classes ::: website,
children :::
branches ::: quora
see also :::

Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:quora
class:website
in comparison to wikipedia and reddit, I do enjoy asking and answering questions on quora. I think its a good opportunity for training and practicing writing in a captivating or experimental manner.


questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or via the comments below
or join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS

AUTH

BOOKS

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT

PRIMARY CLASS

website
SEE ALSO

SIMILAR TITLES
quora

DEFINITIONS



QUOTES [1 / 1 - 12 / 12]


KEYS (10k)

   1 Bryan Del Monte

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   4 Nir Eyal
   2 James Altucher
   2 Geoffrey G Parker

1:Bryan Del Monte (Author | Entrepreneur | Advertising & Marketing Expert | bryandelmonte.com)Answered April 26, 2016
That's like asking - what's considered a good day... it's so broad it depends.

That said, here's some realities about website traffic generally...
  Under 10K unique visitors a month, it's very hard to draw any meaningful conclusions from your analytics. You're just way too small.
  Around 100K a month, you'll be able to really spot some decent trends in your analytics that will allow you to make better content...
  If you're drawing a million unique visitors a year, you're rapidly approaching the top 2% of all websites in the world.
  If you're at 5-10M a year in unique visitors, you're a name brand site in your niche that is routinely visited. It also means you probably have 1000's of articls that are drawing a few hundred visits a month through SEO.
  To be in the top 1/2 1% - you need to draw over 10M unique views a month. If you're at that level... you're on the level of Drudge, Facebook, Amazon, Pintrest, Twitter, etc...
  Most websites have less than 3000 visitors a month... and by most I mean like 98%.

Putting all the aggregate stuff aside, here are some things to think about:

  New/Returning matters. Do people find your content useful or not? Anything under 80% is a win... which is the average bounce rate.
  A thousand true fans can lead to a successful website - it's not all about aggregate stats. (see Kevin Kelly's post - The Technium: 1,000 True Fans ~ Bryan Del Monte, Quora,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:手机背单词或者刷知乎刷quora所达到的利用率都比用kindle看书要高 ~ Anonymous
2:Quora found success by connecting the right reward to the intended behavior of asking and answering questions. ~ Nir Eyal
3:As I read in a Quora thread when somebody asked the question “How do I get motivated?”: “F%*k motivation. Instead, cultivate discipline. ~ Steve Kamb
4:I don't know, and have no intention of finding out. IQ is like dick size - if you have to measure, you're way too invested in it. And both are gauche to discuss in polite company. (Upon being asked his IQ on Quora) ~ Adri n Lamo
5:I wrote a blog post about how the book is different from the blog and why I chose to go the self-publishing route. I wrote guests posts for blogs like Techcrunch, which helped immensely and for which I’m very grateful. I used my social networks: Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Google+, Quora, and Pinterest. ~ James Altucher
6:So designing spreadable value units is a crucial step toward virality. A spreadable value unit may be one that helps to start an interaction on an external network, the way Instagram photos create conversations on Facebook among users intrigued by the images they’ve seen. Or it may create the opportunity to complete an incomplete interaction, the way an unanswered question on Quora demands social feedback in the form of an answer, or a fresh survey on Survey-Monkey invites responses. Making it easy for users to create and disseminate spreadable value units helps you build a platform that has high growth as well as high engagement. ~ Geoffrey G Parker
7:IMPROVE YOUR AUTHENTICITY. Social media can also be called “Individual media” as opposed to “Group Media.” Instead of a large group broadcasting your effort, you can build up your own presence by establishing your Facebook platform, your Twitter presence, your LinkedIn, Quora, Pinterest, blogging, Amazon, SlideShare, Scribd, reddit, etc., presence. All of these channels are used to create authenticity for your offering. Each follower, fan, etc., you are personally able to sway over to your side of the world continues to establish your authenticity, regardless of who is “rejecting” you. This is how you choose yourself and build your own platform rather than relying on the whims of a meager few. ~ James Altucher
8:In Mahalo’s case, executives assumed that paying users would drive repeat engagement with the site. After all, people like money, right? Unfortunately, Mahalo had an incomplete understanding of its users’ drivers. Ultimately, the company found that people did not want to use a Q&A site to make money. If the trigger was a desire for monetary rewards, users were better off spending their time earning an hourly wage. And if the payouts were meant to take the form of a game, like a slot machine, then the rewards came far too infrequently and were too small to matter. However, Quora demonstrated that social rewards and the variable reinforcement of recognition from peers proved to be much more frequent and salient motivators. Quora instituted an upvoting system that reports user satisfaction with answers and provides a steady stream of social feedback. Quora’s social rewards have proven more attractive than Mahalo’s monetary rewards. ~ Nir Eyal
9:Unfortunately, too many companies build their products betting users will do what they make them do instead of letting them do what they want to do. Companies fail to change user behaviors because they do not make their services enjoyable for its own sake, often asking users to learn new, unfamiliar actions instead of making old routines easier. Companies that successfully change behaviors present users with an implicit choice between their old way of doing things and a new, more convenient way to fulfill existing needs. By maintaining the users’ freedom to choose, products can facilitate the adoption of new habits and change behavior for good. Whether coerced into doing something we did not intend, as was the case when Quora opted-in all users to its “views” feature, or feeling forced to adopt a strange new calorie counting behavior on MyFitnessPal, people often feel constrained by threats to their autonomy and rebel. To change behavior, products must ensure the users feel in control. People must want to use the service, not feel they have to. ~ Nir Eyal
10:Reddit is a highly popular link-sharing community that circulates vast amounts of Internet content. When it first launched, the site was seeded with fake profiles posting links to the kind of content the founders wanted to see on the site over time. It worked. The initial content attracted people who were interested in similar content and created a culture of high-quality contributions to the community. Over time, its members have learned to rely on one another for guidance as to what’s worth scrutinizing and what is not. (The success of Reddit’s launch and expansion have not shielded it from controversy, of course, as the 2015 battles over allegedly racist and bigoted content on the site made clear.) Similarly, when Quora first started, the editors would ask questions and then answer the questions themselves, to simulate activity on the platform. Once users started asking questions, editors continued to answer them, thereby demonstrating how the platform was intended to work. Eventually, users themselves took over the process, and the “pump-priming” by Quora personnel could cease. ~ Geoffrey G Parker
11:Bryan Del Monte (Author | Entrepreneur | Advertising & Marketing Expert | bryandelmonte.com)Answered April 26, 2016
That's like asking - what's considered a good day... it's so broad it depends.

That said, here's some realities about website traffic generally...
  Under 10K unique visitors a month, it's very hard to draw any meaningful conclusions from your analytics. You're just way too small.
  Around 100K a month, you'll be able to really spot some decent trends in your analytics that will allow you to make better content...
  If you're drawing a million unique visitors a year, you're rapidly approaching the top 2% of all websites in the world.
  If you're at 5-10M a year in unique visitors, you're a name brand site in your niche that is routinely visited. It also means you probably have 1000's of articls that are drawing a few hundred visits a month through SEO.
  To be in the top 1/2 1% - you need to draw over 10M unique views a month. If you're at that level... you're on the level of Drudge, Facebook, Amazon, Pintrest, Twitter, etc...
  Most websites have less than 3000 visitors a month... and by most I mean like 98%.

Putting all the aggregate stuff aside, here are some things to think about:

  New/Returning matters. Do people find your content useful or not? Anything under 80% is a win... which is the average bounce rate.
  A thousand true fans can lead to a successful website - it's not all about aggregate stats. (see Kevin Kelly's post - The Technium: 1,000 True Fans ~ Bryan Del Monte, Quora,
12:At first, Mahalo garnered significant attention and traffic. At its high point, 14.1 million users worldwide visited the site monthly.[lxxxix] But over time, users began to lose interest. Although the payout of the bounties were variable, somehow users did not find the monetary rewards enticing enough. But as Mahalo struggled to retain users, another Q&A site began to boom. Quora, launched in 2010 by two former Facebook employees, quickly grew in popularity. Unlike Mahalo, Quora did not offer a single cent to anyone answering user questions. Why, then, have users stayed highly engaged with Quora, but not with Mahalo, despite its variable monetary rewards? In Mahalo’s case, executives assumed that paying users would drive repeat engagement with the site. After all, people like money, right? Unfortunately, Mahalo had an incomplete understanding of its users’ drivers. Ultimately, the company found that people did not want to use a Q&A site to make money. If the trigger was a desire for monetary rewards, the user was better off spending their time earning an hourly wage. And if the payouts were meant to take the form of a game, like a slot machine, then the rewards came far too infrequently and were too small to matter. However, Quora demonstrated that social rewards and the variable reinforcement of recognition from peers proved to be much more frequent and salient motivators. Quora instituted an upvoting system that reports user satisfaction with answers and provides a steady stream of social feedback. Quora’s social rewards have proven more attractive than Mahalo’s monetary rewards. Only by understanding what truly matters to users can a company correctly match the right variable reward to their intended behavior. ~ Nir Eyal

IN CHAPTERS









WORDNET






























--- Grep of noun quora
quoratean





IN WEBGEN [10000/4]

Wikipedia - Quora
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Quorarion
https://nightspeakers.fandom.com/wiki/Quorat
Quora


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