kongnŭngjong and his dharma name, Pobun (Dharma Cloud). He succeeded King Pophŭng at the age of seven and reigned for thirty-six years (r. 540-576). Later in his life he became a Buddhist monk and promoted the propagation of Buddhism in Silla. Following his footsteps, his queen, Lady Sado, also entered the SAMGHA and received the dharma name Myoju (Sublime Dwelling); she resided at a monastery called Yonghŭngsa. King Chinhŭng's reign is considered to be a turning point in the development of Buddhism in Silla. King Chinhŭng ordered the construction of the royal monastery Hŭngnyunsa, and after its completion allowed commoners for the first time to enter the saMgha. At his request, the hundred high-seat ceremony (paekkojwa pophoe) for the recitation of the RENWANG JING as well as the eight restrictions festival (P'ALGWANHOE; cf. C. BAGUAN ZHAI) were held for the first time in Silla. HWANGNYONGSA, the grandest monastery in Korea, was also built during his reign.

Ch'ongho Hyujong. (清虚休静) (1520-1604). Korean SoN master of the Choson dynasty; best known to Koreans by his sobriquet Sosan taesa (lit. the Great Master "West Mountain," referring to Mt. Myohyang near present-day P'yongyang in North Korea). Hyujong was a native of Anju in present-day South P'yongan province. After losing his parents at an early age, Hyujong was adopted by the local magistrate of Anju, Yi Sajŭng (d.u.), and educated at the Songgyun'gwan Confucian academy. In 1534, Hyujong failed to attain the chinsa degree and decided instead to become a monk. He was ordained by a certain Sungin (d.u.) on CHIRISAN in 1540, and he later received the full monastic precepts from Hyuong Ilson (1488-1568). Hyujong later became the disciple of the Son master Puyong Yonggwan (1485-1571). In 1552, Hyujong passed the clerical exams (SŬNGKWA) revived by HoŮNG POU, who later appointed Hyujong the prelate (p'ansa) of both the SoN and KYO traditions. Hyujong also succeeded Pou as the abbot of the monastery Pongŭnsa in the capital, but he left his post as prelate and spent the next few years teaching and traveling throughout the country. When the Japanese troops of Hideyoshi Toyotomi (1536/7-1598) invaded Korea in 1592, Hyujong's disciple Kiho Yonggyu (d. 1592) succeeded in retaking the city of Ch'ongju, but died shortly afterward in battle. Hyujong himself was then asked by King Sonjo (r. 1567-1608) to lead an army against the invading forces. His monk militias (ŭisŭnggun) eventually played an important role in fending off the Japanese troops. When the king subsequently gave Hyujong permission to retire, the master left his command in the hands of his disciple SAMYoNG YUJoNG; he died shortly thereafter. Hyujong is said to have had more than one thousand students, among whom Yujong, P'yonyang Ŭn'gi (1581-1644), Soyo T'aenŭng (1562-1649), and Chonggwan Ilson (1533-1608) are best known. Hyujong left a number of writings, including the SoN'GA KWIGAM, which is one of the most widely read works of the Korean Buddhist tradition. Other important works include the Samga kwigam, Son'gyo sok, Son'gyo kyol, and Solson ŭi. In these works, Hyujong attempted to reconcile the teachings of the Son and Kyo traditions of Buddhism, as well as the doctrines of Buddhism and Confucianism.

Chronos (Greek) Time; in Orphism, Phanes (or Eros), Chaos, and Chronos constitute a triad which, emanating from the Unknowable, reproduces the worlds; essentially one, it acts on the plane of maya as three distinct things. Chronos was identified with the titan Kronos, who dethroned Ouranos and succeeded him as ruler of the world, himself being succeeded by Zeus. Kronos devours his own children, which is symbolic of time which both brings forth and destroys events.

Ch'unggyong Ch'onyong. (冲鏡天英) (1215-1286). Korean monk of the Koryo dynasty and fifth patriarch of the SUSoNSA community established by POJO CHINUL. Ch'unggyong was ordained by CHIN'GAK HYESIM in 1229 and passed the national clerical examinations (SŬNGKWA) in 1236. He subsequently began his studies under Hyesim's disciple Mongyo (d. 1252), and he later became the student of Mongyo's disciple CHINMYoNG HONWoN. Ch'unggyong continued studying with his teacher while they were living at the monastery of Sonwonsa and in the Susonsa community. When Chinmyong stepped down as patriarch of Susonsa in 1256, the king gave Ch'unggyong the title of Great Son Master (taesonsa) and appointed him as Chinmyong's successor. The community flourished under Ch'unggyong's supervision. He passed away at the monastery of Pulgaesa in 1286 and was succeeded as patriarch of the Susonsa community by his chief disciple MIRAM CH'UNGJI.

Churchill, Winston ::: (1875-1965) British Prime Minister, 1940-1945. He succeeded Chamberlain on May 10, 1940, at the height of Hitler's conquest of Western Europe. Churchill was one of the very few Western politicians who recognized the threat that Hitler posed to Europe. He strongly opposed Chamberlain's appeasement policies.

Cleanthes (3rd century BC) Greek Stoic philosopher and poet, native of Asia Minor, who studied under Zeno at Athens for 19 years and succeeded him as head of the Stoic school in 260 BC; a beautiful hymn to Zeus is the only one of his writings that remains today.

climax ::: v. i. --> Upward movement; steady increase; gradation; ascent.
A figure in which the parts of a sentence or paragraph are so arranged that each succeeding one rises above its predecessor in impressiveness.
The highest point; the greatest degree.


Conditional_probability ::: is the likelihood of an event or outcome occurring based on the occurrence of a previous event or outcome. Conditional probability is calculated by multiplying the probability of the preceding event by the updated probability of the succeeding, or conditional, event.

Consciousness: (Lat. conscire, to know, to be cognizant of) A designation applied to conscious mind as opposed to a supposedly unconscious or subconscious mind (See Subconscious Mind; Unconscious Mind), and to the whole domain of the physical and non-mental. Consciousness is generally considered an indefinable term or rather a term definable only by direct introspective appeal to conscious experiences. The indefinability of consciousness is expressed by Sir William Hamilton: "Consciousness cannot be defined: we may be ourselves fully aware what consciousness is, but we cannot without confusion convey to others a definition of what we ourselves clearly apprehend. The reason is plain: consciousness lies at the root of all knowledge." (Lectures on Metaphysics, I, 191.) Ladd's frequently quoted definition of consciousness succeeds only in indicating the circumstances under which it is directly observable: "Whatever we are when we are awake, as contrasted with what we are when we sink into a profound and dreamless sleep, that is to be conscious."

consecutive ::: a. --> Following in a train; succeeding one another in a regular order; successive; uninterrupted in course or succession; with no interval or break; as, fifty consecutive years.
Following as a consequence or result; actually or logically dependent; consequential; succeeding.
Having similarity of sequence; -- said of certain parallel progressions of two parts in a piece of harmony; as, consecutive fifths, or consecutive octaves, which are forbidden.


coronation ::: n. --> The act or solemnity of crowning a sovereign; the act of investing a prince with the insignia of royalty, on his succeeding to the sovereignty.
The pomp or assembly at a coronation.


COSMIC KINGDOMS All we know about these six successively higher divine kingdoms in the 42 higher atomic worlds is that they exist, that they constitute a perfect cosmic organization working with unfailing precision in accordance with all existence's laws of nature and life.

In the cosmos, the individual does not acquire any envelopes of his own. He succeeds to some high function and, finally, to the highest in his world with its collective consciousness, and identifies himself with this world as his own envelope.

The individuals of the second divine kingdom aspire towards omniscience in the worlds 36- 42 (only now &


COSMOS, BUILDERS OF THE The cosmos has been built out by a collectivity of monads who have acquired consciousness in a cosmos and have themselves worked their way up through all its 49 worlds. They wish, in their turn, to awaken to consciousness the unconscious monads in primordial matter and make to possible for them to acquire omniscience and omnipotence in the cosmos. K 2.2.9

When a sufficient number of monads have succeeded in working their way from the lowest natural kingdom up to the highest divine kingdom, this collective being is able to leave its cosmic globe in order to begin to build out a cosmic globe of its own in primordial matter, the material being primordial atoms taken from the inexhaustible store of primordial matter. K 4.5.5


cue ::: n. --> The tail; the end of a thing; especially, a tail-like twist of hair worn at the back of the head; a queue.
The last words of a play actor&


Cycles or Law of Cycles ::: An exceedingly interesting branch of theosophical study, and one dealing with a fact which is soobviously manifest in the worlds surrounding us that its existence can hardly be denied, except by thewillfully blind, is what may be called the law of cycles, or nature's repetitive operations.We find nature repeating herself everywhere, although such repetition of course is not merely a runningin the same old ruts on each recurrence of the cyclic activity; for each recurrence is of course theexpression of a modification, more or less great, of what has preceded. Day succeeds night, wintersucceeds summer, the planets circulate around the suns in regular and periodical courses; and these arebut familiar examples of cyclical activity.Cycles in nature show the time periods of periodic recurrence along and in which any evolving entity orthing expresses the energies and powers which are itself, so that cycles and evolution are like the twosides of a coin: the one shows the time periods or cycles, and the other side manifests the energic orsubstantial qualities appearing in manifestation according to these cyclical time-periods; but back of thisapparently double but actually single process always lie profound karmic causes.

dAna. (T. sbyin pa; C. bushi; J. fuse; K. posi 布施). In Sanskrit and PAli, "giving," "generosity," or "charity"; one of the most highly praised of virtues in Buddhism and the foundational practice of the Buddhist laity, presumably because of its value in weaning the layperson from attachment to material possessions while providing essential material support to the SAMGHA. It is the chief cause of prosperity in future lives and rebirth as a divinity (DEVA) in one of the heavens of the sensuous realm (KAMADHATU). There are numerous stories in the AVADANA and JATAKA literatures that illustrate the virtues of giving, the most famous being that of Prince VisvaMtara (P. VESSANTARA), whose generosity was so profound that he gave away not only all his worldly possessions but even his wife and children. In other stories, BODHISATTVAs often give away their body or parts of their body (see DEHADANA; SHESHEN). The immediate karmic result of the practice of giving is said to be wealth in the future, especially as a divinity in one of the heavens. Giving, especially to the SAMGHA, is presumed to generate merit (PUnYA) that will accrue to the benefit of the donor in both this and future lifetimes; indeed, giving is the first in a standard list of meritorious acts, along with morality (sĪLA) and religious development (BHAVANA). In the "graduated discourse" (S. ANUPuRVIKATHA; P. ANUPUBBIKATHA) that the Buddha commonly used in instructing the laity, the discourse on giving (dAnakathA) was even more fundamental than the succeeding discourses on right conduct (sīlakathA) and the joys of rebirth in the heavens (svargakathA). Eight items are typically presumed to make appropriate offerings: food, water, clothing, vehicles, garlands, perfume, beds and dwellings, and lights. In yet another enumeration, there are three kinds of dAna: the "gift of material goods" (AMIsADANA); the gift of fearlessness (ABHAYADANA), and the "gift of the dharma" (DHARMADANA). Of all gifts, however, the greatest was said to be the "gift of the dharma" (dharmadAna), viz., spiritual instruction that will lead not just to better rebirths but to liberation from SAMSARA; it is this gift that the saMgha offers reciprocally to the laity. In MAHAYANA soteriology, giving is listed as the first of the six perfections (PARAMITA) cultivated on the bodhisattva path (see DANAPARAMITA). According to the PAli tradition, dAna is the first of ten perfections (P. pAramī). In some schools, a being who is incapable of even the modicum of detachment that is required to donate one's possessions through charity is thought to have eradicated his wholesome spiritual faculties (SAMUCCHINNAKUsALAMuLA; see also ICCHANTIKA) and to have lost for an indeterminate period any prospect of enlightenment.

Death ::: Death occurs when a general break-up of the constitution of man takes place; nor is this break-up amatter of sudden occurrence, with the exceptions of course of such cases as mortal accidents or suicides.Death is always preceded, varying in each individual case, by a certain time spent in the withdrawal ofthe monadic individuality from an incarnation, and this withdrawal of course takes place coincidentlywith a decay of the seven-principle being which man is in physical incarnation. This decay precedesphysical dissolution, and is a preparation of and by the consciousness-center for the forthcomingexistence in the invisible realms. This withdrawal actually is a preparation for the life to come ininvisible realms, and as the septenary entity on this earth so decays, it may truly be said to beapproaching rebirth in the next sphere.Death occurs, physically speaking, with the cessation of activity of the pulsating heart. There is the lastbeat, and this is followed by immediate, instantaneous unconsciousness, for nature is very merciful inthese things. But death is not yet complete, for the brain is the last organ of the physical body really todie, and for some time after the heart has ceased beating, the brain and its memory still remain activeand, although unconsciously so, the human ego for this short length of time, passes in review every eventof the preceding life. This great or small panoramic picture of the past is purely automatic, so to say; yetthe soul-consciousness of the reincarnating ego watches this wonderful review incident by incident, areview which includes the entire course of thought and action of the life just closed. The entity is, for thetime being, entirely unconscious of everything else except this. Temporarily it lives in the past, andmemory dislodges from the akasic record, so to speak, event after event, to the smallest detail: passesthem all in review, and in regular order from the beginning to the end, and thus sees all its past life as anall-inclusive panorama of picture succeeding picture.There are very definite ethical and psychological reasons inhering in this process, for this process forms areconstruction of both the good and the evil done in the past life, and imprints this strongly as a record onthe fabric of the spiritual memory of the passing being. Then the mortal and material portions sink intooblivion, while the reincarnating ego carries the best and noblest parts of these memories into thedevachan or heaven-world of postmortem rest and recuperation. Thus comes the end called death; andunconsciousness, complete and undisturbed, succeeds, until there occurs what the ancients called thesecond death.The lower triad (prana, linga-sarira, sthula-sarira) is now definitely cast off, and the remaining quaternaryis free. The physical body of the lower triad follows the course of natural decay, and its various hosts oflife-atoms proceed whither their natural attractions draw them. The linga-sarira or model-body remains inthe astral realms, and finally fades out. The life-atoms of the prana, or electrical field, fly instantly backat the moment of physical dissolution to the natural pranic reservoirs of the planet.This leaves man, therefore, no longer a heptad or septenary entity, but a quaternary consisting of theupper duad (atma-buddhi) and the intermediate duad (manas-kama). The second death then takes place.Death and the adjective dead are mere words by which the human mind seeks to express thoughts whichit gathers from a more or less consistent observation of the phenomena of the material world. Death isdissolution of a component entity or thing. The dead, therefore, are merely dissolving bodies -- entitieswhich have reached their term on this our physical plane. Dissolution is common to all things, becauseall physical things are composite: they are not absolute things. They are born; they grow; they reachmaturity; they enjoy, as the expression runs, a certain term of life in the full bloom of their powers; thenthey "die." That is the ordinary way of expressing what men call death; and the corresponding adjectiveis dead, when we say that such things or entities are dead.Do you find death per se anywhere? No. You find nothing but action; you find nothing but movement;you find nothing but change. Nothing stands still or is annihilated. What is called death itself shouts forthto us the fact of movement and change. Absolute inertia is unknown in nature or in the human mind; itdoes not exist.

Demiéville, Paul. (1894-1979). Distinguished French Buddhologist and Sinologist. He was born in Lausanne, Switzerland, and educated in Bern, Munich, and London. He began his study of Chinese at King's College, London, in 1915, continuing in Paris, studying Chinese with Edouard Chavannes and Sanskrit with SYLVAIN LÉVI. In 1919, he became a member of the École française d'Extreme-Orient, spending 1920-24 in Hanoi, 1924-26 teaching Sanskrit and philosophy at Amoy University in Xiamen, China, and 1926-30 in Tokyo, where he served as editor-in-chief of the Buddhist dictionary HoBoGIRIN, which had been founded by Lévi and TAKAKUSU JUNJIRo. Returning to Paris, Demiéville held positions at the École des languages orientales vivantes and the École pratique des hautes études, before being appointed to succeed Henri Maspero in the chair of Chinese language and literature at the Collège de France, where he spent the remainder of his academic career. The majority of his publications, on a remarkable range of Buddhological and Sinological topics, were published as articles (many quite substantial) in journals such as Bulletin de l'École française d'Extreme-Orient, T'oung Pao (where he served as editor), and in Hobogirin. Many of these later writings were gathered into two collections, Choix d'études sinologiques and Choix d'études bouddhiques. Demiéville published a detailed study of the Chinese version of the MILINDAPANHA and worked extensively on the DUNHUANG manuscripts. Two of his monographs are particularly well known, Entretiens de Lin-tsi (1972) on the Chan master LINJI and Le Concile de Lhasa (1952), still regarded as the definitive study on the BSAM YAS DEBATE.

desudation ::: n. --> A sweating; a profuse or morbid sweating, often succeeded by an eruption of small pimples.

Development Towns ::: New towns established in Israel to provide for urban growth, but essentially to house immigrants since 1950's, succeeding the ma'abarah, transitional camp, which had been widely used since 1948. Its goal was to offer communities both homes and employment opportunities, although it often did not succeed in raising initial lower economic status; used primarily for immigrants of Sephardi and eastern origin.

diphyodont ::: a. --> Having two successive sets of teeth (deciduous and permanent), one succeeding the other; as, a diphyodont mammal; diphyodont dentition; -- opposed to monophyodont. ::: n. --> An animal having two successive sets of teeth.

Divine Right of Kings A tradition originating in the priest-kings of the divine dynasties — now forgotten and therefore legendary history — that ruled mankind in its earlier stages; and these again represented those semi-divine beings who came to our globe in this round from a previous round to be revealers to early mankind. As humanity sank into materialism, these initiated and illuminated priest-kings were replaced by schools or priest-colleges. Succeeding ages have witnessed a still further degeneration of the institution. Although the lofty idea imbodied in this phrase has been degraded, legend and tradition tell of a time when its dignity shall be again restored upon the earth, and its institutions shall inaugurate a new and grander age. See also DYNASTIES

Dongshan famen. (J. Tozan homon; K. Tongsan pommun 東山法門). In Chinese, lit. "East Mountain Dharma Gate" or "East Mountain Teachings"; one of the principal early CHAN schools, which is associated with the putative fourth and fifth patriarchs of the tradition, DAOXIN (580-651) and HONGREN (602-675). The name of the school is a toponym for the location of Hongren's monastery, at Huangmei in Qizhou (present-day Hubei province). "East Mountain" refers to the easterly of the "twin peaks" of Mount Shuangfeng, where Hongren taught after the death of his master Daoxin, who had taught on the westerly peak; the term "East Mountain Teachings," however, is typically used to refer to the tradition associated with both masters. The designations Dongshan famen and Dongshan jingmen (East Mountain Pure Gate) first appear in the LENGQIE SHIZI JI ("Records of the Masters and Disciples of the Lankā[vatāra]") and were used in the Northern school of Chan (BEI ZONG) by SHENXIU (606?-706) and his successors to refer to the lineage and teachings that they had inherited from Daoxin and Hongren. ¶ Although later Chan lineage texts list Daoxin and Hongren as respectively the fourth and the fifth Chan patriarchs, succeeding BODHIDHARMA, HUIKE, and SENGCAN, the connection of the East Mountain lineage to these predecessors is tenuous at best and probably nonexistent. The earliest biography of Daoxin, recorded in the XU GAOSENG ZHUAN ("Supplementary Biographies of Eminent Monks"), not only does not posit any connection between Daoxin and the preceding three patriarchs, but does not even mention their names. This connection is first made explicit in the c. 713 CHUAN FABAO JI ("Annals of the Transmission of the Dharma-Jewel"), one of the earliest Chan "transmission of the lamplight" (CHUANDENG LU) lineage texts. Unlike many of the Chan "schools" that were associated with a single charismatic teacher, the "East Mountain Teachings" was unusual in that it had a single, enduring center in Huangmei, which attracted increasing numbers of students. Some five or six names of students who studied with Daoxin survive in the literature, with another twenty-five associated with Hongren. Although Hongren's biography in the Chuan fabao ji certainly exaggerates when it says that eight to nine out of every ten Buddhist practitioners in China studied under Hongren, there is no question that the number of students of the East Mountain Teachings grew significantly over two generations. ¶ The fundamental doctrines and practices of the East Mountain Teachings can be reconstructed on the basis of the two texts: the RUDAO ANXIN YAO FANGBIAN FAMEN ("Essentials of the Teachings of the Expedient Means of Entering the Path and Pacifying the Mind") and the XIUXIN YAO LUN ("Treatise on the Essentials of Cultivating the Mind"), ascribed respectively to Daoxin and Hongren. The Rudao anxin yao fangbian famen, which is included in the Lengqie shizi ji, employs the analogy of a mirror from the Banzhou sanmei jing (S. PRATYUTPANNABUDDHASAMMUKHĀVASTHITASAMĀDHISuTRA) to illustrate the insubstantiality of all phenomena, viz., one's sensory experiences are no more substantial than the reflections in a mirror. The text then presents the "single-practice SAMĀDHI" (YIXING SANMEI) as a practical means of accessing the path leading to NIRVĀnA, based on the Wenshushuo bore jing ("Perfection of Wisdom Sutra Spoken by MANJUsRĪ"). Single-practice samādhi here refers to sitting in meditation, the supreme practice that subsumes all other practices; it is not one samādhi among others, as it is portrayed in the MOHE ZHIGUAN ("Great Calming and Contemplation"). Single-practice samādhi means to contemplate every single aspect of one's mental and physical existence until one realizes they are all empty, just like the reflections in the mirror, and "to guard that one without deviation" (shouyi buyi). The Xiuxin yao lun, which is attributed to Hongren, stresses the importance of "guarding the mind" (SHOUXIN). Here, the relationship between the pure mind and the afflictions (KLEsA) is likened to that between the sun and clouds: the pure mind is obscured by afflictions, just as the sun is covered by layers of clouds, but if one can guard the mind so that it is kept free from false thoughts and delusions, the sun of NIRVĀnA will then appear. The text suggests two specific meditation techniques for realizing this goal: one is continuously to visualize the original, pure mind (viz., the sun) so that it shines without obscuration; the other is to concentrate on one's own deluded thoughts (the clouds) until they disappear. These two techniques purport to "guard the mind" so that delusion can never recur. The East Mountain Teachings laid a firm foundation for the doctrines and practices of later Chan traditions like the Northern school.

down men’s activities. The angels succeed each

During the fourth root-race on this globe D of the fourth round, evolution reached the middle of its course for this planetary manvantara, and the door to entry into the state of spiritual and intellectual evolution called the human kingdom was closed. All entities beneath the humans (and probably higher anthropoids who were in existence before that epoch) must await until the next succeeding round before even the highest representatives of the beast kingdom can pass on to the human stage. All subhuman kingdoms will show a tendency as time goes on to die out, because the monads of these kingdoms will go into latency for the remainder of the planetary manvantara; their chance for evolution into the human state will come again during the succeeding planetary manvantara. See also ATLANTEANS

Each root-race reaches its evolutionary maximum at its midpoint, when a racial cataclysm occurs and the race begins to decline. At the same time the seeds of the succeeding root-race appear, and the new root-race in its infancy begins to run parallel with the race that is declining, so that there is continual overlapping.

Erebus (Greek) erebos. Darkness; Erebus and Nux or Nyx (night) sprang from Chaos, and the pair gave birth in their turn to Aether and Hemera (Day). Darkness begets light. “Erebos was the spiritual or active side corresponding to Brahman in Hindu philosophy, and Nyx the passive side corresponding to pradhana or mulaprakriti, . . . Then from Erebos and Nyx as dual were born Aether and Hemera, Spirit and Day — Spirit being here again in this succeeding stage the active side, and Day the passive aspect, the substantial or vehicular side” (FSO 72).

escheatage ::: n. --> The right of succeeding to an escheat.

EVOLUTION The unity of action exhibited in the operations of nature; the act or process of evolving; the succession of changes by which a germ passes from a simple to a complex condition. "With each succeeding Kingdom, evolution has changed its direction upward from the physical to the psychical."—Funk.

fact ::: (artificial intelligence, programming) The kind of clause used in logic programming which has no subgoals and so is always true (always succeeds). E.g. wet(water).male(denis). Rules usually contain logic variables, facts rarely do, except for oddities like equal(X,X).. (1996-10-20)

fact "artificial intelligence, programming" The kind of {clause} used in {logic programming} which has no {subgoals} and so is always true (always succeeds). E.g. wet(water). male(denis). This is in contrast to a {rule} which only succeeds if all its subgoals do. Rules usually contain {logic variables}, facts rarely do, except for oddities like "equal(X,X).". (1996-10-20)

Faith Healing, Drugless Healing Apart from the regular medical and surgical practice, widespread forms of drugless healing are employed today. Public opinion generally is either frankly skeptical about the whole matter, or believes that such afford safe and easy means of relief and escape from suffering and disease. As a whole, these forms of faith or magnetic healing depend on the “inborn or inherent, ability of the ‘healer’ or practitioner to convey healthy life-force from himself to the diseased person. This is the key to success, or the lack of success, in all cases, and in all kinds of healing of whatever so-called ‘school’ ” (SOPh 622). If the practitioner succeeds in conveying the vitality of the pranic fluids from his own healthy body to the diseased body or organ of another person, that healthy life-force “expels” or changes the inharmonious vibrations in the afflicted part and, by restoring harmony there, brings about health. Such cures can be permanent; usually they are temporary, lasting from a few days to a few years.

From the Rootless Root spring forth into manifestation in ever succeeding and unending cosmic periods, the universes which are scattered like seeds over the limitless fields of space; but in and through this womb there is the ever living and working hiranyagarbha (golden germ or egg), signifying for each such manifesting universe its divine monad — its divine consciousness and intelligence. See also BOUNDLESS

FTW "chat" An ambiguous acronym which might stand for any of "For The Win" (the thing just referred to will help you succeed), "Forever Two Wheels" (biker slang), {WTF} backwards, "Fuck The World", "Fuck This War", "Fun To Watch" or something else. (2008-09-12)

Glücks, Richard (1889-1945) ::: In 1936 Glücks became chief aide to Theodor Eicke and eventually succeeded Eicke as the inspector of the Nazi concentration camps. Glücks was responsible for the construction of Auschwitz and the creation of the gas chambers. In 1942 he was made head of an SS Wirtschafts-Verwaltunghauptamt unit. He died in May 1945, presumably a suicide.

goal "programming" In {logic programming}, a {predicate} applied to its {arguments} which the system attempts to prove by matching it against the {clauses} of the program. A goal may fail or it may succeed in one or more ways. (1997-07-14)

goal ::: (programming) In logic programming, a predicate applied to its arguments which the system attempts to prove by matching it against the clauses of the program. A goal may fail or it may succeed in one or more ways. (1997-07-14)

GOD AND AfAN. ::: Man becomes God, and all human acti- vity reaches its highest and noblest v%hen it succeeds in bringing body, heart and mind into touch with spirit.

greatwork ::: Great Work This term originates from the Latin of the Alchemists and relates to the completion of the alchemical process, the Summum Bonum. In Ceremonial/Ritual Magick, the phrase refers to the ultimate goal, i.e. union with the Divine. In Thelemic practice, it means succeeding in gaining the knowledge of and conversation with one's Holy Guardian Angel.

Guruparampara (Sanskrit) Guruparamparā [from guru teacher + paramparā a row or uninterrupted series or succession] An uninterrupted series or succession of teachers. Every Mystery school or esoteric college of ancient times had its regular and uninterrupted series of teacher succeeding teacher, each one passing on to his successor the mystical authority and headship he himself had received from his predecessor. There are two kinds of guruparampara: first, those who rise one above the other in spiritual dignity and in progressively greater esoteric degree; and, second, those who succeed each other in time and in one line in the outer world. Yet these two kinds are but the same rule of series manifesting in two slightly differing manners. This process copies the hierarchical structure of nature itself.

Guru-parampara(Sanskrit) ::: This is a compound formed of guru, meaning "teacher," and a subordinate compoundparam-para, the latter compound meaning "a row or uninterrupted series or succession." Henceguru-parampara signifies an uninterrupted series or succession of teachers. Every Mystery school oresoteric college of ancient times had its regular and uninterrupted series or succession of teachersucceeding teacher, each one passing on to his successor the mystical authority and headship he himselfhad received from his predecessor.Like everything else of an esoteric character in the ancient world, the guru-parampara or succession ofteachers faithfully copied what actually exists or takes place in nature herself, where a hierarchy with itssummit or head is immediately linked on to a superior hierarchy as well as to an inferior one; and it is inthis manner that the mystical circulations of the kosmos, and the transmission of life or vital currentsthroughout the fabric or web of being is assured.From this ancient fact and teaching of the Mystery schools came the greatly distorted ApostolicSuccession of the Christian Church, a pale and feeble reflection in merely ecclesiastical government of afundamental spiritual and mystical reality. The great Brotherhood of the sages and seers of the world,which in fact is the association of the Masters of Wisdom and Compassion headed by the Maha-chohan,is the purest and most absolute form or example of the guru-parampara existing on our earth today. (Seealso Hermetic Chain)

gyve ::: n. --> A shackle; especially, one to confine the legs; a fetter. ::: v. t. --> To fetter; to shackle; to chain. H () the eighth letter of the English alphabet, is classed among the consonants, and is formed with the mouth organs in the same position as that of the succeeding vowel. It is used with certain consonants to

Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich: Born at Stuttgart in 1770 and died at Berlin in 1831. He studied theology, philosophy and the classics at Tübingen, 1788-93, occupied the conventional position of tutor in Switzerland and Frankfort on the Main, 1794-1800, and went to Jena as Privatdocent in philosophy in 1801. He was promoted to a professorship at Jena in 1805, but was driven from the city the next year by the incursion of the French under Napoleon. He then went to Bamberg, where he remained two years as editor of a newspaper. The next eight years he spent as director of the Gymnasium at Nürnberg. In 1816 he accepted a professorship of philosophy at Heidelberg, from which position he was called two years later to succeed Fichte at the University of Berlin. While at Jena, he co-operated with Schelling in editing the Kritisches Journal der Philosophie, to which he contributed many articles. His more important volumes were published as follows: Phänomenologie des Geistes, 1807; Wissenschaft der Logik, 1812-16; Encyklopädie der philosophischen Wissenschaften im Grundrisse, 1817; Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts, 1820. Shortly after his death his lectures on the philosophy of religion, the history of philosophy, the philosophy of history, and aesthetics were published from the collated lecture-notes of his students. His collected works in nineteen volumes were published 1832-40 by a group of his students. -- G.W.C.

heir ::: n. --> One who inherits, or is entitled to succeed to the possession of, any property after the death of its owner; one on whom the law bestows the title or property of another at the death of the latter.
One who receives any endowment from an ancestor or relation; as, the heir of one&


His word metempsychoses is given as meaning the transference of the soul from one body to another; whereas by its Greek etymology it should mean the various highly occult transformations undergone by the soul-ego after death, and preceding the process of reensoulment — something of larger significant content than what the word reincarnation has mainly come to mean today, as implying merely soul-reimbodiment. It is the teaching of the various successive karmic transformations and imbodiments of a monad during its evolutionary cycle — not only in the larger sense of cosmic destiny, but also in the smaller sense of its karmic transformations between death and the succeeding physical birth.

Hongren. (J. Konin/Gunin; K. Hongin 弘忍) (601-674). Chinese Chan master and the reputed fifth patriarch of the Chan zong. Hongren was a native of Huangmei in Qizhou (present-day Hubei province). Little is known of his early life, but he eventually became the disciple of the fourth patriarch DAOXIN. After Daoxin's death in 651, Hongren succeeded his teacher and moved to Mt. Fengmao (also known as Dongshan or East Mountain), the east peak of Mt. Shuangfeng (Twin Peaks) in Huangmei. Hongren's teachings thus came to be known as the "East Mountain teachings" (DONGSHAN FAMEN), although that term is later applied also to the lineage and teachings of both Daoxin and Hongren. After his move to Mt. Fengmao, disciples began to flock to study under Hongren. Although Hongren's biography in the CHUAN FABAO JI certainly exaggerates when it says that eight to nine out of every ten Buddhist practitioners in China studied under him, there is no question that the number of students of the East Mountain teachings grew significantly over two generations. The twenty-five named disciples of Hongren include such prominent figures as SHENXIU, Zhishen (609-702), Lao'an (d. 708), Faru (638-689), Xuanze (d.u.), and HUINENG, the man who would eventually be recognized by the mature Chan tradition as the sixth, and last, patriarch. The legendary account of Hongren's mind-to-mind transmission (YIXIN CHUANXIN) of the DHARMA to Huineng can be found in the LIUZU TAN JING. Later, Emperor Daizong (r. 762-779) bestowed upon Hongren the title Chan master Daman (Great Abundance). The influential treatise XIUXIN YAO LUN ("Treatise on the Essentials of Cultivating the Mind") is attributed to Hongren; it stresses the importance of "guarding the mind" (SHOUXIN). In that text, the relationship between the pure mind and the afflictions (KLEsA) is likened to that between the sun and the clouds: the pure mind is obscured by afflictions just as the sun is covered by layers of clouds; but if one can guard the mind so that it is kept free from false thoughts and delusions, the sun of NIRVĀnA will then appear. The text suggests two specific meditation techniques for realizing this goal: one is continuously to visualize the original, pure mind (viz., the sun) so that it shines without obscuration; the other is to concentrate on one's own deluded thoughts (the clouds) until they disappear. These two techniques purport to "guard the mind" so that delusion can never recur.

Hsun Tzu: (Hsun Ch'ing, Hsun Kuan, c. 335-286 B.C.) For thirty years travelled, offered his service to the various powerful feudal states, and succeeded in becoming a high officer of Ch'i and Ch'u. A great critic of all contemporary schools, he greatly developed Confucianism, became the greatest Confucian except Mencius. Both Han Fei, the outstanding Legalist, and Li Ssu, the premier of Ch'in who effected the first unification of China, were his pupils. (Hsun Tzu, Eng. tr. by H. H. Dubs: The Works of Hsun Tze.) -- W.T.C.

huguo Fojiao. (J. gokoku Bukkyo; K. hoguk Pulgyo 護國佛敎). In Chinese, "state-protection Buddhism," referring to the sociopolitical role Buddhism played in East Asia to protect the state against war, insurrection, and natural disasters. The doctrinal justification for such a protective role for Buddhism derives from the "Guanshiyin pusa pumen pin" ("Chapter on the Unlimited Gate of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA") and the "Tuoluoni pin" (DHĀRAnĪ chapter) of the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), the "Huguo pin" ("Chapter on Protecting the State") of the RENWANG JING ("Scripture for Humane Kings"), and the "Zhenglun pin" ("Chapter on Right View") of the SUVARnAPRABHĀSOTTAMASuTRA ("Golden Light Sutra"). For example, the Suvarnaprabhāsottamasutra states that a ruler who accepts that sutra and has faith in the dharma will be protected by the four heavenly kings (CĀTURMAHĀRĀJAKĀYIKA); but if he neglects the dharma, the divinities will abandon his state and calamity will result. The "Huguo pin" of the Renwang jing notes that "when the state is thrown into chaos, facing all sorts of disasters and being destroyed by invading enemies," kings should set up in a grand hall one hundred buddha and bodhisattva images and one hundred seats, and then invite one hundred eminent monks to come there and teach the Renwang jing. This ritual, called the "Renwang Assembly of One-Hundred Seats" (C. Renwang baigaozuo hui; J. Ninno hyakukozae; K. Inwang paekkojwa hoe) would ward off any calamity facing the state and was held in China, Japan, and Korea from the late sixth century onward. In Japan, these three scriptures were used to justify the role Buddhism could play in protecting the state; and the Japanese reformist NICHIREN (1222-1282) cites the Suvarnaprabhāsottamasutra in his attempts to demonstrate that the calamities then facing Japan were a result of the divinities abandoning the state because of the government's neglect of the true teachings of Buddhism. The notion of state protection also figured in the introduction of ZEN to Japan. In 1198, the TENDAI and ZEN monk MYoAN EISAI (1141-1215) wrote his KoZEN GOKOKURON ("Treatise on the Promulgation of Zen as a Defense of the State"), which explained why the new teachings of Zen would both protect the state and allow the "perfect teachings" (see JIAOXIANG PANSHI) of Tendai to flourish. ¶ "State-protection Buddhism" has also been posited as one of the defining characteristics of Korean Buddhism. There are typically four types of evidence presented in support of this view. (1) Such rituals as the Inwang paekkojwa hoe (Renwang jing recitation) were held at court at least ten times during the Silla dynasty and increased dramatically to as many as one hundred twenty times during the succeeding Koryǒ dynasty. (2) Monasteries and STuPAs were constructed for their apotropaic value in warding off calamity. During the Silla dynasty, e.g., HWANGNYONGSA and its nine-story pagoda, as well as Sach'onwangsa (Four Heavenly Kings Monastery), were constructed for the protection of the royal family and the state during the peninsular unification wars. During the succeeding Koryo dynasty, the KORYo TAEJANGGYoNG (Korean Buddhism canon) was carved (twice) in the hopes that state support for this massive project would prompt the various buddhas and divinities (DEVA) to ward off foreign invaders and bring peace to the kingdom. (3) Eminent monks served as political advisors to the king and the government. For example, Kwangjong (r. 949-975), the fourth monarch of the Koryǒ dynasty, established the positions of wangsa (royal preceptor) and kuksa (state preceptor, C. GUOSHI), and these offices continued into the early Choson dynasty. (4) Monks were sometimes at the vanguard in repelling foreign invaders, such as the Hangmagun (Defeating Māra Troops) in twelfth-century Koryo, who fought against the Jurchen, and the Choson monks CH'oNGHo HYUJoNG (1520-1604) and SAMYoNG YUJoNG (1544-1610), who raised monks' militias to fight against the Japanese during the Hideyoshi invasions of the late sixteenth century. In the late twentieth century, revisionist historians argued that the notion of "state-protection Buddhism" in Korea may reflect as much the political situation of the modern and contemporary periods as any historical reality, and may derive from the concept of "chingo kokka" (protecting the state) advocated by Japanese apologists during the Buddhist persecution of the Meiji period (1868-1912).

Hushang (Persian) Also Husheng, Hoshang, Hosheng, Haoshyanha; Ushhanj (Arabic) Second king of the legendary Pishdadi dynasty, who succeeded his grandfather Kaimurath. In Firdusi’s Shahnamah, he is noted as having introduced and taught his people the method of making bread and the art of cookery. He first brought out fire from stone, and thus founded the religion of the Fire-worshipers, calling the flame which was produced the Light of the Divinity, and introducing the Festival of Sadah. His celestial guardian was Manishram or Behram, the planet Mars.

Huyèn Quang. (玄光) (1254-1334). Third patriarch of the TRÚC LM school of the Vietnamese THIỀN (C. Chan) tradition; his personal name was Lý Đạo Tái and he was a native of Giang Hạ (present-day Hà Bắc province). After passing the civil-service examination and serving as a scholar-official, he left home to become a monk in 1305, when he was already fifty-one years old. He first studied under Chan master Bão Phác of Lẽ Vĩnh monastery and then became a follower of Tràn Nhan Tông and, after the latter's death, of Pháp Loa, who was thirty years his junior. After a short stint as abbot of Van Yen monastery on Mount Yen Tử, he moved to Côn Sơn monastery. Huyèn Quang was already seventy-seven years old when he succeeded Pháp Loa as the third patriarch of the Trúc Lam school in 1331 but seems never to have had the ambition to lead the Buddhist order. He died at Côn Sơn in 1334. Huyèn Quang was a talented poet, who left behind more than twenty poems, most of which deal with the beauty of the natural world.

Hwangnyongsa. (皇/龍寺). In Korean, "royal," or "Yellow Dragon Monastery" ("royal" and "yellow" are homophonous in Korean); an important Korean monastery located in the Silla-dynasty capital of Kyongju. The monastery was constructed between 553 and 569, during the reign of the Silla king Chinhŭng (r. 540-576) and was especially renowned for its sixteen-foot high image of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha (completed in 574) and its massive, nine-story pagoda (STuPA), which was built in 645 during the reign of Queen Sondok (r. 632-647). In the winter of 1238, during the succeeding Koryo dynasty (918-1392), the entire monastery, including the buddha image and the pagoda, was totally destroyed by invading Mongol troops, and only the foundation stones currently remain. The site of the monastery was excavated by the Kyongju National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage between 1976 and 1983. Royal Dragon monastery flourished due to the support of the Silla royal family, which sought to use Buddhism as an unifying political ideology; The stories told concerning the foundation of the monastery, the image, and the pagoda all reflect this fact. The construction of the monastery is thus often cited as an example of "state-protection Buddhism" hoguk Pulgyo; C. HUGUO FOJIAO) in Korea. According to the SAMGUK YUSA ("Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms"), in the second month of 553, King Chinhŭng was building a new palace to the south of his Dragon Palace and east of Wolsong palace, when a yellow dragon (hwangnyong) appeared at the site. Yellow dragons were popular autochthonous deities in Silla; hence, given the auspicious nature of this apparition, the king changed plans and instead built a Buddhist monastery on the site, which is called both Yellow Dragon and Royal Dragon monastery in the literature. When the Silla monk CHAJANG (d.u.; fl. c. 590-658) was training at WUTAISHAN in China, an emanation of the bodhisattva MANJUsRĪ told him that Hwangnyongsa was constructed on the site of the dispensation of the previous buddha KĀsYAPA. Not long after the monastery's completion, a ship with 57,000 pounds of iron and 30,000 ounces of gold aboard appeared at Sap'o Harbor in Hagok County (currently Kokp'o near Ulsan, on the southeast coast of the peninsula). The ship also carried an inscription, which said that the Indian king AsOKA, having tried and failed three times to forge a sākyamuni triad from these metals, had finally decided to load the materials aboard ship, along with models of the images, and send them off in search of a land with the requisite metallurgical skill to craft such a statue. King Chinŭng ordered his metallurgists to forge this sixteen-foot statue of the Buddha, and they succeeded on the first attempt in the third month of 574. Chajang also was told by MANJUSRĪ that the queen belonged to the Indian KsATRIYA caste. He was later told by a divine being that if a nine-story pagoda were constructed within the precincts of Royal Dragon monastery, the kingdoms bordering Silla would surrender and submit to Silla hegemony. Hearing Chajang's prediction, in 645, the queen built the pagoda, which was 224 feet tall and made entirely of wood. Chajang placed within its columns some of the relics (sARĪRA) of the Buddha that he had received at Wutaishan. (Another portion was enshrined at T'ONGDOSA, where they remain still today.) It was said that the nine stories of the pagoda symbolized the nine kingdoms and tribal leagues surrounding Silla. During the time when Hwangnyongsa was constructed, the unification wars between the three Korean kingdoms of Silla, Koguryo, and Paekche were raging. The Silla monarchs at this time tried to justify their royal authority by relying on Buddhism, particularly by comparing the Silla rulers to the imported Buddhist notion of the ideal Buddhist ruler, or CAKRAVARTIN (wheel-turning emperor) and by positing that the royal family was genealogically related to the ksatriya clan of the Buddha. These associations are also obvious in the personal names of Silla kings, queens, and other royal family members. For example, the names of the King Chinhŭng's two princes were Tongnyun (Copper Wheel) and Kŭmnyun (Gold Wheel), both specific types of cakravartins; additionally, King Chinp'yong's personal name was Paekchong and his queen's was Maya, the Sino-Korean translation and transcription, respectively, of the names of sākyamuni Buddha's father and mother, sUDDHODANA and MĀYĀ. The foundation of Hwangnyongsa was intimately associated with these attempts by the royal family to employ Buddhism as a tool for justifying and reinforcing its authority. The monastery sponsored the Inwang Paekkojwa hoe (Humane Kings Assembly of One-Hundred Seats), a state-protection (hoguk) rite based on the RENWANGJING ("Scripture for Humane Kings"), in the hopes that the power of the buddhadharma would protect and promote the royal family and the kingdom. According to both the Samguk yusa and the Samguk Sagi ("Historical Records of the Three Kingdoms"), such a ceremony was held at Hwangnyongsa in 613 and 636, before the unification of the three kingdoms, as well as several times subsequently. Monks who resided at Hwangnyongsa also played important roles in Silla politics and religion. WoN'GWANG (532-630), who composed the five codes of conduct for the "flower boys" (hwarang), an elite group of male aristocratic youths, may have written there a letter to ask Emperor Yangdi (r. 604-618) of the Sui dynasty to attack Koguryo on Silla's behalf. Another resident, Chajang, encouraged the royal family to adopt Chinese official attire and the Chinese chronological era at the Silla court and was appointed kukt'ong (state superintendent), to supervise the entire Silla Buddhist ecclesia. Several other Hwangnyongsa monks, including Hyehun (fl. c. 640), Kangmyong (fl. 655), and Hunp'il (fl. 879), were appointed to kukt'ong and other important Silla ecclesiastical positions. Finally, several important Silla scholar-monks resided at Hwangnyongsa, including WoNHYO (617-686), who delivered his first public teaching of the KŬMGANG SAMMAEGYoNG NON ("Exposition of the Vajrasamādhisutra") at the monastery.

hydra ::: n. --> A serpent or monster in the lake or marsh of Lerna, in the Peloponnesus, represented as having many heads, one of which, when cut off, was immediately succeeded by two others, unless the wound was cauterized. It was slain by Hercules. Hence, a terrible monster.
Hence: A multifarious evil, or an evil having many sources; not to be overcome by a single effort.
Any small fresh-water hydroid of the genus Hydra, usually found attached to sticks, stones, etc., by a basal sucker.


Iddhi (Pali) Iddhi [from the verbal root sidh to succeed, attain an objective, reach accomplishment] Equivalent to the Sanskrit siddhi, used to signify the powers or attributes of perfection: powers of various kinds, spiritual and intellectual as well as astral and physical, acquired through training, discipline, initiation, and individual holiness. In Buddhism it is generally rendered “occult power.” There are two classes of iddhis, the higher of which, according to the Digha-Nikaya and other Buddhist works, are eight in number: 1) the power to project mind-made images of oneself; 2) to become invisible; 3) to pass through solid things, such as a wall; 4) to penetrate solid ground as if it were water; 5) to walk on water; 6) to fly through the air; 7) to touch sun and moon; and 8) to ascend into the highest heavens. The same work represents the Buddha as saying: “It is because I see danger in the practice of these mystic wonders that I loathe and abhor and am ashamed thereof” (1:213) — a true statement although iddhis are powers of the most desirable kind when pertaining to the higher nature, for they are of spiritual, intellectual, and higher psychical character. It is only when iddhis or siddhis are limited to the meaning of the gross astral psychic attributes that the Buddha properly condemns them as being dangerous always, and to the ambitious and selfish person extremely perilous. Further, it was an offense against the regulations of the Brotherhood (Samgha) for any member to display any powers before the laity.

IDEAS, DYNAMIC ENERGY OF Every idea is a mental atom charged with energy. If these succeed in penetrating into brain-cells that are receptive, yet not previously vitalized by similar mental molecules, they can have an adverse effect on the balance of people&

Immortality ::: A term signifying continuous existence or being; but this understanding of the term is profoundlyillogical and contrary to nature, for there is nothing throughout nature's endless and multifarious realmsof being and existence which remains for two consecutive instants of time exactly the same.Consequently, immortality is a mere figment of the imagination, an illusory phantom of reality. When thestudent of the esoteric wisdom once realizes that continuous progress, i.e., continuous change inadvancement, is nature's fundamental procedure, he recognizes instantly that continuous remaining in anunchanging or immutable state of consciousness or being is not only impossible, but in the last analysis isthe last thing that is either desirable or comforting. Fancy continuing immortal in a state of imperfection such as we human beingsexemplify -- which is exactly what the usual acceptance of this term immortality means. The highest godin highest heaven, although seemingly immortal to us imperfect human beings, is nevertheless anevolving, growing, progressing entity in its own sublime realms or spheres, and therefore as the ages passleaves one condition or state to assume a succeeding condition or state of a nobler and higher type;precisely as the preceding condition or state had been the successor of another state before it.Continuous or unending immutability of any condition or state of an evolving entity is obviously animpossibility in nature; and when once pondered over it becomes clear that the ordinary acceptance ofimmortality involves an impossibility. All nature is an unending series of changes, which means all thehosts or multitudes of beings composing nature, for every individual unit of these hosts is growing,evolving, i.e., continuously changing, therefore never immortal. Immortality and evolution arecontradictions in terms. An evolving entity means a changing entity, signifying a continuous progresstowards better things; and evolution therefore is a succession of state of consciousness and being afteranother state of consciousness and being, and thus throughout duration. The Occidental idea of staticimmortality or even mutable immortality is thus seen to be both repellent and impossible.This doctrine is so difficult for the average Occidental easily to understand that it may be advisable onceand for all to point out without mincing of words that just as complete death, that is to say, entireannihilation of consciousness, is an impossibility in nature, just so is continuous and unchangingconsciousness in any one stage or phase of evolution likewise an impossibility, because progress ormovement or growth is continuous throughout eternity. There are, however, periods more or less long ofcontinuance in any stage or phase of consciousness that may be attained by an evolving entity; and thehigher the being is in evolution, the more its spiritual and intellectual faculties have been evolved orevoked, the longer do these periods of continuous individual, or perhaps personal, quasi-immortalitycontinue. There is, therefore, what may be called relative immortality, although this phrase is confessedlya misnomer.Master KH in The Mahatma Letters, on pages 128-30, uses the phrase ``panaeonic immortality" tosignify this same thing that I have just called relative immortality, an immortality -- falsely so called,however -- which lasts in the cases of certain highly evolved monadic egos for the entire period of amanvantara, but which of necessity ends with the succeeding pralaya of the solar system. Such a periodof time of continuous self-consciousness of so highly evolved a monadic entity is to us humans actually arelative immortality; but strictly and logically speaking it is no more immortality than is the ephemeralexistence of a butterfly. When the solar manvantara comes to an end and the solar pralaya begins, evensuch highly evolved monadic entities, full-blown gods, are swept out of manifested self-consciousexistence like the sere and dried leaves at the end of the autumn; and the divine entities thus passing outenter into still higher realms of superdivine activity, to reappear at the end of the pralaya and at the dawnof the next or succeeding solar manvantara.The entire matter is, therefore, a highly relative one. What seems immortal to us humans would seem tobe but as a wink of the eye to the vision of super-kosmic entities; while, on the other hand, the span ofthe average human life would seem to be immortal to a self-conscious entity inhabiting one of theelectrons of an atom of the human physical body.The thing to remember in this series of observations is the wondrous fact that consciousness frometernity to eternity is uninterrupted, although by the very nature of things undergoing continuous andunceasing change of phases in realization throughout endless duration. What men call unconsciousness ismerely a form of consciousness which is too subtle for our gross brain-minds to perceive or to sense or tograsp; and, secondly, strictly speaking, what men call death, whether of a universe or of their ownphysical bodies, is but the breaking up of worn-out vehicles and the transference of consciousness to ahigher plane. It is important to seize the spirit of this marvelous teaching, and not allow the imperfectbrain-mind to quibble over words, or to pause or hesitate at difficult terms.

In a more restricted sense, applied to the kumara-births of Siva, representative of spiritual beings in each root-race which are mythologically referred to in India as four youths: four white, four red, four yellow, four dark or brown. It means that in every root-race there are a number of karmically elect who strike the keynotes of evolution and succeeding civilizations in a root-race, and thus labor to keep alive and to increase the spiritual and intellectual fires during that race’s evolutionary course.

incomer ::: n. --> One who comes in.
One who succeeds another, as a tenant of land, houses, etc.


incoming ::: a. --> Coming in; accruing.
Coming in, succeeding, or following, as occupant or possessor; as, in incoming tenant. ::: n. --> The act of coming in; arrival.
Income; gain.


inheritable ::: a. --> Capable of being inherited; transmissible or descendible; as, an inheritable estate or title.
Capable of being transmitted from parent to child; as, inheritable qualities or infirmities.
Capable of taking by inheritance, or of receiving by descent; capable of succeeding to, as an heir.


inheritance ::: fig. Something that is or may be inherited; property passing at the owner"s death to the heir or those entitled to succeed.

inherit ::: v. t. --> To take by descent from an ancestor; to take by inheritance; to take as heir on the death of an ancestor or other person to whose estate one succeeds; to receive as a right or title descendible by law from an ancestor at his decease; as, the heir inherits the land or real estate of his father; the eldest son of a nobleman inherits his father&

In popular mythology the Tuat was separated from the world by a range of mountains and consisted of a great valley, shut in by mountains, through which ran a river (the counterpart of the Nile, reminding one of the Jordan of the Jews and Christians), the banks of which were the abode of evil spirits and monstrous beasts. As the sun passed through the Tuat great numbers of souls were described as making their way to the boat of the sun, and those that succeeded in clinging to the boat were able to come forth into new life as the sun rose from the eastern end of the valley to usher in another day. Tuat was also depicted as the region where the soul went during night, returning to join the living on earth during the day.

instant ::: n. 1. A particular moment or point in time. 2. An infinitesimal or very short space of time; a moment. adj. 3. Succeeding without any interval of time; prompt; immediate. instant"s.

INTEGRAL YOGA ::: This yoga accepts the value of cosmic existence and holds it to be a reality; its object is to enter into a higher Truth-Consciousness or Divine Supramental Consciousness in which action and creation are the expression not of ignorance and imperfection, but of the Truth, the Light, the Divine Ānanda. But for that, the surrender of the mortal mind, life and body to the Higher Consciousnessis indispensable, since it is too difficult for the mortal human being to pass by its own effort beyond mind to a Supramental Consciousness in which the dynamism is no longer mental but of quite another power. Only those who can accept the call to such a change should enter into this yoga.

Aim of the Integral Yoga ::: It is not merely to rise out of the ordinary ignorant world-consciousness into the divine consciousness, but to bring the supramental power of that divine consciousness down into the ignorance of mind, life and body, to transform them, to manifest the Divine here and create a divine life in Matter.

Conditions of the Integral Yoga ::: This yoga can only be done to the end by those who are in total earnest about it and ready to abolish their little human ego and its demands in order to find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasyā needed too constant and intense.

Method in the Integral Yoga ::: To concentrate, preferably in the heart and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness. One can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is the beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one’s own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother’s Power and Presence.

Integral method ::: The method we have to pursue is to put our whole conscious being into relation and contact with the Divine and to call Him in to transform Our entire being into His, so that in a sense God Himself, the real Person in us, becomes the sādhaka of the sādhana* as well as the Master of the Yoga by whom the lower personality is used as the centre of a divine transfiguration and the instrument of its own perfection. In effect, the pressure of the Tapas, the force of consciousness in us dwelling in the Idea of the divine Nature upon that which we are in our entirety, produces its own realisation. The divine and all-knowing and all-effecting descends upon the limited and obscure, progressively illumines and energises the whole lower nature and substitutes its own action for all the terms of the inferior human light and mortal activity.

In psychological fact this method translates itself into the progressive surrender of the ego with its whole field and all its apparatus to the Beyond-ego with its vast and incalculable but always inevitable workings. Certainly, this is no short cut or easy sādhana. It requires a colossal faith, an absolute courage and above all an unflinching patience. For it implies three stages of which only the last can be wholly blissful or rapid, - the attempt of the ego to enter into contact with the Divine, the wide, full and therefore laborious preparation of the whole lower Nature by the divine working to receive and become the higher Nature, and the eventual transformation. In fact, however, the divine strength, often unobserved and behind the veil, substitutes itself for the weakness and supports us through all our failings of faith, courage and patience. It” makes the blind to see and the lame to stride over the hills.” The intellect becomes aware of a Law that beneficently insists and a Succour that upholds; the heart speaks of a Master of all things and Friend of man or a universal Mother who upholds through all stumblings. Therefore this path is at once the most difficult imaginable and yet in comparison with the magnitude of its effort and object, the most easy and sure of all.

There are three outstanding features of this action of the higher when it works integrally on the lower nature. In the first place, it does not act according to a fixed system and succession as in the specialised methods of Yoga, but with a sort of free, scattered and yet gradually intensive and purposeful working determined by the temperament of the individual in whom it operates, the helpful materials which his nature offers and the obstacles which it presents to purification and perfection. In a sense, therefore, each man in this path has his own method of Yoga. Yet are there certain broad lines of working common to all which enable us to construct not indeed a routine system, but yet some kind of Shastra or scientific method of the synthetic Yoga.

Secondly, the process, being integral, accepts our nature such as it stands organised by our past evolution and without rejecting anything essential compels all to undergo a divine change. Everything in us is seized by the hands of a mighty Artificer and transformed into a clear image of that which it now seeks confusedly to present. In that ever-progressive experience we begin to perceive how this lower manifestation is constituted and that everything in it, however seemingly deformed or petty or vile, is the more or less distorted or imperfect figure of some elements or action in the harmony of the divine Nature. We begin to understand what the Vedic Rishis meant when they spoke of the human forefathers fashioning the gods as a smith forges the crude material in his smithy.

Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognise in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in Nature, in the other it becomes swift and selfconscious and the instrument confesses the hand of the Master. All life is a Yoga of Nature seeking to manifest God within itself. Yoga marks the stage at which this effort becomes capable of self-awareness and therefore of right completion in the individual. It is a gathering up and concentration of the movements dispersed and loosely combined in the lower evolution.

Key-methods ::: The way to devotion and surrender. It is the psychic movement that brings the constant and pure devotion and the removal of the ego that makes it possible to surrender.

The way to knowledge. Meditation in the head by which there comes the opening above, the quietude or silence of the mind and the descent of peace etc. of the higher consciousness generally till it envelops the being and fills the body and begins to take up all the movements.
Yoga by works ::: Separation of the Purusha from the Prakriti, the inner silent being from the outer active one, so that one has two consciousnesses or a double consciousness, one behind watching and observing and finally controlling and changing the other which is active in front. The other way of beginning the yoga of works is by doing them for the Divine, for the Mother, and not for oneself, consecrating and dedicating them till one concretely feels the Divine Force taking up the activities and doing them for one.

Object of the Integral Yoga is to enter into and be possessed by the Divine Presence and Consciousness, to love the Divine for the Divine’s sake alone, to be tuned in our nature into the nature of the Divine, and in our will and works and life to be the instrument of the Divine.

Principle of the Integral Yoga ::: The whole principle of Integral Yoga is to give oneself entirely to the Divine alone and to nobody else, and to bring down into ourselves by union with the Divine Mother all the transcendent light, power, wideness, peace, purity, truth-consciousness and Ānanda of the Supramental Divine.

Central purpose of the Integral Yoga ::: Transformation of our superficial, narrow and fragmentary human way of thinking, seeing, feeling and being into a deep and wide spiritual consciousness and an integrated inner and outer existence and of our ordinary human living into the divine way of life.

Fundamental realisations of the Integral Yoga ::: The psychic change so that a complete devotion can be the main motive of the heart and the ruler of thought, life and action in constant union with the Mother and in her Presence. The descent of the Peace, Power, Light etc. of the Higher Consciousness through the head and heart into the whole being, occupying the very cells of the body. The perception of the One and Divine infinitely everywhere, the Mother everywhere and living in that infinite consciousness.

Results ::: First, an integral realisation of Divine Being; not only a realisation of the One in its indistinguishable unity, but also in its multitude of aspects which are also necessary to the complete knowledge of it by the relative consciousness; not only realisation of unity in the Self, but of unity in the infinite diversity of activities, worlds and creatures.

Therefore, also, an integral liberation. Not only the freedom born of unbroken contact of the individual being in all its parts with the Divine, sāyujya mukti, by which it becomes free even in its separation, even in the duality; not only the sālokya mukti by which the whole conscious existence dwells in the same status of being as the Divine, in the state of Sachchidananda ; but also the acquisition of the divine nature by the transformation of this lower being into the human image of the divine, sādharmya mukti, and the complete and final release of all, the liberation of the consciousness from the transitory mould of the ego and its unification with the One Being, universal both in the world and the individual and transcendentally one both in the world and beyond all universe.

By this integral realisation and liberation, the perfect harmony of the results of Knowledge, Love and Works. For there is attained the complete release from ego and identification in being with the One in all and beyond all. But since the attaining consciousness is not limited by its attainment, we win also the unity in Beatitude and the harmonised diversity in Love, so that all relations of the play remain possible to us even while we retain on the heights of our being the eternal oneness with the Beloved. And by a similar wideness, being capable of a freedom in spirit that embraces life and does not depend upon withdrawal from life, we are able to become without egoism, bondage or reaction the channel in our mind and body for a divine action poured out freely upon the world.

The divine existence is of the nature not only of freedom, but of purity, beatitude and perfection. In integral purity which shall enable on the one hand the perfect reflection of the divine Being in ourselves and on the other the perfect outpouring of its Truth and Law in us in the terms of life and through the right functioning of the complex instrument we are in our outer parts, is the condition of an integral liberty. Its result is an integral beatitude, in which there becomes possible at once the Ānanda of all that is in the world seen as symbols of the Divine and the Ānanda of that which is not-world. And it prepares the integral perfection of our humanity as a type of the Divine in the conditions of the human manifestation, a perfection founded on a certain free universality of being, of love and joy, of play of knowledge and of play of will in power and will in unegoistic action. This integrality also can be attained by the integral Yoga.

Sādhanā of the Integral Yoga does not proceed through any set mental teaching or prescribed forms of meditation, mantras or others, but by aspiration, by a self-concentration inwards or upwards, by a self-opening to an Influence, to the Divine Power above us and its workings, to the Divine Presence in the heart and by the rejection of all that is foreign to these things. It is only by faith, aspiration and surrender that this self-opening can come.

The yoga does not proceed by upadeśa but by inner influence.

Integral Yoga and Gita ::: The Gita’s Yoga consists in the offering of one’s work as a sacrifice to the Divine, the conquest of desire, egoless and desireless action, bhakti for the Divine, an entering into the cosmic consciousness, the sense of unity with all creatures, oneness with the Divine. This yoga adds the bringing down of the supramental Light and Force (its ultimate aim) and the transformation of the nature.

Our yoga is not identical with the yoga of the Gita although it contains all that is essential in the Gita’s yoga. In our yoga we begin with the idea, the will, the aspiration of the complete surrender; but at the same time we have to reject the lower nature, deliver our consciousness from it, deliver the self involved in the lower nature by the self rising to freedom in the higher nature. If we do not do this double movement, we are in danger of making a tamasic and therefore unreal surrender, making no effort, no tapas and therefore no progress ; or else we make a rajasic surrender not to the Divine but to some self-made false idea or image of the Divine which masks our rajasic ego or something still worse.

Integral Yoga, Gita and Tantra ::: The Gita follows the Vedantic tradition which leans entirely on the Ishvara aspect of the Divine and speaks little of the Divine Mother because its object is to draw back from world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation beyond it.

The Tantric tradition leans on the Shakti or Ishvari aspect and makes all depend on the Divine Mother because its object is to possess and dominate the world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation through it.

This yoga insists on both the aspects; the surrender to the Divine Mother is essential, for without it there is no fulfilment of the object of the yoga.

Integral Yoga and Hatha-Raja Yogas ::: For an integral yoga the special methods of Rajayoga and Hathayoga may be useful at times in certain stages of the progress, but are not indispensable. Their principal aims must be included in the integrality of the yoga; but they can be brought about by other means. For the methods of the integral yoga must be mainly spiritual, and dependence on physical methods or fixed psychic or psychophysical processes on a large scale would be the substitution of a lower for a higher action. Integral Yoga and Kundalini Yoga: There is a feeling of waves surging up, mounting to the head, which brings an outer unconsciousness and an inner waking. It is the ascending of the lower consciousness in the ādhāra to meet the greater consciousness above. It is a movement analogous to that on which so much stress is laid in the Tantric process, the awakening of the Kundalini, the Energy coiled up and latent in the body and its mounting through the spinal cord and the centres (cakras) and the Brahmarandhra to meet the Divine above. In our yoga it is not a specialised process, but a spontaneous upnish of the whole lower consciousness sometimes in currents or waves, sometimes in a less concrete motion, and on the other side a descent of the Divine Consciousness and its Force into the body.

Integral Yoga and other Yogas ::: The old yogas reach Sachchidananda through the spiritualised mind and depart into the eternally static oneness of Sachchidananda or rather pure Sat (Existence), absolute and eternal or else a pure Non-exist- ence, absolute and eternal. Ours having realised Sachchidananda in the spiritualised mind plane proceeds to realise it in the Supramcntal plane.

The suprcfhe supra-cosmic Sachchidananda is above all. Supermind may be described as its power of self-awareness and W’orld- awareness, the world being known as within itself and not out- side. So to live consciously in the supreme Sachchidananda one must pass through the Supermind.

Distinction ::: The realisation of Self and of the Cosmic being (without which the realisation of the Self is incomplete) are essential steps in our yoga ; it is the end of other yogas, but it is, as it were, the beginning of outs, that is to say, the point where its own characteristic realisation can commence.

It is new as compared with the old yogas (1) Because it aims not at a departure out of world and life into Heaven and Nir- vana, but at a change of life and existence, not as something subordinate or incidental, but as a distinct and central object.

If there is a descent in other yogas, yet it is only an incident on the way or resulting from the ascent — the ascent is the real thing. Here the ascent is the first step, but it is a means for the descent. It is the descent of the new coosdousness attain- ed by the ascent that is the stamp and seal of the sadhana. Even the Tantra and Vaishnavism end in the release from life ; here the object is the divine fulfilment of life.

(2) Because the object sought after is not an individual achievement of divine realisation for the sake of the individual, but something to be gained for the earth-consciousness here, a cosmic, not solely a supra-cosmic acbievement. The thing to be gained also is the bringing of a Power of consciousness (the Supramental) not yet organised or active directly in earth-nature, even in the spiritual life, but yet to be organised and made directly active.

(3) Because a method has been preconized for achieving this purpose which is as total and integral as the aim set before it, viz., the total and integral change of the consciousness and nature, taking up old methods, but only as a part action and present aid to others that are distinctive.

Integral Yoga and Patanjali Yoga ::: Cilia is the stuff of mixed mental-vital-physical consciousness out of which arise the movements of thought, emotion, sensation, impulse etc.

It is these that in the Patanjali system have to be stilled altogether so that the consciousness may be immobile and go into Samadhi.

Our yoga has a different function. The movements of the ordinary consciousness have to be quieted and into the quietude there has to be brought down a higher consciousness and its powers which will transform the nature.


intelligent backtracking ::: (algorithm) An improved backtracking algorithm for Prolog interpreters, which records the point at which each logic variable becomes bound and, when a bind any of those variables. No choice from such a choice point can succeed since it does not change the bindings which caused the failure. (1996-04-06)

intelligent backtracking "algorithm" An improved {backtracking} {algorithm} for {Prolog} {interpreters}, which records the point at which each {logic variable} becomes bound and, when a given set of bindings leads to failure, ignores any {choice point} which does not bind any of those variables. No choice from such a choice point can succeed since it does not change the bindings which caused the failure. (1996-04-06)

interlude ::: n. --> A short entertainment exhibited on the stage between the acts of a play, or between the play and the afterpiece, to relieve the tedium of waiting.
A form of English drama or play, usually short, merry, and farcical, which succeeded the Moralities or Moral Plays in the transition to the romantic or Elizabethan drama.
A short piece of instrumental music played between the parts of a song or cantata, or the acts of a drama; especially, in


In the Brahmanical system the solar system was regarded as an Egg of Brahma (brahmanda), the prakritic or prithivi-form of Brahma, so that its life span is equivalent to the length of Brahma’s manifested life. A Day of Brahma for a planetary chain consists of a planetary manvantara — seven rounds of the various life-waves around that chain — a period of 4,320,000,000 terrestrial years. The ensuing pralaya or Night of Brahma is of an equivalent length, together equaling 8,640,000,000 terrestrial years. Forty-nine such planetary Days and Nights equal one solar manvantara, equivalent to a Year of Brahma; and each such year of Brahma is figured as being 360 of his Days; and 100 such Years of Brahma equal Brahma’s Life, a period of 311,040,000,000,000 terrestrial years — including in this vast time period the various twilights and dawns. Theosophic philosophy states that one-half of Brahma’s Life has been spent, or 50 Years of Brahma. At the end of Brahma’s Life, the final consummation of the solar system, so far as the planetary chain is concerned, will occur, and everything within the bounds of this system will vanish, and the succeeding solar pralaya will commence.

In the earlier third root-races, the Sons of Wisdom produced by kriyasakti a progeny called the Sons of Ad, Sons of the Fire-mist, or Sons of Will and Yoga. This was not a race, but “at first a wondrous Being, called the ‘Initiator,’ and after him a group of semi-divine and semi-human beings. ‘Set apart’ in Archaic genesis for certain purposes, they are those in whom are said to have incarnated the highest Dhyanis, ‘Munis and Rishis from previous Manvantaras’ — to form the nursery for future human adepts, on this earth and during the present cycle” (SD 1:207). This Wondrous Being, who descended in the early part of the Third Age, is the tree from which have come the great historically known sages and hierophants, and it holds spiritual sway over the initiated adepts. “He is the ‘Initiator,’ called the ‘great sacrifice.’ For, sitting at the threshold of light, he looks into it from within the circle of Darkness, which he will not cross, nor will he quit his post till the last day of this life-cycle. Why does the solitary Watcher remain at his self-chosen post? Why does he sit by the fountain of primeval Wisdom, of which he drinks no longer, as he has naught to learn which he does not know . . .? Because the lonely, sore-footed pilgrims on their way back to their home are never sure to the last moment of not losing their way in this limitless desert of illusion and matter called Earth-Life. Because he would fain show the way to that region of freedom and light, from which he is a voluntary exile himself, to every prisoner who has succeeded in liberating himself from the bonds of flesh and illusion. Because, in short, he has sacrificed himself for the sake of mankind, though but a few Elect may profit by the great sacrifice” (SD 1:208).

In the Eddas the aesir are in perpetual opposition to the jotunn (giants; Icelandic jotnar), as energy is opposed to inertia. When the gods withdraw at Ragnarok, the universe ceases to be. The aesir’s reign or life was preceded by a period of quiescence, during which nothing existed. This was Ymir, the frostgiant, the transformed Bargalmer (Icelandic Bergelmir), fruitage of a previous cycle of universal life, who was “saved on a boatkeel” or “ground on the mill” to furnish substance for the succeeding world. This was to be created by All-father Odin and his two brothers, Vile and Vi (or Ve). The frost giant is killed — transformed — by the three gods, and from his substance (Orgalmer) the worlds are created. They are sustained by Trudgalmer until the gods again withdraw. In his capacity of creator Odin is named Ofner (opener), energic counterpart of Orgalmer, while at the end of a cosmic life he becomes Svafner (closer) and paired with Bargalmer.

In the Vedantic system of Krishna, however, avyakta is also parabrahman, that which will not perish even at the time of cosmic pralaya, because parabrahman is the one essence, not only of the whole cosmos, but even of mulaprakriti itself, the foundation of the manifested cosmos. “In case you follow the Sankhyan doctrine, you have to rise from Upadhi to Upadhi in gradual succession, and when you try to rise from the last Upadhi to their Avyaktam, there is unfortunately no connection that is likely to enable your consciousness to bridge the interval. If the Sankhyan system of philosophy is the true one, your aim will be to trace Upadhi to its source, but not consciousness to its source. The consciousness manifested in every Upadhi is traceable to the Logos and not to the Avyaktam of the Sankhyas. It is very much easier for a man to follow his own consciousness farther and farther into the depths of his inmost nature, and ultimately reach its source — the Logos — than to try to follow Upadhi to its source in this Mulaprakriti, this Avyaktam. Moreover, supposing you do succeed in reaching this Avyaktam, you can never fix your thoughts in it or preserve your individuality in it; for, it is incapable of retaining any of these permanently” (Notes on BG 98). Nevertheless the Sankhya philosophy is as true as is the Vedanta, and reaches the same ultimates of philosophic thought and understanding, although along differing systemic lines.

INTUITION Refers to at least causal consciousness (47:1-3). Ignorance has idiotized this originally esoteric term so as to denote emotional impulses with a faint content of the lowest mental consciousness (47:7).

It is intuition that opens up the world of ideas for us. It is a special organ of knowledge that gives us correct ideas, correct knowledge of reality. Only a few men have worked their way up through the different &


  “It is likewise the old Stoic doctrine, that the elements give birth one to another. Manifestation begins on the spiritual plane, and as the life impulses reach forth into grosser forms, into matter . . . the succeeding elements (bases, rudiments) are born, each one from the preceding one, and from all preceding ones. For instance, earth is born not merely from the element water, but likewise from fire, and air. Furthermore, the seven rounds of a planetary chain, the seven globes of a planetary chain, and the seven root-races of any globe thereof, has each its predominating correspondence with one of these seven elements” (Fund 348).

Jen: Man. Goodness; virtue in general; the moral principle; the moral ideal of the superior man (chun. tzu); the fundamental as well as the sum total of virtues, just as the Prime (yuan) is the origin and the vital force of all things --jen consisting of "man" and "two" and yuan consisting of "two" and "man". (Confucianism.) True manhood; man's character; human-heartedness; moral character; being man-like; "that by which a man is to be a man;" "realization of one's true self and the restoration of the moral order." (Confucius and Mencius.) "The active (yang) and passive (yin) principles are the way of Heaven; the principles of strength and weakness are the way of Earth; and true manhood and righteousness (i) are the way of Man." "True manhood is man's mind and righteousness is man's path." It is one of the three Universally Recognized Moral Qualities of man (ta te), the four Fundamentals of the Moral Life (ssu tuan), and the five Constant Virtues (wu ch'ang). True manhood and righteousness are the basic principles of Confucian ethics and politics. (Confucianism.) The golden rule; "Being true to the principles of one's nature (chung) and the benevolent exercise of them in relation to others (shu)." "The true man, having established his own character, seeks to establish the character of others; and having succeeded, seeks to make others succeed." (Confucius.) Love; benevolence; kindness; charity; compassion; "the character of the heart and the principle of love;" "love towards all men and benefit towards things." (Confucianism.) "Universal love without the element of self," (Chuang Tzu, between 399 and 295 B.C.) "Universal Love." (Han Yu, 767-824.) The moral principle with regard to others. "True manhood is the cardinal virtue by which others are pacified, whereas righteousness is the cardinal principle by which the self is rectified." It means "to love others and not the self." (Tung Chung-shu, 177-104 B.C.) Love of all men and things and impartiality and justice towards all men and things, this virtue being the cardinal virtue not only of man but also of the universe. "Love means to devote oneself to the benefit of other people and things." "Love implies justice, that is, as a man, treating others as men." "The true man regards the universe and all things as a unity. They are all essential to himself. As he realizes the true self, there is no limit to his love." (Ch'eng Ming-tao, 1032-1068.) "Love is the source of all laws, the foundation of all phenomena." "What is received from Heaven at the beginning is simply love, and is therefore the complete substance of the mind." "Love is the love of creating in the mind of Heaven and Earth, and men and other creatures receive it as their mind." (Chu Hsi, 1130-1200.)

jiupin. (J. kuhon; K. kup'um 九品). In Chinese, "nine grades." According to the PURE LAND school, beings who succeed in being reborn into a pure land are divided into "nine grades," e.g., "the uppermost in the top grade (shangshang)," "the intermediate in the top grade (shangzhong)," "the lowest in the top grade (shangxia)," "the uppermost in the intermediate grade (zhongshang),"..."the lowest in the bottom grade (xiaxia)." One's rebirth "grade" is determined by one's previous practice, the amount of meritorious actions one has performed, and the greatness of one's aspiration for enlightenment, among other factors. For example, according to the GUAN WULIANGSHOU JING ("Sutra on the Visualization of the Buddha of Immeasurable Life"), the "uppermost in the top grade" is won by possessing the utmost sincerity (zhicheng xin), profound aspiration (shenxin), and a desire to direct one's highest aspiration to the purpose of being reborn in the pure land (huixiang fayuan xin) during a lifetime of practice. By contrast, the "lowest in the bottom grade" is secured by a penitent reprobate who is able to chant the name of AMITĀBHA up to ten times (shinian) right before his or her death. One's reborn "grade" will affect things such as the time one will take to reach buddhahood in the pure land (the higher the grade, the quicker one will the attainment). See also AMITUO JIUPIN YIN.

Just as the forces of nature are in themselves neutral, and become “good” or “bad” as they are used by individuals, similarly so is a symbol usable in a good or a bad sense. In the use of nagas and sarpas, the Brothers of Light are properly called nagas, and the Brothers of Darkness are more properly called sarpas, as the root srip which means to wriggle, hence to insinuate, to creep in by stealth and deceive. Both the Brothers of Light and of Darkness are focuses of power, subtlety, wisdom, and knowledge; in the one case rightly and nobly applied, and in the other wrongly applied. The former are the nagas or serpents of light: subtle, wise, and with power to cast off the garment or vehicle when the body has grown old and to assume another at will. The latter are more strictly the sarpas or serpents of darkness, insinuating, worldly wise, selfishly shrewd, deceitful, venomous, and dangerous, and yet possessing the same powers, but in less degree, and using them wrongly, thus deceiving human hearts and succeeding in their work often by lies and misrepresentations. Nevertheless, precisely because nagas and sarpas are used almost indiscriminately, either word may apply both to the servants of light or of darkness.

Kama-loka is the abode of the disimbodied astral forms called kama-rupas and of the still highly vitalized astral entities who quit physical existence as suicides and executed criminals who, thus violently hurled out of their bodies before the term of natural death, are as fully alive as ever they were on earth, lacking only the physical body and its linga-sarira. In addition the kama-loka contains elementaries and lost souls tending to avichi. All these entities remain in kama-loka until they fade out from it by the complete exhaustion of the effects of the mental and emotional impulses that created these eidolons of human and animal passions and desires. The second death takes place in kama-loka, after the upper duad frees itself of the lower, material human elements before entering devachan. “If, contrariwise, the entity in the kama-loka is so heavy with evil and is so strongly attracted to earth-spheres that the influence of the monad cannot withdraw the Reincarnating Ego from the Kama-rupa, then the latter with its befouled ‘soul’ sinks lower and lower and may even enter the Avichi. If the influence of the monad succeeds, as it usually does, in bringing about the ‘second death,’ then the kama-rupa becomes a mere phantom or kama-rupic spook, and begins instantly to decay and finally vanishes away, its component life-atoms pursuing each one the road whither its attractions draw it” (OG 76). The highest regions of kama-loka blend into the lowest regions of devachan, while the grossest and lowest regions of kama-loka bend into the highest regions of avichi.

Kama-Loka(Sanskrit) ::: A compound which can be translated as "desire world," which is accurate enough, but onlyslightly descriptive. It is a semi-material plane or rather world or realm, subjective and invisible tohuman beings as a rule, which surrounds and also encloses our physical globe. It is the habitat ordwelling-place of the astral forms of dead men and other dead beings -- the realm of the kama-rupas ordesire-bodies of defunct humans. "It is the Hades," as H. P. Blavatsky says, "of the ancient Greeks, andthe Amenti of the Egyptians, the land of Silent Shadows."It is in the kama-loka that the second death takes place, after which the freed upper duad of the humanbeing that was enters the devachan. The highest regions of the kama-loka blend insensibly into the lowestregions or realms of the devachan; and, conversely, the grossest and lowest regions of the kama-lokablend insensibly into the highest regions of the avichi.When the physical body breaks up at death, the astral elements of the excarnate entity remain in thekama-loka or "shadow world," with the same vital centers as in physical life clinging within them, stillvitalizing them; and here certain processes take place. The lower human soul that is befouled withearth-thought and the lower instincts cannot easily rise out of the kama-loka, because it is foul, it isheavy; and its tendency is consequently downwards. It is in the kama-loka that the processes ofseparation of the monad from the kama-rupic spook or phantom take place; and when this separation iscomplete, which is the second death above spoken of, then the monad receives the reincarnating egowithin its bosom, wherein it enjoys its long rest of bliss and recuperation. If, contrariwise, the entity inthe kama-loka is so heavy with evil and is so strongly attracted to earth spheres that the influence of themonad cannot withdraw the reincarnating ego from the kama-rupa, then the latter with its befouled soulsinks lower and lower and may even enter the avichi. If the influence of the monad succeeds, as it usuallydoes, in bringing about the second death, then the kama-rupa becomes a mere phantom or kama-rupicspook, and begins instantly to decay and finally vanishes away, its component life-atoms pursuing eachone the road whither its attractions draw it.

Keizan Jokin. (瑩山紹瑾) (1268-1325). Japanese ZEN master and putative second patriarch of the SoTo Zen tradition. Keizan was a native of Echizen in present-day Fukui prefecture. Little is known of his early years, but Keizan is said to have been influenced by his mother, who was a pious devotee of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA. Keizan went to the nearby monastery of EIHEIJI and studied under the Zen master Gikai (1219-1309), a disciple of DoGEN KIGEN (1200-1253). He was later ordained by the monk Ejo (1198-1280). After Ejo's death, Keizan went to the nearby monastery of Hokyoji and continued his studies under another disciple of Dogen, Jakuen (1207-1299). At age twenty-eight, Keizan was invited as the founding abbot (kaisan; C. KAISHAN) of the monastery of Jomanji in Awa (present-day Tokushima prefecture). The next year, Keizan briefly visited Eiheiji to train in the conferral of bodhisattva precepts (bosatsukai; PUSA JIE; see also BODHISATTVAsĪLA) under the guidance of the abbot Gien (d. 1313). Keizan returned to Jomanji the very same year and began to confer precepts. Several years later, Keizan joined Gikai once more at the latter's new temple of Daijoji in Ishikawa and became his disciple. Three years later, Keizan succeeded Gikai as abbot of Daijoji. In 1300, Keizan began his lectures on what would eventually come to be known as the DENKoROKU. In 1311, while setting the regulations for Daijoji, Keizan composed the ZAZEN YoJINKI and Shinjinmei nentei. He also entrusted Daijoji to his disciple Meiho Sotetsu (1277-1350) and established the monastery of Jojuji in nearby Kaga. In 1317, Keizan established the monastery of Yokoji on Mt. Tokoku. Keizan also came into possession of a local temple known as Morookadera, which was renamed SoJIJI. In 1322, Yokoji and Sojiji were sanctioned as official monasteries by Emperor Godaigo (r. 1318-1339). This sanction is traditionally considered to mark the official establishment of Soto as an independent Zen institution. Keizan later entrusted the monastery of Sojiji to his disciple Gasan Joseki (1276-1366) and retired to Yokoji. In the years before his death, Keizan built a buddha hall, founder's hall, dharma hall, and monk's hall at Yokoji.

khanikasamādhi. In Pāli, "momentary concentration"; a type of rudimentary concentration ancillary to UPACĀRASAMĀDHI and APPANĀSAMĀDHI, which is used with reference to meditators who are developing insight (vipassanā; S. VIPAsYANĀ) practice. Although a meditator specializing in insight techniques may not be developing advanced forms of meditative absorption (JHĀNA; S. DHYĀNA), he still requires a modicum of concentration in order to maintain his intensive analysis of experience. Hence, the commentators posit that even insight practice requires "momentary concentration" in order to succeed.

klippoth ::: Klippoth In Lurianic Kabbalah, the purpose of man is to restore the original harmony in the universe that was destroyed with the breaking of the Vessels (also known as the 'Fall'). The original vessels shattered and fell to earth as the evil Klippoth. Many worlds were created and destroyed prior to the present creation. These are compared with sparks which fly out from a red hot iron beaten by a hammer, and which are extinguished according to the distance they are removed from the burning mass. These creations, which have been succeeded by the present order of things, are indicated in Genesis, chapter 36, verses 31 40. The kings of Edom, who reigned before the monarchs of Israel, are mentioned as having died one after the other. They are the primordial worlds which were successively destroyed, the worlds of the Klippoth.

Kyo. (C. jiao; J. kyo 敎). In Korean, "doctrine" or "teaching," generally referring to doctrinally oriented Buddhist schools and their tenets, as distinguished from meditation-oriented Buddhist schools and practices (SoN; C. CHAN). While the Chinese and Japanese Buddhist traditions appear to have used the term doctrine only to describe one of two generic approaches to Buddhism, in Korea Buddhist schools have often been categorized as belonging to either the Doctrine (Kyo) or the Meditation (Son) schools; indeed, during the period of Buddhist suppression under the Choson dynasty, Kyo and Son became the specific designations for the two officially sanctioned schools of the tradition. During the stable political environment of the Unified Silla period (668-935), five major Kyo schools are traditionally presumed to have developed in Korean Buddhism: NIRVĀnA (Yolban chong), VINAYA (Kyeyul chong), Dharma-nature (PoPSoNG CHONG), Hwaom [alt. Wonyung chong], and YOGĀCĀRA (Popsang chong). Toward the end of the Unified Silla period, however, the newly imported Son (C. Chan, Meditation) lineages, which were associated with local gentry on the frontier of the kingdom, began to criticize the main doctrinal school, Hwaom, that was supported by the old Silla aristocracy in the capital of KYoNGJU; these schools came to be called the "Nine Mountains School of Son" (KUSAN SoNMUN). These various doctrine and meditation schools were collectively referred to as the "Five Doctrinal [Schools] and Nine Mountains [Schools of Son]" (OGYO KUSAN). The Ogyo Kusan designation continued to be used into the succeeding Koryo dynasty (937-1392), which saw the first attempts to bring together these two distinct strands of the Korean Buddhist tradition. Attempts to find common ground between the Kyo and Son schools are seen, for example, in ŬICH'oN's "cultivation together of scriptural study and contemplation" (kyogwan kyomsu) and POJO CHINUL's "cultivation in tandem of concentration [viz., Son] and wisdom [viz., scripture]" (chonghye ssangsu). The Ch'ont'ae (C. TIANTAI) and CHOGYE schools that are associated respectively with these two monks were both classified as Son schools during the mid- to late-Koryo dynasty; together with the five previous Kyo schools, these schools were collectively called the "Five Kyo and Two [Son] Traditions" (OGYO YANGJONG). This designation continued to be used into the early Choson dynasty (1392-1910). The Confucian orientation of the new Choson dynasty led to an increasing suppression of these Buddhist traditions. In 1407, King T'aejong (r. 1400-1418) restructured the various schools then current in Korean Buddhism into three schools of Son and four of Kyo; subsequently, in 1424, King Sejong (r. 1418-1450) reduced all these remaining schools down to, simply, the "Two Traditions, Son and Kyo" (SoN KYO YANGJONG), a designation that continued to be used through the remainder of the dynasty. The modern Chogye order of Korean Buddhism claims to be a synthetic tradition that combines both strands of Son meditation practice and Kyo doctrinal study into a single denomination.

Labyrinth [from Greek labyrinthos probably from laura crypt] The complex prison built for King Minos of Crete by Daedalus to house the Minotaur. Theseus succeeded in finding his way out with the aid of the thread given him by the king’s daughter, Ariadne. Symbolically, it may be the celestial labyrinth, into which the souls of the departed plunge, and also its earthly counterpart, as shown in the tortuous subterranean chambers in ancient Egypt, or similar constructions under temples in various ancient lands. These labyrinths also symbolized the races of mankind, and the succession of gods, demigods, and heroes who preceded mortal kings. These underground chambers in general were used as initiation chambers in the Mysteries, where candidates were taught by actual experience various truths regarding human destiny after death; hence there was an exact analogy between the physical construction of these chambers and the truths thus symbolized. The labyrinth therefore refers both to an inner and outer mystery. One of the coins unearthed at Knossos in Crete showed a diagram of such a maze, and this identical pattern, exact to the last important detail, has been found among the Pima Indians of Arizona (cf Theosophical Path, April 1925). Clearly its real significance was common knowledge to initiates in all parts of the world.

League for Programming Freedom "body, legal" (LPF) A grass-roots organisation of professors, students, businessmen, programmers and users dedicated to bringing back the freedom to write programs. Once programmers were allowed to write programs using all the techniques they knew, and providing whatever features they felt were useful. Monopolies, {software patents} and {interface copyrights} have taken away freedom of expression and the ability to do a good job. "{Look and feel}" lawsuits attempt to monopolise well-known command languages; some have succeeded. Copyrights on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition and stifle incremental improvements. {Software patents} are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pre-trial seizure. It is difficult and expensive to find out whether the techniques you consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future. The League is not opposed to the legal system that Congress intended -- {copyright} on individual programs. They aim to reverse the changes made by judges in response to special interests, often explicitly rejecting the public interest principles of the Constitution. The League works to abolish the monopolies by publishing articles, talking with public officials, boycotting egregious offenders and in the future may intervene in court cases. On 1989-05-24, the League picketed {Lotus} headquarters on account of their lawsuits, and then again on 1990-08-02. These marches stimulated widespread media coverage for the issue. The League's funds are used for filing briefs; printing handouts, buttons and signs and whatever will persuade the courts, the legislators and the people. The League is a non-profit corporation, but not considered a tax-exempt charity. {LPF Home (http://progfree.org/)}. (2007-02-28)

League for Programming Freedom ::: (body) (LPF) A grass-roots organisation of professors, students, businessmen, programmers and users dedicated to bringing back the freedom to interface copyrights, have taken away our freedom of expression and our ability to do a good job.Look and feel lawsuits attempt to monopolise well-known command languages; some have succeeded. Copyrights on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition, and stifle incremental improvements.Software patents are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pre-trial consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future.The League is not opposed to the legal system that Congress intended -- copyright on individual programs. Our aim is to reverse the recent changes made by judges in response to special interests, often explicitly rejecting the public interest principles of the Constitution.The League works to abolish the new monopolies by publishing articles, talking with public officials, boycotting egregious offenders, and in the future may stimulated widespread media coverage for the issue. We welcome suggestions for other activities, as well as help in carrying them out.Membership dues in the League are $42 per year for programmers, managers and professionals; $10.50 for students; $21 for others. The League's funds will be is a non-profit corporation, but not considered a tax-exempt charity. However, for those self-employed in software, the dues can be a business expense.The League needs both activist members and members who only pay their dues. We also greatly need additional corporate members; contact us for information.Jack Larsen is President, Chris Hofstader is Secretary, and Steve Sisak is Treasurer. .Telephone: +1 (617) 243 4091.E-mail: .Address: League for Programming Freedom, 1 Kendall Square

Lemuria, although submerged as a continental system, was not submerged as was Atlantis, but sank because of terrific seismic and volcanic activities lasting for ages. Its Atlantic portion was the geological basis for the succeeding continental system of Atlantis, which thus was rather a development of the Lemurian system than an entirely new and separate body of continental masses. See ROOT-RACE, THIRD

lineal ::: a. --> Descending in a direct line from an ancestor; hereditary; derived from ancestors; -- opposed to collateral; as, a lineal descent or a lineal descendant.
Inheriting by direct descent; having the right by direct descent to succeed (to).
Composed of lines; delineated; as, lineal designs.
In the direction of a line; of or pertaining to a line; measured on, or ascertained by, a line; linear; as, lineal magnitude.


logic programming "artificial intelligence, programming, language" A {declarative}, {relational} style of programming based on {first-order logic}. The original logic programming language was {Prolog}. The concept is based on {Horn clauses}. The programmer writes a "database" of "{facts}", e.g. wet(water). ("water is wet") and "{rules}", e.g. mortal(X) :- human(X). ("X is mortal is implied by X is human"). Facts and rules are collectively known as "{clauses}". The user supplies a "{goal}" which the system attempts to prove using "{resolution}" or "{backward chaining}". This involves matching the current goal against each fact or the left hand side of each rule using "{unification}". If the goal matches a fact, the goal succeeds; if it matches a rule then the process recurses, taking each sub-goal on the right hand side of the rule as the current goal. If all sub-goals succeed then the rule succeeds. Each time a possible clause is chosen, a "{choice point}" is created on a {stack}. If subsequent {resolution} fails then control eventually returns to the choice point and subsequent clauses are tried. This is known as "{backtracking}". Clauses may contain {logic variables} which take on any value necessary to make the fact or the left hand side of the rule match a goal. Unification binds these variables to the corresponding subterms of the goal. Such bindings are associated with the {choice point} at which the clause was chosen and are undone when backtracking reaches that choice point. The user is informed of the success or failure of his first goal and if it succeeds and contains variables he is told what values of those variables caused it to succeed. He can then ask for alternative solutions. (1997-07-14)

logic programming ::: (artificial intelligence, programming, language) A declarative, relational style of programming based on first-order logic. The original logic programming language was Prolog. The concept is based on Horn clauses.The programmer writes a database of facts, e.g. wet(water). (water is wet) and rules, e.g. mortal(X) :- human(X). (X is mortal is implied by X is human). Facts and rules are collectively known as clauses.The user supplies a goal which the system attempts to prove using resolution or backward chaining. This involves matching the current goal against each taking each sub-goal on the right hand side of the rule as the current goal. If all sub-goals succeed then the rule succeeds.Each time a possible clause is chosen, a choice point is created on a stack. If subsequent resolution fails then control eventually returns to the choice point and subsequent clauses are tried. This is known as backtracking.Clauses may contain logic variables which take on any value necessary to make the fact or the left hand side of the rule match a goal. Unification binds these associated with the choice point at which the clause was chosen and are undone when backtracking reaches that choice point.The user is informed of the success or failure of his first goal and if it succeeds and contains variables he is told what values of those variables caused it to succeed. He can then ask for alternative solutions. (1997-07-14)

Macroprosopus (Latin) [from Greek makros great + prosopon face] Also Long Face, Great or Vast Countenance. Coined by medieval Qabbalists to translate the Chaldee phrase ’Arich ’Anpin (great face), one of the names of the first emanation of the Sephirothal Tree, Kether the Crown. Generally regarded as the universe in its totality, “in the Chaldean Kabal, a pure abstraction; the Word or logos, or dabar (in Hebrew), which Word, though it becomes in fact a plural number, or ‘Words’ — d(a)B(a)Rim, when it reflects itself, or falls into the aspect of a Host (of angels, or Sephiroth, ‘numbers’) is still collectively One, and on the ideal plane a nought — 0, a ‘No-thing.’ It is without form or being, ‘with no likeness with anything else’ ” (SD 1:350). The originator of the succeeding nine emanated Sephiroth which, flowing forth from the Crown, are collectively called Microprosopus.

Magma "symbolic mathematics, tool" A program used for heavy duty algebraic computation in many branches of mathematics. Magma, developed by John Cannon and associates at the University of Sydney, succeeded {Cayley}. It runs at several hundred sites. E-mail: "magma@maths.usyd.edu.au". {(http://maths.usyd.edu.au:8000/u/magma/)}. [W. Bosma, J. Cannon and C. Playoust, The Magma algebra system I: The user language, J. Symb. Comp., 24, 3/4, 1997, 235-265]. (2000-12-21)

Magma ::: (symbolic mathematics, tool) A program used for heavy duty algebraic computation in many branches of mathematics. Magma, developed by John Cannon and associates at the University of Sydney, succeeded Cayley. It runs at several hundred sites.E-mail: . .[W. Bosma, J. Cannon and C. Playoust, The Magma algebra system I: The user language, J. Symb. Comp., 24, 3/4, 1997, 235-265].(2000-12-21)

Mahāmaudgalyāyana. (P. Mahāmoggallāna; T. Mo'u 'gal gyi bu chen po; C. Mohemujianlian/Mulian; J. Makamokkenren/Mokuren; K. Mahamokkollyon/Mongnyon 摩訶目犍連/目連). An eminent ARHAT and one of the two chief disciples of the Buddha, often depicted together with his friend sĀRIPUTRA flanking the Buddha. Mahāmaudgalyāyana was considered supreme among the Buddha's disciples in supranormal powers (ṚDDHI). According to Pāli accounts, where he is called Moggallāna, he was older than the Buddha and born on the same day as sāriputra (P. Sāriputta). Both he and sāriputra were sons of wealthy families and were friends from childhood. Once, when witnessing a play, the two friends were overcome with a sense of the impermanence and the vanity of all things and decided to renounce the world as mendicants. They first became disciples of the agnostic SaNjaya Belatthiputta (SANJAYA VAIRĀtĪPUTRA), although later they took their leave and wandered the length and breadth of India in search of a teacher. Finding no one who satisfied them, they parted company, promising one another that if one should succeed he would inform the other. Later sāriputra met the Buddha's disciple, Assaji (S. AsVAJIT), who recited for him a précis of the Buddha's teachings, the so-called YE DHARMĀ verse, which immediately prompted sāriputra to attain the path of a stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA). He repeated the stanza to Mahāmaudgalyāyana, who likewise immediately became a stream-enterer. The two friends thereupon resolved to take ordination as disciples of the Buddha and, together with five hundred disciples of their former teacher SaNjaya, proceeded to the Veluvana (S. VEnUVANAVIHĀRA) grove where the Buddha was residing. The Buddha ordained the entire group with the formula ehi bhikkhu pabbajjā ("Come forth, monks"; see EHIBHIKsUKĀ), whereupon all five hundred became arhats, except for sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana. Mahāmaudgalyāyana attained arhatship seven days after his ordination, while sāriputra reached the goal one week later. The Buddha declared sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana his chief disciples the day they were ordained, noting that they had both strenuously exerted themselves in countless previous lives for this distinction; they appear often as the bodhisattva's companions in the JĀTAKAs. sāriputra was chief among the Buddha's disciples in wisdom, while Mahāmaudgalyāyana was chief in mastery of supranormal powers. He could create doppelgängers of himself and transform himself into any shape he desired. He could perform intercelestial travel as easily as a person bends his arm, and the tradition is replete with the tales of his travels, such as flying to the Himālayas to find a medicinal plant to cure the ailing sāriputra. Mahāmaudgalyāyana said of himself that he could crush Mount SUMERU like a bean and roll up the world like a mat and twirl it like a potter's wheel. He is described as shaking the heavens of sAKRA and BRAHMĀ to dissuade them from their pride, and he often preached to the divinities in their abodes. Mahāmaudgalyāyana could see ghosts (PRETA) and other spirits without having to enter into meditative trance as did other meditation masters, and because of his exceptional powers the Buddha instructed him alone to subdue the dangerous NĀGA, Nandopananda, whose huge hood had darkened the world. Mahāmaudgalyāyana's powers were so immense that during a terrible famine, he offered to turn the earth's crust over to uncover the ambrosia beneath it; the Buddha wisely discouraged him, saying that such an act would confound creatures. Even so, Mahāmaudgalyāyana's supranormal powers, unsurpassed in the world, were insufficient to overcome the law of cause and effect and the power of his own former deeds, as the famous tale of his death demonstrates. A group of naked JAINA ascetics resented the fact that the people of the kingdom of MAGADHA had shifted their allegiance and patronage from them to the Buddha and his followers, and they blamed Mahāmaudgalyāyana, who had reported that, during his celestial and infernal travels, he had observed deceased followers of the Buddha in the heavens and the followers of other teachers in the hells. They hired a group of bandits to assassinate the monk. When he discerned that they were approaching, the eighty-four-year-old monk made his body very tiny and escaped through the keyhole. He eluded them in different ways for six days, hoping to spare them from committing a deed of immediate retribution (ĀNANTARYAKARMAN) by killing an arhat. On the seventh day, Mahāmaudgalyāyana temporarily lost his supranormal powers, the residual karmic effect of having beaten his blind parents to death in a distant previous lifetime, a crime for which he had previously been reborn in hell. The bandits ultimately beat him mercilessly, until his bones had been smashed to the size of grains of rice. Left for dead, Mahāmaudgalyāyana regained his powers and soared into the air and into the presence of the Buddha, where he paid his final respects and passed into NIRVĀnA at the Buddha's feet. ¶ Like many of the great arhats, Mahāmaudgalyāyana appears frequently in the MAHĀYĀNA sutras, sometimes merely listed as a member of the audience, sometimes playing a more significant role. In the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, he is one of the sRĀVAKA disciples who is reluctant to visit VIMALAKĪRTI. In the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, he is one of four arhats who understands the parable of the burning house and who rejoices in the teaching of the one vehicle (EKAYĀNA); later in the sutra, the Buddha prophesies his eventual attainment of buddhahood. Mahāmaudgalyāyana is additionally famous in East Asian Buddhism for his role in the apocryphal YULANBEN JING. The text describes his efforts to save his mother from the tortures of her rebirth as a ghost (preta). Mahāmaudgalyāyana (C. Mulian) is able to use his supranormal powers to visit his mother in the realm of ghosts, but the food that he offers her immediately bursts into flames. The Buddha explains that it is impossible for the living to make offerings directly to the dead; instead, one should make offerings to the SAMGHA in a bowl, and the power of their meditative practices will be able to save one's ancestors and loved ones from rebirths in the unfortunate realms (DURGATI).

Malang fu. (J. Merofu; K. Marang pu 馬郎婦). In Chinese, "Mr. Ma's Wife"; also known as YULAN GUANYIN (Fish Basket Guanyin); a famous manifestation of the BODHISATTVA GUANYIN (AVALOKITEsVARA). The story of Mrs. Ma is found in various Chinese miracle-tale collections. The basic outline of the story begins with a beautiful young woman who comes to a small town to sell fish. Many young men propose to her, but she insists that she will only marry a man who can memorize the "Universal Gateway" chapter of the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra") in one night. Twenty men succeed, so she then asks them to memorize the VAJRACCHEDIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀSuTRA in one night. The ten men who succeed at that task are then asked to memorize the entire Saddharmapundarīkasutra. One young man whose surname was Ma succeeds and he marries the beautiful fish seller. Unfortunately, she became ill on their wedding day and died the very same day. Later, a foreign monk visits the town to pay respects and informed Ma and the townsmen that this young fish seller was none other than the bodhisattva Guanyin in disguise.

Manam Chonghon. (曼庵宗憲) (1876-1957). Korean monk and educator during the Japanese occupation and postwar periods; also known as Mogyang. After losing his parents at an early age, Manam became a monk and studied under HANYoNG CHoNGHO (1870-1948). In 1900, he devoted himself to the study of SoN meditation at the monastery of Unmun Sonwon (UNMUNSA). In 1910, after Korea's annexation by Japan, Manam traveled throughout the southern regions of the peninsula and delivered lectures on Buddhism to the public until he settled down at the monastery of PAEGYANGSA in 1920 to serve as abbot. At a time when the Buddhist community was split over the issue of clerical marriage, Manam, for the first time, divided his monk-students between the celibate chongpop chung (proper-dharma congregation) and the married hobop chung (protecting-dharma congregation). Manam's actions were considered to be a formal recognition of clerical marriage and were heavily criticized by the rest of the Buddhist community led by YONGSoNG CHINJONG (1864-1940) and Namjon Kwangon (1868-1936). In 1945, the Koburhoe organization that Manam established clashed with the General Administrative Committee of the Choson Buddhist order over the issue of the laxity of Buddhist practice in Korea, with Manam arguing for a return to the strict and disciplined lifestyle of the past as a means of preventing the corruption of Buddhism. After the end of the Japanese occupation, Manam organized the Kobul Ch'ongnim gathering and initiated what later came to be called the "purification movement" (chonghwa undong) in Korean Buddhism. In 1952, he succeeded his teacher Hanyong and became head (kyojong) of the Choson Buddhist order. As head, he gave the order a new name, the "Chogye Order of Korean Buddhism" (Taehan Pulgyo Chogye Chong; see CHONGYE CHONG), and created a new entry in its constitution, formally delineating the distinction between married monks (kyohwasŭng) and celibate monks (suhaengsŭng). He attempted to initiate a new plan for the organization of monasteries that would give priority to the celibate monks, but his plan was never put into practice. When President Syngman Rhee showed his support for the purification movement in May 1954, the monks of the Chogye order held a national convention and appointed Manam, Tongsan Hyeil (1890-1965), and Ch'ongdam Sunho (1902-1971) as the new leaders of the order and initiated a nationwide Buddhist reformation movement. Manam, however, was ultimately unable to mediate the different opinions of the representatives of the Buddhist community concerning the specific details and goals of the purification movement.

Many of the great mystical religions refer to mundane mountains or world-mountains, whether of cosmic or terrestrial character. These myths are always extremely recondite because connected with the spiritual and psychological forces continuously at work in the solar system. They are bound up with the teachings of the other globes of the earth planetary chain, and with the relations of such globes to the solar system. Also they refer to the north pole of the earth which was the situation of the first continent on our globe when manifestation began in the fourth round. This continent, the Sacred Imperishable Land, was likewise the seat of the first race of beings who through evolution became the human and superior races. It has been called sacred and imperishable because as a land mass or massif it endures from the beginning of the fourth round to its end, without finding a final watery grave as do succeeding continental massifs. The polar land does not remain unchanged, as there is constant change through the ages involving minor subsidences and elevations and inroads of the arctic seas into the land masses, so that there is a constant shifting in topographical outline. The meaning is that as a land mass, whatever its minor changes, it remains throughout the entire globe-manvantara.

Manzan Dohaku. (卍山道白) (1636-1715). In Japanese, "Myriad Mountains, Purity of the Path"; ZEN master and scholar of the SoToSHu. Manzan is said to have become a monk at the age of nine and to have experienced a deep awakening at sixteen. After his awakening, he left the following verse: "The night is deep and the clouds have cleared from the sky as if it had been washed; throughout the world, nowhere is the radiance of my eyes defiled or obstructed." In 1678, he met the Soto Zen master Gesshu Soko (1618-1696) and inherited his dharma (shiho). Two years later Manzan took over the abbacy of the temple Daijoji from Gesshu and remained there for ten years. In 1700, Manzan went to the city of Edo (Tokyo) in hopes of reforming the custom of IN'IN EKISHI, or "changing teachers according to temple." Instead, he called for a direct, face-to-face transmission (menju shiho) from one master to his disciple (isshi insho). After several failed attempts he finally succeeded in persuading the bakufu government to ban the in'in ekishi and GARANBo ("temple dharma lineage") practice in 1703. Manzan was also a consummate scholar who is renowned for his efforts to edit Zen master DoGEN KIGEN's magnum opus, SHoBoGENZo. He based his arguments for the abandonment of garanbo and in'in ekishi on his readings of the Shobogenzo. Manzan left many works. His Zenkaiketsu and Taikaku kanna offered a Zen perspective on the meaning of precepts. He also wrote the Tomon enyoshu, which explains various matters related to Zen, including face-to-face transmission (menju shiho). His teachings can also be found in the Manzan osho goroku. His most eminent disciple was the Tokugawa reformer MENZAN ZUIHo (1683-1769).

Mathematical Analyzer, Numerical Integrator and Computer "computer, history" (MANIAC, Or "Mathematical Analyzer, Numerator, Integrator, and Computer") An early computer, built for the {Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory}. MANIAC began operation in March 1952. Typical of early computers, it ran its own propriatery language. It was succeeded by {MANIAC II} in 1957. A {MANIAC III} was built at the University of Chicago in 1964. Contrary to legend, MANIAC did not run {MAD} ({Michigan Algorithm Decoder}), which was not invented until 1959. (2013-05-05)

Medium ::: A word of curiously ill-defined significance, and used mostly if not exclusively by modern Spiritists. Thegeneral sense of the word would seem to be a person of unstable psychical temperament, or constitutionrather, who is supposed to act as a canal or channel of transmission, hence "medium," between humanbeings and the so-called spirits.A medium actually in the theosophical teaching is one whose inner constitution is in unstable balance, orperhaps even dislocated, so that at different times the sheaths of the inner parts of the medium'sconstitution function irregularly and in magnetic sympathy with currents and entities in the astral light,more particularly in kama-loka. It is an exceedingly unfortunate and dangerous condition to be in, despitewhat the Spiritists claim for it.Very different indeed from the medium is the mediator, a human being of relatively highly evolvedspiritual and intellectual and psychical nature who serves as an intermediary or mediator between themembers of the Great Brotherhood, the mahatmas, and ordinary humanity. There are also mediators of astill more lofty type who serve as channels of transmission for the passing down of divine and spiritualand highly intellectual powers to this sphere. Actually, every mahatma is such a mediator of this highertype, and so in even larger degree are the buddhas and the avataras. A mediator is one of highly evolvedconstitution, every portion of which is under the instant and direct control of the spiritual dominating willand the loftiest intelligence which the mediator is capable of exercising. Every human being should striveto be a mediator of this kind between his own inner god and his mere brain-mind. The more he succeeds,the grander he is as a man.Mediator, therefore, and medium are the polar antitheses of each other. The medium is irregular,negative, often irresponsible or quasi-irresponsible, and uncertain, and is not infrequently the victim orplaything of evil and degenerate entities whom theosophists call elementaries, having their habitat in theastral light of the earth; whereas the mediator is one more or less fully insouled or inspirited with divine,spiritual, and intellectual powers and their corresponding faculties and organs.

megrim ::: n. --> A kind of sick or nevrous headache, usually periodical and confined to one side of the head.
A fancy; a whim; a freak; a humor; esp., in the plural, lowness of spirits.
A sudden vertigo in a horse, succeeded sometimes by unconsciousness, produced by an excess of blood in the brain; a mild form of apoplexy.
The British smooth sole, or scaldfish (Psetta arnoglossa).


Mesa Xerox PARC, 1977. System and application programming for proprietary hardware: Alto, Dolphin, Dorado and Dandelion. Pascal-like syntax, ALGOL68-like semantics. An early version was weakly typed. Mesa's modules with separately compilable definition and implementation parts directly led to Wirth's design for Modula. Threads, coroutines (fork/join), exceptions, and monitors. Type checking may be disabled. Mesa was used internally by Xerox to develop ViewPoint, the Xerox Star, MDE, and the controller of a high-end copier. It was released to a few universitites in 1985. Succeeded by Cedar. ["Mesa Language Manual", J.G. Mitchell et al, Xerox PARC, CSL-79-3 (Apr 1979)]. ["Early Experience with Mesa", Geschke et al, CACM 20(8):540-552 (Aug 1977)].

Mesa ::: Xerox PARC, 1977. System and application programming for proprietary hardware: Alto, Dolphin, Dorado and Dandelion. Pascal-like syntax, ALGOL68-like semantics. Star, MDE, and the controller of a high-end copier. It was released to a few universitites in 1985. Succeeded by Cedar.[Mesa Language Manual, J.G. Mitchell et al, Xerox PARC, CSL-79-3 (Apr 1979)].[Early Experience with Mesa, Geschke et al, CACM 20(8):540-552 (Aug 1977)].

Miram Ch'ungji. (宓庵冲止) (1226-1292). Korean monk from the late Koryo dynasty and sixth-generation successor to the SUSoNSA religious society (K. kyolsa; C. JIESHE) established by POJO CHINUL; also known as Pophwan. In 1244, Miram passed the highest-level civil examination at the age of nineteen. He was subsequently appointed to the Hallim academy, the king's secretariat, and was later sent to Japan as an emissary. When he heard that state preceptor (K. kuksa; C. GUOSHI) CH'UNGGYoNG CH'oNYoNG was residing at the nearby monastery of Sonwonsa in Kaegyong, he decided to become the master's disciple. In 1286, after Ch'unggyong passed away, Ch'ungji succeeded him as head of the Susonsa society. He later went to Yanjing (present-day Beijing) at the request of the Yuan emperor Shizong (r. 1260-1294). He passed away in 1292 at the age of sixty-seven, and was given the posthumous title and name State Preceptor Won'gam. He was a talented poet and his poetry can be found in the Tongmunson. His extant writings also include the Chogye Won'gam kuksa orok, Haedong Chogye cheyukse Won'gam kuksa kasong, and Haedong Chogye Miram hwasang chapcho. A compendium of his writings, the Won'gam kuksa chip, is no longer extant.

mission only Azrael, angel of death, succeeded.

Miyun Yuanwu. (J. Mitsuun Engo; K. Mirun Wono 密雲圓悟) (1566-1642). Chinese CHAN master of the LINJI ZONG; also known as Tiantong. Miyun was a native of Changzhou prefecture in present-day Jiangsu province. He is said to have decided to become a monk after reading the LIUZU TAN JING and was formally ordained by Huanyou Zhengzhuan (1549-1614) at the age of twenty-eight. In 1602, Miyun followed Huanyou to the monastery of Longchiyuan in Changzhou and served as its prior (JIANYUAN). In 1611, Miyun received Huanyou's robes and bowls as a mark of transmission. Three years later, Miyun succeeded Huanyou's seat at Longchiyuan. In 1623, Miyun moved to the monastery Tongxuansi on TIANTAISHAN and again to Guanghuisi in Fuzhou prefecture (Zhejing province) a year later. In 1630, Miyun restored the monastery Wanfusi on Mt. Huangbo. He subsequently served as abbots of the monasteries Guanglisi on Mt. Yuwang, Jingdesi on Mt. Tiantong, and Dabao'ensi in Jinleng. His teachings are recorded in the Miyun chanshi yulu.

MORALS The terms morals (from Latin) and ethics (from Greek) through ignorance&

Mu'an Xingtao. (J. Mokuan Shoto; K. Mogam Songdo 木菴性瑫) (1611-1684). Chinese CHAN master, calligrapher, and pioneer of the oBAKUSHu in Japan. He was a native of Quanzhou in present-day Fujian province. After his novice ordination at the age of eighteen, Mu'an received the full monastic precepts from the monk Yongjue Yuanxian (1578-1657) on Mt. Gu (present-day Fujian province). Mu'an visited the eminent Chan master MIYUN YUANWU before he returned to Yongjue, under whom he is said to have attained awakening. Later, Mu'an continued his studies under FEIYIN TONGRONG and his disciple YINYUAN LONGQI at the monastery of Wanfusi on Mt. Huangbo (present-day Fujian province). Mu'an eventually became Yinyuan's disciple and inherited his lineage. In 1655, Mu'an arrived in Nagasaki, Japan, and began his residence at the monastery of Fukusaiji. In 1661, Mu'an followed Yinyuan to his new monastery of MANPUKUJI in Uji. Three years later, Mu'an succeeded Yinyuan as the abbot of the monastery, and the next year he oversaw the ordination of monks at the triple-precept platform ceremony (sandan kaie). In 1670, he received the purple robe, and later with the support of the shogun Tokugawa Ietsuna (1639-1680), he established the monastery of Zuishoji in Edo. In 1675, he turned over the administration of Zuishoji to his disciple Tetsugyu Doki (1628-1700) and that of Manpukuji to Huilin Xingji (1609-1681).

Mukan Fumon. (無關普門) (1212-1291). Japanese proper name of RINZAISHu monk and first abbot of NANZENJI; also known as Gengo. Mukan was born in Hoshina in Shinano province (present-day Nagano prefecture) and received the BODHISATTVA precepts around 1230 at a monastery affiliated with MYoAN EISAI's (1141-1215) lineage. He became versed at Japanese exoteric and esoteric Buddhist teachings, and traveled around the eastern part of Japan, especially the Kanto and Tohoku regions, to lecture. Between 1243 and 1249, Mukan studied under ENNI BEN'EN (1202-1280). Mukan traveled to China in 1251, where he received transmission from Duanqiao Miaolun (1201-1261), the tenth-generation master in the YANGQI PAI collateral lineage of the LINJI ZONG, before returning to Japan in 1263. Mukan became the third abbot of Tohukuji in 1281 and was later appointed in 1291 by the cloistered Emperor Kameyama (r. 1260-1274) to be the founding abbot (J. kaisan; C. KAISHAN) of Nanzenji. There is a well-known story about his appointment as the Nazenji abbot. The monastery was originally built as a royal palace, but soon after the emperor moved there, ghosts began to haunt it. After several other monks failed to exorcise the ghosts, the emperor finally invited Mukan to try. Mukan succeeded in removing the ghosts by conducting Zen meditation with his disciples. In gratitude, the emperor turned the palace into a Rinzai monastery and appointed Mukan its abbot.

Nachshon Operation ::: Initiated on April 6, 1948, and lasting until April 15, this operation succeeded in opening the road to Jerusalem long enough to push through three large convoys stuffed with food and weapons. One of the largest operations of the War of Independence, 1,500 soldiers fielded by the Haganah attacked five different locations. The name “Operation Nachshon” was derived from the biblical personage Nachshon Ben Aminadav who was the first to jump into the Red Sea when the Jews fled Egypt.

Nanzenji. (南禪寺). In Japanese, "Southern ZEN Monastery," major monastery in Kyoto, Japan, that is currently the headquarters (honzan) of the Nanzenji branch of the RINZAISHu. In 1264, Emperor Kameyama (r. 1259-1274) built a country villa, which he later converted to a Zen monastery named Nanzenji. He invited the monk Mukan Fumon (1212-1291), a disciple of ENNI BEN'EN (1202-1280), to serve as the monastery's founding abbot (J. kaisan; C. KAISHAN). After Fumon's departure, the monk Soen (1261-1313) succeeded Mukan and oversaw additional construction at the monastery. As the first Zen monastery constructed by an emperor, many eminent Zen masters were appointed to its abbacy. In 1325, Emperor Godaigo (r. 1318-1339) invited MUSo SoSEKI (1275-1351) to serve as abbot of Nanzenji. After his triumphant return to Kyoto in 1334, Godaigo elevated Nanzenji to the first rank in the influential GOZAN system. Nanzenji maintained this rank, even after political power was handed over to the Ashikaga shogunate. During the Muromachi period, the abbacy of Nanzenji came to be restricted only to those who had already served as abbot of another gozan monastery. For this reason, Nanzenji became the center of gozan culture and Zen practice. The monastery suffered from a series of conflagrations in 1393, 1447, and 1467. Although the monastery never fully recovered from these fires, some restoration efforts were made by Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1536-1598).

Nara Buddhism, Six Schools of. A traditional grouping of six major scholastic schools of Japanese Buddhism active during the Nara period (710-794 CE): (1) Sanronshu (see SAN LUN ZONG), an East Asian counterpart of the MADHYAMAKA school; (2) Kegonshu (see HUAYAN ZONG), an East Asian exegetical tradition focused on the AVATAMSAKASuTRA; (3) RISSHu, or VINAYA exegesis; (4) Jojitsushu (see CHENGSHI LUN) the TATTVASIDDHI exegetical tradition; (5) Hossoshu (see FAXIANG ZONG), an East Asian strand of YOGĀCĀRA; and (6) Kushashu, focused on ABHIDHARMA exegesis using the ABHIDHARMAKOsABHĀsYA. These six schools are presumed to have been founded during the initial phase of Buddhism's introduction into Japan, between c. 552 and the end of the Nara period in 794. These learned schools were eventually supplanted by the practice and meditative schools of TENDAISHu and SHINGONSHu, which were introduced during the succeeding Heian period (794-1185), and the later schools of the ZENSHu, the pure land schools of JoDOSHu and JoDO SHINSHu, and NICHIRENSHu of the Kamakura period (1185-1333).

Nativity In Christianity, the supposed birth of Jesus about the time of the winter solstice. This date is due to the labors of the 6th century Roman abbot, Dionysius Exiguus. The first year of this reckoning, which later became the accepted Christian era, is called 1 AD, and the preceding year is called by chronologers 1 BC, but others here insert a year zero. The epoch of the birth or nativity of Jesus is generally thought to be four years too late, but one may have well-grounded suspicions that these four years themselves are far too late, and efforts by various scholars have at times been made to place the birth of Jesus in the reign of Alexander Jannaeus, the son of Johannes Hyrcanus, the same Alexander having succeeded his brother Aristobolus I, as King of the Jews, in 104 BC.

Naturally the geologic changes which the globe underwent up to our own time, took many, many millions of years; for example, sedimentation on globe D in this round began more than 320 million years ago. Sedimentation refers to the appearance of the mineral life-wave on globe D after preliminary work during the fourth round had been accomplished by the three preceding elemental kingdoms. After the mineral kingdom had run through its septenary cycling, then its surplus of life passed to the succeeding globe E, and the life-wave of the vegetable kingdom made its appearance on globe D; after the vegetable life-wave came the animal; and after the animal appeared the human, which in its turn will be followed by the life-waves of the three dhyani-chohanic kingdoms.

Next, as a consequence, it follows that only a limited part of the action of the vital or other higher plane is concerned with the earth-existence. But even this creates a mass of possibilities which is far greater than the earth can at one time mainfest or contain in its own less plastic formulas. All these possibilities do not realise themselves ; some fail altogether and leave at the most an idea that comes to nothing ; some try seriously and are repelled and defeated and, even if in action for a time, come to nothing. Others effectuate a half manifestation, and this is the most usual result, the more so as these vital or other supraphysical forces come Into conflict and have not only to overcome the resistance of the physical consciousness and of matter, but their own internecine resistance to each other. A certain number succeed in precipitating their results in a more complete and successful creation, so that if you compare this creation with its original in the higher plane, there is something

Niflung(ar) (Icelandic) [from nifl mist, nebula + unge child] Children of the mist; in the Norse Edda comparable to the Sons of the Firemist of the Stanzas of Dzyan (SD 1:86). Beings that were part of earth’s primordial, nebular history before humanity had become distinct physical beings. They were succeeded by increasingly material races, among them the Volsungar (children of volsi phallus) representing a later stage of development after the separation of mankind into male and female. The tales of the Nibelungen give little of the broader import found in the Edda.

nigh swallowed Moses, and would have succeeded

Nirvana is also “the state of the monadic entities in the period that intervenes between minor manvantaras or Rounds of a Planetary Chain; and more fully so between each seven-Round period or Day of Brahma, and the succeeding Day or new Kalpa of a Planetary Chain. At these last times, starting forth from the seventh sphere in the seventh Round, the monadic entities will have progressed far beyond even the highest state of Devachan. Too pure and too far advanced even for such a condition as the devachanic felicity, they go to their appropriate sphere and condition, which latter is the Nirvana following the end of the seventh Round” (OG 115-16).

Nirvana(Sanskrit) ::: This is a compound: nir, "out," and vana, the past participle passive of the root va, "to blow,"literallly meaning "blown out." So badly has the significance of the ancient Indian thought (and even its language, the Sanskrit) been understood, that for many years erudite European scholars were discussingwhether being "blown out" meant actual entitative annihilation or not. But the being blown out refersonly to the lower principles in man.Nirvana is a very different thing from the "heavens." Nirvana is a state of utter bliss and complete,untrammeled consciousness, a state of absorption in pure kosmic Being, and is the wondrous destiny ofthose who have reached superhuman knowledge and purity and spiritual illumination. It really ispersonal-individual absorption into or rather identification with the Self -- the highest SELF. It is also thestate of the monadic entities in the period that intervenes between minor manvantaras or rounds of aplanetary chain; and more fully so between each seven-round period or Day of Brahma, and thesucceeding day or new kalpa of a planetary chain. At these last times, starting forth from the seventhsphere in the seventh round, the monadic entities will have progressed far beyond even the highest stateof devachan. Too pure and too far advanced even for such a condition as the devachanic felicity, they goto their appropriate sphere and condition, which latter is the nirvana following the end of the seventhround.Devachan and nirvana are not localities. They are states, states of the beings in those respective spiritualconditions. Devachan is the intermediate state; nirvana is the superspiritual state; and avichi, popularlycalled the lowest of the hells, is the nether pole of the spiritual condition. These three are states of beingshaving habitat in the lokas or talas, in the worlds of the kosmic egg.So far as the individual human being is concerned, the nirvanic state or condition may be attained to bygreat spiritual seers and sages, such as Gautama the Buddha, and even by men less progressed than he;because in these cases of the attaining of the nirvana even during a man's life on earth, the meaning isthat one so attaining has through evolution progressed so far along the path that all the lower personalpart of him is become thoroughly impersonalized, the personal has put on the garment of impersonality,and such a man thereafter lives in the nirvanic condition of the spiritual monad.As a concluding thought, it must be pointed out that nirvana, while the ultima thule of the perfection tobe attained by any human being, nevertheless stands less high in the estimate of mystics than thecondition of the bodhisattva. For the bodhisattva, although standing on the threshold of nirvana andseeing and understanding its ineffable glory and peace and rest, nevertheless retains his consciousness inthe worlds of men, in order to consecrate his vast faculties and powers to the service of all that is. Thebuddhas in their higher parts enter the nirvana, in other words, assume the dharmakaya state or vesture,whereas the bodhisattva assumes the nirmanakaya vesture, thereafter to become an ever-active andcompassionate and beneficent influence in the world. The buddha indeed may be said to act indirectlyand by long distance control, thus indeed helping the world diffusively or by diffusion; but thebodhisattva acts directly and positively and with a directing will in works of compassion, both for theworld and for individuals.

Nirvanin, Nirvani (Sanskrit) Nirvāṇin One who enters, or has entered, nirvana; a jivanmukta. One who is liberated for the remainder of the entire solar manvantara from the cycle of spiritual transmigrations through the various spheres of being, visible and invisible. The nirvanin, therefore, rests in crystallized bliss and purity, relatively at one with the cosmic spirit or Logos for the remainder of the cosmic manvantara and throughout the long pralaya which succeeds it. Only when the next manvantara opens will the nirvanin, through karmic necessity, be obliged to enter the pathways of experience in the new system of worlds. Also nirvanee.

Niwano Nikkyo. (庭野日敬) (1906-1999). Cofounder of RISSHo KoSEIKAI, a Japanese lay Buddhist organization that was an offshoot of REIYuKAI and was strongly influenced by NICHIRENSHu doctrine. Niwano was born into a poor family in a small town in Nigata prefecture in northern Japan. After going to work in Tokyo in 1923, Niwano led a typical working-class life, running such small businesses as rice, charcoal, and Japanese-pickle shops, while also showing an intense interest in astrology, numerology, and divination. Niwano became an ardent adherent of Reiyukai in 1934, when his nine-month-old daughter recovered from a serious illness after he followed the organization's practice of ancestor worship. Niwano soon became a leading evangelist for Reiyukai, recruiting many new followers, one of whom was NAGANUMA MYoKo (1899-1957). In 1938, Niwano and Naganuma left Reiyukai and cofounded Rissho Koseikai, together with about thirty other followers. According to Niwano, the group seceded because of Reiyukai's overemphasis on the miraculous benefit, rather than the teachings, of the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), although others say that the split occurred because the leader of Reiyukai publicly criticized Niwano's interest in divination. After establishing the organization, Naganuma served as a spirit medium, while Niwano focused on teaching and administration. After Naganuma's death in 1957, Niwano became the president of the million-member organization and declared the end of the organization's first era of "skillful means" (J. hoben; S. UPĀYAKAUsALYA), which had been characterized by spirit mediumship and divine instructions, and the dawn of a new era of "manifesting the truth" (shinjitsu kengen). Niwano affirmed that henceforth the central objects of the organization's faith would be the Saddharmapundarīkasutra and sĀKYAMUNI Buddha, which were eternal and universal. Based on his understanding of the sutra, Niwano emphasized the spiritual development of individuals along the BODHISATTVA path, whose salvific efforts should be dedicated not just to one's own family and ancestors, but also to Japanese society and the world at large. Niwano also dedicated himself to promoting world peace through interreligious cooperation, one example of which was the establishment of the Niwano Peace Foundation in 1978. Niwano resigned from the presidency of Rissho Koseikai in 1991 and was succeeded by his eldest son Niwano Nichiko (b. 1938).

Numa Second of the so-called legendary kings of ancient Rome who, with Romulus, belongs to the class of eponymous ancestors, heroes, and instructors seen by us but dimly, which are met with in the traditional history of so many peoples. In Numa’s case there has undoubtedly been considerable adaptation, even among the ancients themselves, as to dates, localities, and other accessories, due to the requirements of historians who were compiling a consecutive account of their people’s ancestry and beginnings. It may even be that Numa is a generic name, standing for a dynasty or class of teachers, much as the names Solomon and Zoroaster did. The fables and mythoi that have come down to us about Numa show him to be one of those early initiated founders of civilizations and culture. Among all Romans, ancient and later, he was universally respected and regarded almost as the father of Latin civilization. As Romulus represents conquering might, so Numa stands for a succeeding period of consolidation and instruction. He is the teacher, not only of religion but of scientific arts. Tradition connects him with Pythagoras and the Etruscan hierophants. Romulus suggests the attributes of Aries, the first sign of the zodiac and the house of Mars; while Numa suggests the next sign, Taurus, a quiet sign under Venus and the Moon. He was the lawgiver, representing the second stage in the formation of a culture.

Number 5 Electronic Switching System "communications" (5ESS) An electronic {circuit switching} product sold by {Alcatel Lucent} (formerly {Western Electric}/{AT&T Network Systems}/{Lucent Technologies}), used by many telephone exchange carriers and service providers. Succeeded the Number 4 Electronic Switching System (4ESS) and reached widespread use in the 1980s. Not to be confused with the {Class 5 Switch}. (2013-09-14)

Nu, U. (1907-1995). Burmese (Myanmar) political leader and patron of Buddhism. (U is a Burmese honorific.) As a young man, U Nu became active in anti-British agitation and in 1936 was expelled by British authorities from the University of Rangoon law school for his political activities. Thereafter, he became a leader of the Burmese nationalist movement, adopting the nationalist title "Thakin" (master), along with his comrades Aung San, Ne Win, and others. On the eve of the Japanese invasion of Burma in 1942, he was imprisoned by the British as a potential agent. He was released by the Japanese occupation forces and served as the foreign minister of their puppet regime. With growing disenchantment at Japanese mistreatment of Burmese citizens, U Nu helped to organize a clandestine guerilla resistance force that assisted the British when they retook Burma. At the conclusion of World War II, he participated in negotiations with the British for Burmese independence. He became Burma's first prime minister and served three terms in office (1948-1956, 1957-1958, 1960-1962). A devout Buddhist, he organized under government auspices national monastic curricula, promoted the practice of insight meditation (VIPASSANĀ), and, in 1956, sponsored the convention of the sixth Buddhist council (according to Burmese reckoning; see COUNCIL, SIXTH) in celebration of the 2,500th anniversary of the Buddha's parinibbāna (S. PARINIRVĀnA). The council prepared a new Burmese edition of the Pāli canon (P. tipitaka; S. TRIPItAKA), together with its commentaries and sub-commentaries, which is currently used in Burmese monastic education. U Nu also attempted, unsuccessfully, to unite the several noncommensal fraternities (Burmese GAING) of the Burmese SAMGHA into a single body. While achieving much in the religious sphere, U Nu proved unable to cope with the political crises confronting his government, and Burma descended into civil war. He resigned as prime minister in 1956, returned to office in 1957, abdicated civilian government to General Ne Win in 1958, returned to office in 1960, and finally was deposed and arrested by Ne Win in a coup d'état in 1962. U Nu was released in 1968, and a year later he organized a resistance army from exile in Thailand. A rapprochement between U Nu and Ne Win was reached in 1980, and he was allowed to return to Burma, where he devoted himself to religious affairs, in particular as director of a Buddhist translation bureau located at Kaba Aye in Rangoon (Yangon). He again entered politics during the democracy uprising of 1988, setting up a symbolic provisional government when the then-ruling Burmese Socialist government collapsed. He was placed under house arrest in 1989 by the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC), a group composed of generals who succeeded Ne Win. He was released in 1992. A prolific writer on politics and Buddhism, his works include Buddhism: Theory and Practice, Burma under the Japanese, Unite and March, Towards Peace and Democracy, and his autobiography, Saturday's Son.

Obscuration A state of sleep or dormancy of greater or less extent, that prevails between two successive periods of activity on a globe of a planetary chain as the life-waves succeed one another in their serial rounds on such a chain.

Obscuration ::: This is a word coined by A. P. Sinnett, one of the pioneers in theosophical propaganda. A far better wordthan obscuration would have been dormancy or sleep, because this word obscuration actually ratherobscures the sense. A man is not "obscured" when he sleeps. The inner faculties may be so, in a sense;but it is better actually to state in more appropriate words just what the real condition is. It is that ofsleep, or latency -- of dormancy, rather. Thus when one of the seven kingdoms has passed through itsseven periods of progress, of evolution, it goes into dormancy or obscuration.Likewise when the seven kingdoms -- from the first elemental kingdom upwards to the human -- havefinished their evolution on globe A (for instance) during the first round, globe A then goes intoobscuration, that is, into dormancy; it goes to sleep. Everything left on it is now dormant, is sleeping,awaiting the incoming, when round two begins, of the life-waves which have just left it. Again, when thelife-waves have run their full sevenfold course, or their seven stock-races or root-races on globe B, thenglobe B in its turn goes into dormancy or obscuration, which is not pralaya; and the distinction betweenpralaya and obscuration is an extremely important one. It may be possible in popular usage at times tocall the state of dormancy by the name of pralaya in a very limited and particular sense; but pralayareally means disintegration and disappearance, like that of death. But obscuration is sleep -- dormancy.Thus is it with each one of the seven globes of the planetary chain, one after the other, each one goinginto obscuration when a life-wave has left it, so far as that particular life-wave is concerned. When thefinal or rather the last representatives of the last root-race of the last life-wave leave it, each globe thengoes to sleep or into dormancy.During a planetary obscuration or planetary rest period, at the end of a round, the entities leave the lastglobe, the seventh, and enter into a (lower) nirvanic period of manvantaric repose, answering to thedevachanic or between-life state of the human entity between one life on earth and the next life on earth.There is one very important point of the teachings to be noted here: a globe when a life-wave leaves itdoes not remain in obscuration or continuously dormant until the same life-wave returns to it in the nextround. The life-waves succeed each other in regular file, and each life-wave as it enters a globe has itsperiod of beginning, its efflorescence, and its decay, and then leaves the globe in obscuration so far asthat particular life-wave is concerned. But the globe within a relatively short time receives a succeedinglife-wave, which runs through its courses and leaves the globe again in obscuration so far as this lastlife-wave is concerned, etc. It is obvious, therefore, that a period of obscuration on any globe of theplanetary chain is much shorter than the term of a full planetary round.

occurs check "programming" A feature of some implementations of {unification} which causes unification of a {logic variable} V and a structure S to fail if S contains V. Binding a variable to a structure containing that variable results in a cyclic structure which may subsequently cause unification to loop forever. Some implementations use extra pointer comparisons to avoid this. Most implementations of {Prolog} do not perform the occurs check for reasons of efficiency. Without occurs check the {complexity} of {unification} is O(min(size(term1), size(term2))) with occurs check it's O(max(size(term1), size(term2))) In {theorem proving} unification without the occurs check can lead to unsound inference. For example, in {Prolog} it is quite valid to write X = f(X). which will succeed, binding X to a cyclic structure. Clearly however, if f is taken to stand for a function rather than a {constructor}, then the above equality is only valid if f is the {identity function}. Weijland calls unification without occur check, "complete unification". The reference below describes a complete unification algorithm in terms of Colmerauer's consistency algorithm. ["Semantics for Logic Programs without Occur Check", W.P. Weijland, Theoretical Computer Science 71 (1990) pp 155-174]. (1996-01-11)

Ogdoad [from Greek] The number eight, a group of eight. It symbolizes the eternal, spiral motion of cycles, as is suggested by the form of the numeral 8 which, lying on its side, makes the modern mathematical symbol for infinity. The ogdoad show the regular breathing of the kosmos presided over by the eight great gods — seven from the primeval Mother, the One and the Triad (SD 2:580). A septenate may be made into an ogdoad by counting in either the last of the preceding hierarchy, or the first of the succeeding. If to a group of seven forces be added either the one from which they proceed, or that manifestation in which they eventuate, an ogdoad is produced, as in the case of the eight sons of Aditi, seven plus Martanda (the sun). Eight is the third power of two, and a number pertaining to physical space, and seems correlative to seven, just as four is correlative to three. The eight great gods of the Mediterranean ancients are the seven sacred planets, usually Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, the Sun as a substitute for a secret planet, Venus, Mercury, and the Moon as a substitute for another secret planet, with Earth as the eighth. It was not so much the physical celestial bodies which were intended as their respective rectors or planetary spirits. See also EIGHT

only with the mind or the mental word is better than being extremely passive and submitted to the attack, — for although it may not succeed instantaneously, the mental call even ends by bringing the Force and opening up the consciousness again. i

Operation Nachshon ::: Initiated on April 6, 1948, and lasting until April 15, this operation succeeded in opening the road to Jerusalem long enough to push through three large convoys stuffed with food and weapons. One of the largest operations of the War of Independence, 1,500 soldiers fielded by the Haganah attacked five different locations. The name “Operation Nachshon” was derived from the biblical personage Nachshon Ben Aminadav who was the first to jump into the Red Sea when the Jews fled Egypt.

Operation Yoav ::: Ignoring the provisions of the second truce, the Egyptians denied Jewish convoys passage through the Hatta-Karatiya gap in their line. In addition, they captured positions beyond the truce demarcation lines and attacked several IDF posts that covered the pass. Following an Egyptian raid on inter-kibbutz communications routes and the firing on an Israeli convoy on October 15, the Israel Army and Air force took the offensive and launched Operation Yoav. In seven days they succeeded in opening the road to the Negev and capturing its capital, Beersheba.

otani Kozui. (大谷光瑞) (1876-1948). Modern Japanese explorer to Buddhist archeological sites in Central Asia, and especially DUNHUANG; the twenty-second abbot of the NISHI HONGANJIHA, one of the two main sub-branches of the JoDO SHINSHu of the Japanese pure land tradition. otani was sent to London at the age of fourteen by his father, the twenty-first abbot of Nishi Honganji in Kyoto, to study Western theology. Inspired by the contemporary expeditions to Central Asia then being conducted by European explorers such as SIR MARC AUREL STEIN (1862-1943) and Sven Hedin (1865-1952), otani decided to take an overland route on his return to Japan so that he could survey Buddhist sites along the SILK ROAD. otani embarked on his first expedition to the region in 1902, accompanied by several other Japanese priests from Nishi Honganji. While en route, otani received the news of his father's death and returned to Japan to succeed to the abbacy; the expedition continued and returned to Japan in 1904. Even though his duties subsequently kept him in Japan, otani dispatched expeditions to Chinese Turkestan in 1908-1909 and between 1910 and 1914. The artifacts recovered during these three expeditions include manuscripts, murals, sculpture, textiles, etc., and are known collectively as the "otani collection." These materials are now dispersed in Japan, Korea, and China, but they are still regarded as important sources for the study of Central Asian Buddhist archeology.

Ovid tells that after Deukalion’s flood, Zeus ordered Prometheus and Athene to create a new race of men out of mud; he made them in the image of the gods with an upright posture, after Epimetheus had succeeded in fashioning only mindless creatures. This represents a stage in the history of the downward arc of evolution, which may be interpreted cosmically, geographically, and in relation to man. It is in one sense the descent of the manasaputras, agnishvattas, and other Sons of Flame, who endowed the mindless forms with the divine spark; so that Prometheus is Lucifer, Phosphoros, the Light-bringer, the serpent of Eden, etc.

Password Authentication Protocol "networking" (PAP) An {authentication} scheme used by {PPP} servers to validate the identity of the originator of the connection. PAP applies a two-way {handshaking} procedure. After the link is established the originator sends an id-password pair to the server. If authentication succeeds the server sends back an acknowledgement; otherwise it either terminates the connection or gives the originator another chance. PAP is not a strong authentication method. Passwords are sent over the circuit "in the clear" and there is no protection against playback or repeated "trial and error" attacks. The originator is in total control of the frequency and timing of the attempts. Therefore, any server that can use a stronger authentication method, such as {CHAP}, will offer to negotiate that method prior to PAP. The use of PAP is appropriate, however, if a {plaintext} password must be available to simulate a login at a remote host. PAP is defined in {RFC} 1334. (1996-03-23)

Password Authentication Protocol ::: (networking) (PAP) An authentication scheme used by PPP servers to validate the identity of the originator of the connection.PAP applies a two-way handshaking procedure. After the link is established the originator sends an id-password pair to the server. If authentication succeeds the server sends back an acknowledgement; otherwise it either terminates the connection or gives the originator another chance.PAP is not a strong authentication method. Passwords are sent over the circuit in the clear and there is no protection against playback or repeated trial to PAP. The use of PAP is appropriate, however, if a plaintext password must be available to simulate a login at a remote host.PAP is defined in RFC 1334. (1996-03-23)

PDP-11 ::: Programmed Data Processor model 11.A series of minicomputers based on an instruction set designed by C. Gordon Bell at DEC in the early 1970s (late 60s?). The PDP-11 family, which came after, but was not derived from, the PDP-10, was the most successful computer of its time until it was itself succeeded by the VAX.Models included the 11/23 and 11/24 (based on the F11 chipset); 11/44, 11/04, 11/34, 11/05, 11/10, 11/15, 11/20, 11/35, 11/40, 11/45, 11/70, 11/60 (MSI and (J11 chipset) and SBC-11/21 (T11 chip) and then there was compatibility mode in the early VAX processors.The B and C languages were both used initially to implement Unix on the PDP-11. The microprocessor design tradition owes a heavy debt to the PDP-11 instruction set.See also SEX. (1994-12-21)

PDP-11 Programmed Data Processor model 11. A series of {minicomputers} based on an {instruction set} designed by C. Gordon Bell at {DEC} in the early 1970s (late 60s?). The PDP-11 family, which came after, but was not derived from, the {PDP-10}, was the most successful computer of its time until it was itself succeeded by the {VAX}. Models included the 11/23 and 11/24 (based on the F11 chipset); 11/44, 11/04, 11/34, 11/05, 11/10, 11/15, 11/20, 11/35, 11/40, 11/45, 11/70, 11/60 ({MSI} and {SSI}); LSI-11/2 and LSI-11 (LSI-11 chipset). In addition there were the 11/8x (J11 chipset) and SBC-11/21 (T11 chip) and then there was compatibility mode in the early {VAX} processors. The {B} and {C} languages were both used initially to implement {Unix} on the PDP-11. The {microprocessor} design tradition owes a heavy debt to the PDP-11 {instruction set}. See also {SEX}. (1994-12-21)

Pelliot, Paul. (1878-1945). French Sinologist, whose retrieval of thousands of manuscripts from DUNHUANG greatly advanced the modern understanding of Buddhism along the ancient SILK ROAD. A pupil of SYLVAIN LÉVI (1863-1935), Pelliot was appointed to the École Française d'Extreme-Orient in Hanoi in 1899. In 1906, Pelliot turned his attention to Chinese Central Asia, leading an expedition from Paris to Tumchuq and KUCHA, where he unearthed documents in the lost TOCHARIAN language. In Urumchi, Pelliot received word of the hidden library cave at Dunhuang discovered by AUREL STEIN and arrived at the site in February 1908. There, he spent three weeks reading through an estimated twenty thousand scrolls. Like Stein, Pelliot sent thousands of manuscripts to Europe to be studied and preserved. Unlike Stein, who knew no Chinese or Prakritic languages, Pelliot was able to more fully appreciate the range of documents at Dunhuang, selecting texts in Chinese, Tibetan, Khotanese, Sogdian (see SOGDIANA), and Uighur and paying particular attention to unusual texts, including rare Christian and Manichaean manuscripts. Today these materials form the Pelliot collection of Dunhuang materials in the Bibliothèque nationale in Paris. Ironically, it was Pelliot's announcement of the Dunhuang manuscript cache to scholars in Beijing in May 1908 that resulted in the immediate closing of the site to all foreigners. Pelliot returned to Paris in 1909, only to be confronted by the erroneous claim that he had returned with forged manuscripts. These charges were proved false only in 1912 with the publication of Stein's book, Ruins of Desert Cathay, which made clear that Stein had left manuscripts behind in Dunhuang. In 1911, Pelliot was made chair of Central Asian Languages at the Collège de France and dedicated the rest of his career to the study of both China and Central Asia. During the First World War, Pelliot served as French military attaché in Beijing. In the postwar years he was an active member of the Société Asiatique. In 1920, he succeeded Édouard Chavannes as the editor of the journal T'oung Pao. His vast erudition, combined with his knowledge of some thirteen languages, made him one of the leading scholars of Asia of his generation.

Peripatetics [from Greek peri about + patein to pace, walk] The followers of Aristotle (384-322 BC), either because he paced up and down when he lectured as commonly supposed, or from the peripatos or covered walk of the Lyceum. The chief representatives of the school are Theophrastus of Lesbos (372-287 BC), who with Eudemus of Rhodes, Aristoxemus of Tarentum, and Dicaearchus of Messene, were the personal disciples of Aristotle; Strato of Lampsacus (succeeded Theophrastus 288 BC); Andronicus of Rhodes (head of the school at Rome 58 BC); Alexander of Aphrodisias (commentator of Aristotle, 2nd and 3rd century AD).

perseverance ::: n. --> The act of persevering; persistence in anything undertaken; continued pursuit or prosecution of any business, or enterprise begun.
Discrimination.
Continuance in a state of grace until it is succeeded by a state of glory; sometimes called final perseverance, and the perseverance of the saints. See Calvinism.


Phra Kaew Morakot. In Thai, "The Emerald Buddha" (full name: Phra Phuttha Maha Mani Ratana Patimakorn; P. Buddhamahāmaniratnapatimā); this most sacred and venerated buddha image in Thailand is currently enshrined at Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the Emerald Buddha), an ornate temple located on the grounds of the royal palace in the Thai capital of Bangkok. The image, which is in the seated meditation posture, is 29.5 inches (forty-five centimeters) tall; despite its name, it is in fact not made of emerald, but is carved from a single block of a green stone thought to be either jasper or jade. Kaew is an indigenous Thai word for "glass" or "translucence"; morakot derives from the Sanskrit word for emerald (S. morakata). According to legend, the Emerald Buddha was the first buddha image ever made and was carved five hundred years after the Buddha's death out of a sacred gem that came from INDRA's palace. The image is said to have been made by NĀGASENA (c. 150 BCE), the interlocutor of the MILINDAPANHA, in the north Indian city of PĀtALIPUTRA around 43 BCE. The image was then taken to Sri Lanka in the fourth century CE, and was on its way to Burma in 457, when the ship carrying it went off course and the image next appeared in Cambodia. The image eventually came into Thai hands and made its way to AYUTHAYA, Chiangrai, Chiangmai, and ultimately Bangkok. The image's actual provenance is a matter of debate. Some art historians argue that on stylistic grounds the Emerald Buddha appears to have been carved in northern Thailand around the fifteenth century, while others argue for a south Indian or Sri Lankan origin based on its meditative posture, which is uncommon in Thai buddha images. The Emerald Buddha first enters the historical record upon its discovery in 1434 CE, in the area that is now the northern Thai province of Chiangrai, when lightning struck a chedi (P. cetiya, S. CAITYA) and a buddha image made of stucco was found inside. As the stucco began to flake off, the image of the Emerald Buddha was revealed. At that time, Chiangrai was ruled by the Lānnā Thai kingdom, whose king attempted to bring the image back to his capital of Chiangmai. The chronicles relate that three times he sent an elephant to bring the Emerald Buddha to Chiangmai, but each time the elephant went to Lampang instead, so the king finally relented and allowed the image to remain there. In 1468, the new Chiangmai monarch, King Tiloka, finally succeeded in moving the image to Chiangmai and installed it in the eastern niche of a large STuPA at Wat Chedi Luang. The image remained there until 1552, when it was taken to LUANG PRABANG, then the capital of Laos, by the Lao ruler, who was also ruling Chiangmai at the time. In 1564, the king then took the image to Vientiane, where he set up a new capital after fleeing the Burmese. The Emerald Buddha remained in Vientiane for 214 years, until 1778 when the Siamese general Taksin captured the city and took the Emerald Buddha to Thonburi, then the Siamese capital. In 1784, when Bangkok was established as the capital, the image was installed there, in Wat Phra Kaew, the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, as the palladium of the nation (then known as Siam). Because Wat Phra Kaew is located within the palace grounds, the temple is unique in Thai Buddhism for having no monastic residences; the grounds contain only sacred shrines, stupas, and the main ubosoth (UPOsADHA hall), where the Buddha resides. The image of the Emerald Buddha is always clothed in golden raiments, which are changed according to the seasons. King Rāma I (r. 1782-1809) had two seasonal costumes made for the statue: a ceremonial robe for the hot season and a monastic robe for the rainy season. King Rāma III (1824-1851) had another costume made for the cold season: a mantle of gold beads. The ruling monarch performs the ceremonial changing of the garments each season.

pierce ::: 1. To cut or pass through with or as if with a sharp instrument; stab or penetrate. Also fig. 2. To make a hole or opening in; perforate. 3. To succeed in penetrating (something) with the eyes or the intellect. 4. To move or affect (a person"s emotions, bodily feelings, etc.) deeply or sharply. pierced, piercing.

Pisces, the Fishes (Sanskrit Mina), is the last sign of the zodiac, and therefore marks the end of one cycle and the initiatory stage of the succeeding cycle. The fish-avatara of Vishnu is both the first and the tenth or last; and this applies both to mahakalpas and to minor cycles within them, likewise to a division of the present and former manvantara. Though Pisces as now understood refers to cyclic junctions in general, with their accompanying world saviors and floods, it has particular reference for Occidentals to Jesus and the entry of the equinoctial point into Pisces.

posterity ::: n. --> The race that proceeds from a progenitor; offspring to the furthest generation; the aggregate number of persons who are descended from an ancestor of a generation; descendants; -- contrasted with ancestry; as, the posterity of Abraham.
Succeeding generations; future times.


Potalaka. (T. Po ta la; C. Butuoluoshan; J. Fudarakusen; K. Pot'araksan 補陀落山). According to the GAndAVYuHASuTRA, a mountain that is the abode of the bodhisattva of compassion, AVALOKITEsVARA. The precise location of the mountain is the subject of considerable speculation. According to XUANZANG, it is located in southern India to the east of the Malaya Mountains. He describes it as a perilous mountain with a lake and a heavenly stone palace at the summit. A river flows from the summit, encircling the mountain twenty times before flowing into the South Sea. Those who seek to meet the bodhisattva scale the mountain, but few succeed. Xuanzang says that the bodhisattva appears to his devotees at the base the mountain in the form of Mahesvara (siva) or an ascetic sadhu covered in ashes. Modern scholarship has speculated that Xuanzang was describing the mountain called Potikai or Potiyil in Tamil Nadu. Other sources place the mountain on an island in the Indian Ocean. In East Asian Buddhism, it is called PUTUOSHAN and is identified as a mountainous island in the Zhoushan Archipelago, about sixty-two miles off the eastern coast of Zhejiang province. When the fifth DALAI LAMA constructed his palace in LHA SA, he named it PO TA LA, after this mountain identified with Avalokitesvara, of whom he is considered the human incarnation.

Potentiality: See Dynamis. Power: In general: the physical, mental and moral ability to act or to receive an action; the general faculty of doing, making, performing, realizing, achieving, producing or succeeding; ability, capacity, virtue, virtuality, potency, potentiality, faculty, efficacy, efficacity, efficiency, operative causality, process of change or becoming; natural operative force, energy, vigor, strength, or effective condition applied or applicable to work; person, agent, body, institution, government or state, having or exercising an ability to act in accordance with its nature and functions; spirit, divinity, deity, superhuman agent, supernatural principle of activity; an attribute or name of God; in theology, an order of angels; in law the authority, capacity or right to exercise certain natural and legal prerogatives, also, the authority vestcd in a person by law; influence, prerogative, force. A. In psychology, power is sometimes synonymous with faculty (q.v.). It also means a quality which renders the nature of an individual agent apt to elicit certain physical and moral actions. Hence, power is a natural endowment enabling the intellect to condition the will and thus create hibits and virtues, in a higher degree, power is a moral disposition enabling the individual to cultivate his perfectibility. The distinction between powers is given by the distinction of their actions. Powers are acthe or operative, and passive or receptive; they are immediate or remote. Even impotence and incapacity are not different in kind from power, but simply in degree. These Aristotelian views on power, including its ontological interpretation, have held the ground for centuries, and we find them partly also in Hobbes and Locke who defined power as the ability to make or to receive change. Hume's analysis of power showed it to be an illusion; and with the advent of positivism and experimental psychology, this concept lost much of its value. The notion of power has been used by Fechner in his doctrine and law concerning the relation between stimuli and sensations.

Pralaya(Sanskrit) ::: A compound word, formed of laya, from the root li, and the prefix pra. Li means "to dissolve,""to melt away," "to liquefy," as when one pours water upon a cube of salt or of sugar. The cube of salt orof sugar vanishes in the water -- it dissolves, changes its form -- and this may be taken as a figure,imperfect as it is, or as a symbol, of what pralaya is: a crumbling away, a vanishing away, of matter intosomething else which is yet in it, and surrounds it, and interpenetrates it. Such is pralaya, usuallytranslated as the state of latency, state of rest, state of repose, between two manvantaras or life cycles. Ifwe remember distinctly the meaning of the Sanskrit word, our minds take a new bent in direction, followa new thought. We get new ideas; we penetrate into the arcanum of the thing that takes place. Pralaya,therefore, is dissolution, death.There are many kinds of pralayas. There is the universal pralaya, called prakritika, because it is thepralaya or vanishing away, melting away, of prakriti or nature. Then there is the solar pralaya. Sun inSanskrit is surya, and the adjective from this is saurya: hence, the saurya pralaya or the pralaya of thesolar system. Then, thirdly, there is the terrestrial or planetary pralaya. One Sanskrit word for earth isbhumi, and the adjective corresponding to this is bhaumika: hence, the bhaumika pralaya. Then there isthe pralaya or death of the individual man. Man is purusha; the corresponding adjective is paurusha:hence, the paurusha pralaya or death of man. These adjectives apply equally well to the several kinds ofmanvantaras or life cycles.There is another kind of pralaya which is called nitya. In its general sense, it means "constant" or"continuous," and can be exemplified by the constant or continuous change -- life and death -- of the cellsof our bodies. It is a state in which the indwelling and dominating entity remains, but its differentprinciples and rupas undergo continuous and incessant change. Hence it is called nitya, signifyingcontinuous. It applies to the body of man, to the outer sphere of earth, to the earth itself, to the solarsystem, and indeed to all nature. It is the unceasing and chronic changing of things that are -- the passingfrom phase to phase, meaning the pralaya or death of one phase, to be followed by the rebirth of itssucceeding phase. There are other kinds of pralayas than those herein enumerated.

Pramlocha (Sanskrit) Pramlocā [from pra forth + the verbal root mluc to go] One sent forth; one of the apsarasas or celestial nymphs sent on earth by Kamadeva or Indra to tempt the sage Kandu from his devotions and austerities. She succeeded in her unholy purpose, and according to the account stayed with him 907 years six months and three days, which were to the sage as one day. After this she flew away, wiping the perspiration from her body with the leaves of the trees as she passed through the air. The child she had conceived by the rishi came forth from the pores of her skin in drops of perspiration: the trees received the living dews, the winds collected them into one mass, Soma (the moon) matured them till they became the lovely girl Marisha. This story is an allegory founded on the physical mode of procreation of the second root-race or sweat-born.

pranidhāna. (P. panidhāna; T. smon lam; C. yuan; J. gan; K. won 願). In Sanskrit, "vow" or "aspiration"; a statement expressing the solemn wish that a specific aim be achieved. The most famous type of pranidhāna is the vow the BODHISATTVA takes to become a buddha in order to liberate all sentient beings from suffering (see PuRVAPRAnIDHĀNA). Pranidhāna is also listed as one of the ten perfections (PĀRAMITĀ) and as one of the ten powers (BALA) of a bodhisattva. A vow may take the form of an oath, in which one promises to achieve an aim, or the form of a prayer, in which one asks that an aim be fulfilled, often through dedicating merit toward that aim. The term occurs also in purvapranidhāna, or "prior vow," a vow made in the past that has either been fulfilled in the present or will be fulfilled in the future, typically in conjunction with the aspiration to attain buddhahood. The term purvapranidhāna is used specifically in the MAHĀYĀNA to denote the vow made in the past by a bodhisattva to become a buddha himself, often specifying the place, the time, and the retinue that will be associated with that event. Since the buddhas succeeded in achieving their goal of buddhahood, their prior vows are therefore all considered to have been fulfilled. The most famous of all purvapranidhāna are the forty-eight vows that the monk DHARMĀKARA made before the buddha LOKEsVARARĀJA, which ultimately led to his becoming the buddha AMITĀBHA and creating the pure land of SUKHĀVATĪ; these vows are described in the SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA and are foundational to the PURE LAND traditions of East Asia.

pratyaya. (P. paccaya; T. rkyen; C. yuan; J. en; K. yon ). In Sanskrit, "condition"; referring generally to the subsidiary factors whose concomitance results in the production of an effect from a cause, especially in the compound HETUPRATYAYA ("causes and conditions"). For example, in the production of a sprout from a seed, the seed would be the cause (HETU), while such factors as heat and moisture would be conditions (pratyaya). Given the centrality of the doctrine of causality of Buddhist thought, detailed lists and descriptions of conditions appear in all strata of Buddhist literature. In the context of epistemology, in the case of the perception of a tree by a moment of visual consciousness (CAKsURVIJNĀNA), the prior moment of consciousness that leads to this specific visual consciousness is called the immediately antecedent condition (SAMANANTARAPRATYAYA), the tree is called the object condition (ĀLAMBANAPRATYAYA), and the visual sense organ is called the predominant condition (ADHIPATIPRATYAYA); the "cooperative condition" (SAHAKĀRIPRATYAYA) is the subsidiary conditions that must be present in order for an effect to be produced, such as for light to be present in order to generate visual consciousness, or the presence of heat and moisture for a seed to grow into a sprout. ¶ A much more detailed roster of these conditions occurs in a detailed list of twenty-four conditions enumerated in the PAttHĀNA, the seventh book of the Pāli ABHIDHAMMAPItAKA, a work that applies twenty-four specific conditions to the mental and physical phenomena of existence and presents a detailed account of the Pāli interpretation of the doctrine of dependent origination (P. paticcasamuppāda; S. PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA). The twenty-four conditions are (1) the root condition (hetupaccaya), the condition upon which mental states entirely depend, such as a tree depending on its root. These root conditions are greed (LOBHA), hate (P. dosa, S. DVEsA), and delusion (MOHA) in the case of unwholesome mental states, or greedlessness (alobha), hatelessness (adosa; DVEsA), and undeludedness (amoha) in the case of wholesome mental states. Without these roots being present, the respective mental states cannot exist. (2) The object condition (ārammanapaccaya) is an object of perception and as such forms the condition for mental phenomena. External sense objects, such a sound, comprise the object conditions for the five physical sense consciousnesses, while mental objects such as thoughts, emotions, and memories comprise the object condition for the single internal sense consciousness of mind. (3) The dominant condition (adhipatipaccaya) gives rise to mental phenomena by way of predominance and can be one of four types: intention (chanda), energy (viriya), consciousness (citta), and investigation (vīmaMsā). At any given time only one of the four conditions can predominate in a state of consciousness. (4) The proximate condition (anantarapaccaya) and (5) the immediately antecedent condition (samanantarapaccaya) refer to any stage in the process of consciousness that serves as the condition for the immediately following stage. For example, an eye consciousness that sees a visual object functions as the immediately antecedent condition for the arising in the next moment of the mental consciousness that receives the visual image. The mental consciousness, in turn, serves as the immediately antecedent condition for the mental consciousness that performs the function of investigating the object. (6) The cooperative condition (sahajātapaccaya) is any phenomenon or condition the arising of which necessitates the simultaneous arising of another thing; for example, any one of the four mental aggregates (P. khandha; S. SKANDHA) of feeling (vedanā), conception (P. saNNā; S. SAMJNĀ), conditioning factors (P. sankhāra; S. SAMSKĀRA), and consciousness (P. viNNāna; S. VIJNĀNA) functions as the cooperative condition for all the rest, since all four invariably arise together in the same moment. (7) The condition by way of mutuality (aNNāmaNNapaccaya) refers to the fact that all simultaneous phenomena, such as the mental aggregates mentioned above, are mutually supportive and so are also conditioned by way of mutuality; they arise and fall in dependence on one another. (8) The support condition (nissayapaccaya) is a preceding or simultaneous condition that functions as a foundation for another phenomenon in the manner of earth for a tree. An example is the five external sense organs (eye, ear, nose, tongue and body) and the one internal mental sense organ (mind), which are the preceding and simultaneous conditions for the six kinds of consciousness that arise when sense organs come into contact with their respective objects. (9) The decisive support condition (upanissayapaccaya) is anything that functions as a strong inducement to moral, immoral, or neutral mental or physical action. It is of three kinds: (a) by way of object (ārammana), which can be any real or imaginary object of thought; (b) by way of proximity; and (c) by way of natural support (pakati), which includes such things as mental attitudes and associations with friends that can act as natural inducements to either wholesome or unwholesome behavior, or climate and food that induce health or illness of the body. (10) The prenascent condition (purejātapaccaya) is something previously arisen that forms a base for something arising later. An example is the five physical sense organs and the physical base of mind that, having already arisen, form the condition for the arising of consciousness through their operation. (11) The postnascent condition (pacchājātapaccaya) refers to consciousness arisen through the operation of the senses, because it serves as the necessary condition for the continued preservation of this already arisen body with its functioning senses. (12) The repetition condition (āsevanapaccaya) refers to impulsion moments of consciousness (javana) that arise in a series, each time serving as a condition for succeeding moments by way of repetition and frequency. (13) The action condition (kammapaccaya) refers to the KARMAN or karmic volitions (kammacetanā) of a previous birth that functioned to generate the physical and mental characteristics of an individual's present existence. (14) The karmaresult condition (vipākapaccaya) refers to the five karmically resultant external sense consciousnesses that function as simultaneous conditions for other mental and physical phenomena. (15) The nutriment condition (āhārapaccaya) is of four kinds and refers to material food (kabalinkārāhāra), which is food for the body; sensory and mental contact (phassa), which is food for sensation (vedanā); mental volition (CETANĀ = karman), which is food for rebirth; and consciousness (viNNāna), which is food for the mind-body complex (NĀMARuPA) at the moment of conception. (16) The faculty condition (indriyapaccaya) refers to twenty of twenty-two faculties (INDRIYA) enumerated in the Pāli abhidhamma out of which, for example, the five external sense faculties form the condition for their respective sense consciousnesses. (17) The meditative-absorption condition (jhānapaccaya) refers to a list of seven jhāna factors as conditions for simultaneous mental and corporeal phenomena. They are thought (vitakka), imagination (vicāra), rapture (pīti), joy (sukha), sadness (domanassa), indifference (upekkhā), and concentration (samādhi). (18) The path condition (maggapaccaya) refers to twelve path factors that condition progress along the path. These are: wisdom (paNNā), thought-conception (vitakka), right speech (sammavācā), right bodily action (sammakammanta), right livelihood (sammajīva), energy (viriya), mindfulness (sati), concentration (samādhi), wrong views (micchāditthi), wrong speech (micchāvācā), wrong bodily action (micchākammanta), and wrong livelihood (micchājīva). (19) The association condition (sampayuttapaccaya) refers to the four mental aggregates of feeling (vedanā), perception (saNNā), mental formations (sankhāra), and consciousness (viNNāna), which assist one another by association through sharing a common physical base, a common object, and arising and passing away simultaneously. (20) The dissociation condition (vippayuttapaccaya) refers to phenomena that assist other phenomena by virtue of not having the same physical base and objects. (21 and 24) The presence condition (atthipaccaya) and the nondisappearance condition (avigatapaccaya) refer to any phenomenon that through its presence is a condition for other phenomena. (22 and 23) The absence condition (natthipaccaya) and the disappearance condition (vigatapaccaya) refer to any phenomenon, such as a moment of consciousness, which having just passed away constitutes the necessary condition for the immediately following moment of the same phenomenon by providing an opportunity for it to arise. ¶ The SARVĀSTIVĀDA school also recognizes a list of four conditions, all of which appear in the preceding Pāli list and thus appear to have evolved before the separation of the SARVĀSTIVĀDA and STHAVIRANIKĀYA schools: (1) HETUPRATYAYA, or condition qua cause, corresponding to no. 1 in the Pāli list; (2) SAMANANTARAPRATYAYA, or immediately antecedent condition, corresponding to no. 5 in the Pāli list; (3) ĀLAMBANAPRATYAYA, or object condition, corresponding to no. 2 in the Pāli list; (4) ADHIPATIPRATYAYA, or predominant condition, corresponding to no. 3 in the Pāli list. These four pratyaya first appear in the first-century CE VIJNĀNAKĀYA and antedate the related Sarvāstivāda list of six "causes" (HETU).

pratyekabuddha. (P. paccekabuddha; T. rang sangs rgyas; C. yuanjue/dujue; J. engaku/dokukaku; K. yon'gak/tokkak 覺/獨覺). In Sanskrit, "individually enlightened one" or "solitary buddha"; an ARHAT who becomes enlightened through his own efforts without receiving instruction from a buddha in his final lifetime. Unlike the "perfectly enlightened buddhas" (SAMYAKSAMBUDDHA), the pratyekabuddha refrains from teaching others about his experience because he has neglected to develop the same degree of great compassion (MAHĀKARUnĀ) that motivates the samyaksaMbuddhas. Even though he does not teach others, he may still guide by example, or through the use of gestures. Pratyekabuddhas are also distinguished from those who achieve the goal of arhat via the sRĀVAKA ("disciple") path, because srāvakas are unable to achieve enlightenment on their own and must be instructed in the principles of Buddhism in order to succeed in their practice. A pratyekabuddha is also distinguished from the srāvaka by the duration of his path: the pratyekabuddha path is longer because he must accumulate the necessary amount of merit (PUnYA) to allow him to achieve liberation without relying on a teacher in his final lifetime. A pratyekabuddha is said to achieve liberation through contemplation of the principle of dependent origination (PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA), which accounts for the Chinese translation of yuanjue ("awakening via conditionality"). Two types of pratyekabuddhas are commonly enumerated in the literature: those who wander alone "like a rhinoceros" (KHAdGAVIsĀnAKALPA) and the "congregators" (VARGACĀRIN). According to the MAHĀYĀNA, the path of the pratyekabuddha, together with the path of the srāvaka, constitutes the HĪNAYĀNA, or "lesser vehicle"; these two categories are also often referred to as the "two vehicles" (C. ER SHENG) and their followers as "two-vehicle adherents." These lesser "two vehicles" contrast with the third and highest vehicle, the BODHISATTVAYĀNA.

prevail ::: v. i. --> To overcome; to gain the victory or superiority; to gain the advantage; to have the upper hand, or the mastery; to succeed; -- sometimes with over or against.
To be in force; to have effect, power, or influence; to be predominant; to have currency or prevalence; to obtain; as, the practice prevails this day.
To persuade or induce; -- with on, upon, or with; as, I prevailedon him to wait.


principal component analysis (PCA) ::: A statistical procedure that uses an orthogonal transformation to convert a set of observations of possibly correlated variables (entities each of which takes on various numerical values) into a set of values of linearly uncorrelated variables called principal components. This transformation is defined in such a way that the first principal component has the largest possible variance (that is, accounts for as much of the variability in the data as possible), and each succeeding component, in turn, has the highest variance possible under the constraint that it is orthogonal to the preceding components. The resulting vectors (each being a linear combination of the variables and containing n observations) are an uncorrelated orthogonal basis set. PCA is sensitive to the relative scaling of the original variables.

prosper ::: v. t. --> To favor; to render successful. ::: v. i. --> To be successful; to succeed; to be fortunate or prosperous; to thrive; to make gain.
To grow; to increase.


purvapranidhāna. (T. sngon gyi smon lam; C. benyuan; J. hongan; K. ponwon 本願). In Sanskrit, "prior vow," a vow made in the past that has either been fulfilled in the present or will be fulfilled in the future, typically in conjunction with the attainment of buddhahood. The term purvapranidhāna is used specifically in the MAHĀYĀNA to denote the vow made in the past by a BODHISATTVA to become a buddha himself, often specifying the place, the time, and the retinue that will be associated with that achievement. Since the buddhas have perforce succeeded in achieving their goal of buddhahood, their prior vows are therefore all considered to have been fulfilled. The most famous of all prior vows are the forty-eight vows described in the SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA, in which the bodhisattva DHARMĀKARA makes a series of forty-eight vows to create the PURE LAND of SUKHĀVATĪ. These vows are narrated by the Buddha, who explains that the bodhisattva fulfilled all the vows and became the buddha AMITĀBHA. The exegesis of the vows of Dharmākara was an important element of JoDOSHu and JoDO SHINSHu buddhology in Japan. (The Chinese translation of this term literally means "original vow," and this English rendering is commonly seen in Western translations of PURE LAND works.) The compound *pubbepanidhāna is unattested in Pāli sources, but the term panidhāna is used to refer to this aspiration made in a previous life.

Race(s) During evolution on each of the globes of the earth-chain, the human life-wave passes through seven evolutionary stages called root-races, of which we are at present in the fifth root-race of the fourth round on the fourth globe. Each root-race is divided into seven subraces, of which we are now in the fourth of the fifth root-race. These subraces are themselves subdivided into smaller divisions, and these again into still smaller racial units. G. de Purucker divides each root-race into: 1) primary subrace; 2) secondary subrace; 3) family race; 4) national race; 5) tribal race; 6) tribal generation; and 7) individual man (about 72 years) — each division containing seven of the succeeding type.

Rang 'byung rig pa'i rdo rje. (Rangjung Rikpe Dorje) (1924-1981). A renowned and influential Tibetan Buddhist master, recognized as the sixteenth Karma pa, principal leader of the KARMA BKA' BRGYUD sect of Tibetan Buddhism. He was born in 1924 in the SDE DGE area of Khams, eastern Tibet, to an aristocratic family, and was recognized as the incarnation of the fifteenth Karma pa by the eleventh TAI SI TU. At the age of eight, the Karma pa was enthroned by the Tai Si tu at DPAL SPUNGS monastery in Khams. Soon after, he went to MTSHUR PHU monastery in central Tibet, where he undertook his studies. In his early years, he received many important Bka' brgyud, SA SKYA, and RNYING MA teachings from eminent masters of the time. In his teenage years, the Karma pa divided his time between Mtshur phu and Dpal spungs monasteries, settling at Mtshur phu at the age of eighteen for several years of retreat. In 1947, the Karma pa took his first long pilgrimage and visited the holy sites of India, Nepal, and Sikkim. In 1954, he accompanied the fourteenth DALAI LAMA to Beijing in attempts to find a peaceful agreement between the nations of China and Tibet. The next year, the Karma pa returned to Khams, where he sought to mediate conflicts between Tibetan militias and the Chinese military, which was beginning to establish a presence in Tibet. By the spring of 1959, the Karma pa decided that it would be better for the preservation of his tradition's religious heritage to leave his homeland and move into exile. After informing the Dalai Lama of his decision, the Karma pa left for Bhutan with an entourage of one hundred fifty laypeople, incarnate lamas (SPRUL SKU), and monks. He soon moved to Rumtek (Rum theg) monastery in Sikkim, which had been founded previously by the ninth Karma pa DBANG PHYUG RDO RJE. By 1966, the sixteenth Karma pa and his followers had restored Rumtek and formed a new seat in exile for the Karma Bka' brgyud sect. Rang 'byung rig pa'i rdo rje was renowned for his erudition in Buddhist philosophy as well as his mastery of meditation and his ability to work miracles. Beginning in 1974, the sixteenth Karma pa undertook numerous journeys to Europe and North America, where he founded several important Karma bka' brgyud study and meditation centers. During this time, he traveled widely, attracting a great number of Western disciples. In 1981, the sixteenth Karma pa passed away in a hospital near Chicago. His attending physician attested to the fact that the Karma pa's body remained warm for three days after being pronounced dead. Rang 'byung rig pa'i rdo rje was succeeded by the seventeenth Karma pa, O rgyan 'phrin las rdo rje (Orgyan Tinle Dorje).

Raphael succeed in vanquishing Asmadai (along

Rennyo. (蓮如) (1415-1499). In Japanese, "Lotus Suchness"; proper name of the Japanese monk who played a crucial role in the consolidation of JoDO SHINSHu tradition. Rennyo was born at the monastery of HONGANJI in the Higashiyama district of Kyoto. He was the son of Zonnyo (1396-1457), himself a descendent of SHINRAN and the seventh abbot of Honganji. Despite some opposition from his stepmother and her son Nyojo (1412-1460), Rennyo succeeded his father as abbot of Honganji after his father's death in 1457. Rennyo began expanding his sphere of influence by proselytizing in the outskirts of Kyoto. In 1465, the monks of HIEIZAN (see ENRYAKUJI) destroyed Honganji in order to restrict the spread of Rennyo's influence in regions under TENDAI control. Rennyo was able to save the portrait of Shinran (goei) from destruction and installed it temporarily at the temple of MIIDERA. After the attack, Rennyo wandered from region to region until he settled down far away from Mt. Hiei in Hokuriku (present-day Echizen), where he acquired a large following (of mostly peasants) through active proselytizing and the writing of pastoral letters (ofumi). In 1475, Rennyo returned to Kyoto, where he began the construction of a new Honganji in the district of Yamashina the following year. Rennyo also restored the hoonko memorial service for Shinran and established the nenbutsu (C. NIANFO; see NAMU AMIDABUTSU) inscriptions as an important object of worship. In his writings, Rennyo also systematized the teachings of Shinran and criticized priestly corruption and "heretical" teachings that did not emphasize exclusive faith in the buddha AMITĀBHA and his name. Under Rennyo's tenure as abbot, the Honganji complex grew into one of the most powerful monasteries of its era, controlling a vast network of subtemples. This period is traditionally considered to represent the institutional formation of Jodo Shinshu.

rhyme ::: n. --> An expression of thought in numbers, measure, or verse; a composition in verse; a rhymed tale; poetry; harmony of language.
Correspondence of sound in the terminating words or syllables of two or more verses, one succeeding another immediately or at no great distance. The words or syllables so used must not begin with the same consonant, or if one begins with a vowel the other must begin with a consonant. The vowel sounds and accents must be the same, as also the sounds of the final consonants if there be any.


rhyme: Rhyme is the matching similarity of sounds in two or more words, especially when their accented vowels and all succeeding consonants are identical. For instance, the word-pairs listed here are all rhymes: mating/dating, feast/beast, emotion/demotion and fascinate/deracinate. Rhyme is often used inpoetry.

Risk_assessment ::: is a general term used across many industries to determine the likelihood of loss on an asset, loan, or investment. Assessing risk is essential for determining the worthwhile of an investment and the best process(es) to mitigate risk, and it presents the upside reward compared to the risk profile. It also determines the rate of return necessary to make a particular investment succeed.

Roerich, George (Yuri). (1902-1960). George (Yuri) Nikolaevich Roerich was the son of Russian painter and mystic Nikolai Roerich and Helena Ivanova, a Theosophist who translated Madame Blavatsky's The Secret Doctrine into Russian. Roerich spent much of his childhood traveling the world. The family traveled to Urga, in the far western region of Siberia, and their journeys took them to Ladakh as well as later to Europe and America. He studied Asian languages at the University of London, at Harvard University, and at Paris, where he studied with SYLVAIN LÉVI. Nikolai Roerich believed that sAMBHALA was located in Central Asia, perhaps in the Gobi Desert, and from 1925 to 1928 he led an expedition through Chinese Turkestan, Mongolia, and Tibet, in search of evidence of the hidden kingdom of sambhala, the supposed abode of the mahātmas, the spiritual masters of all religions. In 1928, George and his father established the Urusvati Himalayan Research Institute in Darjeeling, India, moving later to the Kullu Valley in the western Himalayas. George Roerich was a scholar in Tibetology and Mongolian studies, later serving as the first director of the Buddhist Branch of the Institute of Oriental Studies in Moscow. Roerich played a significant role in reviving Russian Orientalism after returning from exile in 1957. Under Khrushchev's government, Roerich was able to revive the Biblioteca Buddhica Series, which had ceased publication in 1937. He worked with Bidiya Dandaron and GUNAPALA PIYASENA MALALASEKERA (1899-1973) and succeeded in printing the first Russian version of the DHAMMAPADA in 1960. He died suddenly from a heart attack that same year. Among his publications, his most important for Buddhist studies was his translation (with the assistance of DGE 'DUN CHOS 'PHEL) of the DEB THER SNGON PO ("Blue Annals") by 'Gos lo tsā ba Gzhon nu dpal.

Root- and seed-manu, in certain relations, are spoken of as being respectively the prime cause and its accumulated final effect at the end of the round. As we are now in the middle of the fourth round, there have so far been seven principal or round-manus. By reason of nature’s analogical procedures, there is for each globe of a planetary chain a root-manu at the beginning of its several succeeding periods of activity, and a seed-manu at the end of the same; as being their spiritual offspring, the names are the same as those by which the principal or round-manus are known. This list of root- and seed-manus for each round is given in The Laws of Manu (cf SD 2:309): 1) Svayambhuva, Svarochi or Svarochisha; 2) Auttami, Tamasa; 3) Raivata, Chakshusha; 4) Vaivasvata (our progenitor), Savarna; 5) Daksha-savarna, Brahma-savarna; 6) Dharma-savarna, Rudra-savarna; and 7) Rauchya, Bhautya.

Root-race, Sixth The root-race which will succeed the present fifth root-race, sometimes called the Aryan race in theosophical literature because the Aryan Hindus were a part of the original first subrace of the fifth root-race. Care should be taken not to confuse the sixth root-race with the sixth subrace of the fifth root-race which was stated by Blavatsky to be in process of forming in America as seeds — the earliest pioneers, although already beginning to appear, will not be numerous for several thousand years. The preparation for the sixth root-race will take place during the sixth and seventh subraces of the fifth root-race in the Americas. When the time arrives, this future sixth root-race will be predominant on the earth, new lands will have appeared, and many of the present lands will be submerged. The surface of the globe will, in time of course, be entirely changed, and there will then be more land than water (as also was the case during the fourth root-race).

Round, Second The evolutionary course of the life-waves once around the entire planetary chain is termed a round. A noteworthy difference between the first round and all succeeding rounds is that during the first round all the vestures of various kinds used by the evolving monads, whether grouped as life-waves or not, were constructed as elementary outlines, the monads pursuing their first cycling by building forms of a spiritual-ethereal character. This applies not only the globes of a planetary chain themselves, but to the various bodies in which the individual monads of the life-waves manifest. Some of these bodies remain on each globe of the chain and become sishtas (remainders) when their respective life-waves pass to the next succeeding globe; and this procedure began during the first round. These remaining vestures or sishtas are ready as evolutionary type-forms when the incoming monads of the life-waves re-enter the different globes after having passed around the chain. These returning monads of the life-waves imbodying themselves in and through the sishtas, are the beginnings of the different root-races on each globe. Evolution proceeds through this process after the end of the first round, thus avoiding what would have otherwise been the need of the monads of the incoming life-waves to build bodies from the ground up — the sishtas being relatively highly evolved vehicles waiting for the pioneer monads of the various life-waves.

Rulers, Divine The nations of antiquity, such as the Egyptians, Chaldeans, and Greeks, had traditions of early racial divine rulers and spiritual dynasties which preceded their human kings. In the later races, these rulers stood for the dynasties of the gods, rishis, pitris, manus, etc., who are said in theosophy to have incarnated themselves in the third root-race on this globe during our present round, and to be born again and again as spiritual teachers in succeeding cycles for the instruction of nations, among whom they appear from time to time.

rustle ::: v. i. --> To make a quick succession of small sounds, like the rubbing or moving of silk cloth or dry leaves.
To stir about energetically; to strive to succeed; to bustle about. ::: v. t. --> To cause to rustle; as, the wind rustles the leaves.


Sambhala(Sanskrit) ::: A place-name of highly mystical significance. Many learned occidental Orientalists haveendeavored to identify this mystical and unknown locality with some well-known modern district ortown, but unsuccessfully. The name is mentioned in the Puranas and elsewhere, and it is stated that out ofSambhala will appear in due course of time the Kalki-Avatara of the future. The Kalki-Avatara is one ofthe manifestations or avataras of Vishnu. Among the Buddhists it is also stated that out of Sambhala willcome in due course of time the Maitreya-Buddha or next buddha.Sambhala, however, although no erudite Orientalist has yet succeeded in locating it geographically, is anactual land or district, the seat of the greatest brotherhood of spiritual adepts and their chiefs on earthtoday. From Sambhala at certain times in the history of the world, or more accurately of our own fifthroot-race, come forth the messengers or envoys for spiritual and intellectual work among men.This Great Brotherhood has branches in various parts of the world, but Sambhala is the center or chieflodge. We may tentatively locate it in a little-known and remote district of the high tablelands of centralAsia, more particularly in Tibet. A multitude of airplanes might fly over the place without "seeing" it, forits frontiers are very carefully guarded and protected against invasion, and will continue to be so until thekarmic destiny of our present fifth root-race brings about a change of location to some other spot on theearth, which then in its turn will be as carefully guarded as Sambhala now is.

sānakavāsin. (T. Sha na'i gos can; C. Shangnahexiu/Shangnuojiafusuo; J. Shonawashu/Shonyakabasha; K. Sangnahwasu/Sangnakkabaksa 商那和修/商諾迦縛娑). In Sanskrit, "Linen Wearer" [alt. sānakavāsa]; the third (or fourth according to SARVĀSTIVĀDA sources) successor to the Buddha in some of the traditional dharma lineages preserved in Nepal, Tibet, and East Asia. His name derives from a legend that, from the moment he was born following a six-year-long period of gestation in his mother's womb, he was always dressed in linen garments. Before becoming a monk, he was a rich merchant in RĀJAGṚHA, who frequently offered alms to the SAMGHA. He entered the religious order on the recommendation of ĀNANDA, and eventually succeeded him. After mastering all the canons, sānakavāsin traveled around India, propagating Buddhism. He converted many people to the religion, including UPAGUPTA, who became his successor. He also played a role in the second Buddhist council (see COUNCIL, SECOND). He is believed to have died in MATHURĀ.

saptatathāgata. (P. sattatathāgata; T. de bzhin gshegs pa bdun; C. qifo/guoqu qifo; J. shichibutsu/kako shichibutsu; K. ch'ilbul/kwago ch'ilbul 七佛/過去七佛). In Sanskrit, the "seven buddhas [of antiquity]"; a list of seven past buddhas bridging the last two cyclical periods of the universe, which include sĀKYAMUNI and the six buddhas who preceded him, i.e., VIPAsYIN (P. Vipassin), sikhin (P. Sikhī), Visvabhu (P. Vessabhu), Krakucchanda (P. KondaNNa), Kanakamuni (P. Konāgamana) and KĀsYAPA (P. Kassapa). The first three buddhas are the last three of the one thousand buddhas who appeared in the preceding "glorious eon" (vyuhakalpa), the cyclic period of a universe just prior to the present "auspicious eon" (BHADRAKALPA), and the remaining four buddhas are the first four of the one thousand buddhas during the present bhadrakalpa. sākyamuni will be succeeded by MAITREYA, the fifth buddha in the current cycle. The seven buddhas of antiquity are widely discussed in the ĀGAMA literature and in such texts as the BHADRAKALPIKASuTRA, where their activities, lineages, parents, offspring, disciples, residences, and teachings are recorded in great detail. Initially depicted symbolically, such as at BHĀRHUT and SĀNCĪ in the form of a row of seven BODHI TREEs, the seven tathāgatas were shown in human form by the time of the Kushan dynasty and are common in monastic art across Central and East Asia. The buddhas are often differentiated only by the MUDRĀs they display. MAITREYA is often added as an eighth figure, distinguished by his bodhisattva guise.

sāriputra. (P. Sāriputta; T. Shā ri bu; C. Shelifu; J. Sharihotsu; K. Saribul 舍利弗). In Sanskrit, "Son of sārī"; the first of two chief disciples of the Buddha, along with MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA. sāriputra's father was a wealthy brāhmana named Tisya (and sāriputra is sometimes called Upatisya, after his father) and his mother was named sārī or sārikā, because she had eyes like a sārika bird. sārī was the most intelligent woman in MAGADHA; she is also known as sāradvatī, so sāriputra is sometimes referred to as sāradvatīputra. sāriputra was born in Nālaka near RĀJAGṚHA. He had three younger brothers and three sisters, all of whom would eventually join the SAMGHA and become ARHATs. sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana were friends from childhood. Once, while attending a performance, both became overwhelmed with a sense of the vanity of all impermanent things and resolved to renounce the world together. They first became disciples of the agnostic SANJAYA VAIRĀtĪPUTRA, although they later took their leave of him and wandered through India in search of the truth. Finding no solution, they parted company, promising one another that whichever one should succeed in finding the truth would inform the other. It was then that sāriputra met the Buddha's disciple, AsVAJIT, one of the Buddha's first five disciples (PANCAVARGIKA) and already an arhat. sāriputra was impressed with Asvajit's countenance and demeanor and asked whether he was a master or a disciple. When he replied that he was a disciple, sāriputra asked him what his teacher taught. Asvajit said that he was new to the teachings and could only provide a summary, but then uttered one of the most famous statements in the history of Buddhism, "Of those phenomena produced through causes, the TATHĀGATA has proclaimed their causes (HETU) and also their cessation (NIRODHA). Thus has spoken the great renunciant." (See YE DHARMĀ s.v.). Hearing these words, sāriputra immediately became a stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA) and asked where he could find this teacher. In keeping with their earlier compact, he repeated the stanza to his friend Mahāmaudgalyāyana, who also immediately became a streamenterer. The two friends resolved to take ordination as disciples of the Buddha and, together with five hundred disciples of their former teacher SaNjaya, proceeded to the VEnUVANAVIHĀRA, where the Buddha was in residence. The Buddha ordained the entire group with the EHIBHIKsUKĀ ("Come, monks") formula, whereupon all except sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana became arhats. Mahāmaudgalyāyana was to attain arhatship seven days after his ordination, while sāriputra reached the goal after a fortnight upon hearing the Buddha preach the Vedanāpariggahasutta (the Sanskrit recension is entitled the Dīrghanakhaparivrājakaparipṛcchā). The Buddha declared sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana his chief disciples the day they were ordained, giving as his reason the fact that both had exerted themselves in religious practice for countless previous lives. sāriputra was declared chief among the Buddha's disciples in wisdom, while Mahāmaudgalyāyana was chief in mastery of supranormal powers (ṚDDHI). sāriputra was recognized as second only to the Buddha in his knowledge of the dharma. The Buddha praised sāriputra as an able teacher, calling him his dharmasenāpati, "dharma general" and often assigned topics for him to preach. Two of his most famous discourses were the DASUTTARASUTTA and the SAnGĪTISUTTA, which the Buddha asked him to preach on his behalf. Sāriputra was meticulous in his observance of the VINAYA, and was quick both to admonish monks in need of guidance and to praise them for their accomplishments. He was sought out by others to explicate points of doctrine and it was he who is said to have revealed the ABHIDHARMA to the human world after the Buddha taught it to his mother, who had been reborn in the TRĀYASTRIMsA heaven; when the Buddha returned to earth each day to collect alms, he would repeat to sāriputra what he had taught to the divinities in heaven. sāriputra died several months before the Buddha. Realizing that he had only seven days to live, he resolved to return to his native village and convert his mother; with this accomplished, he passed away. His body was cremated and his relics were eventually enshrined in a STuPA at NĀLANDĀ. sāriputra appears in many JĀTAKA stories as a companion of the Buddha, sometimes in human form, sometimes in animal form, and sometimes with one of them a human and the other an animal. sāriputra also plays a major role in the MAHĀYĀNA sutras, where he is a common interlocutor of the Buddha and of the chief BODHISATTVAs. Sometimes he is portrayed as a dignified arhat, elsewhere he is made the fool, as in the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA when a goddess turns him into a woman, much to his dismay. In either case, the point is that the wisest of the Buddha's arhat disciples, the master of the abhidharma, does not know the sublime teachings of the Mahāyāna and must have them explained to him. The implication is that the teachings of the Mahāyāna sutras are therefore more profound than anything found in the canons of the MAINSTREAM BUDDHIST SCHOOLS. In the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀHṚDAYA ("Heart Sutra"), it is sāriputra who asks AVALOKITEsVARA how to practice the perfection of wisdom, and even then he must be empowered to ask the question by the Buddha. In the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, it is sāriputra's question that prompts the Buddha to set forth the parable of the burning house. The Buddha predicts that in the future, sāriputra will become the buddha Padmaprabha.

Savarna (Sanskrit) Sāvarṇa Similar in color or appearance or class; the eighth manu. A name used either alone or in combination for all the manus succeeding the eighth, except the last two, the 13th and 14th. Being the eighth manu of our earth-chain, Savarna is the seed-manu of the present fourth round; and Savarna’s culmination of svabhavic individuality will be during the last root-races on globe G of our planetary chain.

schema ::: n. --> An outline or image universally applicable to a general conception, under which it is likely to be presented to the mind; as, five dots in a line are a schema of the number five; a preceding and succeeding event are a schema of cause and effect.

screaming tty ::: [Unix] A terminal line which spews an infinite number of random characters at the operating system. This can happen if the terminal is either disconnected or attacks, so although none of the logins succeeds; the overhead of rejecting them all can be substantial.[Jargon File]

screaming tty [Unix] A terminal line which spews an infinite number of random characters at the operating system. This can happen if the terminal is either disconnected or connected to a powered-off terminal but still enabled for login; misconfiguration, misimplementation, or simple bad luck can start such a terminal screaming. A screaming tty or two can seriously degrade the performance of a vanilla Unix system; the arriving "characters" are treated as userid/password pairs and tested as such. The Unix password encryption algorithm is designed to be computationally intensive in order to foil brute-force crack attacks, so although none of the logins succeeds; the overhead of rejecting them all can be substantial. [{Jargon File}]

Second Death ::: This is a phrase used by ancient and modern mystics to describe the dissolution of the principles of manremaining in kama-loka after the death of the physical body. For instance, Plutarch says: "Of the deathswe die, the one makes man two of three, and the other, one out of two." Thus, using the simple divisionof man into spirit, soul, and body: the first death is the dropping of the body, making two out of three; thesecond death is the withdrawal of the spiritual from the kama-rupic soul, making one out of two.The second death takes place when the lower or intermediate duad (manas-kama) in its turn separatesfrom, or rather is cast off by, the upper duad; but preceding this event the upper duad gathers unto itselffrom this lower duad what is called the reincarnating ego, which is all the best of the entity that was, allits purest and most spiritual and noblest aspirations and hopes and dreams for betterment and for beautyand harmony. Inherent in the fabric, so to speak, of the reincarnating ego, there remain of course theseeds of the lower principles which at the succeeding rebirth or reincarnation of the ego will develop intothe complex of the lower quaternary. (See also Kama-Rupa)

sequel ::: n. --> That which follows; a succeeding part; continuation; as, the sequel of a man&

sequence ::: n. --> The state of being sequent; succession; order of following; arrangement.
That which follows or succeeds as an effect; sequel; consequence; result.
Simple succession, or the coming after in time, without asserting or implying causative energy; as, the reactions of chemical agents may be conceived as merely invariable sequences.
Any succession of chords (or harmonic phrase) rising or


sequent ::: a. --> Following; succeeding; in continuance.
Following as an effect; consequent. ::: n. --> A follower.
That which follows as a result; a sequence.


sequential ::: a. --> Succeeding or following in order.

series ::: n. --> A number of things or events standing or succeeding in order, and connected by a like relation; sequence; order; course; a succession of things; as, a continuous series of calamitous events.
Any comprehensive group of animals or plants including several subordinate related groups.
An indefinite number of terms succeeding one another, each of which is derived from one or more of the preceding by a fixed law, called the law of the series; as, an arithmetical series; a geometrical


Sethianites Also Sethiotai, Sethians, Sethites. A branch of the Gnostics Ophites, who regarded Seth, the son of Adam, as the first spiritual man, and maintained that Seth reappeared as Christ. The teachings of the Ophites in their different branches were extremely profound and highly philosophic, but the Christians neither could nor would understand the inner meanings of the Ophite doctrines, but took their allegories; and in the process of grossly distorting them, and misquoting them for the purpose of ridicule, succeeded in confusing later centuries as to just what the Ophites did teach.

Siddhanta (Sanskrit) Siddhānta [from siddha accomplished from the verbal root sidh to accomplish, succeed + anta end, completion] An established or canonical textbook or scientific treatise on astronomy and mathematics. One of the best known and most ancient in India is the Surya-Siddhanta, whose age dates even from Atlantean times. The Surya-Siddhanta itself claims to have been written down under solar instruction by the Atlantean astronomer and mathematician Asuramaya, so that it is contemporaneous with the first appearance of the present fifth root-race.

Siddhartha (Sanskrit) Siddhārtha [from siddha attained from the verbal root sidh to accomplish, attain, succeed + artha object, aim] One who has attained or accomplished his object, one who has fulfilled the object of his coming on earth; a name given to Gautama Buddha. See also GAUTAMA

sion appointed by a succeeding pope, Innocent VIII, condemned at least ten of Pico’s theses as “rash, false, and hereti¬

Skandha(s)(Sanskrit) ::: Literally "bundles," or groups of attributes, to use H. P. Blavatsky's definition. When deathcomes to a man in any one life, the seeds of those causes previously sown by him and which have not yetcome forth into blossom and full-blown flower and fruit, remain in his interior and invisible parts asimpulses lying latent and sleeping: lying latent like sleeping seeds for future flowerings into action in thenext and succeeding lives. They are psychological impulse-seeds lying asleep until their appropriatestage for awakening into action arrives at some time in the future.In the case of the cosmic bodies, every solar or planetary body upon entering into its pralaya, itsprakritika-pralaya -- the dissolution of its lower principles -- at the end of its long life cycle, exists inspace in the higher activity of its spiritual principles, and in the dispersion of its lowest principles, whichlatter latently exist in space as skandhas in a laya-condition.When a laya-center is fired into action by the touch of wills and consciousnesses on their downward way,becoming the imbodying life of a solar system, or of a planet of a solar system, the center manifests firston its highest plane, and later on its lower plane. The skandhas are awakened into life one after another:first the highest ones, next the intermediate ones, and lastly the inferior ones, cosmically and qualitativelyspeaking.The term skandhas in theosophical philosophy has the general significance of bundles or groups ofattributes, which together form or compose the entire set of material and also mental, emotional, andmoral qualities. Exoterically the skandhas are "bundles" of attributes five in number, but esoterically theyare seven. These unite at the birth of man and constitute his personality. After the death of the body theskandhas are separated and so remain until the reincarnating ego on its downward path into physicalincarnation gathers them together again around itself, and thus reforms the human constitutionconsidered as a unity.In brief, the skandhas can be said to be the aggregate of the groups of attributes or qualities which makeeach individual man the personality that he is; but this must be sharply distinguished from theindividuality.

software law ::: (legal) Software may, under various circumstances and in various countries, be restricted by patent or copyright or both. Most commercial software is sold under some kind of software license.A patent normally covers the design of something with a function such as a machine or process. Copyright restricts the right to make and distribute copies data structures it uses and it could also be considered as a recording which can be copied and performed (run).Look and feel lawsuits attempt to monopolize well-known command languages; some have succeeded. Copyrights on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition, and stifle incremental improvements.Software patents are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pretrial consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future.The proper use of copyright is to prevent software piracy - unauthorised duplication of software. This is completely different from copying the idea behind the program in the same way that photocopying a book differs from writing another book on the same subject.Usenet newsgroup: misc.legal.computing.[The Software Developer's and Marketer's Legal Companion, Gene K. Landy, 1993, AW, 0-201-62276-9]. (1994-11-16)

software law "legal" Software may, under various circumstances and in various countries, be restricted by patent or {copyright} or both. Most commercial software is sold under some kind of {software license}. A patent normally covers the design of something with a function such as a machine or process. Copyright restricts the right to make and distribute copies of something written or recorded, such as a song or a book of recipies. Software has both these aspects - it embodies functional design in the {algorithms} and data structures it uses and it could also be considered as a recording which can be copied and "performed" (run). "{Look and feel}" lawsuits attempt to monopolize well-known command languages; some have succeeded. {Copyrights} on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition, and stifle incremental improvements. {Software patents} are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pretrial seizure. It is difficult and expensive to find out whether the techniques you consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future. The proper use of {copyright} is to prevent {software piracy} - unauthorised duplication of software. This is completely different from copying the idea behind the program in the same way that photocopying a book differs from writing another book on the same subject. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:misc.legal.computing}. ["The Software Developer's and Marketer's Legal Companion", Gene K. Landy, 1993, AW, 0-201-62276-9]. (1994-11-16)

Solomon, King of Israel and Judah (Hebrew) Shĕlomoh [from shālōm prosperous cf Arab zuleima, Greek Salomon Latin solomo, genitive solomonis, French Salomon] Peace, prosperity; according to orthodox Biblical chronology, he lived 993-953 BC, the youngest son of David whom he succeeded through the influence of his mother Bathsheba and the prophet Nathan. Throughout the East, especially in Arabia and thence in Europe, there are many legends of his wisdom and magical powers, and notably with regard to his seal, the six-pointed star or double interlaced equilateral triangles (Solomon’s seal); his meeting with the Queen of Sheba and his answering of the questions and riddles propounded by her and others; and his judgments. Solomon is said to have gotten “his secret learning from India through Hiram, the king of Ophir, and perhaps Sheba” (IU 1:135, 136n).

Some have benefited by putting a will on the body before going to sleep at night that the dreams should not happen • — though it may not succeed at the beginning, it tells in most cases after a time by fixing a certain inhibitory force on the subconscient from which these dreams arise.

Sotoshu. (曺洞宗). One of the three major branches of the Japanese Zen tradition, along with the RINZAISHu and oBAKUSHu. The Soto tradition traces its lineage back to DoGEN KIGEN (1200-1253), who is credited with transmitting to Japan the CAODONG ZONG line of the Chinese CHAN teacher TIANTONG RUJING (1162-1227). After returning from China in 1227, Dogen settled in Kyoto and sought to create a new Zen community. Because of resistance from the TENDAI and Rinzai traditions that were already firmly entrenched in the capital (see ENNI BEN'EN), Dogen and his followers eventually left for the rural area of Echizen (in the northern part of present-day Fukui prefecture), and founded EIHEIJI, which came to serve as the center of this new Zen institution. In Echizen, Dogen devoted his time and energy to securing the doctrinal and institutional bases for his community. Dogen's venture was aided by several adherents of the DARUMASHu, who joined the community. Among them were Koun Ejo (1198-1280), the editor of the seventy-five-roll version of Dogen's magnum opus, the SHoBoGENZo, and Tettsu Gikai (1219-1309), whose lineage subsequently came to dominate the Soto school; these monks later served as the second and the third abbots of Eiheiji. Modern scholars believe that a dispute between Gikai and a fellow disciple of Koun Ejo named Gien (d. 1313) concerning the abbotship of Eiheiji prompted Gikai to move to Daijoji in Ishikawa. Gikai was succeeded by his disciple KEIZAN JoKIN (1268-1325), who is honored as "the second patriarch" of Soto by the school's modern followers. Keizan revitalized the Soto community by synthesizing Zen practice with the worship of local gods (KAMI), thus appealing to the local populace. Keizan also established SoJIJI, which along with Eiheiji came to serve as the headquarters (honzan) of the Soto tradition. Gazan Shoseki (1275-1365), a successor of Keizan, produced several disciples, including Taigen Soshin (d. c. 1371) and Tsugen Jakurei (1322-1391), who are credited with the Soto school's rapid expansion throughout Japan during the medieval period. Soto monks of this period, especially those belonging to Keizan-Gazan lines, proselytized in the rural areas of Japan, which had been largely neglected by the established Buddhist traditions at court, and attracted a following among commoners and local elites by engaging in such social activities as building bridges and irrigation systems, as well as by performing rituals that met their religious needs, such as funeral services and mass ordinations (jukai e). Each lineage of the Soto tradition also developed its own secret koan manuals (monsan), only available to selected monks, which gave a received set of questions and answers regarding each koan (C. GONG'AN). During the Tokugawa period, the Soto school developed into one of the largest Buddhist sects in Japan, with a stable financial base, thanks to the mandatory parish system (DANKA SEIDO) that the government launched, in which every household was required to register as a member of a local Buddhist temple and was responsible for the financial support for the temple. By the middle of the eighteenth century, there were more than 17,500 Soto temples across Japan. Although the religious life of the majority of the Soto monks and lay followers during this period was focused on practical religious benefits, such as faith healing and funeral services, a restoration movement eventually developed that sought to return to the putative "original teachings and practices" of the founder Dogen. MANZAN DoHAKU (1636-1714) opposed the custom of IN'IN EKISHI, or "changing teachers according to temple," which was widespread in the Soto tradition during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and was required in order to inherit the dharma lineage of a temple (GARANBo). Instead, Manzan called for a direct, face-to-face transmission (menju shiho) from one master to his disciple (isshi insho), which he claimed Dogen had established for the Soto tradition. After several failed attempts, he finally succeeded in persuading the bakufu government to ban the in'in ekishi and garanbo practice in 1703. TENKEI DENSON (1648-1735) and MENZAN ZUIHo (1683-1769) also composed influential commentaries to Dogen's magnum opus, the Shobogenzo, which led to a renaissance in Dogen studies. After the Meiji reforms of 1868, the two head monasteries of Eiheiji and Sojiji, which had remained rivals through the Tokugawa period, worked together to reform the school, issuing several standardizations of the rules for temple operation, ritual procedures, etc. In 1890, Azegami Baisen (d.1901) from Sojiji and Takiya Takushu (d. 1897) from Eiheiji edited the layman ouchi Seiran's (1845-1918) introductory work on the Shobogenzo and distributed it under the title of the Soto kyokai shushogi ("Meaning of Practice and Realization in the Soto Sect"). This text played a major role in the popularization of the school's meditative practice of "just sitting" (SHIKAN TAZA), which fosters a psychological state in which "body and mind are sloughed off" (SHINJIN DATSURAKU); sitting practice itself is therefore regarded as the manifestation of the perfect enlightenment of buddhahood. The Soto school continues to thrive today, with the great majority of its more than fourteen thousand contemporary temples affiliated with Sojiji.

soul ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The word ‘soul", as also the word ‘psychic", is used very vaguely and in many different senses in the English language. More often than not, in ordinary parlance, no clear distinction is made between mind and soul and often there is an even more serious confusion, for the vital being of desire — the false soul or desire-soul — is intended by the words ‘soul" and ‘psychic" and not the true soul, the psychic being.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The word soul is very vaguely used in English — as it often refers to the whole non-physical consciousness including even the vital with all its desires and passions. That was why the word psychic being has to be used so as to distinguish this divine portion from the instrumental parts of the nature.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The word soul has various meanings according to the context; it may mean the Purusha supporting the formation of Prakriti, which we call a being, though the proper word would be rather a becoming; it may mean, on the other hand, specifically the psychic being in an evolutionary creature like man; it may mean the spark of the Divine which has been put into Matter by the descent of the Divine into the material world and which upholds all evolving formations here.” *Letters on Yoga

  "A distinction has to be made between the soul in its essence and the psychic being. Behind each and all there is the soul which is the spark of the Divine — none could exist without that. But it is quite possible to have a vital and physical being supported by such a soul essence but without a clearly evolved psychic being behind it.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The soul and the psychic being are practically the same, except that even in things which have not developed a psychic being, there is still a spark of the Divine which can be called the soul. The psychic being is called in Sanskrit the Purusha in the heart or the Chaitya Purusha. (The psychic being is the soul developing in the evolution.)” *Letters on Yoga

  "The soul or spark is there before the development of an organised vital and mind. The soul is something of the Divine that descends into the evolution as a divine Principle within it to support the evolution of the individual out of the Ignorance into the Light. It develops in the course of the evolution a psychic individual or soul individuality which grows from life to life, using the evolving mind, vital and body as its instruments. It is the soul that is immortal while the rest disintegrates; it passes from life to life carrying its experience in essence and the continuity of the evolution of the individual.” *Letters on Yoga

  ". . . for the soul is seated within and impervious to the shocks of external events. . . .” *Essays on the Gita

  ". . . the soul is at first but a spark and then a little flame of godhead burning in the midst of a great darkness; for the most part it is veiled in its inner sanctum and to reveal itself it has to call on the mind, the life-force and the physical consciousness and persuade them, as best they can, to express it; ordinarily, it succeeds at most in suffusing their outwardness with its inner light and modifying with its purifying fineness their dark obscurities or their coarser mixture. Even when there is a formed psychic being able to express itself with some directness in life, it is still in all but a few a smaller portion of the being — ‘no bigger in the mass of the body than the thumb of a man" was the image used by the ancient seers — and it is not always able to prevail against the obscurity or ignorant smallness of the physical consciousness, the mistaken surenesses of the mind or the arrogance and vehemence of the vital nature.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

". . . the soul is an eternal portion of the Supreme and not a fraction of Nature.” The Life Divine

"The true soul secret in us, — subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, — this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” The Life Divine

*Soul, soul"s, Soul"s, souls, soulless, soul-bridals, soul-change, soul-force, Soul-Forces, soul-ground, soul-joy, soul-nature, soul-range, soul-ray, soul-scapes, soul-scene, soul-sense, soul-severance, soul-sight, soul-slaying, soul-space,, soul-spaces, soul-strength, soul-stuff, soul-truth, soul-vision, soul-wings, world-soul, World-Soul.



Stoic School: Founded by Zeno (of Citium, in Cyprus) in the year 308 B.C. in Athens. For Stoicism virtue alone is the only good and the virtuous man is the one who has attained happiness through knowledge, as Socrites had taught. The virtuous man thus finds happiness in himself and is independent of the external world which he has succeeded in overcoming by mastering himself, his passions and emotions. As for the Stoic conception of the universe as a whole, their doctrine is pantheistic. All things and all natural laws follow by a conscious determination from the basic World Reason, and it is this rational order by which, according to Stoicism, the wise man seeks to regulate his life as his highest duty. -- M.F.

strobila ::: n. --> A form of the larva of certain Discophora in a state of development succeeding the scyphistoma. The body of the strobila becomes elongated, and subdivides transversely into a series of lobate segments which eventually become ephyrae, or young medusae.
A mature tapeworm.


successor ::: one who succeeds or follows another.

Such a complete circuit of the life-waves on each and every one of the globes of a planetary chain is termed a planetary round or chain-round, whereas the complete passage of a life-wave on one globe before going to the next succeeding globe is termed a globe-round; seven or twelve of these globe-rounds comprise one planetary round. Each life-wave makes seven cycles on each globe, which are termed root-races. See also ROUND

Suicide As an inseparable part of the universe, whether considered as an organism or as a huge animated machine, we cannot violently remove ourselves from the pattern without interfering with the harmonious working of the other parts; and just here enters the immense moral or ethical import of the evil of suicide. But even had we a right to destroy our life, it would be futile. We may destroy the body, but we cannot destroy the mind. The suicide, after the temporary but complete unconsciousness which succeeds death, awakes in kama-loka the same person, in the same state of consciousness, minus only the physical triad (body, astral body, and gross physical vitality). His state of consciousness is one of torture, the repetition over and over of his suicidal act and the emotions that induced and accompanied it; this happens automatically because the mind, like an automaton repeats incessantly perforce the controlling or dominating impulses that governed it when the person took his physical life. And as the higher ego has its own life term, he has to remain in that condition until what would have been the natural term of life on earth is ended, body or no body.

Sukhāvatīvyuhasutra. (T. Bde ba can gyi bkod pa'i mdo; C. Wuliangshou jing; J. Muryojukyo; K. Muryangsu kyong 無量壽經). Literally, the "Sutra Displaying [the Land of] Bliss," the title of the two most important Mahāyāna sutras of the "PURE LAND" tradition. The two sutras differ in length, and thus are often referred to in English as the "larger" and "smaller" (or "longer" and "shorter") Sukhāvatīvyuhasutras; the shorter one is commonly called the AMITĀBHASuTRA. Both sutras are believed to date from the third century CE. The longer and shorter sutras, together with the GUAN WULIANGSHOU JING (*Amitāyurdhyānasutra), constitute the three main texts associated with the pure land tradition of East Asia (see JINGTU SANBUJING). There are multiple Sanskrit, Chinese, and Tibetan versions of both the longer and shorter sutras, with significant differences among them. ¶ The longer Sukhāvatīvyuhasutra begins with ĀNANDA noticing that the Buddha is looking especially serene one day, and so asks him the reason. The Buddha responds that he was thinking back many millions of eons in the past to the time of the buddha LOKEsVARARĀJA. The Buddha then tells a story in the form of a flashback. In the audience of this buddha was a monk named DHARMĀKARA, who approached Lokesvararāja and proclaimed his aspiration to become a buddha. Dharmākara then requested the Buddha to describe all of the qualities of the buddha-fields (BUDDHAKsETRA). Lokesvararāja provided a discourse that lasted one million years, describing each of the qualities of the lands of trillions of buddhas. Dharmākara then retired to meditate for five eons, seeking to concentrate all of the marvelous qualities of the millions of buddha-fields that had been described to him into a single pure buddha-field. When he completed his meditation, he returned to describe this imagined land to Lokesvararāja, promising to create a place of birth for fortunate beings and vowing that he would follow the bodhisattva path and become the buddha of this new buddha-field. He described the land he would create in a series of vows, stating that if this or that marvel was not present in his pure land, may he not become a buddha: e.g., "If in my pure land there are animals, ghosts, or hell denizens, may I not become a buddha." He made forty-eight such vows. These included the vow that all the beings in his pure land will be the color of gold; that beings in his pure land will have no conception of private property; that no bodhisattva will have to wash, dry, or sew his own robes; that bodhisattvas in his pure land will be able to hear the dharma in whatever form they wish to hear it and whenever they wish to hear it; that any woman who hears his name, creates the aspiration to enlightenment (BODHICITTA), and feels disgust at the female form, will not be reborn as a woman again. Two of these vows would become the focus of particular attention. In the eighteenth vow (seventeenth in the East Asian versions), Dharmākara vows that when he has become a buddha, he will appear at the moment of death to anyone who creates the aspiration to enlightenment, hears his name, and remembers him with faith. In the nineteenth vow (eighteenth in the East Asian versions), he promises that anyone who hears his name, wishes to be reborn in his pure land, and dedicates their merit to that end, will be reborn there, even if they make such a resolution as few as ten times during the course of their life. Only those who have committed one of the five inexpiable transgressions bringing immediate retribution (ĀNANTARYAKARMAN, viz., patricide, matricide, killing an ARHAT, wounding a buddha, or causing schism in the SAMGHA) are excluded. The scene then returns to the present. Ānanda asks the Buddha whether Dharmākara was successful, whether he did in fact traverse the long path of the bodhisattva to become a buddha. The Buddha replies that he did indeed succeed and that he became the buddha Amitābha (Infinite Light). The pure land that he created is called sukhāvatī. Because Dharmākara became a buddha, all of the things that he promised to create in his pure land have come true, and the Buddha proceeds to describe sukhāvatī in great detail. It is carpeted with lotuses made of seven precious substances, some of which reach ten leagues (YOJANA) in diameter. Each lotus emits millions of rays of light and from each ray of light there emerge millions of buddhas who travel to world systems in all directions to teach the dharma. The pure land is level, like the palm of one's hand, without mountains or oceans. It has great rivers, the waters of which rise as high or sink as low as one pleases, from the shoulders to the ankles, and vary in temperature as one pleases. The sound of the river takes the form of whatever auspicious words one wishes to hear, such as "buddha," "emptiness," "cessation," and "great compassion." The words "hindrance," "misfortune," and "pain" are never heard, nor are the words "day" and "night" used, except as metaphors. The beings in the pure land do not need to consume food. When they are hungry, they simply visualize whatever food they wish and their hunger is satisfied without needing to eat. They dwell in bejeweled palaces of their own design. Some of the inhabitants sit cross-legged on lotus blossoms while others are enclosed within the calyx of a lotus. The latter do not feel imprisoned, because the calyx of the lotus is quite large, containing within it a palace similar to that inhabited by the gods. Those who dedicate their merit toward rebirth in the pure land yet who harbor doubts are reborn inside lotuses where they must remain for five hundred years, enjoying visions of the pure land but deprived of the opportunity to hear the dharma. Those who are free from doubt are reborn immediately on open lotuses, with unlimited access to the dharma. Such rebirth would become a common goal of Buddhist practice, for monks and laity alike, in India, Tibet, and throughout East Asia. ¶ The "shorter" Sukhāvatīvyuhasutra was translated into Chinese by such famous figures as KUMĀRAJĪVA and XUANZANG. It is devoted largely to describing this buddha's land and its many wonders, including the fact that even the names for the realms of animals and the realms of hell-denizens are not known; all of the beings born there will achieve enlightenment in their next lifetime. In order to be reborn there, one should dedicate one's merit to that goal and bear in mind the name of the buddha here known as AMITĀYUS (Infinite Life). Those who are successful in doing so will see Amitāyus and a host of bodhisattvas before them at the moment of death, ready to escort them to sukhāvatī, the land of bliss. In order to demonstrate the efficacy of this practice, the Buddha goes on to list the names of many other buddhas abiding in the four cardinal directions, the nadir, and the zenith, who also praise the buddha-field of Amitāyus. Furthermore, those who hear the names of the buddhas that he has just recited will be embraced by those buddhas. Perhaps to indicate how his own buddha-field (that is, our world) differs from that of Amitāyus, sākyamuni Buddha concludes by conceding that it has been difficult to teach the dharma in a world as degenerate as ours.

Superbrain "computer" A {personal computer} released in 1980 by {Intertec}. The Superbrain had two {Z80A} {microprocessors} running at 4 MHz, one for the main processing and the other for peripheral activities. It had an integrated {keyboard} and {display}. It was sold with the {CP/M} {operating system}, {Microsoft Basic}, an {8080} {assembler} and {Microsoft Cobol 74}. The base model, the "Superbrain 10", had no drives, only a network connection. Other models added one or two 5" {floppy disc} units. The "Jr" had 170K drives (single-sided), the "QD" had 340 KB drives (double-sided) and the "SD" had 780k. Intertec did not sell or support a hard drive or an {S-100} bus for these machines. The network version of the SuperBrain was called CompuStar. The network was a large gray parallel cable. CompuStar had three "file servers" that accepted up to 255 machines. These were the "DSS-10" with a 10MB 8" Winchester drive; the "CDC" with 96MB consisting of 80MB fixed and a 16MB removable platter; and the "Priam" with a 144MB 14" platter winchester. Intertec manufactured the controllers for the last two and an enclosure and power supply for the Priam. CDC had to go on-site to install the 96MB. The SuperBrain was succeeded in 1982 by the {SuperBrain II}. {(http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?st=1&c=204)}. (2013-12-30)

Svipdag (Icelandic, Scandinavian) [from svip, svep appearance + dag day] Appearing as day; in Norse mythology, the hero Svipdag seeks the hall of Menglad (Freya) hoping to win her hand. After receiving from his dead mother (his own past) all needful virtues and qualities, he succeeds in reaching the abode of his beloved, only to be stopped at the magic gate by Odin in the guise of Verywise. Here he must satisfactorily answer a number of testing questions before he is finally admitted to the hall of Menglad, who has been eagerly awaiting his arrival. She represents his own divine hamingja (higher self).

Tahmurath (Persian), Takhmorab (Pahlavi) Takhmōrab, Takhma-rupa (Avestan) [from Avest takhmao strength, force + rupa body, form] Also Teimuraz, Tahumers, Tahmuras, Taimuraz. The third king of the legendary Pishdadi dynasty, succeeding his father Hushang. His steed, the Simorgh-Anke, was more rare and rapid than his father’s twelve-legged horse. He is called Div-band (the binder of divs) in Firdusi’s Shahnameh, for he waged war on the divs and captured them all. Tahmurath ordered their death, whereupon they promised to teach him the art of writing if he spared their lives. Granting their entreaty, he was taught not one but thirty languages.

Tamasie vairSgya arises from dissatisfaction, disappointment, a feeling of inability to succeed or face life, a crushing under the grips and pains of life.

“Tao is the ultimate reality in which all attributes are united, it is heavy as a stone, light as a feather; it is the unity underlying plurality. It is that by losing of which men die; by getting of which men live. Whatever is done without it fails; whatever is done by means of it, succeeds. It has neither root nor stalk, leaf nor flower. Yet upon it depends the generation and the growth of the ten thousand things [the cosmos], each after its kind” (Kuan tzu, 49).

Teachers succeed one another and thus pass on the teachings from age to age; as in the succession of the buddhas and especially of the bodhisattvas in Buddhism; the guruparampara chain in Brahmanism; and even in exoteric life in ancient times, and in far less degree, there were the hierophants in the various Mystery schools, such as in the Eleusinia.

  “The ‘BEING’ . . . is the Tree from which, in subsequent ages, all the great historically known Sages and Hierophants, such as the Rishi Kapila, Hermes, Enoch, Orpheus, etc., etc., have branched off. As objective man, he is the mysterious (to the profane — the ever invisible) yet ever present Personage about whom legends are rife in the East, especially among the Occultists and the students of the Sacred Science. It is he who changes form, yet remains ever the same. And it is he again who holds spiritual sway over the initiated Adepts throughout the whole world. He is, as said, the ‘Nameless One’ who has so many names, and yet whose names and whose very nature are unknown. He is the ‘Initiator,’ called the ‘Great sacrifice.’ For, sitting at the threshold of light, he looks into it from within the circle of Darkness, which he will not cross; nor will he quit his post till the last day of this life-cycle. . . . Because he would fain show the way to that region of freedom and light, from which he is a voluntary exile himself, to every prisoner who has succeeded in liberating himself from the bonds of flesh and illusion. . . .

The chakras below the diaphragm were already developed in
Lemurians and now fulfil all their requisite functions automatically as organs of apprehension and activity. In contrast, the chakras above the diaphragm are but little developed at mankind&


The declared purpose of the Neoplatonists was to demonstrate the reality of a fundamental wisdom, to draw together the elect of every faith, and likewise to sow the seeds for a unification of faiths. The teachings are religious in the sense that they appeal to the religious instincts and inculcate the loftiest and purest morality; but on the other hand no church or creed was founded. The conditions of the times did not call for a scientific presentation of the ancient teachings; the regimentation of external life had turned men’s hopes inward. Such a system could not be created by merely putting together borrowings from Plato and Pythagoras, the Jews, and Gnostics, etc. Behind the movement must have been minds initiated in the lore of ancient Egypt and India, and thus supplied with the design which alone could make a unity out of the elements. Through succeeding centuries, revivals of Neoplatonism have appeared, sometimes using the name itself. It deeply influenced the Christian church, not only in early times but later under the influence of the pseudo-Dionysius and still later of Erigena.

The first Dalai Lama, DGE 'DUN GRUB, was known as a great scholar and religious practitioner. A direct disciple of TSONG KHA PA, he is remembered for founding BKRA SHIS LHUN PO monastery near the central Tibetan town of Shigatse. The second Dalai Lama, Dge 'dun rgya mtsho, was born the son of a RNYING MA YOGIN and became a renowned tantric master in his own right. ¶ It is with the third Dalai Lama, BSOD NAMS RGYA MTSHO, that the Dalai Lama lineage actually begins. Recognized at a young age as the reincarnation of Dge 'dun rgya mtsho, he was appointed abbot of 'BRAS SPUNGS monastery near LHA SA and soon rose to fame throughout central Asia as a Buddhist teacher. He served as a religious master for the Mongol ruler Altan Khan, who bestowed the title "Dalai Lama," and is credited with converting the Tümed Mongols to Buddhism. Later in life, he traveled extensively across eastern Tibet and western China, teaching and carrying out monastic construction projects. ¶ The fourth Dalai Lama, Yon tan rgya mtsho, was recognized in the person of the grandson of Altan Khan's successor, solidifying Mongol-Tibetan ties. ¶ While the first four Dalai Lamas served primarily as religious scholars and teachers, the fifth Dalai Lama, NGAG DBANG BLO BZANG RGYA MTSHO, combined religious and secular activities to become one of Tibet's preeminent statesmen. He was a dynamic political leader who, with the support of Gushi Khan, defeated his opponents and in 1642 was invested with temporal powers over the Tibetan state, in addition to his religious role, a position that succeeding Dalai Lamas held until 1959. A learned and prolific author, he and his regent, SDE SRID SANGS RGYAS RGYA MTSHO, were largely responsible for the identification of the Dalai Lamas with the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara. The construction of the PO TA LA palace began during his reign (and was completed after this death). He is popularly known as the "Great Fifth." ¶ The sixth Dalai Lama, TSHANGS DBYANGS RGYA MTSHO, was a controversial figure who chose to abandon the strict monasticism of his predecessors in favor of a life of society and culture, refusing to take the vows of a fully ordained monk (BHIKsU). He is said to have frequented the drinking halls below the Po ta la palace. He constructed pleasure gardens and the temple of the NAGAs, called the KLU KHANG, on the palace grounds. He is remembered especially for his poetry, which addresses themes such as love and the difficulty of spiritual practice. Tibetans generally interpret his behavior as exhibiting an underlying tantric wisdom, a skillful means for teaching the dharma. His death is shrouded in mystery. Official accounts state that he died while under arrest by Mongol troops. According to a prominent secret biography (GSANG BA'I RNAM THAR), however, he lived many more years, traveling across Tibet in disguise. ¶ The seventh Dalai Lama, SKAL BZANG RGYA MTSHO, was officially recognized only at the age of twelve, and due to political complications, did not participate actively in affairs of state. He was renowned for his writings on tantra and his poetry. ¶ The eighth Dalai Lama, 'Jam dpal rgya mtsho (Jampal Gyatso, 1758-1804), built the famous NOR BU GLING KHA summer palace. ¶ The ninth through twelfth Dalai Lamas each lived relatively short lives, due, according to some accounts, to political intrigue and the machinations of power-hungry regents. According to tradition, from the death of one Dalai Lama to the investiture of the next Dalai Lama as head of state (generally a period of some twenty years), the nation was ruled by a regent, who was responsible for discovering the new Dalai Lama and overseeing his education. If the Dalai Lama died before reaching his majority, the reign of the regent was extended. ¶ The thirteenth Dalai Lama, THUB BSTAN RGYA MTSHO, was an astute and forward-looking political leader who guided Tibet through a period of relative independence during a time of foreign entanglements with Britain, China, and Russia. In his last testament, he is said to have predicted Tibet's fall to Communist China. ¶ The fourteenth and present Dalai Lama, Bstan 'dzin rgya mtsho, assumed his position several years prior to reaching the age of majority as his country faced the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1950. In 1959, he escaped into exile, establishing a government-in-exile in the Himalayan town of Dharamsala (DHARMAsALA) in northwestern India. Since then, he has traveled and taught widely around the world, while also advocating a nonviolent solution to Tibet's occupation. He was born in the A mdo region of what is now Qinghai province in China to a farming family, although his older brother had already been recognized as an incarnation at a nearby important Dge lugs monastery (SKU 'BUM). On his becoming formally accepted as Dalai Lama, his family became aristocrats and moved to Lha sa. He was educated traditionally by private tutors (yongs 'dzin), under the direction first of the regent Stag brag rin po che (in office 1941-1950), and later Gling rin po che Thub bstan lung rtogs rnam rgyal (1903-1983) and Khri byang rin po che Blo bzang ye shes (1901-1981). His modern education was informal, gained from conversations with travelers, such as the Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer. When the Chinese army entered the Khams region of eastern Tibet in 1951, he formally took over from the regent and was enthroned as the head of the DGA' LDAN PHO BRANG government. In the face of Tibetan unrest as the Chinese government brought Tibet firmly under central control, the Dalai Lama fled to India in 1959; the Indian government accorded the Dalai Lama respect as a religious figure but did not accept his claim to be the head of a separate state. In 1989, the Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, an event that increased his prominence around the world. He is the author of many books in English, most of them the written record of lectures and traditional teachings translated from Tibetan.

The first root-race of the fourth round was by far the longest of its seven root-races, because within it were included advanced monads from the third round or life-wave on this globe, called sishtas (those left behind to serve as “seeds of life” for the returning life-wave in the succeeding round), and other forerunners, who preceded by millions of years the main aggregation of monads that formed the first root-race properly so called. The second root-race was not so long as the first, the third was considerably shorter, and so forth. We are now about halfway through the fifth root-race, and two-and-a-half root-races are still to come before the end of the fourth round on this globe. The fourth round contains the period of greatest materiality for the vehicles of the monad during the entire seven rounds, and during this middle round the ascent of the ladder of spiritual unfoldment begins. Although the “physical” conditions of the entire fourth round were denser than those of its predecessors, the early part of the fourth, which includes the first and second root-races and most of the third, was still quite ethereal and no material traces of man have been left for science to discover. In the fourth root-race, the earth itself became hard and dense.

The first three successors to Tsong-kha-pa as leaders of the Gelukpa school were his foremost disciples Gyel-tshab-je (Rgyal tshab rje), Khe-dub-je (Mkhas grub rje), and his nephew Gen-dun-dub (Dge ’dun grub). Gendundub, who founded the monastery of Tashi-Lhunpo and built up the Gelukpa order, was subsequently recognized as the first Dalai Lama. He was succeeded by Gen-dun Gya-tsho (Dge ’dun rgya mtsho), who was recognized as the reincarnation of Gendundub. Gendun Gyatsho was, in turn, succeeded by his reincarnation, Sonam Gyatsho (Bsod nams Rgya mstho). In 1578 Sonam Gyatsho received the patronage of Altan Khan, leader of the Tumed Mongols, who conferred on him the honorific title of Ta-le Lama, which was posthumously conferred on Sonam Gyatsho’s predecessors. From this time on the Gelukpas received Mongol patronage and spread their school among the Mongols — in fact, the fourth Dalai Lama was a great-grandson of Altan Khan. It was the fifth Dalai Lama who commissioned the building of the Potala palace and, with the aid of the Mongol leader Gushri Khan, established the Gelukpa order as the dominant power in Tibet and the Dalai Lama in Lhasa as the temporal ruler of the country.

The four yugas refer to any root-race, although indeed a root-race from its individual beginning to its individual ending is about double the length of the great yuga as set forth in the above chart. The racial yugas, however, overlap because each new great race is born at about the middle period of the parent race, although the individual length of any one race is as above stated. Thus it is that by the overlapping of the races, a race and its succeeding race may for a long time be contemporaneous on the face of the globe.

The globes of the earth-chain during their first round were in their first or elementary rupa stage, a condition entirely different from anything commonly known today. For during the first round — which followed upon three preliminary elemental rounds — one cosmic element was developed, namely that of fire. Manifested material fire as we know it had not appeared, but this first fire could be described as cool and luminous. Thus even the grossest globe (globe D), although formed into a sphere, was without solidity or other quality than a cold radiance. The other cosmic elements developed in similar fashion in succeeding rounds.

The hidden voice or active manifestation of the latent occult potency of the mantras is called vach. The would-be magician attempting to evoke the “spirits of the vasty deep” by uninstructed chanting or singing of any ancient mantras will never succeed in using the mantras effectively in a magical way, until he himself has become so cleansed of all human impurities as to be able at will and with inner vision to enter into communion if not direct confabulation with the inner realms.

The individualized life cycles in the rounds are associated with diversities in environment. Each round is a component part of a great serial order of evolution which may be summarized as the gradual descent of spirit into matter and the subsequent ascent. The first round, even on this globe, was highly spiritual and ethereal: the succeeding rounds are less so, until the middle of the fourth round is reached. After that axial period the process is reversed and by degrees the original state of ethereality is reassumed. A similar process takes place within each round, but on a minor scale — smaller cycles within a dominant one. The physical condition of the earth’s substance is modified in a corresponding way. The amazing modern discoveries of the nature of the atom, of its transmutations, and of the transformation of ‘matter’ into energy have removed any prima facie objections to such a process.

The Jews took over the name of the deity and in the Old Testament we find: “Behold there sat women weeping for Tammuz” (Ezek 8:14) — in Hebrew tammuz. “The women of Israel held annual lamentations over Adonis (that beautiful youth being identical with Tammuz). The feast held in his honour was solstitial, and began with the new moon, in the month of Tammuz (July), taking place chiefly at Byblos in Phoenicia; but it was also celebrated as late as the fourth century of our era at Bethlehem, . . . Indeed, in the Mysteries of Tammuz or Adonis a whole week was spent in lamentations and mourning. The funereal processions were succeeded by a fast, and later by rejoicings; for after the fast Adoni-Tammuz was regarded as raised from the dead, and wild orgies of joy, of eating and drinking, as now in Easter week, went on uninterruptedly for several days” (TG 318-9).

The jiva or prana of theosophy is not an immaterial spirit different from matter acting on a lifeless body; it is itself substantial, consisting in fact of streams of living beings, life-atoms; and so far from acting on something other than itself called the body, it actually composes the body. The minute analysis to which science is now able to subject physical matter has not succeeded in finding anything more rudimentary than living, moving fire, light, and electricity — in short, the ocean of jiva.

The mythos of Orpheus and Eurydice is a Mystery-story of the loss of the Word — Eurydice being a personification of the esoteric wisdom. The recovery of the Word is possible only to him who, during initiation, descends into the Underworld fully prepared, and who fulfills the inescapable conditions for return therefrom in possession of the Word, as was Orpheus through his marriage with Eurydice. Should he like Orpheus lose it — fail to bring Eurydice back with him — such loss brings inevitable death, or at least a rupture between the personal man and his higher spiritual nature, so that the personal man, unprotected by his spiritual nature, becomes the prey of remorse and of the lower terrestrial passions, the Bacchantes, and is finally slain by them. But this is not necessarily final failure, for in the next or in a succeeding life he may again begin his search for the Word, and if undaunted by obstacles, even by repeated failures, he continue in his search, he may and probably will ultimately find it.

Theogony [from Greek theogonia from theos god + gon generation] A genealogy of gods or divine beings, or a treatise on this, such as that of Hesiod; more generally, the philosophical science which traces the coming into being of any hierarchical universe by means of the succeeding hosts of divinities which, by manifesting themselves on various planes, produce the composite universe. A universe is in its origin and essence divine, built by and of the substance of the hierarchies of gods. It is the spiritual aspect of cosmogony or world-building.

The originating causes of sex are not rooted in the higher principles or elements of the human composite constitution. It is the effect of former thought-deposits, of emotional and mental tendencies and biases given way to in preceding lives on earth. The predominating and it may perhaps truly be said that the main cause of sex-change in incarnation is strong attraction to the opposite sex during the few — or in rare cases it may be a fairly large number — preceding lives on earth. This attraction, which is the instrumental cause of the tendencies and biases spoken of, arising out of thought and emotional energy, feminizes the life-atoms, or masculinizes them, as the individual case may be, and the natural consequence is incarnation in a body of the sex to which attraction leads. Thus a reincarnating ego may have several incarnations in bodies of one sex, and then incarnate in bodies of the opposite sex for a number of times in succeeding incarnations. How many times, therefore, a reincarnating ego may imbody in a male or a female body is not subject to any arbitrary rule but depends solely upon the karmic impulse laid aside in the treasury of psychomental experiences.

:::   "The perfect cosmic vision & cosmic sentiment is the cure of all error & suffering; but most men succeed only in enlarging the range of their ego.” Essays Divine and Human

“The perfect cosmic vision & cosmic sentiment is the cure of all error & suffering; but most men succeed only in enlarging the range of their ego.” Essays Divine and Human

The philosophy of Aristotle was continued after his death by other members of the Peripatetic school, the most important of whom were Theophrastus, Eudemus of Rhodes, and Strato of Lampsacus. In the Alexandrian Age, particularly after the editing of Aristotle's works by Andronicus of Rhodes (about 50 B.C.), Aristotelianism was the subject of numerous expositions and commentaries, such as those of Alexander of Aphrodisias, Themistius, John Philoponus, and Simplicius. With the closing of the philosophical schools in the sixth century the knowledge of Aristotle, except for fragments of the logical doctrine, almost disappeared in the west. It was preserved, however, by Arabian and Syrian scholars; from whom, with the revival of learning in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, it passed again to western Europe and became in Thomas Aquinas the philosophical basis of Christian theology. For the next few centuries the prestige of Aristotle was immense; he was "the philosopher," "the master of those who know." With the rise of modern science his authority has greatly declined. Yet Aristotelianism is still a force in modern thought: in Neo-Scholasticism; in recent psychology, whose behavioristic tendencies are in part a revival of Aristotelian modes of thought; in the various forms of vitalism in contemporary biology; in the dynamism of such thinkers as Bergson; and in the more catholic naturalism which has succeeded the mechanistic materialism of the last century, and which, whether by appeal to a doctrine of levels or by emphasis on immanent teleology, seems to be striving along Aristotelian lines for a conception of nature broad enough to include the religious, moral and artistic consciousness. Finally, a very large part of our technical vocabulary, both in science and in philosophy, is but the translation into modern tongues of the terms used by Aristotle, and carries with it, for better or worse, the distinctions worked out in his subtle mind. -- G.R.M.

The scheme of terrestrial evolution from the standpoint of the ancient wisdom given in The Secret Doctrine is, in a few words: the earth we see is the fourth of a sevenfold “chain” of globes which constitutes a single organism, as we may call it. The other six globes are not visible to our gross senses but the entire group is intimately connected. The vast stream of human monads circulates seven times round the earth planetary chain during the great cycle. We are now in the fourth circulation or round of the great pilgrimage on our globe and so this period is called the fourth round. While on our globe we pass through seven stages called “root-races,” each lasting for millions of years. Each in its turn is subdivided into smaller septenary sections. Each succeeding root-race is shorter than its predecessor, and there is some overlapping. Great geological changes separate each root-race from its successor and only a comparatively few survivors remain to provide the seed for the next root-race.

The smritis were a system of oral teaching, passing from one generation of recipients to the succeeding generation, as was the case with the Brahmanical books before they were imbodied in manuscript. The Smartava-Brahmanas are, for this reason, considered by many to be esoterically superior to the Srauta-Brahmanas. In its widest application, the smritis include the Vedangas, the Sutras, the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Puranas, the Dharma-sastras, especially the works of Manu, Yajnavalkya, and other inspired lawgivers, and the ethical writing or Niti-sastras; whereas the typical example of the sruti are the Vedas themselves considered as revelations.

“… the soul is at first but a spark and then a little flame of godhead burning in the midst of a great darkness; for the most part it is veiled in its inner sanctum and to reveal itself it has to call on the mind, the life-force and the physical consciousness and persuade them, as best they can, to express it; ordinarily, it succeeds at most in suffusing their outwardness with its inner light and modifying with its purifying fineness their dark obscurities or their coarser mixture. Even when there is a formed psychic being able to express itself with some directness in life, it is still in all but a few a smaller portion of the being—‘no bigger in the mass of the body than the thumb of a man’ was the image used by the ancient seers—and it is not always able to prevail against the obscurity or ignorant smallness of the physical consciousness, the mistaken surenesses of the mind or the arrogance and vehemence of the vital nature.” The Synthesis of Yoga

The Xisuthrus-Noah story has more than one application in now forgotten human history. In one, Xisuthrus is the ideal figure of a race passing over from one to the next succeeding continental system; or on the cosmic scale, of the transmigration of the various classes of monads with their chief from one dying planet to the succeeding planet, the child of the former. In the case of the earth, it is the transmigration of the ten or twelve classes of monads from the moon-chain to the earth-chain, the ark standing for the cosmic surroundings governed by karmic law and holding the monads together as classes. Xisuthrus or Noah, therefore, is the collectivity of all these monadic classes into a unity for purposes of mythologic story.

Thích Nhất Hạnh. (釋一行) (1926-). Internationally renowned Vietnamese monk and one of the principal propounders of "Engaged Buddhism." He was born in southern Vietnam, the son of a government bureaucrat. Nhát Hạnh entered a Buddhist monastery as a novice in 1942, where he studied with a Vietnamese Zen master, and received full ordination as a monk in 1949. His interests in philosophy, literature, and foreign languages led him to leave the Buddhist seminary to study at Saigon University. While teaching in a secondary school, he served as editor of the periodical "Vietnamese Buddhism," the organ of the Association of All Buddhists in Vietnam. In 1961, he went to the United States to study at Princeton University, returning to South Vietnam in December 1963 after the overthrow of the government of the Catholic president Ngô Đình Diem, which had actively persecuted Buddhists. The persecutions had led to widespread public protests that are remembered in the West through photographs of the self-immolation of Buddhist monks. Nhát Hạnh worked to found the Unified Buddhist Church and the Institute of Higher Buddhist Studies, which later became Vạn Hạnh University. He devoted much of his time to the School of Youth for Social Service, which he founded and of which he was the director. The school's activities included sending teams of young people to the countryside to offer various forms of social assistance to the people. He also founded a new Buddhist sect (the Order of Interbeing), and helped establish a publishing house, all of which promoted what he called Engaged Buddhism. A collection of his pacifist poetry was banned by the governments of both North and South Vietnam. While engaging in nonviolent resistance to the Vietnam War, he also sought to aid its victims. In 1966, Nhát Hạnh promulgated a five-point peace plan while on an international lecture tour, during which he met with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (who would later nominate him for the Nobel Peace Prize) and Thomas Merton in the United States, addressed the House of Commons in Britain, and had an audience with Pope Paul VI in Rome. The book that resulted from his lecture tour, Vietnam: Lotus in a Sea of Fire, was banned by the South Vietnamese government. Fearing that he would be arrested or assassinated if he returned to Vietnam after the lecture tour, his supporters urged him to remain abroad and he has lived in exile ever since, residing primarily in France. He founded a center called Plum Village in southern France, whence he has sought to assist Vietnamese refugees and political prisoners and to teach Engaged Buddhism to large audiences in Europe and the Americas. A prolific writer, he has published scores of books on general, nonsectarian Buddhist teachings and practices, some of which have become bestsellers. He has made numerous trips abroad to teach and lead meditation retreats. In his teachings, Nhát Hạnh calls for a clear recognition and analysis of suffering, identifying its causes, and then working to relieve present suffering and prevent future suffering through nonviolent action. Such action in bringing peace can only truly succeed when the actor is at peace or, in his words, is "being peace."

this and the succeeding canto, Dore provided wood

This condition of human consciousness differs from the devachanic state. As used above, akasic samadhi was applied to those individuals dying by accident who on earth had been of unusually pure character and life. It is a temporary condition, equivalent to an automatic reproduction in the victim’s consciousness of the beautiful and holy thoughts that the person had had during incarnated life; in fact, a sort of preliminary to the devachanic state. Such dream state immediately succeeds the first condition of absolute unconsciousness which the shock of death brings to all human beings, good, bad, or indifferent. In the above cases there is no conscious kama-lokic experience whatsoever, because the shock of death has brought about the paralysis of all the lower parts of the human constitution. Only adumbrations of the consciousness of the buddhi and atman, with the most spiritual portion of manas are then active (ML 131). In certain cases the condition of samadhi in the akasic portions of the human constitution may last until what would have been the natural life term on earth is completed; and then these individuals glide into the devachanic state.

This great system is worthy of being enumerated among the outpourings of the ancient wisdom and may be said to have been the religion of the Roman world under the early empire. Even Christian sectarianism admits that paganism reached one of its great heights of ethical idealism under the Stoics; and it has reverberated in wave after wave through succeeding ages down to the transcendentalism and “new thought” of our times.

Thumb "processor" An extension to the {Advanced RISC Machine} architecture, announced on 06 March 1995 by {Advanced RISC Machines} Ltd. By identifying the critical subset of the ARM {instruction set} and encoding it into 16 bits, ARM has succeeded in reducing typical program size by 30-40% from ARM's already excellent code density. Since this Thumb instruction set uses less memory for program storage, cost is further reduced. All Thumb-aware {processor cores} combine the capability to execute both the 32-bit ARM and the 16-bit Thumb instruction sets. Careful design of the Thumb instructions allow them to be decompressed into full ARM instructions transparently during normal instruction decoding without any performance penalty. This differs from other 32-bit processors, like the {Intel 486SX}, with a 16-bit data bus, which require two 16-bit memory accesses to execute every 32-bit instruction and so halve performance. The patented Thumb decompressor has been carefully designed with only a small amount of circuitry additional to the existing instruction decoder, so chip size and thus cost do not significantly increase. Designers can easily interleave fast ARM instructions (for performance critical parts of a program) with compact Thumb code to save memory. (1995-03-14)

Tiantai zong. (J. Tendaishu; K. Ch'ont'ae chong 天台宗). In Chinese, "Terrace of Heaven School"; one of the main schools of East Asian Buddhism; also sometimes called the "Lotus school" (C. Lianhua zong), because of its emphasis on the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"). "Terrace of Heaven" is a toponym for the school's headquarters on Mt. Tiantai in present-day Zhejiang province on China's eastern seaboard. Although the school retrospectively traces its origins back to Huiwen (fl. 550-577) and NANYUE HUISI (515-577), whom the school honors as its first and second patriarchs, respectively, the de facto founder was TIANTAI ZHIYI (538-597), who created the comprehensive system of Buddhist teachings and practices that we now call Tiantai. Zhiyi advocated the three truths or judgments (SANDI): (1) the truth of emptiness (kongdi), viz., all things are devoid of inherent existence and are empty in their essential nature; (2) the truth of being provisionally real (jiadi), viz., all things are products of a causal process that gives them a derived reality; and (3) the truth of the mean (zhongdi), viz., all things, in their absolute reality, are neither real nor unreal, but simply thus. Zhiyi described reality in terms of YINIAN SANQIAN (a single thought contains the TRICHILIOCOSM [TRISĀHASRAMAHĀSĀHASRALOKADHĀTU]), which posits that any given thought-moment perfectly encompasses the entirety of reality; at the same time, every phenomenon includes all other phenomena (XINGJU SHUO), viz., both the good and evil aspects of the ten constituents (DHĀTU) or the five sense organs (INDRIYA) and their respective objects and the three realms of existence (TRAIDHĀTUKA) are all contained in the original nature of all sentient beings. Based on this perspective on reality, Zhiyi made unique claims about the buddha-nature (FOXING) and contemplation (GUAN): he argued that not only buddhas but even sentient beings in such baleful existences as animals, hungry ghosts, and hell denizens, possess the capacity to achieve buddhahood; by the same token, buddhas also inherently possess all aspects of the unenlightened three realms of existence. The objects of contemplation, therefore, should be the myriad of phenomena, which are the source of defilement, not an underlying pure mind. Zhiyi's grand synthesis of Buddhist thought and practice is built around a graduated system of calmness and insight (jianzi ZHIGUAN; cf. sAMATHA and VIPAsYANĀ), which organized the plethora of Buddhist meditative techniques into a broad, overarching soteriological system. To Zhiyi is also attributed the Tiantai system of doctrinal classification (panjiao; see JIAOXIANG PANSHI) called WUSHI BAJIAO (five periods and eight teachings), which the Koryo Korean monk CH'EGWAN (d. 970) later elaborated in its definitive form in his CH'oNT'AE SAGYO ŬI (C. Tiantai sijiao yi). This system classifies all Buddhist teachings according to the five chronological periods, four types of content, and four modes of conversion. Zhiyi was succeeded by Guanding (561-632), who compiled his teacher's works, especially his three masterpieces, the FAHUA XUANYI, the FAHUA WENJU, and the MOHE ZHIGUAN. The Tiantai school declined during the Tang dynasty, overshadowed by the newer HUAYAN and CHAN schools. The ninth patriarch JINGXI ZHANRAN (711-782) was instrumental in rejuvenating the school; he asserted the superiority of the Tiantai school over the rival Huayan school by adapting Huayan concepts and terminologies into the tradition. Koryo monks such as Ch'egwan and Ŭit'ong (927-988) played major roles in the restoration of the school by helping to repatriate lost Tiantai texts back to China. During the Northern Song period, Wu'en (912-988), Yuanqing (d. 997), Zhiyuan (976-1022), and their disciples, who were later pejoratively called the SHANWAI (Off-Mountain) faction by their opponents, led the resurgence of the tradition by incorporating Huayan concepts in the school's thought and practice: they argued that since the true mind, which is pure in its essence, produces all phenomena in accord with conditions, practitioners should contemplate the true mind, rather than all phenomena. Believing this idea to be a threat to the tradition, SIMING ZHILI (960-1028) and his disciples, who called themselves SHANJIA (On-Mountain), criticized such a concept of pure mind as involving a principle of separateness, since it includes only the pure and excludes the impure, and led a campaign to expunge the Huayan elements that they felt were displacing authentic Tiantai doctrine. Although Renyue (992-1064) and Congyi (1042-1091), who were later branded as the "Later Off-Mountain Faction," criticized Zhili and accepted some of the Shanwai arguments, the Shanjia faction eventually prevailed and legitimized Zhili's positions. The orthodoxy of Zhili's position is demonstrated in the FOZU TONGJI ("Comprehensive History of the Buddhas and Patriarchs"), where the compiler Zhipan (1220-1275), himself a Tiantai monk, lists Zhili as the last patriarch in the dharma transmission going back to the Buddha. Tiantai theories and practices were extremely influential in the development of the thought and practice of the Chan and PURE LAND schools; this influence is especially noticeable in the white-lotus retreat societies (JIESHE; see also BAILIAN SHE) organized during the Song dynasty by such Tiantai monks as Zhili and Zunshi (964-1032) and in Koryo Korea (see infra). After the Song dynasty, the school declined again, and never recovered its previous popularity. ¶ Tiantai teachings and practices were transmitted to Korea during the Three Kingdoms period through such Korean monks as Hyon'gwang (fl. sixth century) and Yon'gwang (fl. sixth century), both of whom traveled to China and studied under Chinese Tiantai teachers. It was not until several centuries later, however, that a Korean analogue of the Chinese Tiantai school was established as an independent Buddhist school. The foundation of the Korean CH'oNT'AE CHONG is traditionally assumed to have occurred in 1097 through the efforts of the Koryo monk ŬICH'oN (1055-1101). Ŭich'on was originally a Hwaom monk, but he sought to use the Ch'ont'ae tradition in order to reconcile the age-old tension in Korean Buddhism between KYO (Doctrine) and SoN (Meditation). In the early thirteenth century, the Ch'ont'ae monk WoNMYO YOSE (1163-1245) organized the white lotus society (PAENGNYoN KYoLSA), which gained great popularity especially among the common people; following Yose, the school was led by Ch'on'in (1205-1248) and CH'oNCH'AEK (b. 1206). Although the Ch'ont'ae monk Chogu (d. 1395) was appointed as a state preceptor (K. kuksa; C. GUOSHI) in the early Choson period, the Ch'ont'ae school declined and eventually died out later in the Choson dynasty. The contemporary Ch'ont'ae chong is a modern Korean order established in 1966 that has no direct relationship to the school founded by Ŭich'on. ¶ In Japan, SAICHo (767-822) is credited with founding the Japanese TENDAISHu, which blends Tiantai and tantric Buddhist elements. After Saicho, such Tendai monks as ENNIN (793-864), ENCHIN (814-891), and ANNEN (b. 841) systematized Tendai doctrines and developed its unique forms, which are often called TAIMITSU (Tendai esoteric teachings). Since the early ninth century, when the court granted the Tendai school official recognition as an independent sect, Tendai became one of the major Buddhist schools in Japan and enjoyed royal and aristocratic patronage for several centuries. The Tendai school's headquarters on HIEIZAN became an important Japanese center of Buddhist learning: the founders of the so-called new Buddhist schools of the Kamakura era, such as HoNEN (1133-1212), SHINRAN (1173-1263), NICHIREN (1222-1282), and DoGEN KIGEN (1200-1253), all first studied on Mt. Hiei as Tendai monks. Although the Tendai school has lost popularity and patrons to the ZENSHu, PURE LAND, and NICHIRENSHu schools, it remains still today an active force on the Japanese Buddhist landscape.

Tiryns A city in Argolis, belonging to the Achaean age, said to have been founded by Proetus, brother of Acrisius, who was succeeded by Perseus; and the scene of the early life of Heracles. The site was excavated by Schliemann and Dorpfeld, and an ancient palace discovered. The walls, together with cyclopean masonry in other places, were constructed under the guidance of very late Atlantean initiates, who colonized parts of Europe when it had begun to arise from under the waters of the Atlantic, and when their own vast continental system had largely disappeared. Actually, it may be that the builders of the so-called cyclopean stonework or masonry structures in Greece, Italy, and Asia Minor, and perhaps elsewhere, were immigrants from Plato’s Atlantis or Poseidonis, as related in the Timaeus, and referred to by other Greek and Roman writers.

Toshodaiji. (唐招提寺). In Japanese, "Monastery for a Tang Wanderer"; located in the ancient Japanese capital of Nara and the head monastery of the VINAYA school (J. Risshu). Toshodaiji was originally a residence for Prince Niitabe, who donated it to the Tang-Chinese monk GANJIN (C. Jianzhen; 688-763), the founder of the vinaya school (RISSHu) in Japan. Ganjin came to Japan in 759 at the invitation of two Japanese monks who had studied with him in China at his home monastery of Damingsi (J. Daimyoji) in present-day Yangzhou. Ganjin tried to reach Japan five times before finally succeeding; then sixty-six and blind, he established an ordination platform at ToDAIJI before moving to Toshodaiji, where he passed away in 763. The monastery's name thus refers to Ganjin, a "wandering monk from Tang." The kondo, the golden hall that is the monastery's main shrine, was erected after Ganjin's death and finished around 781, followed three decades later by the monastery's five-story pagoda, which was finished in 810. The kondo is one of the few Nara-period temple structures that has survived and is one of the reasons why the monastery is so prized. It was built in the Yosemune style, with a colonnade with eight pillars, and enshrines three main images: the cosmic buddha VAIROCANA at the center, flanked by BHAIsAJYAGURU, and a thousand-armed AVALOKITEsVARA (see SĀHASRABHUJASĀHASRANETRĀVALOKITEsVARA), only 953 of which remain today, with images of BRAHMĀ and INDRA at the sides and statues of the four heavenly king protectors of Buddhism standing in each corner. The kodo, or lecture hall, was moved to the monastery from Heijo Palace and is the only extant structure that captures the style of a Tenpyo palace; it houses a statue of the bodhisattva MAITREYA. A kyozo, or SuTRA repository, holds the old library. The monastery also includes a treasure repository, a bell tower, and an ordination platform in the lotus pond. In 763, as Ganjin's death neared, he had a memorial statue of himself made and installed in his quarters at Toshodaiji. This dry-lacquer statue of a meditating Ganjin is enshrined today in the mieido (image hall), but is brought out for display only on his memorial days of June 5-7 each year; it is the oldest example in Japan of such a memorial statue. Toshodaiji was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1998.

traverse ::: a. --> Lying across; being in a direction across something else; as, paths cut with traverse trenches.
Anything that traverses, or crosses.
Something that thwarts, crosses, or obstructs; a cross accident; as, he would have succeeded, had it not been for unlucky traverses not under his control.
A barrier, sliding door, movable screen, curtain, or the like.


trill ::: v. i. --> To flow in a small stream, or in drops rapidly succeeding each other; to trickle.
To utter trills or a trill; to play or sing in tremulous vibrations of sound; to have a trembling sound; to quaver. ::: v. t. --> To turn round; to twirl.


trisiksā. (P. tisikkhā; T. bslab pa gsum; C. sanxue; J. sangaku; K. samhak 三學). In Sanskrit, the "three trainings"; three overarching categories of Buddhist practice. First is the training in higher morality (ADHIsĪLAsIKsĀ), which encompasses all forms of restraint of body and speech, including lay and monastic precepts that serve as the foundation for the cultivation of the succeeding stages of concentration and wisdom. Second is the training in higher concentration (ADHISAMĀDHIsIKsĀ, also called adhicitta), which encompasses all forms of meditative practice directed toward the achievement of states of concentration. Third is the training in higher wisdom (ADHIPRAJNĀsIKsĀ), which includes all forms study and reflection that are directed toward developing insight into the true nature of reality. These three trainings are said to subsume all of the constituents of the noble eightfold path (ĀRYĀstĀnGAMĀRGA): adhiprajNāsiksā comprises the first two constituents, viz., right views (SAMYAGDṚstI) and right intention (SAMYAKSAMKALPA); adhisīlasiksā, the middle three constituents, viz., right speech (SAMYAGVĀC), right action (SAMYAKKARMĀNTA), and right livelihood (SAMYAGĀJĪVA); and adhisamādhisiksā, the last three constituents, viz., right effort (SAMYAGVYĀYĀMA), right mindfulness (SAMYAKSMṚTI), and right concentration (SAMYAKSAMĀDHI).

Troll (Scandinavian) In common usage, an evil gnome or spirit depicted in stories as an ugly and dangerous sprite. As a prefix, used in Scandinavian tongues to denote magical or extrasensory means (e.g., trollkonst magic art, trollkaring old woman, hag, who practices magic arts). In this context it has come to mean almost exclusively an evil influence but there remain tales where a troll is seen as a model of gratitude and faithfulness. This may be a case where the spiritual influences of one culture become regarded by succeeding peoples as demonic. It is also possible that the trolls exemplified less evolved characteristics which become the faithful servants of him who overcomes these weaknesses in himself.

Tsi'u dmar po. (Tsi'u Marpo). The DHARMAPĀLA of BSAM YAS monastery; he succeeded PE HAR when the later moved to GNAS CHUNG outside of LHA SA. Tsi'u dmar is the leader of the BSTAN class of Tibetan spirits. His medium traditionally resided in the Tsi'u dmar lcog dbug khang at BSAM YAS, where each year the Lha sa glud 'gong would arrive bearing all the negative fortune of the city. Inside, Tsi'u dmar was said to sit in judgment of the dead, chopping up their spirits with such frequency that each year the chopping block would need to be replaced. According to legend, the deity Dza sa dmar po, the spirit of a nobleman who died of an illness caused by the Bsam yas protector, once defeated Tsi'u dmar, forcing the god to abandon his seat at Bsam yas. Dza sa dmar po later voluntarily left when he discovered he was unable to shoulder the burden of Tsi'u dmar po's helmet, and hence the responsibility of guarding Bsam yas; having established peaceful relations with the dharmapāla, he was installed by the monks at Bsam yas in his own protector temple at the monastery. In memory of the conflict, the mediums of Tsi'u dmar po begin their trance by thrusting their swords in the direction of Dza sa dmar po's temple.

 Tzadik (&

ulterior ::: a. --> Situated beyond, or on the farther side; thither; -- correlative with hither.
Further; remoter; more distant; succeeding; as, ulterior demands or propositions; ulterior views; what ulterior measures will be adopted is uncertain. ::: n.


unsucceedable ::: a. --> Not able or likely to succeed.

unification ::: (programming) The generalisation of pattern matching that is the logic programming equivalent of instantiation in logic. When two terms are to be pair of sub-terms is unified recursively and the unification succeeds if all the sub-terms unify.The result of unification is either failure or success with a set of variable bindings, known as a unifier. There may be many such unifiers for any pair of simply add extra bindings for sub-terms which are variables in the original terms. (1995-12-14)

unification "programming" The generalisation of {pattern matching} that is the {logic programming} equivalent of {instantiation} in {logic}. When two {terms} are to be unified, they are compared. If they are both constants then the result of unification is success if they are equal else failure. If one is a variable then it is bound to the other, which may be any term (which satisfies an "{occurs check}"), and the unification succeeds. If both terms are structures then each pair of sub-terms is unified {recursive}ly and the unification succeeds if all the sub-terms unify. The result of unification is either failure or success with a set of variable bindings, known as a "{unifier}". There may be many such unifiers for any pair of terms but there will be at most one "{most general unifier}", other unifiers simply add extra bindings for sub-terms which are variables in the original terms. (1995-12-14)

Unified Modeling Language "language" (UML) A non-proprietary, third generation {modelling language}. The Unified Modeling Language is an open method used to specify, visualise, construct and document the artifacts of an {object-oriented} software-intensive system under development. The UML represents a compilation of "best engineering practices" which have proven successful in modelling large, complex systems. UML succeeds the concepts of {Booch}, {OMT} and {OOSE} by fusing them into a single, common and widely usable modelling language. UML aims to be a standard modelling language which can model {concurrent} and distributed systems. UML is not an {industry standard}, but is taking shape under the auspices of the {Object Management Group} (OMG). OMG has called for information on object-oriented methodologies, that might create a rigorous software modelling language. Many industry leaders have responded in earnest to help create the standard. See also: {STP}, {IDE}. {OMG UML Home (http://uml.org/)}. {Rational UML Resource Center (http://rational.com/uml/index.jsp)}. (2002-01-03)

Unified Modeling Language ::: (language) (UML) A non-proprietary, third generation modelling language. The Unified Modeling Language is an open method used to specify, visualise, system under development. The UML represents a compilation of best engineering practices which have proven successful in modelling large, complex systems.UML succeeds the concepts of Booch, OMT and OOSE by fusing them into a single, common and widely usable modelling language. UML aims to be a standard modelling language which can model concurrent and distributed systems.UML is not an industry standard, but is taking shape under the auspices of the Object Management Group (OMG). OMG has called for information on object-oriented methodologies, that might create a rigorous software modelling language. Many industry leaders have responded in earnest to help create the standard.See also: STP, IDE. . .(2002-01-03)

Upagupta. (T. Nyer sbas; C. Youpojuduo; J. Ubakikuta; K. Ubagukta 優婆毱多). An Indian ARHAT, said to have lived in the MATHURĀ region of India. Upagupta is unknown in Pāli canonical sources but appears frequently in the Sanskrit AVADĀNA literature, especially the AsOKĀVADĀNA and the DIVYĀVADĀNA. Upagupta is famed for having tamed (and in some versions, converted) MĀRA by placing a garland of corpses around his neck. Upagupta was later invited to PĀtALIPUTRA by King AsOKA, and then conducted the monarch on a tour of the sacred sites (MAHĀSTHĀNA) associated with the life of the Buddha. The cult of Upagupta became popular in Southeast Asian Buddhist countries from the twelfth century onward, thanks to his prominent appearance in Sanskrit materials, and he eventually comes to be featured in noncanonical Pāli materials as well. Upagupta occupies pride of place in Burmese (Myanmar) Buddhism, where he is presumed to reside in a pavilion in the southern ocean, whence he is invited to rituals to protect the Burmese from Māra's interference. At the conclusion of the ceremonies, an image of Upagupta is placed on a raft and floated downstream. Upagupta is listed in SARVĀSTIVĀDA sources as the fifth of the Indian patriarchs who are said to have succeeded the Buddha as head of the SAMGHA, following MAHĀKĀsYAPA, ĀNANDA, MADHYĀNTIKA, and sĀnAKAVĀSIN; the East Asian CHAN tradition typically lists him instead as the fourth patriarch. According to a Chinese account of the origins of the VINAYA, Upagupta had five major disciples who were said to have established their own schools based on their differing views regarding doctrine; these five also redacted separate editions of the vinaya, which the Chinese refer to as the "five vinaya recensions" (wubu lü).

Vallabhacharya was born in the forest of Champaranya in 1479. At an early age he began traveling to propagate his doctrines, and at the court of Krishna-deva, king of Vijaya-nagara, succeeded so well in his controversies with the Saivas, according to the reports of his followers, that many Vaishnavas chose him as their chief. He then went to other parts of India, and finally settled at Benares, where he composed 17 works, the most important of which were commentaries on the Vedanta- and Mimansa-Sutras and another on the Bhagavata-Purana, on which this sect seems in the main to base their doctrines. He left 84 disciples. He taught a non-ascetic view of religion and deprecated all self-mortification as dishonoring the body which contained a portion of the supreme spirit. His emphasis on human affections and emotions seems at times to fringe closely the frontiers of licentiousness.

VEGETABLE MONAD The monad during its evolution in the vegetable kingdom is called vegetable monad.

When the mineral monads have succeeded in acquiring physical etheric consciousness, they pass to the vegetable kingdom. Consciousness first manifests itself as a tendency to repetition, becoming a tendency to organized habit, or &


Visvamitra (Sanskrit) Viśvāmitra Friend of all; a celebrated rishi (sage), famed for his contests with the sage Vasishtha. By birth a Kshattriya of the lineage of Pururavas of the lunar dynasty, he was employed at the court of Raja Sudas of the Tritsus, as was Vasishtha. Visvamitra was constantly worsted in his struggles for supremacy over the great Brahmin Vasishtha, and determined to elevate himself to the rank of a Brahmin, which he succeeded in doing after many strenuous austerities. Many verses of the Rig-Veda are said to have been written by him, and he is also credited with authorship of a law book.

Wumen Huikai. (J. Mumon Ekai; K. Mumun Hyegae 無門慧開) (1183-1260). In Chinese, "Gateless, Opening of Wisdom"; CHAN master in the LINJI ZONG; author of the eponymous WUMEN GUAN ("Gateless Checkpoint"), one of the two most important collections of Chan GONG'AN (J. koan; K. kongan). A native of Hangzhou prefecture in present-day Zhejiang province, Huikai was ordained by the monk "One Finger" Tianlong (d.u.), who also hailed from Hangzhou (see also YIZHI CHAN). Wumen later went to the monastery of Wanshousi in Jiangsu province to study with Yuelin Shiguan (1143-1217), from whom Huikai received the WU GONG'AN of ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN; Huikai is said to have struggled with this gong'an for six years. In 1218, Huikai traveled to Baoyinsi on Mt. Anji, where he succeeded Yuelin as abbot. He subsequently served as abbot at such monasteries as TIANNINGSI, Pujisi, Kaiyuansi, and Baoningsi. In 1246, Huikai was appointed as abbot of Huguo Renwangsi in Hangzhou prefecture, and it is here that the Japanese ZEN monk SHINICHI KAKUSHIN studied under him. Emperor Lizong (r. 1224-1264) invited Huikai to provide a sermon at the Pavilion of Mysterious Virtue in the imperial palace and also to pray for rain. In honor of his achievements, the emperor bestowed upon him a golden robe and the title Chan master Foyan (Dharma Eye).

Wuxue Zuyuan. (J. Mugaku Sogen; K. Muhak Chowon 無學祖元) (1226-1286). Chinese CHAN master in the LINJI ZONG, who was the founder of the influential monastery of ENGAKUJI in Kamakura, Japan; also known as Ziyuan. On the advice of his brother, Wuxue entered the Chinese monastery of Jingcisi, where he was ordained by Beijian Jujian (1164-1246). Wuxue later became the student of the Linji Chan master WUZHUN SHIFAN (1178-1249) and received his seal of transmission (YINKE). Wuxue also studied under XUTANG ZHIYU (1185-1269) and Wuchu Daguan (1201-1268) and spent the next few decades residing at various monasteries in Zhejiang prefecture. In 1275, Wuxue left for Nengrensi to avoid the invading Mongol troops of the Yuan dynasty. In 1279, at the invitation of Hojo Tokimune (1251-1284), the eighth regent of the Kamakura shogunate, Wuxue reluctantly left China for Japan. Upon his arrival in Kamakura, Wuxue was appointed abbot of KENCHoJI, succeeding the third abbot LANXI DAOLONG. In 1282, Tokimune established Engakuji to commemorate the defeat of the invading Mongol troops and installed Wuxue as its founding abbot (J. kaisan; C. KAISHAN). Serving as administrator of the two most powerful Buddhist institutions in Japan at the time, Wuxue established a firm foundation for the success of the RINZAISHu in Japan. Wuxue was given the posthumous title state preceptor (J. kokushi, C. GUOSHI) Bukko (Buddha Radiance). His students included Japan's first female Zen master, MUGAI NYODAI (1223-1298), and KoHo KENNICHI (1241-1316), the son of Emperor Gosaga (r. 1242-1246) and the teacher of MUSo SOSEKI. Wuxue's teachings appear in his Bukko kokushi goroku.

Wuzhun Shifan. (J. Bujun Shihan/Bushun Shiban/Mujun Shihan; K. Mujun Sabom 無準師範) (1178-1249). Chinese CHAN master in the LINJI ZONG. After his ordination in the winter of 1194, Wuzhun studied under a series of famed Chan masters, including FOZHAO DEGUANG and Po'an Zuxian. Wuzhun eventually attained awakening under Po'an and succeeded his lineage. During his illustrious career at such important monasteries as WANSHOUSI on Mt. Jing, Wuzhun also taught the Japanese pilgrims Hoshin (d.u.), Doyu (1201-1258), and the famed ENNI BEN'EN, who is now regarded as the first exponent of ZEN in Japan. Wuzhun was later summoned by Emperor Lizong (r. 1224-1264) to provide a public lecture at the Pavilion of Benevolent Illumination in the imperial palace. The emperor later bestowed upon him the title Chan master Fojian (Buddha Mirror). Wuzhun left many famous disciples such as WUXUE ZUYUAN and Mu'an Puning, both of whom went to Kamakura in Japan and served as abbots of the powerful monastery of KENCHoJI.

Yakushiji. (藥師寺). In Japanese, "Medicine Buddha Monastery." One of the seven great monasteries of Nara, Japan. Yakushiji is currently the headquarters (daihonzan) of the Hosso (C. FAXIANG ZONG) tradition. In 680, Emperor Tenmu (r. 673-686) ordered the construction of a statue of the Medicine Buddha (BHAIsAJYAGURU) and a new monastery to pray for the recovery of his ill consort, who later succeeded him as Empress Jito (r. 687-697). Due to the emperor's death and the lack of sufficient funds, construction began under Empress Jito's reign in the old capital of Fujiwarakyo in present-day Kashihara city. Construction was completed in 697, but the monastery was physically relocated to the new capital Heijokyo in 718 after the transfer of the capital in 710. The monastery originally consisted of two pagodas to the east and the west flanking a central golden hall (kondo) and a lecture hall (kodo) behind it. After a great fire in 973, only the pagodas and the golden hall remained. The hall collapsed during a typhoon in 1445 and the west pagoda was lost to fire during a war in 1528. Reconstruction of the monastery took place during most of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The golden hall houses the famed Medicine Buddha triad from the Hakuho period (645-710), now designated a national treasure.

Yellow-faced Used in an archaic commentary on the Book of Dzyan (SD 2:427-8), referring to people on Atlantis, the continent of the fourth root-race, who remained true to their teachers, in contradistinction to the Black-faced — those who followed their sorcerer-leaders in practices of black magic — who were engulfed in the cataclysm which submerged Atlantis. The Yellow-faced, the ancestors of the succeeding fifth root-race, were led to safety by their teachers, the Sons of Wisdom. Thus the fifth root-race — sometimes referred to as Aryans because the Aryan Hindus are the descendants of the first subrace of the fifth root-race — are said to be the descendants of “the yellow Adams, the gigantic and highly civilized Atlanto-Aryan race”; “they ‘of the yellow hue’ are the forefathers of those whom Ethnology now classes as the Turanians, the Mongols, Chinese and other ancient nations; and the land they fled to was no other than Central Asia. There entire new races were born; there they lived and died until the separation of the nations. . . . Nearly two-thirds of one million years have elapsed since that period” (SD 2:426, 425).

YMODEM ::: A file transfer protocol used between modems. YMODEM was developed by Chuck Forsberg as the successor to XMODEM and was itself succeeded by ZMODEM. XMODEM used 128-byte packets, YMODEM can also use 1 kilobyte packets. Whereas YMODEM is a batch protocol, YMODEM-G is a non-stop version.File sizes are included in the YMODEM header when sending both binary and text files. Thus files transferred via YMODEM should preserve their exact length. File modification times may also be present in the YMODEM header.YModem can fall back to smaller packets when necessary but there is no backward compatibility with XModem's error detection.[Chuck Forsberg, XMODEM/YMODEM Protocol Reference]. (1995-02-02)

YMODEM A file transfer {protocol} used between {modems}. YMODEM was developed by Chuck Forsberg as the successor to {XMODEM} and was itself succeeded by {ZMODEM}. XMODEM used 128-byte {packets}, YMODEM can also use 1 kilobyte packets. Whereas YMODEM is a batch protocol, {YMODEM-G} is a non-stop version. File sizes are included in the YMODEM header when sending both binary and text files. Thus files transferred via YMODEM should preserve their exact length. File modification times may also be present in the YMODEM header. YModem can {fall back} to smaller packets when necessary but there is no backward compatibility with XModem's error detection. [Chuck Forsberg, "XMODEM/YMODEM Protocol Reference"]. (1995-02-02)

Yoav Operation ::: Ignoring the provisions of the second truce, the Egyptians denied Jewish convoys passage through the Hatta-Karatiya gap in their line. In addition, they captured positions beyond the truce demarcation lines and attacked several IDF posts that covered the pass. Following an Egyptian raid on inter-kibbutz communications routes and the firing on an Israeli convoy on October 15, the Israel Army and Air force took the offensive and launched Operation “Yoav.” In seven days they succeeded in opening the road to the Negev and capturing its capital, Beersheba.

youth ::: pl. --> of Youth ::: n. --> The quality or state of being young; youthfulness; juvenility.
The part of life that succeeds to childhood; the period of existence preceding maturity or age; the whole early part of life, from


Yuga(Sanskrit) ::: A word meaning an "age," a period of time. A yuga is a period of mundane time, and four ofthese periods are usually enumerated in "divine years":1. Krita or Satya Yuga. . . . 4,000Sandhya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400Sandhyamsa. . . . . . . . . . . . . 400Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,8002. Treta Yuga. . . . . . . . . . . 3,000Sandhya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300Sandhyamsa. . . . . . . . . . . . . 300Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,6003. Dvapara Yuga. . . . . . . . 2,000Sandhya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200Sandhyamsa. . . . . . . . . . . . . 200Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,4004. Kali Yuga. . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000Sandhya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100Sandhyamsa. . . . . . . . . . . . . 100Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,200TOTAL . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .12,000This rendered in years of mortals equals:4,800 x 360 = 1,728,0003,600 x 360 = 1,296,0002,400 x 360 = 864,0001,200 x 360 = 432,000. . . . . .Total 4,320,000Of these four yugas, our present racial period is the fourth or kali yuga, often called the "iron age" or the"black age." It is stated to have commenced at the moment of Krishna's death, usually given as 3,102years before the Christian era. There is a very important point of the teaching in connection with theyugas which must not be forgotten. It is the following: The four yugas as above outlined refer to whatmodern theosophical philosophy calls a root-race, although indeed a root-race from its individualbeginning to its individual ending is about double the length of the composite yuga above set forth incolumnar form. The racial yugas, however, overlap because each new great race is born at about themiddle period of the parent race, although the individual length of any one race is as above stated. Thus itis that by the overlapping of the races, a race and its succeeding race may for a long time becontemporaneous on the face of the globe.As the four yugas are a reflection in human history of what takes place in the evolution of the earth itselfand of the planetary chain, therefore the same scheme of yugas applies also on a cosmic scale -- thereexist the four series of satya yuga, treta yuga, dvapara yuga, and kali yuga, in the evolution of the earth,and on a still larger scale in the evolution of a planetary chain. Of course these cosmic yugas are verymuch longer than the racial yugas, but the same general scheme of 4, 3, 2 applies throughout. For furtherdetails of the teaching concerning the yugas, the student should consult H. P. Blavatsky's The SecretDoctrine, and the work by the present author, Fundamentals of the Esoteric Philosophy.

Yunmen Wenyan. ( J. Unmon Bun'en; K. Unmun Munon 雲門文偃) (864-949). Chinese CHAN monk and founder of the YUNMEN ZONG, one of the so-called five houses and seven schools (WU JIA QI ZONG) of the classical Chinese Chan tradition. Yunmen was a native of Jiaxing in present-day Zhejiang province. He was ordained at the age of sixteen by the VINAYA master Zhideng (d.u.) of the monastery Kongwangsi and two years later received the full monastic precepts at the precept platform in Piling (present-day Jiangsu province). After his full ordination, Yunmen returned to Kongwangsi and studied the DHARMAGUPTAKA vinaya (SIFEN LÜ) under Zhideng. Later, Yunmen visited Muzhou Daoming (d.u.), a prominent disciple of the eminent Chan master HUANGBO XIYUN, and continued his studies of Chan under XUEFENG YICUN. Yunmen eventually became Xuefeng's disciple and inherited his lineage. Taking his leave of Xuefeng, Yunmen continued to visit other Chan masters throughout the country, and in 911 he visited the funerary STuPA of the sixth patriarch (LIUZU) HUINENG on CAOXISHAN. Yunmen then visited Lingshu Rumin (d. 918), a famed disciple of the Chan master Fuzhou Da'an (793-883), at his monastery of Lingshu Chanyuan in Shaozhou (present-day Guangdong province) and continued to study under Lingshu until his death in 918. Yunmen was then asked by the ruler of the newly established Nan Han state (917-971), Liu Yan (r. 917-942), to succeed Lingshu's place at Lingshu Chanyuan. In 923, he established a monastery on Mt. Yunmen in the region, whence he acquired his toponym. He continued to reside on Mt. Yunmen for thirty years and frequently visited the palace of the Nan Han state to preach. In 938, Liu Cheng (943-958), monarch of the Nan Han, bestowed on him the title Great Master Kuangzhen (Genuine Truth). According to his wishes, no funerary stupa was prepared for Yunmen and his body was left in his abbot's quarters (FANGZHANG). Yunmen was especially famous for his so-called one-word barriers (YIZI GUAN), in which he used a single utterance to respond to a student's question. For example, once a monk asked him, "When you kill your parents, you repent before the Buddha. But when you kill the buddhas and patriarchs, to whom do you repent?" Yunmen answered, "Lu" ("exposed"). Eighteen of Yunmen's most famous Chan cases (GONG'AN) are collected in the BIYAN LU ("Blue Cliff Record"); his extended teachings are recorded in the Yunmen Kuangzhen chanshi guanglu.

zushi. (J. soshi; K. chosa 祖師). In Chinese, "patriarch" (lit. "ancestral teacher"), referring to eminent teachers in lineages that are claimed to trace back to sĀKYAMUNI Buddha or even earlier buddhas. Indian Sanskrit texts dating from the 2nd century CE onward refer to a tradition of five "masters of the dharma" (dharmācārya) who succeeded the Buddha as head of the SAMGHA: MAHĀKĀsYAPA, ĀNANDA, MADHYĀNTIKA, sĀnAKAVĀSIN, and UPAGUPTA . Later sources expand this list into a roster of nine eminent masters who "handed down the lamplight of wisdom successively through the generations." Often, these genealogies were extended as far back as the seven buddhas of antiquity (SAPTATATHĀGATA). It is widely presumed that this notion of dharma-transmission lineages developed from the earlier VINAYA concept of the "preceptor" (UPĀDHYĀYA), a senior monk who confers the lower ordination (pravrajyā, see PRAVRAJITA) to new novices (sRĀMAnERA) and higher ordination (UPASAMPADĀ) to monks (BHIKsU). This personal connection between preceptor and disciple created incipient ordination families connected to specific preceptors, connections that later could be extended to dharma transmission as well. ¶ In East Asia, these lists of Indian dharma masters continued to be expanded and elaborated upon so that they also included the preeminent indigenous figures within each lineage, thus connecting the Chinese patriarchs of each lineage with their Indian predecessors. Most of the indigenous traditions of East Asian Buddhism, including the CHAN ZONG, TIANTAI ZONG, JINGTU ZONG, and HUAYAN ZONG, draw their legitimacy at least partially from their claims that their teachings and practices derive from an unbroken lineage of authoritative teachers that can be traced back geographically to India and temporally to the person of the Buddha himself. The specific names and numbers of patriarchs recognized within each lineage typically change over time and vary widely between the different traditions. Of these lists, the list of patriarchs recognized in the Chan school has received the lion's share of scholarly attention in the West. This Chan list varies widely, but a well-established roster includes twenty-eight Indian and six Chinese patriarchs. These six Chinese patriarchs (liu zu)-BODHIDHARMA, HUIKE, SENGCAN, DAOXIN, HONGREN, and HUINENG-are credited by the classical tradition with the development and growth of Chan in China, but early records of the Chan school, such as the LENGQIE SHIZU JI and LIDAI FABAO JI, reveal the polemical battles fought between disparate contemporary Chan communities to place their own teachers on this roster of patriarchal orthodoxy. It is important to note that all of these various lists of patriarchs, in all the different traditions, are created retrospectively as a way of legitimizing specific contemporary lineages or teachers and verifying the authenticity of their teachings; thus their accounts of the chronology and history of their lineages must be used critically. The compound zushi can mean either "patriarch" (lit., ancestral teacher) or in other contexts "patriarchs and teachers," as in the stock phrase "all the buddhas of the three time-periods and patriarchs and teachers throughout successive generations" (sanshi zhufo lidai zushi), which explicitly traces a school's ancestral lineage from the past to the present and into the future. Some modern Buddhists, especially in the West, deplore the sexism inherent in the term "patriarch," preferring instead to render it with the gender-neutral term "ancestor." See also CHUANDENG LU; FASI; PARAMPARĀ; YINKE.

ZX-80 ::: (computer) Sinclair's cheap personal computer with built-in BASIC, launched at the end of January 1980 at a computer fair in Wembley, UK. The 24 lines by 32 characters of monochrome text. An audio cassette recorder was used to save programs.The ZX-80 was sold in kit form for �79.95 or ready-built for �99.95. It was used by many UK hobbyists as a means of learning the basics of computing. Some remember the 1KB ZX-80 for the claim in its advertising that you could control a nuclear power station with it.The ZX-80 was succeeded by the ZX-81. . . .(2002-08-30)

ZX-80 "computer" {Sinclair}'s cheap {personal computer} with built-in {BASIC}, launched at the end of January 1980 at a computer fair in Wembley, UK. The processor was an {NEC 780-C} running at 3.25 MHz. It had 1KB of {RAM}, externally expandable to 16KB, and 4KB of ROM. It had RF video output to a TV, displaying 24 lines by 32 characters of monochrome text. An audio cassette recorder was used to save programs. The ZX-80 was sold in kit form for £79.95 or ready-built for £99.95. It was used by many UK hobbyists as a means of learning the basics of computing. Some remember the 1KB ZX-80 for the claim in its advertising that you could control a nuclear power station with it. The ZX-80 was succeeded by the {ZX-81}. {(http://home.t-online.de/home/p.liebert/zx80_eng.htm)}. {Planet Sinclair (http://nvg.ntnu.no/sinclair/)}. {The Sinclair Story (http://sincuser.f9.co.uk/046/sstory.htm)}. (2002-08-30)



QUOTES [72 / 72 - 1500 / 4406]


KEYS (10k)

   12 Sri Aurobindo
   9 Sri Ramakrishna
   4 The Mother
   4 Swami Vivekananda
   3 Sri Sarada Devi
   3 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   1 William the Silent
   1 Thoreau
   1 The Mother
   1 THE GOSPEL OF THE HOLY MOTHER
   1 SWAMI PREMANANDA
   1 Stephen Hawking
   1 Sri Ramakrishna
   1 Schopenhauer
   1 Saint Odile
   1 Saint Irenaeus
   1 Ramakrishna
   1 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   1 Peter J Carroll
   1 Our Lady to Father Stefano Gobbi
   1 Og Mandino
   1 Noam Chomsky
   1 Napoleon Hill
   1 Mother Mirra
   1 Miyamoto Musashi
   1 Marcus Tomlinson
   1 Karl Popper
   1 Joseph Campbell
   1 Jean Piaget
   1 Imitation of Christ
   1 Holy Mother Sri Sarada Devi
   1 Herman Melville
   1 Hakuin Ekaku
   1 Eliphas Levi
   1 Earl Nightingale
   1 Dalai Lama
   1 C.S. Lewis
   1 Carlyle
   1 Carl Jung
   1 Bessie Anderson Stanley
   1 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   1 Confucius
   1 Aleister Crowley

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   23 Anonymous
   13 Abraham Lincoln
   12 Tony Robbins
   12 Og Mandino
   11 John C Maxwell
   10 Swami Vivekananda
   10 Richard Branson
   9 Voltaire
   9 Mark Twain
   9 C S Lewis
   8 Sun Tzu
   7 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   7 Napoleon Hill
   7 Michael Jordan
   7 Friedrich Nietzsche
   6 Ovid
   6 Malcolm Gladwell
   6 Jim Rohn
   5 William Feather
   5 Sri Chinmoy

1:It is not enough to try, you must succeed. ~ The Mother,
2:It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation. ~ Herman Melville,
3:You would succeed if you were sincere. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
4:People with goals succeed, because they know where they are going.
   ~ Earl Nightingale,
5:Failure will never overtake me if my determination to succeed is strong enough." ~ Og Mandino,
6:However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at." ~ Stephen Hawking,
7:It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.
   ~ Napoleon Hill,
8:It is not your business to succeed, but to do right; when you have done so, the rest lies with God. ~ C.S. Lewis
9:Never forget the goal. Never stop aspiring. Never halt in your progress, and you are sure to succeed. ~ Mother Mirra,
10:It is only those who persevere to the end that succeed. ~ Swami Vivekananda, (C.W. V. 31),
11:We begin to know really when we succeed in forgetting completely what we have learned. ~ Thoreau, the Eternal Wisdom
12:One does not need to hope in order to act, nor to succeed in order to persevere. ~ William the Silent, the Eternal Wisdom
13:... want to re-establish order. Some will try to do so, but this will not succeed and thus will end up even worse off than before!" ~ Saint Odile, (660-720 AD),
14:Keep your mind steady by gently warding off all intruding thoughts but without strain. Soon you will succeed. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
15:The heart of a sinner is like a curled hair. You may pull it ever so long but will not succeed in making it straight. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
16:You will succeed through practice. Don't give up your practice of Japa, even if your mind doesn't become steady. Do your spiritual practice ardently. ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
17:He who wants to find God, finds God. Go and verify it in your own life! Try for three days and thou art sure to succeed. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
18:Nobody will come to help you if you put yourself forward as a leader. ... Kill the ego first if you want to succeed. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
19:There is no other way to succeed than to draw the mind back every time it turns outwards and fix it in the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
20:One must learn to speak the truth alone if one is to succeed truly in changing the nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, Speech and Yoga,
21:The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential... these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence." ~ Confucius,
22:You will never succeed by argument, convincing another of their error. When the grace of God descends, each one understands his own mistakes. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
23:When the present dream of our life is finished, a new dream will succeed it and there our life and death will not be known. ~ Schopenhauer, the Eternal Wisdom
24:f you succeed inconquering yourself entirely, you will conquer the rest with the greatest ease. To triumph over oneself is the perfect victory ~ Imitation of Christ, the Eternal Wisdom
25:If you don't succeed in meditation, practice Japa. Japa leads to perfection. One attains perfection through Japa. If a meditative mood sets in well and good. If not, don't force your mind to meditate. ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
26:Succeed in not fearing the lion, and the lion will fear YOU. Say to suffering, 'I will that you shall become a pleasure,' and it will prove to be such-- and even more than a pleasure, it will be a blessing.
   ~ Eliphas Levi,
27:Krishna said to Arjuna, 'Friend, if you want to realize Me, you will not succeed if you have even one of the eight occult powers.' This is the truth. Occult power is sure to beget pride, and pride makes one forget God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
28:Do not be discouraged, but continue to practice meditation. You will soon succeed in freeing your mind from distractions. He who keeps his mind God, finds His grace, and through His grace becomes absorbed in meditation. ~ SWAMI PREMANANDA,
29:Death is not a way to succeed in sadhana. If you die in that way, you will only have the same difficulties again with probably less favourable circumstances. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - III, Difficulties of the Path - VII,
30:The truth is that you cannot attain God if you have even a trace of desire. Subtle is the way of dharma. If you are trying to thread a needle, you will not succeed if the thread has even a slight fiber sticking out. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
31:It is not one's personal fitness and worthiness that makes one succeed, but the Mother's grace and power and the consent of the soul to her grace and the workings of her Force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, The Call and the Capacity,
32:The human being is made of different parts, sometimes clearly separated. They can unite only under the psychic influence and action. Persist in your endeavour and you are sure to succeed. Blessings. 5 October 1972
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
33:Disciple: Lucky indeed are those who receive ur blessings now. Those who come later on cannot have this rare opportunity. MOTHER : What do u mean? Do u mean to say they will not succeed? God exists always everywhere. The Master is always present. They will succeed thro His grac ~ THE GOSPEL OF THE HOLY MOTHER,
34:You have either to train the memory by practising to remember - or if you cannot do that, try only to understand, read much and let the memory remember what it can. There are people who have a bad memory but they succeed in their studies in spite of it.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
35:If concentration is made with the brain, sensations of heat and even headache ensue.
Concentration has to be made in the heart, which is cool and refreshing.
Relax and your meditation will be easy.
Keep your mind steady by gently warding off all intruding thoughts, but without strain - soon you will succeed. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Guru Ramana II. XI,
36:If we are demoralized, sad and only complain, we'll not solve our problems. If we only pray for a solution, we'll not solve our problems. We need to face them, to deal with them without violence, but with confidence - and never give up. If you adopt a non-violent approach, but are also hesitant within, you'll not succeed. You have to have confidence and keep up your efforts - in other words, never give up. ~ Dalai Lama,
37:What are the steps to follow for (1) sadhana and (2) silence of the mind?

   (1) Do work as sadhana. You offer to the Divine the work you do to the best of your capacities and you leave the result to the Divine. (2) Try to become conscious first above your head, keeping the brain as silent as possible. If you succeed and the work is done in that condition, then it will become perfect.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
38:In his book: 'Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us', Daniel Pink narrows motivation down to 3 key elements: autonomy, mastery, and purpose. Without a genuine interest in what we do, we will never be proud of it, we will never master it, and we will never feel purposed for it. In short, if you are not interested, you are not motivated, and without motivation, you will not succeed.
   ~ Marcus Tomlinson, How to become an Expert Software Engineer,
39:MASTER (to Atul): "What is worrying you? Is it that you haven't that grit, that intense restlessness for God?"
ATUL: "How can we keep our minds on God?"
MASTER: "Abhyasayoga, the yoga of practice. You should practise calling on God every day. It is not possible to succeed in one day; through daily prayer you will come to long for God.
"How can you feel that restlessness if you are immersed in worldliness day and night?" ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
40:Death is not a way to succeed in sadhana. If you die in that way [suicide], you will only have the same difficulties again with probably less favourable circumstances.
The way to succeed in sadhana is to refuse to be discouraged, to aspire simply and sincerely so that the Mother's force may work in you and bring down what is above. No man ever succeeded in this sadhana by his own merit. To become open and plastic to the Mother is the one thing needed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
41:I do have one great hope. It is that with the disappearance of Marxism, we may succeed in eliminating the pressure of ideologies as the centre of politics. Marxism needed an anti-Marxist ideology, so what you had was the clash between two ideologies which were both in a sense completely mad. There was nothing real behind them - only wrong problems. What I hope from the open society is that we will re-establish a list of priorities of the things which have to be done in society. ~ Karl Popper, interviewed by Giancarlo Bosetti, in The Lesson of this Century,
42:Drugs have a long history of use in magic in various cultures, and usually in the context of either ecstatic communal rituals or in personal vision quests. However compared to people in simple pastoral tribal situations most people in developed countries now live in a perpetual state of mental hyperactivity with overactive imaginations anyway, so throwing drugs in on top of this usually just leads to confusion and a further loss of focus. Plus as the real Shamans say, if you really do succeed in opening a door with a drug it will thereafter open at will and most such substances give all they will ever give on the first attempt.
   ~ Peter J Carroll, The Octavo,
43:DR. MANILAL: How can one succeed in meditation?

SRI AUROBINDO: By quietude of mind. There is not only the Infinite in itself, but also an infinite sea of peace, joy, light, power above the head. The golden Lid, Hiranmaya Patram, intervenes between the mind and what is above the mind. Once you break this lid ( making a movement of the hands above the head ) they can come down any time at your will. But for that, quietude is essential. Of course, there are people who can get them without first establishing the quietude, but it is very difficult. ( On 13-12-1938 ) ~ Sri Aurobindo, TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO VOLUME 1, BY NIRODBARAN (Page no.17),
44:Therefore the coming of a spiritual age must be preceded by the appearance of an increasing number of individuals who are no longer satisfied with the normal intellectual, vital and physical existence of man, but perceive that a greater evolution is the real goal of humanity and attempt to effect it in themselves, to lead others to it and to make it the recognised goal of the race. In proportion as they succeed and to the degree to which they carry this evolution, the yet unrealised potentiality which they represent will become an actual possibility of the future.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Advent and Progress of the Spiritual Age, 263,
45:There is no method in this Yoga except to concentrate, preferably in the heart, and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness; one can concentrate also in the head or between the eyebrows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is a beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one's own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother's Power and Presence.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
46:There is only one way if you cannot exert your will - it is to call the Force; even the call only with the mind or the mental word is better than being extremely passive and submitted to the attack, - for although it may not succeed instantaneously, the mental call even ends by bringing the Force and opening up the consciousness again. For everything depends upon that. In the externalised consciousness obscurity and suffering can always be there; the more the internalised consciousness reigns, the more these things are pushed back and out, and with the full internalised consciousness they cannot remain
   - if they come, it is as outside touches unable to lodge themselves in the being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
47:It's like chopping down a huge tree of immense girth. You won't accomplish it with one swing of your axe. If you keep chopping away at it, though, and do not let up, eventually, whether it wants to or not, it will suddenly topple down. When that time comes, you could round up everyone you could find and pay them to hold the tree up, but they wouldn't be able to do it. It would still come crashing to the ground. . . . But if the woodcutter stopped after one or two strokes of his axe to ask the third son of Mr. Chang, Why doesn't this tree fall? And after three or four more strokes stopped again to ask the fourth son of Mr. Li, Why doesn't this tree fall? he would never succeed in felling the tree. It is no different for someone who is practicing the Way.
   ~ Hakuin Ekaku,
48:What is surrender?

It means that one gives oneself entirely to the Divine.

Yes, and then what happens? If you give yourself entirely to the Divine, it is He who does the Yoga, it is no longer you; hence this is not very difficult; while if you do tapasya, it is you yourself who do the yoga and you carry its whole responsibility—it is there the danger lies. But there are people who prefer to have the whole responsibility, with its dangers, because they have a very independent spirit. They are not perhaps in a great hurry—if they need several lives to succeed, it does not matter to them. But there are others who want to go quicker and be more sure of reaching the goal; well, these give over the whole responsibility to the Divine. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951,
49:2. Refusal of the Call:Often in actual life, and not infrequently in the myths and popular tales, we encounter the dull case of the call unanswered; for it is always possible to turn the ear to other interests. Refusal of the summons converts the adventure into its negative. Walled in boredom, hard work, or 'culture,' the subject loses the power of significant affirmative action and becomes a victim to be saved. His flowering world becomes a wasteland of dry stones and his life feels meaningless-even though, like King Minos, he may through titanic effort succeed in building an empire or renown. Whatever house he builds, it will be a house of death: a labyrinth of cyclopean walls to hide from him his minotaur. All he can do is create new problems for himself and await the gradual approach of his disintegration. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces,
50:It is to bring back all the scattered threads of consciousness to a single point, a single idea. Those who can attain a perfect attention succeed in everything they undertake; they will always make rapid progress. And this kind of concentration can be developed exactly like the muscles; one may follow different systems, different methods of training. Today we know that the most pitiful weakling, for example, can with discipline become as strong as anyone else. One should not have a will that flickers out like a candle. The will, the concentration must be cultivated; it is a question of method, of regular exercise. If you will, you can. But the thought Whats the use? must not come in to weaken the will. The idea that one is born with a certain character and can do nothing about it is a stupidity.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951,
51:Please initiate me into a tangible form of Yoga. I make this assurance that I shall follow your instructions to the very letter and refer to you my doubts and difficulties on the way.

There is no method in this Yoga except to concentrate, preferably in the heart, and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness; one can concentrate also in the head or between the eyebrows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is a beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one's own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother's Power and Presence. 30 November 1934 ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother,
52:Does this happen even if one has a great aspiration?

The aspiration must be very vigilant.

I have known people (many, not only a few, I mean among those who do yoga), I have known many who, every time they had a fine aspiration, and their aspiration was very strong and they received an answer to this aspiration, every time, the very same day or at the latest the next day, they had a complete setback of consciousness and were facing the exact opposite of their aspiration. Such things happen almost constantly. Well, these people have developed only the positive side. They make a kind of discipline of aspiration, they ask for help, they try to come into contact with higher forces, they succeed in this, they have experiences; but they have completely neglected cleaning their room; it has remained as dirty as ever, and so, naturally, when the experience has gone, this dirt becomes still more repulsive than before. ~ The Mother, 1950-1951, 26 April 1951,
53:In the depths of your consciousness is the psychic being, the temple of the Divine within you. This is the centre round which should come about the unification of all these divergent parts, all these contradictory movements of your being. Once you have got the consciousness of the psychic being and its aspiration, these doubts and difficulties can be destroyed. It takes more or less time, but you will surely succeed in the end. Once you have turned to the Divine, saying, "I want to be yours", and the Divine has said, "Yes", the whole world cannot keep you from it. When the central being has made its surrender, the chief difficulty has disappeared. The outer being is like a crust. In ordinary people the crust is so hard and thick that they are not conscious of the Divine within them. If once, even for a moment only, the inner being has said, "I am here and I am yours", then it is as though a bridge has been built and little by little the crust becomes thinner and thinner until the two parts are wholly joined and the inner and the outer become one. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
54:
   Sweet Mother, Is it possible to have control over oneself during sleep? For example, if I want to see you in my dreams, can I do it at will?

Control during sleep is entirely possible and it is progressive if you persist in the effort. You begin by remembering your dreams, then gradually you remain more and more conscious during your sleep, and not only can you control your dreams but you can guide and organise your activities during sleep.

   If you persist in your will and your effort, you are sure to learn how to come and find me at night during your sleep and afterwards to remember what has happened.

   For this, two things are necessary, which you must develop by aspiration and by calm and persistent effort.

   (1) Concentrate your thought on the will to come and find me; then pursue this thought, first by an effort of imagination, afterwards in a tangible and increasingly real way, until you are in my presence.

   (2) Establish a sort of bridge between the waking and the sleeping consciousness, so that when you wake up you remember what has happened.

It may be that you succeed immediately, but more often it takes a certain time and you must persist in the effort. 25 September 1959

   ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother, 226,
55:The third operation in any magical ceremony is the oath or proclamation. The Magician, armed and ready, stands in the centre of the Circle, and strikes once upon the bell as if to call the attention of the Universe. He then declares who he is, reciting his magical history by the proclamation of the grades which he has attained, giving the signs and words of those grades. He then states the purpose of the ceremony, and proves that it is necessary to perform it and to succeed in its performance. He then takes an oath before the Lord of the Universe (not before the particular Lord whom he is invoking) as if to call Him to witness the act. He swears solemnly that he will perform it-that nothing shall prevent him from performing it-that he will not leave the operation until it is successfully performed-and once again he strikes upon the bell. Yet, having demonstrated himself in that position at once infinitely lofty and infinitely unimportant, the instrument of destiny, he balances this by the Confession, in which there is again an infinite exaltation harmonised with an infinite humility. He admits himself to be a weak human being humbly aspiring to something higher; a creature of circumstance utterly dependent-even for the breath of life-upon a series of fortunate accidents.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA,
56:We have all a ruling defect, which is for our soul as the umbilical cord of its birth in sin, and it is by this that the enemy can always lay hold upon us: for some it is vanity, for others idleness, for the majority egotism. Let a wicked and crafty mind avail itself of this means and we are lost; we may not go mad or turn idiots, but we become positively alienated, in all the force of the expression - that is, we are subjected to a foreign suggestion. In such a state one dreads instinctively everything that might bring us back to reason, and will not even listen to representations that are opposed to our obsession. Here is one of the most dangerous disorders which can affect the moral nature. The sole remedy for such a bewitchment is to make use of folly itself in order to cure folly, to provide the sufferer with imaginary satisfactions in the opposite order to that wherein he is now lost. Endeavour, for example, to cure an ambitious person by making him desire the glories of heaven - mystic remedy; cure one who is dissolute by true love - natural remedy; obtain honourable successes for a vain person; exhibit unselfishness to the avaricious and procure for them legitimate profit by honourable participation in generous enterprises, etc. Acting in this way upon the moral nature, we may succeed in curing a number of physical maladies, for the moral affects the physical in virtue of the magical axiom: "That which is above is like unto that which is below." This is why the Master said, when speaking of the paralyzed woman: "Satan has bound her." A disease invariably originates in a deficiency or an excess, and ever at the root of a physical evil we shall find a moral disorder. This is an unchanging law of Nature. ~ Eliphas Levi, Transcendental Magic,
57:THE PSYCHOLOGY OF YOGA
Initial Definitions and Descriptions
Yoga has four powers and objects, purity, liberty, beatitude and perfection. Whosoever has consummated these four mightinesses in the being of the transcendental, universal, lilamaya and individual God is the complete and absolute Yogin.
All manifestations of God are manifestations of the absolute Parabrahman.
The Absolute Parabrahman is unknowable to us, not because It is the nothingness of all that we are, for rather whatever we are in truth or in seeming is nothing but Parabrahman, but because It is pre-existent & supra-existent to even the highest & purest methods and the most potent & illimitable instruments of which soul in the body is capable.
In Parabrahman knowledge ceases to be knowledge and becomes an inexpressible identity. Become Parabrahman, if thou wilt and if That will suffer thee, but strive not to know It; for thou shalt not succeed with these instruments and in this body.
In reality thou art Parabrahman already and ever wast and ever will be. To become Parabrahman in any other sense, thou must depart utterly out of world manifestation and out even of world transcendence.
Why shouldst thou hunger after departure from manifestation as if the world were an evil? Has not That manifested itself in thee & in the world and art thou wiser & purer & better than the Absolute, O mind-deceived soul in the mortal? When That withdraws thee, then thy going hence is inevitable; until Its force is laid on thee, thy going is impossible, cry thy mind never so fiercely & wailingly for departure. Therefore neither desire nor shun the world, but seek the bliss & purity & freedom & greatness of God in whatsoever state or experience or environment.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human,
58:Sweet Mother, You have asked the teachers "to think with ideas instead of with words".4 You have also said that later on you will ask them to think with experiences. Will you throw some light on these three ways of thinking?
Our house has a very high tower; at the very top of this tower there is a bright and bare room, the last before we emerge into the open air, into the full light.

   Sometimes, when we are free to do so, we climb up to this bright room, and there, if we remain very quiet, one or more visitors come to call on us; some are tall, others small, some single, others in groups; all are bright and graceful.

   Usually, in our joy at their arrival and our haste to welcome them, we lose our tranquillity and come galloping down to rush into the great hall that forms the base of the tower and is the storeroom of words. Here, more or less excited, we select, reject, assemble, combine, disarrange, rearrange all the words in our reach, in an attempt to portray this or that visitor who has come to us. But most often, the picture we succeed in making of our visitor is more like a caricature than a portrait.

   And yet if we were wiser, we would remain up above, at the summit of the tower, quite calm, in joyful contemplation.

   Then, after a certain length of time, we would see the visitors themselves slowly, gracefully, calmly descend, without losing anything of their elegance or beauty and, as they cross the storeroom of words, clothe themselves effortlessly, automatically, with the words needed to make themselves perceptible even in the material house.

   This is what I call thinking with ideas.

   When this process is no longer mysterious to you, I shall explain what is meant by thinking with experiences. ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother,
59:When a corner of Maya, the illusion of individual life, is lifted before the eyes of a man in such sort that he no longer makes any egoistic difference between his own person and other men, that he takes as much interest in the sufferings of others as in his own and that he becomes succourable to the point of devotion, ready to sacrifice himself for the salvation of others, then that man is able to recognise himself in all beings, considers as his own the infinite sufferings of all that lives and must thus appropriate to himself the sorrow of the world. No distress is alien to him. All the torments which he sees and can so rarely soften, all the torments of which he hears, those even which it is impossible for him to conceive, strike his spirit as if he were himself the victim. Insensible to the alternations of weal and woe which succeed each other in his destiny, delivered from all egoism, he penetrates the veils of the individual illusion : all that lives, all that suffers is equally near to his heart. He conceives the totality of things, their essence, their eternal flux, the vain efforts, the internal struggles and sufferings without end ; he sees to whatever side he turns his gaze man who suffers, the animal who suffers and a world that is eternally passing away. He unites himself henceforth to the sorrows of the world as closely as the egoist to his own person. How can he having such a knowledge of the world affirm by incessant desires his will to live, attach himself more and more to life and clutch it to him always more closely ? The man seduced by the illusion of individual life, a slave of his egoism, sees only the things that touch him personally and draws from them incessantly renewed motives to desire and to will : on the contrary one who penetrates the essence of things and dominates their totality, elevates himself to a state of voluntary renunciation, resignation and true tranquillity. ~ Schopenhauer, the Eternal Wisdom
60:At the basis of this collaboration there is necessarily the will to change, no longer to be what one is, for things to be no longer what they are. There are several ways of reaching it, and all the methods are good when they succeed! One may be deeply disgusted with what exists and wish ardently to come out of all this and attain something else; one may - and this is a more positive way - one may feel within oneself the touch, the approach of something positively beautiful and true, and willingly drop all the rest so that nothing may burden the journey to this new beauty and truth.

   What is indispensable in every case is the ardent will for progress, the willing and joyful renunciation of all that hampers the advance: to throw far away from oneself all that prevents one from going forward, and to set out into the unknown with the ardent faith that this is the truth of tomorrow, inevitable, which must necessarily come, which nothing, nobody, no bad will, even that of Nature, can prevent from becoming a reality - perhaps of a not too distant future - a reality which is being worked out now and which those who know how to change, how not to be weighed down by old habits, will surely have the good fortune not only to see but to realise. People sleep, they forget, they take life easy - they forget, forget all the time.... But if we could remember... that we are at an exceptional hour, a unique time, that we have this immense good fortune, this invaluable privilege of being present at the birth of a new world, we could easily get rid of everything that impedes and hinders our progress.

   So, the most important thing, it seems, is to remember this fact; even when one doesn't have the tangible experience, to have the certainty of it and faith in it; to remember always, to recall it constantly, to go to sleep with this idea, to wake up with this perception; to do all that one does with this great truth as the background, as a constant support, this great truth that we are witnessing the birth of a new world.

   We can participate in it, we can become this new world. And truly, when one has such a marvellous opportunity, one should be ready to give up everything for its sake. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958, [T1],
61:
   Are not offering and surrender to the Divine the same thing?


They are two aspects of the same thing, but not altogether the same. One is more active than the other. They do not belong to quite the same plane of existence.

For example, you have decided to offer your life to the Divine, you take that decision. But all of a sudden, something altogether unpleasant, unexpected happens to you and your first movement is to react and protest. Yet you have made the offering, you have said once for all: "My life belongs to the Divine", and then suddenly an extremely unpleasant incident happens (that can happen) and there is something in you that reacts, that does not want it. But here, if you want to be truly logical with your offering, you must bring forward this unpleasant incident, make an offering of it to the Divine, telling him very sincerely: "Let Your will be done; if You have decided it that way, it will be that way." And this must be a willing and spontaneous adhesion. So it is very difficult.

Even for the smallest thing, something that is not in keeping with what you expected, what you have worked for, instead of an opposite reaction coming in - spontaneously, irresistibly, you draw back: "No, not that" - if you have made a complete surrender, a total surrender, well, it does not happen like that: you are as quiet, as peaceful, as calm in one case as in the other. And perhaps you had the notion that it would be better if it happened in a certain way, but if it happens differently, you find that this also is all right. You might have, for example, worked very hard to do a certain thing, so that something might happen, you might have given much time, much of your energy, much of your will, and all that not for your own sake, but, say, for the divine work (that is the offering); now suppose that after having taken all this trouble, done all this work, made all these efforts, it all goes just the other way round, it does not succeed. If you are truly surrendered, you say: "It is good, it is all good, it is all right; I did what I could, as well as I could, now it is not my decision, it is the decision of the Divine, I accept entirely what He decides." On the other hand, if you do not have this deep and spontaneous surrender, you tell yourself: "How is it? I took so much trouble to do a thing which is not for a selfish purpose, which is for the Divine Work, and this is the result, it is not successful!" Ninety-nine times out of a hundred, it is like that.

True surrender is a very difficult thing.

~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953, 52,
62:Disciple: What are the conditions of success in this yoga?

Sri Aurobindo: I have often told of them. Those go through who have the central sincerity. It does not mean that the sincerity is there in all the parts of the being. In that sense no one is entirely ready. But if the central sincerity is there it is possible to establish it in all the parts of the being.
The second thing necessary is a certain receptivity in the being, what we call, the "opening" up of all the planes to the Higher Power.
The third thing required is the power of holding the higher Force, a certain ghanatwa - mass - that can hold the Power when it comes down.
And about the thing that pushes there are two things that generally push: One is the Central Being. The other is destiny. If the Central Being wants to do something it pushes the man. Even when the man goes off the line he is pushed back again to the path. Of course, the Central Being may push through the mind or any other part of the being. Also, if the man is destined he is pushed to the path either to go through or to get broken,

Disciple: There are some people who think they are destined or chosen and we see that they are not "chosen".

Sri Aurobindo: Of course, plenty of people think that they are specially "chosen" and that they are the first and the "elect" and so on. All that is nothing.

Disciple: Then, can you. say who is fit out of all those that have come?

Sri Aurobindo: It is very difficult to say. But this can be said that everyone of those who have come in has some chance to go through if he can hold on to it.

Disciple: There is also a chance of failure.

Sri Aurobindo: Of course, and besides, the whole universe is a play of forces and one can't always wait till all the conditions of success have been fulfilled. One has to take risks and take his chance.

Disciple: What is meant by "chance"? Does it mean that it is only one possibility out of many others, or does it mean that one would be able to succeed in yoga?

Sri Aurobindo: It means only that he can succeed if he takes his chance properly. For instance, X had his chance.

Disciple: Those who fall on the path or slip, do they go down in their evolution?

Sri Aurobindo: That depends. Ultimately, the Yoga may be lost to him.

Disciple: The Gita says: Na hi kalyānkṛt - nothing that is beneficial - comes to a bad end.

Sri Aurobindo: That is from another standpoint. You must note the word is kalyān kṛt - it is an important addition.
~ Sri Aurobindo, EVENING TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO, RECORDED BY A B PURANI (20-09-1926),
63:reading :::
   50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927)
   Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954)
   Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997)
   Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997)
   Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964)
   Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980)
   Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006)
   David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012)
   Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984)
   Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997)
   Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006)
   Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961)
   Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen
   Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958)
   Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947)
   Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969)
   Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936)
   Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901)
   Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983)
   Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006)
   Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005)
   Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998)
   John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999)
   Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013)
   Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958)
   Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967)
   Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951)
   Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945)
   William James - Principles of Psychology (1890)
   Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953)
   Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)
   Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953)
   RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959)
   Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970)
   Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974)
   Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014)
   Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012)
   IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927)
   Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951)
   Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966)
   Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002)
   VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998)
   Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961)
   Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970)
   Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004)
   Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002)
   BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953)
   Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000)
   William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics,
64:Sweet Mother, here it is written: "It is part of the foundation of Yoga to become conscious of the great complexity of our nature, see the different forces that move it and get over it a control of directing knowledge." Are these forces different for each person?

Yes. The composition is completely different, otherwise everybody would be the same. There are not two beings with an identical combination; between the different parts of the being and the composition of these parts the proportion is different in each individual. There are people, primitive men, people like the yet undeveloped races or the degenerated ones whose combinations are fairly simple; they are still complicated, but comparatively simple. And there are people absolutely at the top of the human ladder, the e ́lite of humanity; their combinations become so complicated that a very special discernment is needed to find the relations between all these things.

There are beings who carry in themselves thousands of different personalities, and then each one has its own rhythm and alternation, and there is a kind of combination; sometimes there are inner conflicts, and there is a play of activities which are rhythmic and with alternations of certain parts which come to the front and then go back and again come to the front. But when one takes all that, it makes such complicated combinations that some people truly find it difficult to understand what is going on in themselves; and yet these are the ones most capable of a complete, coordinated, conscious, organised action; but their organisation is infinitely more complicated than that of primitive or undeveloped men who have two or three impulses and four or five ideas, and who can arrange all this very easily in themselves and seem to be very co-ordinated and logical because there is not very much to organise. But there are people truly like a multitude, and so that gives them a plasticity, a fluidity of action and an extraordinary complexity of perception, and these people are capable of understanding a considerable number of things, as though they had at their disposal a veritable army which they move according to circumstance and need; and all this is inside them. So when these people, with the help of yoga, the discipline of yoga, succeed in centralising all these beings around the central light of the divine Presence, they become powerful entities, precisely because of their complexity. So long as this is not organised they often give the impression of an incoherence, they are almost incomprehensible, one can't manage to understand why they are like that, they are so complex. But when they have organised all these beings, that is, put each one in its place around the divine centre, then truly they are terrific, for they have the capacity of understanding almost everything and doing almost everything because of the multitude of entities they contain, of which they are constituted. And the nearer one is to the top of the ladder, the more it is like that, and consequently the more difficult it is to organise one's being; because when you have about a dozen elements, you can quickly compass and organise them, but when you have thousands of them, it is difficult. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, 215-216,
65:What do you mean by these words: 'When you are in difficulty, widen yourself'?

I am speaking, of course, of difficulties on the path of yoga, incomprehension, limitations, things like obstacles, which prevent you from advancing. And when I say "widen yourself", I mean widen your consciousness.

Difficulties always arise from the ego, that is, from your more or less egoistic personal reaction to circumstances, events and people around you, to the conditions of your life. They also come from that feeling of being closed up in a sort of shell, which prevents your consciousness from uniting with higher and vaster realities.

One may very well think that one wants to be vast, wants to be universal, that all is the expression of the Divine, that one must have no egoism - one may think all sorts of things - but that is not necessarily a cure, for very often one knows what one ought to do, and yet one doesn't do it, for one reason or another.

But if, when you have to face anguish, suffering, revolt, pain or a feeling of helplessness - whatever it may be, all the things that come to you on the path and which precisely are your difficulties-if physically, that is to say, in your body- consciousness, you can have the feeling of widening yourself, one could say of unfolding yourself - you feel as it were all folded up, one fold on another like a piece of cloth which is folded and refolded and folded again - so if you have this feeling that what is holding and strangling you and making you suffer or paralysing your movement, is like a too closely, too tightly folded piece of cloth or like a parcel that is too well-tied, too well-packed, and that slowly, gradually, you undo all the folds and stretch yourself out exactly as one unfolds a piece of cloth or a sheet of paper and spreads it out flat, and you lie flat and make yourself very wide, as wide as possible, spreading yourself out as far as you can, opening yourself and stretching out in an attitude of complete passivity with what I could call "the face to the light": not curling back upon your difficulty, doubling up on it, shutting it in, so to say, into yourself, but, on the contrary, unfurling yourself as much as you can, as perfectly as you can, putting the difficulty before the Light - the Light which comes from above - if you do that in all the domains, and even if mentally you don't succeed in doing it - for it is sometimes difficult - if you can imagine yourself doing this physically, almost materially, well, when you have finished unfolding yourself and stretching yourself out, you will find that more than three-quarters of the difficulty is gone. And then just a little work of receptivity to the Light and the last quarter will disappear.

This is much easier than struggling against a difficulty with one's thought, for if you begin to discuss with yourself, you will find that there are arguments for and against which are so convincing that it is quite impossible to get out of it without a higher light. Here, you do not struggle against the difficulty, you do not try to convince yourself; ah! you simply stretch out in the Light as though you lay stretched on the sands in the sun. And you let the Light do its work. That's all. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers, Volume-8, page no.286-288),
66:If this is the truth of works, the first thing the sadhaka has to do is to recoil from the egoistic forms of activity and get rid of the sense of an "I" that acts. He has to see and feel that everything happens in him by the plastic conscious or subconscious or sometimes superconscious automatism of his mental and bodily instruments moved by the forces of spiritual, mental, vital and physical Nature. There is a personality on his surface that chooses and wills, submits and struggles, tries to make good in Nature or prevail over Nature, but this personality is itself a construction of Nature and so dominated, driven, determined by her that it cannot be free. It is a formation or expression of the Self in her, - it is a self of Nature rather than a self of Self, his natural and processive, not his spiritual and permanent being, a temporary constructed personality, not the true immortal Person. It is that Person that he must become. He must succeed in being inwardly quiescent, detach himself as the observer from the outer active personality and learn the play of the cosmic forces in him by standing back from all blinding absorption in its turns and movements. Thus calm, detached, a student of himself and a witness of his nature, he realises that he is the individual soul who observes the works of Nature, accepts tranquilly her results and sanctions or withholds his sanction from the impulse to her acts. At present this soul or Purusha is little more than an acquiescent spectator, influencing perhaps the action and development of the being by the pressure of its veiled consciousness, but for the most part delegating its powers or a fragment of them to the outer personality, - in fact to Nature, for this outer self is not lord but subject to her, anı̄sa; but, once unveiled, it can make its sanction or refusal effective, become the master of the action, dictate sovereignly a change of Nature. Even if for a long time, as the result of fixed association and past storage of energy, the habitual movement takes place independent of the Purusha's assent and even if the sanctioned movement is persistently refused by Nature for want of past habit, still he will discover that in the end his assent or refusal prevails, - slowly with much resistance or quickly with a rapid accommodation of her means and tendencies she modifies herself and her workings in the direction indicated by his inner sight or volition. Thus he learns in place of mental control or egoistic will an inner spiritual control which makes him master of the Nature-forces that work in him and not their unconscious instrument or mechanic slave. Above and around him is the Shakti, the universal Mother and from her he can get all his inmost soul needs and wills if only he has a true knowledge of her ways and a true surrender to the divine Will in her. Finally, he becomes aware of that highest dynamic Self within him and within Nature which is the source of all his seeing and knowing, the source of the sanction, the source of the acceptance, the source of the rejection. This is the Lord, the Supreme, the One-in-all, Ishwara-Shakti, of whom his soul is a portion, a being of that Being and a power of that Power. The rest of our progress depends on our knowledge of the ways in which the Lord of works manifests his Will in the world and in us and executes them through the transcendent and universal Shakti. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Supreme Will, 216,
67:CHAPTER XIII
OF THE BANISHINGS: AND OF THE PURIFICATIONS.
Cleanliness is next to Godliness, and had better come first. Purity means singleness. God is one. The wand is not a wand if it has something sticking to it which is not an essential part of itself. If you wish to invoke Venus, you do not succeed if there are traces of Saturn mixed up with it.

That is a mere logical commonplace: in magick one must go much farther than this. One finds one's analogy in electricity. If insulation is imperfect, the whole current goes back to earth. It is useless to plead that in all those miles of wire there is only one-hundredth of an inch unprotected. It is no good building a ship if the water can enter, through however small a hole.

That first task of the Magician in every ceremony is therefore to render his Circle absolutely impregnable.
If one littlest thought intrude upon the mind of the Mystic, his concentration is absolutely destroyed; and his consciousness remains on exactly the same level as the Stockbroker's. Even the smallest baby is incompatible with the virginity of its mother. If you leave even a single spirit within the circle, the effect of the conjuration will be entirely absorbed by it.> {101}

The Magician must therefore take the utmost care in the matter of purification, "firstly", of himself, "secondly", of his instruments, "thirdly", of the place of working. Ancient Magicians recommended a preliminary purification of from three days to many months. During this period of training they took the utmost pains with diet. They avoided animal food, lest the elemental spirit of the animal should get into their atmosphere. They practised sexual abstinence, lest they should be influenced in any way by the spirit of the wife. Even in regard to the excrements of the body they were equally careful; in trimming the hair and nails, they ceremonially destroyed> the severed portion. They fasted, so that the body itself might destroy anything extraneous to the bare necessity of its existence. They purified the mind by special prayers and conservations. They avoided the contamination of social intercourse, especially the conjugal kind; and their servitors were disciples specially chosen and consecrated for the work.

In modern times our superior understanding of the essentials of this process enables us to dispense to some extent with its external rigours; but the internal purification must be even more carefully performed. We may eat meat, provided that in doing so we affirm that we eat it in order to strengthen us for the special purpose of our proposed invocation.> {102}

By thus avoiding those actions which might excite the comment of our neighbours we avoid the graver dangers of falling into spiritual pride.

We have understood the saying: "To the pure all things are pure", and we have learnt how to act up to it. We can analyse the mind far more acutely than could the ancients, and we can therefore distinguish the real and right feeling from its imitations. A man may eat meat from self-indulgence, or in order to avoid the dangers of asceticism. We must constantly examine ourselves, and assure ourselves that every action is really subservient to the One Purpose.

It is ceremonially desirable to seal and affirm this mental purity by Ritual, and accordingly the first operation in any actual ceremony is bathing and robing, with appropriate words. The bath signifies the removal of all things extraneous to antagonistic to the one thought. The putting on of the robe is the positive side of the same operation. It is the assumption of the fame of mind suitable to that one thought.

A similar operation takes place in the preparation of every instrument, as has been seen in the Chapter devoted to that subject. In the preparation of theplace of working, the same considerations apply. We first remove from that place all objects; and we then put into it those objects, and only those {103} objects, which are necessary. During many days we occupy ourselves in this process of cleansing and consecration; and this again is confirmed in the actual ceremony.

The cleansed and consecrated Magician takes his cleansed and consecrated instruments into that cleansed and consecrated place, and there proceeds to repeat that double ceremony in the ceremony itself, which has these same two main parts. The first part of every ceremony is the banishing; the second, the invoking. The same formula is repeated even in the ceremony of banishing itself, for in the banishing ritual of the pentagram we not only command the demons to depart, but invoke the Archangels and their hosts to act as guardians of the Circle during our pre-occupation with the ceremony proper.

In more elaborate ceremonies it is usual to banish everything by name. Each element, each planet, and each sign, perhaps even the Sephiroth themselves; all are removed, including the very one which we wished to invoke, for that force ... ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA,
68:Depression, unless one has a strong will, suggests, "This is not worth while, one may have to wait a lifetime." As for enthusiasm, it expects to see the vital transformed overnight: "I am not going to have any difficulty henceforth, I am going to advance rapidly on the path of yoga, I am going to gain the divine consciousness without any difficulty." There are some other difficulties.... One needs a little time, much perseverance. So the vital, after a few hours - perhaps a few days, perhaps a few months - says to itself: "We haven't gone very far with our enthusiasm, has anything been really done? Doesn't this movement leave us just where we were, perhaps worse than we were, a little troubled, a little disturbed? Things are no longer what they were, they are not yet what they ought to be. It is very tiresome, what I am doing." And then, if one pushes a little more, here's this gentleman saying, "Ah, no! I have had enough of it, leave me alone. I don't want to move, I shall stay in my corner, I won't trouble you, but don't bother me!" And so one has not gone very much farther than before.
   This is one of the big obstacles which must be carefully avoided. As soon as there is the least sign of discontentment, of annoyance, the vital must be spoken to in this way, "My friend, you are going to keep calm, you are going to do what you are asked to do, otherwise you will have to deal with me." And to the other, the enthusiast who says, "Everything must be done now, immediately", your reply is, "Calm yourself a little, your energy is excellent, but it must not be spent in five minutes. We shall need it for a long time, keep it carefully and, as it is wanted, I shall call upon your goodwill. You will show that you are full of goodwill, you will obey, you won't grumble, you will not protest, you will not revolt, you will say 'yes, yes', you will make a little sacrifice when asked, you will say 'yes' wholeheartedly."
   So we get started on the path. But the road is very long. Many things happen on the way. Suddenly one thinks one has overcome an obstacle; I say "thinks", because though one has overcome it, it is not totally overcome. I am going to take a very obvious instance, of a very simple observation. Someone has found that his vital is uncontrollable and uncontrolled, that it gets furious for nothing and about nothing. He starts working to teach it not to get carried away, not to flare up, to remain calm and bear the shocks of life without reacting violently. If one does this cheerfully, it goes quite quickly. (Note this well, it is very important: when you have to deal with your vital take care to remain cheerful, otherwise you will get into trouble.) One remains cheerful, that is, when one sees the fury rise, one begins to laugh. Instead of being depressed and saying, "Ah! In spite of all my effort it is beginning all over again", one begins to laugh and says, "Well, well! One hasn't yet seen the end of it. Look now, aren't you ridiculous, you know quite well that you are being ridiculous! Is it worthwhile getting angry?" One gives it this lesson cheerfully. And really, after a while it doesn't get angry again, it is quiet - and one relaxes one's attention. One thinks the difficulty has been overcome, one thinks a result has at last been reached: "My vital does not trouble me any longer, it does not get angry now, everything is going fine." And the next day, one loses one's temper. It is then one must be careful, it is then one must not say, "Here we are, it's no use, I shall never achieve anything, all my efforts are futile; all this is an illusion, it is impossible." On the contrary, one must say, "I wasn't vigilant enough." One must wait long, very long, before one can say, "Ah! It is done and finished." Sometimes one must wait for years, many years....
   I am not saying this to discourage you, but to give you patience and perseverance - for there is a moment when you do arrive. And note that the vital is a small part of your being - a very important part, we have said that it is the dynamism, the realising energy, it is very important; but it is only a small part. And the mind!... which goes wandering, which must be pulled back by all the strings to be kept quiet! You think this can be done overnight? And your body?... You have a weakness, a difficulty, sometimes a small chronic illness, nothing much, but still it is a nuisance, isn't it? You want to get rid of it. You make efforts, you concentrate; you work upon it, establish harmony, and you think it is finished, and then.... Take, for instance, people who have the habit of coughing; they can't control themselves or almost can't. It is not serious but it is bothersome, and there seems to be no reason why it should ever stop. Well, one tells oneself, "I am going to control this." One makes an effort - a yogic effort, not a material one - one brings down consciousness, force, and stops the cough. And one thinks, "The body has forgotten how to cough." And it is a great thing when the body has forgotten, truly one can say, "I am cured." But unfortunately it is not always true, for this goes down into the subconscient and, one day, when the balance of forces is not so well established, when the strength is not the same, it begins again. And one laments, "I believed that it was over! I had succeeded and told myself, 'It is true that spiritual power has an action upon the body, it is true that something can be done', and there! it is not true. And yet it was a small thing, and I who want to conquer immortality! How will I succeed?... For years I have been free from this small thing and here it is beginning anew!" It is then that you must be careful. You must arm yourself with an endless patience and endurance. You do a thing once, ten times, a hundred times, a thousand times if necessary, but you do it till it gets done. And not done only here and there, but everywhere and everywhere at the same time. This is the great problem one sets oneself. That is why, to those who come to tell me very light-heartedly, "I want to do yoga", I reply, "Think it over, one may do the yoga for a number of years without noticing the least result. But if you want to do it, you must persist and persist with such a will that you should be ready to do it for ten lifetimes, a hundred lifetimes if necessary, in order to succeed." I do not say it will be like that, but the attitude must be like that. Nothing must discourage you; for there are all the difficulties of ignorance of the different states of being, to which are added the endless malice and the unbounded cunning of the hostile forces in the world.... They are there, do you know why? They have been.... ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951,
69:
   Mother, when one imagines something, does it not exist?

When you imagine something, it means that you make a mental formation which may be close to the truth or far from the truth - it also depends upon the quality of your formation. You make a mental formation and there are people who have such a power of formation that they succeed in making what they imagine real. There are not many of these but there are some. They imagine something and their formation is so well made and so powerful that it succeeds in being realised. These are creators; there are not many of them but there are some.

   If one thinks of someone who doesn't exist or who is dead?

Ah! What do you mean? What have you just said? Someone who doesn't exist or someone who is dead? These are two absolutely different things.

   I mean someone who is dead.

Someone who is dead!

   If this person has remained in the mental domain, you can find him immediately. Naturally if he is no longer in the mental domain, if he is in the psychic domain, to think of him is not enough. You must know how to go into the psychic domain to find him. But if he has remained in the mental domain and you think of him, you can find him immediately, and not only that, but you can have a mental contact with him and a kind of mental vision of his existence.

   The mind has a capacity of vision of its own and it is not the same vision as with these eyes, but it is a vision, it is a perception in forms. But this is not imagination. It has nothing to do with imagination.

   Imagination, for instance, is when you begin to picture to yourself an ideal being to whom you apply all your conceptions, and when you tell yourself, "Why, it should be like this, like that, its form should be like this, its thought like that, its character like that," when you see all the details and build up the being. Now, writers do this all the time because when they write a novel, they imagine. There are those who take things from life but there are those who are imaginative, creators; they create a character, a personage and then put him in their book later. This is to imagine. To imagine, for example, a whole concurrence of circumstances, a set of events, this is what I call telling a story to oneself. But it can be put down on paper, and then one becomes a novelist. There are very different kinds of writers. Some imagine everything, some gather all sorts of observations from life and construct their book with them. There are a hundred ways of writing a book. But indeed some writers imagine everything from beginning to end. It all comes out of their head and they construct even their whole story without any support in things physically observed. This truly is imagination. But as I say, if they are very powerful and have a considerable capacity for creation, it is possible that one day or other there will be a physical human being who realises their creation. This too is true.

   What do you suppose imagination is, eh? Have you never imagined anything, you?

   And what happens?

   All that one imagines.


You mean that you imagine something and it happens like that, eh? Or it is in a dream...

   What is the function, the use of the imagination?

If one knows how to use it, as I said, one can create for oneself his own inner and outer life; one can build his own existence with his imagination, if one knows how to use it and has a power. In fact it is an elementary way of creating, of forming things in the world. I have always felt that if one didn't have the capacity of imagination he would not make any progress. Your imagination always goes ahead of your life. When you think of yourself, usually you imagine what you want to be, don't you, and this goes ahead, then you follow, then it continues to go ahead and you follow. Imagination opens for you the path of realisation. People who are not imaginative - it is very difficult to make them move; they see just what is there before their nose, they feel just what they are moment by moment and they cannot go forward because they are clamped by the immediate thing. It depends a good deal on what one calls imagination. However...

   Men of science must be having imagination!


A lot. Otherwise they would never discover anything. In fact, what is called imagination is a capacity to project oneself outside realised things and towards things realisable, and then to draw them by the projection. One can obviously have progressive and regressive imaginations. There are people who always imagine all the catastrophes possible, and unfortunately they also have the power of making them come. It's like the antennae going into a world that's not yet realised, catching something there and drawing it here. Then naturally it is an addition to the earth atmosphere and these things tend towards manifestation. It is an instrument which can be disciplined, can be used at will; one can discipline it, direct it, orientate it. It is one of the faculties one can develop in himself and render serviceable, that is, use it for definite purposes.

   Sweet Mother, can one imagine the Divine and have the contact?

Certainly if you succeed in imagining the Divine you have the contact, and you can have the contact with what you imagine, in any case. In fact it is absolutely impossible to imagine something which doesn't exist somewhere. You cannot imagine anything at all which doesn't exist somewhere. It is possible that it doesn't exist on the earth, it is possible that it's elsewhere, but it is impossible for you to imagine something which is not already contained in principle in the universe; otherwise it could not occur.

   Then, Sweet Mother, this means that in the created universe nothing new is added?

In the created universe? Yes. The universe is progressive; we said that constantly things manifest, more and more. But for your imagination to be able to go and seek beyond the manifestation something which will be manifested, well, it may happen, in fact it does - I was going to tell you that it is in this way that some beings can cause considerable progress to be made in the world, because they have the capacity of imagining something that's not yet manifested. But there are not many. One must first be capable of going beyond the manifested universe to be able to imagine something which is not there. There are already many things which can be imagined.

   What is our terrestrial world in the universe? A very small thing. Simply to have the capacity of imagining something which does not exist in the terrestrial manifestation is already very difficult, very difficult. For how many billions of years hasn't it existed, this little earth? And there have been no two identical things. That's much. It is very difficult to go out from the earth atmosphere with one's mind; one can, but it is very difficult. And then if one wants to go out, not only from the earth atmosphere but from the universal life!

   To be able simply to enter into contact with the life of the earth in its totality from the formation of the earth until now, what can this mean? And then to go beyond this and enter into contact with universal life from its beginnings up to now... and then again to be able to bring something new into the universe, one must go still farther beyond.

   Not easy!
   That's all?
   (To the child) Convinced?
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, [T1],
70:Intuition And The Value Of Concentration :::
   Mother, how can the faculty of intuition be developed?

   ... There are different kinds of intuition, and we carry these capacities within us. They are always active to some extent but we don't notice them because we don't pay enough attention to what is going on in us. Behind the emotions, deep within the being, in a consciousness seated somewhere near the level of the solar plexus, there is a sort of prescience, a kind of capacity for foresight, but not in the form of ideas: rather in the form of feelings, almost a perception of sensations. For instance, when one is going to decide to do something, there is sometimes a kind of uneasiness or inner refusal, and usually, if one listens to this deeper indication, one realises that it was justified. In other cases there is something that urges, indicates, insists - I am not speaking of impulses, you understand, of all the movements which come from the vital and much lower still - indications which are behind the feelings, which come from the affective part of the being; there too one can receive a fairly sure indication of the thing to be done. These are forms of intuition or of a higher instinct which can be cultivated by observation and also by studying the results. Naturally, it must be done very sincerely, objectively, without prejudice. If one wants to see things in a particular way and at the same time practise this observation, it is all useless. One must do it as if one were looking at what is happening from outside oneself, in someone else. It is one form of intuition and perhaps the first one that usually manifests. There is also another form but that one is much more difficult to observe because for those who are accustomed to think, to act by reason - not by impulse but by reason - to reflect before doing anything, there is an extremely swift process from cause to effect in the half-conscious thought which prevents you from seeing the line, the whole line of reasoning and so you don't think that it is a chain of reasoning, and that is quite deceptive. You have the impression of an intuition but it is not an intuition, it is an extremely rapid subconscious reasoning, which takes up a problem and goes straight to the conclusions. This must not be mistaken for intuition. In the ordinary functioning of the brain, intuition is something which suddenly falls like a drop of light. If one has the faculty, the beginning of a faculty of mental vision, it gives the impression of something coming from outside or above, like a little impact of a drop of light in the brain, absolutely independent of all reasoning. This is perceived more easily when one is able to silence one's mind, hold it still and attentive, arresting its usual functioning, as if the mind were changed into a kind of mirror turned towards a higher faculty in a sustained and silent attention. That too one can learn to do. One must learn to do it, it is a necessary discipline.
   When you have a question to solve, whatever it may be, usually you concentrate your attention here (pointing between the eyebrows), at the centre just above the eyes, the centre of the conscious will. But then if you do that, you cannot be in contact with intuition. You can be in contact with the source of the will, of effort, even of a certain kind of knowledge, but in the outer, almost material field; whereas, if you want to contact the intuition, you must keep this (Mother indicates the forehead) completely immobile. Active thought must be stopped as far as possible and the entire mental faculty must form - at the top of the head and a little further above if possible - a kind of mirror, very quiet, very still, turned upwards, in silent, very concentrated attention. If you succeed, you can - perhaps not immediately - but you can have the perception of the drops of light falling upon the mirror from a still unknown region and expressing themselves as a conscious thought which has no connection with all the rest of your thought since you have been able to keep it silent. That is the real beginning of the intellectual intuition.
   It is a discipline to be followed. For a long time one may try and not succeed, but as soon as one succeeds in making a mirror, still and attentive, one always obtains a result, not necessarily with a precise form of thought but always with the sensations of a light coming from above. And then, if one can receive this light coming from above without entering immediately into a whirl of activity, receive it in calm and silence and let it penetrate deep into the being, then after a while it expresses itself either as a luminous thought or as a very precise indication here (Mother indicates the heart), in this other centre.
   Naturally, first these two faculties must be developed; then, as soon as there is any result, one must observe the result, as I said, and see the connection with what is happening, the consequences: see, observe very attentively what has come in, what may have caused a distortion, what one has added by way of more or less conscious reasoning or the intervention of a lower will, also more or less conscious; and it is by a very deep study - indeed, almost of every moment, in any case daily and very frequent - that one succeeds in developing one's intuition. It takes a long time. It takes a long time and there are ambushes: one can deceive oneself, take for intuitions subconscious wills which try to manifest, indications given by impulses one has refused to receive openly, indeed all sorts of difficulties. One must be prepared for that. But if one persists, one is sure to succeed.
   And there comes a time when one feels a kind of inner guidance, something which is leading one very perceptibly in all that one does. But then, for the guidance to have its maximum power, one must naturally add to it a conscious surrender: one must be sincerely determined to follow the indication given by the higher force. If one does that, then... one saves years of study, one can seize the result extremely rapidly. If one also does that, the result comes very rapidly. But for that, it must be done with sincerity and... a kind of inner spontaneity. If one wants to try without this surrender, one may succeed - as one can also succeed in developing one's personal will and making it into a very considerable power - but that takes a very long time and one meets many obstacles and the result is very precarious; one must be very persistent, obstinate, persevering, and one is sure to succeed, but only after a great labour.
   Make your surrender with a sincere, complete self-giving, and you will go ahead at full speed, you will go much faster - but you must not do this calculatingly, for that spoils everything! (Silence) Moreover, whatever you may want to do in life, one thing is absolutely indispensable and at the basis of everything, the capacity of concentrating the attention. If you are able to gather together the rays of attention and consciousness on one point and can maintain this concentration with a persistent will, nothing can resist it - whatever it may be, from the most material physical development to the highest spiritual one. But this discipline must be followed in a constant and, it may be said, imperturbable way; not that you should always be concentrated on the same thing - that's not what I mean, I mean learning to concentrate.
   And materially, for studies, sports, all physical or mental development, it is absolutely indispensable. And the value of an individual is proportionate to the value of his attention.
   And from the spiritual point of view it is still more important.
   There is no spiritual obstacle which can resist a penetrating power of concentration. For instance, the discovery of the psychic being, union with the inner Divine, opening to the higher spheres, all can be obtained by an intense and obstinate power of concentration - but one must learn how to do it. There is nothing in the human or even in the superhuman field, to which the power of concentration is not the key. You can be the best athlete, you can be the best student, you can be an artistic, literary or scientific genius, you can be the greatest saint with that faculty. And everyone has in himself a tiny little beginning of it - it is given to everybody, but people do not cultivate it.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958,
71:Mental Education

OF ALL lines of education, mental education is the most widely known and practised, yet except in a few rare cases there are gaps which make it something very incomplete and in the end quite insufficient.

   Generally speaking, schooling is considered to be all the mental education that is necessary. And when a child has been made to undergo, for a number of years, a methodical training which is more like cramming than true schooling, it is considered that whatever is necessary for his mental development has been done. Nothing of the kind. Even conceding that the training is given with due measure and discrimination and does not permanently damage the brain, it cannot impart to the human mind the faculties it needs to become a good and useful instrument. The schooling that is usually given can, at the most, serve as a system of gymnastics to increase the suppleness of the brain. From this standpoint, each branch of human learning represents a special kind of mental gymnastics, and the verbal formulations given to these various branches each constitute a special and well-defined language.

   A true mental education, which will prepare man for a higher life, has five principal phases. Normally these phases follow one after another, but in exceptional individuals they may alternate or even proceed simultaneously. These five phases, in brief, are:

   (1) Development of the power of concentration, the capacity of attention.
   (2) Development of the capacities of expansion, widening, complexity and richness.
   (3) Organisation of one's ideas around a central idea, a higher ideal or a supremely luminous idea that will serve as a guide in life.
   (4) Thought-control, rejection of undesirable thoughts, to become able to think only what one wants and when one wants.
   (5) Development of mental silence, perfect calm and a more and more total receptivity to inspirations coming from the higher regions of the being.

   It is not possible to give here all the details concerning the methods to be employed in the application of these five phases of education to different individuals. Still, a few explanations on points of detail can be given.

   Undeniably, what most impedes mental progress in children is the constant dispersion of their thoughts. Their thoughts flutter hither and thither like butterflies and they have to make a great effort to fix them. Yet this capacity is latent in them, for when you succeed in arousing their interest, they are capable of a good deal of attention. By his ingenuity, therefore, the educator will gradually help the child to become capable of a sustained effort of attention and a faculty of more and more complete absorption in the work in hand. All methods that can develop this faculty of attention from games to rewards are good and can all be utilised according to the need and the circumstances. But it is the psychological action that is most important and the sovereign method is to arouse in the child an interest in what you want to teach him, a liking for work, a will to progress. To love to learn is the most precious gift that one can give to a child: to love to learn always and everywhere, so that all circumstances, all happenings in life may be constantly renewed opportunities for learning more and always more.

   For that, to attention and concentration should be added observation, precise recording and faithfulness of memory. This faculty of observation can be developed by varied and spontaneous exercises, making use of every opportunity that presents itself to keep the child's thought wakeful, alert and prompt. The growth of the understanding should be stressed much more than that of memory. One knows well only what one has understood. Things learnt by heart, mechanically, fade away little by little and finally disappear; what is understood is never forgotten. Moreover, you must never refuse to explain to a child the how and the why of things. If you cannot do it yourself, you must direct the child to those who are qualified to answer or point out to him some books that deal with the question. In this way you will progressively awaken in the child the taste for true study and the habit of making a persistent effort to know.

   This will bring us quite naturally to the second phase of development in which the mind should be widened and enriched.

   You will gradually show the child that everything can become an interesting subject for study if it is approached in the right way. The life of every day, of every moment, is the best school of all, varied, complex, full of unexpected experiences, problems to be solved, clear and striking examples and obvious consequences. It is so easy to arouse healthy curiosity in children, if you answer with intelligence and clarity the numerous questions they ask. An interesting reply to one readily brings others in its train and so the attentive child learns without effort much more than he usually does in the classroom. By a choice made with care and insight, you should also teach him to enjoy good reading-matter which is both instructive and attractive. Do not be afraid of anything that awakens and pleases his imagination; imagination develops the creative mental faculty and through it study becomes living and the mind develops in joy.

   In order to increase the suppleness and comprehensiveness of his mind, one should see not only that he studies many varied topics, but above all that a single subject is approached in various ways, so that the child understands in a practical manner that there are many ways of facing the same intellectual problem, of considering it and solving it. This will remove all rigidity from his brain and at the same time it will make his thinking richer and more supple and prepare it for a more complex and comprehensive synthesis. In this way also the child will be imbued with the sense of the extreme relativity of mental learning and, little by little, an aspiration for a truer source of knowledge will awaken in him.

   Indeed, as the child grows older and progresses in his studies, his mind too ripens and becomes more and more capable of forming general ideas, and with them almost always comes a need for certitude, for a knowledge that is stable enough to form the basis of a mental construction which will permit all the diverse and scattered and often contradictory ideas accumulated in his brain to be organised and put in order. This ordering is indeed very necessary if one is to avoid chaos in one's thoughts. All contradictions can be transformed into complements, but for that one must discover the higher idea that will have the power to bring them harmoniously together. It is always good to consider every problem from all possible standpoints so as to avoid partiality and exclusiveness; but if the thought is to be active and creative, it must, in every case, be the natural and logical synthesis of all the points of view adopted. And if you want to make the totality of your thoughts into a dynamic and constructive force, you must also take great care as to the choice of the central idea of your mental synthesis; for upon that will depend the value of this synthesis. The higher and larger the central idea and the more universal it is, rising above time and space, the more numerous and the more complex will be the ideas, notions and thoughts which it will be able to organise and harmonise.

   It goes without saying that this work of organisation cannot be done once and for all. The mind, if it is to keep its vigour and youth, must progress constantly, revise its notions in the light of new knowledge, enlarge its frame-work to include fresh notions and constantly reclassify and reorganise its thoughts, so that each of them may find its true place in relation to the others and the whole remain harmonious and orderly.

   All that has just been said concerns the speculative mind, the mind that learns. But learning is only one aspect of mental activity; the other, which is at least equally important, is the constructive faculty, the capacity to form and thus prepare action. This very important part of mental activity has rarely been the subject of any special study or discipline. Only those who want, for some reason, to exercise a strict control over their mental activities think of observing and disciplining this faculty of formation; and as soon as they try it, they have to face difficulties so great that they appear almost insurmountable.

   And yet control over this formative activity of the mind is one of the most important aspects of self-education; one can say that without it no mental mastery is possible. As far as study is concerned, all ideas are acceptable and should be included in the synthesis, whose very function is to become more and more rich and complex; but where action is concerned, it is just the opposite. The ideas that are accepted for translation into action should be strictly controlled and only those that agree with the general trend of the central idea forming the basis of the mental synthesis should be permitted to express themselves in action. This means that every thought entering the mental consciousness should be set before the central idea; if it finds a logical place among the thoughts already grouped, it will be admitted into the synthesis; if not, it will be rejected so that it can have no influence on the action. This work of mental purification should be done very regularly in order to secure a complete control over one's actions.

   For this purpose, it is good to set apart some time every day when one can quietly go over one's thoughts and put one's synthesis in order. Once the habit is acquired, you can maintain control over your thoughts even during work and action, allowing only those which are useful for what you are doing to come to the surface. Particularly, if you have continued to cultivate the power of concentration and attention, only the thoughts that are needed will be allowed to enter the active external consciousness and they then become all the more dynamic and effective. And if, in the intensity of concentration, it becomes necessary not to think at all, all mental vibration can be stilled and an almost total silence secured. In this silence one can gradually open to the higher regions of the mind and learn to record the inspirations that come from there.

   But even before reaching this point, silence in itself is supremely useful, because in most people who have a somewhat developed and active mind, the mind is never at rest. During the day, its activity is kept under a certain control, but at night, during the sleep of the body, the control of the waking state is almost completely removed and the mind indulges in activities which are sometimes excessive and often incoherent. This creates a great stress which leads to fatigue and the diminution of the intellectual faculties.

   The fact is that like all the other parts of the human being, the mind too needs rest and it will not have this rest unless we know how to provide it. The art of resting one's mind is something to be acquired. Changing one's mental activity is certainly one way of resting; but the greatest possible rest is silence. And as far as the mental faculties are concerned a few minutes passed in the calm of silence are a more effective rest than hours of sleep.

   When one has learned to silence the mind at will and to concentrate it in receptive silence, then there will be no problem that cannot be solved, no mental difficulty whose solution cannot be found. When it is agitated, thought becomes confused and impotent; in an attentive tranquillity, the light can manifest itself and open up new horizons to man's capacity. Bulletin, November 1951

   ~ The Mother, On Education,
72:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step.

But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort.

Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.

*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection.

You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, *I am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: *I have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages.

In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything.

It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM.

My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga.

All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.

These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness.

And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed.

And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen.

My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal.

Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967

~ The Mother, Sweet Mother, The Mother to Mona Sarkar, [T0],

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Either attempt it not, or succeed. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
2:I will persist until I succeed! ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
3:And will you succeed? Yes, you will indeed! ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
4:Rather fail with honor than succeed by fraud. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
5:Books succeed; and lives fail. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
6:He who feared that he would not succeed sat still. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
7:Pessimism blunts the tools you need to succeed. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
8:It takes less work to succeed than to fail. ~ w-clement-stone, @wisdomtrove
9:In war, practice dissimulation and you will succeed. ~ sun-tzu, @wisdomtrove
10:Only the absolutely determined people succeed. ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
11:Remember, you only have to succeed the last time. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
12:If you try to fail, and succeed, what have you done? ~ george-carlin, @wisdomtrove
13:If at first you do succeed don't take any more chances. ~ kin-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
14:If at first you do succeed, quit trying on investing. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
15:I live to succeed, not to please you or anyone else. ~ marilyn-monroe, @wisdomtrove
16:In America, everything you need to succeed is within reach. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
17:Whether you think you will succeed or not, you are right. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
18:Do not try to live forever. You will not succeed. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
19:Everything that you need to succeed has been given to you. ~ alan-cohen, @wisdomtrove
20:If at first you don't succeed, failure may be your style. ~ quentin-crisp, @wisdomtrove
21:Is your fear of failure greater than your desire to succeed? ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
22:I would rather fail trying than succeed at doing nothing. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
23:Aim not to win or succeed, but for excellence in the moment. ~ dan-millman, @wisdomtrove
24:If you believe in yourself and have passion, you can succeed. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
25:If he did not succeed, he at least failed in a glorious undertaking. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
26:I would rather fail at what I love than succeed at what I hate. ~ les-brown, @wisdomtrove
27:Success is counted sweetest / By those who ne'er succeed. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
28:You cannot succeed by yourself. It's hard to find a rich hermit. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
29:A person who refuses to give up will always succeed eventually. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
30:... a true servant of God is someone who helps another succeed. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
31:Only a lie that wasn't ashamed of itself could possibly succeed. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
32:The question is not Will you succeed? but rather, Will you matter? ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
33:To succeed in life, you need two things: ignorance and confidence. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
34:If I succeed, I will give thanks. If I fail, I will seek His grace. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
35:Never try to discourage thinking for you are sure to succeed. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
36:No man can succeed in a line of endeavor which he does not like. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
37:Success is a learnable skill. You can learn to succeed at anything ~ t-harv-eker, @wisdomtrove
38:To see them succeed, to see them improve, that is what matters. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
39:God doesn't require us to succeed, he only requires that you try. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
40:People rarely succeed unless they have fun in what they are doing. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
41:But when ill indeed, Even dismissing the doctor don't always succeed. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
42:If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried. ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
43:Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can succeed. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
44:People with goals succeed because they know where they're going. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
45:It's your thinking that decides whether you're going to succeed or fail. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
46:Success will win you false friends and true enemies - succeed anyway. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
47:To succeed, planning alone is insufficient. One must improvise as well. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
48:I am not a failure if I don't succeed; I am successful because I tried. ~ susan-jeffers, @wisdomtrove
49:If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you. ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
50:To succeed you must add water to your wine, until there is no more wine. ~ jules-renard, @wisdomtrove
51:To succeed, you must have tremendous perseverance, tremendous will. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
52:If we succeed without sacrifice, it's because someone sacrificed for us. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
53:It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
54:Nobody knows what I am trying to do but I do and I know when I succeed. ~ gertrude-stein, @wisdomtrove
55:With courage you can stay with something long enough to succeed at it. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
56:Failure will never overtake me if my determination to succeed is strong enough. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
57:There is so much data available to us, but most data won't help us succeed. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
58:Let us be thankful for the fools. But for them the rest of us could not succeed. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
59:Resolve in advance to persist until you succeed, no matter what the difficulty. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
60:All the forces of darkness need to succeed ... is for the people to do nothing. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
61:Failure is an absolute prerequisite for success. You learn to succeed by failing. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
62:It's impossible to fail completely and it's impossible to succeed perfectly. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
63:There is only one way to succeed in anything and that is to give it everything. ~ vince-lombardi, @wisdomtrove
64:If I persist, if I continue to try, if I continue to charge forward, I will succeed! ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
65:To succeed, work hard, never give up and above all cherish a magnificent obsession. ~ walt-disney, @wisdomtrove
66:You will succeed if you persevere; and you will find joy in overcoming obstacles. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
67:We find our energies are actually cramped when we are overanxious to succeed. ~ michel-de-montaigne, @wisdomtrove
68:Be bold, brave and not afraid to fall on your face and ultimately you will succeed ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
69:He who has infinite patience and infinite energy at his back, will alone succeed. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
70:Never hide behind busy work. It takes just as much energy to fail as it does to succeed. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
71:The goal has never been to always succeed. The goal is to be allowed to keep initiating. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
72:Some men succeed by what they know; some by what they do; and a few by what they are. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
73:However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
74:To survive and succeed, every organization will have to turn itself into a change agent ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
75:We are the sons of Light and children of God. Glory unto the Lord, we will succeed. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
76:I never have frustrations. The reason is to wit: Of at first I don't succeed, I quit! ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
77:It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
78:Let no feeling of discouragement prey upon you, and in the end you are sure to succeed. ~ abraham-lincoln, @wisdomtrove
79:Our business in life is not to succeed, but to continue to fail in good spirits. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
80:When you absolutely believe in yourself and your ability to succeed, nothing will stop you. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
81:Do your work with your whole heart, and you will succeed - there's so little competition. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
82:Keep your mind on your objective, and persist until you succeed. Study, think, and plan. ~ w-clement-stone, @wisdomtrove
83:The man who has the largest capacity for work and thought is the man who is bound to succeed. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
84:And will you succeed? Yes indeed, yes indeed! Ninety-eight and three-quarters percent guaranteed! ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
85:To succeed in any field, Our enthusiasm-eyes must sparkle and our enthusiasm-hearts Must dance. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
86:If you are successful, you will win some false friends & some true enemies: Succeed anyway ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
87:It is not your business to succeed, but to do right. When you have done so the rest lies with god. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
88:I'd rather attempt to do something great and fail than to attempt to do nothing and succeed. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
89:Persistence is the iron quality of success; if you persist long enough you must eventually succeed ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
90:The more times and the more different things you try, the more likely it is that you will succeed. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
91:Having the competitive edge to be able to succeed is having control of your time, life and mind. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
92:I will persist until I succeed. I know that small attempts, repeated, will complete any undertaking. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
93:Know that the mind which is born to succeed joins itself to a determined will and perseveres. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
94:To wish is of little account; to succeed you must earnestly desire; and this desire must shorten thy sleep. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
95:Love the one who wears your ring. And cherish the children who share your name. Succeed at home first. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
96:Many people are afraid to embrace religion, for fear they shall not succeed in maintaining it. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
97:The biggest reason people don't succeed is because they don't expose themselves to existing information. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
98:Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other one thing. ~ abraham-lincoln, @wisdomtrove
99:Failure is a prerequisite for great success. If you want to succeed faster, double your rate of failure. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
100:Most people would succeed in small things if they were not troubled with great ambitions. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
101:Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
102:Run and become. Become and run. Run to succeed in the outer world. Become to proceed in the inner world. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
103:Empires of the Mind: Lessons to Lead and Succeed in a Knowledge-based World. Book by Denis Waitley, 1995. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
104:My business is to succeed, and I’m good at it. I create my Iliad by my actions, create it day by day. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
105:It is no use saying, &
106:Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail. Without it, nothing can succeed. ~ abraham-lincoln, @wisdomtrove
107:They had not yet attained the stupefying boredom of omnipotence; their experiments did not always succeed. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
108:To succeed in business you need to be original, but you also need to understand what your customers want. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
109:You've got to take risks if you're going to succeed. I would much rather ask forgiveness than permission. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
110:Without debate, without criticism no administration and no country can succeed and no republic can survive. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
111:Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time. ~ thomas-edison, @wisdomtrove
112:To succeed in sales, simply talk to lots of people every day. And here's what's exciting: There are lots of people! ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
113:If you don't succeed at first, there's no need for the F word (Failure). Pick yourself up and try, try again. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
114:Women are constantly trying to commit suicide for love, but generally they take care not to succeed. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
115:My scholarly expectation is then that I may succeed in becoming clever in philosophy in spite of my stupidity. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
116:God's love never ceases. Never... God doesn't love us less if we fail or more if we succeed. God's love never ceases. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
117:Great leaders must be able to realize when something isn’t working-no matter how hard they’ve worked to make it succeed. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
118:However bad life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. Where there's life, there's hope. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
119:To find yourself jilted is a blow to your pride. Do your best to forget it and if you don't succeed, at least pretend to. ~ moliere, @wisdomtrove
120:Trust in God and destroy fear, which paralyzes all efforts to succeed and attracts the very thing you fear. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
121:A republic cannot succeed, till it contains a certain body of men imbued with the principles of justice and honour. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
122:One may go wrong in many different ways, but right only in one, which is why it is easy to fail and difficult to succeed. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
123:Make each day count by setting specific goals to succeed, then putting forth every effort to exceed your own expectations. ~ les-brown, @wisdomtrove
124:The entrepreneurs who succeed usually want to make a difference to people’s lives, not just their own bank balances. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
125:In warfare, there are no constant conditions. He who can modify his tactics in relation to his opponent will succeed and win. ~ sun-tzu, @wisdomtrove
126:It is through the human figure that I best succeed in expressing the nearly religious feeling that I have towards life. ~ henri-matisse, @wisdomtrove
127:The reason most people fail instead of succeed is they trade what they want most for what they want at the moment. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
128:Do not be concerned that you might set a target too high and fail. Be concerned that you will set it too low and succeed. ~ michelangelo, @wisdomtrove
129:Implement your plans with courage and persistence. Have complete faith in your ability to succeed and never, ever give up. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
130:I really believe that everyone has a talent, ability, or skill that he can mine to support himself and to succeed in life. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
131:Most people who succeed in the face of seemingly impossible conditions are people who simply don't know how to quit. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
132:Success simple disciplines, practiced every day, while failure a few errors in judgment, repeated every day. Choose to succeed. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
133:The more you succeed in loving, the more you'll be convinced at the existence of God and the immortality of your soul. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
134:Every start on an untrodden path is a venture which only in unusual circumstances looks sensible and likely to succeed. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
135:If one must be rejected, one succeed, make him my lord within whose faithful breast is fixed my image, and who loves me best. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
136:Give me a man with an average ability but a burning desire to succeed and I will give you a winner in exchange every time. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
137:If I succeed in loving you, I will be able to love everyone and all species on Earth... This is the real message of love. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
138:You can develop a burning desire to succeed. How? Keep your mind on the things you want and off the things you don't want. ~ w-clement-stone, @wisdomtrove
139:If not in the interests of the state, do not act. If you cannot succeed, do not use troops. If you are not in danger, do not fight. ~ sun-tzu, @wisdomtrove
140:People are not remembered by how few times they fail, but by how often they succeed. Every wrong step is another step forward. ~ thomas-edison, @wisdomtrove
141:Politics is not a bad profession. If you succeed there are many rewards, if you disgrace yourself you can always write a book. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
142:He will often have to scratch his head, and bite his nails to the quick. [To succeed he will have to puzzle his brains and work hard.] ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
143:While you may have made money doing something a certain way yesterday, there's no reason to believe you'll succeed at it tomorrow. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
144:However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do, and succeed at. It matters that you don’t just give up. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
145:Beware of endeavoring to become a great man in a hurry. One such attempt in ten thousand may succeed. These are fearful odds. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
146:There is a great deal that either has to be given up or be taken away from you if you are going to succeed in writing a body of work. ~ susan-sontag, @wisdomtrove
147:There's something which impels us to show our inner souls. The more courageous we are, the more we succeed in explaining what we know. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
148:We prematurely write off people as failures. We are too much in awe of those who succeed and far too dismissive of those who fail. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
149:Decency must be an even more exhausting state to maintain than its opposite. Those who succeed seem to need a stupefying amount of sleep. ~ quentin-crisp, @wisdomtrove
150:Cease negative mental chattering. If you think a thing is impossible, you'll make it impossible. Pessimism blunts the tools you need to succeed. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
151:Success is the most natural thing in the world. The person who does not succeed has placed himself in opposition to the laws of the Universe. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
152:If you try to create a type, you may end with nothing. If you do a good job of creating an individual, you may succeed at creating a type. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
153:Success is to be measured not so much by the position one has reached in life as by the obstacles he has overcome while trying to succeed. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
154:The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential... these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
155:You succeed because you've chosen to be confident. It's not really useful to require yourself to be successful before you're able to become confident. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
156:I believe we are most likely to succeed when ambition is focused on noble and worthy purposes and outcomes rather than on goals set out of selfishness. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
157:Some boys go to college and eventually succeed in getting out. Others go to college and never succeed in getting out. The latter are called professors. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
158:He who wants to succeed should learn how to fight, to strive and to suffer. You can acquire a lot in life, if you are prepared to give up a lot to get it. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
159:People talk of the pathos and failure of plain women; but it is a more terrible thing that a beautiful woman may succeed in everything but womanhood. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
160:Some men, who begin by saying that the world is a hell, often end by saying that it is a heaven when they succeed in the practice of self-control. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
161:Wisdom always makes men fortunate: for by wisdom no man could ever err, and therefore he must act rightly and succeed, or his wisdom would be wisdom no longer. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
162:If you have more than 120 or 130 I.Q. points, you can afford to give the rest away. You don't need extraordinary intelligence to succeed as an investor. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
163:In the struggle for survival, the fittest win out at the expense of their rivals because they succeed in adapting themselves best to their environment. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
164:The great difference between those who succeed and those who fail does not consist in the amount of work done by each but in the amount of intelligent work. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
165:Tomorrow is the day reserved for the labor of the lazy. I am not lazy. Tomorrow is the day when the failure will succeed. I am not a failure. I will act now. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
166:The important thing is not to know who "I" is or what "I" is. You'll never succeed. There are no words for it. The important thing is to drop the labels. ~ anthony-de-mello, @wisdomtrove
167:We Don't always succeed in what we try, certainly not by the world's standards, but I think you'll find it's the willingness to keep trying that matters most. ~ fred-rogers, @wisdomtrove
168:Under democracy one party always devotes its chief energies to trying to prove that the other party is unfit to rule—and both commonly succeed, and are right. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
169:In Paris they just simply opened their eyes and stared when we spoke to them in French! We never did succeed in making those idiots understand their own language. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
170:If you love, absolutely love what you are doing, chances are excellent that you will succeed. There is nothing so exhausting as working on a job you don't like. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
171:If you're co-founder or CEO, you have to do all kinds of tasks you might not want to do. If you don't do your chores, the company won't succeed. No task is too menial. ~ elon-musk, @wisdomtrove
172:Rome did not create a great empire by having meetings, they did it by killing all those who opposed them. If at first you don't succeed, failure may be your style. ~ quentin-crisp, @wisdomtrove
173:People in their handlings of affairs often fail when they are about to succeed. If one remains as careful at the end as he was at the beginning, there will be no failure. ~ lao-tzu, @wisdomtrove
174:Just never forget to be dexterous and deft. And never mix up your right foot with your left. And will you succeed? Yes! You will, indeed! (98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed.) ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
175:If we don’t get the first SpaceX rocket launch to succeed by the time we’ve spent $100 million, we will stop the company. That will be enough for three attempted launches. ~ elon-musk, @wisdomtrove
176:Life is a glorious opportunity, if it is used to condition us for eternity. If we fail in this, though we succeed in everything else, our life will have been a failure. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
177:The man who will use his skill and constructive imagination to see how much he can give for a dollar, instead of how little he can give for a dollar, is bound to succeed. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
178:We succeed only as we identify in life, or in war, or in anything else, a single overriding objective, and make all other considerations bend to that one objective. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
179:Mastering proactive responses will take time and practice. You may not always succeed, but just remembering that you have a choice will make a great deal of difference. ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
180:It is better to try something and fail than to try nothing and succeed. The result may be the same, but you won't be. We always grow more through defeats than victories. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
181:The function and responsibility of the President is to set before the American people the unfinished business, the things we must do if we are going to succeed as a nation. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
182:Those who start in business with too little money are more likely to succeed than those who start with too much. Energy and imagination are the springboards to wealth creation. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
183:You will never succeed while smarting under the drudgery of your occupation, if you are constantly haunted with the idea that you could succeed better in something else. ~ orison-swett-marden, @wisdomtrove
184:That is the hardest thing of all. It is much harder to judge yourself than to judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself, it's because you're truly a wise man. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
185:A female friend, amiable, clever, and devoted, is a possession more valuable than parks and palaces; and without such a muse, few men can succeed in life, none be contented. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
186:When we use power to cause someone else not to succeed so that we can succeed, it slows our vibratory frequency. It slows us down.  When we slow down we experience unhappiness. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
187:Unhappy is the fate of one who tries to win his battles and succeed in his attacks without cultivating the spirit of enterprise, for the result is waste of time and general stagnation. ~ sun-tzu, @wisdomtrove
188:... outsiders are way more likely to approach your organization with fabulous projects if they think they're likely to both get a good reception and succeed when they get to market. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
189:I have begun everything with the idea that I could succeed, and I never had much patience with the multitudes of people who are always ready to explain why one cannot succeed. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
190:An investor will succeed by coupling good business judgment with an ability to insulate his thoughts and behavior from the super-contagious emotions that swirl about the marketplace. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
191:I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has had to overcome while trying to succeed. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
192:In order to succeed, this group will need a singleness of purpose, they will need a dedication, and they will have to convince all of their prospects of the willingness to sacrifice. ~ vince-lombardi, @wisdomtrove
193:Not to give up under any circumstances should be the motto of our life: I shall try again and again, and I am bound to succeed. There will be obstacles, but I have to defy the obstacles. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
194:Will you succeed because you are more well-rounded than others? Because you fit in better than everyone else? Bloody unlikely. We succeed when we are trusted to be the best at what we do. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
195:The hyperfast-moving, wired-up, reengineered, quality-obsessed organization will succeed or fail on the strength of the trust that its managers place in the folks working on the front line. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
196:No employer today is independent of those about him. He cannot succeed alone, no matter how great his ability or capital. Business today is more than ever a question of cooperation. ~ orison-swett-marden, @wisdomtrove
197:Now I feel as if I should succeed in doing something in mathematics, although I cannot see why it is so very important. . . The knowledge doesn't make life any sweeter or happier, does it? ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
198:Our task is to find teaching methods that continually engage the whole human being. We would not succeed in this endeavor if we failed to concentrate on developing the human sense of art. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
199:We live in a competitive society. To pretend that it is not there is ridiculous. That is how the whole planet is set up. If you are not competitive, you do not succeed, you do not survive. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
200:Badness cannot succeed even in being bad in the same way in which goodness is good. Goodness is, so to speak, itself: badness is only spoiled goodness. Evil is a parasite, not an original thing. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
201:The best way to succeed is to discover what you love and then find a way to offer it to others in the form of service, working hard, and also allowing the energy of the universe to lead you. ~ oprah-winfrey, @wisdomtrove
202:You need a string of successes behind you to buoy that self-image; otherwise, you have a terribly negative attitude about yourself and it is very unlikely you are going to succeed at anything. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
203:It is not reasonable that he who does not shoot should hit the mark, nor that he who does not stand fast at his post should win the day, or that the helpless man should succeed or the coward prosper. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
204:The way to learn to do things is to do things. The way to learn a trade is to work at it. Success teaches how to succeed. Begin with the determination to succeed, and the work is half done already. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
205:It should feel genuinely good to earn income from your blog - you should be driven by a healthy ambition to succeed. If your blog provides genuine value, you fully deserve to earn income from it. ~ steve-pavlina, @wisdomtrove
206:Psychoanalysis is a science conducted by lunatics for lunatics. They are generally concerned with proving that people are irresponsible; and they certainly succeed in proving that some people are ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
207:People do not mind people who try things and fail. If you're a good entrepreneur, you're not going to succeed in every single thing you try. You've got to try to succeed at more things than fail. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
208:Time changes everything, but with patience we can keep our desires relatively constant. If we can just hang on long enough, time will eventually create for us the conditions in which we can succeed. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
209:God puts people in our lives on purpose so we can help them succeed and help them become all He created them to be. Most people will not reach their full potential without somebody else believing in them. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
210:So be sure when you step, Step with care and great tact. And remember that life's A Great Balancing Act. And will you succeed? Yes! You will, indeed! (98 and ¾ percent guaranteed) Kid, you'll move mountains. ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
211:God doesn't ask that we succeed in everything, but that we are faithful. However beautiful our work may be, let us not become attached to it. Always remain prepared to give it up, without losing your peace. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
212:The right art is purposeless, aimless! The more obstinately you try to learn how to shoot the arrow for the sake of hitting the goal, the less you will succeed in the one and the further the other will recede. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
213:Your persistence is, in fact, the true measure of your belief in yourself and your ability to succeed. Each time that you persist in the face of adversity and disappointment, you build the habit of persistence. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
214:If a man wants to set up as an innkeeper and he does not succeed, it is not comic. If, on the contrary, a girl asks to be allowed to set up as a prostitute and she fails, as sometimes happens, it is comic. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
215:These are the four abuses: desire to succeed in order to make oneself famous; taking credit for the labors of others; refusal to correct one's errors despite advice; refusal to change one's ideas despite warnings. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
216:Do you feel disappointed because something you planned didn't work out If so you can get re-appointed today. In God there are never any dead-ends only detours. Don't ever give up. Just keep trying until you succeed. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
217:The simplified life is a sanctified life, Much more calm, much less strife. Oh, what wondrous truths are unveiled- Projects succeed which had previously failed. Oh, how beautiful life can be, Beautiful simplicity. ~ peace-pilgrim, @wisdomtrove
218:You'll never succeed in idealizing hard work. Before you can dig mother earth you've got to take off your ideal jacket. The harder a man works, at brute labor, the thinner becomes his idealism, the darker his mind. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
219:I may venture to affirm the rest of mankind, that they are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
220:Courage changes things for the better... [With courage you can] stay with something long enough to succeed at it, realizing that it usually takes two, three or four times as long to succeed as you thought or hoped. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
221:The truth is that you cannot attain God if you have even a trace of desire. Subtle is the way of dharma. If you are trying to thread a needle, you will not succeed if the thread has even a slight fiber sticking out. ~ sri-ramakrishna, @wisdomtrove
222:Marrying, founding a family, accepting all the children that come, supporting them in this insecure world, and perhaps even guiding them a little, is, I am convinced, the utmost a human being can succeed in doing at all. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
223:He who learns but does not think, is lost! He who thinks but does not learn is in great danger... Men of superior mind busy themselves first getting at the root of things; when they succeed, the right course is open to them. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
224:The victim should have the right to end his life, if he wants. But I think it would be a great mistake. However bad life may seem, there is always something you can do, and succeed at. While there's life, there is hope. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
225:If you want to succeed always associate with winners, people who have understood something. You will notice that they all share something in common, tremendous attention to detail in their personal lives and associations. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
226:The profoundest affinities are those most readily felt, and though a thousand later considerations may overlay and override them, they remain a background and standard for all happiness. If we trace them out we succeed. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
227:The monomaniac is unlikely to succeed. Most leave only their bleached bones in the roadless desert. But the rest of us, with our multiple interests instead of a single mission, are certain to fail and have no impact at all. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
228:You knew all along that your sanctioned world was only half the world, and you tried to suppress the other half the same way the priests and teachers do. You won't succeed. No one succeeds in this once he has begun to think. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
229:Send me 300 francs; that sum will enable me to go to Paris. There, at least, one can cut a figure and surmount obstacles. Everything tells me I shall succeed. Will you prevent me from doing so for the want of 100 crowns? ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
230:Humanists recognize that it is only when people feel free to think for themselves, using reason as their guide, that they are best capable of developing values that succeed in satisfying human needs and serving human interests. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
231:I do not doubt that it would be easier for fate to take away your suffering than it would for me. But you will see for yourself that much has been gained if we succeed in turning your hysterical misery into common unhappiness. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
232:The way you succeed at all this stuff is by stopping trying to succeed and just working very hard without thinking about it, just trusting, completely. It's that faith that creates the bridge on which you walk across to eternity. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
233:Teamwork appears most effective if each individual helps others to succeed, increasing the synergy of that team; ideally, every person will contribute different skills to increase the efficiency of the team and develop its unity. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
234:Don Quixote thought he could have made beautiful bird-cages and toothpicks if his brain had not been so full of ideas of chivalry. Most people would succeed in small things if they were not troubled with great ambitions. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
235:These lights, this brightness, these clusters of human hope, of wild desire—I shall take these lights in my fingers. I shall make them bright, and whether they shine or not, it is in these fingers that they shall succeed or fail. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
236:Ulysses ... is a dogged attempt to cover the universe with mud, an inverted Victorianism, an attempt to make crossness and dirt succeed where sweetness and light failed, a simplification of the human character in the interests of Hell. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
237:Historical theology has too often failed to interpret repentance as a positive creative force. ... Essentially, if Christianity is to succeed in the next millennium, it must cease to be a negative religion and must become positive. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
238:World, death, devil, hell, away and leave me in peace! You have no hold on me. If you will not let me live, then I will die. But you won't succeed in that. Chop my head off, and it won't harm me. I have a God who will give me a new one. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
239:We are not going to succeed in everything we attempt in life. That's a guarantee. In fact, the more we do in life, the more chance there is not to succeed in some things. But what a rich life we are having! Win or lose, we just keep winning. ~ susan-jeffers, @wisdomtrove
240:All that is necessary for evil to succeed is for good men to do nothing as they must if they believe they can do nothing. There is nothing worse because the council of despair is declaration of irresponsibility; it is Pilate washing his hands. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
241:I will persist until I succeed. Always will I take another step. If that is of no avail I will take another, and yet another. In truth, one step at a time is not too difficult... I know that small attempts, repeated, will complete any undertaking. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
242:Remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Try to make sense of what you see and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious. And however difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
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244:I believe that my race will succeed in proportion as it learns to do a common thing in an uncommon manner; learns to do a thing so thoroughly that no one can improve upon what it has done; learns to make its services of indispensable value. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
245:People see successes that men have made and somehow they appear to be easy. But that is a world away from the facts. It is failure that is easy. Success is always hard. A man can fail easily; he can succeed only by paying out all that he has and is. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
246:There is only one way to succeed in anything and that is to give everything. I do and I demand that my players do. Any man's finest hour is when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle... victorious. ~ vince-lombardi, @wisdomtrove
247:Expect to succeed even before you start. All winners, no matter what their game, start with the expectations that they are going to succeed. Winners say, "I want to do this and I CAN do this", not "I would like to do this, but I don't think I can." ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
248:I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live by the light that I have. I must stand with anybody that stands right, and stand with him while he is right, and part with him when he goes wrong. ~ abraham-lincoln, @wisdomtrove
249:If you want a man to succeed in the reform of his affairs which are in a deadlock and mess, you must self-evidently first of all tell him how to reform the instrument with which he has to carry out that reform&
250:To succeed, you must have tremendous perserverance... tremendous will. "I will drink the ocean", says the perservering soul; at my will mountains will crumble. Have that sort of energy, that sort of will; work hard, and you will reach the goal. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
251:God may allow His servant to succeed when He has disciplined him to a point where he does not need to succeed to be happy. The man who is elated by success and is cast down by failure is still a carnal man. At best his fruit will have a worm in it. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
252:I have advice for new writers, first of all, at any time in the history of publishing in my experience, there will be endless number people telling you that you can't do what you are trying to do. You won't succeed, there's something else you should be doing. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
253:The spirit of the place is a strange thing. Our mechanical age tries to override it. But it does not succeed. In the end the strange, sinister spirit of the place, so diverse and adverse in differing places, will smash our mechanical oneness into smithereens. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
254:Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. To these I commit my day. If I succeed, I will give thanks. If I fail, I will seek his grace. And then, when this day is done, I will place my head on my pillow and rest. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
255:For a true writer each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
256:At bottom, and just in the deepest and most important things, we are unutterably alone, and for one person to be able to advise or even help another, a lot must happen, a lot must go well, a whole constellation of things must come right in order once to succeed. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
257:Love is better than hate, because it brings harmony instead of conflict into the desires of the persons concerned. Two people between whom there is love succeed or fail together, but when two people hate each other the success of either is the failure of the other. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
258:Many of us delude ourselves with the thought that if we could stand in the lot of our more fortunate neighbor, we could live better, happier and more useful lives. ... It is my experience that unless we can succeed in our present position, we could not succeed in any other. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
259:There never has been devised, and there never will be devised, any law which will enable a man to succeed save by the exercise of those qualities which have always been the prerequisites of success - the qualities of hard work, of keen intelligence, of unflinching will. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
260:You must be as joyful when you fail again and again as you are joyful when you succeed. It is often when you fail that you move toward the goal without being aware of it. You must feel joy even when you have not fully succeeded but only moved toward achievement of your goal. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
261:Once the realization is accepted that even between the closest human beings infinite distances continue, a wonderful living side by side can grow, if they succeed in loving the distance between them which makes it possible for each to see the other whole against the sky. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
262:The witch doctor succeeds for the same reason all the rest of us succeed. Each patient carries his or her own doctor inside him or her. They come to us not knowing that truth. We are at our best when we give the doctor who resides within each patient a chance to go to work. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
263:There is indeed one element in human destiny that not blindness itself can controvert: whatever else we are intended to do, we are not intended to succeed; failure is the fate allotted. It is so in every art and study; it is so above all in the continent art of living well. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
264:The ... problem that confronts homosexuals is that they set out to win the love of a "real" man. If they succeed, they fail. A man who "goes with" other men is not what they would call a real man. The conundrum is incapable of resolution, but that does not make homosexuals give it up. ~ quentin-crisp, @wisdomtrove
265:I've come to believe that each of us has a personal calling that's as unique as a fingerprint - and that the best way to succeed is to discover what you love and then find a way to offer it to others in the form of service, working hard, and also allowing the energy of the universe to lead you. ~ oprah-winfrey, @wisdomtrove
266:Be of good cheer. Do not think of today's failures, but of the success that may come tomorrow. You have set yourselves a difficult task, but you will succeed if you persevere, and you will find a joy in overcoming obstacles... Remember, no effort that we make to attain something beautiful is ever lost. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
267:The fastest way for you to succeed is by piggy-backing on the good advice and counsel of men and women who have already spent years leaning how to succeed. When you do this on a regular and systematic basis, you will open up doors of opportunity and possibilities for you that today you cannot even imagine. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
268:Through my love for you, I want to express my love for the whole cosmos, the whole of humanity, and all beings. By living with you, I want to learn to love everyone and all species. If I succeed in loving you, I will be able to love everyone and all species on Earth... This is the real message of love. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
269:To succeed in this new world, we will have to learn, first, who we are. Few people, even highly successful people, can answer the questions, Do you know what you're good at? Do you know what you need to learn so that you get the full benefit of your strengths? Few have even asked themselves these questions. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
270:[Speaking of his experience in a concentration camp:] As we said before, any attempt to restore a man's inner strength in the camp had first to succeed in showing him some future goal... Woe to him who saw no more sense in his life, no aim, no purpose, and therefore no point in carrying on. He was soon lost. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
271:The understanding between a non-technical writer and his reader is that he shall talk more or less like a human being and not like an Act of Parliament. I take it that the aim of such books must be to convey exact thought in inexact language... he can never succeed without the co-operation of the reader. ~ sir-arthur-eddington, @wisdomtrove
272:This Maya is everywhere. It is terrible. Yet we have to work through it. The man who says that he will work when the world has become all good and then he will enjoy bliss is as likely to succeed as the man who sits beside the Ganga and says, "I will ford the river when all the water has run into the ocean." ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
273:Good writing does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head—even if in the end you conclude that someone else's head is not a place you'd really like to be. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
274:I believe that traditional wisdom is incomplete. A composer can have all the talent of Mozart and a passionate desire to succeed, but if he believes he cannot compose music, he will come to nothing. He will not try hard enough. He will give up too soon when the elusive right melody takes too long to materialize. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
275:I will persist until I succeed. I was not delivered into this world into defeat, nor does failure course in my veins. I am not a sheep waiting to be prodded by my shepperd. I am lion and I refuse to talk, to walk, to sleep with the sheep. The slaughterhouse of failure is not my destiny. I will persist until I succeed. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
276:And yet all loneliness, angers, hatreds, envies, and itchings that it contains, if rolled into one single experience and put into the scale against the least moment of the joy that is felt by the least in Heaven, would have no weight that could be registered at all. Bad cannot succeed even in being bad as truly as good is good. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
277:Good description is a learned skill, one of the prime reasons why you cannot succeed unless you read a lot and write a lot. It’s not just a question of how-to, you see; it’s also a question of how much to. Reading will help you answer how much, and only reams of writing will help you with the how. You can learn only by doing. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
278:I am a spark from the Infinite. I am not flesh and bones. I am light. In helping others to succeed I shall find my own prosperity. In the welfare of others I shall find my own well-being. I am infinite. I am spaceless, I am tireless; I am beyond body thought, and utterance; beyond all matter and mind. I am endless bliss. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
279:If you get into entrepreneurshi p driven by profit, you are a lot more likely to fail. The entrepreneurs who succeed usually want to make a difference to people’s lives, not just their own bank balances. The desire to change things for the better is the motivation for taking risks and pursuing seemingly impossible business ideas. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
280:Your identity, self-esteem, and awareness of your ego lay the groundwork for your life. How you conduct yourself with others, and whether you have the strength to make your way without needing to ask for another's permission, depends on how well you succeed at the many challenges that awaken your need to take charge of who you are. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
281:Most of our businesses do succeed, but if something completely fails, then as long as we bow out gracefully and pay off all our debts, and nobody gets hurt, then I don't think people disrespect Virgin for trying. The public appreciates someone having a go; it appreciates the attempt. Who's been a success in life who hasn't failed? ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
282:It is one thing for the human mind to extract from the phenomena of nature the laws which it has itself put into them; it may be a far harder thing to extract laws over which it has no control. It is even possible that laws which have not their origin in the mind may be irrational, and we can never succeed in formulating them. ~ sir-arthur-eddington, @wisdomtrove
283:Your identity, self-esteem, and awareness of your ego lay the groundwork for your life. How you conduct yourself with others, and whether you have the strength to make your way without needing to ask for another's permission, depends on how well you succeed at the many challenges that awaken your need to take charge of who you are. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
284:All manifest life seems to require a period of sleep, of calm, in which to gain added strength, renewed vigour, for the next manifestation, or awakening to activity. Thus is the march of all progress, of all manifest life - in waves, successive waves, [of] activity and repose. Waves succeed each other in an endless chain of progression. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
285:God's love never ceases. Never. Though we spurn him. Ignore him. Reject him. Despise him. Disobey him. He will not change. Our evil cannot diminish his love. Our goodness cannot increase it. Our faith does not earn it any more than our stupidity jeopardizes it. God doesn't love us less if we fail or more if we succeed. God's love never ceases. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
286:I define democracy as control by the people. Slaves are those who allow others to control their lives. Insofar as people succeed in solving their problems fairly and efficiently at a grassroots level, they retain control over their lives. Insofar as they delegate their problem solving to a higher authority, they lose control over their lives. ~ peace-pilgrim, @wisdomtrove
287:Ignoring your passion is like dying a slow death…Passion whispers to you through your feelings, beckoning you toward your highest good. Pay attention to what makes you feel energized, connected, stimulated - what gives you your juice. Do what you love, give it back in the form of service, and you will do more than succeed. You will triumph.    ~ oprah-winfrey, @wisdomtrove
288:By our attitude, we decide to read, or not to read. By our attitude, we decide to try or give up. By our attitude, we blame ourselves for our failure, or we blame others. Our attitude determines whether we tell the truth or lie, act or procrastinate, advance or recede, and by our own attitude we and we alone actually decide whether to succeed or fail. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
289:William James once made an acute point about the relationship between happiness and expectation. He argued that satisfaction with ourselves does not require us to succeed in every endeavour. We are not always humiliated by failing; we are humiliated only if we first invest our pride and sense of worth in a given achievement and then do not reach it. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
290:There is something that is much more scarce, something finer far, something rarer than ability. It is the ability to recognize ability. The sternest comment that can be made against employers as a class lies in the fact that men of Ability usually succeed in showing their worth in spite of their employer, and not with his assistance and encouragement. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
291:Caution has its place, no doubt, but we cannot refuse our support to a serious venture which challenges the whole of the personality. If we oppose it, we are trying to suppress what is best in man -his daring and his aspirations. And should we succeed, we should only have stood in the way of that invaluable experience which might have given a meaning to life. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
292:Struggle hard and then if you do not succeed, you are not to blame. Let the world praise or blame you. Let all the wealth of the earth come to your feet, or let you be made the poorest on earth. Let death come this moment or hundreds of years hence. Swerve not from the path you have taken. All good thoughts are immortal and go to make Buddhas and Christs. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
293:The will of the people, moreover, practically means the will of the most numerous or the most active part of the people; the majority, or those who succeed in making themselves accepted as the majority; type people, consequently, may desire to oppress a part of their number; and precautions are as much needed against this as against any other abuse of power. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
294:If you love yourself, you love everybody else as you do yourself. As long as you love another person less than yourself, you will not succeed in loving yourself, but if you love all alike, including yourself, you will love them as one person and that person is both God and man. Thus he is the great righteous person who, loving himself, loves all others equally. ~ meister-eckhart, @wisdomtrove
295:When you work towards your goals, you become healthier and healthier, mentally. It is very hard to do with a negative attitude. You just need to become more and more positive. And then you start to succeed. And starting to succeed is like winning a race and having the audience cheer. That makes you feel happy and motivates you to work even harder and achieve even more. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
296:It would be one of the greatest triumphs of humanity, one of the most tangible liberations from the constraints of nature to which mankind is subject, if we could succeed in raising the responsible act of procreating children to the level of a deliberate and intentional activity and in freeing it from its entanglement with the necessary satisfaction of a natural need. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
297:Let none falter who thinks he is right, and we may succeed. But if, after all, we shall fail, be it so: we still shall have the proud consolation of saying to our consciences, and to the departed shade of our country's freedom, that the cause approved of our judgment and adored of our hearts, in disaster, in chains, in torture, in death, we never faltered in defending. ~ abraham-lincoln, @wisdomtrove
298:Too many dogs continue to be abused and abandond - one is too many - and people continue to kill people for money and envy and no reason at all. Bad people succeed and good people fail, but that's not the end of the story. Miracles happen that nobody sees, and among us walk heroes who are never recognised, and people live in loneliness because they cannot believe they are loved ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
299:A man's usefulness depends on his living up to his ideals insofar as he can. It is hard to fail but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. All daring and courage, all iron endurance of misfortune, make for a finer, nobler type of manhood. Only those are fit to live who do not fear to die; and none are fit to die who have shrunk from the joy of life and the duty of life. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
300:My third maxim was to try always to conquer myself rather than fortune, and to change my desires rather than the order of the world, and generally to accustom myself to believing that there is nothing entirely in our power except our thoughts, so that after we have done our best regarding things external to us, everything in which we do not succeed is for us absolutely impossible. ~ rene-descartes, @wisdomtrove
301:There are men who practice Titiksha, and succeed in it. There are men who sleep on the banks of the Ganga in the midsummer sun of India, and in winter float in the waters of the Ganga for a whole day; they do not care. Men sit in the snow of the Himalayas, and do not care to wear any garment. What is heat? What is cold? Let things come and go, what is that to me, I am not the body. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
302:Let there be wicked kings and beheadings, battles and dungeons, giants and dragons, and let the villans be soundly killed at the end of the book. I think it is possible that by confining your child to the blameless stories of life in which nothing at all alarming ever happens, you would fail to banish the terrors, and would succeed in banishing all that can ennoble them or make them endurable. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
303:You must have complete determination. The worst opponent you can come across is one whose aim has become an obsession. For instance, if a man has decided that he is going to bite off your nose no matter what happens to him in the process, the chances are he will succeed in doing it. He may be severely beaten up, too, but that will not stop him from carrying out his objective. That is the real fighter. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
304:The conditions of city life may be made healthy, so far as the physical constitution is concerned; but there is connected with the business of the city so much competition, so much rivalry, so much necessity for industry, that I think it is a perpetual, chronic, wholesale violation of natural law. There are ten men that can succeed in the country, where there is one that can succeed in the city. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
305:If all the evidence put forward for the authenticity of religious teachings originates in the past, it is natural to look round and see whether the present, about which it is easier to form judgements, may not also be able to furnish evidence of the sort. If by this means we could succeed in clearing even a single portion of the religious system from doubt, the whole of it would gain enormously in credibility. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
306:By this method thousands of humans have been brought to think that humility means pretty women trying to believe they are ugly and clever men trying to believe they are fools. And since what they are trying to believe may, in some cases, be manifest nonsense, they cannot succeed in believing it and we have the chance of keeping their minds endlessly revolving on themselves in an effort to achieve the the impossible. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
307:Men who look upon themselves born to reign, and others to obey, soon grow insolent; selected from the rest of mankind their minds are early poisoned by importance; and the world they act in differs so materially from the world at large, that they have but little opportunity of knowing its true interests, and when they succeed to the government are frequently the most ignorant and unfit of any throughout the dominions. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
308:We talked about and that has always been a puzzle to me why American men think that success is everything when they know that eighty percent of them are not going to succeed more than to just keep going and why if they are not why do they not keep on being interested in the things that interested them when they were college men and why American men different from English men do not get more interesting as they get older. ~ gertrude-stein, @wisdomtrove
309:Do you see the consequences of the way we have chosen to think about success? Because we so profoundly personalize success, we miss opportunities to lift others onto the top rung... We are too much in awe of those who succeed and far too dismissive of those who fail. And most of all, we become much too passive. We overlook just how large a role we all play—and by we I mean society—in determining who makes it and who doesn’t. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
310:The value of market esoterica to the consumer of investment advice is a different story. In my opinion, investment success will not be produced by arcane formulae, computer programs or signals flashed by the price behavior of stocks and markets. Rather an investor will succeed by coupling good business judgment with an ability to insulate his thoughts and behavior from the super-contagious emotions that swirl about the marketplace. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
311:I could not sit seriously down to write a serious Romance under any other motive than to save my life, & if it were indispensable for me to keep it up & never relax into laughing at myself or other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter. No - I must keep my own style & go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
312:Success is a learnable skill. You can learn to succeed at anything. If you want to be a great golfer, you can learn how to do it. If you want to be a great piano player, you can learn how to do it. If you want to be truly happy, you can learn how to do it. If you want to be rich, you can learn how to do it. It doesn't matter where you are right now. It doesn't matter where you're starting from. What matters is that you are willing to learn. ~ t-harv-eker, @wisdomtrove
313:The fateful question for the human species seems to me to be whether and to what extent their cultural development will succeed in mastering the disturbance of their communal life by the human instinct of aggression and self-destruction ... One thing only do I know for certain and that is that man's judgements of value follow directly from his wihes for happiness-that, accordingly, they are an attempt to support his illusions with arguments. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
314:Nothing frustrates me more than someone who reads something of mine or anyone else's and says, angrily, &
315:Liberals tend to understand that a person can be lucky or unlucky in all matters relevant to his success. Conservatives, however, often make a religious fetish of individualism. Many seem to have absolutely no awareness of how fortunate one must be to succeed at anything in life, no matter how hard one works. One must be lucky to be able to work. One must be lucky to be intelligent, physically healthy, and not bankrupted in middle age by the illness of a spouse. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
316:And so it is that I carry with me from this State to that high and lonely office to which I now succeed more than fond memories and fast friendships. The enduring qualities of Massachusettsthe common threads woven by the Pilgrim and the Puritan, the fisherman and the farmer, the Yankee and the immigrantwill not be and could not be forgotten in the Nations Executive Mansion. They are an indelible part of my life, my convictions, my view of the past, my hopes for the future. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
317:The men of wealth who today are trying to prevent the regulation and control of their business in the interest of the public by the proper government authorities will not succeed, in my judgment, in checking the progress of the movement. But if they did succeed they would find that they had sown the wind and would surely reap the whirlwind, for they would ultimately provoke the violent excesses which accompany a reform coming by convulsion instead of by steady and natural growth. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
318:Authority never matches responsibility. That's one of the great myths and delusions of all times. Winning managers and individual performers at all levels know that effectiveness means building your own network and creating your own authority. Those who succeed always reach far beyond formal deputation, take initiatives, and take the heat when things go awry. That's true in the military in times of war, true for 200 person manufacturing firms, and true at giant automakers or software companies. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
319:If the behaviour of babies and small children is any guide, we emerge into the world with our tendencies to imbalance already well entrenched. In our playpens and high chairs, we are rarely far from displaying either hysterical happiness or savage disappointment, love or rage, mania or exhaustion&
320:Our Founding Fathers well understood that concentrated power is the enemy of liberty and the rights of man. They knew that the American experiment in individual liberty, free enterprise and republican self-government could succeed only if power were widely distributed. And since in any society social and political power flow from economic power, they saw that wealth and property would have to be widely distributed among the people of the country. The truth of this insight is immediately apparent. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
321:Military tactics are like unto water; for water in its natural course runs away from high places and hastens downwards... Water shapes its course according to the nature of the ground over which it flows; the soldier works out his victory in relation to the foe whom he is facing. Therefore, just as water retains no constant shape, so in warfare there are no constant conditions. He who can modify his tactics in relation to his opponent and thereby succeed in winning, may be called a heaven-born captain. ~ sun-tzu, @wisdomtrove
322:We were to found a University magazine. A pair of little, active brothers-Livingstone by name, great skippers on the foot, great rubbers of the hands, who kept a book-shop over against the University building-had been debauched to play the part of publishers. We four were to be conjuct editors and, what was the main point of the concern, to print our own works; while, by every rule of arithmetic-that flatterer of credulity-the adventure must succeed and bring great profit. Well, well: it was a bright vision. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
323:In order to succeed we need leaders of inspired idealism, leaders to whom are granted great visions, who dream greatly and strive to make their dreams come true; who can kindle the people with the fire from their own burning souls. The leader for the time being, whoever he may be, is but an instrument, to be used until broken and then to be cast aside; and if he is worth his salt he will care no more when he is broken than a soldier cares when he is sent where his life is forfeit in order that the victory may be won. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
324:I must hold in balance the sense of the futility of effort and the sense of the necessity to struggle; the conviction of the inevitability of failure and still the determination to &
325:Changing the world is like trying to straighten a dog's tail. However much you may try, you won't succeed. But although the tail won't straighten, if you keep trying every day, at least you will put on some muscle. Similarly, even though it is difficult to make a change, our effort to do so in itself brings positive results. It will help us change. Without waiting for others to change,if we change ourselves first, that will make a difference. Instead of worrying about results, focus on doing our best in what we are engaged in. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
326:Do, each day, all that can be done that day. You don't need to overwork-or to rush blindly into your work, trying to do the greatest possible number of things in the shortest possible amount of time. Don't try to do tomorrow's-or next week's-work today. It's not so much the number of the things you do but the quality, the efficiency of each separate action that counts. . . . you need only to succeed in the small tasks of each day. This makes a successful day. With enough of these, you have a successful week, month, year-and lifetime. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
327:Many poets are not poets for the same reason that many religious men are not saints: they never succeed in being themselves. They never get around to being the particular poet or the particular monk they are intended to be by God. They never become the man or the artist who is called for by all the circumstances of their individual lives. They waste their years in vain efforts to be some other poet, some other saint... They wear out their minds and bodies in a hopeless endeavor to have somebody else's experiences or write somebody else's poems. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
328:Now we cannot... discover our failure to keep God's law except by trying our very hardest (and then failing). Unless we really try, whatever we say there will always be at the back of our minds the idea that if we try harder next time we shall succeed in being completely good. Thus, in one sense, the road back to God is a road of moral effort, of trying harder and harder. But in another sense it is not trying that is ever going tobring us home. All this trying leads up to the vital moment at which you turn to God and say, "You must do this. I can't. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
329:You can be good for the mere sake of goodness; you cannot be bad for the mere sake of badness. You can do a kind action when you are not feeling kind and when it gives you no pleasure, simply because kindness is right; but no one ever did a cruel action simply because cruelty is wrong - only because cruelty is pleasant or useful to him, In other words, badness cannot succeed even in being bad in the same way in which goodness is good. Goodness is, so to speak, itself: badness is only spoiled goodness. And there must be something good first before it can be spoiled. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
330:If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives: Be kind anyway. If you are successful you will win some false friends and true enemies: Succeed anyway. If you are honest and frank people will try to cheat you: Be honest anyway. What you spend years building, someone could destroy overnight: Build anyway. If you find serenity and happiness, they may be jealous of you: Be happy anyway. The good you do today, will often be forgotten by tomorrow: Do good anyway. Give the world the best you have, and it may never be enough: Give your best anyway. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
331:A small knowledge of human nature will convince us, that, with far the greatest part of mankind, interest is the governing principle... Few men are capable of making a continual sacrifice of all views of private interest, or advantage, to the common good. It is vain to exclaim against the depravity of human nature on this account; the fact is so, the experience of every age and nation has proved it and we must in a great measure, change the constitution of man, before we can make it otherwise. No institution, not built on the presumptive truth of these maxims can succeed. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
332:This world is not for cowards. Do not try to fly. Look not for success or failure. Join yourself to the perfectly unselfish will and work on. Know that the mind which is born to succeed joins itself to a determined will and perseveres. You have the right to work, but do not become so degenerate as to look for results. Work incessantly, but see something behind the work. Even good deeds can find a man in great bondage. Therefore be not bound by good deeds or by desire for name and fame. Those who know this secret pass beyond this round of birth and death and become immortal. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
333:If a night-moth were to concentrate its will on flying to a star or some equally unattainable object, it wouldn't succeed. Only, it wouldn't even try in the first place. A moth confines its search to what has sense and value for it, what it needs, what is indispensable to its life... if I imagined that I wanted under all circumstances to get to the North Pole, then to achieve it I would have to desire it strongly enough that my whole being was ruled by it. But if I were to decide to will that the pastor should stop wearing his glasses, it would be useless. That would be making a game of it. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
334:Trying to become a good or better human being sounds like a commendable and high-minded thing to do, yet it is an endeavour you cannot ultimately succeed in unless there is a shift in consciousness. This is because it is still part of the same dysfunction, a more subtle and rarified form of self-enhancement, of desire for more and a strengthening of one's conceptual identity, one's self- image. You do not become good by trying to be good, but by finding the goodness that is already within you, and allowing that goodness to emerge. But it can only emerge if something fundamental changes in your state of consciousness.  ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
335:Try to be, only to be. The all-important word is &
336:According to Buddhism, most people identify happiness with pleasant feelings, while identifying suffering with unpleasant feelings. People consequently ascribe immense importance to what they feel, craving to experience more and more pleasures, while avoiding pain. Whatever we do throughout our lives, whether scratching our leg, fidgeting slightly in the chair, or fighting world wars, we are just trying to get pleasant feelings. The problem, according to Buddhism, is that our feelings are no more than fleeting vibrations, changing every moment, like the ocean waves. If five minutes ago I felt joyful and purposeful, now these feelings are gone, and I might well feel sad and dejected. So if I want to experience pleasant feelings, I have to constantly chase them, while driving away the unpleasant feelings. Even if I succeed, I immediately have to start all over again, without ever getting any lasting reward for my troubles. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:succeed. That’s ~ Christina L Rozelle,
2:Either attempt it not, or succeed. ~ Ovid,
3:Nice, smart people succeed. ~ Tim Sanders,
4:We fall forward to succeed. ~ Mary Kay Ash,
5:Lazy people don’t succeed. ~ John C Maxwell,
6:I will persist until I succeed! ~ Og Mandino,
7:Rich people expect to succeed. ~ T Harv Eker,
8:We have to succeed, so we will. ~ Ross Perot,
9:We'll succeed unless we quit. ~ George W Bush,
10:Those who can’t succeed, teach. ~ Anthony Marra,
11:How to succeed? Try hard enough. ~ Malcolm Forbes,
12:I failed so therefore I succeed. ~ Michael Jordan,
13:Succeed in spite of management. ~ Stephen Hawking,
14:Nobody can succeed on their own. ~ Sheryl Sandberg,
15:That to want to succeed is to fail ~ Laura Kasischke,
16:To succeed,all I need to do is suffer. ~ Muhammad Ali,
17:I don't know what drives me to succeed. ~ Adam Sandler,
18:I enjoy helping young children succeed. ~ William Hung,
19:They'd rather see me fail than succeed, ~ Bishop Nehru,
20:I wouldn't succeed at musical theater. ~ David Duchovny,
21:practice dissimulation, and you will succeed. ~ Sun Tzu,
22:The thing he said aloud did not succeed. ~ Tony Burgess,
23:Dream, believe, work hard and succeed. ~ Alexander Stubb,
24:I'm born to succeed; the Infinite within ~ Joseph Murphy,
25:It is not enough to try, you must succeed. ~ The Mother,
26:Nobody in the world can succeed alone. ~ Ernesto Sirolli,
27:You always succeed in producing a result. ~ Tony Robbins,
28:Anything you want to succeed in, you can do. ~ Wayne Dyer,
29:He was happy and therefore bound to succeed. ~ Ian McEwan,
30:Rather fail with honor than succeed by fraud. ~ Sophocles,
31:You would succeed if you were sincere. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
32:Against the odds, they refuse to succeed. ~ Charles Baxter,
33:If at first you don't succeed, Call an airstrike. ~ Banksy,
34:It is impossible to succeed without failing. ~ Brian Tracy,
35:We must have the hope to be able to succeed. ~ Walter Munk,
36:Books succeed; and lives fail. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning,
37:He who feared that he would not succeed sat still. ~ Horace,
38:It is not enough to succeed. Others must fail. ~ Gore Vidal,
39:Men are born to succeed, not to fail. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
40:Pessimism blunts the tools you need to succeed. ~ Bruce Lee,
41:Well, it is always easier to succeed at death. ~ Iain Banks,
42:5) I fail daily, and that is why I succeed. ~ Scott Hildreth,
43:Believe that you will succeed, and you will. ~ Dale Carnegie,
44:If the tanks succeed, then victory follows. ~ Heinz Guderian,
45:Work with integrity and succeed with integrity ~ Abdul Kalam,
46:For me, I'm happy to succeed on any network. ~ David E Kelley,
47:I believe when women succeed America succeeds! ~ Barack Obama,
48:If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0. ~ Various,
49:If we don't succeed, we run the risk of failure. ~ Dan Quayle,
50:No child wants to fail. Everyone wants to succeed. ~ Al Green,
51:Think doubt and fail, think victory and succeed ~ Ann Maxwell,
52:In war, practice dissimulation and you will succeed. ~ Sun Tzu,
53:The real hero must fail in order to succeed. ~ William C Brown,
54:To succeed in life, succeed at being yourself. ~ Napoleon Hill,
55:To succeed, we must first believe that we can. ~ Michael Korda,
56:You want everyone to succeed in your family. ~ Elizabeth Olsen,
57:Don't settle for style. Succeed in substance. ~ Wynton Marsalis,
58:Failure is what you may need to eventually succeed. ~ Jon Jones,
59:I can do it this time. Please, let me succeed. ~ Krista Ritchie,
60:If at first you don't succeed, have a cup of tea. ~ Peter Scott,
61:If at first you don't succeed, try hard work. ~ William Feather,
62:If at first you do succeed, try something harder. ~ Ann Landers,
63:If you be King, why should not I succeed? ~ William Shakespeare,
64:Only the absolutely determined people succeed. ~ Audrey Hepburn,
65:To succeed, find the right rut and stay with it. ~ Mason Cooley,
66:To succeed, you must first believe you can. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis,
67:Fail early, fail often, in order to succeed sooner. ~ Tom Kelley,
68:If at first you don't succeed, redefine success. ~ George Carlin,
69:If at first you don't succeed, try management. ~ Stephen Hawking,
70:If we don't succeed, we run the risk of failure.B ~ Bill Clinton,
71:One does not succeed by sticking to convention. ~ Garry Kasparov,
72:Sometimes you succeed and sometimes you don't. ~ Charles Durning,
73:When men succeed, even their neighbors think them wise. ~ Pindar,
74:You'll never succeed with people who devalue you! ~ Bob Beaudine,
75:If at First You Do Succeed, Try Something Harder ~ John C Maxwell,
76:If you at first don't succeed, try and try again. ~ Graham J Wood,
77:If you want to succeed, double your failure rate. ~ Thomas Watson,
78:It is not enough to succeed. Others must fail. ~ Daniel C Dennett,
79:Share your dream with people who want you to succeed. ~ T D Jakes,
80:The more I help others to succeed, the more I succeed. ~ Ray Kroc,
81:To succeed, one must be creative and persistent. ~ John H Johnson,
82:You must have the devil in you to succeed in the arts. ~ Voltaire,
83:Business cannot succeed in a world that is failing. ~ Don Tapscott,
84:If at first you don't succeed, You're not an Alpha ~ Lisi Harrison,
85:If you don't succeed, you run the risk of failure. ~ George W Bush,
86:Jesus is with me, so everything I do will succeed. ~ Joseph Prince,
87:Yet through delivery orators succeed, ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
88:15. In war, practice dissimulation, and you will succeed. ~ Sun Tzu,
89:An education not founded on Art will never succeed. ~ Margaret Mead,
90:Education is not success but it is to help us succeed. ~ T B Joshua,
91:Failure either breaks people or it makes them succeed. ~ Chris Bosh,
92:I am willing to do whatever is necessary to succeed. ~ Ted Nicholas,
93:If at first you don't succeed, kill your opponent. ~ Gena Showalter,
94:If Stalin gives you a love advice, it has to succeed. ~ Slavoj i ek,
95:My axiom is, to succeed in business: avoid my example. ~ Mark Twain,
96:see startups succeed and change the world. The passion, ~ Eric Ries,
97:Think doubt and fail. Think victory and succeed. ~ David J Schwartz,
98:To learn to succeed, you must first learn to fail. ~ Michael Jordan,
99:Affairs that depend on many rarely succeed. ~ Francesco Guicciardini,
100:Fear is a mindset, and so is the will to succeed. ~ Bethenny Frankel,
101:I'm short enough and ugly enough to succeed on my own. ~ Woody Allen,
102:Is it possible to succeed without any act of betrayal? ~ Jean Renoir,
103:Sometimes I only succeed in beating myself to death ~ Burt Lancaster,
104:The war in Vietnam is going well and will succeed. ~ Robert McNamara,
105:Without spontaneity in any sport, you cannot succeed. ~ Eric Cantona,
106:you want to succeed, double your failure rate.” I ~ Leonard Mlodinow,
107:Democracies succeed or fail based on their journalism. ~ Scott Pelley,
108:If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done? ~ George Carlin,
109:I live to succeed, not to please you or anyone else. ~ Marilyn Monroe,
110:Integrity is the most needed to succeed in business. ~ John C Maxwell,
111:Success is counted sweetest by those ne'er succeed. ~ Emily Dickinson,
112:You invest yourself in what you believe can succeed. ~ John C Maxwell,
113:Don't be afraid of failure. This is the way to succeed. ~ LeBron James,
114:If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving isn’t for you. ~ Sejal Badani,
115:If at first you do succeed, quit trying on investing. ~ Warren Buffett,
116:In America, everything you need to succeed is within reach. ~ Jim Rohn,
117:....it is better to succeed with success than failure. ~ George W Bush,
118:My willingness to fail gives me the ability to succeed. ~ Vinod Khosla,
119:Sometimes you succeed.... and other times you learn. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
120:Whether you think you will succeed or not, you are right. ~ Henry Ford,
121:Do not try to live forever. You will not succeed. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
122:Emotions were only useful to control, survive and succeed ~ C J Roberts,
123:Fail faster. Succeed sooner.” — David Kelley, founder IDEO ~ Tom Peters,
124:If you want to succeed, limit yourself. ~ Charles Augustin Sainte Beuve,
125:In order to succeed, you must have a long-term focus. ~ Anthony Robbins,
126:I say 'try'; if we never try, we shall never succeed. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
127:I was always fiercely determined and driven to succeed. ~ Ricky Ponting,
128:The willingness to fail gives us the freedom to succeed. ~ Vinod Khosla,
129:We cannot all succeed when half of us are held back. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
130:we cannot all succeed when half of us are held back. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
131:You must have the Devil in you to succeed in any of the arts ~ Voltaire,
132:If at first you don't succeed, lower you expectations ~ Jonathan Tropper,
133:If I fail, if I succeed, at least I live as I believe. ~ Whitney Houston,
134:It is not enough that I succeed, everyone else must fail. ~ Iris Murdoch,
135:Eat a lot and train hard, I am sure that you will succeed. ~ Serge Nubret,
136:If at first you don't succeed, failure may be your style. ~ Quentin Crisp,
137:If at first you don’t succeed, failure may be your style. ~ Quentin Crisp,
138:If at first you don't succeed, you're obviously not me. ~ Madonna Ciccone,
139:To succeed in life, you must have the courage to be hated. ~ Paulo Coelho,
140:You can't succeed unless you're willing to risk failure ~ Raymond E Feist,
141:Bad cannot succeed even in being bad as truly as good is good. ~ C S Lewis,
142:Believe, really believe, you can succeed, and you will. ~ David J Schwartz,
143:Failure is not an option. Everyone has to succeed. ~ Arnold Schwarzenegger,
144:God wants you to succeed; He created you to live abundantly. ~ Joel Osteen,
145:If we're unwilling to fail, then we're unwilling to succeed. ~ Mark Manson,
146:If we’re unwilling to fail, then we’re unwilling to succeed. ~ Mark Manson,
147:It is not sufficient that I succeed - all others must fail. ~ Genghis Khan,
148:Sometimes the only way to succeed is to fail backwards ~ Benny Bellamacina,
149:succeed, “you must study the endgame before everything else. ~ Peter Thiel,
150:Talent is a gift, but you can only succeed with hard work. ~ Jean Beliveau,
151:The choice the pioneers faced was stark: succeed or starve. ~ Shimon Peres,
152:The most meaningful way to succeed is to help others succeed. ~ Adam Grant,
153:You've got to be in a determined state in order to succeed. ~ Tony Robbins,
154:3 Commit your actions to the LORD, and your plans will succeed. ~ Anonymous,
155:Even if you do succeed most people wouldn't notice anyway. ~ John Malkovich,
156:(God) wants America to succeed. And he wants America to lead. ~ John Kasich,
157:I failed over and over and over and that is why I succeed. ~ Michael Jordan,
158:If he did not succeed, he at least failed in a glorious undertaking. ~ Ovid,
159:If you never try, you will never know what it means to succeed. ~ Belle Ami,
160:In order to succeed, we must first believe that we can. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis,
161:in order to succeed, we must first believe that we can. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis,
162:In order to succeed... you have to put a stake in the ground. ~ Jeff Raikes,
163:It is only those who persevere to the end that succeed. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
164:it is only those who persevere to the end that succeed. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
165:I would rather fail at what I love than succeed at what I hate. ~ Les Brown,
166:Succeed in not fearing the lion, and the lion will fear you. ~ Eliphas Levi,
167:Success is counted sweetest / By those who ne'er succeed. ~ Emily Dickinson,
168:You cannot succeed by yourself. It's hard to find a rich hermit. ~ Jim Rohn,
169:Commit to the Lord whatever you do, and your plans will succeed. ~ Anonymous,
170:Conquering the world and changing it, I do not think it can succeed. ~ Laozi,
171:If you wish to succeed, you must brave the risk of failure. ~ Garry Kasparov,
172:Only the great masters of style ever succeed in being obscure. ~ Oscar Wilde,
173:When people succeed they party, when people fail they ponder. ~ Tony Robbins,
174:You can succeed beyond the past, but not beyond your belief ~ Orrin Woodward,
175:You should use your influence to help other platforms succeed. ~ Johnny Hunt,
176:Adversity breeds toughness, and the tough succeed. And survive. ~ Dean Koontz,
177:I don't fail. I succeed at finding out what doesn't work. ~ Christopher Titus,
178:If we fail, let us try again and again until we succeed. ~ Joseph Chamberlain,
179:Influence is the platform God gives you to help others succeed. ~ Johnny Hunt,
180:It is not enough to succeed; others must fail. ~ Fran ois de La Rochefoucauld,
181:To succeed in life you need two things: Ignorance and confidence ~ Mark Twain,
182:To succeed, you must believe. When you believe, you will succeed. ~ DJ Khaled,
183:to succeed, “you must study the endgame before everything else. ~ Peter Thiel,
184:You know what they say: If at first you don't succeed, f**k it. ~ Jon Stewart,
185:... a true servant of God is someone who helps another succeed. ~ Billy Graham,
186:If you want to succeed as an author you need to work your ass off. ~ Chris Fox,
187:Losers quit when they fail. Winners fail until they succeed. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
188:Only a lie that wasn't ashamed of itself could possibly succeed ~ Isaac Asimov,
189:People who succeed speak well of themselves to themselves. ~ Laurie Beth Jones,
190:Summer lasts not for ever; seasons succeed each other. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
191:The only way anyone's going to succeed is to build the product. ~ Barry Diller,
192:Almost every dot-com idea from 1999 that failed will succeed. ~ Marc Andreessen,
193:Do not be afraid to fail, but also, do not be afraid to succeed. ~ Eric Schmidt,
194:Failure will not stop you if you are determined to succeed. ~ Jentezen Franklin,
195:If at first you don't succeed, pay someone else to do it for you. ~ Mark Hoppus,
196:If we succeed, it makes no sense to keep it only for ourselves. ~ Edward Boyden,
197:If you truly want to succeed, be prepared to go the extra mile. ~ Napoleon Hill,
198:Like words, memories never really succeed in “catching” reality. ~ Alan W Watts,
199:Only a lie that wasn't ashamed of itself could possibly succeed. ~ Isaac Asimov,
200:The desperate usually succeed because they have nothing to lose. ~ Jodi Picoult,
201:The illusion of fear accompanies goals to test the will to succeed. ~ T F Hodge,
202:The question is not Will you succeed? but rather, Will you matter? ~ Seth Godin,
203:To succeed in baseball, as in life, you must make adjustments. ~ Ken Griffey Jr,
204:To succeed in life, you need two things: ignorance and confidence. ~ Mark Twain,
205:When I see my mom in the stands, it always pushes me to succeed. ~ Ashton Eaton,
206:You need good principles and good language if you are to succeed. ~ Frank Luntz,
207:If I succeed in business but fail as a father, then I've failed. ~ Mark Wahlberg,
208:If I succeed, I will give thanks. If I fail, I will seek His grace. ~ Max Lucado,
209:If you have the courage to start, you have the courage to succeed. ~ Mel Robbins,
210:If you run after wit, you will succeed in catching folly. ~ Baron de Montesquieu,
211:I had to succeed. Failure means I would have to be homeless again. ~ Elie Tahari,
212:Individuals who keep growing in knowledge are the ones who succeed. ~ Zig Ziglar,
213:No man can succeed in a line of endeavor which he does not like. ~ Napoleon Hill,
214:Success is a learnable skill. You can learn to succeed at anything ~ T Harv Eker,
215:The impossible missions are the only ones which succeed. ~ Jacques Yves Cousteau,
216:To see them succeed, to see them improve, that is what matters. ~ Frederick Lenz,
217:To succeed in the world we must look foolish but be wise. ~ Baron de Montesquieu,
218:When I was in high school, I was voted most likely to succeed. ~ Sheryl Sandberg,
219:Be passionate. If you are passionate, you will ultimately succeed. ~ Ivanka Trump,
220:Do not teach your congregation to pray.
Someday they might succeed. ~ Jay Lake,
221:God doesn't require us to succeed, he only requires that you try. ~ Mother Teresa,
222:I just get the impression that everyone is willing me to succeed. ~ Stuart Pearce,
223:It is only as we develop others that we permanently succeed. ~ Harvey S Firestone,
224:I’ve succeeded, I guess, but sometimes maybe to succeed is to fail ~ John Marsden,
225:Most people with new ideas are ridiculed … until they succeed! ~ Stephen Richards,
226:Never try to discourage thinking, for you are sure to succeed. ~ Bertrand Russell,
227:Pain and pleasure, like light and darkness, succeed each other. ~ Laurence Sterne,
228:We must try to stand and succeed, but we must never fail to stand. ~ Claudia Gray,
229:Where you succeed will never matter so much as where you fail. ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
230:Your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other ~ Abraham Lincoln,
231:And on the threshold of being no more I succeed in being another. ~ Samuel Beckett,
232:If at first you don't succeed, keep on sucking till you do succeed. ~ Curly Howard,
233:If at first you don't succeed, then drag racing isn't for you. ~ Christopher Titus,
234:If you have the courage to begin, you have the courage to succeed. ~ David Viscott,
235:I wonder if anyone can ever succeed in making their children content. ~ Anne Frank,
236:Once you succeed in tennis, financially you become quite well off. ~ Stefan Edberg,
237:People rarely succeed unless they have fun in what they are doing. ~ Dale Carnegie,
238:Presents at once? That's good. He is sure to succeed. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
239:All models are wrong, and increasingly you can succeed without them. ~ Peter Norvig,
240:But when ill indeed, Even dismissing the doctor don't always succeed. ~ Victor Hugo,
241:Do your best to succeed and push the limits without violating them. ~ Ken Blanchard,
242:If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried. ~ Steven Wright,
243:If we succeed in empowering girls, we'll succeed in everything else. ~ Desmond Tutu,
244:It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation. ~ Herman Melville,
245:I've always had a will to succeed, to win, however you phrase it. ~ Jack Kent Cooke,
246:Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can succeed. ~ Maria Montessori,
247:Self-government can succeed only through an instructed electorate. ~ Herbert Hoover,
248:stick to truth and we shall succeed, may be slowly, but surely. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
249:Surely you have to succeed, if you give everything you have.' ~ Penelope Fitzgerald,
250:The innovator's motto is this: I succeed or I learn but I never fail. ~ Paul Sloane,
251:Trying the impossible is an honour even if you cannot succeed! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
252:Why do some products, ideas, and behaviors succeed when others fail? ~ Jonah Berger,
253:Without doing one cannot fail. But one cannot succeed either. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
254:Always present yourself as a woman who expects to succeed. ~ Barbara Taylor Bradford,
255:Ambition is violence, the very effort to succeed in the world is violent. ~ Rajneesh,
256:Folks, this government isn't too big to fail, it's too big to succeed. ~ Sarah Palin,
257:If at first you don't succeed - give it up. It isn't worth the pain. ~ Matt Groening,
258:If you want to succeed, you've got to be okay to just lose control. ~ Alexis Ohanian,
259:The best shows succeed because they tap into a national conversation. ~ Damian Lewis,
260:We know that no one person can succeed unless everybody else succeeds. ~ Howard Dean,
261:You can't succeed unless you've got failure, especially creatively. ~ Michael Eisner,
262:You must expect failure after failure after failure before you succeed. ~ Edwin Land,
263:All that is necessary for evil to succeed is that good men do nothing. ~ Edmund Burke,
264:And, moreover, to succeed, the artist much possess the courageous soul. ~ Kate Chopin,
265:But where you succeed will never matter so much as where you fail. ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
266:If at first you don't succeed, see if there is a prize for the losers. ~ Jerry Lawler,
267:It is better to fail at your own life than to succeed at someone else's. ~ Andre Gide,
268:It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. ~ Tracie Peterson,
269:It's your thinking that decides whether you're going to succeed or fail. ~ Henry Ford,
270:I wish President Obama had succeeded because I want America to succeed. ~ Mitt Romney,
271:Jean Todt's system will never succeed, not even with Michael Schumacher. ~ Niki Lauda,
272:No one else can live your life for you. No one else can succeed for you! ~ Og Mandino,
273:Pleasure must succeed to pleasure, else past pleasure turns to pain ~ Robert Browning,
274:Success will win you false friends and true enemies - succeed anyway. ~ Mother Teresa,
275:We are to succeed through the exercise of intellect, not brute force. ~ Shelley Adina,
276:Fail, and your friends feel superior. Succeed, and they feel resentful. ~ Mason Cooley,
277:I’d rather succeed in doing what we can than fail to do what we can’t. ~ Richard Adams,
278:If at first you don't succeed then skydiving definitely isn't for you. ~ Steven Wright,
279:If we want to succeed, we need to recover our grandparents’ work ethic. ~ Darren Hardy,
280:If you are going to succeed, you must deal with what caused you to fail ~ Tony Robbins,
281:It takes a special kind of stubbornness to succeed as an entrepreneur ~ Sophia Amoruso,
282:To succeed, planning alone is insufficient. One must improvise as well. ~ Isaac Asimov,
283:To succeed today, you have to set priorities, decide what you stand for. ~ Lee Iacocca,
284:We must learn to succeed in conditions of low fuel and energy prices ~ Dmitry Medvedev,
285:When major businesses join progressive boycotts, they often succeed. ~ Steven Levitsky,
286:Without Divine assistance I can not succeed; with it I can not fail. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
287:18 Plans succeed through good counsel; don’t go to war without wise advice. ~ Anonymous,
288:Begin with the determination to succeed and the work is half done already. ~ Mark Twain,
289:But where you succeed will never matter so much as where you fail. . ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
290:I am not a failure if I don't succeed; I am successful because I tried. ~ Susan Jeffers,
291:I'd rather fail at something important than succeed at something trivial. ~ Paul Hawken,
292:I look up to people who succeed in accomplishing their dreams. ~ Joanna Noelle Levesque,
293:In order to succeed spectacularly, you must be ready to fail spectacularly. ~ Anonymous,
294:It takes a special kind of stubbornness to succeed as an entrepreneur. ~ Sophia Amoruso,
295:I would rather try to succeed and fail than try to do nothing and succeed. ~ Og Mandino,
296:The way to succeed is never quit. Thats it. But really be humble about it. ~ Alex Haley,
297:To succeed, i have to believe every night, in my heart, that i am the best. ~ John Cena,
298:To succeed, you must have tremendous perseverance, tremendous will. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
299:I don’t mind failing, but if I succeed it better be worth succeeding for. ~ Vinod Khosla,
300:If at first you don't succeed, torch the place and claim on the insurance. ~ Dave Turner,
301:It is essential to the triumph of reform that it should never succeed. ~ William Hazlitt,
302:It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
303:Nobody knows what I am trying to do but I do and I know when I succeed. ~ Gertrude Stein,
304:People with goals succeed, because they know where they are going.
   ~ Earl Nightingale,
305:Sometimes it’s better to fail with pride, than to succeed at a price ~ Benny Bellamacina,
306:To succeed in a spectacular fashion you had to be spectacularly unusual. ~ Michael Lewis,
307:To succeed in business, put the interest of the customer ahead of your own. ~ James Cook,
308:To succeed in chaining the multitude, you must seem to wear the same fetters. ~ Voltaire,
309:To succeed in life one needs two things -- influence and a lucky star. ~ Leonid Andreyev,
310:You can succeed at almost anything for which you have unbridled enthusiasm. ~ Zig Ziglar,
311:But to succeed in life every detail should be arranged well beforehand. ~ Agatha Christie,
312:Even if the last move did not succeed, the inner command says move again. ~ Seamus Heaney,
313:Gods really do help groups cohere, succeed, and outcompete other groups. ~ Jonathan Haidt,
314:Gosh darn it,” Gau said, “if you don’t try, you’ll never succeed.” 10. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
315:If you could get up the courage to begin, you have the courage to succeed ~ David Viscott,
316:On a human level, people want to see someone succeed who wants to change. ~ Danny McBride,
317:People have to attempt to do right, even if they believe they cannot succeed ~ Robin Hobb,
318:There's not too many teams that can succeed on and off the field together. ~ Johnny Damon,
319:Those who are humble enough to learn anew will succeed in this new age. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
320:To be wicked does not insure prosperity - for the inn did not succeed well. ~ Victor Hugo,
321:Traitors who prevail are patriots; usurpers who succeed are divine emperors. ~ Gore Vidal,
322:We are not going to succeed because Taliban are masters of guerrilla warfare ~ Imran Khan,
323:Challenges were only hard if you went into them expecting not to succeed. ~ Mariana Zapata,
324:If you're willing to fail interestingly, you tend to succeed interestingly. ~ Edward Albee,
325:I think, team first. It allows me to succeed, it allows my team to succeed. ~ LeBron James,
326:My seat has been the seat of kings, and I will have no rascal to succeed me. ~ Elizabeth I,
327:Not everyone strives to be fashionable. I don't, and I believe I succeed. ~ Joseph Epstein,
328:The best place to succeed is where you are with what you have. —Charles Schwab ~ Anonymous,
329:The best way to succeed in life is to act on the advice we give to others. ~ Mother Teresa,
330:The desire to succeed has a lot less compulsion than the fear of failure. ~ Gerald Seymour,
331:To succeed, jump as quickly at opportunities as you do at conclusions. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
332:WHERE YOU SUCCEED will never matter so much as where you fail,” I said. ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
333:Why do people always assume that volume will succeed when logic won’t? - Damon ~ L J Smith,
334:If at first you don't succeed, you're probably just like everybody else. ~ Nicholas P Adams,
335:I have noticed that these days, people don't want to take their time to succeed. ~ St Lucia,
336:In order to succeed spectacularly you have to be willing to fail spectacularly. ~ Biz Stone,
337:Succeed and you are a brilliant visionary. Fail and you are a delusional loser. ~ Don Dodge,
338:The determination and conviction to succeed can only come from within. ~ Anthony D Williams,
339:The only summit meeting that can succeed is one that does not take place. ~ Barry Goldwater,
340:To succeed in the world it is not enough to be stupid - one must also be polite. ~ Voltaire,
341:To succeed in your mission, you must have single-minded devotion to your goal ~ Abdul Kalam,
342:To succeed, it is necessary to accept the world as it is and rise above it. ~ Michael Korda,
343:We're far more defined by our mistakes than the things that we succeed at. ~ Emma Caulfield,
344:What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Hunger feeds the need to succeed. ~ Steve Kaufman,
345:Failure will never overtake me if my determination to succeed is strong enough. ~ Og Mandino,
346:Failure will never overtake we if my determination to succeed is strong enough. ~ Og Mandino,
347:I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to what light I have. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
348:Philanthropic colonization is a failure. National colonization will succeed. ~ Theodor Herzl,
349:There is so much data available to us, but most data won't help us succeed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
350:To really become motivated to succeed, people need to believe they can win. ~ John C Maxwell,
351:When you stop being so afraid of failing you become much more free to succeed ~ Rich Mullins,
352:When you’ve tried everything and failed, try everything else and succeed ~ Benny Bellamacina,
353:Commit your work to the Lord, and then your plans will succeed.” (Proverbs 16:3). ~ Anonymous,
354:I want to see America thrive. I want to see all different families here succeed. ~ Grace Meng,
355:Let us be thankful for the fools. But for them the rest of us could not succeed. ~ Mark Twain,
356:Nobody with a victim mentality will get anywhere. Ever. They will never succeed. ~ Jon Lovitz,
357:Where Napoleon failed, I shall succeed, I shall land on the shores of Britain. ~ Adolf Hitler,
358:You will be judged by what you succeed at gentlemen, not by what you attempt ~ Clement Attlee,
359:All the forces of darkness need to succeed ... is for the people to do nothing. ~ Edmund Burke,
360:Bravery is measured by how hard you try, not by whether you actually succeed. ~ Nancy Straight,
361:For a man to successful, not only must he succeed but his friends must also fail. ~ Gore Vidal,
362:For every curiosity headline that succeed in getting results, a dozen will fail. ~ John Caples,
363:Putting forth the effort to succeed is (tan.ta.mount), tantamount to your success. ~ Jon Jones,
364:To have made even one person's life a little better, that is to succeed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
365:When people 'succeed' they tend to party, when they 'fail' they tend to ponder. ~ Tony Robbins,
366:badness cannot succeed even in being bad in the same way in which goodness is good. ~ C S Lewis,
367:Doing nothing gives me great pleasure. And believe me, I succeed wonderfully in it. ~ Morrissey,
368:Do not adopt the best system of government, but the one most likely to succeed. ~ Simon Bolivar,
369:Failure will never overtake me if my definition to succeed is strong enough ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
370:Failure will never overtake you if your determination to succeed is strong enough. ~ Og Mandino,
371:If you can't quit no matter how hard you try, then you have a chance to succeed. ~ Laura Fitton,
372:It is possible to fail in many ways...while to succeed is possible only in one way. ~ Aristotle,
373:I've failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed. ~ Michael Jordan,
374:Obliteration is our hallmark," he said. "We don't always succeed, but we try. ~ Neal Shusterman,
375:People who succeed in life have a need for something greater than themselves. ~ Robert Herjavec,
376:Some are born to love, and some to fight. How can I ever succeed at both? ~ Heather Day Gilbert,
377:Take risks and you'll get the payoffs. Learn from your mistakes until you succeed. ~ Bobby Flay,
378:The success of most things depends upon knowing how long it will take to succeed. ~ Montesquieu,
379:The worst thing that can happen to a man is to succeed before he is ready. ~ Martyn Lloyd Jones,
380:To succeed as a rate-buster is not simply to start but to endure. Regulation ~ Benjamin P Hardy,
381:When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you'll be successful ~ Eric Thomas,
382:Without your involvement you can't succeed. With your involvement you can't fail. ~ Abdul Kalam,
383:With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed. ~ Doris Kearns Goodwin,
384:You succeed because you're willing to give everything to your craft- everything! ~ Shannon Hale,
385:All men need to succeed in the music industry is talent, but women have to be hot. ~ Nina LaCour,
386:At first I thought it was a fear of failure. Now I think you're afraid to succeed. ~ Jaci Burton,
387:Better to fail at doing the right thing than to succeed at doing the wrong thing. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
388:Efforts can succeed over time, and not trying ensures that the worst will happen. ~ Noam Chomsky,
389:Failure will never overtake me if my determination to succeed is
strong enough. ~ Og Mandino,
390:I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed. ~ Michael Jordan,
391:I've failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed. ~ Michael Jordan,
392:Sounds harsh, doesn’t it? Well, it is harsh, but necessary if you want to succeed. ~ Peter Voogd,
393:the real trick in life is to want nothing, and to succeed in getting it. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
394:There's only one way to succeed in anything, and that is to give it everything. ~ Vince Lombardi,
395:Those who would take over the earth and shape it to their will, never, I notice succeed. ~ Laozi,
396:We begin to know really when we succeed in forgetting completely what we have learned. ~ Thoreau,
397:When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you'll be successful. ~ Eric Thomas,
398:You don't need every investor to believe that you can succeed. You only need one. ~ Ben Horowitz,
399:You teach kids how to succeed when they successfully foil the educational system. ~ Arlo Guthrie,
400:You will succeed if you persevere; and you will find joy in overcoming obstacles. ~ Helen Keller,
401:Creativity requires a state of grace. So many things are required for it to succeed. ~ Magda Szab,
402:If at first you don’t succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.” Chloe Traeger ~ Jill Shalvis,
403:If I persist, if I continue to try, if I continue to charge forward, I will succeed! ~ Og Mandino,
404:If you want to succeed faster, there’s nothing for it but to fail faster and better. ~ Kelly Link,
405:I have a competition in me. I want no one else to succeed. I hate most people. ~ Daniel Day Lewis,
406:Live beyond your means, then you're forced to work hard, you have to succeed. ~ Edward G Robinson,
407:People who focus exclusively on efforts that matter, succeed. It's that simple. ~ Michael Lazerow,
408:People who think and say we more often than I are a lot more likely to succeed. ~ Richard Branson,
409:The best way to succeed in life is to act on the advice we give to others. ~ Suzanne Woods Fisher,
410:The best way to succeed in this world is to act on the advice you give to others. ~ Napoleon Hill,
411:The human race has been in a long struggle to eliminate murder. And we will succeed. ~ Bill James,
412:To succeed in the world it is not enough to be stupid, you must also be well-mannered. ~ Voltaire,
413:To succeed, work hard, never give up and above all cherish a magnificent obsession. ~ Walt Disney,
414:To succeed, you also have to know how to make choices and how to think more broadly. ~ Bill Gates,
415:To Succeed, you must reach for the stars, and let your imagination find its own path ~ Tahir Shah,
416:When you make your competition the person in the mirror, you’ll succeed every time. ~ Peter Voogd,
417:As we first succeed, we will find ourselves in new situations, facing new problems. ~ Ryan Holiday,
418:Basketball isn't just a sport. It is an art, one that must be mastered to succeed. ~ Stephen Curry,
419:Being a hero doesn't mean you succeed in saving the day. It just means you tried. ~ James Marsters,
420:If you're so afraid of failure, you will never succeed. You have to take chances. ~ Mario Andretti,
421:If you want to give yourself a fair chance to succeed, never expect too much too soon ~ Po Bronson,
422:I when you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe then you will be successful ~ Eric Thomas,
423:No struggle can ever succeed without women participating side by side with men. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
424:Only when you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, will you be successful. ~ Eric Thomas,
425:Our attitude is the primary force that will determine whether we succeed or fail. ~ John C Maxwell,
426:The more you succeed in loving, the more you’ll be convinced of the existence ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
427:The will to succeed is important, but what's more important is the will to prepare. ~ Bobby Knight,
428:To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone. ~ Reba McEntire,
429:When I'm asked how to succeed in show business, I always say I haven't the foggiest ~ Ethel Merman,
430:A determination to succeed is the only way to succeed that I know anything about. ~ William Feather,
431:A man cannot be said to succeed in this life who does not satisfy one friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
432:Do not contemplate what lies beyond failure while you are still trying to succeed. ~ Salman Rushdie,
433:If at first you don’t succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.” - Chloe Traeger ~ Jill Shalvis,
434:That's why I love spiders. 'If at first you don't succeed, try, try, try again. ~ Diana Wynne Jones,
435:The hardships that I encountered in the past will help me succeed in the future. ~ Philip Emeagwali,
436:There's only one way to succeed in anything, and that is to give it everything. ~ Vince Lombardi Jr,
437:To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone. ~ Reba McEntire,
438:We find our energies are actually cramped when we are overanxious to succeed. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
439:When the time comes, we can only expect that we have learned enough to succeed. ~ Danielle Trussoni,
440:You can be the one - in - a - million. Don’t be discouraged by the odds to Succeed. ~ David Beckham,
441:Be bold, brave and not afraid to fall on your face and ultimately you will succeed ~ Richard Branson,
442:Curious fact that those who never fail are also those who never truly succeed. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
443:He felt that to succeed here the idea of success must grasp and limit his mind. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
444:I actively seek out small failures to learn from so that I can succeed at big missions. ~ Steve Kamb,
445:I am ready to accept all accusations, allegations, anger - but I have to succeed. ~ Boris Trajkovski,
446:I am still far from being what I want to be, but with God's help I shall succeed. ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
447:If you tell people that they have what it takes to succeed, they'll prove you right ~ Charles Duhigg,
448:It is not in what you succeed in doing that you get your joy, but in the doing of it.  ~ Jack London,
449:Life is an experiment in which you may fail or succeed. Explore more, expect least. ~ Santosh Kalwar,
450:MOST LIES succeed because no one goes through the work to figure out how to catch them. ~ Paul Ekman,
451:no struggle can ever succeed without women participating side by side with men ~ Muhammad Ali Jinnah,
452:She says knowing how to succeed means knowing how the world works and playing the game. ~ Jen Larsen,
453:Sometimes we are afraid because success puts pressure on us to continue to succeed. ~ John C Maxwell,
454:A lot of people notice when you succeed, but they don't see what it takes to get there. ~ Dawn Staley,
455:Harness the Power of Accelerated Failure - the faster you fail, the faster you succeed. ~ Bill Bonner,
456:He who has infinite patience and infinite energy at his back, will alone succeed. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
457:If we fail to succeed in our attempt to fail, then failure is the only path to success. ~ Sean Gibson,
458:I love seeing my teammates succeed. That's what I get more excited about than anything ~ LeBron James,
459:I’m not going to die because I failed as someone else. I’m going to succeed as myself. ~ Margaret Cho,
460:Never having been able to succeed in the world, he took his revenge by speaking ill of it. ~ Voltaire,
461:Never hide behind busy work. It takes just as much energy to fail as it does to succeed. ~ Og Mandino,
462:No struggle can ever succeed without women participating side by side with men. ~ Muhammad Ali Jinnah,
463:One does not need to hope in order to act, nor to succeed in order to persevere. ~ William the Silent,
464:Take responsibility for your fate. You still may not succeed, but at least you’ll try. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
465:The goal has never been to always succeed. The goal is to be allowed to keep initiating. ~ Seth Godin,
466:The only way to succeed is to make people hate you. That way they remember you. ~ Josef von Sternberg,
467:To succeed in business it is necessary to make others see things as you see them. ~ Aristotle Onassis,
468:To succeed in life, you need three things: A Wishbone, A Back Bone, and a Funny Bone. ~ Reba McEntire,
469:Will I, succeed, paranoid from the weed and hocus pocus, try to focus but I can't see. ~ Tupac Shakur,
470:Work for something because it is good, not just because it stands a chance to succeed. ~ Vaclav Havel,
471:Work for something because it is good, not just because it stands a chance to succeed. ~ V clav Havel,
472:You are meant to succeed in the work you love. Your desire will take you all the way. ~ Tama J Kieves,
473:You've got to be a disciplined person if you want to succeed both in sport and in life. ~ Lynn Davies,
474:Hypotyposis is the rhetorical effect by which words succeed in rendering a visual scene. ~ Umberto Eco,
475:If I can succeed in saving only a single soul I can be sure that my own will be saved. ~ Dominic Savio,
476:If you can remember, worry, or tie your shoe, you can succeed with Psycho-Cybernetics! ~ Maxwell Maltz,
477:In order for a writer to succeed, I suggest three things - read and write - and wait. ~ Countee Cullen,
478:In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure. ~ Bill Cosby,
479:Is it not by love alone that we succeed in penetrating to the very essence of being? ~ Igor Stravinsky,
480:My parents instilled in me the value of learning and encouraged me to succeed in school. ~ Bruce Brown,
481:Some men succeed by what they know; some by what they do; and a few by what they are. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
482:The difference between men who succeed or fail is their ability to handle pressure. ~ Edwin Louis Cole,
483:We're hoping to succeed; we're okay with failure. We just don't want to land in between. ~ David Chang,
484:When people succeed, it is because of hard work. Luck has nothing to do with success. ~ Diego Maradona,
485:Will is what can make you succeed when your thoughts tell you that you're defeated. ~ Carlos Castaneda,
486:Yet through delivery orators succeed, I feel that I am far behind indeed. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
487:An energetic man will succeed where an indolent one would vegetate and inevitably perish. ~ Jules Verne,
488:an energetic man will succeed where an indolent one would vegetate and inevitably perish. ~ Jules Verne,
489:Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed. ~ Mia Hamm,
490:However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. ~ Stephen Hawking,
491:If you put the work in, and you show that you're willing to work hard, you'll succeed. ~ Liam Hemsworth,
492:In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure. ~ Bill Cosby,
493:In whatever man does without God, he must fail miserably, or succeed more miserably. ~ George MacDonald,
494:It’s better to succeed against daunting odds than settle for a fantasy and get nowhere. ~ Michael Hyatt,
495:It’s okay to succeed, to have good things, and to have loving relationships that work. ~ Melody Beattie,
496:To succeed with the opposite sex, tell her you're impotent. She can't wait to disprove it. ~ Cary Grant,
497:To survive and succeed, every organization will have to turn itself into a change agent ~ Peter Drucker,
498:We are the sons of Light and children of God. Glory unto the Lord, we will succeed. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
499:Whatever your goal is you will never succeed unless you let go of your fears and fly. ~ Richard Branson,
500:You know, even if we succeed, some of them aren’t going to want to come with us, ~ Adrienne Maree Brown,
501:Being positive won’t guarantee you’ll succeed. But being negative will guarantee you won’t. ~ Jon Gordon,
502:IBM pioneer Thomas Watson said, “If you want to succeed, double your failure rate.” I ~ Leonard Mlodinow,
503:I don’t mind the low probability of success, but it better be impactful if we do succeed. ~ Vinod Khosla,
504:Intent is what can make a man succeed when his thoughts tell him that he is defeated. ~ Carlos Castaneda,
505:It’s far better to attempt something great and fail than to plan to do nothing and succeed. ~ John Hagee,
506:Matthew Broderick and Megan Mullally were unbelievable to work with in 'How to Succeed. ~ Victoria Clark,
507:The success of most things depends upon knowing how long it will take to succeed. ~ Baron de Montesquieu,
508:We are too much in awe of those who succeed and far too dismissive of those who fail. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
509:As I see it, we shall never succeed in knowing ourselves unless we seek to know God: let ~ Teresa of vila,
510:Hardin once said: ‘To succeed, planning alone is insufficient. One must improvise as well. ~ Isaac Asimov,
511:I am fully aware that everybody has a right to succeed, and success should be with ethics. ~ Sharad Pawar,
512:If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. No use being a damn fool about it. ~ W C Fields,
513:If you lose your nerve before you hit the bottom, Tyler says, you never really succeed. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
514:If you wait to live you will never succeed. Living begins today and it begins within you. ~ Asa Don Brown,
515:I never have frustrations. The reason is to wit: Of at first I don't succeed, I quit! ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
516:It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed. ~ Napoleon Hill,
517:I used to think that driving, sleepless, ambitious labor was what you needed to succeed. ~ Charles Kuralt,
518:I've failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed-Michael Jordan ~ Louise Bay,
519:Let no feeling of discouragement prey upon you, and in the end you are sure to succeed. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
520:Nothing makes me more determined to succeed than someone telling me something's impossible. ~ Jackie Chan,
521:Our business in life is not to succeed, but to continue to fail in good spirits. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
522:People who have goals succeed because they know where they're going. It's that simple. ~ Earl Nightingale,
523:Succeed! It has been done, and with a stupidity that can astound the most experienced. ~ Donald Barthelme,
524:There's an old military saying...If at first you don't succeed, call in an air strike. ~ Jonathan Maberry,
525:the rewards are great if one succeeds but the rewards are great only because so few succeed. ~ Og Mandino,
526:They were happy to help someone, to succeed at something, even if they weren't to benefit. ~ Ruta Sepetys,
527:When we succeed in surviving strong emotions, we experience a more solid peace of mind. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
528:Do your work with your whole heart, and you will succeed - there's so little competition. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
529:For it is only in our nervousness and inability that we find strength to succeed in You. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
530:Fulfillment comes from striving to succeed, to survive by your own wits and strength. ~ Michael J Sullivan,
531:he said that for wickedness to succeed all it takes is for decent people to do nothing. ~ Peter F Hamilton,
532:I'd rather attempt to do something and fail than to attempt to do nothing and succeed. ~ Robert H Schuller,
533:If you are successful, you will win some false friends & some true enemies: Succeed anyway ~ Mother Teresa,
534:It is not enough that we should succeed, but our friends must fail as well. ~ Francois de La Rochefoucauld,
535:It is only in adventure that some people succeed in knowing themselves - in finding themselves ~ Andr Gide,
536:It's funny. Writing is a solitary task, but in order to succeed at it, you need other people. ~ Kim Wright,
537:Leaders stand out. Good leaders succeed. Great leaders make a difference in the world. ~ Cheryl Richardson,
538:Much of what we think we must do to succeed is unnecessary and even counterproductive. ~ Morra Aarons Mele,
539:The best way to succeed is to discover what you love and find a way to offer it to others. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
540:The difference between those that succeed and those that fail is, those that succeeded tried. ~ Mark Twain,
541:The man who has the largest capacity for work and thought is the man who is bound to succeed. ~ Henry Ford,
542:There is nothing as likely to succeed as what the enemy believes you cannot attempt. ~ Niccolo Machiavelli,
543:What surprises me in life are not the marriages that fail, but the marriages that succeed. ~ Rita Hayworth,
544:You will begin to succeed with your life when the pains and problems of others matter to you. ~ T B Joshua,
545:98% of all comedians feel obliged to be funny when interviewed. Less than 2% succeed. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
546:all it took to succeed was to stop listening to my internal critic and to just start doing. ~ Jen Lancaster,
547:Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
548:Banking gives you a glimpse into what makes companies succeed and what makes companies fail. ~ Sally Jewell,
549:If you want to succeed in politics you must keep your conscience firmly under control. ~ David Lloyd George,
550:If you want to, you can share my teaching refrain: I can't want you to succeed more than you do. ~ Tim Gunn,
551:I'm a big believer that, in life, we can't succeed in everything. Most times, we lose. ~ Sylvester Stallone,
552:Nothing appears to succeed like success in a world that is principally made up of failure. ~ Radclyffe Hall,
553:Nothing is more humiliating than to see idiots succeed in enterprises we have failed in. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
554:Now take Prince Temnos to Princess Berenise. We need him in our custody in order to succeed. ~ Kate Elliott,
555:that overwhelming desire to find a way to succeed, if only to be spared public humiliation. ~ Martin Dugard,
556:To succeed as a lawyer, a man must work like a horse and live like a hermit. ~ John Scott 1st Earl of Eldon,
557:To succeed in the other trades, capacity must be shown; in the law, concealment of it will do. ~ Mark Twain,
558:And will you succeed? Yes indeed, yes indeed! Ninety-eight and three-quarters percent guaranteed! ~ Dr Seuss,
559:everyone has a right to prosper and succeed through hard work, innovation and excellence. We ~ Chetan Bhagat,
560:He means to succeed, and a man who has centuries before him can afford to wait and to go slow. ~ Bram Stoker,
561:If you always depend on others then you'll never succeed. It's best to learn that lesson now. ~ Kayla Krantz,
562:I have always observed that to succeed in the world one should appear like a fool but be wise. ~ Montesquieu,
563:In order to succeed in the world people do their upmost to appear successful. ~ Francois de La Rochefoucauld,
564:It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.
   ~ Napoleon Hill,
565:It is only in adventure that some people succeed in knowing themselves - in finding themselves. ~ Andre Gide,
566:Life is the art of being well deceived, and to succeed, it must be habitual and uninterrupted. ~ Oscar Wilde,
567:Mistakes in life teach you how to succeed because you want to try again and do it better. ~ Carolina Herrera,
568:No one succeeds without effort... Those who succeed owe their success to perseverance. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
569:Some succeed because they are destined to, but most succeed because they are determined to. ~ Henry Van Dyke,
570:There is no philosophy that will help us to succeed if we doubt our ability to do so. ~ Joan Bennett Kennedy,
571:To succeed, always remember that the main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing. ~ Brendon Burchard,
572:To succeed in life in today's world, you must have the will and tenacity to finish the job . ~ Chin Ning Chu,
573:To succeed takes more than the desire to win. It also takes the acceptance that we could fail. ~ Simon Sinek,
574:We should try to succeed by merit, not by favor. He who does well will always have patrons enough. ~ Plautus,
575:Endurance is critical if you want to succeed spectacularly at anything God sets before you. ~ Craig Groeschel,
576:Euthanasia is legal in Hollywood. They just kill the film if it doesn't succeed immediately. ~ Dustin Hoffman,
577:Have you noticed that the cleverest people at school are often not the ones who succeed in life? ~ Paul Arden,
578:I am motivated because of emotion. And it’s that emotion that will always drive me to succeed. ~ Jillian Dodd,
579:I can't tell you how to succeed, but I can tell you how to fail: Try to please everybody. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
580:I did not succeed in life by intelligence. I succeeded because I have a long attention span. ~ Charlie Munger,
581:I mean to make myself a man, and if I succeed in that, I shall succeed in everything else. ~ James A Garfield,
582:'Soul Plane' put me in a position to succeed. I'm glad I had the opportunity to be the lead man. ~ Kevin Hart,
583:Strive to be the best and you may succeed: he may well win the race that runs by himself. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
584:Succeed; that is the advice that falls, drop by drop, from the overhanging fruit of corruption. ~ Victor Hugo,
585:These friends didn’t take away my resolve to succeed as I’d feared. They made me stronger. • ~ Marie Benedict,
586:To succeed in any field, Our enthusiasm-eyes must sparkle and our enthusiasm-hearts Must dance. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
587:When you succeed, everyone wants to be part of it; but when you fail everyone seems outsider. ~ M F Moonzajer,
588:You must have, if socialism was to succeed, a socialism with lots of democratic elements in it. ~ Stefan Heym,
589:A motto I've adopted is, if at first you don't succeed, hide all evidence that you ever tried. ~ Billy Collins,
590:Believe in the reader and they can connect the dots, if you succeed breathe life into the story ~ Esther Freud,
591:Do you think it is better to fail at something worthwhile, or succeed at something meaningless ~ Tommy Wallach,
592:If you lose your nerve before you hit the bottom,” Tyler says, "you’ll never really succeed. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
593:If you miss the first buttonhole, you will not succeed in buttoning up your coat. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
594:It is easier for women to succeed in business, the arts, and politics in America than in Europe. ~ Hedy Lamarr,
595:It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed." - Theodore Roosevelt ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
596:It is not your business to succeed, but to do right. When you have done so the rest lies with god. ~ C S Lewis,
597:J. P. Morgan once said, “If you want something too much, you will not succeed in getting it. ~ Douglas Preston,
598:Living was struggling to do something impossible - to succeed, or die, knowing you had tried! ~ Anne McCaffrey,
599:Men who can succeed in deceiving no one else, will succeed at last in deceiving themselves. ~ Anthony Trollope,
600:Nonviolent campaigns against authoritarian regimes are twice as likely to succeed as violent ones. ~ Anonymous,
601:Only constant repetition will finally succeed in imprinting an idea on the memory of the crowd. ~ Adolf Hitler,
602:She wasn’t going to succeed in newspapers if she didn’t ask the big questions when she could. ~ Larry McMurtry,
603:Sometimes I succeed, sometimes I fail, but every day is a clean slate and a fresh opportunity ~ Gretchen Rubin,
604:Sometimes I succeed, sometimes I fail, but everyday is a clean state and a fresh opportunity. ~ Gretchen Rubin,
605:The tone is so important to a film, and that tone can really make something fall or succeed. ~ Charlize Theron,
606:The turning point in the life of those who succeed usually comes at the moment of some crisis. ~ Napoleon Hill,
607:You can't win enough, you can't have enough money, you can't succeed enough. There is not enough. ~ Will Smith,
608:You have to say: I will become the captain of the problem, defeat the problem and succeed. ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
609:Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any one thing. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
610:Despair and postponement are cowardice and defeat. Men were born to succeed, not to fail. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
611:Embracing personal vulnerability is required if you wish to work, play and succeed in the future. ~ Bill Jensen,
612:I care that you succeed and have a healthy life full of positive emotions and relationships. ~ Brendon Burchard,
613:If at first you don't succeed, try to eat a big lunch and take a nap...er wait, no... #badadvice ~ Jayce O Neal,
614:If one uses music that one does not really love, then one will not succeed in making it one's own. ~ Lukas Foss,
615:I have always observed that to succeed in the world one should seem a fool, but be wise. ~ Baron de Montesquieu,
616:It doesn't matter if I don't succeed in something, what matters is that I learn from my mistakes. ~ Linda Evans,
617:Maybe someday, if I succeed at something, I'll stop saying, "It isn't fair" about everything else. ~ Lois Lowry,
618:People try new things all the time. By now, the people who succeed have to be very sophisticated. ~ Sergey Brin,
619:She’s so focused and driven to personally succeed that perhaps she takes on too much herself ~ Travis Bradberry,
620:Successful people and organizations don’t succeed in spite of failure; they succeed because of it. ~ Jeff Goins,
621:The dark, uneasy world of family life - where the greatest can fail and the humblest succeed. ~ Randall Jarrell,
622:The determination of life insurance salesmen to succeed has made life pretty soft for widows. ~ William Feather,
623:The real trick in life is to want nothing, and to succeed in getting it.

- Karla ~ Gregory David Roberts,
624:There are millions of business ideas out there but only a tiny percentage of businesses succeed. ~ Tony Robbins,
625:the secret to amazing performance is empowering talented people to succeed at meaningful work. ~ Teresa Amabile,
626:The worst thing that can happen to a man is to succeed before he is ready. —D. MARTYN LLOYD-JONES ~ R T Kendall,
627:To succeed in the business of the future we have to become the very people we are trying to reach ~ Brian Solis,
628:TRIED SO HARD TO KEEP THEM FROM FAILING THAT I FAILED TO GIVE THEM WHAT THEY NEEDED TO SUCCEED ~ Iyanla Vanzant,
629:We do not succeed in changing things according to our desire, but gradually our desire changes. ~ Marcel Proust,
630:We had to start somewhere, either succeed or fail, and then build what we knew as we went along. ~ Homer Hickam,
631:When you want to succeed in Real Estate, you have to breath it..you have to want it as much as air ~ Jimmy Reed,
632:Because I'm not attached to the outcome, I don't have to worry whether I succeed or fail. ~ Drunvalo Melchizedek,
633:every single company in a good venture portfolio must have the potential to succeed at vast scale. ~ Peter Thiel,
634:I'd rather attempt to do something great and fail than to attempt to do nothing and succeed. ~ Robert H Schuller,
635:If you succeed in judging yourself rightly, then you are indeed a man of true wisdom. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
636:It is quite possible for the vulgar to be funny, but to succeed, it must rise to a certain genius. ~ Roger Ebert,
637:Let no feeling of discouragement prey
upon you, and in the end you
are sure to succeed. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
638:Men succeed when they realize that their failures are the preparation for their victories. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
639:Success in the majority of circumstances depends on knowing how long it takes to succeed. ~ Baron de Montesquieu,
640:There’s only one certainty in business: You can’t succeed if you quit.” @DarrenHardy #JoinTheRide ~ Darren Hardy,
641:Those who invest only to get rich will fail. Those who invest to help others will probably succeed. ~ Arthur Fry,
642:Because youve done the horrible jobs, it gives you an even grittier determination to succeed. ~ Rob James Collier,
643:Do you think it’s better to fail at something worthwhile, or to succeed at something meaningless? ~ Tommy Wallach,
644:Having the competitive edge to be able to succeed is having control of your time, life and mind. ~ Frederick Lenz,
645:I don't think there could ever be more pressure to succeed than the pressure I place on myself. ~ Carmelo Anthony,
646:If people say "no" to you and it's something you really want to do, keep going and you'll succeed. ~ Elle Fanning,
647:I'll succeed,' Hazel promised. 'And Hecate? I'm not choosing one of your paths. I'm making my own. ~ Rick Riordan,
648:In fact, I’ve come to think of making stone soup as the only way an entrepreneur can succeed. ~ Peter H Diamandis,
649:I think it's an essential fact for any performer or artist to fail as poignantly as they can succeed. ~ Nick Cave,
650:I've been in a hurry all my life. I've been in a hurry to succeed, and in a hurry to prove myself. ~ Henry Kravis,
651:I've failed over and over and over again in my life... and that is why I succeed”—Michael Jordan ~ Michael Jordan,
652:I will persist until I succeed. I know that small attempts, repeated, will complete any undertaking. ~ Og Mandino,
653:Know that the mind which is born to succeed joins itself to a determined will and perseveres. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
654:Most talented players don't always succeed. Some don't even make the team. It's more what's inside. ~ Brett Favre,
655:Nay, be not discouraged. Would it not be expecting too much to hope to succeed at your first attempt? ~ Anonymous,
656:Obstacles are only opportunities to succeed or fail; how we handle them determines what will happen. ~ James Caan,
657:To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.”—Reba McEntire ~ Reba McEntire,
658:We make the oldest stories new when we succeed, and we are trapped by the old stories when we fail ~ Greil Marcus,
659:What really matters is the name you succeed in imposing on the facts - not the facts themselves. ~ Jerome A Cohen,
660:When we succeed in blaming someone for our problems, we still are no closer to a solution for them. ~ Henry Cloud,
661:When you succeed early at an endeavor, you convince yourself you will easily replicate that success. ~ Roxane Gay,
662:You don’t succeed just by learning. You have to study, then do. We need to learn less and do more. ~ Darren Hardy,
663:Believe in the LORD your God, and you will be established; believe his prophets, and you will succeed. ~ Anonymous,
664:He’s trying once more to escape into society, he’s even become a taverngoer; but he won’t succeed. ~ Hermann Hesse,
665:It all started to come together when I realized that boxing was how I was going to succeed in life. ~ Muhammad Ali,
666:I think it's the support from our parents. They want to see us succeed and do what we want to do. ~ Malcolm Subban,
667:It's important to recognize that we in Europe will either succeed together or fail together. ~ Jean Claude Juncker,
668:I was obliged to be industrious. Whoever is equally industrious will succeed equally well. ~ Johann Sebastian Bach,
669:Love is an attempt at penetrating another being, but it can only succeed if the surrender is mutual. ~ Octavio Paz,
670:Proverbs 21:30 (NIV). There is no wisdom, no insight, no plan that can succeed against the LORD....... ~ Anonymous,
671:the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed. ~ C S Lewis,
672:To wish is of little account; to succeed you must earnestly desire; and this desire must shorten thy sleep. ~ Ovid,
673:We are the most disgusting and obnoxious creatures; we can’t succeed, and we won’t let others too. ~ M F Moonzajer,
674:We learn history not in order to know how to behave or how to succeed, but to know who we are. ~ Leszek Ko akowski,
675:We learn history not in order to know how to behave or how to succeed, but to know who we are. ~ Leszek Kolakowski,
676:When we do not succeed to be ourselves, we finally realize that is was completely useless to exist... ~ Hugo Pratt,
677:Where you succeed will never so much matter as where you fail."
-We Are All Beside Ourselves ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
678:And here's what management is: motivating people and putting them in places where they can succeed. ~ Donny Deutsch,
679:Capitalism is based on the concept that in order for someone to succeed, someone else has to suffer. ~ Tawni O Dell,
680:I define success by personal growth; if you don’t continue to grow, you can’t continue to succeed. ~ Tabatha Coffey,
681:If you are convinced of a matter, you must take sides or you don't deserve to succeed. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
682:If you want to succeed in indie publishing, be prepared to work your ass off and demonstrate patience. ~ Sean Platt,
683:In order to succeed, you can't be afraid to fail. Just do it and don't let anybody tell you you can't. ~ Faith Hill,
684:It doesn’t matter how strong or capable you are; if you don’t have a big heart, you will not succeed. ~ Li Ka shing,
685:It is only if you have the courage to follow your heart that you will succeed on the path of love. ~ Frederick Lenz,
686:It remains overwhelmingly and compellingly in Britain's national interest that the EU should succeed. ~ Theresa May,
687:Look at those who have talked about you and doubted you. They are your inspirational reason to succeed. ~ Jon Jones,
688:Love the one who wears your ring. And cherish the children who share your name. Succeed at home first. ~ Max Lucado,
689:Many people are afraid to embrace religion, for fear they shall not succeed in maintaining it. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
690:Men and women succeed because they find a field of endeavor that matches their interests and abilities. ~ Ben Stein,
691:Our country does not guarantee you success--but liberty guarantees you the opportunity to succeed. ~ Deneen Borelli,
692:Our economy is creating jobs and giving businesses the conditions they need to invest and succeed. ~ Dennis Hastert,
693:Presidents have to be very organized to govern successfully, and solo artists rarely succeed. ~ Douglas Holtz Eakin,
694:Quality effective leaders have the confidence to trust others to try, succeed, and sometimes to fail. ~ Simon Sinek,
695:The biggest reason people don't succeed is because they don't expose themselves to existing information. ~ Jim Rohn,
696:The lesson of Buffett was: To succeed in a spectacular fashion you had to be spectacularly unusual. ~ Michael Lewis,
697:the lesson of Buffett was: To succeed in a spectacular fashion you had to be spectacularly unusual. ~ Michael Lewis,
698:THERE IS NOTHING quite like ignorance combined with a driving need to succeed to force rapid learning. ~ Ed Catmull,
699:The trials of our lives make us strong, determined to succeed, to be different, both in body and spirit. ~ J C Reed,
700:Thus times do shift, each thing his turn does hold; New things succeed, as former things grow old. ~ Robert Herrick,
701:Unless people believe that the strategic challenge is attainable, the change is not likely to succeed. ~ W Chan Kim,
702:You can succeed only with God, never against him. You can succeed only with the whole, never against it. ~ Rajneesh,
703:You will have more regrets for the things you didn't try than the ones you tried and didn't succeed at. ~ Jay Samit,
704:even if you fail in doing something ambitious, you usually succeed in doing something important. ~ Peter H Diamandis,
705:My goal is not to fail fast. My goal is to succeed over the long run. They are not the same thing. ~ Marc Andreessen,
706:[The crowd] will finally succeed in remembering only the simplest concepts repeated a thousand times. ~ Adolf Hitler,
707:The problem with trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you so very often succeed. ~ C S Lewis,
708:to succeed in the world he could not be just a dog whisperer. He needed to be a people whisperer. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
709:Try till you succeed...if you don't succeed once, then destroy all evidence of the fact that you tried! ~ W C Fields,
710:When I was at my worst, the first thing I had to do was convince myself that I could succeed again. ~ James Altucher,
711:Everyone loves a success story,” says Newton. “And once you succeed, everyone loves tearing you down. ~ Jeff Pearlman,
712:every time you succeed in looking normal in an area where you’re not, something inside you deadens. ~ Leopoldine Core,
713:If I’m trusting God, I will stare at all the possible ways He’ll use this whether I fail or succeed. ~ Lysa TerKeurst,
714:If our goal is not to "succeed" or avoid failure or mistakes, but to learn something, we will never fail. ~ Jami Gold,
715:Is it the factitious and the conventional that most surely succeed on earth and in the course of life? ~ Paul Cezanne,
716:It is no use saying, 'We are doing our best.' You have got to succeed in doing what is necessary. ~ Winston Churchill,
717:It's a very valuable skill to succeed in life whether you work for a startup or a Fortune 500 company. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
718:I want my daughter to have the choice not just to succeed, but to be liked for her accomplishments. ~ Sheryl Sandberg,
719:Just introduce a woman, conspiracies succeed; Of soldiers, or their weapons, there really is no need. ~ Luo Guanzhong,
720:Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed ~ C S Lewis,
721:we’ve been indoctrinated to believe that the higher the IQ, the more likely one is to succeed in life. ~ Sean Patrick,
722:You need to remind people that you vote, you matter, and that they can’t succeed without your help. ~ Richard L Hanna,
723:Dr. Lloyd-Jones used to say, “The worst thing that can happen to a man is to succeed before he is ready. ~ R T Kendall,
724:If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There's no point in being a damn fool about it. ~ W C Fields,
725:If they believed him attached to me, they would not try to part us; if he were so, they could not succeed. ~ Anonymous,
726:It's no use saying, "We are doing our best." You have got to succeed in doing what is necessary. ~ Winston S Churchill,
727:Many people will never succeed at being themselves because they cannot even get into agreement with God. ~ Joyce Meyer,
728:Most people would succeed in small things if they were not troubled with great ambitions. ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
729:No surprise then that the pure socialists support every revolution except for the ones that succeed. ~ Michael Parenti,
730:Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed. ~ C S Lewis,
731:Run and become. Become and run. Run to succeed in the outer world. Become to proceed in the inner world. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
732:The narrator, I think, must succeed in frightening himself before he can think of frightening his reader… ~ E F Benson,
733:The trials of our lives make us strong, determined to succeed, to be different, both in body and in spirit. ~ J C Reed,
734:To fail is a natural consequence of trying, to succeed is a natural consequence of Cosmic Ordering. ~ Stephen Richards,
735:To succeed in any field,
Our enthusiasm-eyes must sparkle
And our enthusiasm-hearts
Must dance. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
736:We can succeed only by concert. It is not 'can any of us imagine better?, but 'can we all do better? ~ Abraham Lincoln,
737:We do not succeed in spite of our obstacles and challenges. We succeed precisely because of them. ~ Richard Paul Evans,
738:Without the assistance of that Divine Being...I cannot succeed. With that assistance I cannot fail. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
739:You are unstoppable now, naturally more positive than negative, inclined to succeed, and born to thrive. ~ Mike Dooley,
740:You cannot succeed in one department of life while cheating on another, life is an indivisible whole. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
741:You think intelligence and grit can succeed by themselves, but I'm telling you that's a pretty illusion. ~ Nancy Kress,
742:disobedience, refusal to work, refusal to answer when spoken to, and a determination not to succeed. ~ Harold Schechter,
743:If at first you don't succeed, try again. If it still doesn't work out, success may not be your thing. ~ Warren Miller,
744:Our party has known great, great days. But we have no God-given right to survive, let alone to succeed. ~ Francis Maude,
745:People who succeed are those who know how to mobilize all their physical and mental resources on a goal. ~ Tony Robbins,
746:Places that succeed in attracting and retaining creative class people prosper; those that fail don't. ~ Richard Florida,
747:Sometimes you have to trust people enough to let them succeed and love them enough to let them fail. ~ Orson Scott Card,
748:There was no doubt about it: if you wanted to succeed you had to go away. You could do nothing in Dublin. ~ James Joyce,
749:The things that caused problems for me in school are the same things that help me succeed in the world. ~ Larry Ellison,
750:To have success in your professional life is not so hard. To succeed as a man is more difficult. ~ Yann Arthus Bertrand,
751:... with proper design, the features come cheaply. This approach is arduous, but continues to succeed. ~ Dennis Ritchie,
752:With public sentiment, nothing can fail,” Abraham Lincoln said, “without it nothing can succeed. ~ Doris Kearns Goodwin,
753:You can do a couple things and succeed, or you can try to do fifteen things and fail at all of them. ~ Penelope Douglas,
754:You can't succeed in beating the insurgents unless you can convince the people that they can be protected. ~ Rand Beers,
755:You have to love what you're doing. I've never seen anyone succeed who didn't love what they were doing. ~ Donald Trump,
756:Almost more than talent you need tenacity, and an infinite capacity for rejection, if you are to succeed. ~ Larry Kramer,
757:America can't succeed unless you succeed. That is why I am running for president of the United States. ~ Hillary Clinton,
758:Experience has always shown, and reason also, that affairs which depend on many seldom succeed. ~ Francesco Guicciardini,
759:I hold too that whatever may be true of other countries, a bloody revolution will not succeed in India. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
760:I think every parent takes more pleasure in seeing their child succeed than seeing themselves succeed. ~ Jerry Reinsdorf,
761:I've taken many knocks over the years but it has only made me stronger and more determined to succeed. ~ Richard Branson,
762:I was obliged to be industrious. Whoever is equally industrious will succeed . . . equally well. ~ Johann Sebastian Bach,
763:The secret of childhood happiness is to succeed to be happy with the simplest things ever possible! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
764:We do not live to think, but, on the contrary, we think in order that we may succeed in surviving. ~ Jos Ortega y Gasset,
765:When we succeed, we succeed because of our individual initiative, but also because we do things together. ~ Barack Obama,
766:When you succeed you have a million people to thank, but when you fail there is only one person to blame. ~ Daymond John,
767:All forms of government ultimately are not going to succeed in trying to control or censor the Internet. ~ Rupert Murdoch,
768:As Dr. Lloyd-Jones used to say, “The worst thing that can happen to a man is to succeed before he is ready. ~ R T Kendall,
769:I think that the minute that you have a backup plan, you've admitted that you're not going to succeed. ~ Elizabeth Holmes,
770:It is a greater triumph for the fearful soul who tries and fails than for the fearless who succeed. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
771:The number of times I succeed is directly proportional to the number of times I can fail, and keep trying ! ~ Tom Hopkins,
772:The number of times I succeed is in direct proportion to the number of times I can fail and keep on trying. ~ Tom Hopkins,
773:To succeed in life, we must stay within our strength zone but continually move outside our comfort zone. ~ John C Maxwell,
774:To succeed, you need to find something to hold on to, something to motivate you, something to inspire you. ~ Tony Dorsett,
775:We do not live to think, but, on the contrary, we think in order that we may succeed in surviving. ~ Jose Ortega y Gasset,
776:Women are constantly trying to commit suicide for love, but generally they take care not to succeed. ~ W Somerset Maugham,
777:Analogies are figures intended to serve as fatal weapons if they succeed, and as innocent toys if they fail. ~ Henry Adams,
778:Any society that does not succeed in tapping into the energy and creativity of its youth will be left behind. ~ Kofi Annan,
779:a successful man will never keep his place in the world by wronging the people who helped him succeed. ~ Toye Lawson Brown,
780:Blow your own horn loud. If you succeed, people will forgive your noise; if you fail, they'll forget it. ~ William Feather,
781:Companies that build scale for the benefit of their customers and shareholders more often succeed over time. ~ Jamie Dimon,
782:Girls, to me, growing up were very, very petty and didn't want me to succeed and didn't want the best for me. ~ Rachel Zoe,
783:I have the feeling that he would rather see a good cause fail than succeed if he were not the head of it. ~ Woodrow Wilson,
784:I hear and forget. I see and hear and I remember. However, when I see, hear and do, I understand and succeed. ~ Zig Ziglar,
785:Lots of companies don't succeed over time. What do they fundamentally do wrong? They usually miss the future. ~ Larry Page,
786:My business is to succeed, and I’m good at it. I create my Iliad by my actions, create it day by day. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
787:One of the most important things that a woman can do in her life is to encourage another woman to succeed. ~ Michelle Lowe,
788:The blessing of influence is helping others succeed. It is lifting up Christ with your established platform. ~ Johnny Hunt,
789:The fittest person survives! The fighting man succeeds! He who Fights to Fit, will Survive to Succeed! ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
790:The only big companies that succeed will be those that obsolete their own products before somebody else does. ~ Bill Gates,
791:Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed, is more important than any other one thing. ~ Doris Kearns Goodwin,
792:Each one of us has both; good and evil virtues. Those who decide to focus on the good ones succeed in life. ~ Narendra Modi,
793:Grandmaster José Raúl Capablanca put it well: to succeed, “you must study the endgame before everything else. ~ Peter Thiel,
794:I really like doing the laundry, because I succeed at it. But I loathe putting it away. It is already clean. ~ Jenny Holzer,
795:It is the man who carefully advances step by step...who is bound to succeed in the greatest degree. ~ Alexander Graham Bell,
796:it’s becoming clear that people who reject the worst of the current system are actually more likely to succeed. ~ Anonymous,
797:Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail. Without it, nothing can succeed. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
798:Succeed or die. Either we stop the Apocalypse, or we’re caught right in the middle of it.", FADE by Kailin Gow ~ Kailin Gow,
799:To succeed in business you need to be original, but you also need to understand what your customers want. ~ Richard Branson,
800:You've got to take risks if you're going to succeed. I would much rather ask forgiveness than permission. ~ Richard Branson,
801:…Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed, is more important than any other one thing. ~ Doris Kearns Goodwin,
802:...an imperfect plan implemented immediately and violently will always succeed better than a perfect plan. ~ George S Patton,
803:Catherine the Great, like others of her kind, did not succeed in imparting greatness to her descendants. ~ Katharine Anthony,
804:If achieving your potential requires favorable judgment by others, you are much less likely to succeed. ~ Marilyn vos Savant,
805:If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried."
From Head Over Heels, by Jill Shalvis ~ Jill Shalvis,
806:It's the building of things that makes you happy. You have to enjoy the process whether you succeed or fail. ~ Caterina Fake,
807:Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed. Uncle ~ C S Lewis,
808:Only people who look dull ever get into the House of Commons, and only people who are dull ever succeed there. ~ Oscar Wilde,
809:Sometimes you have to succeed to see that there is nothing awesome in the thing which will be achieved! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
810:Suppose you succeed in breaking the wall with your head. And what, then, will you do in the next cell? ~ Stanislaw Jerzy Lec,
811:Systems people succeed every time they apply their systems, in the sense that they did what they intended to do. ~ Anonymous,
812:The men who succeed best in public life are those who take the risk of standing by their own convictions. ~ James A Garfield,
813:They had not yet attained the stupefying boredom of omnipotence; their experiments did not always succeed. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
814:to succeed at anything, you must want it very much. Desire must be in evidence in order to attract ~ William Walker Atkinson,
815:To succeed you have to produce the absolute best stuff you’re capable of producing—a task that requires depth. ~ Cal Newport,
816:Without debate, without criticism no administration and no country can succeed and no republic can survive. ~ John F Kennedy,
817:Your current situation does not determine your future. Your future is determined by your decision to succeed. ~ Tony Robbins,
818:Great leaders don't succeed because they are great. They succeed because they bring out the greatness in others. ~ Jon Gordon,
819:How well I know you by your deeds and how invariably you succeed in living down to what one expects of you! ~ Alexandre Dumas,
820:It’s not enough to shelve your own competitive streak. You have to try, consciously, to help others succeed. ~ Chris Hadfield,
821:No matter how good a driver you are, you have to have the right car and the right team behind you in order to succeed. ~ Nico,
822:People who succeed at the highest level are not lucky; they're doing something differently than everyone else. ~ Tony Robbins,
823:Play around. Dive into absurdity and write. Take chances. You will succeed if you are fearless of failure. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
824:The comedy really comes from how badly you want these characters to succeed and with a comedy that's often hard. ~ Jonah Hill,
825:The most important thing for me to succeed in is day by day becoming a better and more prepared person. ~ Luis Gerardo Mendez,
826:Better have failed in the high aim, as I, Than vulgarly in the low aim succeed As, God be thanked! I do not. ~ Robert Browning,
827:How can you succeed by helping others succeed? We succeed at our very best only when we help others succeed. ~ James C Collins,
828:I always expected my work to be what was noticed, appreciated or what would eventually succeed, not my sexuality. ~ Cris Mazza,
829:I decided long ago never to walk in anyone's shadow; if I fail, or if I succeed at least I did as I believe. ~ Whitney Houston,
830:It's not that I succeed, it's that everyone else has to fail, horribly, preferably in front of their parents. ~ Attila the Hun,
831:Moral: If at first you don’t succeed, invent fire. Or hire a chef. Preferably one with imagination. Jane Yolen, ~ Ellen Datlow,
832:The best way to beat somebody is to show them who you are, and to succeed by doin’ what they say you can’t. ~ Tamera Alexander,
833:To succeed in sales, simply talk to lots of people every day. And here's what's exciting: There are lots of people! ~ Jim Rohn,
834:Had I known that the Germans would not succeed in producing an atomic bomb, I would not have lifted a finger. ~ Albert Einstein,
835:If you cannot put the ego on the side you cannot succeed in love, period. Therefore love must defeat it. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
836:If you don't succeed at first, there's no need for the F word (Failure). Pick yourself up and try, try again. ~ Richard Branson,
837:It is difficult to judge, when both sides are employing weapons of violence, which side 'deserves' to succeed. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
838:It’s also our collective delusion that overwork and burnout are the price we must pay in order to succeed. ~ Arianna Huffington,
839:No enterprise is more likely to succeed than one concealed from the enemy until it is ripe for execution. ~ Niccolo Machiavelli,
840:Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time. ~ Thomas A Edison,
841:Poor Theo. He just wanted to succeed here, but the very system he ascribed to was keeping him from being happy. ~ Bella Forrest,
842:Run and become.
Become and run.
Run to succeed in the outer world.
Become to proceed in the inner world. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
843:..She had started to understand how a woman's attention could succeed in making sense of a man's blind chaos.. ~ Louise Erdrich,
844:The consistent and persistent man of average intelligence is more likely to succeed than an erratic and lazy genius. ~ Om Swami,
845:The first step is always to succeed in becoming surprised - to notice that there is something funny going on. ~ David Gelernter,
846:The right decisions come from the right focus. You’ll succeed if your focus is on the mission, not the money. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
847:What a paradox that is. The things you dislike the most succeed in taking up the majority of your mental time. ~ Joan Borysenko,
848:When we rehearse, we're always trying to aim for something else. But we never quite succeed in getting there. ~ Colin Greenwood,
849:Actually, if American business is going to succeed, we are going to need hundreds, or even thousands, of miracles. ~ Peter Thiel,
850:A man will strategically organize his life in boxes and then spend most of his time in the boxes he can succeed in. ~ Pam Farrel,
851:Christianity is our foe. If animal rights is to succeed, we must destroy the Judeo-Christian religious tradition. ~ Peter Singer,
852:Every human being is born an heir to an inheritance to which he can succeed only in the process of learning. ~ Michael Oakeshott,
853:I feel really grateful to the people who encouraged me and helped me develop. Nobody can succeed on their own. ~ Sheryl Sandberg,
854:I have no recipe for how to combine things. But you must be sincere. And if you are, strangely, it will succeed. ~ Andree Putman,
855:In order to succeed, you must know what you are doing, like what you are doing, and believe in what you are doing. ~ Will Rogers,
856:It is a mere question of time when men will succeed in attaching their machinery to the very wheelwork of nature. ~ Nikola Tesla,
857:It is necessary to meditate early, and often, on the art of dying to succeed later in doing it properly just once. ~ Umberto Eco,
858:No incumbent vice president had been elected to succeed an incumbent president since Martin Van Buren won in 1836. ~ Jon Meacham,
859:Take life slowly and deliberately, making sure to acknowledge the people who have helped you succeed along the way. ~ Ted Levine,
860:The man who starts out simply with the idea of getting rich won't succeed, you must have a larger ambition. ~ John D Rockefeller,
861:Those who speak up, those who use their connections, are more likely to succeed than those who sit and wait. ~ Madeleine M Kunin,
862:By puberty I learned that nothing worth having could be easily attained and to succeed one must be single minded. ~ Russell Brand,
863:I believe that, for the most part, we don’t succeed in spite of our hardships but precisely because of them. ~ Richard Paul Evans,
864:I don't know what drives me to succeed. I know I want to always do the best I can. I never was like that as a kid. ~ Adam Sandler,
865:I just wanted to be a guy on the radio and I wanted to succeed, and I wanted a situation where I could be honest. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
866:My own party can succeed at the polls only so long as it continues to be the party of militant liberalism. ~ Franklin D Roosevelt,
867:people trying to reach goals succeed at a much greater rate if they are connected to a strong human support system. ~ Henry Cloud,
868:The masters, the ones who succeed tremendously and set the standard for others, are those who master the details. ~ Chris Widener,
869:What makes capitalism succeed is not chiefly its structure of incentives but its use of knowledge and experience. ~ George Gilder,
870:When a person is determined to not just succeed but to do work that matters, the world makes room for such ambition. ~ Jeff Goins,
871:And in order to succeed in later life, you need creative skills because look at how fast the world is changing. ~ Robert Sternberg,
872:Empowering students to succeed in school and life—means that we pay attention to the skills companies are seeking. ~ George Couros,
873:God's love never ceases. Never... God doesn't love us less if we fail or more if we succeed. God's love never ceases. ~ Max Lucado,
874:If your city's being populated by highly educated twentysomething s with choices, you're probably going to succeed. ~ Mick Cornett,
875:I hate seeing people that look like you. Especially if God's living by the motto 'If at first you don't succeed.' ~ Demetri Martin,
876:My scholarly expectation is then that I may succeed in becoming clever in philosophy in spite of my stupidity. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
877:Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne’er succeed.
To comprehend a nectar
Requires sorest need. ~ Emily Dickinson,
878:The many many imponderables come together when a film opens and for all sorts of reasons it may or may not succeed. ~ Ben Kingsley,
879:Those who intend to aim for the highest positions are ruthless, devious and utterly determined to succeed. ~ Christopher G Nuttall,
880:We cannot agree that an act of plunder which threatens the livelihood of many nations should be allowed to succeed. ~ Anthony Eden,
881:What are the assumptions that have to prove true in order for me to be able to succeed in this assignment? ~ Clayton M Christensen,
882:When to use iterative development? You should use iterative development only on projects that you want to succeed. ~ Martin Fowler,
883:Whoever does decide to awaken should put their whole effort, attention, and life into it, in order to make it succeed. ~ Belsebuub,
884:You said pain is necessary, because in order for a person to succeed, they must first learn to conquer adversity. ~ Colleen Hoover,
885:Every child in every neighborhood, of every color, class and background, deserves a school that will help them succeed. ~ Rand Paul,
886:Great leaders must be able to realize when something isn’t working-no matter how hard they’ve worked to make it succeed. ~ Jim Rohn,
887:However bad life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. Where there's life, there's hope. ~ Stephen Hawking,
888:I had watched Dad climb into the biggest arena and succeed. I wanted to find out if I had what it took to join him. ~ George W Bush,
889:It doesn't matter if I failed. At least I passed the concept on to others. Even if I don't succeed, someone will succeed. ~ Jack Ma,
890:It is better to fail in a cause that will ultimately succeed than to succeed in a cause that will ultimately fail. ~ Peter Marshall,
891:Keep your mind steady by gently warding off all intruding thoughts but without strain. Soon you will succeed. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
892:That's one of my biggest obstacles. I'm afraid of failure. I want to succeed so bad that I become afraid of failing. ~ LeBron James,
893:The mission of Everyman is to fulfill the lies he incarnates, to succeed in being no more than an exhaust illusion. ~ Emil M Cioran,
894:Then I’ll have to succeed three times as hard as they want me to fail. You, of all people, should understand that. ~ Courtney Milan,
895:To find yourself jilted is a blow to your pride. Do your best to forget it and if you don't succeed, at least pretend to. ~ Moliere,
896:Trust in God and destroy fear, which paralyzes all efforts to succeed and attracts the very thing you fear. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
897:We need to remember that we are saved by grace when we fail. But we need to remember it much more when we succeed. ~ Timothy Keller,
898:When asked what it takes to succeed in the acting profession, Bette Davis would answer, "The courage to be hated." ~ Frank Langella,
899:When you succeed early at an endeavor, you convince yourself you will easily replicate that success. Ask child actors. ~ Roxane Gay,
900:You can't be afraid to fail. It's the only way you succeed - you're not gonna succeed all the time, and I know that. ~ LeBron James,
901:A culture truly changes only when a new way of operating has been shown to succeed over some minimum period of time. ~ John P Kotter,
902:A republic cannot succeed, till it contains a certain body of men imbued with the principles of justice and honour. ~ Charles Darwin,
903:A revolution must aim at the destruction of the given order and will succeed only by asserting an order of its own. ~ Rudolf Arnheim,
904:...But we will succeed. I've seen the future, Jorj. We will succeed, because we have no other choice."

-Thrawn ~ Timothy Zahn,
905:Don’t be sad when you fail and happy when you succeed. Both are going to happen again and again at every new level. ~ James Altucher,
906:Even if my strength should fail, my daring will win me praise: in might enterprises even the will to succeed is enough. ~ Propertius,
907:Failure is not a word in my dictionary. Indecisiveness is. The day I decide to succeed, it will all be over.’ Anita ~ Kulpreet Yadav,
908:For cultural invasion to succeed, it is essential that those invaded become convinced of their intrinsic inferiority. ~ Paulo Freire,
909:For most of us the problem isn’t that we aim too high and fail - it’s just the opposite - we aim too low and succeed. ~ Ken Robinson,
910:If any one should wish to get the kingdom for himself, and to effect this by what he does, I see that he will not succeed. ~ Lao Tzu,
911:If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There’s no point in being a damn fool about it. —W. C. FIELDS ~ Jeff Goins,
912:If I succeed in loving you, I will be able to love everyone and all species on Earth... This is the real message of love ~ Nhat Hanh,
913:If I succeed in putting some warmth and love into the work, then it will find friends. Carrying on working is the ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
914:It is not just that it is more difficult for women to succeed; they get treated much more harshly if ever they mess up. ~ Mary Beard,
915:Those conspiracies that are too incredible to be believed, are by the same right, those which most often succeed. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
916:We have a harder way to succeed in life as Serbs because of the past that we had and because of the history we had. ~ Novak Djokovic,
917:You are worried that the religious Right might succeed in forcing their values onto us? I am worried they might fail. ~ Daniel Lapin,
918:You understand your responsibilities better than guardians twice your age. You'll do what you have to do to succeed. ~ Richelle Mead,
919:Every human being is born an heir to an inheritance to which he can succeed only in a process of learning. ~ Michael Joseph Oakeshott,
920:I am evidence that you don't have to sell a lot of records or succeed in the usual way to have a big audience and a job. ~ Leo Kottke,
921:If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There's no use being a damn fool about it. - W.C. Fields ~ Bethenny Frankel,
922:If you blithely do what you do and you're good at what you do, and try to be a decent person, you can succeed. ~ Michael Patrick Jann,
923:I'm going to keep going until I succeed — or die. Don't think I don't know how this might end. I've known it for years. ~ J K Rowling,
924:I've found that people who look at things as they are, and not as they wish them to be, are the ones who succeed. ~ Sarah Orne Jewett,
925:I was the only westerner to succeed in a place that's like a toilet, and you always come out of a toilet with a smell. ~ David Reuben,
926:Nothing ventured, nothing gained” and “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” or “Rome wasn’t built in a day. ~ Carol S Dweck,
927:One may go wrong in many different ways, but right only in one, which is why it is easy to fail and difficult to succeed. ~ Aristotle,
928:The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time. ~ Louis Ferdinand Celine,
929:The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time. ~ Louis Ferdinand C line,
930:Try to bring me down, but you will never succeed because I'm always moving upward. Maybe not before, but now ... I am. ~ Aaron Carter,
931:We have a terror of seeming to exert ourselves, lest it be noticed that we exerted ourselves and did not succeed. ~ Mignon McLaughlin,
932:When you see yourself succeed, you develop more confidence in your ability to succeed at bigger and bigger things. ~ Benjamin P Hardy,
933:Your ability to face setbacks and disappointments without giving up will be the measure of your ability to succeed. ~ Calvin Coolidge,
934:You tell me. Do you think it’s better to fail at something worthwhile, or to succeed at something meaningless?” Peter ~ Tommy Wallach,
935:Zombies are then a symbol of our own mad urges to destroy ourselves, and a terrifying portent that we might succeed. ~ Kim Paffenroth,
936:Æthelred made an invaluable contribution to the war effort by dropping dead, clearing the way for Edmund to succeed him. ~ Marc Morris,
937:For I consider the character of no man affected by a want of success, provided he has made an honest effort to succeed. ~ Robert E Lee,
938:If you want to succeed you should strike out on new paths, rather than travel the worn paths of accepted success. ~ John D Rockefeller,
939:Irresponsible is only irresponsible if you fail. Succeed, however; and irresponsible quickly becomes merely unorthodox. ~ Lisa Gardner,
940:Powerful men often succeed through the help of their wives. Powerful women only succeed in spite of their husbands. ~ Lynda Lee Potter,
941:Starting a business is like riding a wave between life and death. If you can hang on long enough, you're bound to succeed ~ Sam Altman,
942:The entrepreneurs who succeed usually want to make a difference to people’s lives, not just their own bank balances. ~ Richard Branson,
943:The guy who takes a chance, who walks the line between the known and unknown, who is unafraid of failure, will succeed. ~ Gordon Parks,
944:The more women succeed and rise up into positions of power, the more remote they become from actual masculine energy. ~ Camille Paglia,
945:There is no other way to succeed than to draw the mind back every time it turns outwards and fix it in the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
946:throw roses into the abyss and say: ‘here is my thanks to the monster who didn't succeed in swallowing me alive. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
947:To become better you, look nowhere else for greatness. All you need to improve and succeed are right there in you. ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
948:To help others to develop and succeed in life is a reward itself and only has value when nothing is expected in return. ~ Choi Hong Hi,
949:When intelligent people pride themselves on not understanding, it is quite natural they should succeed better than fools. ~ Andre Gide,
950:Whether you succeed or not is irrelevant, there is no such thing. Making your unknown known is the important thing. ~ Georgia O Keeffe,
951:Worldly wisdom teaches that is it is better for reputation to fail conventionally than to succeed unconventionally. ~ Richard H Thaler,
952:Worldly wisdom teaches that it is better for reputation to fail conventionally than to succeed unconventionally. ~ John Maynard Keynes,
953:You will not succeed unless your men have tenacity and unity of purpose, and above all, a spirit of sympathetic cooperation. ~ Sun Tzu,
954:But, as so often happens, crimes committed with extraordinary boldness are more likely to succeed than any others. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
955:Don't be discouraged. At times the path to truth is circuitous. The point is not to succeed, only to smile eternally. ~ Frederick Lenz,
956:He who can modify his tactics in relation to his opponent and thereby succeed in winning, may be called a heaven-born captain ~ Sun Tzu,
957:I always try to make myself as widely understood as possible; and if I don't succeed, I consider it my own fault. ~ Dmitri Shostakovich,
958:If you want to achieve things in life, you've just got to do them, and if you're talented and smart, you'll succeed. ~ Juliana Hatfield,
959:In warfare, there are no constant conditions. He who can modify his tactics in relation to his opponent will succeed and win. ~ Sun Tzu,
960:It is through the human figure that I best succeed in expressing the nearly religious feeling that I have towards life. ~ Henri Matisse,
961:Most organizations I’ve worked with have too many top priorities to achieve the level of focus they need to succeed. ~ Patrick Lencioni,
962:Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
963:Scientific ideas should succeed or fail according to rational argument and evidence. It is about data rather than dogma. ~ Matthew Syed,
964:The act of trying to guarantee the success of an innovation is almost certain to make it less likely that it will succeed. ~ Seth Godin,
965:The fastest way to succeed is to look as if you're playing by somebody else's rules, while quietly playing by your own. ~ Michael Korda,
966:The reason most people fail instead of succeed is they trade what they want most for what they want at the moment. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
967:The reason most people fail instead of succeed is they trade what they want most for what they want at the moment. ~ Napol on Bonaparte,
968:When you succeed at keeping almost everyone in school, you must figure out ways to educate everyone you keep in school. ~ Diane Ravitch,
969:Baseball is the only field of endeavor where a man can succeed three times out of ten and be considered a good performer. ~ Ted Williams,
970:Before a leader can be accepted, let alone succeed, autonomous professionals must agree to be influenced by that person. ~ David Maister,
971:Be willing to give people a second chance. You'd be surprised how well people respond to another opportunity to succeed. ~ Robert Cheeke,
972:Do not be concerned that you might set a target too high and fail. Be concerned that you will set it too low and succeed. ~ Michelangelo,
973:I really believe that everyone has a talent, ability, or skill that he can mine to support himself and to succeed in life. ~ Dean Koontz,
974:I started to do everything I could to succeed, but found that the more successful I became, the less people liked me. ~ Evangeline Lilly,
975:I've known ambitious people with no aptitude for the thing they did. Most of whom, rather terrifyingly, tended to succeed. ~ Neil Gaiman,
976:Nonviolent non-co-operators can only succeed when they have succeeded in attaining control over the hooligans of India. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
977:Rules existed for a reason: if you followed them, you would succeed; if you didn't, you might burn the world to the ground. ~ Celeste Ng,
978:Rules existed for a reason: if you followed them, you would succeed; if you didn’t, you might burn the world to the ground. ~ Celeste Ng,
979:The effective teachers spent time organizing and structuring their classrooms so the students knew what to do to succeed. ~ Harry K Wong,
980:When you want the absolute best chance to succeed at anything you want, your approach should always be the same. Go small. ~ Gary Keller,
981:You can’t take the team to the next level when you haven’t mastered the skills it takes to succeed on a personal level. ~ John C Maxwell,
982:You will only succeed if you know that what you are doing is right and you know how to bring out the best in people. ~ Margaret Thatcher,
983:And moreover, to succeed, the artist must possess the courageous soul . . . the brave soul. The soul that dares and defies. ~ Kate Chopin,
984:If we’re going to succeed in achieving our goals despite the obstacles that may come, this strength in will must be built. ~ Ryan Holiday,
985:Ill-Success failed to crush us: the mere effort to succeed had given a wonderful zest to existence; it must be pursued. ~ Charlotte Bront,
986:No self-respecting right-wing populist movement in India can succeed without targeting the Muslims as alien to the nation. ~ Gyan Prakash,
987:Only a few businesses will succeed by having the lowest price, so most will need a strategy that includes customer services. ~ Bill Gates,
988:People who fail focus on what they will have to go through; people who succeed focus on what it will feel like at the end. ~ Tony Robbins,
989:Play with passion and heart. If you don't carry passion into sport - or into any job for that matter - you won't succeed. ~ Phil Esposito,
990:The true test of relationships is not only how loyal someone is when we fail, but how thrilled they are when we succeed. ~ John C Maxwell,
991:...throw roses into the abyss and say: 'here is my thanks to the monster who didn't succeed in swallowing me alive. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
992:To succeed in sales, simply talk to lots of people every day. And here's what's exciting—there are lots of people! —Jim Rohn ~ Jeb Blount,
993:Unless a man enters upon the vocation intended for him by nature, and best suited to his peculiar genius, he cannot succeed. ~ P T Barnum,
994:Companies that succeed are driven by internal ambition. Stock price doesn’t drive them. Ambition and values drive them. ~ Sumantra Ghoshal,
995:Equality is treating everyone the same. But equity is taking differences into account, so everyone has a chance to succeed. ~ Jodi Picoult,
996:every company of a certain size must have committed egregious sins to succeed in the cutthroat world of Western capitalism. ~ John Grisham,
997:I estimate that 75% of those organizations using Scrum will not succeed in getting the benefits that they hope for from it. ~ Ken Schwaber,
998:In my inmost heart I believed that I could succeed where others failed, and now I had the opportunity to test myself. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
999:Success simple disciplines, practiced every day, while failure a few errors in judgment, repeated every day. Choose to succeed. ~ Jim Rohn,
1000:The more you succeed in loving, the more you'll be convinced at the existence of God and the immortality of your soul. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
1001:There are some relationships that succeed only because they are impossible, that actually need unhappiness to continue. ~ Anthony Horowitz,
1002:Upon graduation, in the yearbook I was voted "Most likely to succeed." which I know was credited to my artistic achievements. ~ Paul Smith,
1003:When the present dream of our life is finished, a new dream will succeed it and there our life and death will not be known. ~ Schopenhauer,
1004:Allah causes the night and the day to succeed each other. Truly, in these things is indeed a lesson for those who have insight. ~ Anonymous,
1005:Every start on an untrodden path is a venture which only in unusual circumstances looks sensible and likely to succeed. ~ Albert Schweitzer,
1006:If at first you don’t succeed, you’re doing it wrong. Learn from the experience. Try again, but with a different approach. ~ Steve Maraboli,
1007:If one must be rejected, one succeed, make him my lord within whose faithful breast is fixed my image, and who loves me best. ~ John Dryden,
1008:I’m going to keep going until I succeed — or I die. Don’t think I don’t know how this might end. I’ve known it for years.” He ~ J K Rowling,
1009:Iraq will succeed because the Iraqis will see to it that they succeed. And our job is to help them succeed. That's our job. ~ George W Bush,
1010:I really believe that entrepreneurship is about being able to face failure, manage failure and succeed after failing. ~ Kiran Mazumdar Shaw,
1011:man jadda wajada! This magical Arabic chant had a short but powerful meaning: “He who gives his all will surely succeed”. -39 ~ Ahmad Fuadi,
1012:More and more students are playing it safe and not taking any risks. You might not succeed, but that's just part of the game. ~ Walter Munk,
1013:No man can really succeed if he doesn't move away from where he was born. I believe it is particularly true for the writer. ~ Arthur Hailey,
1014:People have to understand that unless social enterprise is experimental, it will not succeed in making a difference. ~ Jacqueline Novogratz,
1015:Praying is what confirms our true belief that we cannot succeed without God, and its absence confirms the exact opposite. ~ James MacDonald,
1016:Some mysterious revenge of nature has seen to it that no poem in praise of drink or tobacco (or snuff, if any) can succeed. ~ Kingsley Amis,
1017:Therefore, observe the words of this covenant and follow them, so that you will succeed in everything you do. Deuteronomy 29:9 ~ Beth Moore,
1018:Unless the cause of peace based on law gathers behind it the force and zeal of a religion, it hardly can hope to succeed. ~ Albert Einstein,
1019:Believe in yourself; you may succeed when others do not believe in you, but never when you do not believe in yourself. ~ Orison Swett Marden,
1020:Fashion is about affordable luxury ... To succeed, designers need to be affordable, wearable, accessible, and aspirational. ~ Tommy Hilfiger,
1021:Few things are impossible in themselves: application to make them succeed fails us more often than the means. ~ Francois de La Rochefoucauld,
1022:Give me a man with an average ability but a burning desire to succeed and I will give you a winner in exchange every time. ~ Andrew Carnegie,
1023:I agree with Sophocles: the greatest luck is not to have been born - but, as the joke goes on, very few people succeed in it. ~ Slavoj Zizek,
1024:In all my travels, I've never seen a country's population more determined to forgive, and to build and succeed than in Rwanda. ~ Rick Warren,
1025:In all thy undertakings, let a reasonable assurance animate thy endeavors if thou despairest of success, thou shalt not succeed. ~ Akhenaton,
1026:It is axiomatic that the attempt to become a Sufi through a desire for personal power as normally understood will not succeed. ~ Idries Shah,
1027:Life is the art of being well deceived; and in order that the deception may succeed it must be habitual and uninterrupted. ~ William Hazlitt,
1028:Life is the greatest of all mysteries, and though I seek to solve its many riddles, my deepest fear is that I will succeed. ~ Brian Rathbone,
1029:MANY poets are not poets for the same reason that many religious men are not saints: they never succeed in being themselves. ~ Thomas Merton,
1030:Mother always used to say, 'If you want to succeed in life, please the women. They are the real bosses. The men don't count. ~ P G Wodehouse,
1031:People who fail focus on what they will have to go through; people who succeed focus on what it will feel like at the end. ~ Anthony Robbins,
1032:There are books showing men how to succeed in everything; they are written by men who cannot even succeed in writing books. ~ G K Chesterton,
1033:This book of instruction must not depart from your mouth … for then you will prosper and succeed in whatever you do. Joshua 1:8 ~ Beth Moore,
1034:You always think, no matter how many times you fail, that the next time you will succeed. Otherwise you wouldn't keep trying. ~ Bruno Heller,
1035:A democracy can't succeed without people's participation. 'MyGov' empowers the people of India to contribute towards Surajya. ~ Narendra Modi,
1036:Ask yourself if I'm capable of contradictions, Draupadi.
Some missions succeed only by their spectacular failure. - Krishn ~ Shinde Sweety,
1037:He remembered his home now, and that gave him new determination to succeed. He was fighting for two camps now -- two families. ~ Rick Riordan,
1038:If not in the interests of the state, do not act. If you cannot succeed, do not use troops. If you are not in danger, do not fight. ~ Sun Tzu,
1039:If your life and your work are aligned with the intentions of Higher Power, the same Force will give you all you need to succeed. ~ Anonymous,
1040:If you want to succeed in the world, you don't have to be much cleverer than other people. You just have to be one day earlier. ~ Leo Szilard,
1041:Nationalism will keep its venom until we succeed in creating an image of the nations of the whole world as so many provinces. ~ Storm Jameson,
1042:The best advice I was given if that if you want to succeed and you want to achieve, you have to learn how to handle failures. ~ Mike Scioscia,
1043:They are coming to teach us good manners!" I replied in English. "But they won't succeed, because we are gods. ~ Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa,
1044:They can call me crazy if I fail, all the chance that I need, is one-in-a-million and they can call me brilliant if I succeed. ~ Ani DiFranco,
1045:will build you up, people who will celebrate your victories, not people who will criticize and be jealous any time you succeed. ~ Joel Osteen,
1046:I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to what light I have. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
1047:I continue to believe that if children are given the necessary tools to succeed, they will succeed beyond their wildest dreams! ~ David Vitter,
1048:It's the circumstances that create fear. How you respond is all you can control. Concentrate on that, and you'll always succeed. ~ Steve Berry,
1049:People need to have the incentive that if they invest and succeed, they can make a fair profit. Otherwise they'll stop investing. ~ Steve Jobs,
1050:Politics is not a bad profession. If you succeed there are many rewards, if you disgrace yourself you can always write a book. ~ Ronald Reagan,
1051:There are two great tragedies in life: one is to fail to achieve one's grandest ambitions, and the other one is to succeed. ~ Graham T Allison,
1052:The reason, I believe, is even if you fail in doing something ambitious, you usually succeed in doing something important. ~ Peter H Diamandis,
1053:You stay safe, You love. You survive. You laugh and cry and struggle and sometimes you fail and sometimes you succeed. You Push. ~ Carrie Ryan,
1054:Always let your subordinates know that the honor will be all theirs if they succeed and the blame will be yours if they fail. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
1055:Every joke is an experiment. When you sit, alone, and write a script, or just a joke, you really have no idea if it will succeed. ~ Judd Apatow,
1056:Failure is not a pre-requisite for success. Already successful entrepreneurs are far more likely to succeed again than who failed ~ Jason Fried,
1057:He will often have to scratch his head, and bite his nails to the quick. [To succeed he will have to puzzle his brains and work hard.] ~ Horace,
1058:However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. It matters that you don’t just give up. ~ Stephen Hawkins,
1059:If one is to succeed in anything, the success must come gently, with a great deal of effort but with no stress or obsession. ~ Carlos Castaneda,
1060:If you don't love what you're doing with unbridled passion and enthusiasm, you're not going to succeed when you hit obstacles. ~ Howard Schultz,
1061:If you don't succeed in meditation, practice Japa. Japa leads to perfection. One attains perfection through Japa. ~ Holy Mother Sri Sarada Devi,
1062:It is the going out from oneself that is love and not the accident of its return. It is the expedition, whether it fail or succeed. ~ H G Wells,
1063:Peace, like war, can succeed only where there is a will to enforce it, and where there is available power to enforce it. ~ Franklin D Roosevelt,
1064:People are not remembered by how few times they fail, but by how often they succeed. Every wrong step is another step forward ~ Thomas A Edison,
1065:People who wish to go into the future should have two skills to succeed - the ability to deal with people and the ability to sell. ~ Shiv Khera,
1066:Sadness usually results from one of the following causes either when a man does not succeed, or is ashamed of his success. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1067:Successful people take big risks knowing that they might fall hard. But, they might succeed more than they ever dreamed, too. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
1068:The courage of leadership is giving others the chance to succeed even though you bear the responsibility for getting things done. ~ Simon Sinek,
1069:The goal is not necessarily to succeed but to keep trying, to be the kind of person who has ideas and see them through. We’ll ~ Esm Raji Codell,
1070:The job is not to succeed but fail more interesting than the last time—- in a more subtle fashion or in a more intriguing way. ~ T J Jagodowski,
1071:Those who succeed can't forgive a fellow for being a failure, and those who fail can't forgive him for being a success. ~ George Horace Lorimer,
1072:To do something familiar and succeed is no surprise, but to try something new and fail--why, that is the start of an adventure. ~ Maryrose Wood,
1073:We will succeed in hallowing God’s name, however, when we eat, drink, and do everything else to His glory (1 Cor. 10:31). ~ John F MacArthur Jr,
1074:While you may have made money doing something a certain way yesterday, there's no reason to believe you'll succeed at it tomorrow. ~ Seth Godin,
1075:Being a warrior doesn't mean necessarily you need to win and succeed. It's just a spiritual condition of living a worthwhile life. ~ Eugene Hutz,
1076:Critics like to point out how you fail so they can laugh and sneer. Coaches point out how you fail so you can learn and succeed. ~ Mark Driscoll,
1077:If God wanted you to live a mediocre life, He wouldn't have made you so awesome. Never apologize for being designed to succeed. ~ Steve Maraboli,
1078:I'm fearful when I push myself. It's a tough thing to do, but you need to acknowledge that you have what it takes to succeed. ~ Gretchen Bleiler,
1079:Instead, we must focus on our hopes. If we cannot anchor ourselves in a belief that we will succeed, we have already been defeated. ~ Robin Hobb,
1080:It was better, he thought, to fail in attempting exquisite things than to succeed in the department of the utterly contemptible. ~ Arthur Machen,
1081:Only a few individuals succeed in throwing off mythology in a time of a certain intellectual supremacy--the mass never frees itself. ~ Carl Jung,
1082:They put others first,
and so become great. They are not focused on outcomes or achievements;
therefore they always succeed. ~ Lao Tzu,
1083:Those who do not succeed do not believe in their ability to exercise the potential power to forge beyond perceptions of limitations. ~ T F Hodge,
1084:To succeed in life and achieve results, you must understand and master three mighty forces— desire, belief, and expectation. ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
1085:Whatever is wrong, I am sure with his sense of the picturesque, Francis will succeed in manifesting a fadeur exquise. ~ Dorothy Dunnett,
1086:when people believe in your product, they will help you succeed through credible, continuous, and cost-effective proselytization. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
1087:When you succeed be proud of yourself and know that not everyone gets to experience the thrill of success on a consistent basis. ~ Robert Cheeke,
1088:You must consider that there is opposition from other human beings and also non-physical forces that don't want you to succeed. ~ Frederick Lenz,
1089:Beware of endeavoring to become a great man in a hurry. One such attempt in ten thousand may succeed. These are fearful odds. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
1090:Don’t sleep too much. If you sleep 3 hours less each night for a year, you will have an extra month and a half to succeed in. ~ Aristotle Onassis,
1091:Her relationships were more about shared memories and common values than about strategic partnerships to help each other succeed. ~ Donald Miller,
1092:I am not the richest, smartest or most talented person in the world, but I succeed because I keep going and going and going. ~ Sylvester Stallone,
1093:If you want to be a superstar, then you need to find a field with a steep Dip—a barrier between those who try and those who succeed. ~ Seth Godin,
1094:If you want to succeed in life...you must pick 3 bones to carry with you at all times: a wish bone, a backbone, and a funny bone. ~ Reba McEntire,
1095:I love 'Wild 'N Out' so much - one, because it's my baby, but also I get to see others succeed and go on to lead their own careers. ~ Nick Cannon,
1096:I try to let my decisions be guided not by what I think will succeed or fail, but what I'm going to learn from that process. ~ Lin Manuel Miranda,
1097:To succeed, we must have the will to succeed, we must have stamina, determination, backbone, perseverance, self-reliance, and faith. ~ B C Forbes,
1098:We can be truly successful only at something we’re willing to fail at. If we’re unwilling to fail, then we’re unwilling to succeed. ~ Mark Manson,
1099:We have a big appetite for putting people down but, at the heart of everyone, there's enough room for all of us to succeed. ~ Matthew McConaughey,
1100:what terrifies me most is how we
foam at the mouth with envy
when others succeed
but sigh in relief
when they are failing ~ Rupi Kaur,
1101:For we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. ~ Barack Obama,
1102:He was so personally motivated, and had such a will to succeed, that he focused on his business almost every waking hour of every day. ~ Anonymous,
1103:I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to
succeed, but I am bound to live up to what light I have. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
1104:It is strange the way the ignorant and inexperienced so often and so undeservedly succeed when the informed and the experienced fail. ~ Mark Twain,
1105:More times than not, it's a failed endeavor. You will fail more times than you succeed. But I think you need those failed endeavors. ~ Ben Gibbard,
1106:One must learn to speak the truth alone if one is to succeed truly in changing the nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, Speech and Yoga,
1107:People fail to succeed, and it is not because they don’t know anything, but because they don’t know what they don’t know! ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
1108:There is tremendous inequity in Hollywood and politics, and I would say globally it's challenging to be a woman and succeed. ~ Julia Louis Dreyfus,
1109:Thomas Edison said, “Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.”1 ~ Joyce Meyer,
1110:To succeed, you have to do something and be very bad at it for a while. You have to look bad before you can look really good. ~ Barbara De Angelis,
1111:We're giving our freedoms away. The American experiment was about freedom. Freedom to be stupid, freedom to fail, freedom to succeed. ~ Glenn Beck,
1112:business is like chess. Grandmaster José Raúl Capablanca put it well: to succeed, “you must study the endgame before everything else. ~ Peter Thiel,
1113:For a technology company to succeed, he argued, it needed always to be looking to destroy itself. If it didn’t, someone else would. ~ Michael Lewis,
1114:If at first you don’t succeed, then maybe you have the wrong idea of success, or you’re using the wrong standard of measuring it. ~ Tristan Sherwin,
1115:If you want to thrive in today's economy, you must challenge the status quo and get the financial education necessary to succeed. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
1116:Only the continuous and steady application of the methods for suppressing a doctrine, etc., makes it possible for a plan to succeed. ~ Adolf Hitler,
1117:Only when we humbly call on God to speak into our lives—knowing if he doesn’t, we won’t succeed—are we actually in a safe place. ~ Jefferson Bethke,
1118:The problem wasn’t that Lehman Brothers had been allowed to fail. The problem was that Lehman Brothers had been allowed to succeed. ~ Michael Lewis,
1119:The question is: Shouldn't Hezbollah disarm? And ultimately they should. And it's necessary for the Lebanese government to succeed. ~ George W Bush,
1120:As we said before, any attempt to restore a man’s inner strength in the camp had first to succeed in showing him some future goal. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1121:Fortunate is the person who can succeed in extracting honey from such a flower as this life, whose root and every petal is bitterness. ~ Lynn Cullen,
1122:If you really want succeed in what you do, obey this rule;... Wake up very early, go to bed lately... Occupy your time usefully! ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1123:I never suffered for lack of confidence. I knew I would succeed; you have to. I think I couldn't go into any venture any other way. ~ Brian Williams,
1124:I was very blessed in always knowing what I wanted to do, and by the grace of God, I've been able to succeed in my chosen career. ~ Nichelle Nichols,
1125:Many succeed momentarily by what they know; Some succeed temporarily by what they do; but Few succeed permanently by what they are. ~ John C Maxwell,
1126:New products succeed not because of the features and functionality they offer but because of the experiences they enable. If ~ Clayton M Christensen,
1127:People who succeed in life don’t try to escape pain, loss or unfairness. They just learn to face them, accept them and move ahead anyway ~ Anonymous,
1128:Something that's fun for me is a challenge. When you have a challenge and you take on that challenge and succeed, that's the best feeling. ~ Amy Lee,
1129:There is a great deal that either has to be given up or be taken away from you if you are going to succeed in writing a body of work. ~ Susan Sontag,
1130:This policy cannot succeed through speeches, and shooting-matches, and songs; it can only be carried out through blood and iron. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
1131:And above all, children need our unconditional love - whether they succeed or make mistakes; when life is easy and when life is tough. ~ Barack Obama,
1132:How can i hope to succeed when surrounded by flaccid imaginations and puny minds when my head.. My head is filled with NIETZCHE? ~ David Mazzucchelli,
1133:How many wisely conceived projects have failed and will fail in the future! How many insane projects have succeeded and will succeed! ~ Denis Diderot,
1134:If a warrior is to succeed at anything, the success must come gently, with a great deal of effort but with no stress or obsession. ~ Carlos Castaneda,
1135:If a warrior is to succeed in anything, the success must come gently, with a great deal of effort but with no stress or obsession. ~ Carlos Castaneda,
1136:If you've climbed the first 140 meters it doesn't mean that you've succeeded; you are going to succeed by climbing the last 10 meters. ~ Alain Robert,
1137:I overhear Bobby Flay say, “Take risks and you’ll get the payoffs. Learn from your mistakes until you succeed. It’s that simple.” I ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1138:Its actually really important that you succeed at what youre succeeding at, but that isnt going to be the measure of your life. ~ Clayton Christensen,
1139:I want to become the first European floor leader to succeed in the NBA. I want to be the standard-bearer and prove we can succeed here. ~ Tony Parker,
1140:I want to succeed. And I want to succeed in the best way possible, without caring whether people call my actions leftist or rightist. ~ Indira Gandhi,
1141:There's something which impels us to show our inner souls. The more courageous we are, the more we succeed in explaining what we know. ~ Maya Angelou,
1142:to be a philosopher in all that you do, and if you wish also to be seen as one, show yourself first that you are and you will succeed. ~ Ryan Holiday,
1143:We prematurely write off people as failures. We are too much in awe of those who succeed and far too dismissive of those who fail. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
1144:When you feel so strongly about something and other people feel equally strongly, you have to feel stronger about it in order to succeed. ~ Joan Chen,
1145:If Nature wants you to succeed at something a situation will be created whereby you will request the right thing, knowingly or not. ~ Robert E Svoboda,
1146:In their vain quest for happiness, they only succeed in rendering it more inaccessible not only for themselves, but for everybody else. ~ Luis E Navia,
1147:It's becoming clear that people who reject the worst of the current system are actually more likely to succeed. -Seth Godin, Linchpin ~ Sophia Amoruso,
1148:It takes a lot more energy to fail than to succeed, since it takes a lot of concentrated energy to hold on to beliefs that don't work. ~ Jerry Gillies,
1149:Unless you’re powered by an ungodly amount of spite, it’s pretty impossible to succeed while doing something that you genuinely hate. ~ Sophia Amoruso,
1150:Whether it's boxing, basketball, or badminton, one must be ready to succeed before entering the arena...long before the lights come up. ~ Muhammad Ali,
1151:Be now what you must be to succeed at the end of your journey, and when the end comes, you will find it is just another beginning.’ Althea ~ Robin Hobb,
1152:God has purposes to fulfill in you and through you, and He will do all that is necessary to make you succeed (Ps. 138:8; Phil. 1:6). ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
1153:I fail sometimes, I succeed sometimes, so that's fair enough. It's a package deal. It comes with that package: failures and success. ~ Sachin Tendulkar,
1154:If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. I lost three times before I got elected. There's no limit. Stay in pursuit of your dreams. ~ Jim Clyburn,
1155:It is not enough to merely be authentic in sharing yourself; to succeed in dating you need to consider how you will be interpreted as well. ~ John Gray,
1156:Later, I began to succeed in decisive games. Perhaps because I realized a very simple truth: not only was I worried, but also my opponent ~ Mikhail Tal,
1157:Mainly, the reason people who didn't succeed had trouble because they had trouble forming teams. They didn't know how to collaborate. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1158:Success isn't supposed to happen, no matter how hard you work. There's no guarantee you're going to succeed. There's nothing set in stone. ~ Kevin Hart,
1159:The ambition, the drive, the wanting to be the center of attention, the wanting to succeed... They're all inside me somewhere. ~ Philip Seymour Hoffman,
1160:The fact that we see something as evil may not necessarily make that thing evil. Evil cannot contest good; succeed and persist ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
1161:The philosophy I shared... was one of ambition - ambition to succeed, ambition to grow, ambition to move forward - backed up by hard work. ~ Frank Lowy,
1162:There is a rhythm to everything, but particularly in the martial arts, if you do not train in its rhythm it is difficult to succeed. ~ Miyamoto Musashi,
1163:To succeed in sales, you need skills—not skills entirely consistent with moral integrity and emotional well-being, but skills nevertheless. ~ Max Barry,
1164:To succeed, we have to be the party of change, we have to root out corruption in our own ranks and we have to be the party of solutions. ~ Bobby Jindal,
1165:I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to the light I have. —Abraham Lincoln ~ Anonymous,
1166:It's funny. You succeed, but now where are you gonna go from there? I've got to keep proving that I can laugh or cry more real each time. ~ Jeff Bridges,
1167:I’ve discovered fulfillment comes from striving to succeed—survival by wits and strength. Such things make each of us who we are, I suppose. ~ Anonymous,
1168:I’ve spent so much time trying to do everything right, to succeed. But why? Travel the world. Make art. It sounds like a recipe for joy. ~ Hannah Howard,
1169:Not to succeed in one thing is to fail in all.’ Far more frightening than any poltergeist is the spectre of loneliness in old age. ~ Penelope Fitzgerald,
1170:believe leadership is servanthood. It’s my responsibility to make sure my people have what they need to succeed and get their work done. ~ John C Maxwell,
1171:Decency must be an even more exhausting state to maintain than its opposite. Those who succeed seem to need a stupefying amount of sleep. ~ Quentin Crisp,
1172:Doctors and kind relations will succeed in stupefying mankind, in making mediocrity pass for genius and in bringing civilisation to ruin. ~ Anton Chekhov,
1173:(Ephesians 2:8-10). We need to remember that we are saved by grace when we fail. But we need to remember it much more when we succeed. ~ Timothy J Keller,
1174:Here is the first step toward success. It's a basic step. It can't be avoided. Step One: Believe in yourself, believe you can succeed. ~ David J Schwartz,
1175:I believe happiness is a chemical imbalance––it's a silly thing to strive for. But, satisfaction––if you seek satisfaction you can succeed. ~ Lydia Lunch,
1176:If you identify a real need, you won’t be the only one satisfying it, and you’ll need all the talent you can muster in order to succeed. ~ Alistair Croll,
1177:I’ll keep it short and sweet - Family. Religion. Friendship. These are the three demons you must slay if you wish to succeed in business. ~ Matt Groening,
1178:I stand ready to lead us down a different path where we're lifted up by our desire to succeed, not dragged down by a resentment of success. ~ Mitt Romney,
1179:It is one of life’s cruel ironies that when it comes to feeding the Beast, success only creates more pressure to hurry up and succeed again. ~ Ed Catmull,
1180:Most of all, I discovered that in order to succeed with a product, you must truly get to know your customers and build something for them. ~ Marc Benioff,
1181:opportunity for new entrants is to fully embrace the potential of Web 2.0. Companies that succeed will create applications that learn from ~ Tim O Reilly,
1182:still hope leads men to venture; and no one ever yet put himself in peril without the inward conviction that he would succeed in his design. ~ Thucydides,
1183:They will want you to succeed, but never more than them. They will write their names on your leash and call you necessary, call you urgent. ~ Ocean Vuong,
1184:Those who are growing great are always asking “why?” If they fail or lose, they ask “why?” If they succeed or win too, they ask “why? ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1185:Those who succeed have a clear, focused picture of their success. The level of success they attain matches the expansiveness of their dreams ~ Mark Allen,
1186:We shall succeed only so far as we continue to undertake “the intolerable labor of thought” — that most distasteful of all our activities. ~ Learned Hand,
1187:Art' is the same word as 'artifice,' that is to say, something deceitful. It must succeed in giving the impression of nature by false means. ~ Edgar Degas,
1188:Don't try to understand it. You won't succeed. Don't try to see it. You can't. Try to live it, and you will be living out of the center. ~ Brennan Manning,
1189:From Marx until today, victim groups have played an indispensable role in Leftist success. Without victim groups, the Left cannot succeed. ~ Dennis Prager,
1190:I am not bound to win, I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to the light that I have. —Abraham Lincoln ~ Jon Gordon,
1191:I think there's something degrading about having a husband for a rival. It's humiliating if you fail and commonplace if you succeed. ~ Christopher Hampton,
1192:Look at this evening. Cousin Kate! Imagine, Cousin Kate! But where have you been off to? Did you succeed in catching the moon in the Ganges? ~ E M Forster,
1193:Some parents believe that competition helps prepare children to succeed. Others fear that their children will not be able to handle failure. ~ Bill Dedman,
1194:There is no such thing as coincidence, Topper. It is always, always your enemies conspiring against you." (from How to Succeed in Evil) ~ Patrick E McLean,
1195:Thinking early in your career about how to help your co-workers succeed instills the right habits that in turn will lead to your own success. ~ Edmond Lau,
1196:To succeed in life and achieve results, you must understand and master three mighty forces— desire, belief, and expectation." Iyadurai ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
1197:To succeed in life requires a total inability to do anything that makes you uncomfortable when you look at yourself in the mirror. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
1198:When you work to please others you can't succeed, but the things you do to satisfy yourself stand a chance if catching someone's interest. ~ Marcel Proust,
1199:When you work to please others you can't succeed, but the things you do to satisfy yourself stand a chance of catching someone's interest. ~ Marcel Proust,
1200:You can't make your kids what you want them to be. They are who they are and you have to help them to succeed in the world as best you can. ~ Cyndi Lauper,
1201:A reformer exhorted children that they would succeed where he and his colleagues had failed with the charge: "Live for that better day. ~ Barbara W Tuchman,
1202:Grandmaster José Raúl Capablanca”—Thiel’s favorite chess player—“put it well: to succeed ‘you must study the endgame before everything else. ~ Ryan Holiday,
1203:He was a typical workaholic, driven to succeed and willing to put in the hours to do so. It didn't leave much time for a social life. (Greg) ~ Lynsay Sands,
1204:I raise up my voice-not so I can shout but so that those without a voice can be heard...we cannot succeed when half of us are held back. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1205:Our desire to share helpful things is so powerful that it can make even false ideas succeed. Sometimes the drive to help takes a wrong turn. ~ Jonah Berger,
1206:The Charkha, which is the embodiment of willing obedience and calm persistence, must therefore succeed before there is civil disobedience. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1207:The creative man with an insight into human nature, with the artistry to touch and move people, will succeed. Without them he will fail. ~ William Bernbach,
1208:To be a rebel is to reject what it means to succeed in a capitalist, consumer culture, especially the idea that we should always come first. ~ Chris Hedges,
1209:You only have to believe that you can succeed, that you can be whatever your heart desires, be willing to work for it, and you can have it. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
1210:You WILL eventually become what you think. Whether you succeed or fail is determined in your mind long before we see it play out in real-time. ~ Mandy Hale,
1211:A generation ago, the image was that you had to trample everyone else down to succeed; but I don't believe that makes good business sense. ~ Richard Branson,
1212:An assessment at one point in time has little value for understanding someone’s ability, let alone their potential to succeed in the future. ~ Carol S Dweck,
1213:Cease negative mental chattering. If you think a thing is impossible, you'll make it impossible. Pessimism blunts the tools you need to succeed. ~ Bruce Lee,
1214:Chastity is the flowering of man; and what are called Genius, Heroism, Holiness, and the like, are but various fruits which succeed it ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1215:It is much more difficult to judge oneself then to judge others. If you succeed to judge yourself well, you are a truly wise man. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
1216:Obviously, if a director doesn't communicative a clear, relevant vision of the material, it will not succeed no matter how good the material. ~ Tom Skerritt,
1217:one set of variables determined whether a marriage would succeed or fail: Were the couples being positive or negative during the interview? ~ John M Gottman,
1218:Some people will try to talk you out of chasing your goals; not because they think you’ll fail, but because they are scared you’ll succeed. ~ Steve Maraboli,
1219:Sometimes I wish I were passionate about something real. Something I knew I could succeed in. Right now all my dreams are a little far-fetched. ~ Kasie West,
1220:The marketplace judges technologies by their practical effectiveness, by whether they succeed or fail to do the job they are designed to do. ~ Freeman Dyson,
1221:the more ‘Yeses’ we can, at the very outset, induce, the more likely we are to succeed in capturing the attention for our ultimate proposal. ~ Dale Carnegie,
1222:Those who try to grasp on to the mystery will never succeed. Only those who let it slip their fingers will come to know it, and hear its secrets ~ Sara Gran,
1223:Try. Make mistake. Fail. Learn. Try better. Make mistake. Fail. Learn. Try better still. Make mistake. Fail. Learn. Repeat until... Try. Succeed. ~ Ken Evoy,
1224:We are committed and if we succeed we'll succeed magnificently, and if we fail it will be a magnificent failure. The magnificence is important. ~ Martin Fry,
1225:What we attempt to do is not without danger. What we attempt to do may not succeed. But it is right and it is just. We act for the good of all. ~ Kate Mosse,
1226:Either well succeed, or we wont succeed. And the definition of success as I described is sectarian violence down. Success is not no violence. ~ George W Bush,
1227:Few things are impracticable in themselves; and it is for want of application, rather than of means, that men fail to succeed. ~ Francois de La Rochefoucauld,
1228:If we succeed without confronting and changing shaking foundation of low self-esteem rooted in contempt of hatred, we will falter along the way. ~ bell hooks,
1229:Put a Post-It note on your mirror that says: 'Someone has to succeed. There's no reason why it shouldn't be me.' Repeat before every audition. ~ Janet McTeer,
1230:The ability to concentrate and to use your time well is everything if you want to succeed in business--or almost anywhere else for that matter. ~ Lee Iacocca,
1231:You know, being an entrepreneur is super hard work, and if you're not passionate about what you're doing, you're probably not going to succeed. ~ Jeff Raikes,
1232:By not caring too much about what people think, I'm able to think for myself and propagate ideas which are very often unpopular. And I succeed. ~ Albert Ellis,
1233:Debtors will seek to cancel their debts. Creditors will try to collect, and the more they succeed, the more they will impoverish the economy. ~ Michael Hudson,
1234:I just have a sense that Obama's not going to ultimately succeed in totally transforming America into something other than how it was founded. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
1235:In my view, all that is necessary for faith is the belief that by doing our best we shall succeed in our aims: the improvement of mankind. ~ Rosalind Franklin,
1236:It is unhappily true that much insincere Literature and Art, executed solely with a view to effect, does succeed by deceiving the public. ~ George Henry Lewes,
1237:Success is the most natural thing in the world. The person who does not succeed has placed himself in opposition to the laws of the Universe. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
1238:These people that write books on how to succeed and how to think positively make millions because it's something that doesn't occur naturally. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
1239:The top 1% often succeed despite how they train, not because of it. Superior genetics, or a luxurious full-time schedule, make up for a lot. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1240:Ultimately, I believe that’s what leadership is all about: helping others to achieve their own greatness by helping the organization to succeed. ~ John Wooden,
1241:If you try to create a type, you may end with nothing. If you do a good job of creating an individual, you may succeed at creating a type. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1242:I think if you don't love people and aren't fascinated by them, you'll never succeed as a portrait photographer, because your pictures will look cold. ~ Rankin,
1243:My parents ingrained in me early on that the perfect score is always something to strive for. I want to win and I want to succeed no matter what. ~ Andrea Jung,
1244:There is no fury like that against one who, we fear, may succeed in making us disloyal to beliefs we hold with passion, but have not really won. ~ Learned Hand,
1245:We succeed in enterprises which demand the positive qualities we possess, but we excel in those which can also make use of our defects. ~ Alexis de Tocqueville,
1246:Your ultimate success or failure will depend on your ability to ignore the worries of the world long enough to allow your investments to succeed. ~ Peter Lynch,
1247:America is a strong and resilient country. And I know we will succeed, if we put aside partisanship and politics and work together as one nation. ~ Barack Obama,
1248:Any political agenda and organization which doesn't begin with personal responsibility is just half the argument. It's just not going to succeed. ~ Peter Coyote,
1249:Feast, and your halls are crowded
Fast, and the world goes by
Succeed and give, and it helps you live
But no man can help you die ~ Ella Wheeler Wilcox,
1250:Had I really succeeded at anything else, I might never have found the determination to succeed in the one arena where I believed I truly belonged. ~ J K Rowling,
1251:I am going to keep going untill I succeed or die.
Don't think I don't know how this might end.
I've known it for years.

-Harry Potter ~ J K Rowling,
1252:I am not bound to win, I am bound to be true.
I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to
the light that I have. —Abraham Lincoln ~ Jon Gordon,
1253:If someone claims you will never succeed, fail only to listen, for when you prove them wrong, it shall be the sweetest success you will ever know. ~ Al Boudreau,
1254:I have learned a great truth of life. We do not succeed in spite of our challenges and difficulties, but rather, precisely because of them. ~ Richard Paul Evans,
1255:Most of the time you will fail, but you will also occasionally succeed. Those occasional successes make all the hard work and sacrifice worthwhile. ~ Dean Kamen,
1256:Whatever makes you crazy is what you were created to crack. Whatever makes you sleepless is what you were born to succeed in. Don’t give up! ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1257:Whatever parts of us we choose to use, we all share something in common: a need to find our way in the Maze and succeed in changing times. The ~ Spencer Johnson,
1258:Whatever your situation might be, set your mind to whatever you want to do and put a good attitude in it, and I believe that you can succeed. ~ Bethany Hamilton,
1259:When you take risks you learn that there will be times when you succeed and there will be times when you fail, and both are equally important. ~ Ellen DeGeneres,
1260:You cannot tell the enemy you're going to leave and expect the enemy to not - and expect to succeed. I mean, that's just a fundamental of warfare. ~ John McCain,
1261:You can’t take the team to the next level when you haven’t mastered the skills it takes to succeed on a personal level. It just doesn’t happen. ~ John C Maxwell,
1262:Combine a certain amount of indifference with your ambition. Be carefully careless. If you don't succeed today, there is always tomorrow. ~ William Merritt Chase,
1263:For countries to succeed, for democracies to succeed, the women and men in those countries need to be free. Women and men need to know their rights. ~ Laura Bush,
1264:Information is power. Information is security. Plans made with imperfect information are fatally flawed, will fail or succeed on the toss of a coin. ~ Ann Leckie,
1265:It takes a huge effort to free yourself from memory, but when you succeed, you start to realize that you're capable of far more than you imagined. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1266:Mind power use is neither a religion nor an elaborate program. You have everything within you to succeed: right attitude and right intentions. ~ Stephen Richards,
1267:Of France and England, did this king succeed;
Whose state so many had the managing.
That they lost France and made his England bleed. ~ William Shakespeare,
1268:People who consistently succeed are those who can commit all of their resources, mental and physical, to work together toward achieving a task. ~ Anthony Robbins,
1269:Remember that common sense is not common practice, and that people who succeed are often those who do the little, everyday things that others won’t. ~ Todd Henry,
1270:...saving a life and nurturing a life are different processes, and that to succeed in the former one must dispense with the pathos of the latter. ~ Anthony Marra,
1271:The cornerstone of our policy in that part of the world is to help democracies. Lebanon's a democracy. We want the Siniora government to succeed. ~ George W Bush,
1272:The first thing these people have who succeed, who are fulfilled, is that they’ve decided what the purpose of the game is, at least for right now. ~ Tony Robbins,
1273:The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential... these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence. ~ Confucius,
1274:Cosmic Ordering is neither a religion nor an elaborate program. You have everything within you to succeed: right attitude and right intentions. ~ Stephen Richards,
1275:Don't question your ability. You were created to succeed and live a life of purpose.   Don't you dare put a question-mark where God put a period! ~ Steve Maraboli,
1276:I do not want to make this charge. I do not see how it can succeed. I would not make it now but that General Lee has ordered it and expects it. ~ James Longstreet,
1277:I enjoy looking at your face... Whenever I look at your face, a question always comes to my mind... Will man ever succeed in reaching the moon? ~ Charles M Schulz,
1278:If the argument is that failure helps you succeed, well, so does success and it's quicker. This suggests at least one reason for trying to succeed. ~ Norman Geras,
1279:If you want to succeed in the world it is necessary, when entering a salon, that your vanity should bow to that of others. ~ Stephanie Felicite comtesse de Genlis,
1280:I've been really lucky. And I really, genuinely believe that if you tell people that they have what it takes to succeed, they'll prove you right. ~ Howard Schultz,
1281:Probably the people around me and the people I care about. They are my motivation. That's probably what drives me to succeed. Family and friends. ~ Taylor Lautner,
1282:Running a school where the students all succeed, even if some students have to help others to make the grade, is good preparation for democracy. ~ William Glasser,
1283:The question we face is whether this candidate can succeed. The question we seem to answer is whether she interviews well. Let’s not substitute. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
1284:They are exactly the persons who are to succeed to the government of our country and to rule its future enmities, its friendships and fortunes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1285:Bezos dismissed those objections and insisted that to succeed in books as Apple had in music, Amazon needed to control the entire customer experience, ~ Brad Stone,
1286:I believed it would succeed. It was Polish Solidarity and its victory that put an end to the old era when what mattered were borders and rival blocs. ~ Lech Walesa,
1287:I committed myself totally, fully, but I didn't succeed in convincing a majority of French... I didn't succeed in making the values we share win. ~ Nicolas Sarkozy,
1288:I have learned a great truth of life. We do not succeed in spite of our challenges and
difficulties, but rather, precisely because of them. ~ Richard Paul Evans,
1289:[I]t is indisputably the mediocre, if not the low, both as regards morality and intelligence, who succeed in life and multiply the fastest. ~ Alfred Russel Wallace,
1290:Our job is to help Iraq forces be better equipped, to help their police be able to deal with these extremists and to help their government succeed. ~ George W Bush,
1291:The Moon shows us only one side of its face and there is no man on Earth who can succeed this! Every man’s other face has its time to be seen! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1292:To succeed [,] consider what is as though it were past, deem yourself inevitable and take credit for it. If you no longer believe, enlarge the temple. ~ W S Merwin,
1293:To succeed, you have to be open to problems. You have to be open to failure. And as you go up the ladder, you gain the right to get more problems. ~ John C Maxwell,
1294:Unlock the power of the will. Learn balance and gain the knowledge and wisdom necessary to guide those powers, to succeed in sports and athletics. ~ Frederick Lenz,
1295:We thought that whatever we wanted to do was right and good, simply because we were Americans, and we would succeed at it because we were Americans. ~ Neil Sheehan,
1296:(whom they could not find) and some sympathetic relatives. The poverty hurt, and they assumed, correctly, it had bred the intense desire to succeed. ~ John Grisham,
1297:Your business needs a raison d'être. Be prepared to work 24 hours a day, and be willing to take risks. And you have to love it or you won't succeed. ~ Josie Natori,
1298:You succeed because you've chosen to be confident. It's not really useful to require yourself to be successful before you're able to become confident. ~ Seth Godin,
1299:You've got to be smart to stay in this game. The quicker you learn, the quicker you succeed. You can't make the same mistakes over and over again. ~ Carlos Delgado,
1300:António Guterres role as Secretary-General in bringing all powers together is very essential` and we hope he can succeed, it's not easy of course. ~ Bashar al Assad,
1301:Do you know what truly, honestly separates people who succeed from those who fail? It’s simple:  People who do the work succeed. People who don’t fail. ~ Sean Platt,
1302:falsehood is a mask; and however well made the mask may be, with a little attention we may always succeed in distinguishing it from the true face. ~ Alexandre Dumas,
1303:Franklin’s own idea was more expansive: he believed in encouraging and providing opportunities for all people to succeed based on their diligence, ~ Walter Isaacson,
1304:I am not bound to win, I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to the light that I have. —Abraham Lincoln sixteenth ~ Jon Gordon,
1305:You are loved by your maker not because you try to please him and succeed, or fail to please him and apologize, but because he wants to be your father. ~ Max Lucado,
1306:You don’t “succeed” because you have no weaknesses; you succeed because you find your unique strengths and focus on developing habits around them. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1307:He regards boredom, I observe, as the One and Mighty Enemy of his soul. And will succeed in conquering it, I am sure—if he survives the experience. ~ Dorothy Dunnett,
1308:If people maintain the belief systems that empower them, they'll keep coming back with enough action and enough resourcefulness to succeed eventually. ~ Tony Robbins,
1309:If you #‎ fail , learn. If you succeed, relish your #‎ success . You can only know the sweet taste of #‎ victory after many bitter struggles. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
1310:If you succeed inconquering yourself entirely, you will conquer the rest with the greatest ease. To triumph over oneself is the perfect victory ~ Imitation of Christ,
1311:In the end, the best way to succeed is to go small. And when you go small, you say no - a lot. A lot more than you might have even considered before. ~ Gary W Keller,
1312:Lincoln responded: I have just received your dispatch of 1 p.m. yesterday. —I begin to see it. You will succeed. — God bless you all. A. LINCOLN6 ~ Jean Edward Smith,
1313:Music has become a bigger business, and with that there is more pressure to succeed; I think that it creates a negative pressure for being creative. ~ Jerry Harrison,
1314:One reason so many of us never succeed at tidying is because we have too much stuff. This excess is caused by our ignorance of how much we actually own. ~ Marie Kond,
1315:Reading at meals is considered rude in polite society, but if you expect to succeed as a writer, rudeness should be the second-to-least of your concerns. ~ Anonymous,
1316:Some boys go to college and eventually succeed in getting out. Others go to college and never succeed in getting out. The latter are called professors. ~ H L Mencken,
1317:The good news about building a company during times like this is that the companies that do succeed are going to be extremely strong and resilient. ~ Marc Andreessen,
1318:Any good, persistent, business-minded, prolific writer can succeed if they keep writing and moving forward. For the modern author, that’s excellent news. ~ Sean Platt,
1319:Every situation is evaluated: Will I succeed or fail? Will I look smart or dumb? Will I be accepted or rejected? Will I feel like a winner or a loser? ~ Carol S Dweck,
1320:He who wants to succeed should learn how to fight, to strive and to suffer. You can acquire a lot in life, if you are prepared to give up a lot to get it. ~ Bruce Lee,
1321:If we take a risk, we might not succeed, but if we avoid all risk, we guarantee we won't succeed, and we miss so much of what God wants us to learn. ~ Craig Groeschel,
1322:It was helpful to have the confidence of youth that came from a lack of desperation. I thought, 'If I don't succeed, I'll go back to school and study.' ~ Olivia Wilde,
1323:People talk of the pathos and failure of plain women; but it is a more terrible thing that a beautiful woman may succeed in everything but womanhood. ~ G K Chesterton,
1324:Some men, who begin by saying that the world is a hell, often end by saying that it is a heaven when they succeed in the practice of self-control. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1325:The biggest reason people don’t succeed is because they don’t expose themselves to existing information.” - Jim Rohn, America’s business philosopher ~ Jeffrey Gitomer,
1326:This is the best of times for those willing to study, learn quickly, work hard … learn from the past to succeed in the future. Robert Kiyosaki (1947-) ~ Anna Coulling,
1327:To survive, much less succeed, I learned I could not give myself over to either pleasure or misery in excess. Whatever you felt was not important. To ~ Alexander Chee,
1328:Who a person is will ultimately determine if their brains, talents, competencies, energy, effort, deal-making abilities, and opportunities will succeed. ~ Henry Cloud,
1329:You are what you think. Before you succeed physically, it had been done mentally. The hometown of both victory and defeat is the mind of a person. ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1330:You can’t expect a relationship to succeed based on the love you felt at the beginning. It succeeds because you continue to build on it until the end. ~ Adriana Locke,
1331:Be willing to fail or succeed on who you really are. Don’t ever try to be anything else. What you are is good enough for whatever it is you’re doing. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1332:Democrats believe in reigniting the American dream by removing barriers to success and building ladders of opportunity for all, so everyone can succeed. ~ Nancy Pelosi,
1333:Everything is a contest. All dealings among men are a contest in which some will succeed and others fail. And some are failing quite spectacularly. ~ Brandon Sanderson,
1334:himself first and last. He’d had to, in order to survive and then to succeed. One was every bit as important to him as the other. The habit was difficult to ~ J D Robb,
1335:If I hadn't lost my hearing, I wouldn't be where I am now. It forced me to maximize my potential. I had to be better than the average person to succeed. ~ Lou Ferrigno,
1336:If you have a dream, don’t just sit there. Gather courage to believe that you can succeed and leave no stone unturned to make it a reality.” ― Roopleen ~ Misty Griffin,
1337:To be an artist you have to be as much a businessman to succeed, you have to spend an equal amount of time doing business as you spend doing your craft. ~ Debbie Harry,
1338:To be a sports person... There is a never say die attitude you have to have to succeed. The first thing I say is "die..." If you beat me, I just give up. ~ Robbie Rist,
1339:Wisdom always makes men fortunate: for by wisdom no man could ever err, and therefore he must act rightly and succeed, or his wisdom would be wisdom no longer. ~ Plato,
1340:You don’t “succeed” because you have no weaknesses; you succeed because you find your unique strengths and focus on developing habits around them. To ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1341:All falsehood is a mask; and however well made the mask may be, with a little attention we may always succeed in distinguishing it from the true face. ~ Alexandre Dumas,
1342:Hoover was incredibly ambitious as a young man. He was highly motivated to succeed in Washington, primarily due to his mother's expectations of him. ~ Leonardo DiCaprio,
1343:If you're going to succeed, then you just have to be thick-skinned. It's something I developed early in my career, and it just goes with the territory. ~ Gracia Martore,
1344:If you succeed not, cast not away the quills yet, nor scratch the wainscot, beat not the poor desk, but bring all to the forge and file again; turn it new. ~ Ben Jonson,
1345:In the struggle for survival, the fittest win out at the expense of their rivals because they succeed in adapting themselves best to their environment. ~ Charles Darwin,
1346:Let’s revise the old adage for our times. All that it requires for evil to succeed is that enough lazy, stupid bastards believe everything they’re told. ~ Karen Traviss,
1347:Only optimists commit suicide, optimists who no longer succeed at being optimists. The others, having no reason to live, why would they have any to die? ~ Emil M Cioran,
1348:OUT OF THE MOUTHS OF BABES
It is a pity that we often succeed in our endeavors to deceive each other.
~ Kris WaldherrEmpress Irene~ Kris Waldherr ~ Kris Waldherr,
1349:Reading at meals is considered rude in polite society, but if you expect to succeed as a writer, rudeness should be the second-to-least of your concerns. ~ Stephen King,
1350:The only way not to let the people you loved down—the people who expected you to succeed at everything you ever tried—was to simply not try at all. ~ Christian Cantrell,
1351:There are no chances.” He favored her again with that unreadable look. “You succeed or you fail. Battles are not won by men who refuse to take risks.” It ~ Kate Elliott,
1352:Anarchists try to identify power structures. They urge those exercising power to justify themselves. This justification does not succeed most of the time. ~ Noam Chomsky,
1353:For a fledging democratic system to succeed, we need citizens who understand the procedures, believe in democratic rules and get personally involved. ~ Friedrich Naumann,
1354:If you have more than 120 or 130 I.Q. points, you can afford to give the rest away. You don't need extraordinary intelligence to succeed as an investor. ~ Warren Buffett,
1355:I love actors and I love to create an environment where they feel safe to connect and thrive and try things, to fail and succeed and flourish and fly. ~ Adriana Trigiani,
1356:I never succeed in painting scenes, however beautiful, immediately upon returning from them. I must wait for a time to draw a veil over the common details. ~ Thomas Cole,
1357:In order to succeed, people need a sense of self-efficacy, to struggle together with resilience to meet the inevitable obstacles and inequities of life. ~ Albert Bandura,
1358:Languages connect us and break down barriers when we unite to nurture the best in us and help each other succeed. Happy International Mother Language Day! ~ Widad Akreyi,
1359:Only optimists commit suicide, optimists who no longer succeed at being optimists. The others, having no reason to live, why would they have any to die? ~ Emile M Cioran,
1360:The great difference between those who succeed and those who fail does not consist in the amount of work done by each but in the amount of intelligent work. ~ Og Mandino,
1361:The last words I spoke to my family still ring in my ears. If I succeed in escaping, somehow or other, no matter what it takes, I’ll get you there too. ~ Masaji Ishikawa,
1362:There is only one form of political strategy in which I have any confidence, and that is to try to do the right thing and sometimes be able to succeed. ~ Calvin Coolidge,
1363:who a person is will ultimately determine if their brains, talents, competencies, energy, effort, deal-making abilities, and opportunities will succeed. It ~ Henry Cloud,
1364:Creating some god for one's inspirations was always a good way to avoid accusations of pride should the scheme succeed, as well as the blame if did not. ~ Margaret Atwood,
1365:If you're not hopeful and optimistic, then you just give up. You have to take that long hard look and just believe that if your consistent, you will succeed ~ John Lewis,
1366:I think that the only way that you're going to succeed anywhere is to fail, as crazy as that sounds. It's the only way. You have to fail your way up. ~ Omar Benson Miller,
1367:QuickBooks - the very fact that we could even dream to make something in the business arena, and that it would then succeed - was a total revolution to me. ~ Scott D Cook,
1368:She tried to be someone people liked. She tried to be someone people disliked. But all I became was someone who didn't succeed with anything I tried to be. ~ Sarah Dessen,
1369:So many ways to screw the pooch, and just one staggeringly complex, scrupulously modeled, endlessly rehearsed, indefatigably tested way to succeed. ~ Margot Lee Shetterly,
1370:There are so many things about playing football that seem to me uniquely American. Anybody can succeed, anybody can play, but youve got to work hard to do it. ~ Dean Cain,
1371:Tomorrow is the day reserved for the labor of the lazy. I am not lazy. Tomorrow is the day when the failure will succeed. I am not a failure. I will act now. ~ Og Mandino,
1372:Creativity requires a state of grace. So many things are required for it to succeed—stimulus and composure, inner peace and a kind of bitter-sweet excitement. ~ Magda Szab,
1373:How did you make Khasar accept you to succeed me?” Genghis murmured to his back. “I told him he could be khan,” Kachiun replied. “I think it terrified him. ~ Conn Iggulden,
1374:It's true that the people that succeed in life are the people that keep getting up after they fall down, but no one gets through without falling down. ~ Christopher Gorham,
1375:It's very weird to succeed at thirty-nine years old and realize that in the midst of your failure, you were slowly building the life that you wanted anyway. ~ Alice Sebold,
1376:People who succeed in the stock market also accept periodic losses, setbacks, and unexpected occurrences. Calamitous drops do not scare them out of the game. ~ Peter Lynch,
1377:Remember, if you succeed in everything you try in life, you're living below your full potential and you should take up more difficult or daring things. ~ Eliezer Yudkowsky,
1378:The Tech Humanist mindset is about aligning your business goals with broader human goals so that the more you succeed, the more you bring humanity with you. ~ Kate O Neill,
1379:This view of randomness holds that a purposeful bet is powerful not because it may succeed, but because it opens you up to unexpected interactions and effects. ~ Anonymous,
1380:Every line we succeed in publishing today - no matter how uncertain the future to which we entrust it - is a victory wrenched from the powers of darkness. ~ Walter Benjamin,
1381:If I have noticed anything over these 60 years on Wall Street, it is that people do not succeed in forecasting what`s going to happen to the stock market. ~ Benjamin Graham,
1382:If you expect to succeed as a writer, rudeness should be the second-to-least of your concerns. The least of all should be polite society and what it expects. ~ Stephen King,
1383:If you want to succeed at any job, make yourself invaluable. Go the extra mile; make them never be able to imagine what life without you there would be like. ~ Ross Mathews,
1384:I said that I’ll try. Not that I would succeed.” He grinned back, shrugging. “Trying is the same as succeeding when it comes to your manic research skills. ~ Shayne Silvers,
1385:I throw the rest of my thoughts into the vault in my head and lean as hard as I can to close the door. I don’t quite succeed. That’s been happening a lot lately. ~ Susan Ee,
1386:It is far more difficult to judge oneself than to judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself correctly, then you are truly a man of wisdom. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
1387:My father died prematurely at the age of 52 when I was 24, and it is a recurring regret that he never lived to see me succeed beyond university and drama. ~ Richard E Grant,
1388:No, I must keep to my own style and go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other. ~ Jane Austen,
1389:People talk of the pathos and failure of plain women; but it is a more terrible thing that a beautiful woman may succeed in everything but womanhood. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1390:Quitting a job doesn't jump-start a dream because dreams take planning, purpose, and progress to succeed. That stuff has to happen before you quit your day job. ~ Jon Acuff,
1391:tell her stories to alleviate her inquietude; for stories always amuse the ladies, and it is only by interesting them that one can succeed in the world." Mambres ~ Voltaire,
1392:The important thing is not to know who "I" is or what "I" is. You'll never succeed. There are no words for it. The important thing is to drop the labels. ~ Anthony de Mello,
1393:There are dark forces in the world that would have you believe that you can't succeed and that you're a failure and that you're evil and all this nonsense. ~ Frederick Lenz,
1394:The unrestricted competition so commonly advocated does not leave us the survival of the fittest. The unscrupulous succeed best in accumulating wealth. ~ Rutherford B Hayes,
1395:This just goes to show that if you want to succeed in this world you don’t have to be much cleverer than other people, you just have to be one day earlier. ~ Richard Rhodes,
1396:Two people between whom there is love succeed or fail together, but when two people hate each other the success of either is the failure of the other. If ~ Bertrand Russell,
1397:Under democracy one party always devotes its chief energies to trying to prove that the other party is unfit to rule—and both commonly succeed, and are right. ~ H L Mencken,
1398:You can’t work with people you hate and succeed. At least, you won’t get the optimum of what you would have obtained when you work with people you love. ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1399:Do not be in a hurry to succeed. What would you have to live for afterwards? Better make the horizon your goal; it will always be ahead of you. ~ William Makepeace Thackeray,
1400:If America is to succeed in responding to these 21st Century challenges, our political system cannot continue to bog down in the mire of partisan gamesmanship. ~ Chuck Hagel,
1401:If you can get sexual attention and then (or therefore) succeed as a writer - or [fill in career blank] - that means you're a writer worthy of literary respect? ~ Cris Mazza,
1402:Simply cutting the taxes for America's wealthiest families is clearly not creating the needed new jobs, and that strategy is unlikely to succeed in the future. ~ Tim Johnson,
1403:To succeed in the world, it is much more necessary to possess the penetration to discern who is a fool, than to discover who is a clever man. ~ Charles Maurice de Talleyrand,
1404:Victory is for those who can say "Victory is mine". Success is for those who can begin saying "I will succeed" and say "I have succeeded" in the end. ~ Mustafa Kemal Atat rk,
1405:Victory is for those who can say "Victory is mine". Success is for those who can begin saying "I will succeed" and say "I have succeeded" in the end. ~ Mustafa Kemal Ataturk,
1406:Whether we succeed or fail in life depends on our ability to conquer the challenges in our opportunities, and to discover the opportunities in our challenges. ~ Joan Marques,
1407:Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely. The real safeguard of democracy, therefore, is education. ~ Franklin D Roosevelt,
1408:If you succeed with your first dream, it helps. You know, people trust you, possibly, for the second one. They give you a chance to play out your second one. ~ James D Watson,
1409:I learned that kids in show business are so different from regular, average students. They would gather behind you and help you to succeed in any way possible. ~ Wally George,
1410:instead of friends and family. Your inner circle typically wants you to succeed and wants to maintain a good relationship with you, so it’s likely that they’ll ~ Josh Kaufman,
1411:Scott believes there are six elements of humor: naughty, clever, cute, bizarre, mean, and recognizable. You have to have at least two dimensions to succeed. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1412:The pressure to succeed has a lot to do with why people overstep the line. It is a peculiar weakness of western culture where we have made a fetish of success. ~ Desmond Tutu,
1413:The same goes for business: There’s no karmic law that dictates your business will succeed if others fail, so why not just wish them well and get on with it? ~ Sophia Amoruso,
1414:These landscapes of water and reflections have become an obsession. It's quite beyond my powers at my age, and yet I want to succeed in expressing what I feel. ~ Claude Monet,
1415:We need to go there and make sure we bring that cup home. and if we do succeed, then we'll dedicate it to the fans that have waited so patiently since 1984. ~ Steven Gerrard,
1416:Whatever success people have in a field, it's a result of hard work. If you ultimately succeed in one place, you must have worked hard there or somewhere else. ~ Cameron Diaz,
1417:You don’t have to be in a boxing ring to be a great fighter. As long as you are true to yourself, you will succeed in your fight for that in which you believe. ~ Muhammad Ali,
1418:7 Be still before the LORD         and wait patiently for him;     do not fret when people succeed in their ways,         when they carry out their wicked schemes. ~ Anonymous,
1419:Art and science have so much in common - the process of trial and error, finding something new and innovative, and to experiment and succeed in a breakthrough. ~ Peter M Brant,
1420:In every [other] pursuit men without natural aptitude succeed by obstinate study of technique, but who is not a poet by nature can never become one by art. ~ Giambattista Vico,
1421:In Paris they just simply opened their eyes and stared when we spoke to them in French! We never did succeed in making those idiots understand their own language. ~ Mark Twain,
1422:It is only when the correct practice is followed for a long time, without interruptions and with a quality of positive attitude and eagerness, that it can succeed. ~ Pata jali,
1423:It is only when the correct practice is followed for a long time, without interruptions and with a quality of positive attitude and eagerness, that it can succeed. ~ Patanjali,
1424:Remember, no one can make you feel inferior without your consent. Eleanor Roosevelt said that. It is a quote I try to live by. Most of the time I succeed. ~ Laurell K Hamilton,
1425:The present is never tidy, or certain, or reasonable, and those who try to make it so once it becomes the past succeed only in making it seem implausible. ~ William Manchester,
1426:To desire to write poems that endure-we undertake such a goal certain of two things: that in all likelihood we will fail, and if we succeed we will never know it ~ Donald Hall,
1427:Two other technology icons, Steve Jobs and Larry Ellison, were adopted, and the experience is thought by some to have given each a powerful motivation to succeed. ~ Brad Stone,
1428:We succeed, not alone by the laborious exertions of our faculties, be they small or great, but by the regular, thoughtful and systematic exercise of them. ~ Frederick Douglass,
1429:We use intelligence to structure our environment so that we can succeed with less intelligence. Our brains make the world smart so that we can be dumb in peace! ~ David Brooks,
1430:What appears good in principle can sometimes fail when introduced to the world. Sometimes, bad products succeed and good products fail. The world is complex. ~ Donald A Norman,
1431:Women should not have to adopt masculine traits in order to succeed. You should be able to stay as a woman, and in tune with your femininity, and still be equal. ~ Isla Fisher,
1432:You look back and see how hard you worked and how poor you were, and how desperately anxious you were to succeed, and all you can remember is how happy you were. ~ Jack London,
1433:Attend your children's athletic events. There's nothing better than watching your child succeed while absolutely loving the opportunity to play in front of you. ~ Robert Cheeke,
1434:for a teacher, there is no greater joy than finding a student with the willingness to learn, the capacity to do great things, and the natural ability to succeed. ~ Gina LaManna,
1435:If I did not succeed I still thought that what I had worked on would be continued. Not immediately. But there are others who believe in things that are true. ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
1436:If you love, absolutely love what you are doing, chances are excellent that you will succeed. There is nothing so exhausting as working on a job you don't like. ~ Napoleon Hill,
1437:It is much more difficult to judge oneself than to judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself rightly, then you are indeed a man of true wisdom ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
1438:I want to encourage people to not think in terms of gifts, but think in terms of, wow. You work hard to succeed at that, because that's exactly what I do. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
1439:Since a good behavior change strategy must be able to succeed in the worst circumstances, it’s best to design a strategy that works in low willpower situations. ~ Stephen Guise,
1440:The Almighty is never taken by surprise. And his plans always succeed. No matter how desperate a situation may appear, he is working constantly for your welfare. ~ Bodie Thoene,
1441:The question is: How do we succeed in Iraq? And you don't succeed by leaving before the mission is complete, like some in this political process are suggesting. ~ George W Bush,
1442:Those who do succeed in reading the Bible from beginning to end will discover that at least it has a beginning and an end, and some traces of a total structure. ~ Northrop Frye,
1443:To succeed is always to fail-in the sense that the more one succeeds in anything, the greater is the need to go on succeeding. To eat is to survive to be hungry. ~ Alan W Watts,
1444:We will succeed, because we are fully committed, because, wherever we live, whoever we are, we all share the same responsibility: Make our planet great again. ~ Emmanuel Macron,
1445:At the unconscious level, Americans believe that good people succeed, that success is bestowed upon you by God. Your success demonstrates that God loves you. ~ Clotaire Rapaille,
1446:Deception is a sort of seduction. In love and war, adultery and espionage, deceit can only succeed if the deceived party is willing, in some way, to be deceived. ~ Ben Macintyre,
1447:Each man has to work out his own understanding of what needs to be done, and then prepare himself to take advantage of the opportunity to succeed in a big way. ~ George S Clason,
1448:If all you succeed in doing in life is getting rich by buying little pieces of paper, it's a failed life. Life is more than being shrewd in wealth accumulation. ~ Charlie Munger,
1449:In my experience the most crucial predictor of recovery is a persistent willingness to exert some effort to help yourself. Given this attitude, you will succeed. ~ David D Burns,
1450:I think it's more and more important to spend time with your children, because it seems to be harder and harder for them to succeed as their parents have succeeded. ~ Dan Marino,
1451:To succeed is always to fail, in the sense that the more one succeeds at anything, the greater is the need to go on succeeding. To eat is to survive to be hungry. ~ Alan W Watts,
1452:Whether you succeed or not is irrelevant, there is no such thing. Making your unknown known is the important thing--and keeping the unknown always beyond you. ~ Georgia O Keeffe,
1453:You may succeed in making another feel guilty about something by blaming him, but you won't succeed in changing whatever it is about you that is making you unhappy. ~ Wayne Dyer,
1454:Housing, employment, health, family—these are the factors that determine whether a person returning home from prison will succeed or fail as a law-abiding citizen. ~ Piper Kerman,
1455:If you wanna take the fucking island burn your fucking boats; and you will take the island 'cause people when they're gonna either die or succeed, tend to succeed. ~ Tony Robbins,
1456:It does not teach you to live gracefully, it teaches you how to exploit others for your own purposes. And we think that the people who are clever are the ones who succeed. ~ Osho,
1457:I wonder why most of us can only perform to our utmost when circumstances drive us, and then I realize that the few who push themselves are the ones who succeed. ~ Twinkle Khanna,
1458:Never will I succeed in putting as much strength in a portrait as there is in a head. The mere fact of living demands such willpower and energy … ALBERTO GIACOMETTI ~ Peter Stamm,
1459:People in their handlings of affairs often fail when they are about to succeed. If one remains as careful at the end as he was at the beginning, there will be no failure. ~ Laozi,
1460:Sam bit her lip, trying not to laugh. She didn’t succeed. After a moment of baleful glaring, Taylor joined in her mirth. Petulance was her first sign of stress. Sam ~ J T Ellison,
1461:Some people are born with a fire inside them. The will to succeed. It isn’t a learned behavior. It’s just some unknown biological factor that makes them try harder. ~ J A Konrath,
1462:Failing honestly and with integrity was something I could accept—but only if I was sure that my efforts to succeed had been worthy of the trust he had placed in me. ~ Shimon Peres,
1463:If we succeed, it will not be because of what we have, but it will be because of what we are; not because of what we own, but, rather because of what we believe. ~ Richard M Nixon,
1464:If you're co-founder or CEO, you have to do all kinds of tasks you might not want to do. If you don't do your chores, the company won't succeed. No task is too menial. ~ Elon Musk,
1465:If you’re trying to succeed in a job or a relationship or at a task, you’re either moving forward, falling behind, or standing still. There are only three choices. To ~ Seth Godin,
1466:of course i want to be successful
but i don’t crave success for me
i need to be successful to gain
enough milk and honey
to help those around
me succeed ~ Rupi Kaur,
1467:One does not succeed by sticking to convention. When your opponent can easily anticipate every move you make, your strategy deteriorates and becomes commoditized. ~ Garry Kasparov,
1468:Rome did not create a great empire by having meetings, they did it by killing all those who opposed them. If at first you don't succeed, failure may be your style. ~ Quentin Crisp,
1469:There is no pressure to perform, to succeed, because we already have. If your family and community accepts you, who else must you impress? Just yourself and God, ja? ~ Sarah Price,
1470:Those who succeed in an outstanding way seldom do so before the age of 40. More often, they do not strike their real pace until they are well beyond the age of 50. ~ Napoleon Hill,
1471:We must have ideals and try to live up to them, even if we never quite succeed. Life would be a sorry business without them. With them it's grand and great. ~ Lucy Maud Montgomery,
1472:When you succeed at creating your own world, whether it's in any realm - like Tolkien was able to do - and people are able to enter that world, it's a special thing. ~ David Selby,
1473:You will succeed through practice. Don't give up your practice of Japa, even if your mind doesn't become steady. Do your spiritual practice ardently. ~ Holy Mother Sri Sarada Devi,
1474:Do not blame anyone if at last you don’t succeed because, your brain is solely responsible for this since this is where every seed of resolution will germinate. ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1475:From now on, change will be the constant. The individuals best prepared to succeed are those who can learn, modify, and grow, regardless of age, experience, or ego. ~ Danny Goodman,
1476:I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles he has overcome while trying to succeed. ~ Robin S Sharma,
1477:In this one particular at least, business is like chess. Grandmaster José Raúl Capablanca put it well: to succeed, “you must study the endgame before everything else. ~ Peter Thiel,
1478:It's human nature to keep doing something as long as it's pleasurable and you can succeed at it, which is why the world population continues to double every 40 years. ~ Peter Lynch,
1479:of course i want to be successful
but i don't crave success for me
i need to be successful to gain
enough milk and honey
to help those around
me succeed ~ Rupi Kaur,
1480:One does not fail at a task. One merely does not succeed. And since one is always striving for success, so long as one continues striving, one can never truly fail. ~ Margaret Weis,
1481:People often say that, by pointing out to a man the faults of his mistress, you succeed only in strengthening his atachment to her, because he does not believe you. ~ Marcel Proust,
1482:Stupidity can win for a moment, but it can never really succeed because the nature of humans is to seek freedom. Rulers can delay that freedom, but t