classes ::: media,
children :::
branches ::: news

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:news
class:media

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-are-the-most-and-the-least-trusted-news-sources-in-the-us-2017-08-03?fbclid=IwAR2C63b82HNfh0y3eBwagUFC5gUERTDXBF1YVeB51VEHiDGHRmRaEcKBzLA
https://ei.marketwatch.com/Multimedia/2017/08/03/Photos/ZG/MW-FR660_Truste_20170803172454_ZG.jpg?uuid=3111a66e-7892-11e7-96b1-9c8e992d421e

https://theintercept.com/
Al Jazeera


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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [2]


current
new_game_man

--- PRIMARY CLASS


buy
Game_Dev
injunction
media
new
place
programming
racket

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [6]


03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation
1.31 - Is Thelema a .New Religion.?
2.11 - WITH THE DEVOTEES AT DAKSHINEWAR
2.17 - M. AT DAKSHINEWAR
anew
anew-book
Holy Bible New International Version
Isaac Newton
new game dev challenge
new game man
new place
new roguelike (racket) (jrl)
news
New Science
New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures
The New Organon
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri (cento), Savitri (extended toc), the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


new birth ::: the Mother: “New birth: birth of the true consciousness, that of the Divine Presence in us.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.

new-built ::: built again.

new-made ::: newly made.

newborn ::: a. --> Recently born.

newcome ::: a. --> Recently come.

newcomer ::: n. --> One who has lately come.

newel ::: n. --> A novelty; a new thing.
The upright post about which the steps of a circular staircase wind; hence, in stairs having straight flights, the principal post at the foot of a staircase, or the secondary ones at the landings. See Hollow newel, under Hollow.

newfangledness ::: n. --> Affectation of, or fondness for, novelty; vain or affected fashion or form.

newfangled ::: a. --> Newmade; formed with the affectation of novelty.
Disposed to change; inclined to novelties; given to new theories or fashions.

newfangleness ::: n. --> Newfangledness.

newfangle ::: a. --> Eager for novelties; desirous of changing. ::: v. t. --> To change by introducing novelties.

newfanglist ::: n. --> One who is eager for novelties or desirous of change.

newfangly ::: adv. --> In a newfangled manner; with eagerness for novelty.

newfashioned ::: a. --> Made in a new form, or lately come into fashion.

newfoundland ::: n. --> An island on the coast of British North America, famed for the fishing grounds in its vicinity.
A Newfoundland dog.

newing ::: v. t. --> Yeast; barm.

newish ::: a. --> Somewhat new; nearly new.

newly ::: adv. --> Lately; recently.
Anew; afresh; freshly.

newmarket ::: n. --> A long, closely fitting cloak.

new-model ::: v. t. --> To remodel.

newness ::: n. --> The quality or state of being new; as, the newness of a system; the newness of a scene; newness of life.

new ::: superl. --> Having existed, or having been made, but a short time; having originated or occured lately; having recently come into existence, or into one&

news-book ::: n. --> A newspaper.

newsboy ::: n. --> A boy who distributes or sells newspaper.

news-letter ::: n. --> A circular letter, written or printed for the purpose of disseminating news. This was the name given to the earliest English newspapers.

newsman ::: n. --> One who brings news.
A man who distributes or sells newspapers.

newsmen ::: pl. --> of Newsman

newsmonger ::: n. --> One who deals in news; one who is active in hearing and telling news.

news ::: n --> A report of recent occurences; information of something that has lately taken place, or of something before unknown; fresh tindings; recent intelligence.
Something strange or newly happened.
A bearer of news; a courier; a newspaper.

newspaper ::: n. --> A sheet of paper printed and distributed, at stated intervals, for conveying intelligence of passing events, advocating opinions, etc.; a public print that circulates news, advertisements, proceedings of legislative bodies, public announcements, etc.

newsroom ::: n. --> A room where news is collected and disseminated, or periodicals sold; a reading room supplied with newspapers, magazines, etc.

news-vnder ::: n. --> A seller of newspapers.

news-writer ::: n. --> One who gathered news for, and wrote, news-letters.

newsy ::: a. --> Full of news; abounding in information as to current events.

newt ::: n. --> Any one of several species of small aquatic salamanders. The common British species are the crested newt (Triton cristatus) and the smooth newt (Lophinus punctatus). In America, Diemictylus viridescens is one of the most abundant species.

newtonian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Sir Isaac Newton, or his discoveries. ::: n. --> A follower of Newton..php{color:

new-year ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to, or suitable for, the commencement of the year; as, New-year gifts or odes.

new zealand ::: --> A group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean.

Newton was influenced by Henry More, e.g. in viewing space as the sensorium of God. See Cudworth, Deism. Cf. M.H. Nicolson, Conway Papers.

New Academy: Name commonly given to what is also called the Third Academy, started by Carneades (214-129 B.C.) who substituted a theory of probability for the principle of doubt which had been introduced into Plato's School by Arcesilaus, the originator of the Second or Middle Academy. The Academy later veered toward eclecticism and eventually was merged with Neo-Platonism. -- J.J.R.

New Realism: A school of thought which dates from the beginning of the twentieth century. It began as a movement of reaction against the wide influence of idealistic metaphysics. Whereas the idealists reduce everything to mind, this school reduced mind to everything. For the New Realists Nature is basic and mind is part and parcel of it. How nature was conceived (whether materialistic, neutralistic, etc.) was not the important factor. New Realists differed here among themselves. Their theory of knowledge was strictly monistic, the subject and object are one since there is no fundamental dualism. Two schools of New Realists are recognized:

Newton's Method: The method of procedure in natural philosophy as formulated by Sir Isaac Newton, especially in his Rules of Reasoning in Philosophy (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, Book III). These rules are as follows: We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes. The qualities of bodies, which admit neither intension nor remission of degrees, and which are found to belong to all bodies within the reach of our experiments, are to be esteemed the universal qualities of all bodies whatsoever. In experimental philosophy we are to look upon propositions collected by general induction from phaenomena as accurately or very nearly true, notwithstanding any contrary hypotheses that may be imagined, till such time as other phaenomena occur, by which they may either be made more accurate, or liable to exceptions. To this passage should be appended another statement from the closing pages of the same work. "I do not make hypotheses; for whatever is not deduced from the phaenomena is to be called an hypothesis; and hypotheses, whether metaphysical or physical, whether of occult qualities or mechanical, have no place in experimental philosophy." -- A.C.S.

newbie
/n[y]oo'bee/ (Sometimes shorted to "noob") Originally
from British public-school and military slang variant of "new
boy", an inexperienced user.
This term surfaced in the {newsgroup} {news:talk.bizarre} but
is now in wide use. Criteria for being considered a newbie
vary wildly; a person can be called a newbie in one group
while remaining a respected regular in another. The label
"newbie" is sometimes applied as a serious insult to a person
who has been around for a long time but who carefully hides
all evidence of having a clue.
See {BIFF}.
[{Jargon File}]
(2007-08-02)

New Flavors
An {object-oriented} {Lisp} from {Symbolics}, the successor to
{Flavors}, it led to {CLOS}.
["Reference Guide to Symbolics-Lisp", Symbolics, March 1985].
(1994-10-10)

newgroup wars
/n[y]oo'groop worz/ [{Usenet}] The salvos of dueling
"newgroup" and "rmgroup" messages sometimes exchanged by
persons on opposite sides of a dispute over whether a
{newsgroup} should be created net-wide, or (even more
frequently) whether an obsolete one should be removed. These
usually settle out within a week or two as it becomes clear
whether the group has a natural constituency (usually, it
doesn't). At times, especially in the completely anarchic alt
hierarchy, the names of newsgroups themselves become a form of
comment or humour; e.g. the spinoff of
alt.swedish.chef.bork.bork.bork from alt.tv.muppets in early
1990, or any number of specialised abuse groups named after
particularly notorious {flamers}, e.g. alt.weemba.
[{Jargon File}]


--- QUOTES [424 / 424 - 500 / 118134] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

  150 Sri Aurobindo
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   1 Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
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NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   17 Anonymous
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   7 Newt Gingrich
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   4 William Shakespeare
   4 Stephen King
   4 Neil Gaiman
   4 John Henry Newman
   3 Stonewall Jackson
   3 Rumi
   3 Rick Riordan
   3 Randy Newman
   3 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   3 Olivia Newton John
   3 Neil Young
   3 Lady Gaga
   3 George Herbert
   3 Chuck Palahniuk
   3 Anne Sexton
   2 Victor Hugo
   2 V E Schwab
   2 Terry Pratchett
   2 Tara Westover
   2 Suzy Kassem
   2 Sigmund Freud
   2 Prince
   2 Peter Newman
   2 Miguel de Cervantes
   2 Laozi
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   2 Jojo Moyes
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   2 John Lescroart
   2 John Keats
   2 Jodi Picoult
   2 Joanna Newsom
   2 J K Rowling
   2 Jane Jacobs
   2 Isaac Bonewits
   2 Helmut Newton
   2 Erin Hunter
   2 Erica Jong
   2 Ed McBain
   2 Ed Catmull
   2 Drake
   2 Dina Silver
   2 David Cronenberg
   2 David Bowie
   2 Criss Jami
   2 Clive Cussler
   2 Billy Joel
   2 Al Gore

1:He who conceives the Truth, is born anew. ~ Vemana,
2:The new idea either finds a champion or dies. ~ Edward Schon,
3:The Psychic’s Choice at the Time of DeathThe psychic being at the time of death chooses what it will work out in the next birth and determines the character and conditions of the new personality. Life is for the evolutionary growth by experience in the conditions of the Ignorance till one is ready for the higher light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, 532.php">CWSA.php">532 ,
4:How can I begin anything new with all of yesterday in me? ~ Leonard Cohen,
5:You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream. ~ C S Lewis,
6:One has to do something new in order to see something new. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
7:All renews itself, nothing perishes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.06 - The Transformation of Dream Life,
8:A successful book cannot afford to be more than ten percent new. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
9:When I saw you I fell in love, and you smiled because you knew. ~ William Shakespeare,
10:If I have seen further, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants. ~ Isaac Newton,
11:Let us sing a new song, not with our lips, but with our lives. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
12:Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate. ~ J R R Tolkien,
13:No one can begin a new life, unless he repent of the old. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
14:See this morning for the first time as a new-born child that has no name ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
15:Even truth needs to be clad in new garments if it is to appeal to a new age. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
16:If you knew the secret of life, you too would choose no other companion but love. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
17:What it knew was an image in a broken glass, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.13 - In the Self of Mind,
18:Each victory gained over oneself means new strength to gain more victories. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga IV ,
19:The sun is new each day. ~ Heraclitus,
20:There is in every child at every stage a new miracle of vigorous unfolding. ~ Erik Erikson,
21:We must always change, renew, rejuvenate ourselves; otherwise, we harden. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
22:Learn to see, and then you'll know that there is no end to the new worlds of our vision. ~ Carlos Castaneda,
23:The pure intellect cannot create poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
24:The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes. ~ Marcel Proust,
25:If people knew how hard I had to work to gain my mastery, it would not seem so wonderful at all. ~ Michelangelo,
26:Poetry like everything else in man evolves. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
27:The principal mark of genius is not perfection but originality, the opening of new frontiers. ~ Arthur Koestler,
28:A new ordeal always brings with it a new awakening. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Ideals Face to Face,
29:The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new. ~ Socrates?,
30:Time was Eternity’s transparent robe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
31:As Aurobindo and Teilhard de Chardin knew, the future of humankind is God-consciousness. ~ Ken Wilber, Up From Eden ,
32:The Word that ushers divine experience ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
33:This darkness hides our nobler destiny. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
34:Worlds were many, but the Self was one. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
35:Strong poisons are the only salvation in desperate diseases. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The New Ideal,
36:The buying of more books than one can read is nothing less than the soul reaching toward infinity... ~ A Edward Newton,
37:The senses there were outlets of the soul; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
38:Everyone who has ever built anywhere a 'new heaven' first found the power thereto in his own hell. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
39:Our death is made a passage to new worlds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
40:She has a secret of will power which no other nation possesses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The New Ideal,
41:A diamond was laying in the street covered with dirt. Many fools passed by. Someone who knew diamonds picked it up. ~ Kabir,
42:Fear not that thy life shall come to an end, but rather fear that it shall never have a beginning. ~ Saint John Henry Newman,
43:Intuition is the father of new knowledge, while empiricism is nothing but an accumulation of old knowledge. ~ Albert Einstein,
44:There is no greater bliss than that of being like a new born child in front of the Divine.With my blessings ~ The Mother,
45:A city of ancient IgnoranceFounded upon a soil that knew not Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
46:If I have ever made any valuable discoveries, it has been due more to patient attention, than to any other talent. ~ Isaac Newton,
47:If you knew what the Gods have in store for you, you would run naked and dance on the beach. ~ Vikings, The Seer to Rollo Vikings,
48:If we wish to make any progress in the service of God we must begin every day of our life with new eagerness. ~ Saint Charles Borromeo,
49:Each day was a spiritual romance, As if he was born into a bright new world; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.02 - The Growth of the Flame,
50:A new light shall break upon the earth, a light of Truth and Harmony. With my blessings. ~ The Mother, Mantras of the Mother 24 December,
51:Yes, this is the true love, which is a force; it is the union that enables new possibilities to be realised... ~ The Mother, On Education ,
52:I have a fundamental belief in the Bible as the Word of God, written by those who were inspired. I study the Bible daily. ~ Isaac Newton,
53:All we have done is ever still to do.All breaks and all renews and is the same. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
54:The bad news is you're falling through the air, nothing to hang on to, no parachute. The good news is, there's no ground. ~ Chogyam Trungpa,
55:All education is the art of making men ethical (sittlich), of transforming the old Adam into the new Adam. ~ Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel,
56:Poetry is a highly charged power of aesthetic expression of the soul of man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
57:Poetry too is an interpreter of truth, but in the forms of an innate beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
58:This is the highest wisdom that I own; freedom and life are earned by those alone who conquer them each day anew. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
59:Can You now say with certainty whether this supramental substance will help decisively to realise this new birth? EVIDENTLY. ~ The Mother,
60:It is the spirit within and not the mind without that is the fount of poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
61:Let us go to sleep with a prayer and wake with an aspiration for the New and Perfect Creation. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II 1.01 - The Human Aspiration,
62:(Darshan Message) Sri Aurobindo's message is an immortal sunlight radiating over the future. 15 August 1972 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
63:Into inertia revolution sinks,In a new dress the old resumes its role; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
64:Like common men he lived to whom the rayOf a new sun but brings another dayUnmeaning. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Khaled of the Sea,
65:Thousands of years before the Christian era, the Tibetans knew that an atom was a solar system [...] ~ Manly P Hall, Magic: A Treatise on Esoteric Ethics ,
66:I never knew a sorrow that an hour of reading could not assuage, a great man had once said. Let's put it to the test. ~ Anna Gavalda, Hunting and Gathering ,
67:It is the true more than the new that the poet is after. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
68:There is only one aim to be followed, the increase of the Peace, Light, Power and the growth of a new consciousness in the being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, (CWSA 23) ,
69:This now he willed to discover and exile, The element in him betraying God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
70:Thoughts too great and deep to find a voice,Thoughts whose desire new-makes the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.09 - The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
71:New words are needed to express new ideas, new forms are necessary to manifest new forces. With My blessings. ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother 01 Augest,
72:The guardians of Eternity keep its lawFor ever fixed upon Truth’s giant base ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
73:We need new myths, but we need to understand we stand on the old myths. These must be completly understood to be able to create new myths ~ James George Frazer,
74:Being but one, she is capable of all; immutable in herself, she renews all things; she diffuses herself among the nations in saintly souls. ~ The Book of Wisdom,
75:Phenomenon built Reality’s summer-houseOn the beaches of the sea of Infinity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
76:In a supramentalised body immunity from illness would be automatic, inherent in its new nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Illness and Health,
77:An old self lurks in the new self we are;Hardly we escape from what we once had been: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
78:Imagination’s great ensorcelling rodSummoned the unknown and gave to it a home, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
79:Armed with the intuition of a blissTo which some moved tranquillity was the key, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
80:Evolution means a bringing out of new powers which lay concealed in the seed or the first form. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
81:Our call must be to live on a new height in all our being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.19 - Out of the Sevenfold Ignorance towards the Sevenfold Knowledge,
82:The ideals which have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully have been kindness, beauty, and truth ~ Albert Einstein,
83:Those who wait on the Lord will find new strength. ... They will run and not grow weary. They will walk and not fain' ~ Anonymous, The Bible (Isaiah 40:31 NLT).,
84:And from the unsounded depths of the Unknown a reply came sublime and formidable and we knew that the earth was saved. ~ The Mother, Prayers And Meditations ,
85:Death in one’s own dharma brings new birth, success in an alien path means only successful suicide. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
86:There Matter is the Spirit’s firm density,An artistry of glad outwardness of self. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
87:Not only the making of new forms is creation, but preservation is creation, destruction itself is creation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I Bhawani Mandir,
88:The new dawns repeat the old and lean forward in light to join the dawns of the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire 1.02 - The Doctrine of the Mystics,
89:It waited for the fiat of the WordThat comes through the still self from the Supreme. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
90:New sentient creatures filled the unseen depths,Life’s glory and swiftness ran in the beauty of beasts, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
91:There are people who are destined to taste only the poison in things, for whom any surprise is a painful surprise and any experience a new occasion for torture. ~ Cioran,
92:It is not necessary to deny the past experience in order to go forward to the new realisation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Time and Change of the Nature,
93:You can recreate a new world this very moment if you know how to create it, that is, if you are capable of changing your nature. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
94:It made of Space a marvel house of God,It poured through Time its works of ageless might, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
95:The Force is there waiting to be manifested, we must discover the new forms through which it can manifest. With my Blessings. ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother 12 June,
96:What we call the Ignorance does not create a new thing and absolute falsehood but only misrepresents the Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.18 - Mind and Supermind,
97:The ninety and nine are with dreams, content, but the hope of the world made new, is the hundredth man who is grimly bent on making those dreams come true. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
98:I have to create a circle of reading for myself: Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Lao-Tzu, Buddha, Pascal, The New Testament. This is also necessary for all people. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
99:There substance was a resonant harp of self,A net for the constant lightnings of the spirit, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
100:The Sole in its solitude yearned towards the AllAnd the Many turned to look back at the One. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
101:In order to be filled anew the vessel must get empty sometimes. It is when we are preparing for greater receptivities that we feel empty. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
102:We are creating new fate for the future even while undergoing old fate from the past in the present. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
103:She is destined once more to new-mould the life of the world and restore the peace of the human spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Swaraj and the Coming Anarchy,
104:An old pull of subconscious cords renews;It draws the unwilling spirit from the heights, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
105:What is a change of consciousness? A change of consciousness is equivalent to a new birth, a birth into a higher sphere of existence. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
106:Eternal Presence [facsimile] Sri Aurobindo is constantly among us and reveals himself to those who are ready to see and hear him. 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
107:Having made the decision, do not revise it unless some new fact comes to your knowledge. Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so futile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
108:... I am now able to put myself into men and change them, removing the darkness and bringing light, giving them a new heart and a new mind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes ,
109:Life with her wine-cup of longing under the purple of her tenture,Death as her gate of escape and rebirth and renewal of venture. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
110:To allow the free working of the New Consciousness that descended last year, what should a sadhak do? 1) Be receptive and 2) Be plastic ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
111:The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect, but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves" ~ Carl Jung,
112:A new kind of poetry demands a new mentality in the recipient as well as in the writer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
113:Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved you! You were within me, but I was outside, and it was there that I searched for you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
114:In destruction felt creation’s hasty pace,Knew loss as the price of a celestial gain ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The World of Falsehood,
115:Knew death for a cellar of the house of life,In destruction felt creation’s hasty pace. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The World of Falsehood,
116:The new God laughs at imitation and discipleship. He needs no imitators and no pupils. He forces men through himself. The God is his own follower in man. He imitates himself” ~ Carl Jung, Red Book ,
117:In order to understand how the new holographic paradigm fits into the overall scheme of things, it is necessary to have an overall scheme of things to begin with. ~ Ken Wilber, Eye to Eye p. 126,
118:Whenever I write a novel, I have a strong sense that I am doing something I was unable to do before. With each new work, I move up a step and discover something new inside me. ~ Haruki Murakami,
119:Every conquering temptation represents a new fund of moral energy. Every trial endured and weathered in the right spirit makes a soul nobler and stronger than it was before. ~ William Butler Yeats,
120:Intense, one-pointed, monumental, lone,Patient he sat like an incarnate hopeMotionless on a pedestal of prayer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
121:All birth entails a constant death or dissolution of that which becomes, in order that it may change into a new becoming. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad: Brahman Oneness of God and the World,
122:These revolutions, demon or drunken god,Convulsing the wounded body of mankindOnly to paint in new colours an old face; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
123:Lord, the year is dying and our gratitude bows down to Thee. Lord, the year is reborn, our prayer rises up to Thee. Let it be for us also the dawn of a new life. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
124:Vain the soul’s hope if changeless Law is all:Ever to the new and the unknown press onThe speeding aeons justifying God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
125:And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God. ~ Anonymous, The Bible Romans 12:2,
126:Let my skin and sinews and bones dry up, together with all the flesh and blood of my body! I welcome it! But I will not move from this spot until I have attained the supreme and final wisdom. ~ Buddha,
127:The Inconscient too is infinite;The more its abysses we insist to sound,The more it stretches, stretches endlessly. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
128:Our ignorance is Wisdom’s chrysalis,Our error weds new knowledge on its way,Its darkness is a blackened knot of light; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
129:At last there wakes in us a witness SoulThat looks at truths unseen and scans the Unknown;Then all assumes a new and marvellous face: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
130:The truth which poetry expresses takes two forms, the truth of life and the truth of that which works in life, the truth of the inner spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
131:Revolutions are distracting things, but they are often good for the human soul; for they bring a rapid unrolling of new horizons. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Character of English Poetry - II,
132:Not Stopping To Mark The Trail ::: Not stopping to mark the trail, let me push even deeper into the mountain! Perhaps there's a place where bad news can never reach me! ~ Saigyo,
133:One endless watches the inconscient sceneWhere all things perish, as the foam the stars.The One lives for ever. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 09.02 - The Journey in Eternal Night and the Voice of the Darkness,
134:There is only one aim to be followed, the increase of the Peace, Light, Power and the growth of a new consciousness in the being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Difficulties of the Physical Nature,
135:Just as we outgrow a pair of trousers, we outgrow acquaintances, libraries, principles, etc., at times before they're worn out and times - and this is the worst of all - before we have new ones. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
136:There are, of course, few Probationers who understand themselves sufficiently to be able to formulate this will to themselves, and therefore at the end of their probation they choose a new name. ~ Aleister Crowley?,
137:A mastering and helpful assimilation of new stuff into an eternal body has always been in the past a peculiar power of the genius of India. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India “Is India Civilised?” - II,
138:Our dead past round our future’s ankles clingsAnd drags back the new nature’s glorious stride,Or from its buried corpse old ghosts arise, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
139:The intellect moves naturally between two limits, the abstractions or solving analyses of the reason and the domain of positive and practical reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
140:There Mind, a splendid sun of vision’s rays,Shaped substance by the glory of its thoughtsAnd moved amidst the grandeur of its dreams. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
141:You have asked us to help You. How can I help You? What am I to do? To concentrate and open to receive the new progressive consciousness, to receive the new things which are coming down. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
142:A certain pride, a certain awe, withheld him from offering to God even one prayer at night, though he knew it was in God's power to take away his life while he slept and hurl his soul hellward ere he could beg for mercy. ~ James Joyce,
143:A new aesthesis of Inferno’s artThat trained the mind to love what the soul hates,Imposed allegiance on the quivering nervesAnd forced the unwilling body to vibrate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
144:Concentration of the mind is in a way common to both Knowledge and Yoga. Yoga aims at union of the individual with the universal, the Reality. This Reality cannot be new. It must exist even now, and it does exist. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
145:In God’s supreme withdrawn and timeless hushA seeing Self and potent Energy met;The Silence knew itself and thought took form:Self-made from the dual power creation rose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.13 - In the Self of Mind,
146:The more the schemata are differentiated, the smaller the gap between the new and the familiar becomes, so that novelty, instead of constituting an annoyance avoided by the subject, becomes a problem and invites searching. ~ Jean Piaget,
147:Blessed be you, mighty matter, irresistible march of evolution, reality ever newborn; you who, by constantly shattering our mental categories, force us to go ever further and further in our pursuit of the truth. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
148:In the passage of the lotus of the throatWhere speech must rise and the expressing mindAnd the heart’s impulse run towards word and act,A glad uplift and a new working came. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
149:Truth-worldTwo beings he was, one wide and free above,One struggling, bound, intense, its portion here.A tie between them still could bridge two worlds; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
150:A huge inertness is the world’s defence,Even in change is treasured changelessness;Into inertia revolution sinks,In a new dress the old resumes its role; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
151:An imprisoned person with no other book than the Tarot, if he knew how to use it, could in a few years acquire Universal Knowledge Gnosis, and would be able to speak on all subjects with unequaled learning and inexhaustible eloquence. ~ Eliphas Levi,
152:One day the Face must burn out through the mask. Our ignorance is Wisdom's chrysalis, Our error weds new knowledge on its way, Its darkness is a blackened knot of light; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
153:(Examples of subjects for meditation) New birth. Birth to a new consciousness. The psychic consciousness. How to awaken in the body the aspiration for the Divine. The ill-effects of uncontrolled speech. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
154:He stood erect among his brute compeers,He built life new, measured the universe,Opposed his fate and wrestled with unseen Powers,Conquered and used the laws that rule the world, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
155:Life renewed its ways which death and sleep cannot alter,Life that pursuing her boundless march to a goal which we know not,Ever her own law obeys, not our hopes, who are slaves of her heart-beats. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
156:In a manifestation in Time new realities can emerge, truths of being not yet realised can put forth their possibilities and become actual in the physical and terrestrial existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.06 - Reality and the Cosmic Illusion,
157:Our souls travelling different paths have met in the agesEach for its work and they cling for an hour to the names of affection,Then Time’s long waves bear them apart for new forms we shall know not, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
158:The beasts are mortal, but they do not know or fully understand that fact; the gods are immortal, and they know it - but poor man, up from beasts and not yet a god, was that unhappy mixture: he was mortal, and he knew it. ~ Ken Wilber, Up From Eden p. x.,
159:Mysticism-Magic and Yoga-is the means, therefore, to a new universal life, richer, greater and more full of resource than ever before, as free as sunlight, as gracious as the unfolding of a rose. It is for man to take. ~ Israel Regardie, The Tree Of Life ,
160:O divine Master, let Thy light fall into this chaos and bring forth from it a new world. Accomplish what is now in preparation and create a new humanity which may be the perfect expression of Thy new and sublime Law. ~ The Mother, Prayers And Meditations ,
161:Is it so bad, then, to be misunderstood? Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh. To be great is to be misunderstood. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
162:Before we can discern the new, we must know the old. It is true that everything has always been there, but in another way, in another light, with a different value attached to it, in another realization or manifestation.” ~ Jean Gebser, The Ever-Present Origin ,
163:God has to work in the soul in secret and in darkness because if we fully knew what was happening, and what Mystery, transformation, God and Grace will eventually ask of us, we would either try to take charge or stop the whole process. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
164:In the new life all the connections must be founded on a spiritual intimacy and a truth quite other than any which supports our present connections. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest To Hrishikesh Kanjilal,
165:Make of us the hero warriors we aspire to become. May we fight successfully the great battle of the future that is to be born, against the past that seeks to endure, so that the new things may manifest and we be ready to receive them. ~ The Mother, On Education ,
166:In the totality of the change we have to achieve, human means and forces too have to be taken up, not dropped but used and magnified to their utmost possibility as part of the new life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 5.02 - Perfection of the Body,
167:The new Yoga cannot be used as a sort of sauce for old dishes; it must occupy the whole place on peril of serious difficulties in the siddhi & even disasters. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest To Motilal Roy,
168:At last he hears a chanting on the heightsAnd the far speaks and the unknown grows near:He crosses the boundaries of the unseenAnd passes over the edge of mortal sightTo a new vision of himself a ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
169:And yet a greater destiny may be his,For the eternal Spirit is his truth.He can re-create himself and all aroundAnd fashion new the world in which he lives: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
170:Has put the stars out ere the light,And from their dewy cushions riseSweet flowers half-opening their eyes.O pleasant then to feel as if new-bornThe sweet, unripe and virgin air, the air of morn. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Songs to Myrtilla,
171:Nothing would ever change; nothing new could ever be expected. It had to end, and it did. Now in the dark world where I dwell, ugly things, and surprising things, and sometimes little wondrous things, spill out in me constantly, and I can count on nothing. ~ Philip K Dick,
172:..yet it is with the old treasure as our initial capital or so much of it as we can recover that we shall most advantageously proceed to accumulate the largest gains in our new commerce with the ever-changeless and ever-changing Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
173:As one age falls, another rises, different to mortal sight, but to immortals only the same; for we see the same characters repeated again & again, in animals, vegetables, minerals, and in men; nothing new occurs. Substance can never suffer change nor decay. ~ William Blake,
174:Last night, we (you and I and some others) were together for quite a long time in the permanent dwelling-place of Sri Aurobindo which exists in the subtle physical (what Sri Aurobindo called the true physical). 1 February 1963 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
175:The new attitude will be consolidated only when the individual can gradually begin to disregard his ego. As long as our thinking is exclusively self-centered the world will remain fragmented. At best the “Thou” will become visible to the “I”; but never the whole. ~ Jean Gebser,
176:Once you were a child. Once you knew what inquiry was for. There was a time when you asked questions because you wanted answers, and were glad when you had found them. Become a child again, even now... You have gone wrong. Thirst was made for water; inquiry for truth. ~ C S Lewis,
177:We want not only a free India, but a great India, India taking worthily her place among the Nations and giving to the life of humanity what she alone can give. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest To the Editor of the New India,
178:She knew herself the Beloved of the Supreme:These Gods and Goddesses were he and she:The Mother was she of Beauty and Delight,The Word in Brahma’s vast creating clasp,The World-Puissance on almighty Shiva’s lap, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
179:The red lotus is the flower of Sri Aurobindo, but specially for his centenary we shall choose the blue lotus, which is the colour of his physical aura, to symbolise the centenary of the manifestation of the Supreme upon earth. 21 December 1971 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
180:New scientific ideas never spring from a communal body, however organized, but rather from the head of an individually inspired researcher who struggles with his problems in lonely thought and unites all his thought on one single point which is his whole world for the moment. ~ Max Planck,
181:If you could take the bliss and happiness that comes from meditation, and put it into a bottle, it would be the most popular drink in the world. Of course, this is not possible. But the good news is that it is free, it is good for your health, and it is always available. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
182:For me, reason is the natural organ of truth; but imagination is the organ of meaning. Imagination, producing new metaphors or revivifying old, is not the cause of truth, but its condition. ~ C S Lewis, "Bluspels and Flalansferes: A Semantic Nightmare" Rehabilitations and Other Essays (1939),
183:A new, self-employed architect scientist is the one in all the world who may accelerate realization of a high-standard survival for all, as now completely practical within the scope of available technology. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, Ideas and Integrities: A Spontaneous Autobiographical Disclosure ,
184:In the texture of our bound humanityHe felt the stark resistance huge and dumbOf our inconscient and unseeing base,The stubborn mute rejection in life’s depths,The ignorant No in the origin of things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
185:Gravity may put the planets into motion, but without the divine Power, it could never put them into such a circulating motion as they have about the Sun; and therefore, for this as well as other reasons, I am compelled to ascribe the frame of this System to an intelligent Agent. ~ Isaac Newton,
186:I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me. ~ Isaac Newton,
187:The joy of life consists in the exercise of ones energies, continual growth, constant change, the enjoyment of every new experience. To stop means simply to die. The eternal mistake of mankind is to set up an attainable ideal. ~ Aleister Crowley, The Confessions of Aleister Crowley: An Autobiography ,
188:The Spirit’s white neutrality becameA playground of miracles, a rendezvousFor the secret powers of a mystic Timelessness:It made of Space a marvel house of God,It poured through Time its works of ageless might. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
189:A world that knows not its inhabiting SelfLabours to find its cause and need to be;A spirit ignorant of the world it made,Obscured by Matter, travestied by Life,Struggles to emerge, to be free, to know and reign; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
190:All that is born and destroyed is reborn in the sweep of the ages;Life like a decimal ever recurring repeats the old figure;Goal seems there none for the ball that is chased throughout Time by the Fate-teams;Evil once ended renews and no issue co ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry 5.1.01 - Ilion,
191:All seemed a vainly teeming vastUpheld by a deluded EnergyTo a spectator self-absorbed and mute,Careless of the unmeaning show he watched,Regarding the bizarre procession passLike one who waits for an expected end. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
192:The true method of discovery is like the flight of an airplane. It starts from the ground of particular observation; it makes a flight in the thin air of imaginative generalization; and it again lands for renewed observation rendered acute by rational interpretation. ~ Alfred North Whitehead, Process and Reality ,
193:Existence found its truth on Oneness’ breastAnd each became the self and space of all.The great world-rhythms were heart-beats of one Soul,To feel was a flame-discovery of God,All mind was a single harp of many strings, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
194:Intelligence is the capacity to receive, decode and transmit information efficiently. Stupidity is blockage of this process at any point. Bigotry, ideologies etc. block the ability to receive; robotic reality-tunnels block the ability to decode or integrate new signals; censorship blocks transmission. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
195:I have had to experience so much stupidity, so many vices, so much error, so much nausea, disillusionment and sorrow, just in order to become a child again and begin anew. I had to experience despair, I had to sink to the greatest mental depths, to thoughts of suicide, in order to experience grace. ~ Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha ,
196:600 million years ago, the monopolizing grip of the algae was broken and an enormous proliferation of new lifeforms emerged, an event called the Cambrian explosion. Life had arisen almost immediately after the origin of the Earth, which suggests that life may be an inevitable chemical process on an Earth-like planet. ~ Carl Sagan,
197:andai on Oct 28, 2017 | parent | favorite | on: Alan Kay on Lisp\nI wonder if LISP and LSD encourage similar ways of thinking.\n\ntempodox on Oct 28, 2017 [-]\nBased on my own experiences with both, I'd say: Yes. Although I'm sure you couldn't prove it mathematically (yet). ~ website, https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15573502 ,
198:The existing scientific concepts cover always only a very limited part of reality, and the other part that has not yet been understood is infinite. Whenever we proceed from the known into the unknown we may hope to understand, but we may have to learn at the same time a new meaning of the word 'understanding'. ~ Werner Heisenberg,
199:A shadowy unity with a vanished pastTreasured in an old-world frame was lurking there,Secret, unnoted by the illumined mind,And in subconscious whispers and in dreamStill murmured at the mind’s and spirit’s choice.Its treacherous elements sp ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
200:Talk 12.A man asked the Maharshi to say something to him. When asked what he wanted to know, he said that he knew nothing and wanted to hear something from the Maharshi.M.: You know that you know nothing. Find out that knowledge. That is liberation (mukti). ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi Sri Ramanasramam,
201:And he knew, also, what the old man was thinking as his tears flowed, and he, Rieux, thought it too: that a loveless world is a dead world, and always there comes an hour when one is weary of prisons, of one's work, and of devotion to duty, and all one craves for is a loved face, the warmth and wonder of a loving heart. ~ Albert Camus, The Plague ,
202:There is much wisdom in the words of Nietzsche: "He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how." I can see in these words a motto which holds true for any psychotherapy. In the Nazi concentration camps, one could have witnessed that those who knew that there was a task waiting for them to fulfill were most apt to survive. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
203:The final result is a system where programmers, artists, animators, and designers are productively programming directly in an S-expression Scheme-like language. Dan closed his talk by wowing the audience with the trailer for the game, which has now been released and is garnering extremely positive reviews. ~ https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9810342,
204:I would take it for granted that everyone who becomes a Christian would undertake [our New Testament regimental orders]. It is enjoined upon us by Our Lord; and since they are his commands, I believe in following them. It is always just possible that Jesus Christ meant what he said when He told us to seek the secret place and to close the door. ~ C S Lewis,
205:Integral theory is a school of philosophy that seeks to integrate all of human wisdom into a new, emergent worldview that is able to accommodate the gifts of all previous worldviews, including those which have been historically at odds: science and religion, Eastern and Western schools of thought, and pre-modern, modern and post-modern worldviews. ~ Daily Evolver,
206:It can be said that all discipline whatsoever, if it is followed strictly, sincerely, deliberately, is of considerable help, for it makes the earthly life reach its goal more rapidly and prepares it to receive the new life. To discipline oneself is to hasten the arrival of this new life and the contact with the supramental reality. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
207:Servitors can be created to perform a wide range of tasks, from the specific to the general, and may be considered as expert systems which are able to modify themselves to take into account new factors that are likely to arise whilst they are performing their tasks. They can be programmed to work within specific circumstances, or to be operating continually. ~ Phil Hine,
208:One by one he would conjure up the world's major electronic papers; he knew the codes of the more important ones by heart, and had no need to consult the list on the back of his pad. Switching to the display unit's short-term memory, he would hold the front page while he quickly searched the headlines and noted the items that interested him. ~ Arthur C Clarke, The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
210:Sometimes, looking at the many books I have at home, I feel I shall die before I come to the end of them, yet I cannot resist the temptation of buying new books. Whenever I walk into a bookstore and find a book on one of my hobbies - for example, Old English or Old Norse poetry - I say to myself, "What a pity I can't buy that book, for I already have a copy at home. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
211:The book exists for us perchance which will explain our miracles and and reveal new ones. The at present unutterable things we may find somewhere uttered. These same questions that disturb and puzzle and confound us have in their turn occurred to all the wise men; not one has been omitted; and each has answered them, according to his ability, by his words and his life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
212:The whole year will be fortunate for you, not if you are drunk on the new-moon [New Year' Day], but if both on the new-moon [Jan 1st], and each day, you do those things approved by God. For days come wicked and good, not from their own nature; for a day differs nothing from another day, but from our zeal and sluggishness. ~ Saint John Chrysostom, A Homily for the New Year / Karl Gebhardt Spilled Spirits,
213:The average voter is a moron. He believes what he reads in newspapers, feeds his imagination and lulls his repressions on the cinema, and hopes to break away from his slavery by football pools, cross-word prizes, or spotting the winner of the 3:30. He is ignorant as no illiterate peasant is ignorant: he has no power of independent thought. He is the prey of panic. But he has the vote. ~ Aleister Crowley,
214:Not every story has a happy ending, ... but the discoveries of science, the teachings of the heart, and the revelations of the soul all assure us that no human being is ever beyond redemption. The possibility of renewal exists so long as life exists. How to support that possibility in others and in ourselves is the ultimate question. ~ Gabor Mate, In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters with Addiction ,
215:In the ancient system of initiation, the truth seeker must pass through a second birth, and those who attained this exalted state were known thereafter as 'the twice born.' Only one who has been born again can understand the mysteries of heaven. This new birth, however, is not attained by merely joining a sect. It must be personally earned through a complete regeneration of character and conduct. ~ Manly P Hall,
216:The striking discoveries of contemporary science are continually telling us new things about how material creation came to be and how it continues to evolve. Although we do not have all the answers, we are clearly going in a direction that transcends the cosmology in which the great world religions came into existence. Our vision, understanding, and our attitudes about God inevitably must change. ~ Thomas Keating,
217:Errors have become stepping-stones, the blind gropings conquests. Thy glory transforms defeats into victories of eternity, and all the shadows have fled before Thy radiant light. It is Thou who wert the motive and the goal; Thou art the worker and the work. The personal existence is a canticle, perpetually renewed, which the universe offers up to Thy inconceivable Splendour. ~ The Mother, Prayers And Meditations ,
218:Her self was nothing, God alone was all, Yet God she knew not but only knew he was. A sacred darkness brooded now within, The world was a deep darkness great and nude. This void held more than all the teeming worlds, This blank felt more than all that Time has borne, This dark knew dumbly, immensely the Unknown. But all was formless, voiceless, infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
219:You should not imagine that your reason can evolve to the extent of understanding God. Rather, if God is to shine divinely within you, your natural light cannot assist this process but must become a pure nothingness, going out of itself. Only then can God enter with his light, bringing back with him all that you have renounced and a thousand times more, including a new form which contains all things in itself. ~ Meister Eckhart,
220:When I start writing a new imaginary future, I have no idea what it is. The characters arrive first. They help me figure out where they are living and I get to fill in the gaps with that and where we are. So when I get to the end of the process of composition, if I feel that I have really done my job, I have no idea what I've got - and I then spend essentially the rest of my life figuring out what it might mean. ~ William Gibson,
221:Your character grows as the game continues. Each monster defeated, each adventure completed, and each treasure recovered not only adds to your continuing story, but also earns your character new abilities. This increase in power is reflected by your character's level; as you continue to play, your character gains more experience, rising in level and mastering new and more powerful abilities. ~ Dungeons and Dragons Players Handbook.,
222:Is this not the first time that the Supramental has come down upon earth? It is certainly the first time that the Supramental has come down as a general force of transformation for the whole earth. It is a new starting-point in the terrestrial creation. But it may be that once before the supramental force has manifested partially and momentarily in an individual as a promise and an example. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
223:[Contemporary man] is blind to the fact that, with all his rationality and efficiency, he is possessed by 'powers' that are beyond his control. His gods and demons have not disappeared at all; they have merely got new names. They keep him on the run with restlessness, vague apprehensions, psychological complications, an insatiable need for pills, alcohol, tobacco, food - and, above all, a large array of neuroses. ~ Carl Jung,
224:Q: Is it intentional in AD&D that the Haste spell (causing magical aging) should require a system shock roll, risking death? Gary: the system shock check was included so DMs has something to use to prevent abuse of the spell, such as when a PC drank a potion of speed and then had a haste spell cast on him. My players knew better that to try to get cutsy like that when I was the DM. ~ Gary Gygax, Dragonsfoot Q&A with Gary Gygax,
225:upon a supramental collective ::: But if a collectivity or group could be formed of those who had reached the supramental perfection, there indeed some divine creation could take shape; a new earth could descend that would be a new heaven, a world of supamental light could be created here amidst the receding darkness of this terrestrial ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,
226:But when you're in front of an audience and you make them laugh at a new idea, you're guiding the whole being for the moment. No one is ever more him/herself than when they really laugh. Their defenses are down. It's very Zen-like, that moment. They are completely open, completely themselves when that message hits the brain and the laugh begins. That's when new ideas can be implanted. If a new idea slips in at that moment, it has a chance to grow. ~ George Carlin,
227:Creatures perishin the darkenedblind of quest,knowing intimations.Guessing and dreamingthey pursue the real,faces turned toward the skywhispering secrets to the heavens.While the lord remains among themin every turn of timeabiding in their every conditionevery instant.Never without him, they,not for the blink of an eye --if only they knew!nor he for a moment without them." ~ Mansur al-Hallaj,
228:Humanity has been sleeping-and still sleeps-lulled within the narrowly confining joys of its little closed loves. In the depths of the human multitude there slumbers an immense spiritual power which will manifest itself only when we have learnt how to break through the dividing walls of our egoism and raise ourselves up to an entirely new perspective, so that habitually and in a practical fashion we fix our gaze on the universal realities. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
229:As it gradually dawns on people, one by one, that the transformation of God is not just an interesting idea but is a living reality, it may begin to function as a new myth. Whoever recognizes this myth as his own personal reality will put his life in the service of this process. Such an individual offers himself as a vessel for the [continuing] incarnation of deity and thereby promotes the on-going transformation of God by giving Him human manifestation. ~ Edward Edinger,
230:The new D&D is too rule intensive. It's relegated the Dungeon Master to being an entertainer rather than master of the game. It's done away with the archetypes, focused on nothing but combat and character power, lost the group cooperative aspect, bastardized the class-based system, and resembles a comic-book superheroes game more than a fantasy RPG where a player can play any alignment desired, not just lawful good. ~ Gary Gygax, GameSpy interview Pt. 2 (16 August 2004),
231:Bjorn: I'm sorry to hear of Helga's death. We knew each other a long time. Since I was a boy. Floki: I too am dead, Bjorn. A part of me died with my daughter, Angrboda, a second part with Ragnar, and the last part of what was Floki died with my sweet, sad Helga. What I am now is nothing. And all this nothing I give to the gods to do with as they please. And I shall be an empty ship with no rudder set upon their endless sea. And where they take me, I shall go. ~ Vikings,
232:If you ask me what you are to do in order to be perfect, I say, first--Do not lie in bed beyond the due time of rising; give your first thoughts to God; make a good visit to the Blessed Sacrament; say the Angelus devoutly; eat and drink to God's glory; say the Rosary well; be recollected; keep out bad thoughts; make your evening meditation well; examine yourself daily; go to bed in good time, and you are already perfect. ~ Blessed Cardinal Newman, Meditations and Devotions ,
233:Creatures perish in the darkenedblind of quest, knowing intimations. Guessing and dreaming they pursue the real, faces turned toward the sky whispering secrets to the heavens. While the lord remains among them in every turn of timeabiding in their every condition every instant. Never without him, they, not for the blink of an eye -- if only they knew! nor he for a moment without them. ~ Mansur al Hallaj,
234:He tore desire up from its bleeding roots And offered to the gods the vacant place. Thus could he bear the touch immaculate. A last and mightiest transformation came. His soul was all in front like a great sea Flooding the mind and body with its waves; His being, spread to embrace the universe, United the within and the without To make of life a cosmic harmony, An empire of the immanent Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
235:The three of them knew it. She was Kafka's mistress. Kafka had dreamt her. The three of them knew it. He was Kafka's friend. Kafka had dreamt him. The three of them knew it. The woman said to the friend, Tonight I want you to have me. The three of them knew it. The man replied: If we sin, Kafka will stop dreaming us. One of them knew it. There was no longer anyone on earth. Kafka said to himself Now the two of them have gone, I'm left alone. I'll stop dreaming myself. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
236:We do not fight against any creed, any religion. We do not fight against any form of government. We do not fight against any caste, any social class. We do not fight against any nation or civilisation. We are fighting division, unconsciousness, ignorance, inertia and falsehood. We are endeavouring to establish upon earth union, knowledge, consciousness, truth; and we fight whatever opposes the advent of this new creation of Light, Peace, Truth and Love. ~ The Mother, Agenda Vol 6 Satprem,
237:For the Ignorance is still in reality a knowledge seeking for itself behind the original mask of Inconscience; the Ignorance does not create a new thing and absolute falsehood but only misrepresents the Truth. The Ignorance is the Mind separated in knowledge from its source of knowledge and giving a false rigidity and a mistaken appearance of opposition and conflictMind and Supermind to the harmonious play of the supreme Truth in its universal manifestation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
238:To proceed, select any minor habit at random and delete it from your behaviour: at the same time adopt any new habit at random. The choices should not involve anything of spiritual, egocentric, or emotional significance, nor should you select anything with any possibility of failure. By persisting with such simple beginnings you become capable of virtually anything. All works of metamorphasis should be committed to the magical diary. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null Liber MMM,
239:the three-dimensional world of ordinary experience-the universe filled with galaxies, stars, planets, houses, boulders, and people-is a hologram, an image of reality coded on a distant two-dimensional surface. This new law of physics, known as the Holographic Principle, asserts that everything inside a region of space can be described by bits of information restricted to the boundary. ~ Leonard Susskind, The Black Hole War: My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics ,
240:And Thou, O Lord, who art all this made one and much more, O sovereign Master, extreme limit of our thought, who standest for us at the threshold of the Unknown, make rise from that Unthinkable some new splendour, some possibility of a loftier and more integral realisation, that Thy work may be accomplished and the universe take one step farther towards the sublime Identity, the supreme Manifestation. And now my pen falls mute and I adore Thee in silence.* ~ The Mother, Prayers And Meditations 270,
241:Thus, I came to the conclusion that the designer of a new system must not only be the implementor and the first large-scale user; the designer should also write the first user manual. The separation of any of these four components would have hurt TeX significantly. If I had not participated fully in all these activities, literally hundreds of improvements would never have been made, because I would never have thought of them or perceived why they were important. ~  Donald Knuth, The Errors Of TeX ,
242:The Mother says, "Look at me, I am here, come back in my new body, divine, transformed and glorious. And I am the same Mother, still human. Do not worry. Do not be concerned about your own self, your progress and realisation, nor about others. I am here, look at me, gaze into me, enter into me wholly, merge into my being, lose yourself into my love, with your love. You will see all problems solved, everything done. Forget all else, forget the world. Remember me alone, be one with me, with my love." ~ Priti Dasgupta, Moments Eternal ,
243:I would say that my most interesting experience with the earlier techniques was the realization that when you make cut-ups you do not get simply random juxtapositions of words, that they do mean something, and often that these meanings refer to some future event. I've made many cut-ups and then later recognized that the cut-up referred to something that I read later in a newspaper or a book, or something that happened... Perhaps events are pre-written and pre-recorded and when you cut word lines the future leaks out. ~ William S Burroughs,
244:I AM NOW CLOSE TO 88 and I am confident that the only thing important about me is that I am an average healthy human. I am also a living case history of a thoroughly documented, half-century, search-and-research project designed to discover what, if anything, an unknown, moneyless individual, with a dependent wife and newborn child, might be able to do effectively on behalf of all humanity that could not be accomplished by great nations, great religions or private enterprise, no matter how rich or powerfully armed. ~ Buckminster Fuller, 1983 ,
245:The Quest of the Holy Grail, the Search for the Stone of the Philosophers-by whatever name we choose to call the Great Work-is therefore endless. Success only opens up new avenues of brilliant possibility. Yea, verily, and Amen! the task is tireless and its joys without bounds; for the whole Universe, and all that in it is, what is it but the infinite playground of the Crowned and Conquering Child, of the insatiable, the innocent, the ever-rejoicing Heir of Space and Eternity, whose name is MAN? ~ Aleister Crowley, Little Essays Toward Truth ,
246:nabla9 on July 15, 2018 [-] \n\nCommon Lisp as hackish vs protective is nice way to describe it.\n\nAnother way to describe it exploratory vs implementatory.\n\nIn some ways Common Lisp is like Mathematica for programming. It's a language for a computer architect to develop and explore high level concept. It's not a accident that early Javascript prototype was done in common lisp or that metaobject protocols, aspect-oriented programming, etc. were first implemented and experimented with Common Lisp. ~ site, https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17533341 ,
247:Each time he took a walk, he felt as though he were leaving himself behind, and by giving himself up to the movement of the streets, by reducing himself to a seeing eye, he was able to escape the obligation to think, and this, more than anything else, brought him a measure of peace, a salutary emptiness within... By wandering aimlessly, all places became equal and it no longer mattered where he was. On his best walks he was able to feel that he was nowhere. And this, finally was all he ever asked of things: to be nowhere. ~ Paul Auster, The New York Trilogy ,
248:Another approach is actually to build the job around the person, to create a virtual job portfolio to match what he/she does best. Say you find a highly competent human being. Rather than asking the person to conform, you find appropriate things for that person to do. This permits a great deal of mobility within the organization, breaks up the traditional hierarchy, unlinks the rigid chain-of-command, and uncovers new functional slots. Such an idea is disturbing to First Tier entities, quite natural in Second Tier structures. ~ Don Edward Beck, Spiral Dynamics ,
249:When we look at existence in itself, Time and Space disappear. If there is any extension, it is not a spatial but a psychological extension; if there is any duration, it is not a temporal but a psychological duration; and it is then easy to see that this extension and duration are only symbols which represent to the mind something not translatable into intellectual terms, an eternity which seems to us the same all-containing ever-new moment, an infinity which seems to us the same all-containing all-pervading point without magnitude. ~ Sri Aurobindo, TLD 1.09-06 ,
250:... Poor sorrowful Earth, remember that I am present in thee and lose not hope; each effort, each grief, each joy and each pang, each call of thy heart, each aspiration of thy soul, each renewel of thy seasons, all, all without exception, what seems ugly and what seems to thee beautiful, all infallibly lead thee towards me, who am endless Peace, shadowless Light, perfect Harmony, Certitude, Rest and Supreme Blessedness. Hearken, O Earth, to the sublime voice that arises, Hearken and take new courage! ~ The Mother, Prayers And Meditations February 5th 1913,
251:I was told when I grew up I could be anything I wanted: a fireman, a policeman, a doctor - even President, it seemed. And for the first time in the history of mankind, something new, called an astronaut. But like so many kids brought up on a steady diet of Westerns, I always wanted to be the avenging cowboy hero - that lone voice in the wilderness, fighting corruption and evil wherever I found it, and standing for freedom, truth and justice. And in my heart of hearts I still track the remnants of that dream wherever I go, in my endless ride into the setting sun. ~ Bill Hicks,
252:17. Freedom to Live:The hero is the champion of things becoming, not of things become, because he is. "Before Abraham was, I AM." He does not mistake apparent changelessness in time for the permanence of Being, nor is he fearful of the next moment (or of the 'other thing'), as destroying the permanent with its change. 'Nothing retains its own form; but Nature, the greater renewer, ever makes up forms from forms. Be sure that nothing perishes in the whole universe; it does but vary and renew its form.' Thus the next moment is permitted to come to pass. ~ Joseph Campbell,
253:Man came silently into the world. As a matter of fact he trod so softly that, when we first catch sight of him as revealed by those indestructible stone instruments, we find him sprawling all over the old world from the Cape of Good Hope to Peking. Without doubt he already speaks and lives in groups ; he already makes fire. After all, this is surely what we ought to expect. As we know, each time a new living form rises up before us out of the depths of history, it is always complete and already legion. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon Of Man The Birth of Thought,
254:Today's news consists of aggregates of fragments. Anyone who has taken part in any event that has subsequently appeared in the news is aware of the gross disparity between the actual and the reported events. We also learn frequently of prefabricated and prevaricated evens of a complex nature purportedly undertaken for the purposes wither of suppressing or rigging the news, which in turn perverts humanity's tactical information resources. All history becomes suspect. Probably our most polluted resource is the tactical information to which humanity spontaneously reflexes. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
255:One alchemist announced that one grain of this powder would transmute into purest gold one hundred thousand times its own weight. But his readers did not realize that this powder is wisdom, one grain of which can transmute all the ignorance in the world. Nor did the reader properly understand that the PHILOSOPHER'S STONE IS KNOWLEDGE, the great miracle worker, or that the elixir of life was Truth, which makes all things new. It was sad that misunderstandings should exist, but wherever great truths are given to small minds, misunderstandings are inevitable. ~ Manly P Hall, (A Monthly Letter April 1937) ,
256:What art Thou then, my God? what, but the Lord God? For who is Lord but the Lord? or who is God save our God? Most highest, most good, most potent, most omnipotent; most merciful, yet most just; most hidden, yet most present; most beautiful, yet most strong; stable, yet incomprehensible; unchangeable, yet all-changing; never new, never old; all-renewing, and bringing age upon the proud, and they know it not; ever working, ever at rest; still gathering, yet nothing lacking; supporting, filling, and overspreading; creating, nourishing, and maturing; seeking, yet having all things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
257:Essentially, Yoga is a generic name for the processes and the result of processes by which we transcend or shred off our present modes of being and rise to a new, a higher, a wider mode of consciousness which is not that of the ordinary animal and intellectual man. Yoga is the exchange of an egoistic for a universal or cosmic consciousness lifted towards or informed by the supra-cosmic, transcendent Unnameable who is the source and support of all things. Yoga is the passage of the human thinking animal towards the God-consciousness from which he has descended. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga ,
258:You could give Aristotle a tutorial. And you could thrill him to the core of his being. Aristotle was an encyclopedic polymath, an all time intellect. Yet not only can you know more than him about the world. You also can have a deeper understanding of how everything works. Such is the privilege of living after Newton, Darwin, Einstein, Planck, Watson, Crick and their colleagues. I'm not saying you're more intelligent than Aristotle, or wiser. For all I know, Aristotle's the cleverest person who ever lived. That's not the point. The point is only that science is cumulative, and we live later. ~ Richard Dawkins,
259:Her mortal members fell back from her soul.A moment of a secret body's sleep,Her trance knew not of sun or earth or world;Thought, time and death were absent from her grasp:She knew not self, forgotten was Savitri.All was the violent ocean of a willWhere lived captive to an immense caress,Possessed in a supreme identity,Her aim, joy, origin, Satyavan alone.Her sovereign prisoned in her being's core,He beat there like a rhythmic heart, - herselfBut different still, one loved, enveloped, clasped,A treasure saved from the collapse of space. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri ,
260:The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age. ~ H P Lovecraft, The Call Of Cthulhu ,
261:This evening the Divine Presence, concrete and material, was there present amongst you. I had a form of living gold, bigger than the universe, and I was facing a huge and massive golden door which separated the world from the Divine. As I looked at the door, I knew and willed, in a single movement of consciousness, that "the time has come," and lifting with both hands a mighty golden hammer I struck one blow, one single blow on the door and the door was shattered to pieces.Then the supramental Light and Force and Consciousness rushed down upon earth in an uninterrupted flow. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
262:What we call destiny is only in fact the result of the present condition of the being and the nature and energies it has accumulated in the past acting on each other and determining the present attempts and their future results. But as soon as one enters the path of spiritual life, this old predetermined destiny begins to recede. There comes in a new factor, the Divine Grace, the help of a higher Divine Force other than the force of Karma, which can lift the sadhak beyond the present possibilities of his nature. One's spiritual destiny is then the divine election which ensures the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I ,
263:His most obvious obstacle, one of which he has not in the least got rid of up to now, is a strongly Rajasic vital ego for which his mind finds justifications and covers. There is nothing more congenial to the vital ego than to put on the cloak of Yoga and imagine itself free, divinised, spiritualised, siddha, and all the rest of it, or advancing towards that end, when it is really doing nothing of the kind, but [is] just its old self in new forms. If one does not look at oneself with a constant sincerity and an eye of severe self-criticism, it is impossible to get out of this circle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings ,
264:It may yet be said that a logical succession of the states of progress would be very much in this order. First, there is a large turning in which all the natural mental activities proper to the individual nature are taken up or referred to a higher standpoint and dedicated by the soul in us, the psychic being, the priest of the sacrifice, to the divine service; next, there is an attempt at an ascent of the being and a bringing down of the Light and Power proper to some new height of consciousness gained by its upward effort into the whole action of the knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent Of The Sacrifice - I,
265:Sri Aurobindo came upon earth to announce the manifestation of the supramental world and not merely did he announce this manifestation but embodied also in part the supramental force and showed by example what one must do to prepare oneself for manifesting it. The best thing we can do is to study all that he has told us and endeavour to follow his example and prepare ourselves for the new manifestation. This gives life its real sense and will help us to overcome all obstacles. Let us live for the new creation and we shall grow stronger and stronger by remaining young and progressive. 30 January 1972 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
266:Magic never in its wildest dreams thought that it would be trumped by mythic. And the mythic gods and goddesses never imagined that reason could and would destroy them. And here we sit, in our rational worldview, all smug and confident that nothing higher will sweep out of the heavens and completely explode our solid perceptions, undoing our very foundations. And yet surely, the transrational lies in wait. It is just around the corner, this new dawn. Every stage transcends and includes, and thus inescapably, unavoidably it seems, the sun will rise on a world tomorrow that in many ways transcends reason. ~ Ken Wilber, A Brief History of Everything ,
267:Freud's convictions about the importance of infantile developments also colored his view of creative activity. Freud was impressed by the parallels between the child at play, the adult daydreamer, and the creative artist. As he once phrased it:Might we not say that every child at play behaves like a creative writer, in that he creates a world of his own, or, rather, rearranges the things of his world in a new way which pleases him?....The creative writer does the same as the child at play. He creates a world of phantasy which he takes very seriously-that is, which he invests with large amounts of emotion-while separating it sharply from reality. ~ Howard Gardner,
268:And as I ran along the shore, crushing sleeping flowers with heedless feet and maddened ever by the fear of unknown things and the lure of the dead faces, I saw that the garden had no end under that moon; for where by day the walls were, there stretched now only new vistas of trees and paths, flowers and shrubs, stone idols and pagodas, and bendings of the yellow-litten stream past grassy banks and under grotesque bridges of marble. And the lips of the dead lotos-faces whispered sadly, and bade me follow, nor did I cease my steps till the stream became a river, and joined amidst marshes of swaying reeds and beaches of gleaming sand the shore of a vast and nameless sea. Upon ~ H P Lovecraft,
269:I knew all along what He meant for me, for I heard it again and again, always I listened to the voice within; I am guiding, therefore fear not. Turn to your own work for which I have brought you to jail and when you come out, remember never to fear, never to hesitate. Remember that it is I who am doing this, not you nor any other. Therefore whatever clouds may come, whatever dangers and sufferings, whatever difficulties, whatever impossibilities, there is nothing impossible, nothing difficult. I am in the nation and its uprising and I am Vasudeva, I am Narayana, and what I will, shall be, not what others will. What I choose to bring about, no human power can stay. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin ,
270:Einstein was remarkable for his powers of concentration; he could work uninterruptedly for hours and even days on the same problem. Some of the topics that interested him remained on his mind for decades. For relaxation he turned to music and to sailing, but often his work would continue during these moments as well; he usually had a notebook in his pocket so that he could jot down any idea that came to him. Once, after the theory of relativity had been put forth, he confessed to his colleague Wolfgang Pauli, "For the rest of my life I want to reflect on what light is." It is perhaps not entirely an accident that a focus on light is also the first visual act of the newborn child. ~ Howard Gardner,
271:The media’s the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that’s power. Because they control the minds of the masses. The press is so powerful in its image-making role, it can make the criminal look like he’s a the victim and make the victim look like he’s the criminal. This is the press, an irresponsible press. It will make the criminal look like he’s the victim and make the victim look like he’s the criminal. If you aren’t careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed and loving the people who are doing the oppressing. ... This is sort of a propaganda tactic that I would call psychological warfare. ~ Malcolm X,
272:The Kingdom is most powerful where we least expect to find it. God does not take away our problems and trials but rather joins us in them. Such is the profound meaning of the incarnation: God becoming a human being. The Kingdom will manifest itself, not because of our efforts to keep trying, even when all effort seems hopeless, but because God loves us so much that God won't be able to stand seeing us struggle and always failing. God will do the impossible. He will give us a new attitude toward suffering. Such is the heart of the Christian ascesis, or self-discipline, and the mystery of transformation. It is the meaning of the Gospel as Therese perceived it. ~ Thomas Keating, St. Therese of Lisieux: A Transformation in Christ ,
273:During this degenerate age in the outer world, there are many natural disasters due to the upsetting of the four elements. Also, demonic forces come with their many weapons to incite the fighting of wars. All of those forces have caused the world to come to ruin and led all to tremble - so terrified that their hair stands up on end. Still, the demonic forces find it necessary to come up with new types of weapons. If we were called on to confront them, there is no way we Dharma practitioners could defeat them. That is why we make supplication prayers to the three jewels, do the aspiration prayers, the offering prayers and the prayers of invocation. We are responsible for those activities. This is what I urge you to do. ~ Chatral Rinpoche,
274:Imagine yourself as a living house. God comes in to rebuild that house. At first, perhaps, you can understand what He is doing. He is getting the drains right and stopping the leaks in the roof and so on; you knew that those jobs needed doing and so you are not surprised. But presently He starts knocking the house about in a way that hurts abominably and does not seem to make any sense. What on earth is He up to? The explanation is that He is building quite a different house from the one you thought of - throwing out a new wing here, putting on an extra floor there, running up towers, making courtyards. You thought you were being made into a decent little cottage: but He is building a palace. He intends to come and live in it Himself. ~ C S Lewis,
275:Although our fallen minds forget to climb, Although our human stuff resists or breaks, She keeps her will that hopes to divinise clay; Failure cannot repress, defeat o'erthrow; Time cannot weary her nor the Void subdue, The ages have not made her passion less; No victory she admits of Death or Fate. Always she drives the soul to new attempt; Always her magical infinitude Forces to aspire the inert brute elements; As one who has all infinity to waste, She scatters the seed of the Eternal's strength On a half-animate and crumbling mould, Plants heaven's delight in the heart's passionate mire, Pours godhead's seekings into a bare beast frame, Hides immortality in a mask of death. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri ,
276:If you want to identify me, ask me not where I live, or what I like to eat, or how I comb my hair, but ask me what I am living for, in detail, ask me what I think is keeping me from living fully for the thing I want to live for . . . To be grateful is to recognize the Love of God in everything He has given us - and He has given us everything. Every breath we draw is a gift of His love, every moment of existence is a grace, for it brings with it immense graces from Him.Gratitude therefore takes nothing for granted, is never unresponsive, is constantly awakening to new wonder and to praise of the goodness of God. For the grateful person knows that God is good, not by hearsay but by experience. And that is what makes all the difference. ~ Thomas Merton,
277:Jordan Peterson's Book List1. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley2. 1984 - George Orwell3. Road To Wigan Pier - George Orwell4. Crime And Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky5. Demons - Fyodor Dostoevsky6. Beyond Good And Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche7. Ordinary Men - Christopher Browning8. The Painted Bird - Jerzy Kosinski9. The Rape of Nanking - Iris Chang10. Gulag Archipelago (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, & Vol. 3) - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn11. Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl12. Modern Man in Search of A Soul - Carl Jung13. Maps Of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief - Jordan B. Peterson14. A History of Religious Ideas (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3) - Mircea Eliade15. Affective Neuroscience - Jaak Panksepp ~ Jordan Peterson,
278:The books I liked became a Bible from which I drew advice and support; I copied out long passages from them; I memorized new canticles and new litanies, psalms, proverbs, and prophecies, and I sanctified every incident in my life by the recital of these sacred texts. My emotions, my tears, and my hopes were no less sincere on account of that; the words and the cadences, the lines and the verses were not aids to make believe: but they rescued from silent oblivion all those intimate adventures of the spirit that I couldn't speak to anyone about; they created a kind of communion between myself and those twin souls which existed somewhere out of reach; instead of living out my small private existence, I was participating in a great spiritual epic. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
279:Apotheosised, transfigured by wisdom's touch, Her days became a luminous sacrifice; An immortal moth in happy and endless fire, She burned in his sweet intolerable blaze. A captive Life wedded her conqueror. In his wide sky she built her world anew; She gave to mind's calm pace the motor's speed, To thinking a need to live what the soul saw, To living an impetus to know and see. His splendour grasped her, her puissance to him clung; She crowned the Idea a king in purple robes, Put her magic serpent sceptre in Thought's grip, Made forms his inward vision's rhythmic shapes And her acts the living body of his will. A flaming thunder, a creator flash, His victor Light rode on her deathless Force; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.03 - The Glory and the Fall of Life,
280:Hearing has consequences. When I truly hear a person and the meanings that are important to him at that moment, hearing not simply his words, but him, and when I let him know that I have heard his own private personal meanings, many things happen. There is first of all a grateful look. He feels released. He wants to tell me more about his world. He surges forth in a new sense of freedom. He becomes more open to the process of change. I have often noticed that the more deeply I hear the meanings of the person, the more there is that happens. Almost always, when a person realize he has been deeply heard, his eyes moisten. I think in some real sense he is weeping for joy. It is as though he were saying, "Thank God, somebody heard me. Someone knows what it's like to be me. ~ Carl Rogers,
281:Certainly we have had our Napoleons and our Hitlers, but we have also had Jesus and Buddha. We have had tyrants, but also great humanitarians. We have had corrupt politicians, but also noble rulers. Even in the most selfish of times, the world has brought forth idealists, philanthropists, great artists, musicians, and poets. If we have inherited ages of feuding and intolerance, we have also inherited the magnificence of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. For each tyrant who has profaned the pages of history, there have been thousands, even millions, of gentle people who have lived unhonored and unknown, keeping principles and living convictions under the most difficult situations. To see this good, and to know it, is to find a new courage and a new faith. ~ Manly P Hall, PRS Journal Summer 1961 p.7,
282:We cannot perceive Chaos directly, for it simultaneously contains the opposite to anything we might think it is. We can, however, occasionally glimpse and make use of partially formed matter which has only probablistic and indeterministic existence. This stuff we can call the aethers. 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ If it makes us feel any better we can call this Chaos, the Tao, or God, and imagine it to be benevolent and human-hearted. There are two schools of thought in magic. One considers the formative agent of the universe to be random and chaotic, and the other considers that it is a force of spiritual consciousness. As they have only themselves on which to base their speculations, they are basically saying that their own natures are either random and chaotic or spiritually conscious. ~ Peter J Carroll, Miscellaneous Excerpts Part 2 ,
283:It is only when after long and persistent concentration or by other means the veil of the mind is rent or swept aside, only when a flood of light breaks over the awakened mentality, jyotirmaya brahman, and conception gives place to a knowledge-vision in which the Self is as present, real, concrete as a physical object to the physical eye, that we possess in knowledge; for we have seen. After that revelation, whatever fadings of the light, whatever periods of darkness may afflict the soul, it can never irretrievably lose what it has once held. The experience is inevitably renewed and must become more frequent till it is constant; when and how soon depends on the devotion and persistence with which we insist on the path and besiege by our will or our love the hidden Deity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga game test3,
284:You have spoken much today of my self-sacrifice and devotion to my country. I have heard that kind of speech ever since I came out of jail, but I hear it with embarrassment, with something of pain. For I know my weakness, I am a prey to my own faults and backslidings. I was not blind to them before and when they all rose up against me in seclusion, I felt them utterly. I knew them that I the man was a man of weakness, a faulty and imperfect instrument, strong only when a higher strength entered into me. Then I found myself among these young men and in many of them I discovered a mighty courage, a power of self-effacement in comparison with which I was simply nothing. I saw one or two who were not only superior to me in force and character, - very many were that, - but in the promise of that intellectual ability on which I prided myself. ~ ,
285:the central notion of the Veda ::: The sense of the first two verses is clear enough when we know Saraswati to be that power of the Truth which we call inspiration. Inspiration from the Truth purifies by getting rid of all falsehood, for all sin according to the Indian idea is merely falsehood, wrongly inspired emotion, wrongly directed will and action. The central idea of life and ourselves from which we start is a falsehood and all else is falsified by it. Truth comes to us as a light, a voice, compelling a change of thought, imposing a new discernment of ourselves and all around us. Truth of thought creates truth of vision and truth of vision forms in us truth of being, and out of truth of being (satyam) flows naturally truth of emotion, will and action. This is indeed the central notion of the Veda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret Of The Veda ,
286:But, apart from all these necessities, there is the one fundamental necessity of the nature and object of embodied life itself, which is to seek infinite experience on a finite basis; and since the form, the basis by its very organisation limits the possibility of experience, this can only be done by dissolving it and seeking new forms. For the soul, having once limited itself by concentrating on the moment and the field, is driven to seek its infinity again by the principle of succession, by adding moment to moment and thus storing up a Time-experience which it calls its past; in that Time it moves through successive fields, successive experiences or lives, successive accumulations of knowledge, capacity, enjoyment, and all this it holds in subconscious or superconscious memory as its fund of past acquisition in Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
287:2. Refusal of the Call:Often in actual life, and not infrequently in the myths and popular tales, we encounter the dull case of the call unanswered; for it is always possible to turn the ear to other interests. Refusal of the summons converts the adventure into its negative. Walled in boredom, hard work, or 'culture,' the subject loses the power of significant affirmative action and becomes a victim to be saved. His flowering world becomes a wasteland of dry stones and his life feels meaningless-even though, like King Minos, he may through titanic effort succeed in building an empire or renown. Whatever house he builds, it will be a house of death: a labyrinth of cyclopean walls to hide from him his minotaur. All he can do is create new problems for himself and await the gradual approach of his disintegration. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces ,
288:The student is told to set apart moments in his daily life in which to withdraw into himself, quietly and alone. He is not to occupy himself at such moments with the affairs of his own ego. This would result in the contrary of what is intended. He should rather let his experiences and the messages from the outer world re-echo within his own completely silent self. At such silent moments every flower, every animal, every action will unveil to him secrets undreamt of. And thus he will prepare himself to receive quite new impressions of the outer world through quite different eyes. The desire to enjoy impression after impression merely blunts the faculty of cognition; the latter, however, is nurtured and cultivated if the enjoyment once experienced is allowed to reveal its message. Thus the student must accustom himself not merely to let the enjoyment. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
289:Often he went to the workshop, to encourage the assistant Erich, who continued working at the altar and eagerly awaited his master's return. Sometimes the Abbot unlocked Goldmund's room, where the Mary figure stood, lifted the cloth from the figure carefully and stayed with her awhile. He knew nothing of the figure's origin; Goldmund had never told him Lydia's story. But he felt everything; he saw that the girl's form had long lived in Goldmund's heart. Perhaps he had seduced her, perhaps betrayed and left heR But, truer than the most faithful husband, he had taken her along in his soul, preserving her image until finally, perhaps after many years in which he had never seen her again, he had fashioned this beautiful, touching statue of a girl and captured in her face, her bear­ ing, her hands all the tenderness, admiration, and longing of their love. ~ Hermann Hesse, Narcissus and Goldmund ,
290:I looked at the jail that secluded me from men and it was no longer by its high walls that I was imprisoned; no, it was Vasudeva who surrounded me. I walked under the branches of the tree in front of my cell but it was not the tree, I knew it was Vasudeva, it was Sri Krishna whom I saw standing there and holding over me his shade. I looked at the bars of my cell, the very grating that did duty for a door and again I saw Vasudeva. It was Narayana who was guarding and standing sentry over me. Or I lay on the coarse blankets that were given me for a couch and felt the arms of Sri Krishna around me, the arms of my Friend and Lover. This was the first use of the deeper vision He gave me. I looked at the prisoners in the jail, the thieves, the murderers, the swindlers, and as I looked at them I saw Vasudeva, it was Narayana whom I found in these darkened souls and misused bodies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin ,
291:Above all, trust in the slow work of God. We are quite naturally impatient in everything to reach the end without delay. We should like to skip the intermediate stages. We are impatient of being on the way to something unknown, something new. And yet it is the law of all progress that it is made by passing through some stages of instability- and that it may take a very long time. And so I think it is with you; your ideas mature gradually-let them grow, let them shape themselves, without undue haste. Don't try to force them on, as though you could be today what time (that is to say, grace and circumstances acting on your own good will) will make of you tomorrow. Only God could say what this new spirit gradually forming within you will be. Give Our Lord the benefit of believing that his hand is leading you, and accept the anxiety of feeling yourself in suspense and incomplete. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
292:And the first of the adepts covered His shame with a cloth, walking backwards, and was white. And the second of the adepts covered his shame with a cloth, walking sideways, and was yellow. And the third of the adepts made a mock of His nakedness, walking forwards, and was black. And these are the three great schools of the Magi, who are also the three Magi that journeyed unto Bethlehem; and because thou hast not wisdom, thou shalt not know which school prevaileth, or if the three schools be not one.* 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ This doctrine of the Three Schools is of extreme interest. Roughly, it may be said that the White is the Pure Mystic, whose attitude to God is one of reverence. The Yellow School conceals the Mysteries indeed, but examines them as it goes along. The Black School is that of pure Scepticism. We are now ready to study the philosophical bases of these three Schools. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears? 43?,
293:I am the sort of man who has changed completely under the effect of suffering, even though this transformation may simply be the intensification of elements already there. Thus amplified, they gave an entirely new perspective on life. I believe frenetically and fanatically, in the virtues of suffering and of anxiety, and I believe in them especially since, though I've suffered greatly and despaired much, I nevertheless acquired through them a sense of my own destiny, a sort of weird enthusiasm for my mission. On the heights of the most terrifying despair, I experience the joy of having a destiny, of living a life of successive deaths and transfigurations, of turning every moment into a cross-road. And I am proud that my life begins with death, unlike the majority of people, who end with death. I feel as if my death were in the past, and the future looks to me like a sort of personal illumination. ~ Emil Cioran,
294:But if in passing from one domain to another we renounce what has already been given us from eagerness for our new attainment, if in reaching the mental life we cast away or belittle the physical life which is our basis, or if we reject the mental and physical in our attraction to the spiritual, we do not fulfil God integrally, nor satisfy the conditions of His selfmanifestation. We do not become perfect, but only shift the field of our imperfection or atmost attain a limited altitude. However high we may climb, even though it be to the Non-Being itself, we climb ill if we forget our base. Not to abandon the lower to itself, but to transfigure it in the light of the higher to which we have attained, is true divinity of nature. Brahman is integral and unifies many states of consciousness at a time; we also, manifesting the nature of Brahman, should become integral and all-embracing. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
295:Forgetful of her spirit and her fate.The impassive skies were neutral, empty, still.Then something in the inscrutable darkness stirred;A nameless movement, an unthought IdeaInsistent, dissatisfied, without an aim,Something that wished but knew not how to be,Teased the Inconscient to wake Ignorance.A throe that came and left a quivering trace,Gave room for an old tired want unfilled,At peace in its subconscient moonless caveTo raise its head and look for absent light,Straining closed eyes of vanished memory,Like one who searches for a bygone selfAnd only meets the corpse of his desire.It was as though even in this Nought's profound,Even in this ultimate dissolution's core,There lurked an unremembering entity,Survivor of a slain and buried pastCondemned to resume the effort and the pang,Reviving in another frustrate world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
296:To The Works Of: Aristotle, Cassius J. Keyser, Eric T. Bell, G. W. Leibnitz, Eugen Bleuler, J. Locke, Niels Bohr, Jacques Loeb, George Boole, H. A. Lorentz, Max Born, Ernst Mach, Louis De Brogue, J. C. Maxwell, Georg Cantor, Adolf Meyer, Ernst Cassirer, Hermann Minkowsja, Charles M. Child, Isaac Newton, C. Darwin, Ivan Pavlov, Rene Descartes, Giuseppe Peano, P. A. M. Dirac, Max Planck, A. S. Eddington, Plato, Albert Einstein, H. Poincare, Euclid, M. Faraday, Sigmund Freud, Josiah Royce, Karl F. Gauss, G. Y. Rainich, G. B. Riemann, Bertrand Russell, Thomas Graham, Ernest Rutherford, Arthur Haas, E. Schrodinger, Wm. R. Hamilton, C. S. Sherrington, Henry Head, Socrates, Werner Heisenberg, Arnold Sommerfeld, C. Judson Herrick, Oswald Veblen, E. V. Huntington, Wm. Alanson White, Smith Ely Jeluffe, Alfred N. Whitehead, Ludwig Wittgenstein Which Have Creatly Influenced My Enquiry This System Is Dedicated ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity ,
297:55: A similar rejection is a necessary self-restraint and a spiritual discipline for the immature seeker, since such powers may be a great, even a deadly peril; for their supernormality may easily feed in him an abnormal exaggeration of the ego. Power in itself may be dreaded as a temptation by the aspirant to perfection, because power can abase as well as elevate; nothing is more liable to misuse. But when new capacities come as an inevitable result of the growth into a greater consciousness and a greater life and that growth is part of the very aim of the spiritual being within us, this bar does not operate; for a growth of the being into supernature and its life in supernature cannot take place or cannot be complete without bringing with it a greater power of consciousness and a greater power of life and the spontaneous development of an instrumentation of knowledge and force normal to that supernature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.08,
298:Solitude, the safeguard of mediocrity, is to genius the stern friend, the cold, obscure shelter where moult the wings which will bear it farther than suns and stars. He who should inspire and lead his race must be defended from travelling with the souls of other men, from living, breathing, reading, and writing in the daily, time-worn yoke of their opinions. "In the morning, - solitude;" said Pythagoras; that Nature may speak to the imagination, as she does never in company, and that her favorite may make acquaintance with those divine strengths which disclose themselves to serious and abstracted thought. 'Tis very certain that Plato, Plotinus, Archimedes, Hermes, Newton, Milton, Wordsworth, did not live in a crowd, but descended into it from time to time as benefactors: and the wise instructor will press this point of securing to the young soul in the disposition of time and the arrangements of living, periods and habits of solitude. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
299:DISCIPLE: It is said that the psychic is a spark of the Divine.SRI AUROBINDO: Yes.DISCIPLE: Then it seems that the function of the psychic being is the same as that of Vedic Agni, who is the leader of the journey?SRI AUROBINDO: Yes. Agni is the God of the Psychic and, among the other things it does, it leads the upward journey.DISCIPLE: How does the psychic carry the personalities formed in this life into another life?SRI AUROBINDO: After death, it gathers its elements and carries them onward to another birth. But it is not the same personality that is born. People easily misunderstand these things, specially when they are put in terms of the mind. The past personality is taken only as the basis but a new personality is put forward. If it was the same personality, then it would act exactly in the same manner and there would be no meaning in that. ~ Sri Aurobindo, EVENING TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO RECORDED BY A B PURANI (page no 665-666),
300:Part 3 - Return12. Refusal of the Return:When the hero-quest has been accomplished, through penetration to the source, or through the grace of some male or female, human or animal, personification, the adventurer still must return with his life-transmuting trophy. The full round, the norm of the monomyth, requires that the hero shall now begin the labor of bringing the runes of wisdom, the Golden Fleece, or his sleeping princess, back into the kingdom of humanity, where the boon may redound to the renewing of the community, the nation, the planet or the ten thousand worlds. But the responsibility has been frequently refused. Even Gautama Buddha, after his triumph, doubted whether the message of realization could be communicated, and saints are reported to have died while in the supernal ecstasy. Numerous indeed are the heroes fabled to have taken up residence forever in the blessed isle of the unaging Goddess of Immortal Being. ~ Joseph Campbell,
301:You must ask yourself, if for 10 years if you didnt avoid doing what you knew you needed to do, by your own definitions right, within the value structure that you've created to the degree that youve done that, what would you be like? Well you know there are remarkable people who come into the world from time to time and there are people who do find out over decades long periods what they could be like if they were who they were if they said... if they spoke their being forward, and theyd get stronger and stronger. you do not know the limits to that, we do not know the limits to that and so you could say well in part perhaps the reason that you're suffering unbearably can be left at your feet because you are not everything you could be and you know it. and of course thats a terrible thing to admit and its a terrible thing to consider but theres real promise in it. perhaps theres another way you could look at the world and another way you could act in the world. .. Imagine many people did that. ~ Jordan Peterson,
302:Therefore, we can attain the overmental consciousness in many different ways: through religious passion, through poetic, intellectual, artistic, or heroic zeal, or through anything that helps man to exceed himself. - Sri Aurobindo assigned a special place to art, which he considered one of the major means of spiritual progress. Unfortunately, artists and creators too often have a considerable ego standing in the way, which is their main difficulty. The religious man, who has worked to dissolve his ego, finds it easier, but he rarely attains universality through his own individual efforts, leaping instead beyond the individual without bothering to develop all the intermediate rungs of the personal consciousness, and when he reaches the top he no longer has a ladder to come down, or he does not want to come down, or there is no individual self left to express what he sees, or else his old individual self tries its best to express his new consciousness, provided he feels the need to express anything at all. ~ Satprem,
303:At every stage of technique since Daedalus or Hero of Alexandria, the ability of the artificer to produce a working simulacrum of a living organism has always intrigued people. This desire to produce and to study automata has always been expressed in terms of the living technique of the age. In the days of magic, we have the bizarre and sinister concept of Golem, that figure of clay into which the Rabbi of Prague breathed life with the blasphemy of the Ineffable Name of God. In the time of Newton, the automaton becomes the clockwork music box, with the little effigies pirouetting stiffly on top. In the nineteenth century, the automaton is a glorified heat engine, burning some combustible fuel instead of the glycogen of the human muscles. Finally, the present automaton opens doors by means of photocells, or points guns to the place at which a radar beam picks up an airplane, or computes the solution of a differential equation. ~ Norbert Wiener, Cybernetics or control and communication in the animal and the machine 1961,
304:[E]very man hath liberty to write, but few ability. Heretofore learning was graced by judicious scholars, but now noble sciences are vilified by base and illiterate scribblers, that either write for vain-glory, need, to get money, or as Parasites to flatter and collogue with some great men, they put out trifles, rubbish and trash. Among so many thousand Authors you shall scarce find one by reading of whom you shall be any whit better, but rather much worse; by which he is rather infected than any way perfected... What a catalogue of new books this year, all his age (I say) have our Frankfurt Marts, our domestic Marts, brought out. Twice a year we stretch out wits out and set them to sale; after great toil we attain nothing...What a glut of books! Who can read them? As already, we shall have a vast Chaos and confusion of Books, we are oppressed with them, our eyes ache with reading, our fingers with turning. For my part I am one of the number-one of the many-I do not deny it... ~ Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy ,
305:In ancient times the disciple had to undergo severe tests to prove his ability for initiation. Here we do not follow that method. Apparently there is no test and no trial. But if you see the truth, you will find that here it is much more difficult. There the disciple knew that he was undergoing a period of trial and after he had passed through some outward tests, he was taken in. But here you have to face life and you are watched at every moment. It is not only your outer actions that count. Each and every thought and inner movement is seen, every reaction is noticed. It is not what you do in the solitude of the forest, but what you do in the thick of the battle of life that is important. Are you ready to submit yourself for such tests? Are you ready to change yourself completely? You will have to throw off your ideas, ideals, values, interests and opinions. Everything will have to be learnt anew. If you are ready for all this, then take a plunge; otherwise don't try to step in. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
306:Ah, yeah. We're gonna go to Mars. And then of course we're gonna colonize deep space. With our microwave hot dogs and plastic vomit, fake dog shit and cinnamon dental floss, lemon-scented toilet paper and sneakers with lights in the heels. And all these other impressive things we've done down here. But let me ask you this: what are we gonna tell the intergalactic council of ministers the first time one of our teenage mothers throws their newborn baby into a dumpster? How are we gonna explain that to the space people? How are we gonna let them know that our ambassador was only late for the meeting because his breakfast was cold and he had to spend half an hour punching his wife around the kitchen? And what are they gonna think when they find out, its just a local custom, that over 80 million women in the Third world have had their clitorises forcibly removed in order to reduce their sexual pleasure so they won't cheat on their husbands? Can't you just sense how eager the rest of the universe is for us to show up? ~ George Carlin,
307:But in whatever way it comes, there must be a decision of the mind and the will and, as its result, a complete and effective self-consecration. The acceptance of a new spiritual idea-force and upward orientation in the being, an illumination, a turning or conversion seized on by the will and the heart's aspiration, -this is the momentous act which contains as in a seed all the results that the Yoga has to give. The mere idea or intellectual seeking of something higher beyond, however strongly grasped by the mind's interest, is ineffective unless it is seized on by the heart as the one thing desirable and by the will as the one thing to be done. For truth of the Spirit has not to be merely thought but to be lived, and to live it demands a unified single-mindedness of the being; so great a change as is contemplated by the Yoga is not to be effected by a divided will or by a small portion of the energy or by a hesitating mind. He who seeks the Divine must consecrate himself to God and to God only. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.02 - Self-Consecration,
308:The fourth condition is study. One must cultivate the mind, know what others have thought, open the mental being to this impact of the higher vibrations of knowledge. A mental knowledge is not tantamount to realization, it is true, but still one must know mentally where one is going, what has happened to others, how they have achieved, what are the hindrances and the helping points. This education of oneself by study, study of spiritual writings, suddhydya as it is called, a disciplined reading and incorporation of the knowledge contained in scriptures and authentic texts - that is a very important part. Even when you don't understand a text, still if you persist at it, the force that is in that book creates certain new grooves in your brain and the second or the third time when you read it, it begins to make some meaning. This is the meaning of studying, of exposing your mind to the constant vibrations of higher levels of knowledge. Incidentally, the mind gets developed, a mental climate is created, a climate of spiritual culture. ~ M P Pandit, The Advent 1981 2020-08-30,
309:It is necessary to observe and know the wrong movements in you; for they are the source of your trouble and have to be persistently rejected if you are to be free.But do not be always thinking of your defects and wrong movements. Concentrate more upon what you are to be, on the ideal, with the faith that, since it is the goal before you, it must and will come.To be always observing faults and wrong movements brings depression and discourages the faith. Turn your eyes more to the coming Light and less to any immediate darkness. Faith, cheerfulness, confidence in the ultimate victory are the things that help, - they make the progress easier and swifter. Make more of the good experiences that come to you; one experience of the kind is more important than the lapses and failures. When it ceases, do not repine or allow yourself to be discouraged, but be quiet within and aspire for its renewal in a stronger form leading to still deeper and fuller experience. Aspire always, but with more quietude, opening yourself to the Divine simply and wholly. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV ,
310:ALL YOGA is in its nature a new birth; it is a birth out of the ordinary, the mentalised material life of man into a higher spiritual consciousness and a greater and diviner being. No Yoga can be successfully undertaken and followed unless there is a strong awakening to the necessity of that larger spiritual existence. The soul that is called to this deep and vast inward change, may arrive in different ways to the initial departure. It may come to it by its own natural development which has been leading it unconsciously towards the awakening; it may reach it through the influence of a religion or the attraction of a philosophy; it may approach it by a slow illumination or leap to it by a sudden touch or shock; it may be pushed or led to it by the pressure of outward circumstances or by an inward necessity, by a single word that breaks the seals of the mind or by long reflection, by the distant example of one who has trod the path or by contact and daily influence. According to the nature and the circumstances the call will come. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.02 - Self-Consecration,
311:The path of seeking truth within and without is not an easy one. It goes literally against everything we've been told and taught by society and governments. The indoctrination of lies, the conditioning and programming is deep and far reaching. It has been going on for millennia. It takes tremendous effort to wake up from the hypnotic slumber, where most people dream to be awake. At this time of transition, as more and more knowledge is coming to the surface, there is the potential to create a new earth. However, this is also the age of deception for there are forces at work that do not want this to happen. They do their best to vector us away from truth and the most effective way to swallow a lie is to sandwich it between some truth with some emotional hooks. As mentioned many times before, lies are mixed with truth, hence discernment is essential. We need to engage our higher emotional center connecting us to divine intuition and also activate our higher intellect, engaging in sincere, open minded critical thinking, fusing the heart and the mind, mysticism and science. ~ Bernhard Guenther,
312:Abrahadabra is a word that first publicly appeared in The Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema . Its author, Aleister Crowley, described it as the Word of the Aeon, which signifieth The Great Work accomplished. This is in reference to his belief that the writing of Liber Legis (another name for The Book of the Law) heralded a new Aeon for mankind that was ruled by the godRa-Hoor-Khuit (a form of Horus). Abrahadabra is, therefore, the magical formula of this new age. It is not to be confused with the Word of the Law of the Aeon, which is Thelema, meaning Will. ... Abrahadabra is also referred to as the Word of Double Power. More specifically, it represents the uniting of the Microcosm with the Macrocosm represented by the pentagram and the hexagram, the rose and the cross, the circle and the square, the 5 and the 6 (etc.), as also called the attainment of the Knowledge and Conversation of ones Holy Guardian Angel. In Commentaries (1996), Crowley says that the word is a symbol of the establishment of the pillar or phallus of the Macrocosm...in the void of the Microcosm. ~ Wikipedia,
313:"Oi, Pampaw," Diogo said as the door to the public hall slid open. "You hear that Eros started talking?"Miller lifted himself to one elbow."Sí," Diogo said. "Whatever that shit is, it started broadcasting. There's even words and shit. I've got a feed. You want a listen?"No, Miller thought. No, I have seen those corridors. What's happened to those people almost happened to me. I don't want anything to do with that abomination."Sure," he said.Diogo scooped up his own hand terminal and keyed in something. Miller's terminal chimed that it had received the new feed route. "Chica perdída in ops been mixing a bunch of it to bhangra," Diogo said, making a shifting dance move with his hips. "Hard-core, eh?"Diogo and the other OPA irregulars had breached a high-value research station, faced down one of the most powerful and evil corporations in a history of power and evil. And now they were making music from the screams of the dying. Of the dead. They were dancing to it in the low-rent clubs. What it must be like, Miller thought, to be young and soulless. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
314:the supreme third period of greater divine equality ::: If we can pass through these two stages of the inner change without being arrested or fixed in either, we are admitted to a greater divine equality which is capable of a spiritual ardour and tranquil passion of delight, a rapturous, all-understanding and all-possessing equality of the perfected soul, an intense and even wideness and fullness of its being embracing all things. This is the supreme period and the passage to it is through the joy of a total self-giving to the Divine and to the universal Mother. For strength is then crowned by a happy mastery, peace deepens into bliss, the possession of the divine calm is uplifted and made the ground for the possession of the divine movement. But if this greater perfection is to arrive, the soul's impartial high-seatedness looking down from above on the flux of forms and personalities and movements and forces must be modified and change into a new sense of strong and calm submission and a powerful and intense surrender. ... ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.09 - Equality and the Annihilation of Ego,
315:To enlarge the sense-faculties without the knowledge that would give the old sense-values their right interpretation from the new standpoint might lead to serious disorders and incapacities, might unfit for practical life and for the orderly and disciplined use of the reason. Equally, an enlargement of our mental consciousness out of the experience of the egoistic dualities into an unregulated unity with some form of total consciousness might easily bring about a confusion and incapacity for the active life of humanity in the established order of the world's relativities. This, no doubt, is the root of the injunction imposed in the Gita on the man who has the knowledge not to disturb the life-basis and thought-basis of the ignorant; for, impelled by his example but unable to comprehend the principle of his action, they would lose their own system of values without arriving at a higher foundation. Such a disorder and incapacity may be accepted personally and are accepted by many great souls as a temporary passage or as the price to be paid for the entry into a wider existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
316:January 1, 1914To Thee, supreme Dispenser of all boons,to Thee who givest life its justification, by making it pure, beautiful and good,to Thee, Master of our destinies and goal of all our aspirations, was consecrated the first minute of this new year.May it be completely glorified by this consecration; may those who hope for Thee, seek Thee in the right path; may those who seek Thee find Thee, and those who suffer, not knowing where the remedy lies, feel Thy life gradually piercing the hard crust of their obscure consciousness.I bow down in deep devotion and in boundless gratitude before Thy beneficent splendour; in name of the earth I give Thee thanks for manifesting Thyself; in its name I implore Thee to manifest Thyself ever more fully, in an uninterrupted growth of Light and Love.Be the sovereign Master of our thoughts, our feelings, our actions.Thou art our reality, the only Reality.Without Thee all is falsehood and illusion, all is dismol obscurity.In Thee are life and light and joy.In Thee is supreme Peace. ~ The Mother, Prayers and Meditation ,
317:Always that same LSD story, you've all seen it. 'Young man on acid, thought he could fly, jumped out of a building. What a tragedy.' What a dick! Fuck him, he's an idiot. If he thought he could fly, why didn't he take off on the ground first? Check it out. You don't see ducks lined up to catch elevators to fly south-they fly from the ground, ya moron, quit ruining it for everybody. He's a moron, he's dead-good, we lost a moron, fuckin' celebrate. Wow, I just felt the world get lighter. We lost a moron! I don't mean to sound cold, or cruel, or vicious, but I am, so that's the way it comes out. Professional help is being sought. How about a positive LSD story? Wouldn't that be news-worthy, just the once? To base your decision on information rather than scare tactics and superstition and lies? I think it would be news-worthy. 'Today, a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration. That we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively. There is no such thing as death, life is only a dream and we're the imagination of ourselves' . . . 'Here's Tom with the weather. ~ Bill Hicks,
318:It is always better to try to concentrate in a centre, the centre of aspiration, one might say, the place where the flame of aspiration burns, to gather in all the energies there, at the solar plexus centre and, if possible, to obtain an attentive silence as though one wanted to listen to something extremely subtle, something that demands a complete attention, a complete concentration and a total silence. And then not to move at all. Not to think, not to stir, and make that movement of opening so as to receive all that can be received, but taking good care not to try to know what is happening while it is happening, for it one wants to understand or even to observe actively, it keeps up a sort of cerebral activity which is unfavourable to the fullness of the receptivity - to be silent, as totally silent as possible, in an attentive concentration, and then be still. If one succeeds in this, then, when everything is over, when one comes out of meditation, some time later - usually not immediately - from within the being something new emerges in the consciousness: a new understanding, a new appreciation of things, a new attitude in life - in short, a new way of being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, [where to concentrate?] ,
319:Central to shamanism is the perception of an otherworld or series of otherworlds. This type of astral or aetheric dimension containing various powers entities and forces allows real effects to be created in this world. The shaman's soul journeys through this dimension while in ecstatic or drug-induced state of trance. The journey may be undertaken for divinatory knowledge, to cure sickness, to deliver a blow to enemies, or to find game animals. Prospective shamans are usually selected from those with a nervous disposition. They may either be assigned to shamanic instruction or are driven to it by a power present in the shamanic culture. Initiation invokes a journey into the otherworld, a meeting with spirits and a death-rebirth experience. In the deathrebirth experience, the candidate has a vision of his body being dismembered, often by fantastic beings or animal spirits, and then reassembled from the wreckage. The new body invariably contains an extra part often described as an additional bone or an inclusion of magical quartz stones or sometimes an animal spirit. This experience graphically symbolizes the location of the aetheric force field within the body or the addition of various extra powers to it. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
320:To See a World...To see a World in a Grain of SandAnd a Heaven in a Wild Flower,Hold Infinity in the palm of your handAnd Eternity in an hour.A Robin Redbreast in a CagePuts all Heaven in a Rage.A dove house fill'd with doves and pigeonsShudders Hell thro' all its regions.A Dog starv'd at his Master's GatePredicts the ruin of the State.A Horse misus'd upon the RoadCalls to Heaven for Human blood.Each outcry of the hunted HareA fiber from the Brain does tear.He who shall train the Horse to WarShall never pass the Polar Bar.The Beggar's Dog and Widow's Cat,Feed them and thou wilt grow fat.The Gnat that sings his Summer songPoison gets from Slander's tongue.The poison of the Snake and NewtIs the sweat of Envy's Foot.A truth that's told with bad intentBeats all the Lies you can invent.It is right it should be so;Man was made for Joy and Woe;And when this we rightly knowThro' the World we safely go.Every Night and every MornSome to Misery are Born.Every Morn and every NightSome are Born to sweet delight.Some are Born to sweet delight,Some are Born to Endless Night. ~ William Blake, Auguries of Innocence ,
321:I have been accused of a habit of changing my opinions. I am not myself in any degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was already active in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions had not changed during the last half century? In science men change their opinions when new knowledge becomes available; but philosophy in the minds of many is assimilated rather to theology than to science. The kind of philosophy that I value and have endeavoured to pursue is scientific, in the sense that there is some definite knowledge to be obtained and that new discoveries can make the admission of former error inevitable to any candid mind. For what I have said, whether early or late, I do not claim the kind of truth which theologians claim for their creeds. I claim only, at best, that the opinion expressed was a sensible one to hold at the time when it was expressed. I should be much surprised if subsequent research did not show that it needed to be modified. I hope, therefore, that whoever uses this dictionary will not suppose the remarks which it quotes to be intended as pontifical pronouncements, but only as the best I could do at the time towards the promotion of clear and accurate thinking. Clarity, above all, has been my aim. ~ Bertrand Russell,
322:If we are religious-minded, perhaps we will see the gods who inhabit this world. Beings, forces, sounds, lights, and rhythms are just so many true forms of the same indefinable, but not unknowable, Essence we call God; we have spoken of God, and made temples, laws or poems to try to capture the one little pulsation filling us with sunshine, but it is free as the wind on foam-flecked shores. We may also enter the world of music, which in fact is not different from the others but a special extension of this same, great inexpressible Vibration. If once, only once, even for a few moments in a lifetime, we can hear that Music, that Joy singing above, we will know what Beethoven and Bach heard; we will know what God is because we will have heard God. We will probably not say anything grandiose; we will just know that That exists, whereupon all the suffering in the world will seem redeemed. At the extreme summit of the overmind, there only remain great waves of multi-hued light, says the Mother, the play of spiritual forces, which later translate - sometimes much later - into new ideas, social changes, or earthly events, after crossing one by one all the layers of consciousness and suffering a considerable distortion and loss of light... ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure Of Consciousness ,
323:Directly on awakening, preferably at dawn, the initiate goes to the place of invocation. Figuring to himself as he goes that being born anew each day brings with it the chance of greater rebirth, first he banishes the temple of his mind by ritual or by some magical trance. Then he unveils some token or symbol or sigil which represents to him the Holy Guardian Angel. This symbol he will likely have to change during the great work as the inspiration begins to move him. Next he invokes an image of the Angel into his minds eye. It may be considered as a luminous duplicate of ones own form standing in front of or behind one, or simply as a ball of brilliant light above ones head. Then he formulates his aspirations in what manner he will, humbling himself in prayer or exalting himself in loud proclamation as his need be. The best form of this invocation is spoken spontaneously from the heart, and if halting at first, will prove itself in time. He is aiming to establish a set of ideas and images which correspond to the nature of his genius, and at the same time receive inspiration from that source. As the magician begins to manifest more of his true will, the Augoeides will reveal images, names, and spiritual principles by which it can be drawn into greater manifestation. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
324:But before entering into the details of I. A. O. as a magical formula it should be remarked that it is essentially the formula of Yoga or meditation; in fact, of elementary mysticism in all its branches. In beginning a meditation practice, there is always a quiet pleasure, a gentle natural growth; one takes a lively interest in the work; it seems easy; one is quite pleased to have started. This stage represents Isis. Sooner or later it is succeeded by depression-the Dark Night of the Soul, an infinite weariness and detestation of the work. The simplest and easiest acts become almost impossible to perform. Such impotence fills the mind with apprehension and despair. The intensity of this loathing can hardly be understood by any person who has not experienced it. This is the period of Apophis. It is followed by the arising not of Isis, but of Osiris. The ancient condition is not restored, but a new and superior condition is created, a condition only rendered possible by the process of death. The Alchemists themselves taught this same truth. The first matter of the work was base and primitive, though 'natural.' After passing through various stages the 'black dragon' appeared; but from this arose the pure and perfect gold ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
325:the psychic transformation ::: The soul, the psychic being is in direct touch with the divine Truth, but it is hidden in man by the mind, the vital being and the physical nature. One may practise yoga and get illuminations in the mind and the reason; one may conquer power and luxuriate in all kinds of experiences in the vital; one may establish even surprising physical Siddhis; but if the true soul-power behind does not manifest, if the psychic nature does not come into the front, nothing genuine has been done. In this yoga the psychic being is that which opens the rest of the nature to the true supramental light and finally to the supreme Ananda. Mind can open by itself to its own higher reaches; it can still itself in some kind of static liberation or Nirvana; but the supramental cannot find a sufficient base in a spiritualised mind alone. If the inmost soul is awakened, if there is a new birth out of the mere mental, vital and physical into the psychic consciousness, then this yoga can be done; otherwise (by the sole power of the mind or any other part) it is impossible.... If there is a refusal of the psychic new birth, a refusal to become the child new born from the Mother, owing to attachment to intellectual knowledge or mental ideas or to some vital desire, then there will be a failure in the sadhana. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - III ,
326:And now, out among the stars, evolution was driving toward new goals. The first explorers of Earth had long since come to the limits of flesh and blood; as soon as their machines were better than their bodies, it was time to move. First their brains, and then their thoughts alone, they transferred into shining new homes of metal and of plastic.In these, they roamed among the stars. They no longer built spaceships. They were spaceships.But the age of the Machine-entities swiftly passed. In their ceaseless experimenting, they had learned to store knowledge in the structure of space itself, and to preserve their thoughts for eternity in frozen lattices of light. They could become creatures of radiation, free at last from the tyranny of matter.Into pure energy, therefore, they presently transformed themselves; and on a thousand worlds, the empty shells they had discarded twitched for a while in a mindless dance of death, then crumbled into rust.Now they were lords of the galaxy, and beyond the reach of time. They could rove at will among the stars, and sink like a subtle mist through the very interstices of space. But despite their godlike powers, they had not wholly forgotten their origin, in the warm slime of a vanished sea.And they still watched over the experiments their ancestors had started, so long ago. ~ Arthur C Clarke, Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet August 12,
328:Endure and you will triumph. Victory goes to the most enduring. And with the Grace and divine love nothing is impossible. My force and love are with you. At the end of the struggle there is Victory And so we find once more that the Ego-idea must be ruthlessly rooted out before Understanding can be attained The emptiness that you described in your letter yesterday was not a bad thing - it is this emptiness inward and outward that often in Yoga becomes the first step towards a new consciousness. Man's nature is like a cup of dirty water - the water has to be thrown out, the cup left clean and empty for the divine liquor to be poured into it. The difficulty is that the human physical consciousness feels it difficult to bear this emptiness - it is accustomed to be occupied by all sorts of little mental and vital movements which keep it interested and amused or even if in trouble and sorrow still active. The cessation of these things is hard to bear for it. It begins to feel dull and restless and eager for the old interests and movements. But by this restlessness it disturbs the quietude and brings back the things that had been thrown out. It is this that is creating the difficulty and the obstruction for the moment. If you can accept emptiness as a passage to the true consciousness and true movements, then it will be easier to get rid of the obstacle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - III ,
329:A book like this, a problem like this, is in no hurry; we both, I just as much as my book, are friends of lento. It is not for nothing that I have been a philologist, perhaps I am a philologist still, that is to say, A TEACHER OF SLOW READING:- in the end I also write slowly. Nowadays it is not only my habit, it is also to my taste - a malicious taste, perhaps? - no longer to write anything which does not reduce to despair every sort of man who is 'in a hurry'. For philology is that venerable art which demands of its votaries one thing above all: to go aside, to take time, to become still, to become slow - it is a goldsmith's art and connoisseurship of the WORD which has nothing but delicate, cautious work to do and achieves nothing if it does not achieve it lento. But precisely for this reason it is more necessary than ever today, by precisely this means does it entice and enchant us the most, in the midst of an age of 'work', that is to say, of hurry, of indecent and perspiring haste, which wants to 'get everything done' at once, including every old or new book:- this art does not so easily get anything done, it teaches to read WELL, that is to say, to read slowly, deeply, looking cautiously before and aft, with reservations, with doors left open, with delicate eyes and fingers...My patient friends, this book desires for itself only perfect readers and philologists: LEARN to read me well! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
330:38 - Strange! The Germans have disproved the existence of Christ; yet his crucifixion remains still a greater historic fact than the death of Caesar. - Sri Aurobindo.To what plane of consciousness did Christ belong?In the Essays on the Gita Sri Aurobindo mentions the names of three Avatars, and Christ is one of them. An Avatar is an emanation of the Supreme Lord who assumes a human body on earth.I heard Sri Aurobindo himself say that Christ was an emanation of the Lord's aspect of love.The death of Caesar marked a decisive change in the history of Rome and the countries dependent on her. It was therefore an important event in the history of Europe.But the death of Christ was the starting-point of a new stage in the evolution of human civilisation. This is why Sri Aurobindo tells us that the death of Christ was of greater historical significance, that is to say, it has had greater historical consequences than the death of Caesar. The story of Christ, as it has been told, is the concrete and dramatic enactment of the divine sacrifice: the Supreme Lord, who is All-Light, All-Knowledge, All-Power, All-Beauty, All-Love, All-Bliss, accepting to assume human ignorance and suffering in matter, in order to help men to emerge from the falsehood in which they live and because of which they die.16 June 1960 ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms volume-10,
331:5. Belly of the Whale:The idea that the passage of the magical threshold is a transit into a sphere of rebirth is symbolized in the worldwide womb image of the belly of the whale. The hero, instead of conquering or conciliating the power of the threshold, is swallowed into the unknown and would appear to have died. This popular motif gives emphasis to the lesson that the passage of the threshold is a form of self-annihilation. Instead of passing outward, beyond the confines of the visible world, the hero goes inward, to be born again. The disappearance corresponds to the passing of a worshipper into a temple-where he is to be quickened by the recollection of who and what he is, namely dust and ashes unless immortal. The temple interior, the belly of the whale, and the heavenly land beyond, above, and below the confines of the world, are one and the same. That is why the approaches and entrances to temples are flanked and defended by colossal gargoyles: dragons, lions, devil-slayers with drawn swords, resentful dwarfs, winged bulls. The devotee at the moment of entry into a temple undergoes a metamorphosis. Once inside he may be said to have died to time and returned to the World Womb, the World Navel, the Earthly Paradise. Allegorically, then, the passage into a temple and the hero-dive through the jaws of the whale are identical adventures, both denoting in picture language, the life-centering, life-renewing act. ~ Joseph Campbell,
332:When the Peace is established, this higher or Divine Force from above can descend and work in us. It descends usually first into the head and liberates the inner mind mind centres, then into the heart centre and liberates fully the psychic and emotional being, then into the navel and other vital centres and liberates the inner vital, then into the Muladhara and below and liberates the inner vital, then into the navel and other vital centres and liberates the inner physical being. It works at the same time for perfection as well as liberation; it takes up the whole nature part by part and deals with it, rejecting what has to be rejected, sublimating what has to be sublimated, creating what has to be created. It integrates, harmonises, establishes a new rhythm in the nature. It can bring down too a higher and yet higher force and range of the higher nature until, if that be the aim of the sadhana, it becomes possible to bring down the supramental force and existence. All this is prepared, assistance, farthered by the work of the psychic being in the heart centre; the more it is open, in front, active, the quicker, safer, easier the working of the Force can be. The more love and bhakti and surrender grow in the heart, the more rapid and perfect becomes the evolution of the sadhana. For the descent and transformation imply at the same time an increasing contact and union with the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother ,
333:the joy of progress ::: It is the will for progress and self-purification which lights the [psychic] fire. The will for progress. Those who have a strong will, when they turn it towards spiritual progress and purification, automatically light the fire within themselves. And each defect one wants to cure or each progress one wants to make - if all that is thrown into the fire, it burns with a new intensity. And this is not an image, it is a fact in the subtle physical. One can feel the warmth of the flame, one can see in the subtle physical the light of the flame. And when there is something in the nature which prevents one from advancing and one throws it into this fire, it begins to burn and the flame becomes more intense....How can one feel sweetness and joy when one is in difficulty?Exactly, when the difficulty is egoistic or personal, if one makes an offering of it and throws it into the fire of purification, one immediately feels the joy of progress. If one does it sincerely, at once there is a welling up of joy. That is obviously what ought to be done instead of despairing and lamenting. If one offers it up and aspires sincerely for transformation and purification, one immediately feels joy springing up in the depths of the heart. Even when the difficulty is a great sorrow, one may do this with much success. One realises that behind the sorrow, no matter how intense it may be, there is divine joy. ~ The Mother,
334:the first necessity; ::: The first necessity is to dissolve that central faith and vision in the mind which concentrate it on its development and satisfaction and interests in the old externalised order of things. It is imperative to exchange this surface orientation for the deeper faith and vision which see only the Divine and seek only after the Divine. The next need is to compel all our lower being to pay homage to this new faith and greater vision. All our nature must make an integral surrender; it must offer itself in every part and every movement to that which seems to the unregenerated sensemind so much less real than the material world and its objects. Our whole being - soul, mind, sense, heart, will, life, body - must consecrate all its energies so entirely and in such a way that it shall become a fit vehicle for the Divine. This is no easy task; for everything in the world follows the fixed habit which is to it a law and resists a radical change. And no change can be more radical than the revolution attempted in the integral Yoga. Everything in us has constantly to be called back to the central faith and will and vision. Every thought and impulse has to be reminded in the language of the Upanishad that That is the divine Brahman and not this which men here adore. Every vital fibre has to be persuaded to accept an entire renunciation of all that hitherto represented to it its own existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.02 - Self-Consecration,
335:The scientists, all of them, have their duties no doubt, but they do not fully use their education if they do not try to broaden their sense of responsibility toward all mankind instead of closing themselves up in a narrow specialization where they find their pleasure. Neither engineers nor other scientific men have any right to prefer their own personal peace to the happiness of mankind; their place and their duty are in the front line of struggling humanity, not in the unperturbed ranks of those who keep themselves aloof from life. If they are indifferent, or discouraged because they feel or think that they know that the situation is hopeless, it may be proved that undue pessimism is as dangerous a "religion" as any other blind creed. Indeed there is very little difference in kind between the medieval fanaticism of the "holy inquisition," and modern intolerance toward new ideas. All kinds of intellect must get together, for as long as we presuppose the situation to be hopeless, the situation will indeed be hopeless. The spirit of Human Engineering does not know the word "hopeless"; for engineers know that wrong methods are alone responsible for disastrous results, and that every situation can be successfully handled by the use of proper means. The task of engineering science is not only to know but to know how. Most of the scientists and engineers do not yet realize that their united judgment would be invincible; no system or class would care to disregard it. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
336:"So," she said. "I've been thinking of it as a computing problem. If the virus or nanomachine or protomolecule or whatever was designed, it has a purpose, right?" "Definitely," Holden said. "And it seems like it's trying to do something-something complex. It doesn't make sense to go to all that trouble just to kill people. Those changes it makes look intentional, just... not complete, to me." "I can see that," Holden said. Alex and Amos nodded along with him but stayed quiet. "So maybe the issue is that the protomolecule isn't smart enough yet. You can compress a lot of data down pretty small, but unless it's a quantum computer, processing takes space. The easiest way to get that processing in tiny machines is through distribution. Maybe the protomolecule isn't finishing its job because it just isn't smart enough to. Yet." "Not enough of them," Alex said. "Right," Naomi said, dropping the towel into a bin under the sink. "So you give them a lot of biomass to work with, and see what it is they are ultimately made to do." "According to that guy in the video, they were made to hijack life on Earth and wipe us out," Miller said. "And that," Holden said, "is why Eros is perfect. Lots of biomass in a vacuum-sealed test tube. And if it gets out of hand, there's already a war going on. A lot of ships and missiles can be used for nuking Eros into glass if the threat seems real. Nothing to make us forget our differences like a new player butting in." ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
337:The Quest A part, immutable, unseen, Being, before itself had been, Became. Like dew a triple queen Shone as the void uncovered: The silence of deep height was drawn A veil across the silver dawn On holy wings that hovered. The music of three thoughts became The beauty, that is one white flame, The justice that surpasses shame, The victory, the splendour, The sacred fountain that is whirled From depths beyond that older world A new world to engender. The kingdom is extended. Night Dwells, and I contemplate the sight That is not seeing, but the light That secretly is kindled, Though oft-time its most holy fire Lacks oil, whene'er my own Desire Before desire has dwindled. I see the thin web binding me With thirteen cords of unity Toward the calm centre of the sea. (O thou supernal mother!) The triple light my path divides To twain and fifty sudden sides Each perfect as each other. Now backwards, inwards still my mind Must track the intangible and blind, And seeking, shall securely find Hidden in secret places Fresh feasts for every soul that strives, New life for many mystic lives, And strange new forms and faces. My mind still searches, and attains By many days and many pains To That which Is and Was and reigns Shadowed in four and ten; And loses self in sacred lands, And cries and quickens, and understands Beyond the first Amen. ~ Aleister Crowley,
338:"AHA!"There are seven keys to the great gate,Being eight in one and one in eight.First, let the body of thee be still,Bound by the cerements of will,Corpse-rigid; thus thou mayst abortThe fidget-babes that tense the thought.Next, let the breath-rhythm be low,Easy, regular, and slow;So that thy being be in tuneWith the great sea's Pacific swoon.Third, let thy life be pure and calmSwayed softly as a windless palm.Fourth, let the will-to-live be boundTo the one love of the Profound.Fifth, let the thought, divinely freeFrom sense, observe its entity.Watch every thought that springs; enhanceHour after hour thy vigilance!Intense and keen, turned inward, missNo atom of analysis!Sixth, on one thought securely pinnedStill every whisper of the wind!So like a flame straight and unstirredBurn up thy being in one word!Next, still that ecstasy, prolongThy meditation steep and strong,Slaying even God, should He distractThy attention from the chosen act!Last, all these things in one o'erpowered,Time that the midnight blossom flowered!The oneness is. Yet even in this,My son, thou shalt not do amissIf thou restrain the expression, shootThy glance to rapture's darkling root,Discarding name, form, sight, and stressEven of this high consciousness;Pierce to the heart! I leave thee here:Thou art the Master. I revereThy radiance that rolls afar,O Brother of the Silver Star! ~ Aleister Crowley,
339:On a thousand bridges and paths they shall throng to the future, and ever more war and inequality shall divide them: thus does my great love make me speak.In their hostilities they shall become inventors of images and ghosts, and with their images and ghosts they shall yet fight the highest fight against one another. Good and evil, and rich and poor, and high and low, and all the names of values-arms shall they be and clattering signs that life must overcome itself again and again.Life wants to build itself up into the heights with pillars and steps; it wants to look into vast distances and out toward stirring beauties: therefore it requires height. And because it requires height, it requires steps and contradiction among the steps and the climbers.Life wants to climb and to overcome itself climbing.And behold, my friends: here where the tarantula has its hole, the ruins of an ancient temple rise; behold it with enlightened eyes Verily, the man who once piled his thoughts to the sky in these stones-he, like the wisest, knew the secret of all life. That struggle and inequality are present even in beauty, and also war for power and more power: that is what he teaches us here in the plainest parable. How divinely vault and arches break through each other in a wrestling match; how they strive against each other with light and shade, the godlike strivers-with such assurance and beauty let us be enemies too, my friends Let us strive against one another like gods. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra trans. Fred Kaufmann,
340:[the value of sublimation:] And since Yoga is in its essence a turning away from the ordinary material and animal life led by most men or from the more mental but still limited way of living followed by the few to a greater spiritual life, to the way divine, every part of our energies that is given to the lower existence in the spirit of that existence is a contradiction of our aim and our self-dedication. On the other hand, every energy or activity that we can convert from its allegiance to the lower and dedicate to the service of the higher is so much gained on our road, so much taken from the powers that oppose our progress. It is the difficulty of this wholesale conversion that is the source of all the stumblings in the path of Yoga. For our entire nature and its environment, all our personal and all our universal self, are full of habits and of influences that are opposed to our spiritual rebirth and work against the whole-heartedness of our endeavour. In a certain sense we are nothing but a complex mass of mental, nervous and physical habits held together by a few ruling ideas, desires and associations, - an amalgam of many small self-repeating forces with a few major vibrations. What we propose in our Yoga is nothing less than to break up the whole formation of our past and present which makes up the ordinary material and mental man and to create a new centre of vision and a new universe of activities in ourselves which shall constitute a divine humanity or a superhuman nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.02 - Self-Consecration,
341:The great men of the past have given us glimpses of what is possible in the way of personality, of intellectual understanding, of spiritual achievement, of artistic creation. But these are scarcely more than Pisgah glimpses. We need to explore and map the whole realm of human possibility, as the realm of physical geography has been explored and mapped. How to create new possibilities for ordinary living? What can be done to bring out the latent capacities of the ordinary man and woman for understanding and enjoyment; to teach people the techniques of achieving spiritual experience (after all, one can acquire the technique of dancing or tennis, so why not of mystical ecstasy or spiritual peace?)... The zestful but scientific exploration of possibilities and of the techniques for realizing them will make our hopes rational, and will set our ideals within the framework of reality, by showing how much of them are indeed realizable. Already, we can justifiably hold the belief that these lands of possibility exist, and that the present limitations and miserable frustrations of our existence could be in large measure surmounted. We are already justified in the conviction that human life as we know it in history is a wretched makeshift, rooted in ignorance; and that it could be transcended by a state of existence based on the illumination of knowledge and comprehension, just as our modern control of physical nature based on science transcends the tentative fumblings of our ancestors, that were rooted in superstition and professional secrecy. ~ Julian Huxley, Transhumanism ,
342:A creative illness succeeds a period of intense preoccupation with an idea and search for a certain truth. It is a polymorphous condition that can take the shape of depression, neurosis, psychosomatic ailments, or even psychosis. Whatever the symptoms, they are felt as painful, if not agonizing, by the subject, with alternating periods of alleviation and worsening. Throughout the illness the subject never loses the thread of his dominating preoccupation. It is often compatible with normal, professional activity and family life. But even if he keeps to his social activities, he is almost entirely absorbed with himself. He suffers from feelings of utter isolation, even when he has a mentor who guides him through the ordeal (like the shaman apprentice with his master). The termination is often rapid and marked by a phase of exhilaration. The subject emerges from his ordeal with a permanent transformation in his personality and the conviction that he has discovered a great truth or a new spiritual world.Many of the nineteenth and twentieth century figures recognized unquestionably as "great" - Nietzsche, Darwin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Freud, Jung, Piaget - were all additionally characterized by lengthy periods of profound psychological unrest and uncertainty. Their "psychopathology" - a term ridiculous in this context - was generated as a consequence of the revolutionary nature of their personal experience (their action, fantasy and thought). It is no great leap of comparative psychology to see their role in our society as analogous to that of the archaic religious leader and healer. ~ Henri Ellenberger,
343:... Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas, by his contrivance, the most ignorant person, at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, might write books in philosophy, poetry, politics, laws, mathematics, and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study." He then led me to the frame, about the sides, whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty feet square, placed in the middle of the room. The superfices was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a die, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered, on every square, with paper pasted on them; and on these papers were written all the words of their language, in their several moods, tenses, and declensions; but without any order. The professor then desired me "to observe; for he was going to set his engine at work." The pupils, at his command, took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of the words was entirely changed. He then commanded six-and-thirty of the lads, to read the several lines softly, as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys, who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn, the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down. ~ Jonathan Swift, Gullivers Travels ,
344:The whole history of mankind and especially the present condition of the world unite in showing that far from being merely hypothetical, the case supposed has always been actual and is actual to-day on a vaster scale than ever before. My contention is that while progress in some of the great matters of human concern has been long proceeding in accordance with the law of a rapidly increasing geometric progression, progress in the other matters of no less importance has advanced only at the rate of an arithmetical progression or at best at the rate of some geometric progression of relatively slow growth. To see it and to understand it we have to pay the small price of a little observation and a little meditation. Some technological invention is made, like that of a steam engine or a printing press, for example; or some discovery of scientific method, like that of analytical geometry or the infinitesimal calculus; or some discovery of natural law, like that of falling bodies or the Newtonian law of gravitation. What happens? What is the effect upon the progress of knowledge and invention? The effect is stimulation. Each invention leads to new inventions and each discovery to new discoveries; invention breeds invention, science begets science, the children of knowledge produce their kind in larger and larger families; the process goes on from decade to decade, from generation to generation, and the spectacle we behold is that of advancement in scientific knowledge and technological power according to the law and rate of a rapidly increasing geometric progression or logarithmic function. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
345:Philosophy, like all other studies, aims primarily at knowledge. The knowledge it aims at is the kind of knowledge which gives unity and system to the body of the sciences, and the kind which results from a critical examination of the grounds of our convictions, prejudices, and beliefs. But it cannot be maintained that philosophy has had any very great measure of success in its attempts to provide definite answers to its questions. If you ask a mathematician, a mineralogist, a historian, or any other man of learning, what definite body of truths has been ascertained by his science, his answer will last as long as you are willing to listen. But if you put the same question to a philosopher, he will, if he is candid, have to confess that his study has not achieved positive results such as have been achieved by other sciences. It is true that this is partly accounted for by the fact that, as soon as definite knowledge concerning any subject becomes possible, this subject ceases to be called philosophy, and becomes a separate science. The whole study of the heavens, which now belongs to astronomy, was once included in philosophy; Newton's great work was called 'the mathematical principles of natural philosophy'. Similarly, the study of the human mind, which was a part of philosophy, has now been separated from philosophy and has become the science of psychology. Thus, to a great extent, the uncertainty of philosophy is more apparent than real: those questions which are already capable of definite answers are placed in the sciences, while those only to which, at present, no definite answer can be given, remain to form the residue which is called philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
346:Why do some children take interest in things only when there is some excitement? They are tamasic. It is due to the large proportion of tamas in their nature. The more tamasic one is, the more does one need something violent and exciting circumstances. When the physical is tamasic, unless one eats spices and highly flavoured food, one does not feel nourished. And yet these are poisons. They act exactly like poison on the nerves. They do not nourish. But it is because people are tamasic, because their body's consciousness is not sufficiently developed. Well, mentally it is the same thing, vitally the same thing. If they are tamasic, they always need new excitements, dramas, murders, suicides, etc. to feel anything at all, otherwise.... And there is nothing, nothing that makes one more wicked and cruel than tamas. For it is this need of excitement which shakes you up a little, makes you come out of yourself. And one must also learn, there, to distinguish between those who are exclusively tamasic and those who are mixed, and those who are struggling within themselves with their different parts. One can, one must know in what proportion their nature is constituted, so as to be able to insist at need on one thing or another. Some people constantly need a whipping from life in order to move, otherwise they would spend their time sleeping. Others, on the contrary, need soothing things, silence, a retreat in the country-side - all things that do a lot of good but which must disappear as soon as one needs to make an effort for progress or to realise something or struggle against a defect, conquer an obstacle.... It is complicated, don't you think so? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 ,
347:The whole crux and difficulty of human life lies here. Man is this mental being, this mental consciousness working as mental force, aware in a way of the universal force and life of which he is part but, because he has not knowledge of its universality or even of the totality of his own being, unable to deal either with life in general or with his own life in a really effective and victorious movement of mastery. He seeks to know Matter in order to be master of the material environment, to know Life in order to be master of the vital existence, to know Mind in order to be master of the great obscure movement of mentality in which he is not only a jet of light of self-consciousness like the animal, but also more and more a flame of growing knowledge. Thus he seeks to know himself in order to be master of himself, to know the world in order to be master of the world. This is the urge of Existence in him, the necessity of the Consciousness he is, the impulsion of the Force that is his life, the secret will of Sachchidananda appearing as the individual in a world in which He expresses and yet seems to deny Himself. To find the conditions under which this inner impulsion is satisfied is the problem man must strive always to resolve and to that he is compelled by the very nature of his own existence and by the Deity seated within him; and until the problem is solved, the impulse satisfied, the human race cannot rest from its labour. Either man must fulfil himself by satisfying the Divine within him or he must produce out of himself a new and greater being who will be more capable of satisfying it. He must either himself become a divine humanity or give place to Superman. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
348:But if somewhere in your being - either in your body or even in your vital or mind, either in several parts or even in a single one - there is an incapacity to receive the descending Force, this acts like a grain of sand in a machine. You know, a fine machine working quite well with everything going all right, and you put into it just a little sand (nothing much, only a grain of sand), suddenly everything is damaged and the machine stops. Well, just a little lack of receptivity somewhere, something that is unable to receive the Force, that is completely shut up (when one looks at it, it becomes as it were a little dark spot somewhere, a tiny thing hard as a stone: the Force cannot enter into it, it refuses to receive it - either it cannot or it will not) and immediately that produces a great imbalance; and this thing that was moving upward, that was blooming so wonderfully, finds itself sick, and sometimes just when you were in the normal equilibrium; you were in good health, everything was going on well, you had nothing to complain about. One day when you grasped a new idea, received a new impulse, when you had a great aspiration and received a great force and had a marvellous experience, a beautiful experience opening to you inner doors, giving you a knowledge you did not have before; then you were sure that everything was going to be all right.... The next day, you are taken ill. So you say: "Still that? It is impossible! That should not happen." But it was quite simply what I have just said: a grain of sand. There was something that could not receive; immediately it brings about a disequilibrium. Even though very small it is enough, and you fall ill. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 Talks 151-175,
349:39 - Sometimes one is led to think that only those things really matter which have never happened; for beside them most historic achievements seem almost pale and ineffective. - Sri AurobindoI would like to have an explanation of this aphorism.Sri Aurobindo, who had made a thorough study of history, knew how uncertain are the data which have been used to write it. Most often the accuracy of the documents is doubtful, and the information they supply is poor, incomplete, trivial and frequently distorted. As a whole, the official version of human history is nothing but a long, almost unbroken record of violent aggressions: wars, revolutions, murders or colonisations. True, some of these aggressions and massacres have been adorned with flattering terms and epithets; they have been called religious wars, holy wars, civilising campaigns; but they nonetheless remain acts of greed or vengeance.Rarely in history do we find the description of a cultural, artistic or philosophical outflowering.That is why, as Sri Aurobindo says, all this makes a rather dismal picture without any deep significance. On the other hand, in the legendary accounts of things which may never have existed on earth, of events which have not been declared authentic by "official" knowledge, of wonderful individuals whose existence is doubted by the scholars in their dried-up wisdom, we find the crystallisation of all the hopes and aspirations of man, his love of the marvellous, the heroic and the sublime, the description of everything he would like to be and strives to become.That, more or less, is what Sri Aurobindo means in his aphorism.22 June 1960 ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms volume-10,
350:science reading list ::: 1. and 2. The Voyage of the Beagle (1845) and The Origin of Species (1859) by Charles Darwin [tie 3. Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy) by Isaac Newton (1687) 4. Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems by Galileo Galilei (1632) 5. De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres) by Nicolaus Copernicus (1543) 6. Physica (Physics) by Aristotle (circa 330 B.C.) 7. De Humani Corporis Fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human Body) by Andreas Vesalius (1543) 8. Relativity: The Special and General Theory by Albert Einstein (1916) 9. The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins (1976) 10. One Two Three . . . Infinity by George Gamow (1947) 11. The Double Helix by James D. Watson (1968) 12. What Is Life? by Erwin Schrodinger (1944) 13. The Cosmic Connection by Carl Sagan (1973) 14. The Insect Societies by Edward O. Wilson (1971) 15. The First Three Minutes by Steven Weinberg (1977) 16. Silent Spring by Rachel Carson (1962) 17. The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould (1981) 18. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Oliver Sacks (1985) 19. The Journals of Lewis and Clark by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark (1814) 20. The Feynman Lectures on Physics by Richard P Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands (1963) 21. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male by Alfred C. Kinsey et al. (1948) 22. Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey (1983) 23. Under a Lucky Star by Roy Chapman Andrews (1943) 24. Micrographia by Robert Hooke (1665) 25. Gaia by James Lovelock (1979) ~ Editors of Discovery Magazine, Website.php">Website ,
351:But this is only one side of the force that works for perfection. The process of the integral Yoga has three stages, not indeed sharply distinguished or separate, but in a certain measure successive. There must be, first, the effort towards at least an initial and enabling self-transcendence and contact with the Divine; next, the reception of that which transcends, that with which we have gained communion, into ourselves for the transformation of our whole conscious being; last, the utilisation of our transformed humanity as a divine centre in the world. So long as the contact with the Divine is not in some considerable degree established, so long as there is not some measure of sustained identity, sayujya, the element of personal effort must normally predominate. But in proportion as this contact establishes itself, the sadhaka must become conscious that a force other than his own, a force transcending his egoistic endeavour and capacity, is at work in him and to this Power he learns progressively to submit himself and delivers up to it the charge of his Yoga. In the end his own will and force become one with the higher Power; he merges them in the divineWill and its transcendent and universal Force. He finds it thenceforward presiding over the necessary transformation of his mental, vital and physical being with an impartial wisdom and provident effectivity of which the eager and interested ego is not capable. It is when this identification and this self-merging are complete that the divine centre in the world is ready. Purified, liberated, plastic, illumined, it can begin to serve as a means for the direct action of a supreme Power in the larger Yoga of humanity or superhumanity, of the earth's spiritual progression or its transformation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
352:If we accept the Vedic image of the Sun of Truth, - an image which in this experience becomes a reality, - we may compare the action of the Higher Mind to a composed and steady sunshine, the energy of the Illumined Mind beyond it to an outpouring of massive lightnings of flaming sun-stuff. Still beyond can be met a yet greater power of the Truth-Force, an intimate and exact Truth-vision, Truth-thought, Truth-sense, Truth-feeling, Truth-action, to which we can give in a special sense the name of Intuition; for though we have applied that word for want of a better to any supra-intellectual direct way of knowing, yet what we actually know as intuition is only one special movement of self-existent knowledge. This new range is its origin; it imparts to our intuitions something of its own distinct character and is very clearly an intermediary of a greater Truth-Light with which our mind cannot directly communicate. At the source of this Intuition we discover a superconscient cosmic Mind in direct contact with the Supramental Truth-Consciousness, an original intensity determinant of all movements below it and all mental energies, - not Mind as we know it, but an Overmind that covers as with the wide wings of some creative Oversoul this whole lower hemisphere of Knowledge-Ignorance, links it with that greater Truth-Consciousness while yet at the same time with its brilliant golden Lid it veils the face of the greater Truth from our sight, intervening with its flood of infinite possibilities as at once an obstacle and a passage in our seeking of the spiritual law of our existence, its highest aim, its secret Reality. This then is the occult link we were looking for; this is the Power that at once connects and divides the supreme Knowledge and the cosmic Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Supermind Mind and the Overmind Maya,
353:the aim of our yoga ::: The aim set before our Yoga is nothing less than to hasten this supreme object of our existence here. Its process leaves behind the ordinary tardy method of slow and confused growth through the evolution of Nature. For the natural evolution is at its best an uncertain growth under cover, partly by the pressure of the environment, partly by a groping education and an ill-lighted purposeful effort, an only partially illumined and half-automatic use of opportunities with many blunders and lapses and relapses; a great portion of it is made up of apparent accidents and circumstances and vicissitudes, - though veiling a secret divine intervention and guidance. In Yoga we replace this confused crooked crab-motion by a rapid, conscious and self-directed evolution which is planned to carry us, as far as can be, in a straight line towards the goal set before us. In a certain sense it may be an error to speak of a goal anywhere in a progression which may well be infinite. Still we can conceive of an immediate goal, an ulterior objective beyond our present achievement towards which the soul in man can aspire. There lies before him the possibility of a new birth; there can be an ascent into a higher and wider plane of being and its descent to transform his members. An enlarged and illumined consciousness is possible that shall make of him a liberated spirit and a perfected force - and, if spread beyond the individual, it might even constitute a divine humanity or else a new, a supramental and therefore a superhuman race. It is this new birth that we make our aim: a growth into a divine consciousness is the whole meaning of our Yoga, an integral conversion to divinity not only of the soul but of all the parts of our nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Self-Surrender in Works - The Way of the Gita,
354:Hence, it's obvious to see why in AA the community is so important; we are powerless over ourselves. Since we don't have immediate awareness of the Higher Power and how it works, we need to be constantly reminded of our commitment to freedom and liberation. The old patterns are so seductive that as they go off, they set off the association of ideas and the desire to give in to our addiction with an enormous force that we can't handle. The renewal of defeat often leads to despair. At the same time, it's a source of hope for those who have a spiritual view of the process. Because it reminds us that we have to renew once again our total dependence on the Higher Power. This is not just a notional acknowledgment of our need. We feel it from the very depths of our being. Something in us causes our whole being to cry out, "Help!" That's when the steps begin to work. And that, I might add, is when the spiritual journey begins to work. A lot of activities that people in that category regard as spiritual are not communicating to them experientially their profound dependence on the grace of God to go anywhere with their spiritual practices or observances. That's why religious practice can be so ineffective. The real spiritual journey depends on our acknowledging the unmanageability of our lives. The love of God or the Higher Power is what heals us. Nobody becomes a full human being without love. It brings to life people who are most damaged. The steps are really an engagement in an ever-deepening relationship with God. Divine love picks us up when we sincerely believe nobody else will. We then begin to experience freedom, peace, calm, equanimity, and liberation from cravings for what we have come to know are damaging-cravings that cannot bring happiness, but at best only momentary relief that makes the real problem worse. ~ Thomas Keating, Divine Therapy and Addiction ,
355:There is a story I would like to tell you about a woman who practices the invocation of the Buddha Amitabha's name. She is very tough, and she practices the invocation three times daily, using a wooden drum and a bell, reciting, "Namo Amitabha Buddha" for one hour each time. When she arrives at one thousand times, she invites the bell to sound. (In Vietnamese, we don't say "strike" or "hit" a bell.) Although she has been doing this for ten years, her personality has not changed. She is still quite mean, shouting at people all the time.A friend wanted to teach her a lesson, so one afternoon when she had just lit the incense, invited the bell to sound three times, and was beginning to recite "Namo Amitabha Buddha," he came to her door, and said, "Mrs. Nguyen, Mrs. Nguyen!" She found it very annoying because this was her time of practice, but he just stood at the front gate shouting her name. She said to herself, "I have to struggle against my anger, so I will ignore that," and she went on, "Namo Amitabha Buddha, Namo Amitabha Buddha."The gentleman continued to shout her name, and her anger became more and more oppressive. She struggled against it, wondering, "Should I stop my recitation and go and give him a piece of my mind?" But she continued chanting, and she struggled very hard. Fire mounted in her, but she still tried to chant "Namo Amitabha Buddha." The gentleman knew it, and he continued to shout, "Mrs. Nguyen! Mrs. Nguyen!"She could not bear it any longer. She threw away the bell and the drum. She slammed the door, went out to the gate and said, "Why, why do you behave like that? Why do you call my name hundreds of times like that?" The gentleman smiled at her and said, "I just called your name for ten minutes, and you are so angry. You have been calling the Buddha's name for ten years. Think how angry he must be! ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
356:principle of Yogic methods ::: Yogic methods have something of the same relation to the customary psychological workings of man as has the scientific handling of the force of electricity or of steam to their normal operations in Nature. And they, too, like the operations of Science, are formed upon a knowledge developed and confirmed by regular experiment, practical analysis and constant result. All Rajayoga, for instance, depends on this perception and experience that our inner elements, combinations, functions, forces can be separated or dissolved, can be new-combined and set to novel and formerly impossible workings or can be transformed and resolved into a new general synthesis by fixed internal processes. Hathayoga similarly depends on this perception and experience that the vital forces and function to which our life is normally subjected and whose ordinary operations seem set and indispensable, can be mastered and the operations changed or suspended with results that would otherwise be impossible and that seem miraculous to those who have not seized the raionale of their process. And if in some other of its forms this character of Yoga is less apparent, because they are more intuitive and less mechanical, nearer, like the Yoga of Devotion, to a supernal ecstasy or, like the Yoga of Knowledge, to a supernal infinity of consciousness and being, yet they too start from the use of some principal faculty in us by ways and for ends not contemplated in its everyday spontaneous workings. All methods grouped under the common name of Yoga are special psychological processes founded on a fixed truth of Nature and developing, out of normal functions, powers and results which were always latent but which her ordinary movements do not easily or do not often manifest. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Introduction - The Conditions of the Synthesis,
357:To analyse the classes of life we have to consider two very different kinds of phenomena: the one embraced under the collective name-Inorganic chemistry-the other under the collective nameOrganic chemistry, or the chemistry of hydro-carbons. These divisions are made because of the peculiar properties of the elements chiefly involved in the second class. The properties of matter are so distributed among the elements that three of them- Oxygen, Hydrogen, and Carbon-possess an ensemble of unique characteristics. The number of reactions in inorganic chemistry are relatively few, but in organic chemistry-in the chemistry of these three elements the number of different compounds is practically unlimited. Up to 1910, we knew of more than 79 elements of which the whole number of reactions amounted to only a few hundreds, but among the remaining three elements-Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen-the reactions were known to be practically unlimited in number and possibilities; this fact must have very far reaching consequences. As far as energies are concerned, we have to take them as nature reveals them to us. Here more than ever, mathematical thinking is essential and will help enormously. The reactions in inorganic chemistry always involve the phenomenon of heat, sometimes light, and in some instances an unusual energy is produced called electricity. Until now, the radioactive elements represent a group too insufficiently known for an enlargement here upon this subject. The organic compounds being unlimited in number and possibilities and with their unique characteristics, represent of course, a different class of phenomena, but being, at the same time, chemical they include the basic chemical phenomena involved in all chemical reactions, but being unique in many other respects, they also have an infinitely vast field of unique characteristics. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity Questions And Answers 1953,
358:More often, he listened to the voice of Eros. Sometimes he watched the video feeds too, but usually, he just listened. Over the hours and days, he began to hear, if not patterns, at least common structures. Some of the voices spooling out of the dying station were consistent-broadcasters and entertainers who were overrepresented in the audio files archives, he guessed. There seemed to be some specific tendencies in, for want of a better term, the music of it too. Hours of random, fluting static and snatched bits of phrases would give way, and Eros would latch on to some word or phrase, fixating on it with greater and greater intensity until it broke apart and the randomness poured back in. "... are, are, are, ARE, ARE, ARE... " Aren't, Miller thought, and the ship suddenly shoved itself up, leaving Miller's stomach about half a foot from where it had been. A series of loud clanks followed, and then the brief wail of a Klaxon. "Dieu! Dieu!" someone shouted. "Bombs son vamen roja! Going to fry it! Fry us toda!" There was the usual polite chuckle that the same joke had occasioned over the course of the trip, and the boy who'd made it-a pimply Belter no more than fifteen years old-grinned with pleasure at his own wit. If he didn't stop that shit, someone was going to beat him with a crowbar before they got back to Tycho. But Miller figured that someone wasn't him. A massive jolt forward pushed him hard into the couch, and then gravity was back, the familiar 0.3 g. Maybe a little more. Except that with the airlocks pointing toward ship's down, the pilot had to grapple the spinning skin of Eros' belly first. The spin gravity made what had been the ceiling the new floor; the lowest rank of couches was now the top; and while they rigged the fusion bombs to the docks, they were all going to have to climb up onto a cold, dark rock that was trying to fling them off into the vacuum. Such were the joys of sabotage. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
359:See how, like lightest waves at play, the airy dancers fleet; And scarcely feels the floor the wings of those harmonious feet. Ob, are they flying shadows from their native forms set free? Or phantoms in the fairy ring that summer moonbeams see? As, by the gentle zephyr blown, some light mist flees in air, As skiffs that skim adown the tide, when silver waves are fair, So sports the docile footstep to the heave of that sweet measure, As music wafts the form aloft at its melodious pleasure, Now breaking through the woven chain of the entangled dance, From where the ranks the thickest press, a bolder pair advance, The path they leave behind them lost--wide open the path beyond, The way unfolds or closes up as by a magic wand. See now, they vanish from the gaze in wild confusion blended; All, in sweet chaos whirled again, that gentle world is ended! No!--disentangled glides the knot, the gay disorder ranges-- The only system ruling here, a grace that ever changes. For ay destroyed--for ay renewed, whirls on that fair creation; And yet one peaceful law can still pervade in each mutation. And what can to the reeling maze breathe harmony and vigor, And give an order and repose to every gliding figure? That each a ruler to himself doth but himself obey, Yet through the hurrying course still keeps his own appointed way. What, would'st thou know? It is in truth the mighty power of tune, A power that every step obeys, as tides obey the moon; That threadeth with a golden clue the intricate employment, Curbs bounding strength to tranquil grace, and tames the wild enjoyment. And comes the world's wide harmony in vain upon thine ears? The stream of music borne aloft from yonder choral spheres? And feel'st thou not the measure which eternal Nature keeps? The whirling dance forever held in yonder azure deeps? The suns that wheel in varying maze?--That music thou discernest? No! Thou canst honor that in sport which thou forgettest in earnest. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
360:indifference to things of the body ::: This detachment of the mind must be strengthened by a certain attitude of indifference to the things of the body; we must not care essentially about its sleep or its waking, its movement or its rest, its pain or its pleasure, its health or ill-health, its vigour or its fatigue, its comfort or its discomfort, or what it eats or drinks. This does not mean that we shall not keep the body in right order so far as we can; we have not to fall into violent asceticisms or a positive neglect of the physical frame. But we have not either to be affected in mind by hunger or thirst or discomfort or ill-health or attach the importance which the physical and vital man attaches to the things of the body, or indeed any but a quite subordinate and purely instrumental importance. Nor must this instrumental importance be allowed to assume the proportions of a necessity; we must not for instance imagine that the purity of the mind depends on the things we eat or drink, although during a certain stage restrictions in eating and drinking are useful to our inner progress; nor on the other hand must we continue to think that the dependence of the mind or even of the life on food and drink is anything more than a habit, a customary relation which Nature has set up between these principles. As a matter of fact the food we take can be reduced by contrary habit and new relation to a minimum without the mental or vital vigour being in any way reduced; even on the contrary with a judicious development they can be trained to a greater potentiality of vigour by learning to rely on the secret fountains of mental and vital energy with which they are connected more than upon the minor aid of physical aliments. This aspect of self-discipline is however more important in the Yoga of self-perfection than here; for our present purpose the important point is the renunciation by the mind of attachment to or dependence on the things of the body. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.07 - The Release from Subjection to the Body,
361:WHEN THE GREAT YOGIN Padmasambhava, called by Tibetans Guru Rinpoche, "the precious teacher," embarks on his spiritual journey, he travels from place to place requesting teachings from yogins and yoginls. Guided by visions and dreams, his journey takes him to desolate forests populated with ferocious wild animals, to poison lakes with fortified islands, and to cremation grounds. Wherever he goes he performs miracles, receives empowerments, and ripens his own abilities to benefit others. When he hears of the supreme queen of all dakinls, the greatly accomplished yogini called Secret Wisdom, he travels to the Sandal Grove cremation ground to the gates of her abode, the Palace of Skulls. He attempts to send a request to the queen with her maidservant Kumari. But the girl ignores him and continues to carry huge brass jugs of water suspended from a heavy yoke across her shoulders. When he presses his request, Kumari continues her labors, remaining silent. The great yogin becomes impatient and, through his yogic powers, magically nails the heavy jugs to the floor. No matter how hard Kumari struggles, she cannot lift them. Removing the yoke and ropes from her shoulders, she steps before Padmasambhava, exclaiming, "You have developed great yogic powers. What of my powers, great one?" And so saying, she draws a sparkling crystal knife from the girdle at her waist and slices open her heart center, revealing the vivid and vast interior space of her body. Inside she displays to Guru Rinpoche the mandala of deities from the inner tantras: forty-two peaceful deities manifested in her upper torso and head and fifty-eight wrathful deities resting in her lower torso. Abashed that he did not realize with whom he was dealing, Guru Rinpoche bows before her and humbly renews his request for teachings. In response, she offers him her respect as well, adding, "I am only a maidservant," and ushers him in to meet the queen Secret Wisdom. ~ Judith Simmer-Brown, Dakini's Warm Breath: The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism Introduction: Encountering the Dakini,
362:Sweet Mother, here it is written: "There is a Yoga-Shakti lying coiled or asleep..." How can it be awakened?I think it awakens quite naturally the moment one takes the resolution to do the yoga. If the resolution is sincere and one has an aspiration, it wakes up by itself. In fact, it is perhaps its awakening which gives the aspiration to do yoga. It is possible that it is a result of the Grace... or after some conversation or reading, something that has suddenly given you the idea and aspiration to know what yoga is and to practise it. Sometimes just a simple conversation with someone is enough or a passage one reads from a book; well, it awakens this Yoga-Shakti and it is this which makes you do your yoga. One is not aware of it at first - except that something has changed in our life, a new decision is taken, a turning. What is it, this Yoga-Shakti, Sweet Mother? It is the energy of progress. It is the energy which makes you do the yoga, precisely, makes you progress - consciously. It is a conscious energy. In fact, the Yoga-Shakti is the power to do yoga. Sweet Mother, isn't it more difficult to draw the divine forces from below? I think it is absolutely useless. Some people think that there are more reserves of energy - I have heard this very often: a great reserve of energy - in the earth, and that if they draw this energy into themselves they will be able to do things; but it is always mixed. The divine Presence is everywhere, that's well understood. And in fact, there is neither above nor below. What is called above and below, I think that is rather the expression of a degree of consciousness or a degree of materiality; there is the more unconscious and the less unconscious, there is what is subconscious and what is superconscious, and so we say above and below for the facility of speech. But in fact, the idea is to draw from the energies of the earth which, when you are standing up, are under your feet, that is, below in relation to you. But these energies are always mixed, and mostly they are terribly dark. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
363:It is not very easy for the customary mind of man, always attached to its past and present associations, to conceive of an existence still human, yet radically changed in what are now our fixed circumstances.We are in respect to our possible higher evolution much in the position of the original Ape of the Darwinian theory. It would have been impossible for that Ape leading his instinctive arboreal life in primeval forests to conceive that there would be one day an animal on the earth who would use a new faculty called reason upon the materials of his inner and outer existence, who would dominate by that power his instincts and habits, change the circumstances of his physical life, build for himself houses of stone, manipulate Nature's forces, sail the seas, ride the air, develop codes of conduct, evolve conscious methods for his mental and spiritual development. And if such a conception had been possible for the Ape-mind, it would still have been difficult for him to imagine that by any progress of Nature or long effort of Will and tendency he himself could develop into that animal. Man, because he has acquired reason and still more because he has indulged his power of imagination and intuition, is able to conceive an existence higher than his own and even to envisage his personal elevation beyond his present state into that existence. His idea of the supreme state is an absolute of all that is positive to his own concepts and desirable to his own instinctive aspiration,-Knowledge without its negative shadow of error, Bliss without its negation in experience of suffering, Power without its constant denial by incapacity, purity and plenitude of being without the opposing sense of defect and limitation. It is so that he conceives his gods; it is so that he constructs his heavens. But it is not so that his reason conceives of a possible earth and a possible humanity. His dream of God and Heaven is really a dream of his own perfection; but he finds the same difficulty in accepting its practical realisation here for his ultimate aim as would the ancestral Ape if called upon to believe in himself as the future Man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.07 - The Ego and the Dualities,
364:For centuries and centuries humanity has waited for this time. It is come. But it is difficult.I don't simply tell you we are here upon earth to rest and enjoy ourselves, now is not the time for that. We are here..... to prepare the way for the new creation.The body has some difficulty, so I can't be active, alas. It is not because I am old, I am not old, I am younger than most of you. If I am here inactive, it is because the body has given itself definitely to prepare the transformation. But the consciousness is clear and we are here to work - rest and enjoyment will come afterwards. Let us do our work here.So I have called you to tell you that. Take what you can, do what you can, my help will be with you. All sincere effort will be helped to the maximum.It is the hour to be the heroic. Heroism is not what it is said to be; it is to become wholly unified - and the Divine help will always be with those who have resolved to be heroic in full sincerity.There!You are here at this moment that is to say upon earth, because you chose it at one time - you do not remember it any more, but I know it - that is why you are here. Well, you must rise to the height of the task. You must strive, you must conquer all weakness and limitations; above all you must tell your ego: "Your hour is gone." We want a race that has no ego, that has in place of the ego the Divine Consciousness. It is that which we want: the Divine Consciousness which will allow the race to develop itself and the Supramental being to take birth.If you believe that I am here because I am bound - it is not true. I am not bound, I am here because my body has been given for the first attempt at transformation. Sri Aurobindo told me so. Well, I am doing it. I do not wish anyone to do it for me because.... Because it is not very pleasant, but I do it willingly because of the result; everybody will be able to benefit from it. I ask only one thing: do not listen to the ego.If there is in your hearts a sincere Yes, you will satisfy me completely. I do not need words, I need the sincere adhesion of your hearts. That's all. ~ The Mother, (This talk was given by the Mother on April 2 1972,
365:At the basis of this collaboration there is necessarily the will to change, no longer to be what one is, for things to be no longer what they are. There are several ways of reaching it, and all the methods are good when they succeed! One may be deeply disgusted with what exists and wish ardently to come out of all this and attain something else; one may - and this is a more positive way - one may feel within oneself the touch, the approach of something positively beautiful and true, and willingly drop all the rest so that nothing may burden the journey to this new beauty and truth. What is indispensable in every case is the ardent will for progress, the willing and joyful renunciation of all that hampers the advance: to throw far away from oneself all that prevents one from going forward, and to set out into the unknown with the ardent faith that this is the truth of tomorrow, inevitable, which must necessarily come, which nothing, nobody, no bad will, even that of Nature, can prevent from becoming a reality - perhaps of a not too distant future - a reality which is being worked out now and which those who know how to change, how not to be weighed down by old habits, will surely have the good fortune not only to see but to realise. People sleep, they forget, they take life easy - they forget, forget all the time.... But if we could remember... that we are at an exceptional hour, a unique time, that we have this immense good fortune, this invaluable privilege of being present at the birth of a new world, we could easily get rid of everything that impedes and hinders our progress. So, the most important thing, it seems, is to remember this fact; even when one doesn't have the tangible experience, to have the certainty of it and faith in it; to remember always, to recall it constantly, to go to sleep with this idea, to wake up with this perception; to do all that one does with this great truth as the background, as a constant support, this great truth that we are witnessing the birth of a new world. We can participate in it, we can become this new world. And truly, when one has such a marvellous opportunity, one should be ready to give up everything for its sake. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958 ,
366:The guiding law of spiritual experience can only come by an opening of human consciousness to the Divine Consciousness; there must be the power to receive in us the working and command and dynamic presence of the Divine Shakti and surrender ourselves to her control; it is that surrender and that control which bring the guidance. But the surrender is not sure, there is no absolute certitude of the guidance so long as we are besieged by mind formations and life impulses and instigations of ego which may easily betray us into the hands of a false experience. This danger can only be countered by the opening of a now nine-tenths concealed inmost soul or psychic being that is already there but not commonly active within us. That is the inner light we must liberate; for the light of this inmost soul is our one sure illumination so long as we walk still amidst the siege of the Ignorance and the Truth-consciousness has not taken up the entire control of our Godward endeavour. The working of the Divine Force in us under the conditions of the transition and the light of the psychic being turning us always towards a conscious and seeing obedience to that higher impulsion and away from the demands and instigations of the Forces of the Ignorance, these between them create an ever progressive inner law of our action which continues till the spiritual and supramental can be established in our nature. In the transition there may well be a period in which we take up all life and action and offer them to the Divine for purification, change and deliverance of the truth within them, another period in which we draw back and build a spiritual wall around us admitting through its gates only such activities as consent to undergo the law of the spiritual transformation, a third in which a free and all-embracing action, but with new forms fit for the utter truth of the Spirit, can again be made possible. These things, however, will be decided by no mental rule but in the light of the soul within us and by the ordaining force and progressive guidance of the Divine Power that secretly or overtly first impels, then begins clearly to control and order and finally takes up the whole burden of the Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1,
367:"Will it take long for the Supermind which is involved in material Nature to emerge into the outer consciousness and bring visible results?" That depends on the state of consciousness from which one answers, for... For the human consciousness, obviously, I think it will take quite a long time. For another consciousness it will be relatively very fast, and for yet another consciousness, it is already accomplished. It is an accomplished fact. But in order to become aware of this, one must be able to enter into another state of consciousness than the ordinary physical consciousness. Sri Aurobindo has spoken - I believe I have read it to you, I think it's in The Synthesis of Yoga - of the true mind, the true vital and the true physical or subtle physical, and he has said that they co-exist with the ordinary mind, vital and physical, and that in certain conditions one may enter into contact with them, and then one becomes aware of the difference between what really is and the appearances of things. Well, for a developed consciousness, the Supermind is already realised somewhere in a domain of the subtle physical, it already exists there visible, concrete, and expresses itself in forms and activities. And when one is in tune with this domain, when one lives there, one has a very strong feeling that this world would only have to be condensed, so to say, for it to become visible to all. What would then be interesting would be to develop this inner perception which would put you into contact with the supramental truth which is already manifested, and is veiled for you only for want of appropriate organs to enter into relation with it. It is possible that those who are conscious of their dreams may have dreams of a new kind which put them into contact with that world, for it is accessible to the subtle physical of all those who have the corresponding organs in themselves. And there is necessarily a subtle influence of this physical on outer matter, if one is ready to receive impressions from it and admit them into one's consciousness. That's all. Now, if nobody has any questions to ask, well, we shall remain silent. Something to say, over there? (Mother looks at a disciple.) Oh! he is burning to speak! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956 ,
368:This is the real sense and drive of what we see as evolution: the multiplication and variation of forms is only the means of its process. Each gradation contains the possibility and the certainty of the grades beyond it: the emergence of more and more developed forms and powers points to more perfected forms and greater powers beyond them, and each emergence of consciousness and the conscious beings proper to it enables the rise to a greater consciousness beyond and the greater order of beings up to the ultimate godheads of which Nature is striving and is destined to show herself capable. Matter developed its organised forms until it became capable of embodying living organisms; then life rose from the subconscience of the plant into conscious animal formations and through them to the thinking life of man. Mind founded in life developed intellect, developed its types of knowledge and ignorance, truth and error till it reached the spiritual perception and illumination and now can see as in a glass dimly the possibility of supermind and a truthconscious existence. In this inevitable ascent the mind of Light is a gradation, an inevitable stage. As an evolving principle it will mark a stage in the human ascent and evolve a new type of human being; this development must carry in it an ascending gradation of its own powers and types of an ascending humanity which will embody more and more the turn towards spirituality, capacity for Light, a climb towards a divinised manhood and the divine life. In the birth of the mind of Light and its ascension into its own recognisable self and its true status and right province there must be, in the very nature of things as they are and very nature of the evolutionary process as it is at present, two stages. In the first, we can see the mind of Light gathering itself out of the Ignorance, assembling its constituent elements, building up its shapes and types, however imperfect at first, and pushing them towards perfection till it can cross the border of the Ignorance and appear in the Light, in its own Light. In the second stage we can see it developing itself in that greater natural light, taking its higher shapes and forms till it joins the supermind and lives as its subordinate portion or its delegate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga 5.08 - Supermind and Mind of Light,
369:Countless books on divination, astrology, medicine and other subjectsDescribe ways to read signs. They do add to your learning,But they generate new thoughts and your stable attention breaks up.Cut down on this kind of knowledge - that's my sincere advice.You stop arranging your usual living space,But make everything just right for your retreat.This makes little sense and just wastes time.Forget all this - that's my sincere advice.You make an effort at practice and become a good and knowledgeable person.You may even master some particular capabilities.But whatever you attach to will tie you up.Be unbiased and know how to let things be - that's my sincere advice.You may think awakened activity means to subdue skepticsBy using sorcery, directing or warding off hail or lightning, for example.But to burn the minds of others will lead you to lower states.Keep a low profile - that's my sincere advice.Maybe you collect a lot of important writings,Major texts, personal instructions, private notes, whatever.If you haven't practiced, books won't help you when you die.Look at the mind - that's my sincere advice.When you focus on practice, to compare understandings and experience,Write books or poetry, to compose songs about your experienceAre all expressions of your creativity. But they just give rise to thinking.Keep yourself free from intellectualization - that's my sincere advice.In these difficult times you may feel that it is helpfulTo be sharp and critical with aggressive people around you.This approach will just be a source of distress and confusion for you.Speak calmly - that's my sincere advice.Intending to be helpful and without personal investment,You tell your friends what is really wrong with them.You may have been honest but your words gnaw at their heart.Speak pleasantly - that's my sincere advice.You engage in discussions, defending your views and refuting others'Thinking that you are clarifying the teachings.But this just gives rise to emotional posturing.Keep quiet - that's my sincere advice.You feel that you are being loyalBy being partial to your teacher, lineage or philosophical tradition.Boosting yourself and putting down others just causes hard feelings.Have nothing to do with all this - that's my sincere advice. ~ Longchenpa, excerpts from 30 Pieces of Sincere Advice
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370:reading ::: Self-Help Reading List: James Allen As a Man Thinketh (1904) Marcus Aurelius Meditations (2nd Century) The Bhagavad-Gita The Bible Robert Bly Iron John (1990) Boethius The Consolation of Philosophy (6thC) Alain de Botton How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997) William Bridges Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes (1980) David Brooks The Road to Character (2015) Brené Brown Daring Greatly (2012) David D Burns The New Mood Therapy (1980) Joseph Campbell (with Bill Moyers) The Power of Myth (1988) Richard Carlson Don't Sweat The Small Stuff (1997) Dale Carnegie How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936) Deepak Chopra The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success (1994) Clayton Christensen How Will You Measure Your Life? (2012) Paulo Coelho The Alchemist (1988) Stephen Covey The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (1989) Mihaly Cziksentmihalyi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1991) The Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler The Art of Happiness (1999) The Dhammapada (Buddha's teachings) Charles Duhigg The Power of Habit (2011) Wayne Dyer Real Magic (1992) Ralph Waldo Emerson Self-Reliance (1841) Clarissa Pinkola Estes Women Who Run With The Wolves (1996) Viktor Frankl Man's Search For Meaning (1959) Benjamin Franklin Autobiography (1790) Shakti Gawain Creative Visualization (1982) Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence (1995) John Gray Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus (1992) Louise Hay You Can Heal Your Life (1984) James Hillman The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling (1996) Susan Jeffers Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway (1987) Richard Koch The 80/20 Principle (1998) Marie Kondo The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (2014) Ellen Langer Mindfulness: Choice and Control in Everyday Life (1989) Lao-Tzu Tao-te Ching (The Way of Power) Maxwell Maltz Psycho-Cybernetics (1960) Abraham Maslow Motivation and Personality (1954) Thomas Moore Care of the Soul (1992) Joseph Murphy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind (1963) Norman Vincent Peale The Power of Positive Thinking (1952) M Scott Peck The Road Less Traveled (1990) Anthony Robbins Awaken The Giant Within (1991) Florence Scovell-Shinn The Game of Life and How To Play It (1923) Martin Seligman Learned Optimism (1991) Samuel Smiles Self-Help (1859) Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man (1955) Henry David Thoreau Walden (1854) Marianne Williamson A Return To Love (1993) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Self-Help ,
371:meta-systemic operations ::: As the 1950's and 60s begin to roll around the last stage of first tier emerged as a cultural force. With the Green Altitude we see the emergence of Pluralistic, Multicultural, Post-Modern world-views.Cognition is starting to move beyond formal-operations into the realm of co-ordinating systems of abstractions, in what is called Meta-systemic Cognition. While formal-operations acted upon the classes and relations between members of classes. Meta-systemic operations start at the level of relating systems to systems. The focus of these investigations is placed upon comparing, contrasting, transforming and synthesizing entire systems, rather than components of one system. This emergent faculty allows self-sense to focus around a heightened sense of individuality and an increased ability for emotional resonance. The recognition of individual differences, the ability to tolerate paradox and contradiction, and greater conceptual complexity all provide for an understanding of conflict as being both internally and externally caused. Context plays a major role in the creation of truth and individual perspective. With each being context dependent and open to subjective interpretation, meaning each perspective and truth are rendered relative and are not able to be judged as better or more true than any other. This fuels a value set that centers on softness over cold rationality. Sensitivity and preference over objectivity.Along with a focus on community harmony and equality which drives the valuing of sensitivity to others, reconcilation, consensus, dialogue, relationship, human development, bonding, and a seeking of a peace with the inner-self. Moral decisions are based on rights, values, or principles that are agreeable to all individuals composing a society based on fair and beneficial practices. All of this leads to the Equality movements and multiculturalism. And to the extreme form of relativitism which we saw earlier as context dependant nature of all truth including objective facts.Faith at the green altitude is called Conjunctive, and allows the self to integrate what was unrecognized by the previous stages self-certainty and cognitive and affective adaptation to reality. New features at this level of faith include the unification of symbolic power with conceptual meaning, an awareness of ones social unconscious, a reworking of ones past, and an opening to ones deeper self. ~ Essential Integral, 4.1-52 Meta-systemic Operations,
372:As far as heaven, as near as thought and hope,Glimmered the kingdom of a griefless life.Above him in a new celestial vaultOther than the heavens beheld by mortal eyes,As on a fretted ceiling of the gods,An archipelago of laughter and fire,Swam stars apart in a rippled sea of sky.Towered spirals, magic rings of vivid hueAnd gleaming spheres of strange felicityFloated through distance like a symbol world.On the trouble and the toil they could not share,On the unhappiness they could not aid,Impervious to life's suffering, struggle, grief,Untarnished by its anger, gloom and hate,Unmoved, untouched, looked down great visioned planesBlissful for ever in their timeless right.Absorbed in their own beauty and content,Of their immortal gladness they live sure.Apart in their self-glory plunged, remoteBurning they swam in a vague lucent haze,An everlasting refuge of dream-light,A nebula of the splendours of the godsMade from the musings of eternity.Almost unbelievable by human faith,Hardly they seemed the stuff of things that are.As through a magic television's glassOutlined to some magnifying inner eyeThey shone like images thrown from a far sceneToo high and glad for mortal lids to seize.But near and real to the longing heartAnd to the body's passionate thought and senseAre the hidden kingdoms of beatitude.In some close unattained realm which yet we feel,Immune from the harsh clutch of Death and Time,Escaping the search of sorrow and desire,In bright enchanted safe peripheriesFor ever wallowing in bliss they lie.In dream and trance and muse before our eyes,Across a subtle vision's inner field,Wide rapturous landscapes fleeting from the sight,The figures of the perfect kingdom passAnd behind them leave a shining memory's trail.Imagined scenes or great eternal worlds,Dream-caught or sensed, they touch our hearts with their depths;Unreal-seeming, yet more real than life,Happier than happiness, truer than things true,If dreams these were or captured images,Dream's truth made false earth's vain realities.In a swift eternal moment fixed there liveOr ever recalled come back to longing eyesCalm heavens of imperishable Light,Illumined continents of violet peace,Oceans and rivers of the mirth of GodAnd griefless countries under purple suns. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.03 - The Glory and the Fall of Life,
373:requirements for the psychic ::: At a certain stage in the Yoga when the mind is sufficiently quieted and no longer supports itself at every step on the sufficiency of its mental certitudes, when the vital has been steadied and subdued and is no longer constantly insistent on its own rash will, demand and desire, when the physical has been sufficiently altered not to bury altogether the inner flame under the mass of its outwardness, obscurity or inertia, an inmost being hidden within and felt only in its rare influences is able to come forward and illumine the rest and take up the lead of the sadhana. Its character is a one-pointed orientation towards the Divine or the Highest, one-pointed and yet plastic in action and movement; it does not create a rigidity of direction like the one-pointed intellect or a bigotry of the regnant idea or impulse like the one-pointed vital force; it is at every moment and with a supple sureness that it points the way to the Truth, automatically distinguishes the right step from the false, extricates the divine or Godward movement from the clinging mixture of the undivine. Its action is like a searchlight showing up all that has to be changed in the nature; it has in it a flame of will insistent on perfection, on an alchemic transmutation of all the inner and outer existence. It sees the divine essence everywhere but rejects the mere mask and the disguising figure. It insists on Truth, on will and strength and mastery, on Joy and Love and Beauty, but on a Truth of abiding Knowledge that surpasses the mere practical momentary truth of the Ignorance, on an inward joy and not on mere vital pleasure, -- for it prefers rather a purifying suffering and sorrow to degrading satisfactions, -- on love winged upward and not tied to the stake of egoistic craving or with its feet sunk in the mire, on beauty restored to its priesthood of interpretation of the Eternal, on strength and will and mastery as instruments not of the ego but of the Spirit. Its will is for the divinisation of life, the expression through it of a higher Truth, its dedication to the Divine and the Eternal. But the most intimate character of the psychic is its pressure towards the Divine through a sacred love, joy and oneness. It is the divine Love that it seeks most, it is the love of the Divine that is its spur, its goal, its star of Truth shining over the luminous cave of the nascent or the still obscure cradle of the new-born godhead within us. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1,
374:Daemons A daemon is a process that runs in the background, not connecting to any controlling terminal. Daemons are normally started at boot time, are run as root or some other special user (such as apache or postfix), and handle system-level tasks. As a convention, the name of a daemon often ends in d (as in crond and sshd), but this is not required, or even universal. The name derives from Maxwell's demon, an 1867 thought experiment by the physicist James Maxwell. Daemons are also supernatural beings in Greek mythology, existing somewhere between humans and the gods and gifted with powers and divine knowledge. Unlike the demons of Judeo-Christian lore, the Greek daemon need not be evil. Indeed, the daemons of mythology tended to be aides to the gods, performing tasks that the denizens of Mount Olympus found themselves unwilling to do-much as Unix daemons perform tasks that foreground users would rather avoid. A daemon has two general requirements: it must run as a child of init, and it must not be connected to a terminal. In general, a program performs the following steps to become a daemon: 1. Call fork( ). This creates a new process, which will become the daemon. 2. In the parent, call exit( ). This ensures that the original parent (the daemon's grandparent) is satisfied that its child terminated, that the daemon's parent is no longer running, and that the daemon is not a process group leader. This last point is a requirement for the successful completion of the next step. 3. Call setsid( ), giving the daemon a new process group and session, both of which have it as leader. This also ensures that the process has no associated controlling terminal (as the process just created a new session, and will not assign one). 4. Change the working directory to the root directory via chdir( ). This is done because the inherited working directory can be anywhere on the filesystem. Daemons tend to run for the duration of the system's uptime, and you don't want to keep some random directory open, and thus prevent an administrator from unmounting the filesystem containing that directory. 5. Close all file descriptors. You do not want to inherit open file descriptors, and, unaware, hold them open. 6. Open file descriptors 0, 1, and 2 (standard in, standard out, and standard error) and redirect them to /dev/null. Following these rules, here is a program that daemonizes itself: ~ OReilly Linux System Programming,
375:reading ::: 50 Spiritual Classics: List of Books Covered: Muhammad Asad - The Road To Mecca (1954) St Augustine - Confessions (400) Richard Bach - Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1970) Black Elk Black - Elk Speaks (1932) Richard Maurice Bucke - Cosmic Consciousness (1901) Fritjof Capra - The Tao of Physics (1976) Carlos Castaneda - Journey to Ixtlan (1972) GK Chesterton - St Francis of Assisi (1922) Pema Chodron - The Places That Scare You (2001) Chuang Tzu - The Book of Chuang Tzu (4th century BCE) Ram Dass - Be Here Now (1971) Epictetus - Enchiridion (1st century) Mohandas Gandhi - An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments With Truth (1927) Al-Ghazzali - The Alchemy of Happiness (1097) Kahlil Gibran - The Prophet (1923) GI Gurdjieff - Meetings With Remarkable Men (1960) Dag Hammarskjold - Markings (1963) Abraham Joshua Heschel - The Sabbath (1951) Hermann Hesse - Siddartha (1922) Aldous Huxley - The Doors of Perception (1954) William James - The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902) Carl Gustav Jung - Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1955) Margery Kempe - The Book of Margery Kempe (1436) J Krishnamurti - Think On These Things (1964) CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters (1942) Malcolm X - The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1964) Daniel C Matt - The Essential Kabbalah (1994) Dan Millman - The Way of the Peaceful Warrior (1989) W Somerset Maugham - The Razor's Edge (1944) Thich Nhat Hanh - The Miracle of Mindfulness (1975) Michael Newton - Journey of Souls (1994) John O'Donohue - Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom (1998) Robert M Pirsig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974) James Redfield - The Celestine Prophecy (1994) Miguel Ruiz - The Four Agreements (1997) Helen Schucman & William Thetford - A Course in Miracles (1976) Idries Shah - The Way of the Sufi (1968) Starhawk - The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess (1979) Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind (1970) Emanuel Swedenborg - Heaven and Hell (1758) Teresa of Avila - Interior Castle (1570) Mother Teresa - A Simple Path (1994) Eckhart Tolle - The Power of Now (1998) Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism (1973) Neale Donald Walsch - Conversations With God (1998) Rick Warren - The Purpose-Driven Life (2002) Simone Weil - Waiting For God (1979) Ken Wilber - A Theory of Everything (2000) Paramahansa Yogananda - Autobiography of a Yogi (1974) Gary Zukav - The Seat of the Soul (1990) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Spirital Classics (2017 Edition) ,
376:Thus the eternal paradox and eternal truth of a divine life in an animal body, an immortal aspiration or reality inhabiting a mortal tenement, a single and universal consciousness representing itself in limited minds and divided egos, a transcendent, indefinable, timeless and spaceless Being who alone renders time and space and cosmos possible, and in all these the higher truth realisable by the lower term, justify themselves to the deliberate reason as well as to the persistent instinct or intuition of mankind. Attempts are sometimes made to have done finally with questionings which have so often been declared insoluble by logical thought and to persuade men to limit their mental activities to the practical and immediate problems of their material existence in the universe; but such evasions are never permanent in their effect. Mankind returns from them with a more vehement impulse of inquiry or a more violent hunger for an immediate solution. By that hunger mysticism profits and new religions arise to replace the old that have been destroyed or stripped of significance by a scepticism which itself could not satisfy because, although its business was inquiry, it was unwilling sufficiently to inquire. The attempt to deny or stifle a truth because it is yet obscure in its outward workings and too often represented by obscurantist superstition or a crude faith, is itself a kind of obscurantism. The will to escape from a cosmic necessity because it is arduous, difficult to justify by immediate tangible results, slow in regulating its operations, must turn out eventually to have been no acceptance of the truth of Nature but a revolt against the secret, mightier will of the great Mother. It is better and more rational to accept what she will not allow us as a race to reject and lift it from the sphere of blind instinct, obscure intuition and random aspiration into the light of reason and an instructed and consciously self-guiding will. And if there is any higher light of illumined intuition or self-revealing truth which is now in man either obstructed and inoperative or works with intermittent glancings as if from behind a veil or with occasional displays as of the northern lights in our material skies, then there also we need not fear to aspire. For it is likely that such is the next higher state of consciousness of which Mind is only a form and veil, and through the splendours of that light may lie the path of our progressive self-enlargement into whatever highest state is humanity's ultimate resting-place. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.01 - The Human Aspiration,
377:Integral knowledge will then mean the cancelling of the sevenfold Ignorance by the discovery of what it misses and ignores, a sevenfold self-revelation within our consciousness:- it will mean the knowledge of the Absolute as the origin of all things; the knowledge of the Self, the Spirit, the Being and of the cosmos as the Self's becoming, the becoming of the Being, a manifestation of the Spirit; the knowledge of the world as one with us in the consciousness of our true self, thus cancelling our division from it by the separative idea and life of ego; the knowledge of our psychic entity and its immortal persistence in Time beyond death and earth-existence; the knowledge of our greater and inner existence behind the surface; the knowledge of our mind, life and body in its true relation to the self within and the superconscient spiritual and supramental being above them; the knowledge, finally, of the true harmony and true use of our thought, will and action and a change of all our nature into a conscious expression of the truth of the Spirit, the Self, the Divinity, the integral spiritual Reality. But this is not an intellectual knowledge which can be learned and completed in our present mould of consciousness; it must be an experience, a becoming, a change of consciousness, a change of being. This brings in the evolutionary character of the Becoming and the fact that our mental ignorance is only a stage in our evolution. The integral knowledge, then, can only come by an evolution of our being and our nature, and that would seem to signify a slow process in Time such as has accompanied the other evolutionary transformations. But as against that inference there is the fact that the evolution has now become conscious and its method and steps need not be altogether of the same character as when it was subconscious in its process. The integral knowledge, since it must result from a change of consciousness, can be gained by a process in which our will and endeavour have a part, in which they can discover and apply their own steps and method: its growth in us can proceed by a conscious self-transformation. It is necessary then to see what is likely to be the principle of this new process of evolution and what are the movements of the integral knowledge that must necessarily emerge in it,-or, in other words, what is the nature of the consciousness that must be the base of the life divine and how that life may be expected to be formed or to form itself, to materialise or, as one might say, to realise. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.15 - Reality and the Integral Knowledge,
378:Why do we forget things? Ah! I suppose there are several reasons. First, because one makes use of the memory to remember. Memory is a mental instrument and depends on the formation of the brain. Your brain is constantly growing, unless it begins to degenerate, but still its growth can continue for a very, very long time, much longer than that of the body. And in this growth, necessarily some things will take the place of others. And as the mental instrument develops, things which have served their term or the transitory moment in the development may be wiped out to give place to the result. So the result of all that you knew is there, living in itself, but the road traversed to reach it may be completely blurred. That is, a good functioning of the memory means remembering only the results so as to be able to have the elements for moving forward and a new construction. That is more important than just retaining things rigidly in the mind. Now, there is another aspect also. Apart from the mental memory, which is something defective, there are states of consciousness. Each state of consciousness in which one happens to be registers the phenomena of a particular moment, whatever they may be. If your consciousness remains limpid, wide and strong, you can at any moment whatsoever, by concentrating, call into the active consciousness what you did, thought, saw, observed at any time before; all this you can remember by bringing up in yourself the same state of consciousness. And that, that is never forgotten. You could live a thousand years and you would still remember it. Consequently, if you don't want to forget, it must be your consciousness which remembers and not your mental memory. Your mental memory will be wiped out inevitably, get blurred, and new things will take the place of the old ones. But things of which you are conscious you do not forget. You have only to bring up the same state of consciousness again. And thus one can remember circumstances one has lived thousands of years ago, if one knows how to bring up the same state of consciousness. It is in this way that one can remember one's past lives. This never gets blotted out, while you don't have any more the memory of what you have done physically when you were very young. You would be told many things you no longer remember. That gets wiped off immediately. For the brain is constantly changing and certain weaker cells are replaced by others which are much stronger, and by other combinations, other cerebral organisations. And so, what was there before is effaced or deformed. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
379:Vijnana, true ideation, called ritam, truth or vedas, knowledge in the Vedas, acts in human mind by four separate functions; revelation, termed drishti, sight; inspiration termed sruti,hearing; and the two faculties of discernment, smriti, memory,which are intuition, termed ketu, and discrimination, termed daksha, division, or viveka, separation. By drishti we see ourselves the truth face to face, in its own form, nature or self-existence; by sruti we hear the name, sound or word by which the truth is expressed & immediately suggested to the knowledge; by ketu we distinguish a truth presented to us behind a veil whether of result or process, as Newton discovered the law of gravitation hidden behind the fall of the apple; by viveka we distinguish between various truths and are able to put them in their right place, order and relation to each other, or, if presented with mingled truth & error, separate the truth from the falsehood. Agni Jatavedas is termed in the Veda vivichi, he who has the viveka, who separates truth from falsehood; but this is only a special action of the fourth ideal faculty & in its wider scope, it is daksha, that which divides & rightly distributes truth in its multiform aspects. The ensemble of the four faculties is Vedas or divine knowledge. When man is rising out of the limited & error-besieged mental principle, the faculty most useful to him, most indispensable is daksha or viveka. Drishti of Vijnana transmuted into terms of mind has become observation, sruti appears as imagination, intuition as intelligent perception, viveka as reasoning & intellectual judgment and all of these are liable to the constant touch of error. Human buddhi, intellect, is a distorted shadow of the true ideative faculties. As we return from these shadows to their ideal substance viveka or daksha must be our constant companion; for viveka alone can get rid of the habit of mental error, prevent observation being replaced by false illumination, imagination by false inspiration, intelligence by false intuition, judgment & reason by false discernment. The first sign of human advance out of the anritam of mind to the ritam of the ideal faculty is the growing action of a luminous right discernment which fixes instantly on the truth, feels instantly the presence of error. The fullness, the manhana of this viveka is the foundation & safeguard of Ritam or Vedas. The first great movement of Agni Jatavedas is to transform by the divine will in mental activity his lower smoke-covered activity into the bright clearness & fullness of the ideal discernment. Agne adbhuta kratw a dakshasya manhana. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns To The Mystic Fire 717,
380:He continuously reflected on her image and attributes, day and night. His bhakti was such that he could not stop thinking of her. Eventually, he saw her everywhere and in everything. This was his path to illumination. He was often asked by people: what is the way to the supreme? His answer was sharp and definite: bhakti yoga. He said time and time again that bhakti yoga is the best sadhana for the Kali Yuga (Dark Age) of the present. His bhakti is illustrated by the following statement he made to a disciple: To my divine mother I prayed only for pure love. At her lotus feet I offered a few flowers and I prayed: Mother! here is virtue and here is vice; Take them both from me. Grant me only love, pure love for Thee. Mother! here is knowledge and here is ignorance; Take them both from me. Grant me only love, pure love for Thee. Mother! here is purity and impurity; Take them both from me. Grant me only love, pure love for Thee. Ramakrishna, like Kabir, was a practical man. He said: "So long as passions are directed towards the world and its objects, they are enemies. But when they are directed towards a deity, then they become the best of friends to man, for they take him to illumination. The desire for worldly things must be changed into longing for the supreme; the anger which you feel for fellow man must be directed towards the supreme for not manifesting himself to you . . . and so on, with all other emotions. The passions cannot be eradicated, but they can be turned into new directions." A disciple once asked him: "How can one conquer the weaknesses within us?" He answered: "When the fruit grows out of the flower, the petals drop off themselves. So when divinity in you increases, the weaknesses of human nature will vanish of their own accord." He emphasized that the aspirant should not give up his practices. "If a single dive into the sea does not bring you a pearl, do not conclude that there are no pearls in the sea. There are countless pearls hidden in the sea. So if you fail to merge with the supreme during devotional practices, do not lose heart. Go on patiently with the practices, and in time you will invoke divine grace." It does not matter what form you care to worship. He said: "Many are the names of the supreme and infinite are the forms through which he may be approached. In whatever name and form you choose to worship him, through that he will be realized by you." He indicated the importance of surrender on the path of bhakti when he said: ~ Swami Satyananda Saraswati, A Systematic Course in the Ancient Tantric Techniques of Yoga and Kriya ,
381:Workshops, churches, and palaces were full of these fatal works of art; he had even helped with a few himself. They were deeply disappointing be­ cause they aroused the desire for the highest and did not fulfill it. They lacked the most essential thing-mystery. That was what dreams and truly great works of art had in common : mystery. Goldmund continued his thought: It is mystery I love and pursue. Several times I have seen it beginning to take shape; as an artist, I would like to capture and express it. Some day, perhaps, I'll be able to. The figure of the universal mother, the great birthgiver, for example. Unlike other fi gures, her mystery does not consist of this or that detail, of a particular voluptuousness or sparseness, coarseness or delicacy, power or gracefulness. It consists of a fusion of the greatest contrasts of the world, those that cannot otherwise be combined, that have made peace only in this figure. They live in it together: birth and death, tenderness and cruelty, life and destruction. If I only imagined this fi gure, and were she merely the play of my thoughts, it would not matter about her, I could dismiss her as a mistake and forget about heR But the universal mother is not an idea of mine; I did not think her up, I saw her! She lives inside me. I've met her again and again. She appeared to me one winter night in a village when I was asked to hold a light over the bed of a peasant woman giving birth: that's when the image came to life within me. I often lose it; for long periods it re­ mains remote; but suddenly it Hashes clear again, as it did today. The image of my own mother, whom I loved most of all, has transformed itself into this new image, and lies encased within the new one like the pit in the cherry. As his present situation became clear to him, Goldmund was afraid to make a decision. It was as difficult as when he had said farewell to Narcissus and to the cloister. Once more he was on an impor­ tant road : the road to his mother. Would this mother-image one day take shape, a work of his hands, and become visible to all? Perhaps that was his goal, the hidden meaning of his life. Perhaps; he didn't know. But one thing he did know : it was good to travel toward his mother, to be drawn and called by her. He felt alive. Perhaps he'd never be able to shape her image, perhaps she'd always remain a dream, an intuition, a golden shimmer, a sacred mystery. At any rate, he had to follow her and submit his fate to her. She was his star. And now the decision was at his fingertips; everything had become clear. Art was a beautiful thing, but it was no goddess, no goal-not for him. He was not to follow art, but only the call of his mother. ~ Hermann Hesse, Narcissus and Goldmund ,
382:One can learn how to identify oneself. One must learn. It is indispensable if one wants to get out of one's ego. For so long as one is shut up in one's ego, one can't make any progress. How can it be done? There are many ways. I'll tell you one. When I was in Paris, I used to go to many places where there were gatherings of all kinds, people making all sorts of researches, spiritual (so-called spiritual), occult researches, etc. And once I was invited to meet a young lady (I believe she was Swedish) who had found a method of knowledge, exactly a method for learning. And so she explained it to us. We were three or four (her French was not very good but she was quite sure about what she was saying!); she said: "It's like this, you take an object or make a sign on a blackboard or take a drawing - that is not important - take whatever is most convenient for you. Suppose, for instance, that I draw for you... (she had a blackboard) I draw a design." She drew a kind of half-geometric design. "Now, you sit in front of the design and concentrate all your attention upon it - upon that design which is there. You concentrate, concentrate without letting anything else enter your consciousness - except that. Your eyes are fixed on the drawing and don't move at all. You are as it were hypnotised by the drawing. You look (and so she sat there, looking), you look, look, look.... I don't know, it takes more or less time, but still for one who is used to it, it goes pretty fast. You look, look, look, you become that drawing you are looking at. Nothing else exists in the world any longer except the drawing, and then, suddenly, you pass to the other side; and when you pass to the other side you enter a new consciousness, and you know." We had a good laugh, for it was amusing. But it is quite true, it is an excellent method to practise. Naturally, instead of taking a drawing or any object, you may take, for instance, an idea, a few words. You have a problem preoccupying you, you don't know the solution of the problem; well, you objectify your problem in your mind, put it in the most precise, exact, succinct terms possible, and then concentrate, make an effort; you concentrate only on the words, and if possible on the idea they represent, that is, upon your problem - you concentrate, concentrate, concentrate until nothing else exists but that. And it is true that, all of a sudden, you have the feeling of something opening, and one is on the other side. The other side of what?... It means that you have opened a door of your consciousness, and instantaneously you have the solution of your problem. It is an excellent method of learning "how" to identify oneself. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 217,
383:Sweet Mother, can the psychic express itself without the mind, the vital and the physical?It expresses itself constantly without them. Only, in order that the ordinary human being may perceive it, it has to express itself through them, because the ordinary human being is not in direct contact with the psychic. If it was in direct contact with the psychic it would be psychic in its manifestation - and all would be truly well. But as it is not in contact with the psychic it doesn't even know what it is, it wonders all bewildered what kind of a being it can be; so to reach this ordinary human consciousness it must use ordinary means, that is, go through the mind, the vital and the physical.One of them may be skipped but surely not the last, otherwise one is no longer conscious of anything at all. The ordinary human being is conscious only in his physical being, and only in relatively rare moments is he conscious of his mind, just a little more frequently of his vital, but all this is mixed up in his consciousness, so much so that he would be quite unable to say "This movement comes from the mind, this from the vital, this from the physical." This already asks for a considerable development in order to be able to distinguish within oneself the source of the different movements one has. And it is so mixed that even when one tries, at the beginning it is very difficult to classify and separate one thing from another.It is as when one works with colours, takes three or four or five different colours and puts them in the same water and beats them up together, it makes a grey, indistinct and incomprehensi- ble mixture, you see, and one can't say which is red, which blue, which green, which yellow; it is something dirty, lots of colours mixed. So first of all one must do this little work of separating the red, blue, yellow, green - putting them like this, each in its corner. It is not at all easy.I have met people who used to think themselves extremely intelligent, by the way, who thought they knew a lot, and when I spoke to them about the different parts of the being they looked at me like this (gesture) and asked me, "But what are you speaking about?" They did not understand at all. I am speaking of people who have the reputation of being intelligent. They don't understand at all. For them it is just the consciousness; it is the consciousness-"It is my consciousness" and then there is the neighbour's consciousness; and again there are things which do not have any consciousness. And then I asked them whether animals had a consciousness; so they began to scratch their heads and said, "Perhaps it is we who put our consciousness in the animal when we look at it," like that... ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
384:Worthy The Name Of Sir Knight Sir Knight of the world's oldest order, Sir Knight of the Army of God, You have crossed the strange mystical border, The ground floor of truth you have trod; You have entered the sanctum sanctorum, Which leads to the temple above, Where you come as a stone, and a Christ-chosen one, In the kingdom of Friendship and Love. II As you stand in this new realm of beauty, Where each man you meet is your friend, Think not that your promise of duty In hall, or asylum, shall end; Outside, in the great world of pleasure, Beyond, in the clamor of trade, In the battle of life and its coarse daily strife Remember the vows you have made. III Your service, majestic and solemn, Your symbols, suggestive and sweet, Your uniformed phalanx in column On gala days marching the street; Your sword and your plume and your helmet, Your 'secrets' hid from the world's sight; These things are the small, lesser parts of the all Which are needed to form the true Knight. IV The martyrs who perished rejoicing In Templary's glorious laws, Who died 'midst the fagots while voicing The glory and worth of their cause- 935 They honored the title of 'Templar' No more than the Knight of to-day Who mars not the name with one blemish of shame, But carries it clean through life's fray. To live for a cause, to endeavor To make your deeds grace it, to try And uphold its precepts forever, Is harder by far than to die. For the battle of life is unending, The enemy, Self, never tires, And the true Knight must slay that sly foe every day Ere he reaches the heights he desires. VI Sir Knight, have you pondered the meaning Of all you have heard and been told? Have you strengthened your heart for its weaning From vices and faults loved of old? Will you honor, in hours of temptation, Your promises noble and grand? Will your spirit be strong to do battle with wrong, 'And having done all, to stand?' VII Will you ever be true to a brother In actions as well as in creed? Will you stand by his side as no other Could stand in the hour of his need? Will you boldly defend him from peril, And lift him from poverty's curseWill the promise of aid which you willingly made, Reach down from your lips to your purse? VIII The world's battle field is before you! Let Wisdom walk close by your side, 936 Let Faith spread her snowy wings o'er you, Let Truth be your comrade and guide; Let Fortitude, Justice and Mercy Direct all your conduct aright, And let each word and act tell to men the proud fact, You are worthy the name of 'Sir Knight'. ~ Ella Wheeler Wilcox,
385:It is then by a transformation of life in its very principle, not by an external manipulation of its phenomena, that the integral Yoga proposes to change it from a troubled and ignorant into a luminous and harmonious movement of Nature. There are three conditions which are indispensable for the achievement of this central inner revolution and new formation; none of them is altogether sufficient in itself, but by their united threefold power the uplifting can be done, the conversion made and completely made. For, first, life as it is is a movement of desire and it has built in us as its centre a desire-soul which refers to itself all the motions of life and puts in them its own troubled hue and pain of an ignorant, half-lit, baffled endeavour: for a divine living, desire must be abolished and replaced by a purer and firmer motive-power, the tormented soul of desire dissolved and in its stead there must emerge the calm, strength, happiness of a true vital being now concealed within us. Next, life as it is is driven or led partly by the impulse of the life-force, partly by a mind which is mostly a servant and abettor of the ignorant life-impulse, but in part also its uneasy and not too luminous or competent guide and mentor; for a divine life the mind and the life-impulse must cease to be anything but instruments and the inmost psychic being must take their place as the leader on the path and the indicator of a divine guidance. Last, life as it is is turned towards the satisfaction of the separative ego; ego must disappear and be replaced by the true spiritual person, the central being, and life itself must be turned towards the fulfilment of the Divine in terrestrial existence; it must feel a Divine Force awaking within it and become an obedient instrumentation of its purpose. There is nothing that is not ancient and familiar in the first of these three transforming inner movements; for it has always been one of the principal objects of spiritual discipline. It has been best formulated in the already expressed doctrine of the Gita by which a complete renouncement of desire for the fruits as the motive of action, a complete annulment of desire itself, the complete achievement of a perfect equality are put forward as the normal status of a spiritual being. A perfect spiritual equality is the one true and infallible sign of the cessation of desire, - to be equal-souled to all things, unmoved by joy and sorrow, the pleasant and the unpleasant, success or failure, to look with an equal eye on high and low, friend and enemy, the virtuous and the sinner, to see in all beings the manifold manifestation of the One and in all things the multitudinous play or the slow masked evolution of the embodied Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 2,
386:root of the falsification and withdrawl of divine love ::: At every moment they are moved to take egoistic advantage of the psychic and spiritual influences and can be detected using the power, joy or light these bring into us for a lower life-motive. Afterwards too, even when the seeker has opened to the Divine Love transcendental, universal or immanent, yet if he tries to pour it into life, he meets the power of obscuration and perversion of these lower Nature-forces. Always they draw away towards pitfalls, pour into that higher intensity their diminishing elements, seek to capture the descending Power for themselves and their interests and degrade it into an aggrandised mental, vital or physical instrumentation for desire and ego. Instead of a Divine Love creator of a new heaven and a new earth of Truth and Light, they would hold it here prisoner as a tremendous sanction and glorifying force of sublimation to gild the mud of the old earth and colour with its rose and sapphire the old turbid unreal skies of sentimentalising vital imagination and mental idealised chimera. If that falsification is permitted, the higher Light and Power and Bliss withdraw, there is a fall back to a lower status; or else the realisation remains tied to an insecure half-way and mixture or is covered and even submerged by an inferior exaltation that is not the true Ananda. It is for this reason that Divine Love which is at the heart of all creation and the most powerful of all redeeming and creative forces has yet been the least frontally present in earthly life, the least successfully redemptive, the least creative. Human nature has been unable to bear it in its purity for the very reason that it is the most powerful, pure, rare and intense of all the divine energies; what little could be seized has been corrupted at once into a vital pietistic ardour, a defenceless religious or ethical sentimentalism, a sensuous or even sensual erotic mysticism of the roseate coloured mind or passionately turbid life-impulse and with these simulations compensated its inability to house the Mystic Flame that could rebuild the world with its tongues of sacrifice. It is only the inmost psychic being unveiled and emerging in its full power that can lead the pilgrim sacrifice unscathed through these ambushes and pitfalls; at each moment it catches, exposes, repels the mind's and the life's falsehoods, seizes hold on the truth of the Divine Love and Ananda and separates it from the excitement of the mind's ardours and the blind enthusiasms of the misleading life-force. But all things that are true at their core in mind and life and the physical being it extricates and takes with it in the journey till they stand on the heights, new in spirit and sublime in figure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 2,
387:To Know How To Suffer IF AT any time a deep sorrow, a searing doubt or an intense pain overwhelms you and drives you to despair, there is an infallible way to regain calm and peace. In the depths of our being there shines a light whose brilliance is equalled only by its purity; a light, a living and conscious portion of a universal godhead who animates and nourishes and illumines Matter, a powerful and unfailing guide for those who are willing to heed his law, a helper full of solace and loving forbearance towards all who aspire to see and hear and obey him. No sincere and lasting aspiration towards him can be in vain; no strong and respectful trust can be disappointed, no expectation ever deceived. My heart has suffered and lamented, almost breaking beneath a sorrow too heavy, almost sinking beneath a pain too strong.... But I have called to thee, O divine comforter, I have prayed ardently to thee, and the splendour of thy dazzling light has appeared to me and revived me. As the rays of thy glory penetrated and illumined all my being, I clearly perceived the path to follow, the use that can be made of suffering; I understood that the sorrow that held me in its grip was but a pale reflection of the sorrow of the earth, of this abysm of suffering and anguish. Only those who have suffered can understand the suffering of others; understand it, commune with it and relieve it. And I understood, O divine comforter, sublime Holocaust, that in order to sustain us in all our troubles, to soothe all our pangs, thou must have known and felt all the sufferings of earth and man, all without exception. How is it that among those who claim to be thy worshippers, some regard thee as a cruel torturer, as an inexorable judge witnessing the torments that are tolerated by thee or even created by thy own will? No, I now perceive that these sufferings come from the very imperfection of Matter which, in its disorder and crudeness, is unfit to manifest thee; and thou art the very first to suffer from it, to bewail it, thou art the first to toil and strive in thy ardent desire to change disorder into order, suffering into happiness, discord into harmony. Suffering is not something inevitable or even desirable, but when it comes to us, how helpful it can be! Each time we feel that our heart is breaking, a deeper door opens within us, revealing new horizons, ever richer in hidden treasures, whose golden influx brings once more a new and intenser life to the organism on the brink of destruction. And when, by these successive descents, we reach the veil that reveals thee as it is lifted, O Lord, who can describe the intensity of Life that penetrates the whole being, the radiance of the Light that floods it, the sublimity of the Love that transforms it for ever! ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago 1.05 - To Know How To Suffer,
388:What do we understand by the term "chance"? Chance can only be the opposite of order and harmony. There is only one true harmony and that is the supramental - the reign of Truth, the expression of the Divine Law. In the Supermind, therefore, chance has no place. But in the lower Nature the supreme Truth is obscured: hence there is an absence of that divine unity of purpose and action which alone can constitute order. Lacking this unity, the domain of lower Nature is governed by what we may call chance - that is to say, it is a field in which various conflicting forces intermix, having no single definite aim. Whatever arises out of such a rushing together of forces is a result of confusion, dissonance and falsehood - a product of chance. Chance is not merely a conception to cover our ignorance of the causes at work; it is a description of the uncertain mele ́e of the lower Nature which lacks the calm one-pointedness of the divine Truth. The world has forgotten its divine origin and become an arena of egoistic energies; but it is still possible for it to open to the Truth, call it down by its aspiration and bring about a change in the whirl of chance. What men regard as a mechanical sequence of events, owing to their own mental associations, experiences and generalisations, is really manipulated by subtle agencies each of which tries to get its own will done. The world has got so subjected to these undivine agencies that the victory of the Truth cannot be won except by fighting for it. It has no right to it: it has to gain it by disowning the falsehood and the perversion, an important part of which is the facile notion that, since all things owe their final origin to the Divine, all their immediate activities also proceed directly from it. The fact is that here in the lower Nature the Divine is veiled by a cosmic Ignorance and what takes place does not proceed directly from the divine knowledge. That everything is equally the will of God is a very convenient suggestion of the hostile influences which would have the creation stick as tightly as possible to the disorder and ugliness to which it has been reduced. So what is to be done, you ask? Well, call down the Light, open yourselves to the power of Transformation. Innumerable times the divine peace has been given to you and as often you have lost it - because something in you refuses to surrender its petty egoistic routine. If you are not always vigilant, your nature will return to its old unregenerate habits even after it has been filled with the descending Truth. It is the struggle between the old and the new that forms the crux of the Yoga; but if you are bent on being faithful to the supreme Law and Order revealed to you, the parts of your being belonging to the domain of chance will, however slowly, be converted and divinised. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 ,
389:reading ::: 50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered: Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927) Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954) Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997) Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997) Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964) Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980) Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006) David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980) Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012) Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984) Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997) Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006) Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961) Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958) Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947) Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969) Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936) Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901) Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983) Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006) Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005) Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998) John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999) Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013) Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958) Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967) Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951) Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945) William James - Principles of Psychology (1890) Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953) Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011) Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953) RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959) Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970) Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974) Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014) Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012) IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927) Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951) Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966) Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002) VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998) Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961) Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970) Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004) Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002) BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953) Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000) William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics ,
390:Our culture, the laws of our culture, are predicated on the idea that people are conscious. People have experience; people make decisions, and can be held responsible for them. There's a free will element to it. You can debate all that philosophically, and fine, but the point is that that is how we act, and that is the idea that our legal system is predicated on. There's something deep about it, because you're subject to the law, but the law is also limited by you, which is to say that in a well-functioning, properly-grounded democratic system, you have intrinsic value. That's the source of your rights. Even if you're a murderer, we have to say the law can only go so far because there's something about you that's divine.Well, what does that mean? Partly it means that there's something about you that's conscious and capable of communicating, like you're a whole world unto yourself. You have that to contribute to everyone else, and that's valuable. You can learn new things, transform the structure of society, and invent a new way of dealing with the world. You're capable of all that. It's an intrinsic part of you, and that's associated with the idea that there's something about the logos that is necessary for the absolute chaos of the reality beyond experience to manifest itself as reality. That's an amazing idea because it gives consciousness a constitutive role in the cosmos. You can debate that, but you can't just bloody well brush it off. First of all, we are the most complicated things there are, that we know of, by a massive amount. We're so complicated that it's unbelievable. So there's a lot of cosmos out there, but there's a lot of cosmos in here, too, and which one is greater is by no means obvious, unless you use something trivial, like relative size, which really isn't a very sophisticated approach.Whatever it is that is you has this capacity to experience reality and to transform it, which is a very strange thing. You can conceptualize the future in your imagination, and then you can work and make that manifest-participate in the process of creation. That's one way of thinking about it. That's why I think Genesis 1 relates the idea that human beings are made in the image of the divine-men and women, which is interesting, because feminists are always criticizing Christianity as being inexorably patriarchal. Of course, they criticize everything like that, so it's hardly a stroke of bloody brilliance. But I think it's an absolute miracle that right at the beginning of the document it says straightforwardly, with no hesitation whatsoever, that the divine spark which we're associating with the word, that brings forth Being, is manifest in men and women equally. That's a very cool thing. You got to think, like I said, do you actually take that seriously? Well, what you got to ask is what happens if you don't take it seriously, right? Read Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. That's the best investigation into that tactic that's ever been produced. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series 1,
391:The Mother once described the characteristics of the unity-body, of the future supramental body, to a young Ashramite: 'You know, if there is something on that window-sill and if I [in a supramental body] want to take it, I stretch out my hand and it becomes - wow! - long, and I have the thing in my hand without even having to get up from my chair ... Physically, I shall be able to be here and there at the same time. I shall be able to communicate with many people at the same time. To have something in my hand, I'll just have to wish for it. I think about something and I want it and it is already in my hand. With this transformed body I shall be free of the fetters of ignorance, pain, of mortality and unconsciousness. I shall be able to do many things at the same time. The transparent, luminous, strong, light, elastic body won't need any material things to subsist on ... The body can even be lengthened if one wants it to become tall, or shrunk when one wants it to be small, in any circumstances ... There will be all kinds of changes and there will be powers without limit. And it won't be something funny. Of course, I am giving you somewhat childish examples to tease you and to show the difference. 'It will be a true being, perfect in proportion, very, very beautiful and strong, light, luminous or else transparent. It will have a supple and malleable body endowed with extraordinary capacities and able to do everything; a body without age, a creation of the New Consciousness or else a transformed body such as none has ever imagined ... All that is above man will be within its reach. It will be guided by the Truth alone and nothing less. That is what it is and more even than has ever been conceived.'895 This the Mother told in French to Mona Sarkar, who noted it down as faithfully as possible and read it out to her for verification. The supramental body will not only be omnipotent and omniscient, but also omnipresent. And immortal. Not condemned to a never ending monotonous immortality - which, again, is one of our human interpretations of immortality - but for ever existing in an ecstasy of inexhaustible delight in 'the Joy that surpasses all understanding.' Moment after moment, eternity after eternity. For in that state each moment is an eternity and eternity an ever present moment. If gross matter is not capable of being used as a permanent coating of the soul in the present phase of its evolution, then it certainly is not capable of being the covering of the supramental consciousness, to form the body that has, to some extent, been described above. This means that the crux of the process of supramental transformation lies in matter; the supramental world has to become possible in matter, which at present still is gross matter. - Sri Aurobindo and the Mother were supramentalized in their mental and vital, but their enormous problem was the supramentalization of the physical body, consisting of the gross matter of the Earth. As the Mother said: 'It is matter itself that must change so that the Supramental may manifest. A new kind of matter no longer corresponding with Mendeleyev's periodic table of the elements? Is that possible? ~ Georges Van Vrekhem,
392:28 August 1957Mother, Sri Aurobindo says here: "Whether the whole of humanity would be touched [by the Supramental influence] or only a part of it ready for the change would depend on what was intended or possible in the continued order of the universe."The Supramental Manifestation, SABCL, Vol. 16, p. 56What is meant by "what was intended or possible"? The two things are different. So far you have said that if humanity changes, if it wants to participate in the new birth...It is the same thing. But when you look at an object on a certain plane, you see it horizontally, and when you look at the same object from another plane, you see it vertically. (Mother shows the cover and the back of her book.) So, if one looks from above, one says "intended"; if one looks from below, one says "possible".... But it is absolutely the same thing, only the point of view is different.But in that case, it is not our incapacity or lack of will to change that makes any difference.We have already said this many a time. If you remain in a consciousness which functions mentally, even if it is the highest mind, you have the notion of an absolute determinism of cause and effect and feel that things are what they are because they are what they are and cannot be otherwise.It is only when you come out of the mental consciousness completely and enter a higher perception of things - which you may call spiritual or divine - that you suddenly find yourself in a state of perfect freedom where everything is possible.(Silence)Those who have contacted that state or lived in it, even if only for a moment, try to describe it as a feeling of an absolute Will in action, which immediately gives to the human mentality the feeling of being arbitrary. And because of that distortion there arises the idea - which I might call traditional - of a supreme and arbitrary God, which is something most unacceptable to every enlightened mind. I suppose that this experience badly expressed is at the origin of this notion. And in fact it is incorrect to express it as an absolute Will: it is very, very, very different. It is something else altogether. For, what man understands by "Will" is a decision that is taken and carried out. We are obliged to use the word "will", but in its truth the Will acting in the universe is neither a choice nor a decision that is taken. What seems to me the closest expression is "vision". Things are because they are seen. But of course "seen", not seen as we see with these eyes.(Mother touches her eyes...) All the same, it is the nearest thing.It is a vision - a vision unfolding itself.The universe becomes objective as it is progressively seen.And that is why Sri Aurobindo has said "intended or possible". It is neither one nor the other. All that can be said is a distortion.(Silence)Objectivisation - universal objectivisation - is something like a projection in space and time, like a living image of what is from all eternity. And as the image is gradually projected on the screen of time and space, it becomes objective:The Supreme contemplating His own Image. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958 ,
393:On that spring day in the park I saw a young woman who attracted me. She was tall and slender, elegantly dressed, and had an intelligent and boyish face. I liked her at once. She was my type and began to fill my imagination. She probably was not much older than I but seemed far more mature, well-defined, a full-grown woman, but with a touch of exuberance and boyishness in her face, and this was what I liked above all . I had never managed to approach a girl with whom I had fallen in love, nor did I manage in this case. But the impression she made on me was deeper than any previous one had been and the infatuation had a profound influence on my life. Suddenly a new image had risen up before me, a lofty and cherished image. And no need, no urge was as deep or as fervent within me as the craving to worship and admire. I gave her the name Beatrice, for, even though I had not read Dante, I knew about Beatrice from an English painting of which I owned a reproduction. It showed a young pre-Raphaelite woman, long-limbed and slender, with long head and etherealized hands and features. My beautiful young woman did not quite resemble her, even though she, too, revealed that slender and boyish figure which I loved, and something of the ethereal, soulful quality of her face. Although I never addressed a single word to Beatrice, she exerted a profound influence on me at that time. She raised her image before me, she gave me access to a holy shrine, she transformed me into a worshiper in a temple. From one day to the next I stayed clear of all bars and nocturnal exploits. I could be alone with myself again and enjoyed reading and going for long walks. My sudden conversion drew a good deal of mockery in its wake. But now I had something I loved and venerated, I had an ideal again, life was rich with intimations of mystery and a feeling of dawn that made me immune to all taunts. I had come home again to myself, even if only as the slave and servant of a cherished image. I find it difficult to think back to that time without a certain fondness. Once more I was trying most strenuously to construct an intimate "world of light" for myself out of the shambles of a period of devastation; once more I sacrificed everything within me to the aim of banishing darkness and evil from myself. And, furthermore, this present "world of light" was to some extent my own creation; it was no longer an escape, no crawling back to -nether and the safety of irresponsibility; it was a new duty, one I had invented and desired on my own, with responsibility and self-control. My sexuality, a torment from which I was in constant flight, was to be transfigured nto spirituality and devotion by this holy fire. Everything :brk and hateful was to be banished, there were to be no more tortured nights, no excitement before lascivious picures, no eavesdropping at forbidden doors, no lust. In place of all this I raised my altar to the image of Beatrice, :.. and by consecrating myself to her I consecrated myself to the spirit and to the gods, sacrificing that part of life which I withdrew from the forces of darkness to those of light. My goal was not joy but purity, not happiness but beauty, and spirituality. This cult of Beatrice completely changed my life. ~ Hermann Hesse, Demian ,
394:At it's narrowest (although this is a common and perhaps the official position; need to find ref in What is Enlightenment) "integral", "turquois" (Spiral Dynamics), and "second tier" (ditto) are all synonms, and in turn are equivalent to Wilber IV / AQAL/Wilber V "Post-metaphysical" AQAL. This is the position that "Integral = Ken Wilber". It constitutes a new philosophical school or meme-set, in the tradition of charismatic spiritual teachers of all ages, in which an articulate, brilliant, and popular figure would arise, and gather a following around him- or her-self. After the teacher passes on, their teaching remains through books and organisations dedicated to perpetuating that teaching; although without the brilliant light of the Founder, things generally become pretty stultifying, and there is often little or no original development. Even so, the books themselves continue to inspire, and many people benefit greatly from these tecahings, and can contact the original Light of the founders to be inspired by them on the subtle planes. Some late 19th, 20th, and early 21st century examples of such teachers, known and less well-known, are Blavatsky, Theon, Steiner, Aurobindo, Gurdjieff, Crowley, Alice Bailey, Carl Jung, Ann Ree Colton, and now Ken Wilber. Also, many popular gurus belong in this category. It could plausibly be suggested that the founders of the great world religions started out no different, but their teaching really caught on n a big way....At its broadest then, the Integral Community includes not only Wilber but those he cites as his influences and hold universal and evolutionary views or teachings, as well as those who, while influenced by him also differ somewhat, and even those like Arthur M Young that Wilber has apparently never heard of. Nevertheless, all share a common, evolutionary, "theory of everything" position, and, whilst they may differ on many details and even on many major points, taken together they could be considered a wave front for a new paradigm, a memetic revolution. I use the term Daimon of the Integral Movement to refer to the spiritual being or personality of light that is behind and working through this broader movement.Now, this doesn't mean that this daimon is necessarily a negative entity. I see a lot of promise, a lot of potential, in the Integral Approach. From what I feel at the moment, the Integral Deva is a force and power of good.But, as with any new spiritual or evolutionary development, there is duality, in that there are forces that hinder and oppose and distort, as well as forces that help and aid in the evolution and ultimate divinisation of the Earth and the cosmos. Thus even where a guru does give in the dark side (as very often happens with many gurus today) there still remains an element of Mixed Light that remains (one finds this ambiguity with Sai Baba, with Da Free John, and with Rajneesh); and we find this same ambiguity with the Integral Community regarding what seems to me a certain offputting devotional attitude towards Wilber himself. The light will find its way, regardless. However, an Intregral Movement that is caught up in worship of and obedience to an authority figure, will not be able to achieve what a movement unfettered by such shackles could. ~ M Alan Kazlev, Kheper Ken Wilber,
395:Can it be said in justification of one's past that whatever has happened in one's life had to happen?The Mother: Obviously, what has happened had to happen; it would not have been, if it had not been intended. Even the mistakes that we have committed and the adversities that fell upon us had to be, because there was some necessity in them, some utility for our lives. But in truth these things cannot be explained mentally and should not be. For all that happened was necessary, not for any mental reason, but to lead us to something beyond what the mind imagines. But is there any need to explain after all? The whole universe explains everything at every moment and a particular thing happens because the whole universe is what it is. But this does not mean that we are bound over to a blind acquiescence in Nature's inexorable law. You can accept the past as a settled fact and perceive the necessity in it, and still you can use the experience it gave you to build up the power consciously to guide and shape your present and your future.Is the time also of an occurrence arranged in the Divine Plan of things?The Mother: All depends upon the plane from which one sees and speaks. There is a plane of divine consciousness in which all is known absolutely, and the whole plan of things foreseen and predetermined. That way of seeing lives in the highest reaches of the Supramental; it is the Supreme's own vision. But when we do not possess that consciousness, it is useless to speak in terms that hold good only in that region and are not our present effective way of seeing things. For at a lower level of consciousness nothing is realised or fixed beforehand; all is in the process of making. Here there are no settled facts, there is only the play of possibilities; out of the clash of possibilities is realised the thing that has to happen. On this plane we can choose and select; we can refuse one possibility and accept another; we can follow one path, turn away from another. And that we can do, even though what is actually happening may have been foreseen and predetermined in a higher plane.The Supreme Consciousness knows everything beforehand, because everything is realised there in her eternity. But for the sake of her play and in order to carry out actually on the physical plane what is foreordained in her own supreme self, she moves here upon earth as if she did not know the whole story; she works as if it was a new and untried thread that she was weaving. It is this apparent forgetfulness of her own foreknowledge in the higher consciousness that gives to the individual in the active life of the world his sense of freedom and independence and initiative. These things in him are her pragmatic tools or devices, and it is through this machinery that the movements and issues planned and foreseen elsewhere are realised here.It may help you to understand if you take the example of an actor. An actor knows the whole part he has to play; he has in his mind the exact sequence of what is to happen on the stage. But when he is on the stage, he has to appear as if he did not know anything; he has to feel and act as if he were experiencing all these things for the first time, as if it was an entirely new world with all its chance events and surprises that was unrolling before his eyes. 28th April ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 ,
396:But there's a reason. There's a reason. There's a reason for this, there's a reason education sucks, and it's the same reason that it will never, ever, ever be fixed. It's never gonna get any better. Don't look for it. Be happy with what you got. Because the owners of this country don't want that. I'm talking about the real owners now, the real owners, the big wealthy business interests that control things and make all the important decisions. Forget the politicians. The politicians are put there to give you the idea that you have freedom of choice. You don't. You have no choice. You have owners. They own you. They own everything. They own all the important land. They own and control the corporations. They've long since bought and paid for the senate, the congress, the state houses, the city halls, they got the judges in their back pockets and they own all the big media companies so they control just about all of the news and information you get to hear. They got you by the balls. They spend billions of dollars every year lobbying, lobbying, to get what they want. Well, we know what they want. They want more for themselves and less for everybody else, but I'll tell you what they don't want: They don't want a population of citizens capable of critical thinking. They don't want well informed, well educated people capable of critical thinking. They're not interested in that. That doesn't help them. Thats against their interests. Thats right. They don't want people who are smart enough to sit around a kitchen table to figure out how badly they're getting fucked by a system that threw them overboard 30 fucking years ago. They don't want that. You know what they want? They want obedient workers. Obedient workers. People who are just smart enough to run the machines and do the paperwork, and just dumb enough to passively accept all these increasingly shittier jobs with the lower pay, the longer hours, the reduced benefits, the end of overtime and the vanishing pension that disappears the minute you go to collect it, and now they're coming for your Social Security money. They want your retirement money. They want it back so they can give it to their criminal friends on Wall Street, and you know something? They'll get it. They'll get it all from you, sooner or later, 'cause they own this fucking place. It's a big club, and you ain't in it. You and I are not in the big club. And by the way, it's the same big club they use to beat you over the head with all day long when they tell you what to believe. All day long beating you over the head in their media telling you what to believe, what to think and what to buy. The table is tilted folks. The game is rigged, and nobody seems to notice, nobody seems to care. Good honest hard-working people -- white collar, blue collar, it doesn't matter what color shirt you have on -- good honest hard-working people continue -- these are people of modest means -- continue to elect these rich cocksuckers who don't give a fuck about them. They don't give a fuck about you. They don't give a fuck about you. They don't care about you at all -- at all -- at all. And nobody seems to notice, nobody seems to care. That's what the owners count on; the fact that Americans will probably remain willfully ignorant of the big red, white and blue dick that's being jammed up their assholes everyday. Because the owners of this country know the truth: it's called the American Dream, because you have to be asleep to believe it. ~ George Carlin,
397:It is thus by an integralisation of our divided being that the Divine Shakti in the Yoga will proceed to its object; for liberation, perfection, mastery are dependent on this integralisation, since the little wave on the surface cannot control its own movement, much less have any true control over the vast life around it. The Shakti, the power of the Infinite and the Eternal descends within us, works, breaks up our present psychological formations, shatters every wall, widens, liberates, presents us with always newer and greater powers of vision, ideation, perception and newer and greater life-motives, enlarges and newmodels increasingly the soul and its instruments, confronts us with every imperfection in order to convict and destroy it, opens to a greater perfection, does in a brief period the work of many lives or ages so that new births and new vistas open constantly within us. Expansive in her action, she frees the consciousness from confinement in the body; it can go out in trance or sleep or even waking and enter into worlds or other regions of this world and act there or carry back its experience. It spreads out, feeling the body only as a small part of itself, and begins to contain what before contained it; it achieves the cosmic consciousness and extends itself to be commensurate with the universe. It begins to know inwardly and directly and not merely by external observation and contact the forces at play in the world, feels their movement, distinguishes their functioning and can operate immediately upon them as the scientist operates upon physical forces, accept their action and results in our mind, life, body or reject them or modify, change, reshape, create immense new powers and movements in place of the old small functionings of the nature. We begin to perceive the working of the forces of universal Mind and to know how our thoughts are created by that working, separate from within the truth and falsehood of our perceptions, enlarge their field, extend and illumine their significance, become master of our own minds and active to shape the movements of Mind in the world around us. We begin to perceive the flow and surge of the universal life-forces, detect the origin and law of our feelings, emotions, sensations, passions, are free to accept, reject, new-create, open to wider, rise to higher planes of Life-Power. We begin to perceive too the key to the enigma of Matter, follow the interplay of Mind and Life and Consciousness upon it, discover more and more its instrumental and resultant function and detect ultimately the last secret of Matter as a form not merely of Energy but of involved and arrested or unstably fixed and restricted consciousness and begin to see too the possibility of its liberation and plasticity of response to higher Powers, its possibilities for the conscious and no longer the more than half-inconscient incarnation and self-expression of the Spirit. All this and more becomes more and more possible as the working of the Divine Shakti increases in us and, against much resistance or labour to respond of our obscure consciousness, through much struggle and movement of progress and regression and renewed progress necessitated by the work of intensive transformation of a half-inconscient into a conscious substance, moves to a greater purity, truth, height, range. All depends on the psychic awakening in us, the completeness of our response to her and our growing surrender. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 2,
398:"The beings who were always appearing and speaking to Jeanne d'Arc would, if seen by an Indian, have quite a different appearance; for when one sees, one projects the forms of one's mind.... You have the vision of one in India whom you call the Divine Mother; the Catholics say it is the Virgin Mary, and the Japanese call it Kwannon, the Goddess of Mercy; and others would give other names. It is the same force, the same power, but the images made of it are different in different faiths." Questions and Answers 1929 - 1931 (21 April 1929)And then? You are not very talkative today! Is that all? You say that "each person has his own world of dreamimagery peculiar to himself." Ibid.Each individual has his own way of expressing, thinking, speaking, feeling, understanding. It is the combination of all these ways of being that makes the individual. That is why everyone can understand only according to his own nature. As long as you are shut up in your own nature, you can know only what is in your consciousness. All depends upon the height of the nature of your consciousness. Your world is limited to what you have in your consciousness. If you have a very small consciousness, you will understand only a few things. When your consciousness is very vast, universal, only then will you understand the world. If the consciousness is limited to your little ego, all the rest will escape you.... There are people whose brain and consciousness are smaller than a walnut. You know that a walnut resembles the brain; well these people look at things and don't understand them. They can understand nothing else except what is in direct contact with their senses. For them only what they taste, what they see, hear, touch has a reality, and all the rest simply does not exist, and they accuse us of speaking fancifully! "What I cannot touch does not exist", they say. But the only answer to give them is: "It does not exist for you, but there's no reason why it shouldn't exist for others." You must not insist with these people, and you must not forget that the smaller they are the greater is the audacity in their assertions. One's cocksureness is in proportion to one's unconsciousness; the more unconscious one is, the more is one sure of oneself. The most foolish are always the most vain. Your stupidity is in proportion to your vanity. The more one knows... In fact, there is a time when one is quite convinced that one knows nothing at all. There's not a moment in the world which does not bring something new, for the world is perpetually growing. If one is conscious of that, one has always something new to learn. But one can become conscious of it only gradually. One's conviction that one knows is in direct proportion to one's ignorance and stupidity. Mother, have the scientists, then, a very small consciousness? Why? All scientists are not like that. If you meet a true scientist who has worked hard, he will tell you: "We know nothing. What we know today is nothing beside what we shall know tomorrow. This year's discoveries will be left behind next year." A real scientist knows very well that there are many more things he doesn't know than those he knows. And this is true of all branches of human activity. I have never met a scientist worthy of the name who was proud. I have never met a man of some worth who has told me: "I know everything." Those I have seen have always confessed: "In short, I know nothing." After having spoken of all that he has done, all that he has achieved, he tells you very quietly: "After all, I know nothing." ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 ,
399:In the process of this change there must be by the very necessity of the effort two stages of its working. First, there will be the personal endeavour of the human being, as soon as he becomes aware by his soul, mind, heart of this divine possibility and turns towards it as the true object of life, to prepare himself for it and to get rid of all in him that belongs to a lower working, of all that stands in the way of his opening to the spiritual truth and its power, so as to possess by this liberation his spiritual being and turn all his natural movements into free means of its self-expression. It is by this turn that the self-conscious Yoga aware of its aim begins: there is a new awakening and an upward change of the life motive. So long as there is only an intellectual, ethical and other self-training for the now normal purposes of life which does not travel beyond the ordinary circle of working of mind, life and body, we are still only in the obscure and yet unillumined preparatory Yoga of Nature; we are still in pursuit of only an ordinary human perfection. A spiritual desire of the Divine and of the divine perfection, of a unity with him in all our being and a spiritual perfection in all our nature, is the effective sign of this change, the precursory power of a great integral conversion of our being and living. By personal effort a precursory change, a preliminary conversion can be effected; it amounts to a greater or less spiritualising of our mental motives, our character and temperament, and a mastery, stilling or changed action of the vital and physical life. This converted subjectivity can be made the base of some communion or unity of the soul in mind with the Divine and some partial reflection of the divine nature in the mentality of the human being. That is as far as man can go by his unaided or indirectly aided effort, because that is an effort of mind and mind cannot climb beyond itself permanently: at most it arises to a spiritualised and idealised mentality. If it shoots up beyond that border, it loses hold of itself, loses hold of life, and arrives either at a trance of absorption or a passivity. A greater perfection can only be arrived at by a higher power entering in and taking up the whole action of the being. The second stage of this Yoga will therefore be a persistent giving up of all the action of the nature into the hands of this greater Power, a substitution of its influence, possession and working for the personal effort, until the Divine to whom we aspire becomes the direct master of the Yoga and effects the entire spiritual and ideal conversion of the being. Two rules there are that will diminish the difficulty and obviate the danger. One must reject all that comes from the ego, from vital desire, from the mere mind and its presumptuous reasoning incompetence, all that ministers to these agents of the Ignorance. One must learn to hear and follow the voice of the inmost soul, the direction of the Guru, the command of the Master, the working of the Divine Mother. Whoever clings to the desires and weaknesses of the flesh, the cravings and passions of the vital in its turbulent ignorance, the dictates of his personal mind unsilenced and unillumined by a greater knowledge, cannot find the true inner law and is heaping obstacles in the way of the divine fulfilment. Whoever is able to detect and renounce those obscuring agencies and to discern and follow the true Guide within and without will discover the spiritual law and reach the goal of the Yoga. A radical and total change of consciousness is not only the whole meaning but, in an increasing force and by progressive stages, the whole method of the integral Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Self-Perfection,
400:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey2. The Old Testament3. Aeschylus - Tragedies4. Sophocles - Tragedies5. Herodotus - Histories6. Euripides - Tragedies7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings9. Aristophanes - Comedies10. Plato - Dialogues11. Aristotle - Works12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus13. Euclid - Elements14.Archimedes - Works15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections16. Cicero - Works17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things18. Virgil - Works19. Horace - Works20. Livy - History of Rome21. Ovid - Works22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion26. Ptolemy - Almagest27. Lucian - Works28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties30. The New Testament31. Plotinus - The Enneads32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine33. The Song of Roland34. The Nibelungenlied35. The Saga of Burnt Njal36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres43. Thomas More - Utopia44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy58. John Milton - Works59. Molière - Comedies60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal69. William Congreve - The Way of the World70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler,
401:The true Mantra must come from within OR it must be given by a GuruNobody can give you the true mantra. It's not something that is given; it's something that wells up from within. It must spring from within all of a sudden, spontaneously, like a profound, intense need of your being - then it has power, because it's not something that comes from outside, it's your very own cry.I saw, in my case, that my mantra has the power of immortality; whatever happens, if it is uttered, it's the Supreme that has the upper hand, it's no longer the lower law. And the words are irrelevant, they may not have any meaning - to someone else, my mantra is meaningless, but to me it's full, packed with meaning. And effective, because it's my cry, the intense aspiration of my whole being.A mantra given by a guru is only the power to realize the experience of the discoverer of the mantra. The power is automatically there, because the sound contains the experience. I saw that once in Paris, at a time when I knew nothing of India, absolutely nothing, only the usual nonsense. I didn't even know what a mantra was. I had gone to a lecture given by some fellow who was supposed to have practiced "yoga" for a year in the Himalayas and recounted his experience (none too interesting, either). All at once, in the course of his lecture, he uttered the sound OM. And I saw the entire room suddenly fill with light, a golden, vibrating light.... I was probably the only one to notice it. I said to myself, "Well!" Then I didn't give it any more thought, I forgot about the story. But as it happened, the experience recurred in two or three different countries, with different people, and every time there was the sound OM, I would suddenly see the place fill with that same light. So I understood. That sound contains the vibration of thousands and thousands of years of spiritual aspiration - there is in it the entire aspiration of men towards the Supreme. And the power is automatically there, because the experience is there.It's the same with my mantra. When I wanted to translate the end of my mantra, "Glory to You, O Lord," into Sanskrit, I asked for Nolini's help. He brought his Sanskrit translation, and when he read it to me, I immediately saw that the power was there - not because Nolini put his power into it (!), God knows he had no intention of "giving" me a mantra! But the power was there because my experience was there. We made a few adjustments and modifications, and that's the japa I do now - I do it all the time, while sleeping, while walking, while eating, while working, all the time.[[Mother later clarified: "'Glory to You, O Lord' isn't MY mantra, it's something I ADDED to it - my mantra is something else altogether, that's not it. When I say that my mantra has the power of immortality, I mean the other, the one I don't speak of! I have never given the words.... You see, at the end of my walk, a kind of enthusiasm rises, and with that enthusiasm, the 'Glory to You' came to me, but it's part of the prayer I had written in Prayers and Meditations: 'Glory to You, O Lord, all-triumphant Supreme' etc. (it's a long prayer). It came back suddenly, and as it came back spontaneously, I kept it. Moreover, when Sri Aurobindo read this prayer in Prayers and Meditations, he told me it was very strong. So I added this phrase as a kind of tail to my japa. But 'Glory to You, O Lord' isn't my spontaneous mantra - it came spontaneously, but it was something written very long ago. The two things are different."And that's how a mantra has life: when it wells up all the time, spontaneously, like the cry of your being - there is no need of effort or concentration: it's your natural cry. Then it has full power, it is alive. It must well up from within.... No guru can give you that. ~ The Mother, Agenda May 11 1963,
402:The perfect supramental action will not follow any single principle or limited rule.It is not likely to satisfy the standard either of the individual egoist or of any organised group-mind. It will conform to the demand neither of the positive practical man of the world nor of the formal moralist nor of the patriot nor of the sentimental philanthropist nor of the idealising philosopher. It will proceed by a spontaneous outflowing from the summits in the totality of an illumined and uplifted being, will and knowledge and not by the selected, calculated and standardised action which is all that the intellectual reason or ethical will can achieve. Its sole aim will be the expression of the divine in us and the keeping together of the world and its progress towards the Manifestation that is to be. This even will not be so much an aim and purpose as a spontaneous law of the being and an intuitive determination of the action by the Light of the divine Truth and its automatic influence. It will proceed like the action of Nature from a total will and knowledge behind her, but a will and knowledge enlightened in a conscious supreme Nature and no longer obscure in this ignorant Prakriti. It will be an action not bound by the dualities but full and large in the spirit's impartial joy of existence. The happy and inspired movement of a divine Power and Wisdom guiding and impelling us will replace the perplexities and stumblings of the suffering and ignorant ego. If by some miracle of divine intervention all mankind at once could be raised to this level, we should have something on earth like the Golden Age of the traditions, Satya Yuga, the Age of Truth or true existence. For the sign of the Satya Yuga is that the Law is spontaneous and conscious in each creature and does its own works in a perfect harmony and freedom. Unity and universality, not separative division, would be the foundation of the consciousness of the race; love would be absolute; equality would be consistent with hierarchy and perfect in difference; absolute justice would be secured by the spontaneous action of the being in harmony with the truth of things and the truth of himself and others and therefore sure of true and right result; right reason, no longer mental but supramental, would be satisfied not by the observation of artificial standards but by the free automatic perception of right relations and their inevitable execution in the act. The quarrel between the individual and society or disastrous struggle between one community and another could not exist: the cosmic consciousness imbedded in embodied beings would assure a harmonious diversity in oneness. In the actual state of humanity, it is the individual who must climb to this height as a pioneer and precursor. His isolation will necessarily give a determination and a form to his outward activities that must be quite other than those of a consciously divine collective action. The inner state, the root of his acts, will be the same; but the acts themselves may well be very different from what they would be on an earth liberated from ignorance. Nevertheless his consciousness and the divine mechanism of his conduct, if such a word can be used of so free a thing, would be such as has been described, free from that subjection to vital impurity and desire and wrong impulse which we call sin, unbound by that rule of prescribed moral formulas which we call virtue, spontaneously sure and pure and perfect in a greater consciousness than the mind's, governed in all its steps by the light and truth of the Spirit. But if a collectivity or group could be formed of those who had reached the supramental perfection, there indeed some divine creation could take shape; a new earth could descend that would be a new heaven, a world of supramental light could be created here amidst the receding darkness of this terrestrial ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.07 - Standards of Conduct and Spiritual Freedom,
403:Of course we do." Dresden's voice was cutting. "But you're thinking too small. Building humanity's greatest empire is like building the world's largest anthill. Insignificant. There is a civilization out there that built the protomolecule and hurled it at us over two billion years ago. They were already gods at that point. What have they become since then? With another two billion years to advance?" With a growing dread, Holden listened to Dresden speak. This speech had the air of something spoken before. Perhaps many times. And it had worked. It had convinced powerful people. It was why Protogen had stealth ships from the Earth shipyards and seemingly limitless behind-the-scenes support. "We have a terrifying amount of catching up to do, gentlemen," Dresden was saying. "But fortunately we have the tool of our enemy to use in doing it." "Catching up?" a soldier to Holden's left said. Dresden nodded at the man and smiled. "The protomolecule can alter the host organism at the molecular level; it can create genetic change on the fly. Not just DNA, but any stable replicatoR But it is only a machine. It doesn't think. It follows instructions. If we learn how to alter that programming, then we become the architects of that change." Holden interrupted. "If it was supposed to wipe out life on Earth and replace it with whatever the protomolecule's creators wanted, why turn it loose?" "Excellent question," Dresden said, holding up one finger like a college professor about to deliver a lecture. "The protomolecule doesn't come with a user's manual. In fact, we've never before been able to actually watch it carry out its program. The molecule requires significant mass before it develops enough processing power to fulfill its directives. Whatever they are." Dresden pointed at the screens covered with data around them. "We are going to watch it at work. See what it intends to do. How it goes about doing it. And, hopefully, learn how to change that program in the process." "You could do that with a vat of bacteria," Holden said. "I'm not interested in remaking bacteria," Dresden said. "You're fucking insane," Amos said, and took another step toward Dresden. Holden put a hand on the big mechanic's shoulder. "So," Holden said. "You figure out how the bug works, and then what?" "Then everything. Belters who can work outside a ship without wearing a suit. Humans capable of sleeping for hundreds of years at a time flying colony ships to the stars. No longer being bound to the millions of years of evolution inside one atmosphere of pressure at one g, slaves to oxygen and water. We decide what we want to be, and we reprogram ourselves to be that. That's what the protomolecule gives us." Dresden had stood back up as he'd delivered this speech, his face shining with the zeal of a prophet. "What we are doing is the best and only hope of humanity's survival. When we go out there, we will be facing gods." "And if we don't go out?" Fred asked. He sounded thoughtful. "They've already fired a doomsday weapon at us once," Dresden said. The room was silent for a moment. Holden felt his certainty slip. He hated everything about Dresden's argument, but he couldn't quite see his way past it. He knew in his bones that something about it was dead wrong, but he couldn't find the words. Naomi's voice startled him. "Did it convince them?" she asked. "Excuse me?" Dresden said. "The scientists. The technicians. Everyone you needed to make it happen. They actually had to do this. They had to watch the video of people dying all over Eros. They had to design those radioactive murder chambers. So unless you managed to round up every serial killer in the solar system and send them through a postgraduate program, how did you do this?" "We modified our science team to remove ethical restraints." Half a dozen clues clicked into place in Holden's head. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
404:All Yoga is a turning of the human mind and the human soul, not yet divine in realisation, but feeling the divine impulse and attraction in it, towards that by which it finds its greater being. Emotionally, the first form which this turning takes must be that of adoration. In ordinary religion this adoration wears the form of external worship and that again develops a most external form of ceremonial worship. This element is ordinarily necessary because the mass of men live in their physical minds, cannot realise anything except by the force of a physical symbol and cannot feel that they are living anything except by the force of a physical action. We might apply here the Tantric gradation of sadhana, which makes the way of the pasu, the herd, the animal or physical being, the lowest stage of its discipline, and say that the purely or predominantly ceremonial adoration is the first step of this lowest part of the way. It is evident that even real religion, - and Yoga is something more than religion, - only begins when this quite outward worship corresponds to something really felt within the mind, some genuine submission, awe or spiritual aspiration, to which it becomes an aid, an outward expression and also a sort of periodical or constant reminder helping to draw back the mind to it from the preoccupations of ordinary life. But so long as it is only an idea of the Godhead to which one renders reverence or homage, we have not yet got to the beginning of Yoga. The aim of Yoga being union, its beginning must always be a seeking after the Divine, a longing after some kind of touch, closeness or possession. When this comes on us, the adoration becomes always primarily an inner worship; we begin to make ourselves a temple of the Divine, our thoughts and feelings a constant prayer of aspiration and seeking, our whole life an external service and worship. It is as this change, this new soul-tendency grows, that the religion of the devotee becomes a Yoga, a growing contact and union. It does not follow that the outward worship will necessarily be dispensed with, but it will increasingly become only a physical expression or outflowing of the inner devotion and adoration, the wave of the soul throwing itself out in speech and symbolic act. Adoration, before it turns into an element of the deeper Yoga of devotion, a petal of the flower of love, its homage and self-uplifting to its sun, must bring with it, if it is profound, an increasing consecration of the being to the Divine who is adored. And one element of this consecration must be a self-purifying so as to become fit for the divine contact, or for the entrance of the Divine into the temple of our inner being, or for his selfrevelation in the shrine of the heart. This purifying may be ethical in its character, but it will not be merely the moralist's seeking for the right and blameless action or even, when once we reach the stage of Yoga, an obedience to the law of God as revealed in formal religion; but it will be a throwing away, katharsis, of all that conflicts whether with the idea of the Divine in himself or of the Divine in ourselves. In the former case it becomes in habit of feeling and outer act an imitation of the Divine, in the latter a growing into his likeness in our nature. What inner adoration is to ceremonial worship, this growing into the divine likeness is to the outward ethical life. It culminates in a sort of liberation by likeness to the Divine,1 a liberation from our lower nature and a change into the divine nature. Consecration becomes in its fullness a devoting of all our being to the Divine; therefore also of all our thoughts and our works. Here the Yoga takes into itself the essential elements of the Yoga of works and the Yoga of knowledge, but in its own manner and with its own peculiar spirit. It is a sacrifice of life and works to the Divine, but a sacrifice of love more than a tuning of the will to the divine Will. The bhakta offers up his life and all that he is and all that he has and all that he does to the Divine. This surrender may take the ascetic form, as when he leaves the ordinary life of men and devotes his days solely to prayer ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.04 - The Way of Devotion,
405:Coded LanguageWhereas, breakbeats have been the missing link connecting the diasporic community to its drum woven pastWhereas the quantised drum has allowed the whirling mathematicians to calculate the ever changing distance between rock and stardom.Whereas the velocity of the spinning vinyl, cross-faded, spun backwards, and re-released at the same given moment of recorded history, yet at a different moment in time's continuum has allowed history to catch up with the present.We do hereby declare reality unkempt by the changing standards of dialogue.Statements, such as, "keep it real", especially when punctuating or anticipating modes of ultra-violence inflicted psychologically or physically or depicting an unchanging rule of events will hence forth be seen as retro-active and not representative of the individually determined is.Furthermore, as determined by the collective consciousness of this state of being and the lessened distance between thought patterns and their secular manifestations, the role of men as listening receptacles is to be increased by a number no less than 70 percent of the current enlisted as vocal aggressors.Motherfuckers better realize, now is the time to self-actualizeWe have found evidence that hip hops standard 85 rpm when increased by a number as least half the rate of it's standard or decreased at ¾ of it's speed may be a determining factor in heightening consciousness.Studies show that when a given norm is changed in the face of the unchanging, the remaining contradictions will parallel the truth.Equate rhyme with reason, Sun with seasonOur cyclical relationship to phenomenon has encouraged scholars to erase the centers of periods, thus symbolizing the non-linear character of cause and effectReject mediocrity!Your current frequencies of understanding outweigh that which as been given for you to understand.The current standard is the equivalent of an adolescent restricted to the diet of an infant.The rapidly changing body would acquire dysfunctional and deformative symptoms and could not properly mature on a diet of apple sauce and crushed pearsLight years are interchangeable with years of living in darkness.The role of darkness is not to be seen as, or equated with, Ignorance, but with the unknown, and the mysteries of the unseen.Thus, in the name of:ROBESON, GOD'S SON, HURSTON, AHKENATON, HATHSHEPUT, BLACKFOOT, HELEN,LENNON, KHALO, KALI, THE THREE MARIAS, TARA, LILITHE, LOURDE, WHITMAN,BALDWIN, GINSBERG, KAUFMAN, LUMUMBA, Gandhi, GIBRAN, SHABAZZ, SIDDHARTHA,MEDUSA, GUEVARA, GUARDSIEFF, RAND, WRIGHT, BANNEKER, TUBMAN, HAMER, HOLIDAY,DAVIS, COLTRANE, MORRISON, JOPLIN, DUBOIS, CLARKE, SHAKESPEARE, RACHMNINOV,ELLINGTON, CARTER, GAYE, HATHOWAY, HENDRIX, KUTL, DICKERSON, RIPPERTON,MARY, ISIS, THERESA, PLATH, RUMI, FELLINI, MICHAUX, NOSTRADAMUS, NEFERTITI,LA ROCK, SHIVA, GANESHA, YEMAJA, OSHUN, OBATALA, OGUN, KENNEDY, KING, FOURLITTLE GIRLS, HIROSHIMA, NAGASAKI, KELLER, BIKO, PERONE, MARLEY, COSBY,SHAKUR, THOSE STILL AFLAMED, AND THE COUNTLESS UNNAMEDWe claim the present as the pre-sent, as the hereafter.We are unraveling our navels so that we may ingest the sun.We are not afraid of the darkness, we trust that the moon shall guide us.We are determining the future at this very moment.We now know that the heart is the philosophers' stoneOur music is our alchemyWe stand as the manifested equivalent of 3 buckets of water and a hand full of minerals, thus realizing that those very buckets turned upside down supply the percussion factor of forever.If you must count to keep the beat then count.Find you mantra and awaken your subconscious.Curve you circles counterclockwiseUse your cipher to decipher, Coded Language, man made laws.Climb waterfalls and trees, commune with nature, snakes and bees.Let your children name themselves and claim themselves as the new day for today we are determined to be the channelers of these changing frequencies into songs, paintings, writings, dance, drama, photography, carpentry, crafts, love, and love.We enlist every instrument: Acoustic, electronic.Every so-called race, gender, and sexual preference.Every per-son as beings of sound to acknowledge their responsibility to uplift the consciousness of the entire fucking World.Any utterance will be un-aimed, will be disclaimed - two rappers slainAny utterance will be un-aimed, will be disclaimed - two rappers slain ~ Saul Williams,
406:The ancient Mesopotamians and the ancient Egyptians had some very interesting, dramatic ideas about that. For example-very briefly-there was a deity known as Marduk. Marduk was a Mesopotamian deity, and imagine this is sort of what happened. As an empire grew out of the post-ice age-15,000 years ago, 10,000 years ago-all these tribes came together. These tribes each had their own deity-their own image of the ideal. But then they started to occupy the same territory. One tribe had God A, and one tribe had God B, and one could wipe the other one out, and then it would just be God A, who wins. That's not so good, because maybe you want to trade with those people, or maybe you don't want to lose half your population in a war. So then you have to have an argument about whose God is going to take priority-which ideal is going to take priority.What seems to happen is represented in mythology as a battle of the gods in celestial space. From a practical perspective, it's more like an ongoing dialog. You believe this; I believe this. You believe that; I believe this. How are we going to meld that together? You take God A, and you take God B, and maybe what you do is extract God C from them, and you say, 'God C now has the attributes of A and B.' And then some other tribes come in, and C takes them over, too. Take Marduk, for example. He has 50 different names, at least in part, of the subordinate gods-that represented the tribes that came together to make the civilization. That's part of the process by which that abstracted ideal is abstracted. You think, 'this is important, and it works, because your tribe is alive, and so we'll take the best of both, if we can manage it, and extract out something, that's even more abstract, that covers both of us.'I'll give you a couple of Marduk's interesting features. He has eyes all the way around his head. He's elected by all the other gods to be king God. That's the first thing. That's quite cool. They elect him because they're facing a terrible threat-sort of like a flood and a monster combined. Marduk basically says that, if they elect him top God, he'll go out and stop the flood monster, and they won't all get wiped out. It's a serious threat. It's chaos itself making its comeback. All the gods agree, and Marduk is the new manifestation. He's got eyes all the way around his head, and he speaks magic words. When he fights, he fights this deity called Tiamat. We need to know that, because the word 'Tiamat' is associated with the word 'tehom.' Tehom is the chaos that God makes order out of at the beginning of time in Genesis, so it's linked very tightly to this story. Marduk, with his eyes and his capacity to speak magic words, goes out and confronts Tiamat, who's like this watery sea dragon. It's a classic Saint George story: go out and wreak havoc on the dragon. He cuts her into pieces, and he makes the world out of her pieces. That's the world that human beings live in.The Mesopotamian emperor acted out Marduk. He was allowed to be emperor insofar as he was a good Marduk. That meant that he had eyes all the way around his head, and he could speak magic; he could speak properly. We are starting to understand, at that point, the essence of leadership. Because what's leadership? It's the capacity to see what the hell's in front of your face, and maybe in every direction, and maybe the capacity to use your language properly to transform chaos into order. God only knows how long it took the Mesopotamians to figure that out. The best they could do was dramatize it, but it's staggeringly brilliant. It's by no means obvious, and this chaos is a very strange thing. This is a chaos that God wrestled with at the beginning of time.Chaos is half psychological and half real. There's no other way to really describe it. Chaos is what you encounter when you're blown into pieces and thrown into deep confusion-when your world falls apart, when your dreams die, when you're betrayed. It's the chaos that emerges, and the chaos is everything it wants, and it's too much for you. That's for sure. It pulls you down into the underworld, and that's where the dragons are. All you've got at that point is your capacity to bloody well keep your eyes open, and to speak as carefully and as clearly as you can. Maybe, if you're lucky, you'll get through it that way and come out the other side. It's taken people a very long time to figure that out, and it looks, to me, that the idea is erected on the platform of our ancient ancestors, maybe tens of millions of years ago, because we seem to represent that which disturbs us deeply using the same system that we used to represent serpentile, or other, carnivorous predators. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series 1,
407:A God's LabourI have gathered my dreams in a silver air Between the gold and the blueAnd wrapped them softly and left them there, My jewelled dreams of you.I had hoped to build a rainbow bridge Marrying the soil to the skyAnd sow in this dancing planet midge The moods of infinity.But too bright were our heavens, too far away, Too frail their ethereal stuff;Too splendid and sudden our light could not stay; The roots were not deep enough.He who would bring the heavens here Must descend himself into clayAnd the burden of earthly nature bear And tread the dolorous way.Coercing my godhead I have come down Here on the sordid earth,Ignorant, labouring, human grown Twixt the gates of death and birth.I have been digging deep and long Mid a horror of filth and mireA bed for the golden river's song, A home for the deathless fire.I have laboured and suffered in Matter's night To bring the fire to man;But the hate of hell and human spite Are my meed since the world began.For man's mind is the dupe of his animal self; Hoping its lusts to win,He harbours within him a grisly Elf Enamoured of sorrow and sin.The grey Elf shudders from heaven's flame And from all things glad and pure;Only by pleasure and passion and pain His drama can endure.All around is darkness and strife; For the lamps that men call sunsAre but halfway gleams on this stumbling life Cast by the Undying Ones.Man lights his little torches of hope That lead to a failing edge;A fragment of Truth is his widest scope, An inn his pilgrimage.The Truth of truths men fear and deny, The Light of lights they refuse;To ignorant gods they lift their cry Or a demon altar choose.All that was found must again be sought, Each enemy slain revives,Each battle for ever is fought and refought Through vistas of fruitless lives.My gaping wounds are a thousand and one And the Titan kings assail,But I dare not rest till my task is done And wrought the eternal will.How they mock and sneer, both devils and men! "Thy hope is Chimera's headPainting the sky with its fiery stain; Thou shalt fall and thy work lie dead."Who art thou that babblest of heavenly ease And joy and golden roomTo us who are waifs on inconscient seas And bound to life's iron doom?"This earth is ours, a field of Night For our petty flickering fires.How shall it brook the sacred Light Or suffer a god's desires?"Come, let us slay him and end his course! Then shall our hearts have releaseFrom the burden and call of his glory and force And the curb of his wide white peace."But the god is there in my mortal breast Who wrestles with error and fateAnd tramples a road through mire and waste For the nameless Immaculate.A voice cried, "Go where none have gone! Dig deeper, deeper yetTill thou reach the grim foundation stone And knock at the keyless gate."I saw that a falsehood was planted deep At the very root of thingsWhere the grey Sphinx guards God's riddle sleep On the Dragon's outspread wings.I left the surface gauds of mind And life's unsatisfied seasAnd plunged through the body's alleys blind To the nether mysteries.I have delved through the dumb Earth's dreadful heart And heard her black mass' bell.I have seen the source whence her agonies part And the inner reason of hell.Above me the dragon murmurs moan And the goblin voices flit;I have pierced the Void where Thought was born, I have walked in the bottomless pit.On a desperate stair my feet have trod Armoured with boundless peace,Bringing the fires of the splendour of God Into the human abyss.He who I am was with me still; All veils are breaking now.I have heard His voice and borne His will On my vast untroubled brow.The gulf twixt the depths and the heights is bridged And the golden waters pourDown the sapphire mountain rainbow-ridged And glimmer from shore to shore.Heaven's fire is lit in the breast of the earth And the undying suns here burn;Through a wonder cleft in the bounds of birth The incarnate spirits yearnLike flames to the kingdoms of Truth and Bliss: Down a gold-red stairway wendThe radiant children of Paradise Clarioning darkness' end.A little more and the new life's doors Shall be carved in silver lightWith its aureate roof and mosaic floors In a great world bare and bright.I shall leave my dreams in their argent air, For in a raiment of gold and blueThere shall move on the earth embodied and fair The living truth of you. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems A God's Labour,
408:AUGOEIDES: The magicians most important invocation is that of his Genius, Daemon, True Will, or Augoeides. This operation is traditionally known as attaining the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. It is sometimes known as the Magnum Opus or Great Work. The Augoeides may be defined as the most perfect vehicle of Kia on the plane of duality. As the avatar of Kia on earth, the Augoeides represents the true will, the raison detre of the magician, his purpose in existing. The discovery of ones true will or real nature may be difficult and fraught with danger, since a false identification leads to obsession and madness. The operation of obtaining the knowledge and conversation is usually a lengthy one. The magician is attempting a progressive metamorphosis, a complete overhaul of his entire existence. Yet he has to seek the blueprint for his reborn self as he goes along. Life is less the meaningless accident it seems. Kia has incarnated in these particular conditions of duality for some purpose. The inertia of previous existences propels Kia into new forms of manifestation. Each incarnation represents a task, or a puzzle to be solved, on the way to some greater form of completion. The key to this puzzle is in the phenomena of the plane of duality in which we find ourselves. We are, as it were, trapped in a labyrinth or maze. The only thing to do is move about and keep a close watch on the way the walls turn. In a completely chaotic universe such as this one, there are no accidents. Everything is signifcant. Move a single grain of sand on a distant shore and the entire future history of the world will eventually be changed. A person doing his true will is assisted by the momentum of the universe and seems possessed of amazing good luck. In beginning the great work of obtaining the knowledge and conversation, the magician vows to interpret every manifestation of existence as a direct message from the infinite Chaos to himself personally. To do this is to enter the magical world view in its totality. He takes complete responsibility for his present incarnation and must consider every experience, thing, or piece of information which assails him from any source, as a reflection of the way he is conducting his existence. The idea that things happen to one that may or may not be related to the way one acts is an illusion created by our shallow awareness. Keeping a close eye on the walls of the labyrinth, the conditions of his existence, the magician may then begin his invocation. The genius is not something added to oneself. Rather it is a stripping away of excess to reveal the god within. Directly on awakening, preferably at dawn, the initiate goes to the place of invocation. Figuring to himself as he goes that being born anew each day brings with it the chance of greater rebirth, first he banishes the temple of his mind by ritual or by some magical trance. Then he unveils some token or symbol or sigil which represents to him the Holy Guardian Angel. This symbol he will likely have to change during the great work as the inspiration begins to move him. Next he invokes an image of the Angel into his minds eye. It may be considered as a luminous duplicate of ones own form standing in front of or behind one, or simply as a ball of brilliant light above ones head. Then he formulates his aspirations in what manner he will, humbling himself in prayer or exalting himself in loud proclamation as his need be. The best form of this invocation is spoken spontaneously from the heart, and if halting at first, will prove itself in time. He is aiming to establish a set of ideas and images which correspond to the nature of his genius, and at the same time receive inspiration from that source. As the magician begins to manifest more of his true will, the Augoeides will reveal images, names, and spiritual principles by which it can be drawn into greater manifestation. Having communicated with the invoked form, the magician should draw it into himself and go forth to live in the way he hath willed. The ritual may be concluded with an aspiration to the wisdom of silence by a brief concentration on the sigil of the Augoeides, but never by banishing. Periodically more elaborate forms of ritual, using more powerful forms of gnosis, may be employed. At the end of the day, there should be an accounting and fresh resolution made. Though every day be a catalog of failure, there should be no sense of sin or guilt. Magic is the raising of the whole individual in perfect balance to the power of Infinity, and such feelings are symptomatic of imbalance. If any unnecessary or imbalanced scraps of ego become identified with the genius by mistake, then disaster awaits. The life force flows directly into these complexes and bloats them into grotesque monsters variously known as the demon Choronzon. Some magicians attempting to go too fast with this invocation have failed to banish this demon, and have gone spectacularly insane as a result. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
409:In the lower planes can't one say what will happen at a particular moment? That depends. On certain planes there are consciousnesses that form, that make formations and try to send them down to earth and manifest them. These are planes where the great forces are at play, forces struggling with each other to organise things in one way or another. On these planes all the possibilities are there, all the possibilities that present themselves but have not yet come to a decision as to which will come down.... Suppose a plane full of the imaginations of people who want certain things to be realised upon earth - they invent a novel, narrate stories, produce all kinds of phenomena; it amuses them very much. It is a plane of form-makers and they are there imagining all kinds of circumstances and events; they play with the forces; they are like the authors of a drama and they prepare everything there and see what is going to happen. All these formations are facing each other; and it is those which are the strongest, the most successful or the most persistent or those that have the advantage of a favourable set of circumstances which dominate. They meet and out of the conflict yet another thing results: you lose one thing and take up another, you make a new combination; and then all of a sudden, you find, pluff! it is coming down. Now, if it comes down with a sufficient force, it sets moving the earth atmosphere and things combine; as for instance, when with your fist you thump the saw-dust, you know surely what happens, don't you? You lift your hand, give a formidable blow: all the dust gets organised around your fist. Well, it is like that. These formations come down into matter with that force, and everything organises itself automatically, mechanically as around the striking fist. And there's your wished object about to be realised, sometimes with small deformations because of the resistance, but it will be realised finally, even as the person narrating the story up above wanted it more or less to be realised. If then you are for some reason or other in the secret of the person who has constructed the story and if you follow the way in which he creates his path to reach down to the earth and if you see how a blow with the fist acts on earthly matter, then you are able to tell what is going to happen, because you have seen it in the world above, and as it takes some time to make the whole journey, you see in advance. And the higher you rise, the more you foresee in advance what is going to happen. And if you pass far beyond, go still farther, then everything is possible. It is an unfolding that follows a wide road which is for you unknowable; for all will be unfolded in the universe, but in what order and in what way? There are decisions that are taken up there which escape our ordinary consciousness, and so it is very difficult to foresee. But there also, if you enter consciously and if you can be present up there... How shall I explain that to you? All is there, absolute, static, eternal: but all that will be unfolded in the material world, naturally more or less one thing after another; for in the static existence all can be there, but in the becoming all becomes in time, that is, one thing after another. Well, what path will the unfolding follow? Up there is the domain of absolute freedom.... Who says that a sufficiently sincere aspiration, a sufficiently intense prayer is not capable of changing the path of the unfolding? This means that all is possible. Now, one must have a sufficient aspiration and a prayer that's sufficiently intense. But that has been given to human nature. It is one of the marvellous gifts of grace given to human nature; only, one does not know how to make use of it. This comes to saying that in spite of the most absolute determinisms in the horizontal line, if one knows how to cross all these horizontal lines and reach the highest Point of consciousness, one is able to make things change, things apparently absolutely determined. So you may call it by any name you like, but it is a kind of combination of an absolute determinism with an absolute freedom. You may pull yourself out of it in any way you like, but it is like that. I forgot to say in that book (perhaps I did not forget but just felt that it was useless to say it) that all these theories are only theories, that is, mental conceptions which are merely more or less imaged representations of the reality; but it is not the reality at all. When you say "determinism" and when you say "freedom", you say only words and all that is only a very incomplete, very approximate and very weak description of what is in reality within you, around you and everywhere; and to be able to begin to understand what the universe is, you must come out of your mental formulas, otherwise you will never understand anything. To tell the truth, if you live only a moment, just a tiny moment, of this absolutely sincere aspiration or this sufficiently intense prayer, you will know more things than by meditating for hours. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 ,
410:Sri Aurobindo writes here: "...Few and brief in their visits are the Bright Ones who are willing or permitted to succour." Why?(1 "The Way", Cent. Vol. 17, p. 40.)One must go and ask them! But there is a conclusion, the last sentences give a very clear explanation. It is said: "Nay, then, is immortality a plaything to be given lightly to a child, or the divine life a prize without effort or the crown for a weakling?" This comes back to the question why the adverse forces have the right to interfere, to harass you. But this is precisely the test necessary for your sincerity. If the way were very easy, everybody would start on the way, and if one could reach the goal without any obstacle and without any effort, everybody would reach the goal, and when one has come to the end, the situation would be the same as when one started, there would be no change. That is, the new world would be exactly what the old has been. It is truly not worth the trouble! Evidently a process of elimination is necessary so that only what is capable of manifesting the new life remains. This is the reason and there is no other, this is the best of reasons. And, you see, it is a tempering, it is the ordeal of fire, only that which can stand it remains absolutely pure; when everything has burnt down, there remains only the little ingot of pure gold. And it is like that. What puts things out very much in all this is the religious idea of fault, sin, redemption. But there is no arbitrary decision! On the contrary, for each one it is the best and most favourable conditions which are given. We were saying the other day that it is only his friends whom God treats with severity; you thought it was a joke, but it is true. It is only to those who are full of hope, who will pass through this purifying flame, that the conditions for attaining the maximum result are given. And the human mind is made in such a way that you may test this; when something extremely unpleasant happens to you, you may tell yourself, "Well, this proves I am worth the trouble of being given this difficulty, this proves there is something in me which can resist the difficulty", and you will notice that instead of tormenting yourself, you rejoice - you will be so happy and so strong that even the most unpleasant things will seem to you quite charming! This is a very easy experiment to make. Whatever the circumstance, if your mind is accustomed to look at it as something favourable, it will no longer be unpleasant for you. This is quite well known; as long as the mind refuses to accept a thing, struggles against it, tries to obstruct it, there are torments, difficulties, storms, inner struggles and all suffering. But the minute the mind says, "Good, this is what has to come, it is thus that it must happen", whatever happens, you are content. There are people who have acquired such control of their mind over their body that they feel nothing; I told you this the other day about certain mystics: if they think the suffering inflicted upon them is going to help them cross the stages in a moment and give them a sort of stepping stone to attain the Realisation, the goal they have put before them, union with the Divine, they no longer feel the suffering at all. Their body is as it were galvanised by the mental conception. This has happened very often, it is a very common experience among those who truly have enthusiasm. And after all, if one must for some reason or other leave one's body and take a new one, is it not better to make of one's death something magnificent, joyful, enthusiastic, than to make it a disgusting defeat? Those who cling on, who try by every possible means to delay the end even by a minute or two, who give you an example of frightful anguish, show that they are not conscious of their soul.... After all, it is perhaps a means, isn't it? One can change this accident into a means; if one is conscious one can make a beautiful thing of it, a very beautiful thing, as of everything. And note, those who do not fear it, who are not anxious, who can die without any sordidness are those who never think about it, who are not haunted all the time by this "horror" facing them which they must escape and which they try to push as far away from them as they can. These, when the occasion comes, can lift their head, smile and say, "Here I am." It is they who have the will to make the best possible use of their life, it is they who say, "I shall remain here as long as it is necessary, to the last second, and I shall not lose one moment to realise my goal"; these, when the necessity comes, put up the best show. Why? - It is very simple, because they live in their ideal, the truth of their ideal; because that is the real thing for them, the very reason of their being, and in all things they can see this ideal, this reason of existence, and never do they come down into the sordidness of material life.So, the conclusion:One must never wish for death.One must never will to die.One must never be afraid to die.And in all circumstances one must will to exceed oneself. ~ The Mother, Question and Answers Volume-4,
411:Death & FameWhen I dieI don't care what happens to my body throw ashes in the air, scatter 'em in East River bury an urn in Elizabeth New Jersey, B'nai Israel CemeteryBut I want a big funeral St. Patrick's Cathedral, St. Mark's Church, the largest synagogue in ManhattanFirst, there's family, brother, nephews, spry aged Edith stepmother 96, Aunt Honey from old Newark,Doctor Joel, cousin Mindy, brother Gene one eyed one ear'd, sister-in-law blonde Connie, five nephews, stepbrothers & sisters their grandchildren, companion Peter Orlovsky, caretakers Rosenthal & Hale, Bill Morgan--Next, teacher Trungpa Vajracharya's ghost mind, Gelek Rinpoche, there Sakyong Mipham, Dalai Lama alert, chance visiting America, Satchitananda Swami Shivananda, Dehorahava Baba, Karmapa XVI, Dudjom Rinpoche, Katagiri & Suzuki Roshi's phantoms Baker, Whalen, Daido Loorie, Qwong, Frail White-haired Kapleau Roshis, Lama Tarchen --Then, most important, lovers over half-century Dozens, a hundred, more, older fellows bald & rich young boys met naked recently in bed, crowds surprised to see each other, innumerable, intimate, exchanging memories"He taught me to meditate, now I'm an old veteran of the thousandday retreat --""I played music on subway platforms, I'm straight but loved him he loved me""I felt more love from him at 19 than ever from anyone""We'd lie under covers gossip, read my poetry, hug & kiss belly to belly arms round each other""I'd always get into his bed with underwear on & by morning my skivvies would be on the floor""Japanese, always wanted take it up my bum with a master""We'd talk all night about Kerouac & Cassady sit Buddhalike then sleep in his captain's bed.""He seemed to need so much affection, a shame not to make him happy""I was lonely never in bed nude with anyone before, he was so gentle my stomach shuddered when he traced his finger along my abdomen nipple to hips-- ""All I did was lay back eyes closed, he'd bring me to come with mouth & fingers along my waist""He gave great head"So there be gossip from loves of 1948, ghost of Neal Cassady commin-gling with flesh and youthful blood of 1997 and surprise -- "You too? But I thought you were straight!""I am but Ginsberg an exception, for some reason he pleased me.""I forgot whether I was straight gay queer or funny, was myself, tender and affectionate to be kissed on the top of my head, my forehead throat heart & solar plexus, mid-belly. on my prick, tickled with his tongue my behind""I loved the way he'd recite 'But at my back allways hear/ time's winged chariot hurrying near,' heads together, eye to eye, on a pillow --"Among lovers one handsome youth straggling the rear"I studied his poetry class, 17 year-old kid, ran some errands to his walk-up flat, seduced me didn't want to, made me come, went home, never saw him again never wanted to... ""He couldn't get it up but loved me," "A clean old man." "He made sure I came first"This the crowd most surprised proud at ceremonial place of honor--Then poets & musicians -- college boys' grunge bands -- age-old rock star Beatles, faithful guitar accompanists, gay classical con-ductors, unknown high Jazz music composers, funky trum-peters, bowed bass & french horn black geniuses, folksinger fiddlers with dobro tamborine harmonica mandolin auto-harp pennywhistles & kazoosNext, artist Italian romantic realists schooled in mystic 60's India, Late fauve Tuscan painter-poets, Classic draftsman Massa-chusets surreal jackanapes with continental wives, poverty sketchbook gesso oil watercolor masters from American provincesThen highschool teachers, lonely Irish librarians, delicate biblio-philes, sex liberation troops nay armies, ladies of either sex"I met him dozens of times he never remembered my name I loved him anyway, true artist""Nervous breakdown after menopause, his poetry humor saved me from suicide hospitals""Charmant, genius with modest manners, washed sink, dishes my studio guest a week in Budapest"Thousands of readers, "Howl changed my life in Libertyville Illinois""I saw him read Montclair State Teachers College decided be a poet-- ""He turned me on, I started with garage rock sang my songs in Kansas City""Kaddish made me weep for myself & father alive in Nevada City""Father Death comforted me when my sister died Boston l982""I read what he said in a newsmagazine, blew my mind, realized others like me out there"Deaf & Dumb bards with hand signing quick brilliant gesturesThen Journalists, editors's secretaries, agents, portraitists & photo-graphy aficionados, rock critics, cultured laborors, cultural historians come to witness the historic funeral Super-fans, poetasters, aging Beatnicks & Deadheads, autograph-hunters, distinguished paparazzi, intelligent gawkersEveryone knew they were part of 'History" except the deceased who never knew exactly what was happening even when I was aliveFebruary 22, 1997 ~ Allen Ginsberg,
412:[the sevenfold ignorance and the integral knowledge:] We are ignorant of the Absolute which is the source of all being and becoming; we take partial facts of being, temporal relations of the becoming for the whole truth of existence,-that is the first, the original ignorance. We are ignorant of the spaceless, timeless, immobile and immutable Self; we take the constant mobility and mutation of the cosmic becoming in Time and Space for the whole truth of existence, -that is the second, the cosmic ignorance. We are ignorant of our universal self, the cosmic existence, the cosmic consciousness, our infinite unity with all being and becoming; we take our limited egoistic mentality, vitality, corporeality for our true self and regard everything other than that as not-self,-that is the third, the egoistic ignorance. We are ignorant of our eternal becoming in Time; we take this little life in a small span of Time, in a petty field of Space, for our beginning, our middle and our end,-that is the fourth, the temporal ignorance. Even within this brief temporal becoming we are ignorant of our large and complex being, of that in us which is superconscient, subconscient, intraconscient, circumconscient to our surface becoming; we take that surface becoming with its small selection of overtly mentalised experiences for our whole existence,-that is the fifth, the psychological ignorance. We are ignorant of the true constitution of our becoming; we take the mind or life or body or any two of these or all three for our true principle or the whole account of what we are, losing sight of that which constitutes them and determines by its occult presence and is meant to determine sovereignly by its emergence their operations,-that is the sixth, the constitutional ignorance. As a result of all these ignorances, we miss the true knowledge, government and enjoyment of our life in the world; we are ignorant in our thought, will, sensations, actions, return wrong or imperfect responses at every point to the questionings of the world, wander in a maze of errors and desires, strivings and failures, pain and pleasure, sin and stumbling, follow a crooked road, grope blindly for a changing goal,-that is the seventh, the practical ignorance. Our conception of the Ignorance will necessarily determine our conception of the Knowledge and determine, therefore, since our life is the Ignorance at once denying and seeking after the Knowledge, the goal of human effort and the aim of the cosmic endeavour. Integral knowledge will then mean the cancelling of the sevenfold Ignorance by the discovery of what it misses and ignores, a sevenfold self-revelation within our consciousness:- it will mean [1] the knowledge of the Absolute as the origin of all things; [2] the knowledge of the Self, the Spirit, the Being and of the cosmos as the Self's becoming, the becoming of the Being, a manifestation of the Spirit; [3] the knowledge of the world as one with us in the consciousness of our true self, thus cancelling our division from it by the separative idea and life of ego; [4] the knowledge of our psychic entity and its immortal persistence in Time beyond death and earth-existence; [5] the knowledge of our greater and inner existence behind the surface; [6] the knowledge of our mind, life and body in its true relation to the self within and the superconscient spiritual and supramental being above them; [7] the knowledge, finally, of the true harmony and true use of our thought, will and action and a change of all our nature into a conscious expression of the truth of the Spirit, the Self, the Divinity, the integral spiritual Reality. But this is not an intellectual knowledge which can be learned and completed in our present mould of consciousness; it must be an experience, a becoming, a change of consciousness, a change of being. This brings in the evolutionary character of the Becoming and the fact that our mental ignorance is only a stage in our evolution. The integral knowledge, then, can only come by an evolution of our being and our nature, and that would seem to signify a slow process in Time such as has accompanied the other evolutionary transformations. But as against that inference there is the fact that the evolution has now become conscious and its method and steps need not be altogether of the same character as when it was subconscious in its process. The integral knowledge, since it must result from a change of consciousness, can be gained by a process in which our will and endeavour have a part, in which they can discover and apply their own steps and method: its growth in us can proceed by a conscious self-transformation. It is necessary then to see what is likely to be the principle of this new process of evolution and what are the movements of the integral knowledge that must necessarily emerge in it,-or, in other words, what is the nature of the consciousness that must be the base of the life divine and how that life may be expected to be formed or to form itself, to materialise or, as one might say, to realise. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine pg 680-683,
413:Mother, how to change one's consciousness? Naturally, there are many ways, but each person must do it by the means accessible to him; and the indication of the way usually comes spontaneously, through something like an unexpected experience. And for each one, it appears a little differently. For instance, one may have the perception of the ordinary consciousness which is extended on the surface, horizontally, and works on a plane which is simultaneously the surface of things and has a contact with the superficial outer side of things, people, circumstances; and then, suddenly, for some reason or other - as I say for each one it is different - there is a shifting upwards, and instead of seeing things horizontally, of being at the same level as they are, you suddenly dominate them and see them from above, in their totality, instead of seeing a small number of things immediately next to yourself; it is as though something were drawing you above and making you see as from a mountain-top or an aeroplane. And instead of seeing each detail and seeing it on its own level, you see the whole as one unity, and from far above. There are many ways of having this experience, but it usually comes to you as if by chance, one fine day. Or else, one may have an experience which is almost its very opposite but which comes to the same thing. Suddenly one plunges into a depth, one moves away from the thing one perceived, it seems distant, superficial, unimportant; one enters an inner silence or an inner calm or an inward vision of things, a profound feeling, a more intimate perception of circumstances and things, in which all values change. And one becomes aware of a sort of unity, a deep identity which is one in spite of the diverse appearances. Or else, suddenly also, the sense of limitation disappears and one enters the perception of a kind of indefinite duration beginningless and endless, of something which has always been and always will be. These experiences come to you suddenly in a flash, for a second, a moment in your life, you don't know why or how.... There are other ways, other experiences - they are innumerable, they vary according to people; but with this, with one minute, one second of such an existence, one catches the tail of the thing. So one must remember that, try to relive it, go to the depths of the experience, recall it, aspire, concentrate. This is the startingpoint, the end of the guiding thread, the clue. For all those who are destined to find their inner being, the truth of their being, there is always at least one moment in life when they were no longer the same, perhaps just like a lightning-flash - but that is enough. It indicates the road one should take, it is the door that opens on this path. And so you must pass through the door, and with perseverance and an unfailing steadfastness seek to renew the state which will lead you to something more real and more total. Many ways have always been given, but a way you have been taught, a way you have read about in books or heard from a teacher, does not have the effective value of a spontaneous experience which has come without any apparent reason, and which is simply the blossoming of the soul's awakening, one second of contact with your psychic being which shows you the best way for you, the one most within your reach, which you will then have to follow with perseverance to reach the goal - one second which shows you how to start, the beginning.... Some have this in dreams at night; some have it at any odd time: something one sees which awakens in one this new consciousness, something one hears, a beautiful landscape, beautiful music, or else simply a few words one reads, or else the intensity of concentration in some effort - anything at all, there are a thousand reasons and thousands of ways of having it. But, I repeat, all those who are destined to realise have had this at least once in their life. It may be very fleeting, it may have come when they were very young, but always at least once in one's life one has the experience of what true consciousness is. Well, that is the best indication of the path to be followed. One may seek within oneself, one may remember, may observe; one must notice what is going on, one must pay attention, that's all. Sometimes, when one sees a generous act, hears of something exceptional, when one witnesses heroism or generosity or greatness of soul, meets someone who shows a special talent or acts in an exceptional and beautiful way, there is a kind of enthusiasm or admiration or gratitude which suddenly awakens in the being and opens the door to a state, a new state of consciousness, a light, a warmth, a joy one did not know before. That too is a way of catching the guiding thread. There are a thousand ways, one has only to be awake and to watch. First of all, you must feel the necessity for this change of consciousness, accept the idea that it is this, the path which must lead to the goal; and once you admit the principle, you must be watchful. And you will find, you do find it. And once you have found it, you must start walking without any hesitation. Indeed, the starting-point is to observe oneself, not to live in a perpetual nonchalance, a perpetual apathy; one must be attentive. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956 ,
414:What are these operations? They are not mere psychological self-analysis and self-observation. Such analysis, such observation are, like the process of right thought, of immense value and practically indispensable. They may even, if rightly pursued, lead to a right thought of considerable power and effectivity. Like intellectual discrimination by the process of meditative thought they will have an effect of purification; they will lead to self-knowledge of a certain kind and to the setting right of the disorders of the soul and the heart and even of the disorders of the understanding. Self-knowledge of all kinds is on the straight path to the knowledge of the real Self. The Upanishad tells us that the Self-existent has so set the doors of the soul that they turn outwards and most men look outward into the appearances of things; only the rare soul that is ripe for a calm thought and steady wisdom turns its eye inward, sees the Self and attains to immortality. To this turning of the eye inward psychological self-observation and analysis is a great and effective introduction.We can look into the inward of ourselves more easily than we can look into the inward of things external to us because there, in things outside us, we are in the first place embarrassed by the form and secondly we have no natural previous experience of that in them which is other than their physical substance. A purified or tranquillised mind may reflect or a powerful concentration may discover God in the world, the Self in Nature even before it is realised in ourselves, but this is rare and difficult. (2) And it is only in ourselves that we can observe and know the process of the Self in its becoming and follow the process by which it draws back into self-being. Therefore the ancient counsel, know thyself, will always stand as the first word that directs us towards the knowledge. Still, psychological self-knowledge is only the experience of the modes of the Self, it is not the realisation of the Self in its pure being. The status of knowledge, then, which Yoga envisages is not merely an intellectual conception or clear discrimination of the truth, nor is it an enlightened psychological experience of the modes of our being. It is a "realisation", in the full sense of the word; it is the making real to ourselves and in ourselves of the Self, the transcendent and universal Divine, and it is the subsequent impossibility of viewing the modes of being except in the light of that Self and in their true aspect as its flux of becoming under the psychical and physical conditions of our world-existence. This realisation consists of three successive movements, internal vision, complete internal experience and identity. This internal vision, dr.s.t.i, the power so highly valued by the ancient sages, the power which made a man a Rishi or Kavi and no longer a mere thinker, is a sort of light in the soul by which things unseen become as evident and real to it-to the soul and not merely to the intellect-as do things seen to the physical eye. In the physical world there are always two forms of knowledge, the direct and the indirect, pratyaks.a, of that which is present to the eyes, and paroks.a, of that which is remote from and beyond our vision. When the object is beyond our vision, we are necessarily obliged to arrive at an idea of it by inference, imagination, analogy, by hearing the descriptions of others who have seen it or by studying pictorial or other representations of it if these are available. By putting together all these aids we can indeed arrive at a more or less adequate idea or suggestive image of the object, but we do not realise the thing itself; it is not yet to us the grasped reality, but only our conceptual representation of a reality. But once we have seen it with the eyes,-for no other sense is adequate,-we possess, we realise; it is there secure in our satisfied being, part of ourselves in knowledge. Precisely the same rule holds good of psychical things and of he Self. We may hear clear and luminous teachings about the Self from philosophers or teachers or from ancient writings; we may by thought, inference, imagination, analogy or by any other available means attempt to form a mental figure or conception of it; we may hold firmly that conception in our mind and fix it by an entire and exclusive concentration;3 but we have not yet realised it, we have not seen God. It is only when after long and persistent concentration or by other means the veil of the mind is rent or swept aside, only when a flood of light breaks over the awakened mentality, jyotirmaya brahman, and conception gives place to a knowledge-vision in which the Self is as present, real, concrete as a physical object to the physical eye, that we possess in knowledge; for we have seen. After that revelation, whatever fadings of the light, whatever periods of darkness may afflict the soul, it can never irretrievably lose what it has once held. The experience is inevitably renewed and must become more frequent till it is constant; when and how soon depends on the devotion and persistence with which we insist on the path and besiege by our will or our love the hidden Deity. (2) And it is only in ourselves that we can observe and know the 2 In one respect, however, it is easier, because in external things we are not so much hampered by the sense of the limited ego as in ourselves; one obstacle to the realisation of God is therefore removed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge,
415:SECTION 1. Books for Serious Study Liber CCXX. (Liber AL vel Legis.) The Book of the Law. This book is the foundation of the New Æon, and thus of the whole of our work. The Equinox. The standard Work of Reference in all occult matters. The Encyclopaedia of Initiation. Liber ABA (Book 4). A general account in elementary terms of magical and mystical powers. In four parts: (1) Mysticism (2) Magical (Elementary Theory) (3) Magick in Theory and Practice (this book) (4) The Law. Liber II. The Message of the Master Therion. Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner. Liber DCCCXXXVIII. The Law of Liberty. A further explanation of The Book of the Law in reference to certain ethical problems. Collected Works of A. Crowley. These works contain many mystical and magical secrets, both stated clearly in prose, and woven into the Robe of sublimest poesy. The Yi King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XVI], Oxford University Press.) The "Classic of Changes"; give the initiated Chinese system of Magick. The Tao Teh King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XXXIX].) Gives the initiated Chinese system of Mysticism. Tannhäuser, by A. Crowley. An allegorical drama concerning the Progress of the Soul; the Tannhäuser story slightly remodelled. The Upanishads. (S. B. E. Series [vols. I & XV.) The Classical Basis of Vedantism, the best-known form of Hindu Mysticism. The Bhagavad-gita. A dialogue in which Krishna, the Hindu "Christ", expounds a system of Attainment. The Voice of the Silence, by H.P. Blavatsky, with an elaborate commentary by Frater O.M. Frater O.M., 7°=48, is the most learned of all the Brethren of the Order; he has given eighteen years to the study of this masterpiece. Raja-Yoga, by Swami Vivekananda. An excellent elementary study of Hindu mysticism. His Bhakti-Yoga is also good. The Shiva Samhita. An account of various physical means of assisting the discipline of initiation. A famous Hindu treatise on certain physical practices. The Hathayoga Pradipika. Similar to the Shiva Samhita. The Aphorisms of Patanjali. A valuable collection of precepts pertaining to mystical attainment. The Sword of Song. A study of Christian theology and ethics, with a statement and solution of the deepest philosophical problems. Also contains the best account extant of Buddhism, compared with modern science. The Book of the Dead. A collection of Egyptian magical rituals. Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie, by Eliphas Levi. The best general textbook of magical theory and practice for beginners. Written in an easy popular style. The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. The best exoteric account of the Great Work, with careful instructions in procedure. This Book influenced and helped the Master Therion more than any other. The Goetia. The most intelligible of all the mediæval rituals of Evocation. Contains also the favourite Invocation of the Master Therion. Erdmann's History of Philosophy. A compendious account of philosophy from the earliest times. Most valuable as a general education of the mind. The Spiritual Guide of [Miguel de] Molinos. A simple manual of Christian Mysticism. The Star in the West. (Captain Fuller). An introduction to the study of the Works of Aleister Crowley. The Dhammapada. (S. B. E. Series [vol. X], Oxford University Press). The best of the Buddhist classics. The Questions of King Milinda. (S. B. E. Series [vols. XXXV & XXXVI].) Technical points of Buddhist dogma, illustrated bydialogues. Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicam Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ. A complete Dictionary of the Correspondences of all magical elements, reprinted with extensive additions, making it the only standard comprehensive book of reference ever published. It is to the language of Occultism what Webster or Murray is to the English language. Varieties of Religious Experience (William James). Valuable as showing the uniformity of mystical attainment. Kabbala Denudata, von Rosenroth: also The Kabbalah Unveiled, by S.L. Mathers. The text of the Qabalah, with commentary. A good elementary introduction to the subject. Konx Om Pax [by Aleister Crowley]. Four invaluable treatises and a preface on Mysticism and Magick. The Pistis Sophia [translated by G.R.S. Mead or Violet McDermot]. An admirable introduction to the study of Gnosticism. The Oracles of Zoroaster [Chaldæan Oracles]. An invaluable collection of precepts mystical and magical. The Dream of Scipio, by Cicero. Excellent for its Vision and its Philosophy. The Golden Verses of Pythagoras, by Fabre d'Olivet. An interesting study of the exoteric doctrines of this Master. The Divine Pymander, by Hermes Trismegistus. Invaluable as bearing on the Gnostic Philosophy. The Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians, reprint of Franz Hartmann. An invaluable compendium. Scrutinium Chymicum [Atalanta Fugiens]¸ by Michael Maier. One of the best treatises on alchemy. Science and the Infinite, by Sidney Klein. One of the best essays written in recent years. Two Essays on the Worship of Priapus [A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus &c. &c. &c.], by Richard Payne Knight [and Thomas Wright]. Invaluable to all students. The Golden Bough, by J.G. Frazer. The textbook of Folk Lore. Invaluable to all students. The Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine. Excellent, though elementary, as a corrective to superstition. Rivers of Life, by General Forlong. An invaluable textbook of old systems of initiation. Three Dialogues, by Bishop Berkeley. The Classic of Subjective Idealism. Essays of David Hume. The Classic of Academic Scepticism. First Principles by Herbert Spencer. The Classic of Agnosticism. Prolegomena [to any future Metaphysics], by Immanuel Kant. The best introduction to Metaphysics. The Canon [by William Stirling]. The best textbook of Applied Qabalah. The Fourth Dimension, by [Charles] H. Hinton. The best essay on the subject. The Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley. Masterpieces of philosophy, as of prose. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Appendix I: Literature Recommended to Aspirants,
416:Depression, unless one has a strong will, suggests, "This is not worth while, one may have to wait a lifetime." As for enthusiasm, it expects to see the vital transformed overnight: "I am not going to have any difficulty henceforth, I am going to advance rapidly on the path of yoga, I am going to gain the divine consciousness without any difficulty." There are some other difficulties.... One needs a little time, much perseverance. So the vital, after a few hours - perhaps a few days, perhaps a few months - says to itself: "We haven't gone very far with our enthusiasm, has anything been really done? Doesn't this movement leave us just where we were, perhaps worse than we were, a little troubled, a little disturbed? Things are no longer what they were, they are not yet what they ought to be. It is very tiresome, what I am doing." And then, if one pushes a little more, here's this gentleman saying, "Ah, no! I have had enough of it, leave me alone. I don't want to move, I shall stay in my corner, I won't trouble you, but don't bother me!" And so one has not gone very much farther than before. This is one of the big obstacles which must be carefully avoided. As soon as there is the least sign of discontentment, of annoyance, the vital must be spoken to in this way, "My friend, you are going to keep calm, you are going to do what you are asked to do, otherwise you will have to deal with me." And to the other, the enthusiast who says, "Everything must be done now, immediately", your reply is, "Calm yourself a little, your energy is excellent, but it must not be spent in five minutes. We shall need it for a long time, keep it carefully and, as it is wanted, I shall call upon your goodwill. You will show that you are full of goodwill, you will obey, you won't grumble, you will not protest, you will not revolt, you will say 'yes, yes', you will make a little sacrifice when asked, you will say 'yes' wholeheartedly." So we get started on the path. But the road is very long. Many things happen on the way. Suddenly one thinks one has overcome an obstacle; I say "thinks", because though one has overcome it, it is not totally overcome. I am going to take a very obvious instance, of a very simple observation. Someone has found that his vital is uncontrollable and uncontrolled, that it gets furious for nothing and about nothing. He starts working to teach it not to get carried away, not to flare up, to remain calm and bear the shocks of life without reacting violently. If one does this cheerfully, it goes quite quickly. (Note this well, it is very important: when you have to deal with your vital take care to remain cheerful, otherwise you will get into trouble.) One remains cheerful, that is, when one sees the fury rise, one begins to laugh. Instead of being depressed and saying, "Ah! In spite of all my effort it is beginning all over again", one begins to laugh and says, "Well, well! One hasn't yet seen the end of it. Look now, aren't you ridiculous, you know quite well that you are being ridiculous! Is it worthwhile getting angry?" One gives it this lesson cheerfully. And really, after a while it doesn't get angry again, it is quiet - and one relaxes one's attention. One thinks the difficulty has been overcome, one thinks a result has at last been reached: "My vital does not trouble me any longer, it does not get angry now, everything is going fine." And the next day, one loses one's temper. It is then one must be careful, it is then one must not say, "Here we are, it's no use, I shall never achieve anything, all my efforts are futile; all this is an illusion, it is impossible." On the contrary, one must say, "I wasn't vigilant enough." One must wait long, very long, before one can say, "Ah! It is done and finished." Sometimes one must wait for years, many years.... I am not saying this to discourage you, but to give you patience and perseverance - for there is a moment when you do arrive. And note that the vital is a small part of your being - a very important part, we have said that it is the dynamism, the realising energy, it is very important; but it is only a small part. And the mind!... which goes wandering, which must be pulled back by all the strings to be kept quiet! You think this can be done overnight? And your body?... You have a weakness, a difficulty, sometimes a small chronic illness, nothing much, but still it is a nuisance, isn't it? You want to get rid of it. You make efforts, you concentrate; you work upon it, establish harmony, and you think it is finished, and then.... Take, for instance, people who have the habit of coughing; they can't control themselves or almost can't. It is not serious but it is bothersome, and there seems to be no reason why it should ever stop. Well, one tells oneself, "I am going to control this." One makes an effort - a yogic effort, not a material one - one brings down consciousness, force, and stops the cough. And one thinks, "The body has forgotten how to cough." And it is a great thing when the body has forgotten, truly one can say, "I am cured." But unfortunately it is not always true, for this goes down into the subconscient and, one day, when the balance of forces is not so well established, when the strength is not the same, it begins again. And one laments, "I believed that it was over! I had succeeded and told myself, 'It is true that spiritual power has an action upon the body, it is true that something can be done', and there! it is not true. And yet it was a small thing, and I who want to conquer immortality! How will I succeed?... For years I have been free from this small thing and here it is beginning anew!" It is then that you must be careful. You must arm yourself with an endless patience and endurance. You do a thing once, ten times, a hundred times, a thousand times if necessary, but you do it till it gets done. And not done only here and there, but everywhere and everywhere at the same time. This is the great problem one sets oneself. That is why, to those who come to tell me very light-heartedly, "I want to do yoga", I reply, "Think it over, one may do the yoga for a number of years without noticing the least result. But if you want to do it, you must persist and persist with such a will that you should be ready to do it for ten lifetimes, a hundred lifetimes if necessary, in order to succeed." I do not say it will be like that, but the attitude must be like that. Nothing must discourage you; for there are all the difficulties of ignorance of the different states of being, to which are added the endless malice and the unbounded cunning of the hostile forces in the world.... They are there, do you know why? They have been.... ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951 ,
417:Mother, when one imagines something, does it not exist?When you imagine something, it means that you make a mental formation which may be close to the truth or far from the truth - it also depends upon the quality of your formation. You make a mental formation and there are people who have such a power of formation that they succeed in making what they imagine real. There are not many of these but there are some. They imagine something and their formation is so well made and so powerful that it succeeds in being realised. These are creators; there are not many of them but there are some. If one thinks of someone who doesn't exist or who is dead?Ah! What do you mean? What have you just said? Someone who doesn't exist or someone who is dead? These are two absolutely different things. I mean someone who is dead.Someone who is dead! If this person has remained in the mental domain, you can find him immediately. Naturally if he is no longer in the mental domain, if he is in the psychic domain, to think of him is not enough. You must know how to go into the psychic domain to find him. But if he has remained in the mental domain and you think of him, you can find him immediately, and not only that, but you can have a mental contact with him and a kind of mental vision of his existence. The mind has a capacity of vision of its own and it is not the same vision as with these eyes, but it is a vision, it is a perception in forms. But this is not imagination. It has nothing to do with imagination. Imagination, for instance, is when you begin to picture to yourself an ideal being to whom you apply all your conceptions, and when you tell yourself, "Why, it should be like this, like that, its form should be like this, its thought like that, its character like that," when you see all the details and build up the being. Now, writers do this all the time because when they write a novel, they imagine. There are those who take things from life but there are those who are imaginative, creators; they create a character, a personage and then put him in their book later. This is to imagine. To imagine, for example, a whole concurrence of circumstances, a set of events, this is what I call telling a story to oneself. But it can be put down on paper, and then one becomes a novelist. There are very different kinds of writers. Some imagine everything, some gather all sorts of observations from life and construct their book with them. There are a hundred ways of writing a book. But indeed some writers imagine everything from beginning to end. It all comes out of their head and they construct even their whole story without any support in things physically observed. This truly is imagination. But as I say, if they are very powerful and have a considerable capacity for creation, it is possible that one day or other there will be a physical human being who realises their creation. This too is true. What do you suppose imagination is, eh? Have you never imagined anything, you? And what happens? All that one imagines.You mean that you imagine something and it happens like that, eh? Or it is in a dream... What is the function, the use of the imagination?If one knows how to use it, as I said, one can create for oneself his own inner and outer life; one can build his own existence with his imagination, if one knows how to use it and has a power. In fact it is an elementary way of creating, of forming things in the world. I have always felt that if one didn't have the capacity of imagination he would not make any progress. Your imagination always goes ahead of your life. When you think of yourself, usually you imagine what you want to be, don't you, and this goes ahead, then you follow, then it continues to go ahead and you follow. Imagination opens for you the path of realisation. People who are not imaginative - it is very difficult to make them move; they see just what is there before their nose, they feel just what they are moment by moment and they cannot go forward because they are clamped by the immediate thing. It depends a good deal on what one calls imagination. However... Men of science must be having imagination!A lot. Otherwise they would never discover anything. In fact, what is called imagination is a capacity to project oneself outside realised things and towards things realisable, and then to draw them by the projection. One can obviously have progressive and regressive imaginations. There are people who always imagine all the catastrophes possible, and unfortunately they also have the power of making them come. It's like the antennae going into a world that's not yet realised, catching something there and drawing it here. Then naturally it is an addition to the earth atmosphere and these things tend towards manifestation. It is an instrument which can be disciplined, can be used at will; one can discipline it, direct it, orientate it. It is one of the faculties one can develop in himself and render serviceable, that is, use it for definite purposes. Sweet Mother, can one imagine the Divine and have the contact?Certainly if you succeed in imagining the Divine you have the contact, and you can have the contact with what you imagine, in any case. In fact it is absolutely impossible to imagine something which doesn't exist somewhere. You cannot imagine anything at all which doesn't exist somewhere. It is possible that it doesn't exist on the earth, it is possible that it's elsewhere, but it is impossible for you to imagine something which is not already contained in principle in the universe; otherwise it could not occur. Then, Sweet Mother, this means that in the created universe nothing new is added?In the created universe? Yes. The universe is progressive; we said that constantly things manifest, more and more. But for your imagination to be able to go and seek beyond the manifestation something which will be manifested, well, it may happen, in fact it does - I was going to tell you that it is in this way that some beings can cause considerable progress to be made in the world, because they have the capacity of imagining something that's not yet manifested. But there are not many. One must first be capable of going beyond the manifested universe to be able to imagine something which is not there. There are already many things which can be imagined. What is our terrestrial world in the universe? A very small thing. Simply to have the capacity of imagining something which does not exist in the terrestrial manifestation is already very difficult, very difficult. For how many billions of years hasn't it existed, this little earth? And there have been no two identical things. That's much. It is very difficult to go out from the earth atmosphere with one's mind; one can, but it is very difficult. And then if one wants to go out, not only from the earth atmosphere but from the universal life! To be able simply to enter into contact with the life of the earth in its totality from the formation of the earth until now, what can this mean? And then to go beyond this and enter into contact with universal life from its beginnings up to now... and then again to be able to bring something new into the universe, one must go still farther beyond. Not easy! That's all? (To the child) Convinced? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
418:Can a Yogi attain to a state of consciousness in which he can know all things, answer all questions, relating even to abstruse scientific problems, such as, for example, the theory of relativity?Theoretically and in principle it is not impossible for a Yogi to know everything; all depends upon the Yogi. But there is knowledge and knowledge. The Yogi does not know in the way of the mind. He does not know everything in the sense that he has access to all possible information or because he contains all the facts of the universe in his mind or because his consciousness is a sort of miraculous encyclopaedia. He knows by his capacity for a containing or dynamic identity with things and persons and forces. Or he knows because he lives in a plane of consciousness or is in contact with a consciousness in which there is the truth and the knowledge. If you are in the true consciousness, the knowledge you have will also be of the truth. Then, too, you can know directly, by being one with what you know. If a problem is put before you, if you are asked what is to be done in a particular matter, you can then, by looking with enough attention and concentration, receive spontaneously the required knowledge and the true answer. It is not by any careful application of theory that you reach the knowledge or by working it out through a mental process. The scientific mind needs these methods to come to its conclusions. But the Yogi's knowledge is direct and immediate; it is not deductive. If an engineer has to find out the exact position for the building of an arch, the line of its curve and the size of its opening, he does it by calculation, collating and deducing from his information and data. But a Yogi needs none of these things; he looks, has the vision of the thing, sees that it is to be done in this way and not in another, and this seeing is his knowledge. Although it may be true in a general way and in a certain sense that a Yogi can know all things and can answer all questions from his own field of vision and consciousness, yet it does not follow that there are no questions whatever of any kind to which he would not or could not answer. A Yogi who has the direct knowledge, the knowledge of the true truth of things, would not care or perhaps would find it difficult to answer questions that belong entirely to the domain of human mental constructions. It may be, he could not or would not wish to solve problems and difficulties you might put to him which touch only the illusion of things and their appearances. The working of his knowledge is not in the mind. If you put him some silly mental query of that character, he probably would not answer. The very common conception that you can put any ignorant question to him as to some super-schoolmaster or demand from him any kind of information past, present or future and that he is bound to answer, is a foolish idea. It is as inept as the expectation from the spiritual man of feats and miracles that would satisfy the vulgar external mind and leave it gaping with wonder. Moreover, the term "Yogi" is very vague and wide. There are many types of Yogis, many lines or ranges of spiritual or occult endeavour and different heights of achievement, there are some whose powers do not extend beyond the mental level; there are others who have gone beyond it. Everything depends on the field or nature of their effort, the height to which they have arrived, the consciousness with which they have contact or into which they enter. Do not scientists go sometimes beyond the mental plane? It is said that Einstein found his theory of relativity not through any process of reasoning, but through some kind of sudden inspiration. Has that inspiration anything to do with the Supermind?The scientist who gets an inspiration revealing to him a new truth, receives it from the intuitive mind. The knowledge comes as a direct perception in the higher mental plane illumined by some other light still farther above. But all that has nothing to do with the action of Supermind and this higher mental level is far removed from the supramental plane. Men are too easily inclined to believe that they have climbed into regions quite divine when they have only gone above the average level. There are many stages between the ordinary human mind and the Supermind, many grades and many intervening planes. If an ordinary man were to get into direct contact even with one of these intermediate planes, he would be dazzled and blinded, would be crushed under the weight of the sense of immensity or would lose his balance; and yet it is not the Supermind. Behind the common idea that a Yogi can know all things and answer all questions is the actual fact that there is a plane in the mind where the memory of everything is stored and remains always in existence. All mental movements that belong to the life of the earth are memorised and registered in this plane. Those who are capable of going there and care to take the trouble, can read in it and learn anything they choose. But this region must not be mistaken for the supramental levels. And yet to reach even there you must be able to silence the movements of the material or physical mind; you must be able to leave aside all your sensations and put a stop to your ordinary mental movements, whatever they are; you must get out of the vital; you must become free from the slavery of the body. Then only you can enter into that region and see. But if you are sufficiently interested to make this effort, you can arrive there and read what is written in the earth's memory. Thus, if you go deep into silence, you can reach a level of consciousness on which it is not impossible for you to receive answers to all your questions. And if there is one who is consciously open to the plenary truth of the supermind, in constant contact with it, he can certainly answer any question that is worth an answer from the supramental Light. The queries put must come from some sense of the truth and reality behind things. There are many questions and much debated problems that are cobwebs woven of mere mental abstractions or move on the illusory surface of things. These do not pertain to real knowledge; they are a deformation of knowledge, their very substance is of the ignorance. Certainly the supramental knowledge may give an answer, its own answer, to the problems set by the mind's ignorance; but it is likely that it would not be at all satisfactory or perhaps even intelligible to those who ask from the mental level. You must not expect the supramental to work in the way of the mind or demand that the knowledge in truth should be capable of being pieced together with the half-knowledge in ignorance. The scheme of the mind is one thing, but Supermind is quite another and it would no longer be supramental if it adapted itself to the exigencies of the mental scheme. The two are incommensurable and cannot be put together. When the consciousness has attained to supramental joys, does it no longer take interest in the things of the mind?The supramental does not take interest in mental things in the same way as the mind. It takes its own interest in all the movements of the universe, but it is from a different point of view and with a different vision. The world presents to it an entirely different appearance; there is a reversal of outlook and everything is seen from there as other than what it seems to the mind and often even the opposite. Things have another meaning; their aspect, their motion and process, everything about them, are watched with other eyes. Everything here is followed by the supermind; the mind movements and not less the vital, the material movements, all the play of the universe have for it a very deep interest, but of another kind. It is about the same difference as that between the interest taken in a puppet-play by one who holds the strings and knows what the puppets are to do and the will that moves them and that they can do only what it moves them to do, and the interest taken by another who observes the play but sees only what is happening from moment to moment and knows nothing else. The one who follows the play and is outside its secret has a stronger, an eager and passionate interest in what will happen and he gives an excited attention to its unforeseen or dramatic events; the other, who holds the strings and moves the show, is unmoved and tranquil. There is a certain intensity of interest which comes from ignorance and is bound up with illusion, and that must disappear when you are out of the ignorance. The interest that human beings take in things founds itself on the illusion; if that were removed, they would have no interest at all in the play; they would find it dry and dull. That is why all this ignorance, all this illusion has lasted so long; it is because men like it, because they cling to it and its peculiar kind of appeal that it endures. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 93?
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419:[The Gods and Their Worlds] [...] According to traditions and occult schools, all these zones of realities, these planes of realities have got different names; they have been classified in a different way, but there is an essential analogy, and if you go back far enough into the traditions, you see only the words changing according to the country and the language. Even now, the experiences of Western occultists and those of Eastern occultists offer great similarities. All who set out on the discovery of these invisible worlds and make a report of what they saw, give a very similar description, whether they be from here or there; they use different words, but the experience is very similar and the handling of forces is the same. This knowledge of the occult worlds is based on the existence of subtle bodies and of subtle worlds corresponding to those bodies. They are what the psychological method calls "states of consciousness", but these states of consciousness really correspond to worlds. The occult procedure consists then in being aware of these various inner states of being or subtle bodies and in becoming sufficiently a master of them so as to be able to go out of them successively, one after another. There is indeed a whole scale of subtleties, increasing or decreasing according to the direction in which you go, and the occult procedure consists in going out of a denser body into a subtler body and so on again, up to the most ethereal regions. You go, by successive exteriorisations, into bodies or worlds more and more subtle. It is somewhat as if every time you passed into another dimension. The fourth dimension of the physicists is nothing but the scientific transcription of an occult knowledge. To give another image, one can say that the physical body is at the centre - it is the most material, the densest and also the smallest - and the inner bodies, more subtle, overflow more and more the central physical body; they pass through it, extending themselves farther and farther, like water evaporating from a porous vase and forming a kind of steam all around. And the greater the subtlety, the more the extension tends to unite with that of the universe: one ends by universalising oneself. And it is altogether a concrete process which gives an objective experience of invisible worlds and even enables one to act in these worlds. There are, then, only a very small number of people in the West who know that these gods are not merely subjective and imaginary - more or less wildly imaginary - but that they correspond to a universal truth. All these regions, all these domains are filled with beings who exist, each in its own domain, and if you are awake and conscious on a particular plane - for instance, if on going out of a more material body you awake on some higher plane, you have the same relation with the things and people of that plane as you had with the things and people of the material world. That is to say, there exists an entirely objective relation that has nothing to do with the idea you may have of these things. Naturally, the resemblance is greater and greater as you approach the physical world, the material world, and there even comes a time when the one region has a direct action upon the other. In any case, in what Sri Aurobindo calls the overmental worlds, you will find a concrete reality absolutely independent of your personal experience; you go back there and again find the same things, with the differences that have occurred during your absence. And you have relations with those beings that are identical with the relations you have with physical beings, with this difference that the relation is more plastic, supple and direct - for example, there is the capacity to change the external form, the visible form, according to the inner state you are in. But you can make an appointment with someone and be at the appointed place and find the same being again, with certain differences that have come about during your absence; it is entirely concrete with results entirely concrete. One must have at least a little of this experience in order to understand these things. Otherwise, those who are convinced that all this is mere human imagination and mental formation, who believe that these gods have such and such a form because men have thought them to be like that, and that they have certain defects and certain qualities because men have thought them to be like that - all those who say that God is made in the image of man and that he exists only in human thought, all these will not understand; to them this will appear absolutely ridiculous, madness. One must have lived a little, touched the subject a little, to know how very concrete the thing is. Naturally, children know a good deal if they have not been spoilt. There are so many children who return every night to the same place and continue to live the life they have begun there. When these faculties are not spoilt with age, you can keep them with you. At a time when I was especially interested in dreams, I could return exactly to a place and continue a work that I had begun: supervise something, for example, set something in order, a work of organisation or of discovery, of exploration. You go until you reach a certain spot, as you would go in life, then you take a rest, then you return and begin again - you begin the work at the place where you left off and you continue it. And you perceive that there are things which are quite independent of you, in the sense that changes of which you are not at all the author, have taken place automatically during your absence. But for this, you must live these experiences yourself, you must see them yourself, live them with sufficient sincerity and spontaneity in order to see that they are independent of any mental formation. For you can do the opposite also, and deepen the study of the action of mental formation upon events. This is very interesting, but it is another domain. And this study makes you very careful, very prudent, because you become aware of how far you can delude yourself. So you must study both, the dream and the occult reality, in order to see what is the essential difference between the two. The one depends upon us; the other exists in itself; entirely independent of the thought that we have of it. When you have worked in that domain, you recognise in fact that once a subject has been studied and something has been learnt mentally, it gives a special colour to the experience; the experience may be quite spontaneous and sincere, but the simple fact that the subject was known and studied lends a particular quality. Whereas if you had learnt nothing about the question, if you knew nothing at all, the transcription would be completely spontaneous and sincere when the experience came; it would be more or less adequate, but it would not be the outcome of a previous mental formation. Naturally, this occult knowledge or this experience is not very frequent in the world, because in those who do not have a developed inner life, there are veritable gaps between the external consciousness and the inmost consciousness; the linking states of being are missing and they have to be constructed. So when people enter there for the first time, they are bewildered, they have the impression they have fallen into the night, into nothingness, into non-being! I had a Danish friend, a painter, who was like that. He wanted me to teach him how to go out of the body; he used to have interesting dreams and thought that it would be worth the trouble to go there consciously. So I made him "go out" - but it was a frightful thing! When he was dreaming, a part of his mind still remained conscious, active, and a kind of link existed between this active part and his external being; then he remembered some of his dreams, but it was a very partial phenomenon. And to go out of one's body means to pass gradually through all the states of being, if one does the thing systematically. Well, already in the subtle physical, one is almost de-individualised, and when one goes farther, there remains nothing, for nothing is formed or individualised. Thus, when people are asked to meditate or told to go within, to enter into themselves, they are in agony - naturally! They have the impression that they are vanishing. And with reason: there is nothing, no consciousness! These things that appear to us quite natural and evident, are, for people who know nothing, wild imagination. If, for example, you transplant these experiences or this knowledge to the West, well, unless you have been frequenting the circles of occultists, they stare at you with open eyes. And when you have turned your back, they hasten to say, "These people are cranks!" Now to come back to the gods and conclude. It must be said that all those beings who have never had an earthly existence - gods or demons, invisible beings and powers - do not possess what the Divine has put into man: the psychic being. And this psychic being gives to man true love, charity, compassion, a deep kindness, which compensate for all his external defects. In the gods there is no fault because they live according to their own nature, spontaneously and without constraint: as gods, it is their manner of being. But if you take a higher point of view, if you have a higher vision, a vision of the whole, you see that they lack certain qualities that are exclusively human. By his capacity of love and self-giving, man can have as much power as the gods and even more, when he is not egoistic, when he has surmounted his egoism. If he fulfils the required condition, man is nearer to the Supreme than the gods are. He can be nearer. He is not so automatically, but he has the power to be so, the potentiality. If human love manifested itself without mixture, it would be all-powerful. Unfortunately, in human love there is as much love of oneself as of the one loved; it is not a love that makes you forget yourself. - 4 November 1958 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III 355
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420:The Science of Living To know oneself and to control oneself AN AIMLESS life is always a miserable life. Every one of you should have an aim. But do not forget that on the quality of your aim will depend the quality of your life. Your aim should be high and wide, generous and disinterested; this will make your life precious to yourself and to others. But whatever your ideal, it cannot be perfectly realised unless you have realised perfection in yourself. To work for your perfection, the first step is to become conscious of yourself, of the different parts of your being and their respective activities. You must learn to distinguish these different parts one from another, so that you may become clearly aware of the origin of the movements that occur in you, the many impulses, reactions and conflicting wills that drive you to action. It is an assiduous study which demands much perseverance and sincerity. For man's nature, especially his mental nature, has a spontaneous tendency to give a favourable explanation for everything he thinks, feels, says and does. It is only by observing these movements with great care, by bringing them, as it were, before the tribunal of our highest ideal, with a sincere will to submit to its judgment, that we can hope to form in ourselves a discernment that never errs. For if we truly want to progress and acquire the capacity of knowing the truth of our being, that is to say, what we are truly created for, what we can call our mission upon earth, then we must, in a very regular and constant manner, reject from us or eliminate in us whatever contradicts the truth of our existence, whatever is opposed to it. In this way, little by little, all the parts, all the elements of our being can be organised into a homogeneous whole around our psychic centre. This work of unification requires much time to be brought to some degree of perfection. Therefore, in order to accomplish it, we must arm ourselves with patience and endurance, with a determination to prolong our life as long as necessary for the success of our endeavour. As you pursue this labour of purification and unification, you must at the same time take great care to perfect the external and instrumental part of your being. When the higher truth manifests, it must find in you a mind that is supple and rich enough to be able to give the idea that seeks to express itself a form of thought which preserves its force and clarity. This thought, again, when it seeks to clothe itself in words, must find in you a sufficient power of expression so that the words reveal the thought and do not deform it. And the formula in which you embody the truth should be manifested in all your feelings, all your acts of will, all your actions, in all the movements of your being. Finally, these movements themselves should, by constant effort, attain their highest perfection. All this can be realised by means of a fourfold discipline, the general outline of which is given here. The four aspects of the discipline do not exclude each other, and can be followed at the same time; indeed, this is preferable. The starting-point is what can be called the psychic discipline. We give the name "psychic" to the psychological centre of our being, the seat within us of the highest truth of our existence, that which can know this truth and set it in movement. It is therefore of capital importance to become conscious of its presence in us, to concentrate on this presence until it becomes a living fact for us and we can identify ourselves with it. In various times and places many methods have been prescribed for attaining this perception and ultimately achieving this identification. Some methods are psychological, some religious, some even mechanical. In reality, everyone has to find the one which suits him best, and if one has an ardent and steadfast aspiration, a persistent and dynamic will, one is sure to meet, in one way or another - outwardly through reading and study, inwardly through concentration, meditation, revelation and experience - the help one needs to reach the goal. Only one thing is absolutely indispensable: the will to discover and to realise. This discovery and realisation should be the primary preoccupation of our being, the pearl of great price which we must acquire at any cost. Whatever you do, whatever your occupations and activities, the will to find the truth of your being and to unite with it must be always living and present behind all that you do, all that you feel, all that you think. To complement this movement of inner discovery, it would be good not to neglect the development of the mind. For the mental instrument can equally be a great help or a great hindrance. In its natural state the human mind is always limited in its vision, narrow in its understanding, rigid in its conceptions, and a constant effort is therefore needed to widen it, to make it more supple and profound. So it is very necessary to consider everything from as many points of view as possible. Towards this end, there is an exercise which gives great suppleness and elevation to the thought. It is as follows: a clearly formulated thesis is set; against it is opposed its antithesis, formulated with the same precision. Then by careful reflection the problem must be widened or transcended until a synthesis is found which unites the two contraries in a larger, higher and more comprehensive idea. Many other exercises of the same kind can be undertaken; some have a beneficial effect on the character and so possess a double advantage: that of educating the mind and that of establishing control over the feelings and their consequences. For example, you must never allow your mind to judge things and people, for the mind is not an instrument of knowledge; it is incapable of finding knowledge, but it must be moved by knowledge. Knowledge belongs to a much higher domain than that of the human mind, far above the region of pure ideas. The mind has to be silent and attentive to receive knowledge from above and manifest it. For it is an instrument of formation, of organisation and action, and it is in these functions that it attains its full value and real usefulness. There is another practice which can be very helpful to the progress of the consciousness. Whenever there is a disagreement on any matter, such as a decision to be taken, or an action to be carried out, one must never remain closed up in one's own conception or point of view. On the contrary, one must make an effort to understand the other's point of view, to put oneself in his place and, instead of quarrelling or even fighting, find the solution which can reasonably satisfy both parties; there always is one for men of goodwill. Here we must mention the discipline of the vital. The vital being in us is the seat of impulses and desires, of enthusiasm and violence, of dynamic energy and desperate depressions, of passions and revolts. It can set everything in motion, build and realise; but it can also destroy and mar everything. Thus it may be the most difficult part to discipline in the human being. It is a long and exacting labour requiring great patience and perfect sincerity, for without sincerity you will deceive yourself from the very outset, and all endeavour for progress will be in vain. With the collaboration of the vital no realisation seems impossible, no transformation impracticable. But the difficulty lies in securing this constant collaboration. The vital is a good worker, but most often it seeks its own satisfaction. If that is refused, totally or even partially, the vital gets vexed, sulks and goes on strike. Its energy disappears more or less completely and in its place leaves disgust for people and things, discouragement or revolt, depression and dissatisfaction. At such moments it is good to remain quiet and refuse to act; for these are the times when one does stupid things and in a few moments one can destroy or spoil the progress that has been made during months of regular effort. These crises are shorter and less dangerous for those who have established a contact with their psychic being which is sufficient to keep alive in them the flame of aspiration and the consciousness of the ideal to be realised. They can, with the help of this consciousness, deal with their vital as one deals with a rebellious child, with patience and perseverance, showing it the truth and light, endeavouring to convince it and awaken in it the goodwill which has been veiled for a time. By means of such patient intervention each crisis can be turned into a new progress, into one more step towards the goal. Progress may be slow, relapses may be frequent, but if a courageous will is maintained, one is sure to triumph one day and see all difficulties melt and vanish before the radiance of the truth-consciousness. Lastly, by means of a rational and discerning physical education, we must make our body strong and supple enough to become a fit instrument in the material world for the truth-force which wants to manifest through us. In fact, the body must not rule, it must obey. By its very nature it is a docile and faithful servant. Unfortunately, it rarely has the capacity of discernment it ought to have with regard to its masters, the mind and the vital. It obeys them blindly, at the cost of its own well-being. The mind with its dogmas, its rigid and arbitrary principles, the vital with its passions, its excesses and dissipations soon destroy the natural balance of the body and create in it fatigue, exhaustion and disease. It must be freed from this tyranny and this can be done only through a constant union with the psychic centre of the being. The body has a wonderful capacity of adaptation and endurance. It is able to do so many more things than one usually imagines. If, instead of the ignorant and despotic masters that now govern it, it is ruled by the central truth of the being, you will be amazed at what it is capable of doing. Calm and quiet, strong and poised, at every minute it will be able to put forth the effort that is demanded of it, for it will have learnt to find rest in action and to recuperate, through contact with the universal forces, the energies it expends consciously and usefully. In this sound and balanced life a new harmony will manifest in the body, reflecting the harmony of the higher regions, which will give it perfect proportions and ideal beauty of form. And this harmony will be progressive, for the truth of the being is never static; it is a perpetual unfolding of a growing perfection that is more and more total and comprehensive. As soon as the body has learnt to follow this movement of progressive harmony, it will be possible for it to escape, through a continuous process of transformation, from the necessity of disintegration and destruction. Thus the irrevocable law of death will no longer have any reason to exist. When we reach this degree of perfection which is our goal, we shall perceive that the truth we seek is made up of four major aspects: Love, Knowledge, Power and Beauty. These four attributes of the Truth will express themselves spontaneously in our being. The psychic will be the vehicle of true and pure love, the mind will be the vehicle of infallible knowledge, the vital will manifest an invincible power and strength and the body will be the expression of a perfect beauty and harmony. Bulletin, November 1950 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
421:Mental EducationOF ALL lines of education, mental education is the most widely known and practised, yet except in a few rare cases there are gaps which make it something very incomplete and in the end quite insufficient. Generally speaking, schooling is considered to be all the mental education that is necessary. And when a child has been made to undergo, for a number of years, a methodical training which is more like cramming than true schooling, it is considered that whatever is necessary for his mental development has been done. Nothing of the kind. Even conceding that the training is given with due measure and discrimination and does not permanently damage the brain, it cannot impart to the human mind the faculties it needs to become a good and useful instrument. The schooling that is usually given can, at the most, serve as a system of gymnastics to increase the suppleness of the brain. From this standpoint, each branch of human learning represents a special kind of mental gymnastics, and the verbal formulations given to these various branches each constitute a special and well-defined language. A true mental education, which will prepare man for a higher life, has five principal phases. Normally these phases follow one after another, but in exceptional individuals they may alternate or even proceed simultaneously. These five phases, in brief, are: (1) Development of the power of concentration, the capacity of attention. (2) Development of the capacities of expansion, widening, complexity and richness. (3) Organisation of one's ideas around a central idea, a higher ideal or a supremely luminous idea that will serve as a guide in life. (4) Thought-control, rejection of undesirable thoughts, to become able to think only what one wants and when one wants. (5) Development of mental silence, perfect calm and a more and more total receptivity to inspirations coming from the higher regions of the being. It is not possible to give here all the details concerning the methods to be employed in the application of these five phases of education to different individuals. Still, a few explanations on points of detail can be given. Undeniably, what most impedes mental progress in children is the constant dispersion of their thoughts. Their thoughts flutter hither and thither like butterflies and they have to make a great effort to fix them. Yet this capacity is latent in them, for when you succeed in arousing their interest, they are capable of a good deal of attention. By his ingenuity, therefore, the educator will gradually help the child to become capable of a sustained effort of attention and a faculty of more and more complete absorption in the work in hand. All methods that can develop this faculty of attention from games to rewards are good and can all be utilised according to the need and the circumstances. But it is the psychological action that is most important and the sovereign method is to arouse in the child an interest in what you want to teach him, a liking for work, a will to progress. To love to learn is the most precious gift that one can give to a child: to love to learn always and everywhere, so that all circumstances, all happenings in life may be constantly renewed opportunities for learning more and always more. For that, to attention and concentration should be added observation, precise recording and faithfulness of memory. This faculty of observation can be developed by varied and spontaneous exercises, making use of every opportunity that presents itself to keep the child's thought wakeful, alert and prompt. The growth of the understanding should be stressed much more than that of memory. One knows well only what one has understood. Things learnt by heart, mechanically, fade away little by little and finally disappear; what is understood is never forgotten. Moreover, you must never refuse to explain to a child the how and the why of things. If you cannot do it yourself, you must direct the child to those who are qualified to answer or point out to him some books that deal with the question. In this way you will progressively awaken in the child the taste for true study and the habit of making a persistent effort to know. This will bring us quite naturally to the second phase of development in which the mind should be widened and enriched. You will gradually show the child that everything can become an interesting subject for study if it is approached in the right way. The life of every day, of every moment, is the best school of all, varied, complex, full of unexpected experiences, problems to be solved, clear and striking examples and obvious consequences. It is so easy to arouse healthy curiosity in children, if you answer with intelligence and clarity the numerous questions they ask. An interesting reply to one readily brings others in its train and so the attentive child learns without effort much more than he usually does in the classroom. By a choice made with care and insight, you should also teach him to enjoy good reading-matter which is both instructive and attractive. Do not be afraid of anything that awakens and pleases his imagination; imagination develops the creative mental faculty and through it study becomes living and the mind develops in joy. In order to increase the suppleness and comprehensiveness of his mind, one should see not only that he studies many varied topics, but above all that a single subject is approached in various ways, so that the child understands in a practical manner that there are many ways of facing the same intellectual problem, of considering it and solving it. This will remove all rigidity from his brain and at the same time it will make his thinking richer and more supple and prepare it for a more complex and comprehensive synthesis. In this way also the child will be imbued with the sense of the extreme relativity of mental learning and, little by little, an aspiration for a truer source of knowledge will awaken in him. Indeed, as the child grows older and progresses in his studies, his mind too ripens and becomes more and more capable of forming general ideas, and with them almost always comes a need for certitude, for a knowledge that is stable enough to form the basis of a mental construction which will permit all the diverse and scattered and often contradictory ideas accumulated in his brain to be organised and put in order. This ordering is indeed very necessary if one is to avoid chaos in one's thoughts. All contradictions can be transformed into complements, but for that one must discover the higher idea that will have the power to bring them harmoniously together. It is always good to consider every problem from all possible standpoints so as to avoid partiality and exclusiveness; but if the thought is to be active and creative, it must, in every case, be the natural and logical synthesis of all the points of view adopted. And if you want to make the totality of your thoughts into a dynamic and constructive force, you must also take great care as to the choice of the central idea of your mental synthesis; for upon that will depend the value of this synthesis. The higher and larger the central idea and the more universal it is, rising above time and space, the more numerous and the more complex will be the ideas, notions and thoughts which it will be able to organise and harmonise. It goes without saying that this work of organisation cannot be done once and for all. The mind, if it is to keep its vigour and youth, must progress constantly, revise its notions in the light of new knowledge, enlarge its frame-work to include fresh notions and constantly reclassify and reorganise its thoughts, so that each of them may find its true place in relation to the others and the whole remain harmonious and orderly. All that has just been said concerns the speculative mind, the mind that learns. But learning is only one aspect of mental activity; the other, which is at least equally important, is the constructive faculty, the capacity to form and thus prepare action. This very important part of mental activity has rarely been the subject of any special study or discipline. Only those who want, for some reason, to exercise a strict control over their mental activities think of observing and disciplining this faculty of formation; and as soon as they try it, they have to face difficulties so great that they appear almost insurmountable. And yet control over this formative activity of the mind is one of the most important aspects of self-education; one can say that without it no mental mastery is possible. As far as study is concerned, all ideas are acceptable and should be included in the synthesis, whose very function is to become more and more rich and complex; but where action is concerned, it is just the opposite. The ideas that are accepted for translation into action should be strictly controlled and only those that agree with the general trend of the central idea forming the basis of the mental synthesis should be permitted to express themselves in action. This means that every thought entering the mental consciousness should be set before the central idea; if it finds a logical place among the thoughts already grouped, it will be admitted into the synthesis; if not, it will be rejected so that it can have no influence on the action. This work of mental purification should be done very regularly in order to secure a complete control over one's actions. For this purpose, it is good to set apart some time every day when one can quietly go over one's thoughts and put one's synthesis in order. Once the habit is acquired, you can maintain control over your thoughts even during work and action, allowing only those which are useful for what you are doing to come to the surface. Particularly, if you have continued to cultivate the power of concentration and attention, only the thoughts that are needed will be allowed to enter the active external consciousness and they then become all the more dynamic and effective. And if, in the intensity of concentration, it becomes necessary not to think at all, all mental vibration can be stilled and an almost total silence secured. In this silence one can gradually open to the higher regions of the mind and learn to record the inspirations that come from there. But even before reaching this point, silence in itself is supremely useful, because in most people who have a somewhat developed and active mind, the mind is never at rest. During the day, its activity is kept under a certain control, but at night, during the sleep of the body, the control of the waking state is almost completely removed and the mind indulges in activities which are sometimes excessive and often incoherent. This creates a great stress which leads to fatigue and the diminution of the intellectual faculties. The fact is that like all the other parts of the human being, the mind too needs rest and it will not have this rest unless we know how to provide it. The art of resting one's mind is something to be acquired. Changing one's mental activity is certainly one way of resting; but the greatest possible rest is silence. And as far as the mental faculties are concerned a few minutes passed in the calm of silence are a more effective rest than hours of sleep. When one has learned to silence the mind at will and to concentrate it in receptive silence, then there will be no problem that cannot be solved, no mental difficulty whose solution cannot be found. When it is agitated, thought becomes confused and impotent; in an attentive tranquillity, the light can manifest itself and open up new horizons to man's capacity. Bulletin, November 1951 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
422:The Supreme Discovery IF WE want to progress integrally, we must build within our conscious being a strong and pure mental synthesis which can serve us as a protection against temptations from outside, as a landmark to prevent us from going astray, as a beacon to light our way across the moving ocean of life. Each individual should build up this mental synthesis according to his own tendencies and affinities and aspirations. But if we want it to be truly living and luminous, it must be centred on the idea that is the intellectual representation symbolising That which is at the centre of our being, That which is our life and our light. This idea, expressed in sublime words, has been taught in various forms by all the great Instructors in all lands and all ages. The Self of each one and the great universal Self are one. Since all that is exists from all eternity in its essence and principle, why make a distinction between the being and its origin, between ourselves and what we place at the beginning? The ancient traditions rightly said: "Our origin and ourselves, our God and ourselves are one." And this oneness should not be understood merely as a more or less close and intimate relationship of union, but as a true identity. Thus, when a man who seeks the Divine attempts to reascend by degrees towards the inaccessible, he forgets that all his knowledge and all his intuition cannot take him one step forward in this infinite; neither does he know that what he wants to attain, what he believes to be so far from him, is within him. For how could he know anything of the origin until he becomes conscious of this origin in himself? It is by understanding himself, by learning to know himself, that he can make the supreme discovery and cry out in wonder like the patriarch in the Bible, "The house of God is here and I knew it not." That is why we must express that sublime thought, creatrix of the material worlds, and make known to all the word that fills the heavens and the earth, "I am in all things and all beings."When all shall know this, the promised day of great transfigurations will be at hand. When in each atom of Matter men shall recognise the indwelling thought of God, when in each living creature they shall perceive some hint of a gesture of God, when each man can see God in his brother, then dawn will break, dispelling the darkness, the falsehood, the ignorance, the error and suffering that weigh upon all Nature. For, "all Nature suffers and laments as she awaits the revelation of the Sons of God." This indeed is the central thought epitomising all others, the thought which should be ever present to our remembrance as the sun that illumines all life. That is why I remind you of it today. For if we follow our path bearing this thought in our hearts like the rarest jewel, the most precious treasure, if we allow it to do its work of illumination and transfiguration within us, we shall know that it lives in the centre of all beings and all things, and in it we shall feel the marvellous oneness of the universe. Then we shall understand the vanity and childishness of our meagre satisfactions, our foolish quarrels, our petty passions, our blind indignations. We shall see the dissolution of our little faults, the crumbling of the last entrenchments of our limited personality and our obtuse egoism. We shall feel ourselves being swept along by this sublime current of true spirituality which will deliver us from our narrow limits and bounds. The individual Self and the universal Self are one; in every world, in every being, in every thing, in every atom is the Divine Presence, and man's mission is to manifest it. In order to do that, he must become conscious of this Divine Presence within him. Some individuals must undergo a real apprenticeship in order to achieve this: their egoistic being is too all-absorbing, too rigid, too conservative, and their struggles against it are long and painful. Others, on the contrary, who are more impersonal, more plastic, more spiritualised, come easily into contact with the inexhaustible divine source of their being.But let us not forget that they too should devote themselves daily, constantly, to a methodical effort of adaptation and transformation, so that nothing within them may ever again obscure the radiance of that pure light. But how greatly the standpoint changes once we attain this deeper consciousness! How understanding widens, how compassion grows! On this a sage has said: "I would like each one of us to come to the point where he perceives the inner God who dwells even in the vilest of human beings; instead of condemning him we would say, 'Arise, O resplendent Being, thou who art ever pure, who knowest neither birth nor death; arise, Almighty One, and manifest thy nature.'" Let us live by this beautiful utterance and we shall see everything around us transformed as if by miracle. This is the attitude of true, conscious and discerning love, the love which knows how to see behind appearances, understand in spite of words, and which, amid all obstacles, is in constant communion with the depths. What value have our impulses and our desires, our anguish and our violence, our sufferings and our struggles, all these inner vicissitudes unduly dramatised by our unruly imagination - what value do they have before this great, this sublime and divine love bending over us from the innermost depths of our being, bearing with our weaknesses, rectifying our errors, healing our wounds, bathing our whole being with its regenerating streams? For the inner Godhead never imposes herself, she neither demands nor threatens; she offers and gives herself, conceals and forgets herself in the heart of all beings and things; she never accuses, she neither judges nor curses nor condemns, but works unceasingly to perfect without constraint, to mend without reproach, to encourage without impatience, to enrich each one with all the wealth he can receive; she is the mother whose love bears fruit and nourishes, guards and protects, counsels and consoles; because she understands everything, she can endure everything, excuse and pardon everything, hope and prepare for everything; bearing everything within herself, she owns nothing that does not belong to all, and because she reigns over all, she is the servant of all; that is why all, great and small, who want to be kings with her and gods in her, become, like her, not despots but servitors among their brethren. How beautiful is this humble role of servant, the role of all who have been revealers and heralds of the God who is within all, of the Divine Love that animates all things.... And until we can follow their example and become true servants even as they, let us allow ourselves to be penetrated and transformed by this Divine Love; let us offer Him, without reserve, this marvellous instrument, our physical organism. He shall make it yield its utmost on every plane of activity. To achieve this total self-consecration, all means are good, all methods have their value. The one thing needful is to persevere in our will to attain this goal. For then everything we study, every action we perform, every human being we meet, all come to bring us an indication, a help, a light to guide us on the path. Before I close, I shall add a few pages for those who have already made apparently fruitless efforts, for those who have encountered the pitfalls on the way and seen the measure of their weakness, for those who are in danger of losing their self-confidence and courage. These pages, intended to rekindle hope in the hearts of those who suffer, were written by a spiritual worker at a time when ordeals of every kind were sweeping down on him like purifying flames. You who are weary, downcast and bruised, you who fall, who think perhaps that you are defeated, hear the voice of a friend. He knows your sorrows, he has shared them, he has suffered like you from the ills of the earth; like you he has crossed many deserts under the burden of the day, he has known thirst and hunger, solitude and abandonment, and the cruellest of all wants, the destitution of the heart. Alas! he has known too the hours of doubt, the errors, the faults, the failings, every weakness. But he tells you: Courage! Hearken to the lesson that the rising sun brings to the earth with its first rays each morning. It is a lesson of hope, a message of solace. You who weep, who suffer and tremble, who dare not expect an end to your ills, an issue to your pangs, behold: there is no night without dawn and the day is about to break when darkness is thickest; there is no mist that the sun does not dispel, no cloud that it does not gild, no tear that it will not dry one day, no storm that is not followed by its shining triumphant bow; there is no snow that it does not melt, nor winter that it does not change into radiant spring. And for you too, there is no affliction which does not bring its measure of glory, no distress which cannot be transformed into joy, nor defeat into victory, nor downfall into higher ascension, nor solitude into radiating centre of life, nor discord into harmony - sometimes it is a misunderstanding between two minds that compels two hearts to open to mutual communion; lastly, there is no infinite weakness that cannot be changed into strength. And it is even in supreme weakness that almightiness chooses to reveal itself! Listen, my little child, you who today feel so broken, so fallen perhaps, who have nothing left, nothing to cover your misery and foster your pride: never before have you been so great! How close to the summits is he who awakens in the depths, for the deeper the abyss, the more the heights reveal themselves! Do you not know this, that the most sublime forces of the vasts seek to array themselves in the most opaque veils of Matter? Oh, the sublime nuptials of sovereign love with the obscurest plasticities, of the shadow's yearning with the most royal light! If ordeal or fault has cast you down, if you have sunk into the nether depths of suffering, do not grieve - for there indeed the divine love and the supreme blessing can reach you! Because you have passed through the crucible of purifying sorrows, the glorious ascents are yours. You are in the wilderness: then listen to the voices of the silence. The clamour of flattering words and outer applause has gladdened your ears, but the voices of the silence will gladden your soul and awaken within you the echo of the depths, the chant of divine harmonies! You are walking in the depths of night: then gather the priceless treasures of the night. In bright sunshine, the ways of intelligence are lit, but in the white luminosities of the night lie the hidden paths of perfection, the secret of spiritual riches. You are being stripped of everything: that is the way towards plenitude. When you have nothing left, everything will be given to you. Because for those who are sincere and true, from the worst always comes the best. Every grain that is sown in the earth produces a thousand. Every wing-beat of sorrow can be a soaring towards glory. And when the adversary pursues man relentlessly, everything he does to destroy him only makes him greater. Hear the story of the worlds, look: the great enemy seems to triumph. He casts the beings of light into the night, and the night is filled with stars. He rages against the cosmic working, he assails the integrity of the empire of the sphere, shatters its harmony, divides and subdivides it, scatters its dust to the four winds of infinity, and lo! the dust is changed into a golden seed, fertilising the infinite and peopling it with worlds which now gravitate around their eternal centre in the larger orbit of space - so that even division creates a richer and deeper unity, and by multiplying the surfaces of the material universe, enlarges the empire that it set out to destroy. Beautiful indeed was the song of the primordial sphere cradled in the bosom of immensity, but how much more beautiful and triumphant is the symphony of the constellations, the music of the spheres, the immense choir that fills the heavens with an eternal hymn of victory! Hear again: no state was ever more precarious than that of man when he was separated on earth from his divine origin. Above him stretched the hostile borders of the usurper, and at his horizon's gates watched jailers armed with flaming swords. Then, since he could climb no more to the source of life, the source arose within him; since he could no more receive the light from above, the light shone forth at the very centre of his being; since he could commune no more with the transcendent love, that love offered itself in a holocaust and chose each terrestrial being, each human self as its dwelling-place and sanctuary. That is how, in this despised and desolate but fruitful and blessed Matter, each atom contains a divine thought, each being carries within him the Divine Inhabitant. And if no being in all the universe is as frail as man, neither is any as divine as he! In truth, in truth, in humiliation lies the cradle of glory! 28 April 1912 ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago The Supreme Discovery,
423:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step. But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort. Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection. You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, WIKI am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: WIKI have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages. In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything. It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM. My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga. All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind. These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness. And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed. And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen. My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal. Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967 ~ The Mother, Sweet Mother The Mother to Mona Sarkar,
424:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passageOmnes eodem cogimur, omniumVersatur urna serius ociusSors exitura et nos in aeternumExilium impositura cymbae.Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vainUpon the axis of its pain,Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!'Farewell, farewell! but this I tellTo thee, thou Wedding-Guest!He prayeth well, who loveth wellBoth man and bird and beast.He prayeth best, who loveth bestAll things both great and small;For the dear God who loveth us,He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:joy conquers fear. ~ Amy Newmark,
2:new job.” Irene ~ Rosalind Lauer,
3:tell a new story ~ Richard Dotts,
4:Traveling renews you. ~ K D Lang,
5:Wear down to be renewed. ~ Laozi,
6:bob dylan new orleans ~ Bob Dylan,
7:cap. The newspaper ~ John Grisham,
8:Excuse us for the news, ~ Chuck D,
9:in my new office; ~ Alex Ferguson,
10:New Living Translation ~ Jeremiah,
11:This is new and exciting. ~ Tijan,
12:anything new. Your ~ Kevin Horsley,
13:beginning I knew we ~ Jodi Picoult,
14:brand-new hot tub. ~ Alafair Burke,
15:I knew a girl named Nikki ~ Prince,
16:I knew the poor, ~ Hilda Doolittle,
17:mother with new ~ Melanie Benjamin,
18:new shape ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
19:Numb is the new deep. ~ John Mayer,
20:TORCHES NEW ENGLAND ~ Rick Riordan,
21:why not? We knew ~ Catherine Bybee,
22:CNN is not fake news. ~ Jolene Ivey,
23:Detroit's New Dashboard ~ Anonymous,
24:Every pain be gold. ~ Sandra Newman,
25:I can eat fifty eggs. ~ Paul Newman,
26:I grew up in New York. ~ Yunjin Kim,
27:news-cramm’d. ~ William Shakespeare,
28:Weird is the new cool. ~ Kasie West,
29:Welcome to the New Raw! ~ John Cena,
30:A liar knew a liar. ~ Juliette Cross,
31:Crazy: the new normal. ~ Rick Yancey,
32:Emotion is always new. ~ Victor Hugo,
33:History – the new sex. ~ Jodi Taylor,
34:I'm a New York story. ~ Steve Madden,
35:millions of miles away ~ Emma Newman,
36:newsletter to hear about ~ Anonymous,
37:Poor is the new black. ~ Erykah Badu,
38:PRELUDE TO A NEW DREAM ~ Miguel Ruiz,
39:She knew too much. -A ~ Sara Shepard,
40:they only knew ~ William W Johnstone,
41:Turn over a new leaf. ~ Edmund Burke,
42:A newt?" "I got better. ~ Terry Jones,
43:Brave new world ~ William Shakespeare,
44:CHAPTER IX—NEW TROUBLES ~ Victor Hugo,
45:Every day is a brand new day! ~ Sting,
46:I feign no hypotheses. ~ Isaac Newton,
47:I needed a new mystery. ~ John Fowles,
48:I read the newspaper. ~ George W Bush,
49:newspapers over his face. ~ Ed McBain,
50:New York has collapsed. ~ James Purdy,
51:Novelty is the new normal, ~ Amy Webb,
52:Piracy is the new radio. ~ Neil Young,
53:Summary of Rule #2 Rule ~ Cal Newport,
54:There are no new pains. ~ Audre Lorde,
55:The sun is new each day. ~ Heraclitus,
56:Times New Roman, ~ Brittany Cavallaro,
57:A new moon teaches gradualness ~ Rumi,
58:Brainy's the new sexy. ~ Steven Moffat,
59:Each year is a new year. ~ Tim Buckley,
60:Funny is funny is funny. ~ Bob Newhart,
61:He knew Carolina de Silva. ~ Meg Cabot,
62:I, in my brand new body, ~ Anne Sexton,
63:I’ll feel my heaven anew, ~ John Keats,
64:I love new questions. ~ Robert Englund,
65:It's a brave new world. ~ Howard Kurtz,
66:I was you
and never knew it ~ Rumi,
67:moment. ‘In New York, ~ Tilly Bagshawe,
68:Quiet IS the new loud. ~ Patrick Stump,
69:Sleep is the new sex. ~ Gretchen Rubin,
70:What's the news? ~ William Shakespeare,
71:You are always new to me. ~ John Keats,
72:A clean break is best. In ~ Cal Newport,
73:All good art is abstract. ~ John Newman,
74:And the game begins anew. ~ Neil Gaiman,
75:Create each day anew. ~ Morihei Ueshiba,
76:Good writing is always new. ~ A S Byatt,
77:I had built a new life. ~ Tara Westover,
78:I knew I’d get stick ~ Peter F Hamilton,
79:I'm home in New Orleans! ~ Ani DiFranco,
80:It felt like a new day. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
81:It's fun doing new things. ~ Rick Baker,
82:I was born in New York. ~ Peter Jurasik,
83:Mexico is the new China. ~ Donald Trump,
84:much older than you knew ~ Faith Martin,
85:New can be an emotion. ~ David Levithan,
86:Old gods do new jobs. ~ Terry Pratchett,
87:The sun is new every day ~ Janet Morris,
88:underage and everyone knew ~ Robyn Carr,
89:We need a new religion. ~ Lauren Hutton,
90:with renewing his offer of ~ Donna Leon,
91:You can't buy history new. ~ N D Wilson,
92:123 ~ Granta The Magazine of New Writing,
93:acquire a new target. It ~ Clive Cussler,
94:Agriculture is the new golf ~ Ed McMahon,
95:Always make new mistakes. ~ Esther Dyson,
96:Bad news is just an excuse. ~ Neil Young,
97:Business news is sexy. ~ Maria Bartiromo,
98:Chits knew no ideology. ~ Rick Perlstein,
99:Don't sell on bad news. ~ Walter Schloss,
100:Drove me to my new life. ~ Tara Westover,
101:Germany has been born anew. ~ Robert Ley,
102:Helpful is the new viral. ~ Laura Fitton,
103:I don't like anything new. ~ Clea DuVall,
104:Metadata is the new wealth ~ Kevin Kelly,
105:newcomer to Westbury. If ~ Melinda Leigh,
106:New Jersey gives us glue. ~ Howard Dietz,
107:People are new everyday. ~ Lauren Oliver,
108:Sleep is the new sex. ~ Margaret Carlson,
109:There is no news industry. ~ Clay Shirky,
110:The Sorting Hat’s New Song ~ J K Rowling,
111:They knew it was the Master. ~ Anonymous,
112:To be worn out is to be renewed. ~ Laozi,
113:walk around my new office. I ~ Anonymous,
114:Women in drudgery knew ~ Muriel Rukeyser,
115:A deep life is a good life. ~ Cal Newport,
116:death was fresh and new. I ~ Rick Riordan,
117:Every end is a new beginning ~ V E Schwab,
118:Every thing new is fine. ~ George Herbert,
119:he good news is: I’m alive. ~ Holly Smale,
120:Hindsight provides new eyes. ~ Wayne Dyer,
121:I do not feign hypotheses. ~ Isaac Newton,
122:If we knew how to find ~ Margarita Engle,
123:i knew him, Horatio ~ William Shakespeare,
124:I knew it would be you ~ Charles Bukowski,
125:It was a fairly new iMac ~ RaeAnne Thayne,
126:Never Again the Burning. ~ Isaac Bonewits,
127:New blood keeps us alive. ~ Monte Pittman,
128:NEW MILFORD, CONNECTICUT ~ Andrew Britton,
129:PROLOGUE Saskia Hartley knew ~ M A Comley,
130:The New Business Road Test ~ Josh Kaufman,
131:Then we knew he was lying. ~ Gary Paulsen,
132:There are no new fundamentals. ~ Jim Rohn,
133:There's a new sexy boy now! ~ Randy Orton,
134:This is the new barbarism. ~ Rebecca West,
135:Congratulations. A new low. ~ Carl Hiaasen,
136:Don't be afraid of new arenas. ~ Elon Musk,
137:Every end is a new beginning. ~ V E Schwab,
138:for news of upcoming releases! ~ Anonymous,
139:Gingrich - primary mission ~ Newt Gingrich,
140:I am a black new wave artist. ~ Kanye West,
141:I knew it was all or nothing. ~ Carl Froch,
142:It was over, and I knew that. ~ Kiera Cass,
143:Love is the new denim or black ~ Lady Gaga,
144:Meet your new alpha, bitch. ~ Sally Thorne,
145:Men love newfangleness. ~ Geoffrey Chaucer,
146:New things are always ugly. ~ Willa Cather,
147:Of all the girls I ever knew ~ Al Stewart,
148:Passion makes the old medicine new: ~ Rumi,
149:secret only she knew— ~ Charlie N Holmberg,
150:To be worn out is to be renewed. ~ Lao Tzu,
151:Toronto Sydney New Delhi ~ Jennifer Weiner,
152:We craved new beginnings ~ Vikki Wakefield,
153:Words, he knew, could scar. ~ Jodi Picoult,
154:You'll have new Septembers. ~ Taylor Swift,
155:as ephemeral as the newspapers. ~ Anonymous,
156:Bad news has good legs. ~ Richard Llewellyn,
157:Brooklyn, New York, and ~ Michael J Tougias,
158:Convert bad news to good news. ~ Bill Gates,
159:Deceit knew no boundaries. ~ Mary E Pearson,
160:Failure: the renewable resource. ~ Kay Ryan,
161:Frying pans! Who knew, right? ~ Walt Disney,
162:Girl I knew you knew that Corly ~ Anonymous,
163:He still knew how she moved. ~ Claudia Gray,
164:History is the new poetry. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
165:I knew you belonged with me. ~ Brenda Novak,
166:I'm a New Yorker, you know. ~ Edward Norton,
167:I've been a very lucky actor. ~ Bob Newhart,
168:Long live the New Flesh! ~ David Cronenberg,
169:Long live the new flesh. ~ David Cronenberg,
170:make the time for renewal. ~ Robin S Sharma,
171:New habits can be launched. ~ William James,
172:newly purchased herbal teabags ~ Andy McNab,
173:Only conflict is news, and ~ Gloria Steinem,
174:Orphan Black is the new black. ~ Haley Webb,
175:Our job is to protect the new. ~ Ed Catmull,
176:Rise, Shine and Eat Protein New ~ Anonymous,
177:Sequence wants to be free. ~ Annalee Newitz,
178:Today.....I begin a new life". ~ Og Mandino,
179:We'll find new stuff to want. ~ Tim O Brien,
180:What goes up must come down. ~ Isaac Newton,
181:Who's to say who's an expert? ~ Paul Newman,
182:Zombies are the new vampire. ~ Stephen King,
183:A new line is a new mind. ~ Eliot Weinberger,
184:Anonymity is the new fame. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
185:Come tomorrow, I'll wake up new. ~ Chad Sugg,
186:Convert to IRA-based system. ~ Newt Gingrich,
187:Damn it. I knew Kevin was right, ~ Hal Elrod,
188:Everything is new and doomed. ~ Tommy Orange,
189:He knew where his towel was. ~ Douglas Adams,
190:I always knew I'd go to space. ~ Mae Jemison,
191:I am always trying to write. ~ Joanna Newsom,
192:I feel like a brand new bitch. ~ Amelia Gray,
193:If youth knew; if age could. ~ Sigmund Freud,
194:I learn something new every day. ~ Stan Getz,
195:I'm in a New York state of mind ~ Billy Joel,
196:I never knew my mother's name. ~ Zo Marriott,
197:It is completely up to you. ~ Tommy Newberry,
198:My new name will keep me warm! ~ Erin Hunter,
199:NEWT (exasperated) Dumbledore. ~ J K Rowling,
200:Normality is the new eccentric. ~ Criss Jami,
201:Old ties give place to new ones. ~ Euripides,
202:Post York New , BeckwithTamara © ~ Anonymous,
203:Press on, press on, men. ~ Stonewall Jackson,
204:Read my lips-NO NEW TAXES! ~ George H W Bush,
205:Rocks crumble, make new forms, ~ Anne Sexton,
206:Sitting is the new smoking. ~ Rujuta Diwekar,
207:Success only breeds a new goal ~ Bette Davis,
208:Technically, I'm a New Yorker. ~ Charlie Day,
209:telling. I thought I knew this ~ Adele Parks,
210:The Ability to Love New People ~ Mary Pipher,
211:The Innovators, Isaacson later ~ Cal Newport,
212:The new European Soviet. ~ Mikhail Gorbachev,
213:There are new monsters now. ~ John Darnielle,
214:Time hath a taming hand. ~ John Henry Newman,
215:Vegetarian is the New Prius! ~ Kathy Freston,
216:Ya’ gotta love New Orleans. ~ O Neil de Noux,
217:And yet, she knew she could be. ~ Ally Carter,
218:Brainy. Definitely the new Sexy. ~ John Green,
219:Crank up the Beach Boys, Baby. ~ Randy Newman,
220:Creativity is the new literacy ~ Chase Jarvis,
221:Don't make it new; make it whole. ~ Alex Ross,
222:eBookNews.SimonandSchuster.com ~ Richard Bach,
223:God damn, it's a brand new payback ~ Ice Cube,
224:I heard the news today, oh boy. ~ David Bowie,
225:I'm kicking new flava in ya ear! ~ Craig Mack,
226:It knew things, that smile. ~ Julie Anne Long,
227:It's a new day in the World After. ~ Susan Ee,
228:I will reign over a new world! ~ Tsugumi Ohba,
229:I wish I knew how to quit you. ~ Annie Proulx,
230:I wuff aunt Newwy's chippen! ~ Heather Brewer,
231:Jack knew what had come after. ~ Billy Coffey,
232:knew who they were, what she’d ~ Katie Ruggle,
233:Let's have some new cliches. ~ Samuel Goldwyn,
234:Maybe he knew I’d need to smile. ~ Kiera Cass,
235:minimize the shallow in my life ~ Cal Newport,
236:Money really, really matters. ~ Newt Gingrich,
237:new blog to hear the latest and ~ Marie Force,
238:New York: A third-rate Babylon. ~ H L Mencken,
239:New York has an electronic heart. ~ Anais Nin,
240:New York has the best tap water. ~ Cary Elwes,
241:Off to the STUDIO in my new whip. ~ Lady Gaga,
242:Rereading, we find a new book. ~ Mason Cooley,
243:resisted all the way: a new ~ Charlotte Bront,
244:Sincere deeds invite new friends. ~ Toba Beta,
245:Snooty knew measly talked muchly. ~ Toba Beta,
246:The 4 Disciplines of Execution, ~ Cal Newport,
247:The real news is bad news. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
248:The Woman Behind the New Deal. ~ David Brooks,
249:Who knew love could kill you? ~ Anthony Doerr,
250:you're a whole new kind of fish. ~ Gail Giles,
251:You're Beautiful! (Pass it on). ~ Kyle Newman,
252:Zombies are the new vampires. ~ Mireille Enos,
253:A new future requires a new past. ~ Eric Foner,
254:An old friend is a new house. ~ George Herbert,
255:breathing, so she knew he was ~ Christie Craig,
256:Denying racism is the new racism. ~ Bill Maher,
257:disappearance, Kyle knew he had ~ Cynthia Eden,
258:discovery and defense of the new. ~ Ed Catmull,
259:drove his new customized Tesla ~ Clive Cussler,
260:EVERY ENDING IS A NEW BEGINNING. ~ Neil Gaiman,
261:Every moment is a new beginning. ~ Elie Wiesel,
262:Hello, hand, meet your new leash. ~ Jaymin Eve,
263:Humans - a renewable resource. ~ Carrie Vaughn,
264:I always write well in New York. ~ David Bowie,
265:I eat Fig Newtons by the sleeve. ~ Brian Regan,
266:I find I like it too much. ~ Stonewall Jackson,
267:I GET A NEW ENEMY FOR CHRISTMAS ~ Rick Riordan,
268:I just wanna do my music. ~ Olivia Newton John,
269:I knew how to live with scars. ~ Meredith Wild,
270:I knew I always wanted to sing. ~ David Ruffin,
271:I knew this girl named Tropicana, ~ Lord Jamar,
272:I love learning new techniques. ~ David Bailey,
273:knew from Monsieur Lefèvre’s face ~ Jojo Moyes,
274:McKinty is an exciting new talent. ~ Ed McBain,
275:Mood has a scuba section? Who knew? ~ Tim Gunn,
276:My duty is to obey orders. ~ Stonewall Jackson,
277:New-car smell is toxic to humans. ~ John Lloyd,
278:New facts often trigger new ideas ~ T L Osborn,
279:New ideas must use old buildings ~ Jane Jacobs,
280:New ideas require new structures. ~ Leroy Hood,
281:New talents are the future. ~ Delphine Arnault,
282:New York, thy name is paranoia. ~ Stephen King,
283:No Good News in This Chapter ~ Haruki Murakami,
284:Of a new Prince, new bondage. ~ George Herbert,
285:Old age is the new childhood. ~ Hanif Kureishi,
286:Only wise men look for new wisdom. ~ Toba Beta,
287:Physics, beware of metaphysics. ~ Isaac Newton,
288:Pre-order is the new order ~ Zachary Schomburg,
289:Teaching is bringing the news. ~ Frank McCourt,
290:Tyler never knew his father. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
291:Understanding brings control. ~ Isaac Bonewits,
292:We're news junkies in my house. ~ Stephen King,
293:1939 New York World’s Fair, ~ Stephen E Ambrose,
294:A new Dragon’s Egg?” asked ~ Melissa de la Cruz,
295:A new mind-set became imperative: ~ Hope Jahren,
296:As far as he knew, I was dying. ~ Mickey Mantle,
297:Bukowski was a loser. He knew it. ~ Mark Manson,
298:CHAPTER LXV THE NEW MINISTER ~ Anthony Trollope,
299:Creativity is a renewable resource. ~ Biz Stone,
300:Crowdfunding is the new black. ~ Rowena Wiseman,
301:Damn-the girl knew how to play. ~ Katie McGarry,
302:EITC is an invitation to fraud. ~ Newt Gingrich,
303:Error of omission begets new rules. ~ Toba Beta,
304:Every new time will give its law. ~ Maxim Gorky,
305:Every wave is new until it breaks. ~ Neil Young,
306:Fill the moment and find variety. ~ Paul Newman,
307:Food is the new rock and roll. ~ David Nicholls,
308:For me, every day is a new thing. ~ Frank Gehry,
309:Girls in New York look like giraffes. ~ Shwayze,
310:Give the park police more ammo. ~ Newt Gingrich,
311:Giving back is the new luxury. ~ Franca Sozzani,
312:God is not afraid of new things. ~ Pope Francis,
313:I like Bach. I like Randy Newman. ~ David Mamet,
314:I'm always looking for new talent. ~ Fred Durst,
315:It's been a privilege to be here. ~ Paul Newman,
316:It's fun to learn a new playbook. ~ Andrew Luck,
317:It's good for you to try new things ~ Jenny Han,
318:Jeb Bush is the new John Connelly. ~ Chuck Todd,
319:knew, what she thought would keep ~ Dina Silver,
320:matthew.mather@phuturenews.com ~ Matthew Mather,
321:My next baby will be my new record. ~ Lady Gaga,
322:My women are always victorious. ~ Helmut Newton,
323:New arts destroy the old. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
324:Newbies tend to demean one another. ~ Toba Beta,
325:New York is the last true city. ~ Toni Morrison,
326:No day is safe from news of you. ~ Sylvia Plath,
327:O loving wisdom of our God ~ John Henry Newman,
328:problems of the the new century ~ E J Dionne Jr,
329:RULE #1 Don’t Follow Your Passion ~ Cal Newport,
330:Self knowledge is always bad news. ~ John Barth,
331:Sunlight will renew your pride. ~ Joni Mitchell,
332:The guilt of newborns is immense. ~ Georg Trakl,
333:The new deputy will be Fireheart, ~ Erin Hunter,
334:There is nothing new under the sun. ~ Anonymous,
335:This is no time to make new enemies. ~ Voltaire,
336:Tomorrow we begin a new tomorrow. ~ Mitt Romney,
337:Wealth is the sinews of affairs. ~ Wilfred Bion,
338:we need to pursue a new tact, ~ Lindsay Buroker,
339:You only grow when you are alone. ~ Paul Newman,
340:You’re new motto is this: do epic. ~ Kim Holden,
341:A bowler can make or break a chap. ~ John Newton,
342:Architects are the new comedians. ~ Simon Doonan,
343:Centralized health dictatorship. ~ Newt Gingrich,
344:Chase National Bank in New York ~ Denise Kiernan,
345:Customers always want something new ~ Steve Jobs,
346:Drill here, drill now, pay less. ~ Newt Gingrich,
347:eBookNews.SimonandSchuster.com ~ Janet Evanovich,
348:even knew where she’d lived. So ~ John Lescroart,
349:Everyday is a new opportunity. ~ Terry McAuliffe,
350:Every man is a new method. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
351:For Frito-Lay!" - Newel and Doren ~ Brandon Mull,
352:Gamache in anger. “He knew that’s ~ Louise Penny,
353:Good news. “Come fast,” he suggests. ~ M R Carey,
354:Good news comes in large packages ~ Hazel Gaynor,
355:I always knew I had to work hard. ~ Eric Cantona,
356:I always knew what I was doing. ~ Jackie Gleason,
357:I could never hate anyone I knew. ~ Charles Lamb,
358:I don't even like New York rappers. ~ ASAP Rocky,
359:I don't have a stack of scripts... ~ Bob Newhart,
360:I enjoy seeing new places. ~ Kareem Abdul Jabbar,
361:I feel more comfortable in comedy. ~ Bob Newhart,
362:I knew their numbers increased; ~ Jonathan Swift,
363:I like Public Enemy a great deal. ~ Randy Newman,
364:I like to discover new things. ~ Olivier Megaton,
365:I'll turn over a new leaf. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
366:I once was lost, but now am found. ~ John Newton,
367:I rather think he knew anyway. ~ Jonathan Stroud,
368:Justice. If only we knew what it was. ~ Socrates,
369:Let me hear your body talk. ~ Olivia Newton John,
370:Let's start a new tomorrow, today. ~ Neil Gaiman,
371:Listening is the new prospecting. ~ John Jantsch,
372:Literature is news that stays news. ~ Ezra Pound,
373:My newspaper job … is my identity. ~ Roger Ebert,
374:New ideas are always resisted. ~ Henning Mankell,
375:New learning never hurt anybody. ~ Tamora Pierce,
376:New options for getting off the grid ~ Anonymous,
377:Nothing is new except arrangement. ~ Will Durant,
378:Oh, Papa. My heart’s broke. ~ Robert Newton Peck,
379:Old things can become new things. ~ Karen Foxlee,
380:political will is a renewable resource ~ Al Gore,
381:Start small and start immediately. ~ Cal Newport,
382:the importance of spawning new ~ Walter Isaacson,
383:we went to the newspapers, in the ~ Samuel Bj rk,
384:You can’t steal a whole new life. ~ Julie Buntin,
385:All wisdom is not new wisdom. ~ Winston Churchill,
386:A wet dream in the mind of New York. ~ Erica Jong,
387:A woman who knew her own worth, ~ Tricia O Malley,
388:Being truthful is the new beautiful ~ Suzy Kassem,
389:Body and soul need new challenges. ~ Paulo Coelho,
390:Charlie alone knew he was a ghost. ~ John le Carr,
391:D. D. Warren knew from experience, ~ Lisa Gardner,
392:Do not read the newspapers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
393:Every day you learn something new. ~ Dennis Brown,
394:Every good soldier knew when to hide. ~ Anonymous,
395:Every instant is a new universe. ~ Joan Tollifson,
396:Everything was new once, after all. ~ Neil Gaiman,
397:His sniff rips a new piece off my heart. ~ Poppet,
398:Hope is a renewable option: ~ Barbara Kingsolver,
399:I always knew how to draw a crowd. ~ Evel Knievel,
400:I am the young, edgy New Yorker. ~ Douglas Wilson,
401:If you could read, you knew shit. ~ Michael Moore,
402:I knew it had to do with engineering, ~ Anonymous,
403:I live my life in gratitude. ~ Olivia Newton John,
404:I'm the one twice over I'm the new eleven ~ Drake,
405:I'm very open to the up-and-comers. ~ Bob Newhart,
406:I'm very wary of news on television. ~ Val Kilmer,
407:I never new real happiness until you ~ Jojo Moyes,
408:Just once I knew what life was for. ~ Anne Sexton,
409:knew when Henri brought you here for ~ S J Parris,
410:Mourning is the new black. ~ Stephanie M Wytovich,
411:New ideas often need old buildings. ~ Jane Jacobs,
412:New Orleans in an amazing town. ~ Benjamin Walker,
413:New theory on H.I.V. in African women ~ Anonymous,
414:New York is my favorite city. ~ Walter Dean Myers,
415:Nobody likes the bringer of bad news. ~ Sophocles,
416:No news at 4:30 a.m. is good. ~ Lady Bird Johnson,
417:Old, Middle, and New or Modern English. ~ Various,
418:Old words are reborn with new faces. ~ Criss Jami,
419:Reconnecting with Compassion ~ John Philip Newell,
420:Robots are the new middle class. ~ James Altucher,
421:•saints. 9 And they sang a new song:  ~ Anonymous,
422:She knew because she looked. ~ Zora Neale Hurston,
423:Tabloid news is tabloid news. ~ Elizabeth Edwards,
424:There is nothing new under the sun. ~ Jon Meacham,
425:Tomorrow will be a new day. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
426:When i want to hear new music, i make it ~ Prince,
427:When the new knocks on your door, open it! ~ Osho,
428:Who Knew I'd Make Her So Blue. ~ Kathleen Glasgow,
429:Winters, deputy clerks in Dallas ~ Michael Newton,
430:worldview. “So?” “You knew that? ~ John Lescroart,
431:Yeah, I was cunt-struck and I knew it. ~ Jani Kay,
432:You raze the old to raise the new. ~ Justina Chen,
433:You're the fantasy I never knew I had. ~ Amy Lane,
434:Ah ha, I knew you were reading it ~ Richard Castle,
435:Anonymity is the truest heroism . ~ Barnett Newman,
436:any pets, so we knew at least one ~ Karen Cantwell,
437:As the suns rise, the goat chews. A ~ Peter Newman,
438:Because I knew it was happening again. ~ R L Stine,
439:Be­cause no­body wants bad news. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
440:Being truthful is the new beautiful. ~ Suzy Kassem,
441:Calculation never made a hero. ~ John Henry Newman,
442:dog knew what the words meant. ~ Lorena McCourtney,
443:dusk, meeting new people, seeing new ~ Dina Silver,
444:Elasticsearch is your new best friend. ~ Anonymous,
445:eorum omnium actiones in se invicem ~ Isaac Newton,
446:Good enough is the new perfect. ~ Jessica N Turner,
447:Heaven looks a lot like New Jersey. ~ Jon Bon Jovi,
448:He who conceives the Truth, is born anew. ~ Vemana,
449:I can bear a lot but not that pall ~ Joanna Newsom,
450:If children could, if adults knew. ~ Sigmund Freud,
451:I have a new name for pain. ~ Christopher Paolini,
452:I knew a Sage once. Trashy little thing. ~ Rebecca,
453:I knew every raindrop by its name. ~ Denis Johnson,
454:I knew I was in England by the smell. ~ Erica Jong,
455:I love my apartment in New York. ~ Amanda Seyfried,
456:I love working in New York theater. ~ Alan Rickman,
457:I'm allowed to have new dreams. ~ Sarah Beth Durst,
458:it was all so new to her, he guessed. ~ Anne Tyler,
459:I want to democratize business news. ~ Neil Cavuto,
460:I would say, the new hipness is #yoga. ~ Peter Max,
461:Jessie knew that,” said ~ Gertrude Chandler Warner,
462:knew. Ray was the epitome of what ~ Angela Marsons,
463:Language knew. Language remembered. ~ Melissa Grey,
464:Let today be the start of something new. ~ Unknown,
465:Man is emphatically self-made. ~ John Henry Newman,
466:new fresh faces of the Republic. ~ Robert Ferrigno,
467:New money burns in the pocket. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
468:New Orleans is a unique environment. ~ Steve Earle,
469:New York City is my playground. ~ Bethenny Frankel,
470:New York in the 60s was amazing. ~ Nicholas Haslam,
471:New York is a sucked orange. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
472:New York is dead. It's too expensive. ~ Carl Andre,
473:New York vintage is too expensive! ~ Kirsten Dunst,
474:Read two old books for every new one. ~ J I Packer,
475:rolling in, even though I knew better. ~ Tami Hoag,
476:Short people got no reason to live. ~ Randy Newman,
477:Starlight gives way to bolder neon. ~ Peter Newman,
478:St. Ash – who knew? (Gallagher) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
479:Strong and healthy is the new sexy. ~ Ronda Rousey,
480:The good news is that we are Buddha. ~ Albert Low,
481:The Justice Dept. is the new F.E.M.A. ~ Bill Press,
482:The new day is a great big fish! ~ Terry Pratchett,
483:There is no bad time for good news. ~ Stephen King,
484:the “Sonia Gluck as I knew her” gag? ~ Ngaio Marsh,
485:The vibrant new field of astrobiology ~ Ian Whates,
486:The will to act is a renewable resource. ~ Al Gore,
487:Today is a new day for the land. ~ Antonis Samaras,
488:Valve wouldn’t have gotten its start ~ Gabe Newell,
489:We all die, just a question of when. ~ Paul Newman,
490:We're on the verge of all things new. ~ Billy Joel,
491:Where the hell are the singing cats? ~ Paul Newman,
492:Who really needs a new album from me? ~ Elton John,
493:You have to set new goals every day. ~ Julie Krone,
494:Brand new Beretta, can't wait to let it go. ~ Drake,
495:Change demands new learning. ~ Rosabeth Moss Kanter,
496:Chicago - it's a mini-New York. ~ Kristin Chenoweth,
497:Collectors Have A New, Troubling Way To ~ Anonymous,
498:Does my new feminism make me look fat? ~ Libba Bray,
499:Every ruler is harsh whose laws is new. ~ Aeschylus,
500:Genius and taste don't go together. ~ Helmut Newton,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



100

   78 Occultism
   33 Philosophy
   28 Yoga
   25 Integral Yoga
   14 Kabbalah
   14 Christianity
   5 Hinduism
   4 Buddhism
   1 Integral Theory


  101 Sri Aurobindo
   73 Aleister Crowley
   18 Swami Krishnananda
   18 Sri Ramakrishna
   18 Satprem
   18 Aldous Huxley
   16 The Mother
   13 Friedrich Nietzsche
   12 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   12 Carl Jung
   11 Saint Teresa of Avila
   10 Swami Vivekananda
   7 Jorge Luis Borges
   6 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   4 Bokar Rinpoche
   3 Thubten Chodron
   2 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   2 Patanjali
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Lewis Carroll
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Jean Gebser
   2 Italo Calvino
   2 H. P. Lovecraft


   53 Magick Without Tears
   48 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   48 Savitri
   45 The Life Divine
   28 Liber ABA
   27 The Divine Comedy
   21 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   18 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   18 The Perennial Philosophy
   18 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   18 Essays On The Gita
   15 Words Of The Mother II
   14 Words Of Long Ago
   14 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   13 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   13 Letters On Yoga II
   13 Letters On Yoga I
   13 General Principles of Kabbalah
   13 Essays Divine And Human
   13 Collected Poems
   12 Twilight of the Idols
   12 Aion
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   10 The Way of Perfection
   10 Theosophy
   10 Talks
   10 Letters On Yoga III
   10 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   10 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   9 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   8 The Secret Of The Veda
   8 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   8 The Bible
   8 Kena and Other Upanishads
   7 Walden
   7 The Interior Castle or The Mansions
   7 Isha Upanishad
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   6 Dark Night of the Soul
   6 Agenda Vol 1
   5 Words Of The Mother III
   5 The Red Book Liber Novus
   5 The Problems of Philosophy
   5 The Blue Cliff Records
   5 Raja-Yoga
   5 On Education
   4 The Integral Yoga
   4 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   4 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   3 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   3 Poetics
   3 Liber Null
   3 How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator
   3 Bhakti-Yoga
   2 Thus Spoke Zarathustra
   2 The Ever-Present Origin
   2 The Castle of Crossed Destinies
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Selected Fictions
   2 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   2 God Exists
   2 Book of Certitude
   2 Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin
   2 Alice in Wonderland
   2 Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2E


00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri, #Sweet Mother - Harmonies of Light, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step.
  
  But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort.
  
  --
  
  You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, *I am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: *I have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages.
  
  --
  
  All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.
  
  --
  
  And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen.
  
  My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal.
  

0.01_-_Introduction, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  One day, we were like this first man in the great, stridulant night of the Oyapock. Our heart was beating with the rediscovery of a very ancient mystery - suddenly, it was absolutely new to be a man amidst the diorite cascades and the pretty red and black coral snakes slithering beneath the leaves. It was even more extraordinary to be a man than our old confirmed tribes, with their infallible equations and imprescriptible biologies, could ever have dreamed. It was an absolutely uncertain 'quantum' that delightfully eluded whatever one thought of it, including perhaps what even the scholars thought of it. It flowed otherwise, it felt otherwise. It lived in a kind of flawless continuity with the sap of the giant balata trees, the cry of the macaws and the scintillating water of a little fountain. It 'understood' in a very different way. To understand was to be in everything. Just a quiver, and one was in the skin of a little iguana in distress. The skin of the world was very vast.
  
  --
  
  Yes, She was in the midst of a spiritual 'horde,' for the pioneer of a new species must always fight against the best of the old: the best is the obstacle, the snare that traps us in its old golden mire.
  
  --
  
  'Something else' is ominous, perilous, disrupting - it is quite unbearable for all those who resemble the old beast. The story of the Pondicherry 'Ashram' is the story of an old clan ferociously clinging to its 'spiritual' privileges, as others clung to the muscles that had made them kings among the great apes. It is armed with all the piousness and all the reasonableness that had made logical man so 'infallible' among his less cerebral brothers. The spiritual brain is probably the worst obstacle to the new species, as were the muscles of the old orangutan for this fragile stranger who no longer climbed so well in the trees and sat, pensive, at the center of a little, uncertain clearing.
  
  There is nothing more pious than the old species. There is nothing more legal. Mother was searching for the path of the new species as much against all the virtues of the old as against all its vices or laws. For, in truth, 'Something Else' ... is something else.
  
  We landed there, one day in February 1954, having emerged from our Guianese forest and a certain number of dead-end peripluses; we had knocked upon all the doors of the old world before reaching that point of absolute impossibility where it was truly necessary to embark into something else or once and for all put a bullet through the brain of this slightly superior ape. The first thing that struck us was this exotic Notre Dame with its burning incense sticks, its effigies and its prostrations in immaculate white: a Church. We nearly jumped into the first train out that very evening, bound straight for the Himalayas, or the devil. But we remained near Mother for nineteen years. What was it, then, that could have held us there? We had not left Guiana to become a little saint in white or to enter some new religion. 'I did not come upon earth to found an ashram; that would have been a poor aim indeed,' She wrote in 1934. What did all this mean, then, this 'Ashram' that was already registered as the owner of a great spiritual business, and this fragile, little silhouette at the center of all these zealous worshippers? In truth, there is no better way to smother someone than to worship him: he chokes beneath the weight of worship, which moreover gives the worshipper claim to ownership. 'Why do you want to worship?' She exclaimed. 'You have but to become! It is the laziness to become that makes one worship.' She wanted so much to make them
   become this 'something else,' but it was far easier to worship and quiescently remain what one was.
  --
  
  Where, then, was 'the Mother of the Ashram' in all this? What is even 'the Ashram,' if not a spiritual museum of the resistances to Something Else. They were always - and still today - reciting their catechism beneath a little flag: they are the owners of the new truth. But the new truth is laughing in their faces and leaving them high and dry at the edge of their little stagnant pond. They are under the illusion that Mother and Sri Aurobindo, twenty-seven or four years after their respective departures, could keep on repeating themselves - but then they would not be Mother and
  Sri Aurobindo! They would be fossils. The truth is always on the move. It is with those who dare, who have courage, and above all the courage to shatter all the effigies, to de-mystify, and to go
  TRULY to the conquest of the new. The 'new' is painful, discouraging, it resembles nothing we know! We cannot hoist the flag of an unconquered country - but this is what is so marvelous: it does not yet exist. We must MAKE IT EXIST. The adventure has not been carved out: it is to be carved out. Truth is not entrapped and fossilized, 'spiritualized': it is to be discovered. We are in a nothing that we must force to become a something. We are in the adventure of the new species. A new species is obviously contradictory to the old species and to the little flags of the alreadyknown. It has nothing in common with the spiritual summits of the old world, nor even with its abysms - which might be delightfully tempting for those who have had enough of the summits, but everything is the same, in black or white, it is fraternal above and below. SOMETHING ELSE is needed.
  
  'Are you conscious of your ceils?' She asked us a short time after the little operation of spiritual demolition She had undergone. 'No? Well, become conscious of your cells, and you will see that it gives TERRESTRIAL results.' To become conscious of one's cells? ... It was a far more radical operation than crossing the Maroni with a machete in hand, for after all, trees and lianas can be cut, but what cannot be so easily uncovered are the grandfather and the grandmother and the whole atavistic pack, not to mention the animal and plant and mineral layers that form a teeming humus over this single pure little cell beneath its millennial genetic program. The grandfathers and grandmothers grow back again like crabgrass, along with all the old habits of being hungry, afraid, falling ill, fearing the worst, hoping for the best, which is still the best of an old mortal habit. All this is not uprooted nor entrapped as easily as celestial 'liberations,' which leave the teeming humus in peace and the body to its usual decomposition. She had come to hew a path through all that. She was the Ancient One of evolution who had come to make a new cleft in the old, tedious habit of being a man. She did not like tedious repetitions, She was the adventuress par excellence - the adventuress of the earth. She was wrenching out for man the great Possible that was already beating there, in his primeval clearing, which he believed he had momentarily trapped with a few machines.
  
  She was uprooting a new Matter, free, free from the habit of inexorably being a man who repeats himself ad infinitum with a few improvements in the way of organ transplants or monetary exchanges. In fact, She was there to discover what would happen after materialism and after spiritualism, these prodigal twin brothers. Because Materialism is dying in the West for the same reason that Spiritualism is dying in the East: it is the hour of the new species. Man needs to awaken, not only from his demons but also from his gods. A new Matter, yes, like a new Spirit, yes, because we still know neither one nor the other. It is the hour when Science, like Spirituality, at the end of their roads, must discover what Matter TRULY is, for it is really there that a Spirit as yet unknown to us is to be found. It is a time when all the 'isms' of the old species are dying: 'The age of
  Capitalism and business is drawing to its close. But the age of Communism too will pass ... 'It is the hour of a pure little cell THAT WILL HAVE TERRESTRIAL REPERCUSSIONS, infinitely more radical than all our political and scientific or spiritualistic panaceas.
  
  This fabulous discovery is the whole story of the AGENDA. What is the passage? How is the path to the new species hewed open? ... Then suddenly, there, on the other side of this old millennial habit - a habit, nothing more than a habit! - of being like a man endowed with time and space and disease: an entire geometry, perfectly implacable and 'scientific' and medical; on the other side ... none of that at all! An illusion, a fantastic medical and scientific and genetic illusion:
   death does not exist, time does not exist, disease does not exist, nor do 'scar' and 'far' - another way of being IN A BODY. For so many millions of years we have lived in a habit and put our own thoughts of the world and of Matter into equations. No more laws! Matter is FREE. It can create a little lizard, a chipmunk or a parrot - but it has created enough parrots. Now it is SOMETHING
  --
  
  Day after day, for seventeen years, She sat with us to tell us of her impossible odyssey. Ah, how well we now understand why She needed such an 'outlaw' and an incorrigible heretic like us to comprehend a little bit of her impossible odyssey into 'nothing.' And how well we now understand her infinite patience with us, despite all our revolts, which ultimately were only the revolts of the old species against itself. The final revolt. 'It is not a revolt against the British government which any one can easily do. It is, in fact, a revolt against the whole universal Nature!' Sri Aurobindo had proclaimed fifty years earlier. She listened to our grievances, we went away and we returned. We wanted no more of it and we wanted still more. It was infernal and sublime, impossible and the sole possibility in this old, asphyxiating world. It was the only place one could go to in this barbedwired, mechanized world, where Cincinnati is just as crowded and polluted as Hong Kong. The new species is the last free place in the general Prison. It is the last hope for the earth. How we listened to her little faltering voice that seemed to return from afar, afar, after having crossed spaces and seas of the mind to let its little drops of pure, crystalline words fall upon us, words that make you see. We listened to the future, we touched the other thing. It was incomprehensible and yet filled with another comprehension. It eluded us on all sides, and yet it was dazzlingly obvious. The 'other species' was really radically other, and yet it was vibrating within, absolutely recognizable, as if it were THAT we had been seeking from age to age, THAT we had been invoking through all our illuminations, one after another, in Thebes as in Eleusis as everywhere we have toiled and grieved in the skin of a man. It was for THAT we were here, for that supreme Possible in the skin of a man at last. And then her voice grew more and more frail, her breath began gasping as though She had to traverse greater and greater distances to meet us. She was so alone to beat against the walls of the old prison. Many claws were out all around. Oh, we would so quickly have cut ourself free from all this fiasco to fly away with Her into the world's future. She was so tiny, stooped over, as if crushed beneath the 'spiritual' burden that all the old surrounding species kept heaping upon her. They didn't believe, no. For them, She was ninety-five years old + so many days. Can someone become a new species all alone? They even grumbled at Her: they had had enough of this unbearable Ray that was bringing their sordid affairs into the daylight. The Ashram was slowly closing over Her. The old world wanted to make a new, golden little Church, nice and quiet. No, no one wanted TO
  BECOME. To worship was so much easier. And then they bury you, solemnly, and the matter is settled - the case is closed: now, no one need bother any more except to print some photographic haloes for the pilgrims to this brisk little business. But they are mistaken. The real business will take place without them, the new species will fly up in their faces - it is already flying in the face of the earth, despite all its isms in black and white; it is exploding through all the pores of this battered old earth, which has had enough of shams - whether illusory little heavens or barbarous little machines.
  
  --
  
  Then we have caught the tail of the Great Possible, we are upon the wayless way, radically in the new, and we flow with the little lizard, the pelican, the big man, we flow everywhere in a world that has lost its old separating skin and its little baggage of habits. We begin seeing otherwise, feeling otherwise. We have opened the gate into an inconceivable clearing. Just a light little vibration that carries you away. Then we begin to understand how it CAN CHANGE, what the mechanism is - a light little mechanism and so miraculous that it looks like nothing. We begin feeling the wonder of a pure little cell, and that a sparkling of joy would be enough to turn the world inside out. We were living in a little thinking fishbowl, we were dying in an old, bottled habit. And then suddenly, all is different. The Earth is free! Who wants freedom?
  It begins in a cell.

0.01_-_Life_and_Yoga, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  HERE are two necessities of Nature's workings which seem always to intervene in the greater forms of human activity, whether these belong to our ordinary fields of movement or seek those exceptional spheres and fulfilments which appear to us high and divine. Every such form tends towards a harmonised complexity and totality which again breaks apart into various channels of special effort and tendency, only to unite once more in a larger and more puissant synthesis. Secondly, development into forms is an imperative rule of effective manifestation; yet all truth and practice too strictly formulated becomes old and loses much, if not all, of its virtue; it must be constantly renovated by fresh streams of the spirit revivifying the dead or dying vehicle and changing it, if it is to acquire a new life. To be perpetually reborn is the condition of a material immortality. We are in an age, full of the throes of travail, when all forms of thought and activity that have in themselves any strong power of utility or any secret virtue of persistence are being subjected to a supreme test and given their opportunity of rebirth. The world today presents the aspect of a huge cauldron of Medea in which all things are being cast, shredded into pieces, experimented on, combined and recombined either to perish and provide the scattered material of new forms or to emerge rejuvenated and changed for a fresh term of existence. Indian Yoga, in its essence a special action or formulation of certain great powers of Nature, itself specialised, divided and variously formulated, is potentially one of these dynamic elements of the future life of humanity. The child of immemorial ages, preserved by its vitality and truth into our modern times, it is now emerging from the secret schools and ascetic retreats in which it had taken refuge and is seeking its place in the future sum of living human powers and utilities. But it has first to rediscover itself, bring to the surface
  
  --
  The Conditions of the Synthesis
   the profoundest reason of its being in that general truth and that unceasing aim of Nature which it represents, and find by virtue of this new self-knowledge and self-appreciation its own recovered and larger synthesis. Reorganising itself, it will enter more easily and powerfully into the reorganised life of the race which its processes claim to lead within into the most secret penetralia and upward to the highest altitudes of existence and personality.
  
  --
  Yogic methods have something of the same relation to the customary psychological workings of man as has the scientific handling of the force of electricity or of steam to their normal operations in Nature. And they, too, like the operations of Science, are formed upon a knowledge developed and confirmed by regular experiment, practical analysis and constant result. All
  Rajayoga, for instance, depends on this perception and experience that our inner elements, combinations, functions, forces, can be separated or dissolved, can be new-combined and set to novel and formerly impossible workings or can be transformed and resolved into a new general synthesis by fixed internal processes. Hathayoga similarly depends on this perception and experience that the vital forces and functions to which our life is normally subjected and whose ordinary operations seem set and indispensable, can be mastered and the operations changed or suspended with results that would otherwise be impossible and that seem miraculous to those who have not seized the rationale of their process. And if in some other of its forms this character of Yoga is less apparent, because they are more intuitive and less mechanical, nearer, like the Yoga of Devotion, to a supernal ecstasy or, like the Yoga of Knowledge, to a supernal infinity of consciousness and being, yet they too start from the use of some principal faculty in us by ways and for ends not contemplated in its everyday spontaneous workings. All methods grouped under the common name of Yoga are special psychological processes founded on a fixed truth of Nature and developing, out of normal functions, powers and results which were always latent but which her ordinary movements do not easily or do not often manifest.
  

0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Nor are the disturbances created by her process as great as is often represented. Some of them are the crude beginnings of new manifestations; others are an easily corrected movement of disintegration, often fruitful of fresh activities and always a small price to pay for the far-reaching results that she has in view.
  
  --
  
  Yoga, the inner instrument.4 And Indian tradition asserts that this which is to be manifested is not a new term in human experience, but has been developed before and has even governed humanity in certain periods of its development. In any case, in order to be known it must at one time have been partly developed.
  

0.02_-_Topographical_Note, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  It was only in 1958 that we began having the first tape-recorded conversations, which, properly speaking, constitute Mother's Agenda. But even then, many of these conversations were lost or only partly noted down. Or else we considered that our own words should not figure in these notes and we carefully omitted all our questions - which was absurd. At that time, no one - neither Mother, nor ourself - knew that this was 'the Agenda' and that we were out to explore the 'Great Passage.'
  Only gradually did we become aware of the true nature of these meetings. Furthermore, we were constantly on the road, so much so that there are sizable gaps in the text. In fact, for seven years,
  --
  From 1960, the Agenda took its final shape arid grew for thirteen years, until May 1973, filling thirteen volumes in all (some six thousand pages), with a change of setting in March 1962 at the time of the Great Turning in Mother's yoga when She permanently retired to her room upstairs, as had Sri Aurobindo in 1926. The interviews then took place high up in this large room carpeted in golden wool, like a ship's stateroom, amidst the rustling of the Copper Pod tree and the cawing of crows. Mother would sit in a low rosewood chair, her face turned towards Sri Aurobindo's tomb, as though She were wearing down the distance separating that world from our own. Her voice had become like that of a child, one could hear her laughter. She always laughed, this Mother. And then her long silences. Until the day the disciples closed her door on us. It was May 19, 1973. We did not want to believe it. She was alone, just as we were suddenly alone. Slowly, painfully, we had to discover the why of this rupture. We understood nothing of the jealousies of the old species, we did not yet realize that they were becoming the 'owners' of Mother - of the Ashram, of Auroville, of
  Sri Aurobindo, of everything - and that the new world was going to be denatured into a new
  Church. There and then, they made us understand why She had pulled us from our forest, one day, and chosen as her confidant an incurable rebel.

0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The mental life concentrates on the aesthetic, the ethical and the intellectual activities. Essential mentality is idealistic and a seeker after perfection. The subtle self, the brilliant Atman,1 is ever a dreamer. A dream of perfect beauty, perfect conduct, perfect Truth, whether seeking new forms of the Eternal or revitalising the old, is the very soul of pure mentality. But it knows not how to deal with the resistance of Matter. There it is hampered and inefficient, works by bungling experiments and has either to withdraw from the struggle or submit to the grey actuality. Or else, by studying the material life and accepting the conditions of the contest, it may succeed, but only in imposing temporarily some artificial system which infinite Nature either rends and casts aside or disfigures out of recognition or by withdrawing her assent leaves as the corpse of a dead ideal. Few and far between have been those realisations of the dreamer in Man which the world has gladly accepted, looks back to with a fond memory and seeks, in its elements, to cherish.
  
  --
  
  In India, for the last thousand years and more, the spiritual life and the material have existed side by side to the exclusion of the progressive mind. Spirituality has made terms for itself with Matter by renouncing the attempt at general progress. It has obtained from society the right of free spiritual development for all who assume some distinctive symbol, such as the garb of the Sannyasin, the recognition of that life as man's goal and those who live it as worthy of an absolute reverence, and the casting of society itself into such a religious mould that its most customary acts should be accompanied by a formal reminder of the spiritual symbolism of life and its ultimate destination. On the other hand, there was conceded to society the right of inertia and immobile self-conservation. The concession destroyed much of the value of the terms. The religious mould being fixed, the formal reminder tended to become a routine and to lose its living sense. The constant attempts to change the mould by new sects and religions ended only in a new routine or a modification of the old; for the saving element of the free and active mind had been exiled. The material life, handed over to the Ignorance, the purposeless and endless duality, became a leaden and dolorous yoke from which flight was the only escape.
  

0.04_-_1951-1954, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  ***
  Whenever a god has donned a body, it was always with the intention of transforming the earth and creating a new world. Yet until now, he always had to give up his body without being able to complete his work; and it has always been said that the earth was not ready, that mankind did not fulfill the conditions necessary for the work to be accomplished.
  
  --
  
  I knew you would ask me this question because it is indeed the most interesting thing in the whole passage - so my answer is ready, along with my answer to another question. But first let me read you this one. You asked, 'What is this Personality and when will She come?' Here is my answer (Mother reads):
  'She has come, bringing with Her a splendor of power and love, an intensity of divine joy heretofore unknown to the Earth. The physical atmosphere has been completely changed by her descent, permeated with new and marvelous possibilities.
  
  --
  
  The world is recreated from minute to minute. If you knew how - I mean if you could change your nature - you could recreate a new world this very minute!
  I didn't say She HAD gone. I said She was CONTEMPLATING it ... at times, now and then.
  --
  
  Yes, certainly ... had there been any receptivity when She came down and had She been able to manifest with the power with which She came ... But I can tell you one thing: even before Her coming, when, with Sri Aurobindo, I had begun going down (for the Yoga) from the mental plane to the vital plane, when we brought our yoga down from the mental plane into the vital plane, in less than a month (I was forty years old at the time - I didn't seem very old, I looked less than forty, but I was forty anyway), after no more than a month of this yoga, I looked exactly like an 18 year old! And someone who knew me and had stayed with me in Japan 13 came here, and when he saw me, he could scarcely believe his eyes! He said, 'But my god, is it you?' I said, 'Of course!'
  Only when we went down from the vital plane into the physical plane, all this went away - because on the physical plane, the work is much harder and we had so much to do, so many things to change.

0.05_-_1955, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Pondicherry
  Mother, after seeing you, I received a letter from my Bangalore friends. They have just bought an old Mogul residence and gardens in Hyderabad that used to belong to the Nizam ... They suggest that their new property would be an enchanting setting for writing the book I have felt like writing for years but never wrote because I was always on the move. Anyway, they have made it clear that should I have qualms about staying with them too long, it would be easy for them to find me some lucrative work that would not be too time consuming - which would allow me to write or do whatever I wish - with their friend the Maharajah of Jaipur, or even in Hyderabad.
  

0.06_-_1956, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  All our efforts are vain and sadly ridiculous. At each instant we must begin everything anew, one step seems to lead us forward another to draw us back. We desperately turn in circles and sometimes, in our dizziness, we believe we glimpse lights, but these are only the little, dancing lights of our own fatigue, our own weakness. There is no victory, there are only moments of respite.
  
  --
  
  Not only do I need to liquidate this past, but also to renew my choice, to strengthen my presence here - and I feel this book as a commitment, it will help me set my route in a decisive way. It is a test.
  
  --
  
  As I looked at the door, I knew and willed, in a single movement of consciousness, that THE
  TIME HAS COME', and lifting with both hands a mighty golden hammer I struck one blow, one single blow23 on the door and the door was shattered to pieces.
  --
  (The same day on the balcony26 )
  Almost a total straightening, along with a very clear perception of the new force and power in the cells of the body.
  
  --
  Thou cost execute;
  A new
  Light shall break upon the earth.
  
  A new world shall be born.
  
  --
  Thou hast willed, and
  A new light breaks
  A new world
  The things that were promised are fulfilled.29
  --
  (Mother's reply)
  It does not bother me at all, and you did well to write. Your experience is excellent, and I was very happy to read it - it shines like a light upon a new horizon.
  
  --
  Sweet Mother, you said, 'The Supramental has come down on earth.' What does this mean, exactly? You also said, 'The things that were promised are fulfilled.' What are these things?
  Oh, really! How ignorant! It has been promised for such a very long time, it has been said for such a very long time - not only here in the Ashram, but ever since the beginning of the earth. There have been all kinds of predictions, by all kinds of prophets. It has been said, 'There will be a new heaven and a new earth, a new race shall be born, the world shall be transformed ...' Prophets have spoken of this in every tradition.
  
  --
  Yes. Then?
  Where is the new race?
  The new race? Wait for something like ... a few thousand years or so, and you will see it!
  When the mind came down upon earth, something like a million years went by between the manifestation of the mind in the earth atmosphere and the appearance of the first man. But it will go faster this time because man is waiting for something, he has a vague idea: he is awaiting in some way or another the advent of the superman. Whereas the apes were certainly not awaiting the birth of man, they never thought of it - for the excellent reason that they probably don't think very much!
  --
  
  Sweet Mother, what should be our attitude towards this new Consciousness?
  That depends upon what you want to do with it.
  --
  
  Will we benefit collectively or individually from this new manifestation?
  Why are you asking this question?
  --
  And why should they benefit from it? What entitles them to benefit from it? Simply because they took the train to come here?
  I knew some people who came here a long time ago, something like (Oh, I don't recall anymore, but quite a long time ago!), certainly more than twenty years ago; the first time someone died in the
  Ashram, they expressed a considerable dissatisfaction: 'But I came here because I thought this yoga would make me immortal! If you can still die, then why did I come here?'
  --
  What have they done on their side? Why should it be easier? To satisfy people's laziness and sloth - or what?
  Because when something new comes, we always have the idea of benefiting from it.
  
  No! Not only in the case of something new: in every case, there is always this idea of benefiting.
  
  --
  There was indeed a possibility to enter into contact with the Thing individually - this was even what Sri Aurobindo had described as being the necessary procedure: a certain number of people would enter into contact with this Force through their inner effort and their aspiration. We had called it the ascent towards the Supermind. And IF and when they had touched the Supermind through an inner ascent (that is, by freeing themselves from the material consciousness), they should have recognized it SPONTANEOUSLY as soon as it came. But a preliminary contact was indispensable - if you have never touched it, how can you recognize it?
  That's how the universal movement works (I read this to you a few days ago): through their inner effort and inner progress, certain individuals, who are the pioneers, the forerunners, enter into communication with the new Force which is to manifest, and they receive it in themselves. And because a number of calls like this surge forth, the thing becomes possible, and the era, the time, the moment for the manifestation comes. This is how it happened - and the Manifestation took place.
  
  --
  
  What I call a 'descent' is the individual movement in an individual consciousness. But when a new world is manifesting in an old world - as when similarly the mind spread over the earth - I call it a manifestation.
  
  --
  
  But now, you may reply to those people who are asking these insidious questions that the best way to receive anything whatsoever is not to pull, but to give. If they want to give themselves to the new life, well, the new life will enter into them.
  
  But if they want to pull the new life into themselves, they will close the door with their egoism.
  
  --
  
  34In fact, following the 'Supramental Manifestation' of February 29, 1956, all of Mother's physical difficulties increased, as though all the obscurities in the physical consciousness were surging forth beneath the pressure of the new light. The same observation applies to the disciples who were around Mother and undoubtedly to the world as a whole.
  
  --
  
  My friends keep telling me that I am not ready and that, like R, 36 whom they knew, I should go and spend some time in society. They say that my idea of going to the Himalayas is absurd, and they advise me to return to Brazil for a few years to stay with W ... W is an elderly American millionaire - the only 'good' rich man I know - who wanted to make me an heir, as it were, to his financial affairs and who treats me rather like a son. He was quite disappointed when I came back to
  India. My friends tell me that if I have to go through a period in the outside world, the best way to do it is to remain near someone who is fond of me, while at the same time ensuring a material independence for the future.
  --
  
  Open a new chapter in your existence. Live, no longer for your own realization or the realization of your ideal, however exalted it may be, but to serve an eternal work that transcends your individuality on all sides.
  

0.07_-_1957, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Sweet Mother,
  The conflict that is tearing me apart is between this shadowy part of a past that does not want to die, and the new light. I wonder if, rather than escaping to some desert, it would not be wiser to resolve this conflict by objectify it, by writing this book I spoke to you about.
  
  --
  
  It went something like this: somewhere, in the center of this enormous edifice, there was a room reserved - as it seemed in the story - for a mother and her daughter. The mother was a lady, an elderly lady, a very influential matron who had a great deal of authority and her own views concerning the entire organization. Her daughter seemed to have a power of movement and activity enabling her to be everywhere at once while at the same time remaining in her room, which was ... well, a bit more than a room - it was a kind of apartment which, above all, had the characteristic of being very central. But she was constantly arguing with her mother. The mother wanted to keep things 'just as they were,' with their usual rhythm, which precisely meant the habit of tearing down one thing to rebuild another, then again tearing down that to build still another, thus giving the building an appearance of frightful confusion. But the daughter did not like this, and she had another plan. Most of all, she wanted to bring something completely new into the organization: a kind of super-organization that would render all this confusion unnecessary. Finally, as it was impossible for them to reach an understanding, the daughter left the room to go on a kind of general inspection ... She went out, looked everything over, and then wanted to return to her room to decide upon some final measures. But this is where something rather ... peculiar began happening.
  
  She clearly remembered where her room was, but each time she set out to go there, either the staircase disappeared or things were so changed that she could no longer find her way! So she went here and there, up and down, searched, went in and out ... but it was impossible to find the way to her room! Since all of this assumed a physical appearance - as I said, a very familiar and very common appearance, as is always the case in these symbolic visions - there was somewhere (how shall I put it?) the hotel's administrative office and a woman who seemed to be the manager, who had all the keys and who knew where everyone was staying. So the daughter went to this person and asked her, 'Could you show me the way to my room?' - 'But of course! Easily!' Everyone around the manager looked at her as if to say, 'How can you say that?' However, she got up, and with authority asked for a key - the key to the daughter's room - saying, 'I shall take you there.'
  And off she went along all kinds of paths, but all so complicated, so bizarre! The daughter was following along behind her very attentively, you see, so as not to lose sight of her. But just as they should have come to the place where the daughter's room was supposed to be, suddenly the manageress (let us call her the manageress), both the manageress and her key ... vanished! And the sense of this vanishing was so acute that ... at the same time, everything vanished!
  So ... to help you understand this enigma, let me tell you that the mother is physical Nature as she is, and the daughter is the new creation. The manageress is the world's organizing mental consciousness as Nature has developed it thus far, that is, the most advanced organizing sense to have manifested in the present state of material Nature. This is the key to the vision.
  
  Naturally, when I awoke, I immediately knew what could resolve this problem which appeared so absolutely insoluble. The vanishing of the manageress and her key was an obvious sign that she was altogether incapable of leading what could be called 'the creative consciousness of the new world' to its true place.
  
  I knew this, but I did not have a vision of the solution, which means it has yet to manifest; this
  'thing' had not yet manifested in the building, this fantastic construction, although it is the very mode of consciousness which could transform this incoherent creation into something real, truly conceived, willed and materialized, with a center in its proper place, a recognized place, and with a
  --
  So, the best way to use these meditations (and they are going to increase, since we are now also going to replace the 'distributions' with short meditations) is to go deep within yourselves, as far as you can, and find the place where you can feel, perceive and perhaps even create an atmosphere of oneness wherein a force of order and organization can put each element in its true place, and out of
   the chaos existing at this hour, make a new, harmonious world surge forth.
  
  --
  
  If I must have some new experience outside, this one has the advantage of being short-termed and not far away from India, and it is also in an interesting milieu. The only disadvantage is that I would have to pay for the trip as far as Kabul. But I don't want to do anything that displeases you or of which you do not really approve. In the event you might feel this to be a worthwhile experience,
  I would have to leave by the beginning of August.
  --
  
  I doubt that a new experience outside can really resolve things, but I believe it might help me make it to the next stage and consolidate my inner life. And if you wish, I would return in a year or two.
  
  --
  
  There are all kinds of freedom - mental freedom, vital freedom, spiritual freedom - which are the fruits of successive masteries. But a completely new freedom has become possible with the
  Supramental Manifestation: it is the freedom of the body.
  
  One of the very first results of the supramental manifestation was to give the body a freedom and an autonomy it has never before known. And when I say freedom, I don't mean some psychological perception or an inner state of consciousness, but something else and far better - it is a new phenomenon in the body, in the cells of the body. For the first time, the cells themselves have felt that they are free, that they have the power to decide. When the new vibrations came and combined with the old ones, I felt it at once and it showed me that a new world was really taking birth.
  
  --
  
  But with the supramental manifestation, something new has taken place in the body: it feels it is its own master, autonomous, with its two feet solidly on the ground, as it were. This gives a physical impression of the whole being suddenly drawing itself up, with its head lifted high - I am my own master.
  
  --
  
  And this new vibration in the body has allowed me to understand the mechanism of the transformation. It is not something that comes from a higher Will, not a higher consciousness that imposes itself upon the body: it is the body itself awakening in its cells, a freedom of the cells themselves, an absolutely new vibration that sets disorders right - even disorders that existed prior to the supramental manifestation.
  
  Naturally, all this is a gradual process, but I am hopeful that little by little this new consciousness will grow, gain ground and victoriously resist the old forces of destruction and annihilation, and this Fatality we believed to be so inexorable.
  
  --
  
  Generally speaking, my Force is constantly here at work, constantly changing the psychological elements of your being to put them into new relationships and to make clear to you the diverse facets of your nature so that you may see what must be changed, developed or eliminated.
  
  --
  
  6) In the course of time and even in the course of your present life, you can make your choice once and for all, irrevocably, and then you have only to confirm it with every new occasion; or else if you do not take a definite decision from the beginning, you will have to choose anew at each moment between the falsehood and the Truth.
  
  7) But even in the event you have not made the irrevocable decision at the outset, should you have the good fortune to live during one of these unimaginable hours of universal history when the
  Grace is present, embodied upon earth, It will offer you, at certain exceptional moments, the renewed possibility of making a final choice that will lead you straight to the goal.
  
  --
  Sweet Mother, this is what is rising from my soul: I feel in me something unemployed, something seeking to express itself in life. I want to be like a knight, your knight, and go off in search of a treasure that I could bring back to you. The world has lost all sense of the wonderful, all beauty of
  Adventure, this quest known to the knights of the Middle Ages. It is this that calls so relentlessly within me, this need for a quest in the world and for a beautiful Adventure which at the same time would be an adventure of the soul. How I wish that the two things, inner and outer, be JOINED, that the joy of action, of the open road and the quest help the soul's blossoming, that they be like a prayer of the soul expressed in life. The knights of the Middle Ages knew this. Perhaps it is all childish and absurd in the midst of this 20th century, but this is what I feel, this that is summoning me to leave - not anything base, not anything mediocre, only a need for something in me to be fulfilled. If only I could bring you back a beautiful treasure!
  
  --
  
  Mother, I feel all this very strongly; I need your help to follow the true path of my being and fulfill this new outer cycle, should you see that it has to be fulfilled. I feel so strongly that something remains for me to DO. Guide me, Sweet Mother.
  

0.07_-_DARK_NIGHT_OF_THE_SOUL, #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  4. This light guided me More surely than the light of noonday
  To the place where he (well I knew who!) was awaiting me
  A place where none appeared.

01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Insistent, dissatisfied, without an aim,
  Something that wished but knew not how to be,
  Teased the Inconscient to wake Ignorance.
  --
  And, conquering Nature's disillusioned breast,
  Compelled renewed consent to see and feel.
  A thought was sown in the unsounded Void,
  --
  Deep, quiet, old, made natural to its place,
  But knew not why it was there nor whence it came.
  The Power that kindles mind was still withdrawn:

01.02_-_The_Issue, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    That joins these changing names, these numberless lives,
    These new oblivious personalities
    And keeps still lurking in our conscious acts
  --
    Her past, a block on the Immortal's road,
    Make a rased ground and shape anew her fate.
    A colloquy of the original Gods

01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Truth unpartitioned found immense sky-room;
  An empyrean vision saw and knew;
  The bounded mind became a boundless light,
  --
  Deceived no more by form he saw the soul.
  In beings it knew what lurked to them unknown;
  It seized the idea in mind, the wish in the heart;
  --
  Silent and listening in the silent heart
  For the coming of the new and the unknown.
  He gazed across the empty stillnesses
  --
  In every hour loosed from the quiver of Time
  There rose a song of new discovery,
  A bow-twang's hum of young experiment.
  Each day was a spiritual romance,
  As if he was born into a bright new world;
  Adventure leaped an unexpected friend,
  --
  A contact thrilled of mighty unknown things.
  Awakened to new unearthly closenesses,
  The touch replied to subtle infinities,
  --
  And saw all things and creatures as itself
  And knew all thought and word as its own voice.
  There unity is too close for search and clasp
  --
  There only were Silence and the Absolute.
  Out of that stillness mind new-born arose
  And woke to truths once inexpressible,
  --
  A seeing thought, a self-revealing voice.
  He knew the source from which his spirit came:
  Movement was married to the immobile Vast;
  --
  On the heart's altar dim the sacred fire.
  An old pull of subconscious cords renews;
  It draws the unwilling spirit from the heights,
  --
  Inspired by silence and the closed eyes' sight
  His force could work with a new luminous art
  On the crude material from which all is made
  --
  A happier cosmic working could begin
  And fashion the world-shape in him anew,
  God found in Nature, Nature fulfilled in God.
  --
  A wide God-knowledge poured down from above,
  A new world-knowledge broadened from within:
  His daily thoughts looked up to the True and One,
  --
  A genius heightened in his body's cells
  That knew the meaning of his fate-hedged works
  Akin to the march of unaccomplished Powers
  --
  One soul's ambition lifted up the race;
  A Power worked, but none knew whence it came.
  The universal strengths were linked with his;

01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The narrow isthmus of the ascending soul:
  We must renew the secret bond in things,
  Our hearts recall the lost divine Idea,
  --
  To her he abandons all to make her great.
  He hopes in her to find himself anew,
  Incarnate, wedding his infinity's peace
  --
  Firm lands appear that tempt and stay awhile,
  Then new horizons lure the mind's advance.
  There comes no close to the finite's boundlessness,
  --
  Content with his safe round's unchanging course,
  He hazards not the new and the unseen.
  But now he hears the sound of larger seas.
  --
  He travels close to unfamiliar coasts
  And finds new haven in storm-troubled isles,
  Or, guided by a sure compass in his thought,
  --
  And passes over the edge of mortal sight
  To a new vision of himself and things.
  He is a spirit in an unfinished world
  --
  He goes or, armed with her fiat, to discover
  A new mind and body in the city of God
  And enshrine the Immortal in his glory's house

01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    That rises from material Nature's sleep
    To clothe the Everlasting in new shapes.
    He could re-read now and interpret new
    Its strange symbol letters, scattered abstruse signs,
  --
    He saw the unshaped thought in soulless forms,
    Knew Matter pregnant with spiritual sense,
    Mind dare the study of the Unknowable,
  --
    He can re-create himself and all around
    And fashion new the world in which he lives:
    He, ignorant, is the Knower beyond Time,
  --
    It was torn out from its mortality
    And underwent a new and bourneless change.
    An Omniscient knowing without sight or thought,
  --
    Consumed the limiting figures of the past
    And made large room for a new self to live.
    Eternity's contact broke the moulds of sense.
  --
    A natural limb of possibility,
    A new domain of normalcy supreme.
    An almighty occultist erects in Space
  --
    And swifter than Imagination's wings.
    All she new-fashions by the thought and word,
    Compels all substance by her wand of Mind.

02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  This, you will see, answers your point about the Western thinkers, Bradley and others, who have arrived through intellectual thinking at the idea of an "Other beyond Thought" or have even, like Bradley, tried to express their conclusions about it in terms that recall some of the expressions in the Arya. The idea in itself is not new; it is as old as the Vedas. It was repeated in other forms in Buddhism, Christian Gnosticism, Sufism. Originally, it was not discovered by intellectual speculation, but by the mystics following an inner spiritual discipline. When, somewhere between the seventh and fifth centuries B.C., men began both in the East and West to intellectualise knowledge, this Truth survived in the East; in the West, where the intellect began to be accepted as the sole or highest instrument for the discovery of
  Truth, it began to fade. But still it has there too tried constantly to return; the Neo-Platonists brought it back, and now, it appears, the Neo-Hegelians and others (e.g., the Russian Ouspensky and one or two German thinkers, I believe) seem to be reaching after it. But still there is a difference.

02.01_-_The_World-Stair, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    Offering their marvel and their multitude.
    These now became new portions of himself,
    The figures of his spirit's greater life,
  --
    Of its dense rings were formed these million stars;
    Upon earth's new-born soil God's tread was heard.
    Across the thick smoke of earth's ignorance

02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The future's marvels wander in its gulfs;
  Things old and new are fashioned in those depths:
  A carnival of beauty crowds the heights
  --
  She faced no peril of sky or of abyss,
  She knew no vistas and no mighty dreams,
  No yearning for her lost infinitudes.

02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Something remained dissatisfied, ever the same
  And in the new saw only a face of the old,
  For every hour repeated all the rest
  --
  Glimmered the kingdom of a griefless life.
  Above him in a new celestial vault
  Other than the heavens beheld by mortal eyes,
  --
  A captive Life wedded her conqueror.
  In his wide sky she built her world anew;
  She gave to mind's calm pace the motor's speed,
  --
  A swift life-impulse stinted not nor stopped:
  It knew not how to tire; happy were its tears.
  There work was play and play the only work,
  --
  Arisen from the breast of some deep Infinite,
  Smiling like a new-born child at love and hope,
  In her nature housing the Immortal's power,
  --
  Her splendour and her swiftness and her bliss,
  Hoping to fill a fair new world with joy.
  As comes a goddess to a mortal's breast
  --
  Azure replied to azure in the sea's laugh;
  new sentient creatures filled the unseen depths,
  Life's glory and swiftness ran in the beauty of beasts,

02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Dividing Matter's sleep from conscious Mind,
  There strayed a call that knew not why it came.
  A Power beyond earth's scope has touched the earth;
  --
  A guideless sense was given her for her road;
  Thought was withheld and nothing now she knew,
  But all the unknown was hers to feel and clasp.
  --
  And to the prick of need that drove their lives.
  A body that knew not its own soul within,
  There lived and longed, had wrath and joy and grief;
  --
  Absorbed they lived in the passion of the scene,
  But knew not who they were or why they lived:
  Content to breathe, to feel, to sense, to act,
  --
  Wasting unmeasured toil on transient things.
  It knew itself a creature of the mud;
  It asked no larger law, no loftier aim;
  --
  An animal limited by its feeding-space.
  It knew not the Immortal in its house;
  It had no greater deeper cause to live.
  --
  It saw an image of the external world
  And saw its surface self, but knew no more.
  Out of a slow confused embroiled self-search
  --
  A little light in a great darkness born,
  Life knew not where it went nor whence it came.
  Around all floated still the nescient haze.

02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  They work and battle and with pain agree:
  These join, those part, all parts and joins anew,
  But never can we know and truly live
  --
  Of the persistent movement we call Time
  And ever renewing its recurrent beat,
  These mobile rounds that stereotype a flux,
  --
  A consciousness with mute stifled beats of sense,
  A mind suppressed that knew not yet of thought,
  An inert spirit that could only be.
  --
  Its stuff unchanged, its way the common route.
  If new designs, if richer details grow
  And thought is added and more tangled cares,
  --
  In her tranquil beauty is his purest bliss.
  A new life dawns, he looks out from vistas wide;
  The Spirit's breath moves him but soon retires:
  --
  That looks at truths unseen and scans the Unknown;
  Then all assumes a new and marvellous face:
  The world quivers with a God-light at its core,
  --
  Like a clay troll kneaded into a god
  new-made in the image of the eternal Guest,
  It shall be caught to the breast of a white Force

02.06_-_The_Integral_Yoga_and_Other_Yogas, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Highest, the Infinite and Eternal is not anything worth doing or recommending to anybody - is "not a very difficult stage"!
  Nothing new? Why should there be anything new? The object of spiritual seeking is to find out what is eternally true, not what is new in Time.
  
  From where did you get this singular attitude towards the old Yogas and Yogis? Is the wisdom of the Vedanta and Tantra a small and trifling thing? Have then the sadhaks of this Asram attained to self-realisation and are they liberated Jivan-muktas, free from ego and ignorance? If not, why then do you say, "it is not a very difficult stage", "their goal is not high", "is it such a long process?"
  I have said that this Yoga was "new" because it aims at the integrality of the Divine in this world and not only beyond it and at a supramental realisation. But how does that justify a superior contempt for the spiritual realisation which is as much the aim of this Yoga as of any other?
  
  --
  
  I have never said that my Yoga was something brand new in all its elements. I have called it the integral Yoga and that means that it takes up the essence and many processes of the old Yogas - its newness is in its aim, standpoint and the totality of its method. In the earlier stages which is all I deal with in books like the Riddle or the Lights1 there is nothing in it that distinguishes it from the old Yogas except the aim underlying its comprehensiveness, the spirit in its movements and the ultimate significance it keeps before it - also the scheme of its psychology and its working, but as that was not and could not be developed systematically or schematically in these letters, it has not been grasped by those who are not already acquainted with it by mental familiarity or some amount of practice. The detail or method of the later stages of the Yoga which go into little known or untrodden regions, I have not made public and I do not at present intend to do so.
  
  --
  I do not therefore care in the least, - even though these ideals were, up to some extent parallel, yet not identical with mine,
  - whether this Yoga and its aim and method are accepted as new or not; that is in itself a trifling matter. That it should be recognised as true in itself by those who can accept or practise it and should make itself true by achievement, is the one thing important; it does not matter if it is called new or a repetition or revival of the old which was forgotten. I laid emphasis on it as new in a letter to certain sadhaks so as to explain to them that a repetition of the aim and idea of the old Yogas was not enough in my eyes, that I was putting forward a thing to be achieved that has not yet been achieved, not yet clearly visualised, even though it is one natural but still secret destined outcome of all the past spiritual endeavour.
  
  It is new as compared with the old Yogas:
  (1) Because it aims not at a departure out of world and life into a Heaven or a Nirvana, but at a change of life and existence, not as something subordinate or incidental, but as a distinct and central object. If there is a descent in other Yogas, yet it is only an incident on the way or resulting from the ascent - the ascent is the real thing. Here the ascent is indispensable, but what is decisive, what is finally aimed at is the resulting descent. It is the descent of the new consciousness attained by the ascent that is the stamp and seal of the sadhana. Even Tantra and Vaishnavism end in the release from life; here the object is the divine fulfilment of life.
  
  --
  
  This is nothing new; it is stated in the Taittiriya Upanishad that there are five Purushas, the physical, the vital, the mental, the
  Truth Purusha (supramental) and the Bliss Purusha; it says that one has to draw the physical self up into the vital, the vital into the mental, the mental into the Truth Self, the Truth Self into the Bliss Self and so attain perfection. But in this Yoga we become aware not only of this taking up but of a pouring down of the powers of the higher Self, so that there comes in the possibility of a descent of the Supramental Self and nature to dominate and change our present nature and turn it from nature of Ignorance into nature of Truth-Knowledge (and through the supramental into nature of Ananda) - this is the third or supramental transformation. It does not always go in this order, for with many the spiritual descent begins first in an imperfect way before the psychic is in front and in charge, but the psychic development has to be attained before a perfect and unhampered spiritual descent can take place, and the last or supramental change is impossible so long as the two first have not become full and complete. That's the whole matter, put as briefly as possible.

02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Invents devices of her magic art
  To find new bodies for the Infinite
  And images of the Unimaginable;
  --
  Occult, profound comes all experience,
  Marvel is ever new, miracle divine.
  There is a screened burden, a mysterious touch,
  --
  They were figures crowding an unfinished sum.
  None truly knew himself or knew the world
  Or the Reality living there enshrined:
  Only they knew what Mind could take and build
  Out of the secret Supermind's huge store.
  --
  And victory's star still lights our desperate road;
  Our death is made a passage to new worlds.
  This to Life's music gives its anthem swell.
  --
  Strove to escape from its long monotone
  And made new things that soon were like the old.
  A curious decoration lured the eye
  --
  Each final scheme leads to a sequel plan.
  Yet every new departure seems the last,
  Inspired evangel, theory's ultimate peak,
  --
  But nothing has been achieved of infinite worth:
  A world made ever anew, never complete,
  Piled always half-attempts on lost attempts
  --
  "Oh, surely one day he shall come to our cry,
  One day he shall create our life anew
  And utter the magic formula of peace

02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    Cherished the putrid corpses of dead truths,
    Hailed twisted forms as things free, new and true,
    Beauty from ugliness and evil drank
  --
    All was belied, yet thought itself the truth;
    All were beset but knew not of the siege:
    For none could see the authors of their fall.
  --
    An air of prophecy felt, a heavenly hope,
    Listened for a gospel, watched for a new star.
    The Fiend was visible but cloaked in light;
  --
    He saw a city of ancient Ignorance
    Founded upon a soil that knew not Light.
    There each in his own darkness walked alone:
  --
    Forfeiting the spirit's lonely chance in Time
    And no news of him reach the waiting gods,
    Marked "missing" in the register of souls,
  --
    Worship was offered to the Undivine.
    A new aesthesis of Inferno's art
    That trained the mind to love what the soul hates,
  --
    Some passion and power and acrid point of life.
    A new philosophy theorised evil's rights,
    Gloried in the shimmering rot of decadence,

02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A lying inspiration fell and dark
  A new order substitutes for the divine.
  A silence falls upon the spirit's heights,
  --
  His being ventured into mindless Void,
  Intolerant gulfs that knew not thought nor sense;
  Thought ceased, sense failed, his soul still saw and knew.
  In atomic parcellings of the Infinite
  --
  He saw in Night the Eternal's shadowy veil,
  Knew death for a cellar of the house of life,
  In destruction felt creation's hasty pace,
  Knew loss as the price of a celestial gain
  And hell as a short cut to heaven's gates.

02.09_-_The_Paradise_of_the_Life-Gods, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Burning like sunsets in a trance of eve.
  As if to some new unsearched profundity,
  Into a joyful stillness plunged their base;
  --
  And thoughts too great and deep to find a voice,
  Thoughts whose desire new-makes the universe.
  A scale of sense that climbed with fiery feet

02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  That each might have his ration of thought-food,
  Then new-built Truth's slain body by its art:
  A robot exact and serviceable and false
  --
  Its young formations move the mind of earth
  To labour and to dream and new-create,
  To feel beauty's touch and know the world and self:
  --
  Wrought within limits but possessed her field;
  She knew by a privilege of thinking force
  And claimed an infant sovereignty of sight.
  --
  Abhorring change as an audacious sin,
  Distrustful of each new discovery
  Only it advances step by careful step
  --
  Into inertia revolution sinks,
  In a new dress the old resumes its role;
  The Energy acts, the stable is its seal:
  --
  She strove to reduce to rules the mystic world.
  Nothing she knew but all things hoped to know.
  In dark inconscient realms once void of thought,
  --
  This now she uses as the assayer's stone.
  As if she knew not facts are husks of truth,
  The husks she keeps, the kernel throws aside.
  --
  The Void is left bare, vacant as before.
  Thus vindicated, crowned, the grand new Thought
  Explained the world and mastered all its laws,
  --
  And felt the marvel in them and the force
  But knew the power behind the face of Time:
  She did the task, obeyed the knowledge given,
  --
  A brilliant hedge drawn round her narrowed her power;
  Faithful to her limited sphere she toiled, but knew
  Its highest, widest seeing was a half-search,
  --
  A rule-maker in a strange stumbling game.
  But she her dwarf aides knew whose confident sight
  A bounded prospect took for the far goal.
  --
  Our ignorance is Wisdom's chrysalis,
  Our error weds new knowledge on its way,
  Its darkness is a blackened knot of light;

02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A thought comes down from the ideal worlds
  And moves us to new-model even here
  Some image of their greatness and appeal
  --
  Thus bound it grew, but could not last and broke
  And to a new thinking's body left its place.
  A cage for the Infinite's great-eyed seraphim Thoughts
  --
  Across the gulfs of silence in their eyes;
  They lived in the mind and knew truth from within;
  A sight withdrawn in the concentrated heart
  --
  A heavenly glory and variety,
  Makes ever new her body to his eyes,
  Or else repeats the first enchantment's touch,
  --
  And beautiful vibrant limbs a living field
  Of throbbing new discovery without end.
  A new beginning flowers in word and laugh,
  A new charm brings back the old extreme delight:
  He is lost in her, she is his heaven here.

02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  At each pace of the journey marvellous
  A new degree of wonder and of bliss,
  A new rung formed in Being's mighty stair,
  A great wide step trembling with jewelled fire

02.13_-_In_the_Self_of_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A seeing Self and potent Energy met;
  The Silence knew itself and thought took form:
  Self-made from the dual power creation rose.
  --
  There he could stay, the Self, the Silence won:
  His soul had peace, it knew the cosmic Whole.
  Then suddenly a luminous finger fell
  --
  A labourer in the dark dazzled by half-light,
  What it knew was an image in a broken glass,
  What it saw was real but its sight untrue.
  --
  Where all must die to live and live to die.
  Immortal by renewed mortality,
  It wandered in the spiral of its acts
  --
  Yet was no more than its original self
  And knew no more than when it first began.
  To be was a prison, extinction the escape.

02.14_-_The_World-Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  It bore within itself a seed, a flame,
  A seed from which the Eternal is new-born,
  A flame that cancels death in mortal things.
  --
  Here where reality was its own dream,
  He knew things by their soul and not their shape:
  As those who have lived long made one in love
  --
  In a background memory's foreseeing muse
  Prophetic of new personality
  Arranged the map of their coming destiny's course:
  --
  Electors of their own self-chosen lot,
  They waited for the adventure of new life.
  A Person persistent through the lapse of worlds,
  --
  A growing figure of its secret self,
  And learns by experience what the spirit knew,
  Till it can see its truth alive and God.
  --
  The calm persistent vision of the One
  Inevitably re-makes, it lives anew:
  Forces and lives and beings and ideas
  --
  Twixt birth and birth, twixt dream and waking dream,
  A pause that gave new strength to do and be.
  Beyond were regions of delight and peace,
  --
  His knowledge stripped bare of the garbs of sense
  Knew by identity without thought or word;
  His being saw itself without its veils,

02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  As if one who arrived out of infinity's womb
  He came new-born, infant and limitless
  And grew in the wisdom of the timeless Child;

03.01_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The cycles of evolution tend always upward, but they are cycles and do not ascend in a straight line. The process therefore gives the impression of a series of ascents and descents, but what is essential in the gains of the evolution is kept or, even if eclipsed for a time, reemerges in new forms suitable to the new ages.
  

03.01_-_The_Pursuit_of_the_Unknowable, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Were turned to props for an impermanent scene.
  But who that mightiness was he knew not yet.
  Impalpable, yet filling all that is,
  --
  A Being formless, featureless and mute
  That knew itself by its own timeless self,
  Aware for ever in its motionless depths,

03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  His small beginnings asked for a mighty end:
  For all that he had been must now new-shape
  In him her joy to embody, to enshrine

03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  object:03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the new Creation
  class:chapter
  --
  
  The House of the Spirit and the new Creation
  A MIGHTIER task remained than all he had done.
  --
  The separate being could no more be felt;
  It disappeared and knew itself no more,
  Lost in the spirit's wide identity.
  --
  And from the naked Spirit's victory
  A new and marvellous creation rose.
  Incalculable outflowing infinitudes
  --
  Harmonised a Oneness deep, immeasurable.
  In these new worlds projected he became
  A portion of the universal gaze,
  --
  Moving in unison to a single goal.
  A stream ever new-born that never dies,
  Caught in its thousandfold current's ravishing flow,
  --
  A fascinating puzzle of events,
  Lured at each turn by new vicissitudes
  To self-discovery that could never cease.
  Ever she framed stark bonds for the will to break,
  Brought new creations for the thought's surprise
  And passionate ventures for the heart to dare,
  --
  And vast adventure into thinking shapes
  And trial and lure of a new living's dreams.
  Untired of sameness and untired of change,
  --
  Or a vexed illusion in man's toiling mind,
  A new creation from the old shall rise,
  A Knowledge inarticulate find speech,
  --
  Redeeming by its substance Nature's fall.
  Himself he knew and why his soul had gone
  Into earth's passionate obscurity
  --
  All else was satisfied with quietude;
  This only knew there was a truth beyond.
  All other parts were dumb in centred sleep

03.03_-_The_Inner_Being_and_the_Outer_Being, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  There are, we might say, two beings in us, one on the surface, our ordinary exterior mind, life, body consciousness, another behind the veil, an inner mind, an inner life, an inner physical consciousness constituting another or inner self. This inner self once awake opens in its turn to our true real and eternal self. It opens inwardly to the soul, called in the language of this Yoga the psychic being which supports our successive births and at each birth assumes a new mind, life and body. It opens above to the Self or spirit which is unborn and by conscious recovery of it we transcend the changing personality and achieve freedom and full mastery over our nature.
  

03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All we have done is ever still to do.
  All breaks and all renews and is the same.
  Huge revolutions of life's fruitless gyre,
  The new-born ages perish like the old,
  As if the sad Enigma kept its right

04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Whose secret touch upon our mortal lives
  Keeps ever new the thrill that made the world,
  Remoulds an ancient sweetness to new shapes
  And guards intact unchanged by death and Time
  The answer of our hearts to Nature's charm
  And keeps for ever new, yet still the same,
  The throb that ever wakes to the old delight
  --
  One had returned from the transcendent planes
  And bore anew the load of mortal breath,
  Who had striven of old with our darkness and our pain;
  --
  Once more with her fathomless heart she fronted Time.
  Again there was renewed, again revealed
  The ancient closeness by earth-vision veiled,
  --
  No victory she admits of Death or Fate.
  Always she drives the soul to new attempt;
  Always her magical infinitude
  --
  To express divinity in terrestrial signs.
  Outlined by the pressure of this new descent
  A lovelier body formed than earth had known.
  --
  As from the animal's life rose thinking man,
  A new epiphany appeared in her.
  A mind of light, a life of rhythmic force,

04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Into communion with its comrade gods.
  Or it helped to beat out new expressive forms
  Of that which labours in the heart of life,
  --
  A law they follow greatening heart and life.
  Opened to the breath is a new diviner air,
  Opened to man is a freer, happier world:
  --
  Her divine parts the soul's allegiance called:
  It saw, it felt, it knew the deity.
  Her will was puissant on their nature's acts,
  --
  Covering their lives with her strong passionate hands
  And knew by sympathy their needs and wants
  And dived in the shallow wave-depths of their lives
  --
  Earth nursed, unconscious still, the inhabiting flame,
  Yet something deeply stirred and dimly knew;
  There was a movement and a passionate call,
  --
  Some secret wing of expectation beat,
  A growing sense of something new and rare
  And beautiful stole across the heart of Time.

04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  A morn that seemed a new creation's front,
  Bringing a greater sunlight, happier skies,
  --
  Out of the changeless origin of things.
  An ancient longing struck again new roots:
  The air drank deep of unfulfilled desire;
  --
  Limited not now by the dull body's eyes,
  new-found through an arch of clear discovery,
  This intimation of the world's delight,
  --
  The strange significant icon of a Power
  Renewing its inscrutable descent
  Into a human figure of its works
  --
  An impromptu from the deeper sight within,
  Thoughts rose in him that knew not their own scope.
  Then to those large and brooding depths whence Love
  --
  Responsive in divine and equal strains,
  Discovering new notes of the eternal theme.
  One force shall be your mover and your guide,
  --
  Moving in muse amid familiar powers,
  Touched by new magnitudes and fiery signs,
  She turned to vastnesses not yet her own;
  --
  When the pale dawn slipped through Night's shadowy guard,
  Vainly the new-born light desired her face;
  The palace woke to its own emptiness;

04.04_-_The_Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The world-ways opened before Savitri.
  At first a strangeness of new brilliant scenes
  Peopled her mind and kept her body's gaze.
  --
  Her acts recalled a line of bygone power,
  Even her motion's purpose was not new:
  Traveller to a prefigured high event,

05.02_-_Satyavan, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The passionate seeing used thought cannot match,
  And knew one nearer than its own close strings.
  
  --
  Broke forth in flame to recreate the world,
  And in that flame to new things she was born.
  
  --
  Arising to a hymn of wonder's priests
  Her soul flung wide its doors to this new sun.
  
  --
  Discovered the aureole round a mortal's head,
  Adored a new divinity in things.
  
  --
  Fell prostrate from their bright sufficiencies,
  As at the touch of a new infinite,
  To worship a godhead greater than their own.
  --
  As though some secret nimbus half was seen;
  Her inner vision still remembering knew
  A forehead that wore the crown of all her past,
  --
  Love brought down power out of eternity
  To make of life his new undying base.
  
  --
  
  These knew each other though in forms thus strange.
  
  Although to sight unknown, though life and mind
  Had altered to hold a new significance,
  
  --
  A moment passed that was eternity's ray,
  An hour began, the matrix of new Time.
  

05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A listener to the universal speech:
  My spirit satisfied within me knew
  Godlike our birthright, luxuried our life
  --
  All things the eye had caught in coloured lines
  Were seen anew through the interpreting mind
  And in the shape it sought to seize the soul.
  --
  I plunged into an inner seeing Mind
  And knew the secret laws and sorceries
  That make of Matter mind's bewildered slave:
  --
  And now diviner voices fill my ear,
  A strange new world swims to me in thy gaze
  Approaching like a star from unknown heavens;
  --
  Then drawing back from their long ecstasy's trance
  Came into a new self and a new world.
  
  --
  Took place again on earth in human forms:
  In a new act of the drama of the world
  The united Two began a greater age.
  --
  A nave of trees enshrined the hermit thatch,
  The new deep covert of her felicity,
  Preferred to heaven her soul's temple and home.

06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And, eager for beauty on discovered earth
  Transformed and new in her heart's miracle-light,
  Saw like a rose of marvel, worshipping,
  --
  A heavenly jar, thy firm deep-honied heart,
  new-brimming with a sweet and nectarous wine.
  
  --
  
  All beautiful things eternal seem and new
  To virgin wonder in her crystal soul.
  --
  To other scenes he moves and other players
  And laughs and weeps mid faces new, unknown.
  

06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  He dies that the world may be new-born and live.
  
  --
  It felt the Spirit's interminable bliss,
  It knew itself deathless, timeless, spaceless, one,
  It saw the Eternal, lived in the Infinite.

07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  She rejoiced in his brightness and believed in his fate
  And knew not of the evil drawing near.
  
  --
  These she controlled, nothing was shown outside:
  She was still to them the child they knew and loved;
  The sorrowing woman they saw not within.
  --
  She dreamed of her body robed in funeral flame,
  She knew she must not clutch that happiness
  To die with him and follow, seizing his robe
  --
  For when he wandered in the forest, oft
  Her conscious spirit walked with him and knew
  His actions as if in herself he moved;

07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And yet was intimate with all the world
  And knew the meaning of the steps of Time
  And saw eternal destiny's changeless scene
  --
  To pass and leave unchanged the old dusty laws?
  Shall there be no new tables, no new Word,
  No greater light come down upon the earth
  --
  
  All that has been renews in him its birth;
  All that can be is figured in his soul.
  --
  Our dead past round our future's ankles clings
  And drags back the new nature's glorious stride,
  Or from its buried corpse old ghosts arise,
  --
  
  An old self lurks in the new self we are;
  Hardly we escape from what we once had been:
  --
  Aspiring he transcends his earthly self;
  He stands in the largeness of his soul new-born,
  Redeemed from encirclement by mortal things
  --
  And lead this great blind struggling world to light
  Or a new world discover or create.
  

07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Each found what it had sought and knew its aim.
  
  --
  But she reined back the high passion in her heart;
  She knew that first she must discover her soul.
  

07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And shake from my aching neck the oppressor's knees
  Only to seat new tyrants on my back:
  My teachers lesson me in slavery,
  --
  I have seized her powers and harnessed for my work,
  I have shaped her metals and new metals made;
  I will make glass and raiment out of milk,
  --
  All that imagination can conceive
  In mind intangible, remould anew
  In Matter's plastic solid and concrete.

07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Her self was nothing, God alone was all,
  Yet God she knew not but only knew he was.
  
  --
  This blank felt more than all that Time has borne,
  This dark knew dumbly, immensely the Unknown.
  
  --
  The mystic cavern in the sacred hill
  And knew the dwelling of her secret soul.
  
  --
  
  All this she saw and inly felt and knew
  Not by some thought of mind but by the self.
  --
  A sealed identity within her woke;
  She knew herself the Beloved of the Supreme:
  These Gods and Goddesses were he and she:
  --
  Here in this chamber of flame and light they met;
  They looked upon each other, knew themselves,
  The secret deity and its human part,
  --
  And the heart's impulse run towards word and act,
  A glad uplift and a new working came.
  
  --
  
  There is won a new proximity to the skies,
  A first betrothal of the Earth to Heaven,

07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And Savitri's life was glad, fulfilled like earth's;
  She had found herself, she knew her being's aim.
  
  --
  A golden circle round a mystic sun
  Disclosed to her new-born predicting sight
  The cyclic rondure of a sovereign life.
  --
  Accept to be small and human on the earth,
  Interrupting thy new-born divinity,
  That man may find his utter self in God.
  --
  This seeing was identical with the seen;
  It knew without knowledge all that could be known,
  It saw impartially the world go by,
  --
  Even as the Unknowable decreed,
  She might be nought or new-become the All,
  Or if the omnipotent Nihil took a shape

07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Accustomed only to read outward signs
  None saw aught new in her, none divined her state;
  They saw a person where was only God's vast,
  --
  
  Astonished by a new enlightenment,
  Invaded by a streak of the Absolute,
  --
  Her spirit saw the world as living God;
  It saw the One and knew that all was He.
  
  She knew him as the Absolute's self-space,
  One with her self and ground of all things here
  --
  Its body was her body's larger frame
  In which she lived and knew herself in it
  One, multitudinous in its multitudes.

08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  What prayer she breathed her soul and Durga knew.
  
  --
  
  The Book of Death was taken from Canto Three of an early version of Savitri which had only six cantos and an epilogue. It was slightly revised at a late stage and a number of new lines were added, but it was never fully worked into the final version of the poem. Its original designation, "Canto Three", has been retained as a reminder of this.
  
  --
  Like the strong sun that serves earth from above."
  Then the doomed husband and the woman who knew
  Went with linked hands into that solemn world
  --
  Coevals and companions of his life
  Here in this world whose every mood he knew:
  Their thoughts which to the common mind are blank,
  --
  
  She knew that visible Death was standing there
  And Satyavan had passed from her embrace.

09.01_-_Towards_the_Black_Void, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  A new sight comes, new voices in us form
  A body of the music of the Gods.
  --
  
  She knew not to what course: her spirit above
  On the crypt-summit of her secret form
  --
  The senses seized in vain a glorious shade:
  Only the spirit knew the spirit still,
  And the heart divined the old loved heart, though changed.
  --
  Her senses felt earth's close and gentle air
  Cling round them and in troubled branches knew
  Uncertain treadings of a faint-foot wind:
  --
  A moment of a secret body's sleep,
  Her trance knew not of sun or earth or world;
  Thought, time and death were absent from her grasp:
  She knew not self, forgotten was Savitri.
  
  --
  In voiceless regions they were travellers
  Alone in a new world where souls were not,
  But only living moods: a strange hushed weird

09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The Woman answered not. Her spirit refused
  The voice of Night that knew and Death that thought.
  
  --
  She saw the undying fountains of her life,
  She knew herself eternal without birth.
  

10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  There breaks a passion and splendour of new birth
  And hue-winged visions stray across the lids,
  --
  And the same thoughts were constant passers-by
  And all renewed unendingly its charm
  Alluring ever the expectant heart
  --
  
  As if a music old yet ever new,
  Moving suggestions on her heart-strings dwelt,

10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Ever he comes to us across the years
  Bearing a new sweet face that is the old.
  

10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  A traveller new-discovering himself,
  One made of Matter's world his starting-point,
  --
  Thought fumbled in a ring to find itself,
  Discovered speech and fed the new-born Word
  That bridged with spans of light the world's ignorance.
  --
  He stood erect among his brute compeers,
  He built life new, measured the universe,
  Opposed his fate and wrestled with unseen Powers,
  --
  An evil transmutation overtook
  Her members till she knew herself no more.
  
  --
  All being it explores for unknown bliss,
  Sounds all experience for things new and strange.
  
  --
  Then is our being rescued from separateness;
  All is itself, all is new-felt in God:
  A Lover leaning from his cloister's door
  --
  A gentle memory pushed away from thee
  By new love and thy children's tender hands,
  Till thou shalt wonder if thou lov'dst at all.

10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Its lost forgotten forms that once had lived,
  And all the present loves as new-revealed
  And all the hopes the future brings had failed
  --
  Brought the same toils and the same barren end,
  Forms ever new and ever old, the long
  Appalling revolutions of the world.
  --
  Ever he obeys her fixed mutation's law;
  In a new version of her oft-told tale
  In ever-wheeling cycles turns the race.
  --
  Convulsing the wounded body of mankind
  Only to paint in new colours an old face;
  These wars, carnage triumphant, ruin gone mad,
  --
  Vain the soul's hope if changeless Law is all:
  Ever to the new and the unknown press on
  
  --
  She spoke; Death unconvinced resisted still,
  Although he knew refusing still to know,
  Although he saw refusing still to see.
  --
  
  At last he knew defeat inevitable
  And left crumbling the shape that he had worn,

1.00a_-_Introduction, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  Secrets. There is one exception to what I have said about publishing everything: that is, the ultimate secret of the O.T.O. This is really too dangerous to disclose; but the safeguard is that you could not use it if you knew it, unless you were an advanced Adept; and you would not be allowed to go so far unless we were satisfied that you were sincerely devoted to the Great Work. (See One Star in Sight). True, the Black Brothers could use it; but they would only destroy themselves.
  
  --
  
  P.S. Please study this letter, and these explanatory figures and meditate upon them until you have fully assimilate not only the matter under immediate consideration, but the general method of Qabalistic research and construction. Note how new cognate ideas arise to enrich the formula.
  
  --
  
  I think I am fair if I say that the first step on the Qabalah which may be called success, is when you make an actual discovery which throws light on some problem which has been troubling you. A quarter of a century ago I was in new Orleans, and was very puzzled about my immediate course of action; in fact I may say I was very much distressed. There seemed literally nothing that I could do, so I bethought myself that I had better invoke Mercury. As soon as I got into the appropriate frame of mind, it naturally occurred to me, with a sort of joy, "But I am Mercury." I put it into Latin Mercurius sum, and suddenly something struck me, a sort of nameless reaction which said: "That's not quite right." Like a flash it came to me to put it into Greek, which gave me "' " and adding that up rapidly, I got the number 418, with all the marvellous correspondences which had been so abundantly useful to me in the past (See Equinox of the Gods, p. 138). My troubles disappeared like a flash of lightning.
  
  --
  
  Your suggested method of study: you have got my idea quite well. But nobody can "take you through" the Grades of AA. The Grades confirm your attainments as you make them; then, the new tasks appear. See One Star in Sight.
  
  --
  
  I think this is your trouble about being "left in the air." When I "present many new things" to you, the sting is in the tail the practice that vitalizes it. Doctrinal stuff is fine "Lazily, lazily, drowsily, drowsily, in the noo-on-dye shaun!" An ounce of your practice is worth a ton of my teaching. GET THAT. It's all your hatred of hard work:
  
  --
  
  Yes, your brain is quite all right; what is wanted is to acquire the habit of pinning things down instantly. (He says 're-incarnation' now what exactly does he mean by that? He says "it is natural to suppose . . . ": what is "natural", and what is implied by supposition?) Practice this style of criticism; write down what happens. Within a week or two you will be astounded to discover that you have got what is apparently little less than a new brain! You must make this a habit, not letting anything get by the sentries.
  

1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  choose to make ourselves. Practice, in the words of William James, may change
  our theoretical horizon, and this in a twofold way: it may lead into new worlds and
  secure new powers. Knowledge we could never attain, remaining what we are, may
  be attainable in consequences of higher powers and a higher life, which we may
  --
  experience with the given facts of their other experiences. To such first-hand
  exponents of the Perennial Philosophy those who knew them have generally given
  the name of saint or prophet, sage or enlightened one. And it is mainly to
  these, because there is good reason for supposing that they knew what they were
  talking about, and not to the professional philosophers or men of letters, that I have

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Gaddhar himself now organized a dramatic company with his young friends. The stage was set in the mango orchard. The themes were selected from the stories of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. Gaddhar knew by heart almost all the roles, having heard them from professional actors. His favourite theme was the Vrindvan episode of Krishna's life, depicting those exquisite love-stories of Krishna and the milkmaids and the cowherd boys. Gaddhar would play the parts of Rdh or Krishna and would often lose himself in the character he was portraying. His natural feminine grace heightened the dramatic effect. The mango orchard would ring with the loud kirtan of the boys. Lost in song and merry-making, Gaddhar became indifferent to the routine of school.
  
  --
  
  At the age of sixteen Gaddhar was summoned to Calcutta by his elder brother Rmkumr, who wished assistance in his priestly duties. Rmkumr had opened a Sanskrit academy to supplement his income, and it was his intention gradually to turn his younger brother's mind to education. Gaddhar applied himself heart and soul to his new duty as family priest to a number of Calcutta families. His worship was very different from that of the professional priests. He spent hours decorating the images and singing hymns and devotional songs; he performed with love the other duties of his office. People were impressed with his ardour. But to his studies he paid scant attention.
  
  --
  
  In 1757 English traders laid the foundation of British rule in India. Gradually the Government was systematized and lawlessness suppressed. The Hindus were much impressed by the military power and political acumen of the new rulers. In the wake of the merchants came the English educators, and social reformers, and Christian missionaries - all bearing a culture completely alien to the Hindu mind. In different parts of the country educational institutions were set up and Christian churches established.
  
  --
  
  Everyone living near Calcutta or the other strongholds of Western culture, even those who attempted to cling to the orthodox traditions of Hindu society, became infected by the new uncertainties and the new beliefs.
  
  --
  
  Kli Temple at Dakshinewar
  
  --
  
  In 1847 the Rni purchased twenty acres of land at Dakshinewar, a village about four miles north of Calcutta. Here she created a temple garden and constructed several temples. Her Ishta, or Chosen Ideal, was the Divine Mother, Kli.
  
  --
  
  At this time there came to Dakshinewar a youth of sixteen, destined to play an important role in Sri Ramakrishna's life. Hriday, a distant nephew of Sri Ramakrishna, hailed from Sihore, a village not far from Kmrpukur, and had been his boyhood friend.
  
  Clever, exceptionally energetic, and endowed with great presence of mind, he moved, as will be seen later, like a shadow about his uncle and was always ready to help him, even at the sacrifice of his personal comfort. He was destined to be a mute witness of many of the spiritual experiences of Sri Ramakrishna and the caretaker of his body during the stormy days of his spiritual practice. Hriday came to Dakshinewar in search of a job, and Sri Ramakrishna was glad to see him.
  
  --
  
  One day the priest of the Radhknta temple accidentally dropped the image of Krishna on the floor, breaking one of its legs. The pundits advised the Rni to install a new image, since the worship of an image with a broken limb was against the scriptural injunctions. But the Rni was fond of the image, and she asked Sri Ramakrishna's opinion. In an abstracted mood, he said: "This solution is ridiculous. If a son-in-law of the Rni broke his leg, would she discard him and put another in his place? Wouldn't she rather arrange for his treatment? Why should she not do the same thing in this case too?
  
  --
  
  Born in an orthodox brhmin family, Sri Ramakrishna knew the formalities of worship, its rites and rituals. The innumerable gods and goddesses of the Hindu religion are the human aspects of the indescribable and incomprehensible Spirit, as conceived by the finite human mind. They understand and appreciate human love and emotion, help men to realize their secular and spiritual ideals, and ultimately enable men to attain liberation from the miseries of phenomenal life. The Source of light, intelligence, wisdom, and strength is the One alone from whom comes the fulfilment of desire. Yet, as long as a man is bound by his human limitations, he cannot but worship God through human forms. He must use human symbols. Therefore Hinduism asks the devotees to look on God as the ideal father, the ideal mother, the ideal husband, the ideal son, or the ideal friend. But the name ultimately leads to the Nameless, the form to the Formless, the word to the Silence, the emotion to the serene realization of Peace in Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute. The gods gradually merge in the one God. But until that realization is achieved, the devotee cannot dissociate human factors from his worship.
  
  --
  
  Suddenly my glance fell on the sword that was kept in the Mother's temple. I determined to put an end to my life. When I jumped up like a madman and seized it, suddenly the blessed Mother revealed Herself. The buildings with their different parts, the temple, and everything else vanished from my sight, leaving no trace whatsoever, and in their stead I saw a limitless, infinite, effulgent Ocean of Consciousness. As far as the eye could see, the shining billows were madly rushing at me from all sides with a terrific noise, to swallow me up! I was panting for breath. I was caught in the rush and collapsed, unconscious. What was happening in the outside world I did not know; but within me there was a steady flow of undiluted bliss, altogether new, and I felt the presence of the Divine Mother." On his lips when he regained consciousness of the world was the word "Mother".
  
  --
  
  In 1858 there came to Dakshinewar a cousin of Sri Ramakrishna, Haladhri by name, who was to remain there about eight years. On account of Sri Ramakrishna's indifferent health, Mathur appointed this man to the office of priest in the Kli temple. He was a complex character, versed in the letter of the scriptures, but hardly aware of their spirit.
  
  --
  
  But in this case the marriage remained for ever unconsummated. Sri Ramakrishna lived at Kmrpukur about a year and a half and then returned to Dakshinewar.
  
  --
  
  There came to Dakshinewar at this time a brhmin woman who was to play an important part in Sri Ramakrishna's spiritual unfoldment. Born in East Bengl, she was an adept in the Tntrik and Vaishnava methods of worship. She was slightly over fifty years of age, handsome, and garbed in the orange robe of a nun. Her sole possessions were a few books and two pieces of wearing-cloth.
  
  --
  
  Thus, the insane priest was, by verdict of the great scholars of the day, proclaimed a Divine Incarnation. His visions were not the result of an over heated brain; they had precedent in spiritual history. And how did the proclamation affect Sri Ramakrishna himself? He remained the simple child of the Mother that he had been since the first day of his life. Years later, when two of his householder disciples openly spoke of him as a Divine Incarnation and the matter was reported to him, he said with a touch of sarcasm: "Do they think they will enhance my glory that way? One of them is an actor on the stage and the other a physician. What do they know about Incarnations? Why years ago pundits like Gauri and Vaishnavcharan declared me to be an Avatar. They were great scholars and knew what they said. But that did not make any change in my mind."
  
  --
  
  About the year 1864 there came to Dakshinewar a wandering Vaishnava monk, Jatdhri, whose Ideal Deity was Rm. He always carried with him a small metal image of the Deity, which he called by the endearing name of Ramll, the Boy Rm. Toward this little image he displayed the tender affection of Kausalya for her divine Son, Rm.
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna, much impressed with his devotion, requested Jatdhri to spend a few days at Dakshinewar. Soon Ramll became the favourite companion of Sri Ramakrishna too. Later on he described to the devotees how the little image would dance gracefully before him, jump on his back, insist on being taken in his arms, run to the fields in the sun, pluck flowers from the bushes, and play pranks like a naughty boy.
  
  --
  
  The Brhmani was the enthusiastic teacher and astonished beholder of Sri Ramakrishna in his spiritual progress. She became proud of the achievements of her unique pupil. But the pupil himself was not permitted to rest; his destiny beckoned him forward. His Divine Mother would allow him no respite till he had left behind the entire realm of duality with its visions, experiences, and ecstatic dreams. But for the new ascent the old tender guides would not suffice. The Brhmani, on whom he had depended for three years saw her son escape from her to follow the command of a teacher with masculine strength, a sterner mien, a gnarled physique, and a virile voice. The new guru was a wandering monk, the sturdy Totpuri, whom Sri Ramakrishna learnt to address affectionately as Nangta, the "Naked One", because of his total renunciation of all earthly objects and attachments, including even a piece of wearing-cloth.
  
  Totpuri was the bearer of a philosophy new to Sri Ramakrishna, the non-dualistic Vednta philosophy, whose conclusions Totpuri had experienced in his own life. This ancient Hindu system designates the Ultimate Reality as Brahman, also described as Satchidnanda, Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute. Brahman is the only Real Existence.
  
  --
  
  Totpuri arrived at the Dakshinewar temple garden toward the end of 1864. Perhaps born in the Punjab, he was the head of a monastery in that province of India and claimed leadership of seven hundred sannysis. Trained from early youth in the disciplines of the Advaita Vednta, he looked upon the world as an illusion. The gods and goddesses of the dualistic worship were to him mere fantasies of the deluded mind.
  
  Prayers, ceremonies, rites, and rituals had nothing to do with true religion, and about these he was utterly indifferent. Exercising self-exertion and unshakable will-power, he had liberated himself from attachment to the sense-objects of the relative universe. For forty years he had practised austere discipline on the bank of the sacred Narmada and had finally realized his identity with the Absolute. Thenceforward he roamed in the world as an unfettered soul, a lion free from the cage. Clad in a loincloth, he spent his days under the canopy of the sky alike in storm and sunshine, feeding his body on the slender pittance of alms. He had been visiting the estuary of the Ganges. On his return journey along the bank of the sacred river, led by the inscrutable Divine Will, he stopped at Dakshinewar.
  
  Totpuri, discovering at once that Sri Ramakrishna was prepared to be a student of Vednta, asked to initiate him into its mysteries. With the permission of the Divine Mother, Sri Ramakrishna agreed to the proposal. But Totpuri explained that only a sannysi could receive the teaching of Vednta. Sri Ramakrishna agreed to renounce the world, but with the stipulation that the ceremony of his initiation into the monastic order be performed in secret, to spare the feelings of his old mother, who had been living with him at Dakshinewar.
  
  --
  
  In the burning flame before him Sri Ramakrishna performed the rituals of destroying his attachment to relatives, friends, body, mind, sense-organs, ego, and the world. The leaping flame swallowed it all, making the initiate free and pure. The sacred thread and the tuft of hair were consigned to the fire, completing his severance from caste, sex, and society. Last of all he burnt in that fire, with all that is holy as his witness, his desire for enjoyment here and hereafter. He uttered the sacred mantras giving assurance of safety and fearlessness to all beings, who were only manifestations of his own Self. The rites completed, the disciple received from the guru the loincloth and ochre robe, the emblems of his new life.
  
  --
  
  Totpuri, a monk of the most orthodox type, never stayed at a place more than three days. But he remained at Dakshinewar eleven months. He too had something to learn.
  
  --
  
  Thus, after Nirvikalpa Samdhi, Sri Ramakrishna realized My in an altogether new role. The binding aspect of Kli vanished from before his vision. She no longer obscured his understanding. The world became the glorious manifestation of the Divine Mother.
  
  --
  
  Totpuri returned to Dakshinewar and spent the remaining hours of the night meditating on the Divine Mother. In the morning he went to the Kli temple with Sri Ramakrishna and prostrated himself before the image of the Mother. He now realized why he had spent eleven months at Dakshinewar. Bidding farewell to the disciple, he continued on his way, enlightened.
  
  --
  
  His body would not have survived but for the kindly attention of a monk who happened to be at Dakshinewar at that time and who somehow realized that for the good of humanity Sri Ramakrishna's body must be preserved. He tried various means, even physical violence, to recall the fleeing soul to the prison-house of the body, and during the resultant fleeting moments of consciousness he would push a few morsels of food down Sri Ramakrishna's throat. Presently Sri Ramakrishna received the command of the Divine Mother to remain on the threshold of relative consciousness. Soon thereafter he was afflicted with a serious attack of dysentery. Day and night the pain tortured him, and his mind gradually came down to the physical plane.
  
  --
  
  From now on Sri Ramakrishna began to seek the company of devotees and holy men. He had gone through the storm and stress of spiritual disciplines and visions. Now he realized an inner calmness and appeared to others as a normal person. But he could not bear the company of worldly people or listen to their talk. Fortunately the holy atmosphere of Dakshinewar and the liberality of Mathur attracted monks and holy men from all parts of the country. Sdhus of all denominations - monists and dualists, Vaishnavas and Vedntists, kts and worshippers of Rm - flocked there in ever increasing numbers. Ascetics and visionaries came to seek Sri Ramakrishna's advice.
  
  Vaishnavas had come during the period of his Vaishnava sdhana, and Tntriks when he practised the disciplines of Tantra. Vedntists began to arrive after the departure of Totpuri. In the room of Sri Ramakrishna, who was then in bed with dysentery, the Vedntists engaged in scriptural discussions, and, forgetting his own physical suffering, he solved their doubts by referring directly to his own experiences. Many of the visitors were genuine spiritual souls, the unseen pillars of Hinduism, and their spiritual lives were quickened in no small measure by the sage of Dakshinewar. Sri Ramakrishna in turn learnt from them anecdotes concerning the ways and the conduct of holy men, which he subsequently narrated to his devotees and disciples. At his request Mathur provided him with large stores of foodstuffs, clothes, and so forth, for distribution among the wandering monks.
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna used to say that when the flower blooms the bees come to it for honey of their own accord. Now many souls began to visit Dakshinewar to satisfy their spiritual hunger. He, the devotee and aspirant, became the Master. Gauri, the great scholar who had been one of the first to proclaim Sri Ramakrishna an Incarnation of God, paid the Master a visit in 1870 and with the Master's blessings renounced the world. Nryan stri, another great pundit, who had mastered the six systems of Hindu philosophy and had been offered a lucrative post by the Maharaja of Jaipur, met the Master and recognized in him one who had realized in life those ideals which he himself had encountered merely in books. Sri Ramakrishna initiated Nryan astri, at his earnest request, into the life of sannys. Pundit Padmalochan, the court pundit of the Maharaja of Burdwan, well known for his scholarship in both the Vednta and the Nyya systems of philosophy, accepted the Master as an Incarnation of God. Krishnakishore, a Vedantist scholar, became devoted to the Master. And there arrived Viwanth Updhyya, who was to become a favourite devotee; Sri Ramakrishna always addressed him as "Captain". He was a high officer of the King of Nepal and had received the title of Colonel in recognition of his merit. A scholar of the Gita, the Bhgavata, and the Vednta philosophy, he daily performed the worship of his Chosen Deity with great devotion. "I have read the Vedas and the other scriptures", he said. "I have also met a good many monks and devotees in different places. But it is in Sri Ramakrishna's presence that my spiritual yearnings have been fulfilled. To me he seems to be the embodiment of the truths of the scriptures."
  
  --
  
  Toward the end of 1866 he began to practise the disciplines of Islm. Under the direction of his Mussalman guru he abandoned himself to his new sdhana. He dressed as a Mussalman and repeated the name of Allah.
  
  --
  
  Eight years later, some time in November 1874, Sri Ramakrishna was seized with an irresistible desire to learn the truth of the Christian religion. He began to listen to readings from the Bible, by ambhu Charan Mallick, a gentleman of Calcutta and a devotee of the Master. Sri Ramakrishna became fascinated by the life and teachings of Jesus. One day he was seated in the parlour of Jadu Mallick's garden house at Dakshinewar, when his eyes became fixed on a painting of the Madonna and Child.
  
  --
  
  The effect of this experience was stronger than that of the vision of Mohammed. In dismay he cried out, "O Mother! What are You doing to me?" And, breaking through the barriers of creed and religion, he entered a new realm of ecstasy. Christ possessed his soul. For three days he did not set foot in the Kli temple. On the fourth day, in the afternoon, as he was walking in the Panchavati, he saw coming toward him a person with beautiful large eyes, serene countenance, and fair skin. As the two faced each other, a voice rang out in the depths of Sri Ramakrishna's soul: "Behold the Christ who shed His heart's blood for the redemption of the world, who suffered a sea of anguish for love of men. It is He, the Master Yogi, who is in eternal union with God. It is Jesus, Love Incarnate." The Son of Man embraced the Son of the Divine Mother and merged in him.
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna accepted the divinity of Buddha and used to point out the similarity of his teachings to those of the Upanishads. He also showed great respect for the Tirthankars, who founded Jainism, and for the ten Gurus of Sikhism. But he did not speak of them as Divine Incarnations. He was heard to say that the Gurus of Sikhism were the reincarnations of King Janaka of ancient India. He kept in his room at Dakshinewar a small statue of Tirthankara Mahvira and a picture of Christ, before which incense was burnt morning and evening.
  
  --
  
  In 1872, Srad Devi paid her first visit to her husband at Dakshinewar. Four years earlier she had seen him at Kmrpukur and had tasted the bliss of his divine company.
  
  Since then she had become even more gentle, tender, introspective, serious, and unselfish. She had heard many rumours about her husband's insanity. People had shown her pity in her misfortune. The more she thought, the more she felt that her duty was to be with him, giving him, in whatever measure she could, a wife's devoted service. She was now eighteen years old. Accompanied by her father, she arrived at Dakshinewar, having come on foot the distance of eighty miles. She had had an attack of fever on the way. When she arrived at the temple garden the Master said sorrowfully: "Ah! You have come too late. My Mathur is no longer here to look after you." Mathur had passed away the previous year.
  
  --
  
  Totpuri, coming to know of the Master's marriage, had once remarked: "What does it matter? He alone is firmly established in the Knowledge of Brahman who can adhere to his spirit of discrimination and renunciation even while living with his wife. He alone has attained the supreme illumination who can look on man and woman alike as Brahman. A man with the idea of sex may be a good aspirant, but he is still far from the goal." Sri Ramakrishna and his wife lived together at Dakshinewar, but their minds always soared above the worldly plane. A few months after Srad Devi's arrival Sri Ramakrishna arranged, on an auspicious day, a special worship of Kli, the Divine Mother. Instead of an image of the Deity, he placed on the seat the living image, Srad Devi herself. The worshipper and the worshipped went into deep Samdhi and in the transcendental plane their souls were united. After several hours Sri Ramakrishna came down again to the relative plane, sang a hymn to the Great Goddess, and surrendered, at the feet of the living image, himself, his rosary, and the fruit of his lifelong sdhana. This is known in Tantra as the Shodasi Puja, the "Adoration of Woman". Sri Ramakrishna realized the significance of the great statement of the Upanishad: "O Lord, Thou art the woman, Thou art the man; Thou art the boy, Thou art the girl; Thou art the old, tottering on their crutches. Thou pervadest the universe in its multiple forms."
  
  --
  
  Second, he knew that he had always been a free soul, that the various disciplines through which he had passed were really not necessary for his own liberation but were solely for the benefit of others. Thus the terms liberation and bondage were not applicable to him. As long as there are beings who consider themselves bound, God must come down to earth as an Incarnation to free them from bondage, just as a magistrate must visit any part of his district in which there is trouble.
  
  --
  
  Third, Sri Ramakrishna realized the wish of the Divine Mother that through him She should found a new Order, consisting of those who would uphold the universal doctrines illustrated in his life.
  
  --
  
  Keshab possessed a complex nature. When passing through a great moral crisis, he spent much of his time in solitude and felt that he heard the voice of God. When a devotional form of worship was introduced into the Brhmo Samj, he spent hours in singing kirtan with his followers. He visited England in 1870 and impressed the English people with his musical voice, his simple English, and his spiritual fervour. He was entertained by Queen Victoria. Returning to India, he founded centres of the Brhmo Samj in various parts of the country. Not unlike a professor of comparative religion in a European university, he began to discover, about the time of his first contact with Sri Ramakrishna, the harmony of religions. He became sympathetic toward the Hindu gods and goddesses, explaining them in a liberal fashion. Further, he believed that he was called by God to dictate to the world God's newly revealed law, the new Dispensation, the Navavidhn.
  
  --
  
  Swmi Daynanda (1824-1883) launched this movement in Bombay in 1875, and soon its influence was felt throughout western India. The Swmi was a great scholar of the Vedas, which he explained as being strictly monotheistic. He preached against the worship of images and re-established the ancient Vedic sacrificial rites. According to him the Vedas were the ultimate authority on religion, and he accepted every word of them as literally true. The rya Samj became a bulwark against the encroachments of Islam and Christianity, and its orthodox flavour appealed to many Hindu minds. It also assumed leadership in many movements of social reform. The caste-system became a target of its attack. Women it liberated from many of their social disabilities. The cause of education received from it a great impetus. It started agitation against early marriage and advocated the remarriage of Hindu widows. Its influence was strongest in the Punjab, the battle-ground of the Hindu and Islamic cultures. A new fighting attitude was introduced into the slumbering Hindu society. Unlike the Brhmo Samj, the influence of the rya Samj was not confined to the intellectuals. It was a force that spread to the masses. It was a dogmatic movement intolerant of those disagreed with its views, and it emphasized only one way, the rya Samj way, to the realization of Truth. Sri Ramakrishna met Swmi Daynanda when the latter visited Bengl.
  
  --
  
  Keshab Chandra Sen and Sri Ramakrishna met for the first time in the garden house of Jaygopl Sen at Belgharia, a few miles from Dakshinewar, where the great Brhmo leader was staying with some of his disciples. In many respects the two were poles apart, though an irresistible inner attraction was to make them intimate friends. The Master had realized God as Pure Spirit and Consciousness, but he believed in the various forms of God as well. Keshab, on the other hand, regarded image worship as idolatry and gave allegorical explanations of the Hindu deities. Keshab was an orator and a writer of books and magazine articles; Sri Ramakrishna had a horror of lecturing and hardly knew how to write his own name. Keshab's fame spread far and wide, even reaching the distant shores of England; the Master still led a secluded life in the village of Dakshinewar. Keshab emphasized social reforms for India's regeneration; to Sri Ramakrishna God-realization was the only goal of life. Keshab considered himself a disciple of Christ and accepted in a diluted form the Christian sacraments and Trinity; Sri Ramakrishna was the simple child of Kli, the Divine Mother, though he too, in a different way, acknowledged Christ's divinity. Keshab was a householder and took a real interest in the welfare of his children, whereas Sri Ramakrishna was a paramahamsa and completely indifferent to the life of the world. Yet, as their acquaintance ripened into friendship, Sri Ramakrishna and Keshab held each other in great love and respect. Years later, at the news of Keshab's death, the Master felt as if half his body had become paralysed. Keshab's concepts of the harmony of religions and the Motherhood of God were deepened and enriched by his contact with Sri Ramakrishna.
  
  --
  
  Keshab's sincerity was enough for Sri Ramakrishna. Henceforth the two saw each other frequently, either at Dakshinewar or at the temple of the Brhmo Samj. Whenever the Master was in the temple at the time of divine service, Keshab would request him to speak to the congregation. And Keshab would visit the saint, in his turn, with offerings of flowers and fruits.
  
  --
  
  Among the Brhmo leaders who knew the Master closely were Pratp Chandra Mazumdr, Vijay Krishna Goswmi, Trailokyanth Sannyl and ivanth astri.
  
  --
  
  This contact with the educated and progressive Benglis opened Sri Ramakrishna's eyes to a new realm of thought. Born and brought up in a simple village, without any formal education, and taught by the orthodox holy men of India in religious life, he had had no opportunity to study the influence of modernism on the thoughts and lives of the Hindus.
  
  He could not properly estimate the result of the impact of Western education on Indian culture. He was a Hindu of the Hindus, renunciation being to him the only means to the realization of God in life. From the Brahmos he learnt that the new generation of India made a compromise between God and the world. Educated young men were influenced more by the Western philosophers than by their own prophets. But Sri Ramakrishna was not dismayed, for he saw in this, too, the hand of God. And though he expounded to the Brahmos all his ideas about God and austere religious disciplines, yet he bade them accept from his teachings only as much as suited their tastes and temperaments.
  
  --
  
  The first two householder devotees to come to Dakshinewar were Rm Chandra Dutta and Manomohan Mitra. A medical practitioner and chemist, Rm was sceptical about God and religion and never enjoyed peace of soul. He wanted tangible proof of God's existence. The Master said to him: "God really exists. You don't see the stars in the day-time, but that doesn't mean that the stars do not exist. There is butter in milk. But can anybody see it by merely looking at the milk? To get butter you must churn milk in a quiet and cool place. You cannot realize God by a mere wish; you must go through some mental disciplines." By degrees the Master awakened Rm's spirituality and the latter became one of his foremost lay disciples. It was Rm who introduced Narendranth to Sri Ramakrishna. Narendra was a relative of Rm.
  
  Manomohan at first met with considerable opposition from his wife and other relatives, who resented his visits to Dakshinewar. But in the end the unselfish love of the Master triumphed over worldly affection. It was Manomohan who brought Rkhl to the Master.
  
  --
  
  Kedarnth Chatterji was endowed with a spiritual temperament and had tried various paths of religion, some not very commendable. When he met the Master at Dakshinewar he understood the true meaning of religion. It is said that the Master, weary of instructing devotees who were coming to him in great numbers for guidance, once prayed to the Goddess Kli: "Mother, I am tired of speaking to people. Please give power to Kedr, Girish, Rm, Vijay, and Mahendra to give them the preliminary instruction, so that just a little teaching from me will be enough." He was aware, however, of Kedr's lingering attachment to worldly things and often warned him about it.
  
  --
  
  Bhavanth Chatterji visited the Master while he was still in his teens. His parents and relatives regarded Sri Ramakrishna as an insane person and tried their utmost to prevent him from becoming intimate with the Master. But the young boy was very stubborn and often spent nights at Dakshinewar. He was greatly attached to Narendra, and the Master encouraged their friendship. The very sight of him often awakened Sri Ramakrishna's spiritual emotion.
  
  --
  
  Mahendranth Gupta, known as "M.", arrived at Dakshinewar in February 1882. He belonged to the Brhmo Samj and was headmaster of the Vidysgar High School at ymbazr, Calcutta. At the very first sight the Master recognized him as one of his "marked" disciples. Mahendra recorded in his diary Sri Ramakrishna's conversations with his devotees. These are the first directly recorded words, in the spiritual history of the world, of a man recognized as belonging in the class of Buddha and Christ. The present volume is a translation of this diary. Mahendra was instrumental, through his personal contacts, in spreading the Master's message among many young and aspiring souls.
  
  --
  
  He often loaded the Master with insults, drank in his presence, and took liberties which astounded the other devotees. But the Master knew that at heart Girish was tender, faithful, and sincere. He would not allow Girish to give up the theatre. And when a devotee asked him to tell Girish to give up drinking, he sternly replied: "That is none of your business. He who has taken charge of him will look after him. Girish is a devotee of heroic type. I tell you, drinking will not affect him." The Master knew that mere words could not induce a man to break deep-rooted habits, but that the silent influence of love worked miracles. Therefore he never asked him to give up alcohol, with the result that Girish himself eventually broke the habit. Sri Ramakrishna had strengthened Girish's resolution by allowing him to feel that he was absolutely free.
  
  One day Girish felt depressed because he was unable to submit to any routine of spiritual discipline. In an exalted mood the Master said to him: "All right, give me your power of attorney. Henceforth I assume responsibility for you. You need not do anything." Girish heaved a sigh of relief. He felt happy to think that Sri Ramakrishna had assumed his spiritual responsibilities. But poor Girish could not then realize that he also, on his part, had to give up his freedom and make of himself a puppet in Sri Ramakrishna's hands. The Master began to discipline him according to this new attitude.
  
  --
  
  Many people who could not go to Dakshinewar participated in these meetings and felt blessed. Such an occasion would be concluded with a sumptuous feast.
  
  --
  
  He claimed to have been initiated by Totpuri and used to say that he had been following the path of knowledge according to his guru's instructions. He possessed a large library of English and Sanskrit books. But though he pretended to have read them, most of the leaves were uncut. The Master knew all his limitations, yet enjoyed listening to him recite from the Vedas and other scriptures. He would always exhort Mahim to meditate on the meaning of the scriptural texts and to practise spiritual discipline.
  
  Pratp Hazra, a middle-aged man, hailed from a village near Kmrpukur. He was not altogether unresponsive to religious feelings. On a moment's impulse he had left his home, aged mother, wife, and children, and had found shelter in the temple garden at Dakshinewar, where he intended to lead a spiritual life. He loved to argue, and the Master often pointed him out as an example of barren argumentation. He was hypercritical of others and cherished an exaggerated notion of his own spiritual advancement. He was mischievous and often tried to upset the minds of the Master's young disciples, criticizing them for their happy and joyous life and asking them to devote their time to meditation. The Master teasingly compared Hazra to Jatila and Kutila, the two women who always created obstructions in Krishna's sport with the gopis, and said that Hazra lived at Dakshinewar to "thicken the plot" by adding complications.
  
  --
  
  The first of these young men to come to the Master was Ltu. Born of obscure parents, in Behar, he came to Calcutta in search of work and was engaged by Rmchandra Dutta as house-boy. Learning of the saintly Sri Ramakrishna, he visited the Master at Dakshinewar and was deeply touched by his cordiality. When he was about to leave, the Master asked him to take some money and return home in a boat or carriage. But Ltu declared he had a few pennies and jingled the coins in his pocket. Sri Ramakrishna later requested Rm to allow Ltu to stay with him permanently. Under Sri Ramakrishna's guidance Ltu made great progress in meditation and was blessed with ecstatic visions, but all the efforts of the Master to give him a smattering of education failed. Ltu was very fond of kirtan and other devotional songs but remained all his life illiterate.
  
  --
  
  Even before Rkhl's coming to Dakshinewar, the Master had had visions of him as his spiritual son and as a playmate of Krishna at Vrindvan. Rkhl was born of wealthy parents. During his childhood he developed wonderful spiritual traits and used to play at worshipping gods and goddesses. In his teens he was married to a sister of Manomohan Mitra, from whom he first heard of the Master. His father objected to his association with Sri Ramakrishna but afterwards was reassured to find that many celebrated people were visitors at Dakshinewar. The relationship between the Master and this beloved disciple was that of mother and child. Sri Ramakrishna allowed Rkhl many liberties denied to others. But he would not hesitate to chastise the boy for improper actions. At one time Rkhl felt a childlike jealousy because he found that other boys were receiving the Master's affection. He soon got over it and realized his guru as the Guru of the whole universe. The Master was worried to hear of his marriage, but was relieved to find that his wife was a spiritual soul who would not be a hindrance to his progress.
  
  --
  
  Gopl Chandra Ghosh came to Dakshinewar at a rather advanced age and was called the elder Gopl. He had lost his wife, and the Master assuaged his grief. Soon he renounced the world and devoted himself fully to meditation and prayer. Some years later Gopl gave the Master the ochre cloths with which the latter initiated several of his disciples into monastic life.
  
  --
  
  In a state of mental conflict and torture of soul, Narendra came to Sri Ramakrishna at Dakshinewar. He was then eighteen years of age and had been in college two years. He entered the Master's room accompanied by some light-hearted friends. At Sri Ramakrishna's request he sang a few songs, pouring his whole soul into them, and the Master went into Samdhi. A few minutes later Sri Ramakrishna suddenly left his seat, took Narendra by the hand, and led him to the screened verandah north of his room.
  
  --
  
  The Master wanted to train Narendra in the teachings of the non-dualistic Vednta philosophy. But Narendra, because of his Brhmo upbringing, considered it wholly blasphemous to look on man as one with his Creator. One day at the temple garden he laughingly said to a friend: "How silly! This jug is God! This cup is God! Whatever we see is God! And we too are God! Nothing could be more absurd." Sri Ramakrishna came out of his room and gently touched him. Spellbound, he immediately perceived that everything in the world was indeed God. A new universe opened around him. Returning home in a dazed state, he found there too that the food, the plate, the eater himself, the people around him, were all God. When he walked in the street, he saw that the cabs, the horses, the streams of people, the buildings, were all Brahman. He could hardly go about his day's business. His parents became anxious about him and thought him ill. And when the intensity of the experience abated a little, he saw the world as a dream.
  
  --
  
  Narendra now realized that he had a spiritual mission to fulfil. He resolved to renounce the world, as his grandfather had renounced it, and he came to Sri Ramakrishna for his blessing. But even before he had opened his mouth, the Master knew what was in his mind and wept bitterly at the thought of separation. "I know you cannot lead a worldly life," he said, "but for my sake live in the world as long as I live."
  
  --
  
  This was a very rich and significant experience for Narendra. It taught him that akti, the Divine Power, cannot be ignored in the world and that in the relative plane the need of worshipping a Personal God is imperative. Sri Ramakrishna was overjoyed with the conversion. The next day, sitting almost on Narendra's lap, he said to a devotee, pointing first to himself, then to Narendra: "I see I am this, and again that. Really I feel no difference. A stick floating in the Ganges seems to divide the water; but in reality the water is one. Do you see my point? Well, whatever is, is the Mother - isn't that so?" In later years Narendra would say: "Sri Ramakrishna was the only person who, from the time he met me, believed in me uniformly throughout. Even my mother and brothers did not. It was his unwavering trust and love for me that bound me to him for ever. He alone knew how to love. Worldly people only make a show of love for selfish ends."
  
  --
  
  Others destined to be monastic disciples of Sri Ramakrishna came to Dakshinewar.
  
  Traknth Ghoshl had felt from his boyhood the noble desire to realize God. Keshab and the Brhmo Samj had attracted him but proved inadequate. In 1882 he first met the Master at Rmchandra's house and was astonished to hear him talk about Samdhi, a subject which always fascinated his mind. And that evening he actually saw a manifestation of that superconscious state in the Master. Trak became a frequent visitor at Dakshinewar and received the Master's grace in abundance. The young boy often felt ecstatic fervour in meditation. He also wept profusely while meditating on God.
  
  --
  
  Bburm Ghosh came to Dakshinewar accompanied by Rkhl, his classmate. The Master, as was often his custom, examined the boy's physiognomy and was satisfied about his latent spirituality. At the age of eight Bburm had thought of leading a life of renunciation, in the company of a monk, in a hut shut out from the public view by a thick wall of trees. The very sight of the Panchavati awakened in his heart that dream of boyhood. Bburm was tender in body and soul. The Master used to say that he was pure to his very bones. One day Hazra in his usual mischievous fashion advised Bburm and some of the other young boys to ask Sri Ramakrishna for some spiritual powers and not waste their life in mere gaiety and merriment. The Master, scenting mischief, called Bburm to his side, and said: "What can you ask of me? Isn't everything that I have already yours? Yes, everything I have earned in the shape of realizations is for the sake of you all. So get rid of the idea of begging, which alienates by creating a distance.
  
  --
  
  Nitya Niranjan Sen was a disciple of heroic type. He came to the Master when he was eighteen years old. He was a medium for a group of spiritualists. During his first visit the Master said to him: "My boy, if you think always of ghosts you will become a ghost, and if you think of God you will become God. Now, which do you prefer?" Niranjan severed all connections with the spiritualists. During his second visit the Master embraced him and said warmly: "Niranjan, my boy, the days are flitting away. When will you realize God? This life will be in vain if you do not realize Him. When will You devote your mind wholly to God?" Niranjan was surprised to see the Master's great anxiety for his spiritual welfare. He was a young man endowed with unusual spiritual parts. He felt disdain for worldly pleasures and was totally guileless, like a child. But he had a violent temper. One day, as he was coming in a country boat to Dakshinewar, some of his fellow passengers began to speak ill of the Master. Finding his protest futile, Niranjan began to rock the boat, threatening to sink it in midstream. That silenced the offenders. When he reported the incident to the Master, he was rebuked for his inability to curb his anger.
  
  --
  
  Jogindranth came of an aristocratic brhmin family of Dakshinewar. His father and relatives shared the popular mistrust of Sri Ramakrishna's sanity. At a very early age the boy developed religious tendencies, spending two or three hours daily in meditation, and his meeting with Sri Ramakrishna deepened his desire for the realization of God. He had a perfect horror of marriage. But at the earnest request of his mother he had had to yield, and he now believed that his spiritual future was doomed. So he kept himself away from the Master.
  
  --
  
  is propitious, then even a hundred thousand marriages cannot injure you. It you desire to lead a householder's life, then bring your wife here one day, and I shall see that she becomes a real companion in your spiritual progress. But if you want to lead a monastic life, then I shall eat up your attachment to the world." Jogin was dumbfounded at these words. He received new strength, and his spirit of renunciation was re-established.
  
  --
  
  The Master knew Hari's passion for Vednta. But he did not wish any of his disciples to become a dry ascetic or a mere bookworm. So he asked Hari to practise Vednta in life by giving up the unreal and following the Real. "But it is not so easy", Sri Ramakrishna said, "to realize the illusoriness of the world. Study alone does not help one very much.
  
  --
  
  Unsurpassed among the woman devotees of the Master in the richness of her devotion and spiritual experiences was Aghoramani Devi, an orthodox brhmin woman. Widowed at an early age, she had dedicated herself completely to spiritual pursuits. Gopl, the Baby Krishna, was her Ideal Deity, whom she worshipped following the Vtsalya attitude of the Vaishnava religion, regarding Him as her own child. Through Him she satisfied her unassuaged maternal love, cooking for Him, feeding Him, bathing Him, and putting Him to bed. This sweet intimacy with Gopl won her the sobriquet of Gopl M, or Gopl's Mother. For forty years she had lived on the bank of the Ganges in a small bare room, her only companions being a threadbare copy of the Ramayana and a bag containing her rosary. At the age of sixty, in 1884, she visited Sri Ramakrishna at Dakshinewar.
  
  --
  
  One early morning at three o'clock, about a year later, Gopl M was about to finish her daily devotions, when she was startled to find Sri Ramakrishna sitting on her left, with his right hand clenched, like the hand of the image of Gopl. She was amazed and caught hold of the hand, whereupon the figure vanished and in its place appeared the real Gopl, her Ideal Deity. She cried aloud with joy. Gopl begged her for butter. She pleaded her poverty and gave Him some dry coconut candies. Gopl sat on her lap, snatched away her rosary, jumped on her shoulders, and moved all about the room. As soon as the day broke she hastened to Dakshinewar like an insane woman. Of course Gopl accompanied her, resting His head on her shoulder. She clearly saw His tiny ruddy feet hanging over her breast. She entered Sri Ramakrishna's room. The Master had fallen into Samdhi. Like a child, he sat on her lap, and she began to feed him with butter, cream, and other delicacies. After some time he regained consciousness and returned to his bed. But the mind of Gopl's Mother was still roaming in another plane.
  
  --
  
  never leaving her for a moment. Then the intensity of her vision was lessened; had it not been, her body would have perished. The Master spoke highly of her exalted spiritual condition and said that such vision of God was a rare thing for ordinary mortals. The fun-loving Master one day confronted the critical Narendranth with this simple-minded woman. No two could have presented a more striking contrast. The Master knew of Narendra's lofty contempt for all visions, and he asked the old lady to narrate her experiences to Narendra. With great hesitation she told him her story. Now and then she interrupted her maternal chatter to ask Narendra: "My son, I am a poor ignorant woman. I don't understand anything. You are so learned. Now tell me if these visions of Gopl are true." As Narendra listened to the story he was profoundly moved. He said, "Yes, mother, they are quite true." Behind his cynicism Narendra, too, possessed a heart full of love and tenderness.
  
  --
  
  One night he had a haemorrhage of the throat. The doctor now diagnosed the illness as cancer. Narendra was the first to break this heart-rending news to the disciples. Within three days the Master was removed to Calcutta for better treatment. At Balarm's house he remained a week until a suitable place could be found at ympukur, in the northern section of Calcutta. During this week he dedicated himself practically without respite to the instruction of those beloved devotees who had been unable to visit him oftener at Dakshinewar. Discourses incessantly flowed from his tongue, and he often went into Samdhi. Dr. Mahendra Sarkr, the celebrated homeopath of Calcutta, was invited to undertake his treatment.
  
  --
  
  The Holy Mother - so Srad Devi had come to be affectionately known by Sri Ramakrishna's devotees - was brought from Dakshinewar to look after the general cooking and to prepare the special diet of the patient. The dwelling space being extremely limited, she had to adapt herself to cramped conditions. At three o'clock in the morning she would finish her bath in the Ganges and then enter a small covered place on the roof, where she spent the whole day cooking and praying. After eleven at night, when the visitors went away, she would come down to her small bedroom on the first floor to enjoy a few hours' sleep. Thus she spent three months, working hard, sleeping little, and praying constantly for the Master's recovery.
  
  --
  
  It took the group only a few days to become adjusted to the new environment. The Holy Mother, assisted by Sri Ramakrishna's niece, Lakshmi Devi, and a few woman devotees, took charge of the cooking for the Master and his attendants. Surendra willingly bore the major portion of the expenses, other householders contributing according to their means. Twelve disciples were constant attendants of the Master: Narendra, Rkhl, Bburm, Niranjan, Jogin, Ltu, Trak, the elder Gopl, Kli, ashi, arat, and the younger Gopl. Srad, Harish, Hari, Gangdhar, and Tulasi visited the Master from time to time and practised sdhana at home. Narendra, preparing for his law examination, brought his books to the garden house in order to continue his studies during the infrequent spare moments. He encouraged his brother disciples to intensify their meditation, scriptural studies, and other spiritual disciplines. They all forgot their relatives and their worldly duties.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  new York
  
  --
  
  The Master, who divined the mood of desperation in M, his resolve to take leave of this 'play-field of deception', put new faith and hope into him by his gracious words of assurance: "God forbid! Why should you take leave of this world? Do you not feel blessed by discovering your Guru? By His grace, what is beyond all imagination or dreams can be easily achieved!" At these words the clouds of despair moved away from the horizon of M.'s mind, and the sunshine of a new hope revealed to him fresh vistas of meaning in life. Referring to this phase of his life, M. used to say, "Behold! where is the resolve to end life, and where, the discovery of God! That is, sorrow should be looked upon as a friend of man. God is all good." ( Ibid P.33.)
  
  --
  
  During the Master's lifetime M. does not seem to have revealed the contents of his diary to any one. There is an unconfirmed tradition that when the Master saw him taking notes, he expressed apprehension at the possibility of his utilising these to publicise him like Keshab Sen; for the Great Master was so full of the spirit of renunciation and humility that he disliked being lionised. It must be for this reason that no one knew about this precious diary of M. for a decade until he brought out selections from it as a pamphlet in English in 1897 with the Holy Mother's blessings and permission. The Holy Mother, being very much pleased to hear parts of the diary read to her in Bengali, wrote to M.: "When I heard the Kathmrita, (Bengali name of the book) I felt as if it was he, the Master, who was saying all that." ( Ibid Part I. P 37.)
  
  --
  
  And Swamiji added a post script to the letter: "Socratic dialogues are Plato all over you are entirely hidden. Moreover, the dramatic part is infinitely beautiful. Everybody likes it here or in the West." Indeed, in order to be unknown, Mahendranath had used the pen-name M., under which the book has been appearing till now. But so great a book cannot remain obscure for long, nor can its author remain unrecognised by the large public in these modern times. M. and his book came to be widely known very soon and to meet the growing demand, a full-sized book, Vol. I of the Gospel, translated by the author himself, was published in 1907 by the Brahmavadin Office, Madras. A second edition of it, revised by the author, was brought out by the Ramakrishna Math, Madras in December 1911, and subsequently a second part, containing new chapters from the original Bengali, was published by the same Math in 1922. The full English translation of the Gospel by Swami Nikhilananda appeared first in 1942.
  

1.00_-_INTRODUCTION, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  There is Sri Aurobindo the philosopher, and Sri Aurobindo the poet, which he was essentially, a visionary of evolution; but not everyone is a philosopher or a poet, much less a seer. But would we not be content if he gave us a way to believe in our own possibilities,
  not only our human but our superhuman and divine possibilities, and not only to believe in them but to discover them ourselves, step by step, to see for ourselves and to become vast, as vast as the earth we love and all the lands and all the seas we hold within us? For there is Sri Aurobindo the explorer, who was also a yogi; did he not say that Yoga is the art of conscious self-finding? 3 It is this exploration of consciousness that we would like to undertake with him. If we proceed calmly, patiently, and with sincerity, bravely facing the difficulties of the road and God knows it is rugged enough there is no reason that the window should not open at some point and let the sun shine on us forever. Actually, it is not one but several windows that open one after another, each time on a wider perspective, a new dimension of our own kingdom; and each time it means a change of consciousness as radical as going from sleep to the waking state. We are going to outline the main stages of these changes of consciousness,
  as Sri Aurobindo experienced them and described them to his disciples in his integral yoga, until they take us to the threshold of a new, still unknown experience that may have the power to change life itself.
  For Sri Aurobindo is not only the explorer of consciousness, he is the builder of a new world. Indeed, what is the point of changing our consciousness if the world around us remains as it is? We would be like Hans Christian Andersen's emperor walking naked through the streets of his capital. Thus, after exploring the outermost frontiers of worlds that were not unknown to ancient wisdom, Sri Aurobindo discovered yet another world, not found on any map, which he called the Supermind or Supramental, and which he sought to draw down upon Earth. He invites us to draw it down a little with him and to take part in the beautiful story, if we like beautiful stories. For the Supermind, Sri Aurobindo tells us, brings a dramatic change to the 3
  
  --
  evolution of consciousness on earth; it is the change of consciousness that will have the power to hope as thoroughly and lastingly as the Mind did when it first appeared in living matter. We will see,
  therefore, how the integral yoga leads to a supramental yoga, or yoga of terrestrial transformation, which we will try to outline only, because the story is still in the making; it is quite new and difficult, and we do not quite know yet where it will take us, or even whether it will succeed.
  That, in fact, depends a little upon us all.

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  It hath been decreed by God that, should any one of His servants intend to travel, he must fix for his wife a time when he will return home. If he return by the promised time, he will have obeyed the bidding of his Lord and shall be numbered by the Pen of His behest among the righteous; otherwise, if there be good reason for delay, he must inform his wife and make the utmost endeavour to return to her. Should neither of these eventualities occur, it behoveth her to wait for a period of nine months, after which there is no impediment to her taking another husband; but should she wait longer, God, verily, loveth those women and men who show forth patience. Obey ye My commandments, and follow not the ungodly, they who have been reckoned as sinners in God's Holy Tablet. If, during the period of her waiting, word should reach her from her husband, she should choose the course that is praiseworthy. He, of a truth, desireth that His servants and His handmaids should be at peace with one another; take heed lest ye do aught that may provoke intransigence amongst you. Thus hath the decree been fixed and the promise come to pass. If, however, news should reach her of her husband's death or murder, and be confirmed by general report, or by the testimony of two just witnesses, it behoveth her to remain single; then, upon completion of the fixed number of months, she is free to adopt the course of her choosing. Such is the bidding of Him Who is mighty and powerful in His command.
  
  --
  
  Should resentment or antipathy arise between husband and wife, he is not to divorce her but to bide in patience throughout the course of one whole year, that perchance the fragrance of affection may be renewed between them. If, upon the completion of this period, their love hath not returned, it is permissible for divorce to take place. God's wisdom, verily, hath encompassed all things. The Lord hath prohibited, in a Tablet inscribed by the Pen of His command, the practice to which ye formerly had recourse when thrice ye had divorced a woman. This He hath done as a favour on His part, that ye may be accounted among the thankful. He who hath divorced his wife may choose, upon the passing of each month, to remarry her when there is mutual affection and consent, so long as she hath not taken another husband. Should she have wed again, then, by this other union, the separation is confirmed and the matter is concluded unless, clearly, her circumstances change. Thus hath the decree been inscribed with majesty in this glorious Tablet by Him Who is the Dawning-place of Beauty.
  
  --
  
  Ye have been enjoined to renew the furnishings of your homes after the passing of each nineteen years; thus hath it been ordained by One Who is Omniscient and All-Perceiving. He, verily, is desirous of refinement, both for you yourselves and for all that ye possess; lay not aside the fear of God and be not of the negligent. Whoso findeth that his means are insufficient to this purpose hath been excused by God, the Ever-Forgiving, the Most Bounteous.
  
  --
  
  The world's equilibrium hath been upset through the vibrating influence of this most great, this new World Order. Mankind's ordered life hath been revolutionized through the agency of this unique, this wondrous System-the like of which mortal eyes have never witnessed.
  

1.00_-_Preface, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  Since the question of Magick has been slightly dealt with in the last chapter of this book, it is perhaps advisable here to state that the interpretations given to certain doctrines and to some of the Hebrew letters border very closely on magical formulae. I have purposely refrained, however, from entering into a deeper consideration of the Practical Qabalah, although several hints of value may be discovered in the explanation of the Tetragrammaton, for example, which may prove of no inconsiderable service. As I have previously remarked, this book is primarily intended as an elementary textbook of the Qabalah, interpreted as a new system for philosophical classification. This must consti- tute my sole excuse for what may appear to be a refusal to deal more adequately with methods of Attainment.
  - Israel Regardie.

1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  I wrote this book down from Frater Perdurabo's dictation at the Villa Caldarazzo, Posilippo, Naples, where I was studying under him, a villa actually prophesied to us long before we reached Naples by that Brother of the A.'.A.'. who appeared to me in Zurich. Any point which was obscure to me was cleared up in some new discourse (the discourses have consequently been re-arranged). Before printing, the whole work was read by several persons of rather less than average intelligence, and any point not quite clear even to them has been elucidated.
  
  --
  
  Each of them, perfectly silent up to the time of the disappearance, came back and immediately began to preach a new law.
  
  --
  
  There will be no need to persuade ourselves at great length that all external influences are likely to be unfavourable. new faces, new scenes will disturb us; even the new habits of life which we undertake for this very purpose of controlling the mind will at first tend to upset it. Still, we must give up our habit of eating too much, and follow the natural rule of eating only when we are hungry, listening to the interior voice which tells us that we have had enough.
  
  --
  
  Before we have been doing this for very long we are almost certain to get impatient, and we shall find that we have to practice many other things in order to assist us in our work. new problems will constantly arise which must be faced, and solved.
  

1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being, #Theosophy, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
   p. 12
   existence. A year after I go again over the same meadow. Other flowers are there. new joy arises in me through them. My joy of the former year will appear as a memory. It is in me; the object which aroused it in me is gone. But the flowers which I. now see are of the same species as those I saw the year before; they have grown in accordance with the same laws as did the others. If I have enlightened myself regarding this species and these laws, I find them again in the flowers of this year as I recognized them in those of the former year. And I shall perhaps muse as follows: "The flowers of last year are gone; my joy in them remains only in my remembrance. It is bound up with my existence alone. That, however, which I recognized in the flowers of the former year and recognize again this year, will remain as long as such flowers grow. That is something that revealed itself to me, but which is not dependent on my existence in the same way as my joy is. My feelings of joy remain in me; the laws, the being of the flowers, remain outside of me in the world."
  

1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Yoga
  
    The other Gods died of their temporality, yet the supreme meaning never dies, it turns into meaning and then into absurdity, and out of the fire and blood of their collision the supreme meaning rises up rejuvenated anew.
  
  --
  
    Believe me. 23 It is no teaching and no instruction that I give you. On what basis should I presume to teach you? I give you news of the way of this man, but not of your own way. My path is not your path therefore I fol. i(v)/ii(r) cannot teach you. The way is within us, but not in Gods, nor in teachings, 24 nor in laws. Within us is the way, the truth, and the life.
  
  --
    Secundus, ch. 9), and the drinking of the bitter drink prepared by the solitary (Libel' Secundus, ch. 20).
    10. The Draft continues: Who drinks this drink will never again thirst for this world nor for the afterlife since he drank crossing and completion. He drank the hot melting river of life which congeals to hard ore in his soul and awaits new melting and mixture (p. 4).
    11. The calligraphic volume has: this-supreme meaning.
  --
  
    [2] The spirit of the depths forced me to say this and at the same time to undergo it against myself since I had not expected it then. I still labored misguidedly under the spirit of this time, and thought differently about the human soul. I thought and spoke much of the soul. I knew in any learned words for her, I had judged her and turned her into a scientific object. 37 I did not consider that my soul cannot be the object of my judgment and knowledge; much more are my judgment and knowledge the objects of my soul. 38
  

1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The effect here, which is our own personality and individuality, is projected by certain conditions as causative factors which do not operate outside our individuality, but are the very constituents of our individuality; therefore, what is called for is a very unusual type of transformation on the part of the effect, for the sake of the knowledge of its cause. All logical and scientific methods fail here because of a completely new type of technique that is expected to be employed. The observing scientist here is not sitting in a laboratory with some instrument to observe the effect, or to know the nature of the cause of a particular effect. The observer is involved in the very act of observation, and herein is the difficulty. The observer is involved in the act of observation, so that the condition of the observer determines the condition of the observation and the nature of the observed effect.
  

1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  Here we have not merely an effort of the will, but an educative process of the understanding. Understanding plays a very serious role in every walk of life. When the understanding is clear, the will can be applied in its implementation. But, the will is not to be applied bereft of understanding. Otherwise, that which the understanding has not accepted as correct will react upon us it will have a deleterious effect upon the entire system. That which the understanding or the reason cannot accept, our whole personality will not accept, and that which we cannot accept cannot become part of our nature; and thus, a new difficulty will be created.
  
  --
  
  The third way to handle desire, which is the only effective course, is sublimation. Sublimation is the only technique to be adopted. Sublimation means boiling, melting and transforming the desire into a new substance altogether. The desire is no longer a desire; it has become something else. The shape of the desire has changed, and it has now become something quite different from what it was. This is the most difficult of all the techniques of self-control. The emotions are the motive power behind our thoughts, will and actions. Whatever we do is generally driven from behind by an emotion, like a dynamo, and this emotion is connected with desire. The desire is inseparable from an emotion. An emotion need not necessarily be a kind of upheaval of feeling. That upheaval is felt only when the desire is very intense. Otherwise, it is like a mild ripple on the surface of a lake. When it becomes very intense it is like a strong wave on the ocean, throwing everything hither and thither nevertheless, it is an emotion.
  

1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  Humanly speaking, Sri Aurobindo is close to us, because once we have respectfully bowed before the "wisdom of the East" and the odd ascetics who seem to make light of all our fine laws, we find that our curiosity has been aroused but not our life; we need a practical truth that will survive our rugged winters. Sri Aurobindo knew our winters well; he experienced them as a student, from the age of seven until twenty. He lived from one lodging house to another at the whim of more or less benevolent landladies, with one meal a day, and not even an overcoat to put on his back, but always laden with books: the French symbolists, Mallarm, Rimbaud, whom he read in the original French long before reading the Bhagavad Gita in translation. To us Sri Aurobindo personifies a unique synthesis.
  He was born in Calcutta on August 15, 1872, the year of Rimbaud's Illuminations, just a few years before Einstein; modern physics had already seen the light of day with Max Planck, and Jules Verne was busy probing the future. Yet, Queen Victoria was about to become Empress of India, and the conquest of Africa was not even completed; it was the turning point from one world to another.
  Historically, it appears that the birth of a new world is often preceded by periods of trial and destruction, but perhaps this is simply a misreading: it may be because the new seeds are already alive that the forces of subversion (or clearing away) are raging. In any event,
  Europe was at the peak of its glory; the game seemed to be played in the West. This is how it appeared to Dr. Krishnadhan Ghose, Sri Aurobindo's father, who had studied medicine in England, and had returned to India completely anglicized. He did not want his three sons, of whom Sri Aurobindo was the youngest, to be in the least contaminated by the "steamy and retrograde" mysticism in which his country seemed to be running to ruin. He did not even want them to know anything of the traditions and languages of India. Sri Aurobindo was therefore provided not only with an English first name, Akroyd,
  --
  not even in India, and he often emphasized that religion and spirituality are not necessarily synonymous: True theocracy, he would write later, is the kingdom of God in man and not the kingdom of a Pope, a priesthood or a sacerdotal class.7
  When he began his life in London, at the age of twelve, Sri Aurobindo knew Latin and French thoroughly. The headmaster of St.
  Paul's School, where he had enrolled, was so surprised at the aptitude of his young student that he personally coached him in Greek. Three years later, Sri Aurobindo could skip half his classes and spend most of his time engrossed in his favorite occupation:reading. Nothing seemed to escape this voracious adolescent (except cricket, which held as little interest for him as Sunday school.) Shelley and "Prometheus Unbound," the French poets, Homer, Aristophanes, and soon all of European thought for he quickly came to master enough German and Italian to read Dante and Goethe in the original peopled a solitude of which he has said nothing. He never sought to form relationships, while Manmohan, the second brother, roamed through London in the company of his friend Oscar Wilde and would make a name for himself in English poetry. Each of the three brothers led his separate life. However, there was nothing austere about Sri Aurobindo, and certainly nothing of the puritan (the prurient,8 as he called it); it was just that he was "elsewhere," and his world was 6

1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle, #The Interior Castle or The Mansions, #Saint Teresa of Avila, #Christianity
  
  1.: WHILE I was begging our Lord to-day to speak for me, since I knew not what to say nor how to commence this work which obedience has laid upon me, an idea occurred to me which I will explain, and which will serve as a foundation for that I am about to write.
  

1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE, #Alice in Wonderland, #Lewis Carroll, #Fiction
  Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole; she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through the doorway. "Oh," said Alice, "how I wish I could shut up like a telescope!
  I think I could, if I only knew how to begin."
  Alice went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate, a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes. This time she found a little bottle on it ("which certainly was not here before," said Alice), and tied 'round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words "DRINK ME" beautifully printed on it in large letters.

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  I should not obtrude my affairs so much on the notice of my readers if very particular inquiries had not been made by my townsmen concerning my mode of life, which some would call impertinent, though they do not appear to me at all impertinent, but, considering the circumstances, very natural and pertinent. Some have asked what I got to eat; if I did not feel lonesome; if I was not afraid; and the like. Others have been curious to learn what portion of my income I devoted to charitable purposes; and some, who have large families, how many poor children I maintained. I will therefore ask those of my readers who feel no particular interest in me to pardon me if I undertake to answer some of these questions in this book. In most books, the _I_, or first person, is omitted; in this it will be retained; that, in respect to egotism, is the main difference. We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking. I should not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well.
  
  --
  Sandwich Islanders as you who read these pages, who are said to live in
  new England; something about your condition, especially your outward condition or circumstances in this world, in this town, what it is, whether it is necessary that it be as bad as it is, whether it cannot be improved as well as not. I have travelled a good deal in Concord; and everywhere, in shops, and offices, and fields, the inhabitants have appeared to me to be doing penance in a thousand remarkable ways. What
  I have heard of Brahmins sitting exposed to four fires and looking in the face of the sun; or hanging suspended, with their heads downward, over flames; or looking at the heavens over their shoulders until it becomes impossible for them to resume their natural position, while from the twist of the neck nothing but liquids can pass into the stomach; or dwelling, chained for life, at the foot of a tree; or measuring with their bodies, like caterpillars, the breadth of vast empires; or standing on one leg on the tops of pillars,even these forms of conscious penance are hardly more incredible and astonishing than the scenes which I daily witness. The twelve labors of Hercules were trifling in comparison with those which my neighbors have undertaken; for they were only twelve, and had an end; but I could never see that these men slew or captured any monster or finished any labor. They have no friend Iolas to burn with a hot iron the root of the hydras head, but as soon as one head is crushed, two spring up.
  --
  
  When we consider what, to use the words of the catechism, is the chief end of man, and what are the true necessaries and means of life, it appears as if men had deliberately chosen the common mode of living because they preferred it to any other. Yet they honestly think there is no choice left. But alert and healthy natures remember that the sun rose clear. It is never too late to give up our prejudices. No way of thinking or doing, however ancient, can be trusted without proof. What everybody echoes or in silence passes by as true to-day may turn out to be falsehood to-morrow, mere smoke of opinion, which some had trusted for a cloud that would sprinkle fertilizing rain on their fields. What old people say you cannot do you try and find that you can. Old deeds for old people, and new deeds for new. Old people did not know enough once, perchance, to fetch fresh fuel to keep the fire a-going; new people put a little dry wood under a pot, and are whirled round the globe with the speed of birds, in a way to kill old people, as the phrase is. Age is no better, hardly so well, qualified for an instructor as youth, for it has not profited so much as it has lost.
  
  --
  Food and Shelter. The necessaries of life for man in this climate may, accurately enough, be distributed under the several heads of Food,
  Shelter, Clothing, and Fuel; for not till we have secured these are we prepared to entertain the true problems of life with freedom and a prospect of success. Man has invented, not only houses, but clothes and cooked food; and possibly from the accidental discovery of the warmth of fire, and the consequent use of it, at first a luxury, arose the present necessity to sit by it. We observe cats and dogs acquiring the same second nature. By proper Shelter and Clothing we legitimately retain our own internal heat; but with an excess of these, or of Fuel, that is, with an external heat greater than our own internal, may not cookery properly be said to begin? Darwin, the naturalist, says of the inhabitants of Tierra del Fuego, that while his own party, who were well clothed and sitting close to a fire, were far from too warm, these naked savages, who were farther off, were observed, to his great surprise, to be streaming with perspiration at undergoing such a roasting. So, we are told, the new Hollander goes naked with impunity, while the European shivers in his clothes. Is it impossible to combine the hardiness of these savages with the intellectualness of the civilized man? According to Liebig, mans body is a stove, and food the fuel which keeps up the internal combustion in the lungs. In cold weather we eat more, in warm less. The animal heat is the result of a slow combustion, and disease and death take place when this is too rapid; or for want of fuel, or from some defect in the draught, the fire goes out. Of course the vital heat is not to be confounded with fire; but so much for analogy. It appears, therefore, from the above list, that the expression, _animal life_, is nearly synonymous with the expression, _animal heat_; for while Food may be regarded as the Fuel which keeps up the fire within us,and Fuel serves only to prepare that
  Food or to increase the warmth of our bodies by addition from without,Shelter and Clothing also serve only to retain the _heat_ thus generated and absorbed.
  --
  The grand necessity, then, for our bodies, is to keep warm, to keep the vital heat in us. What pains we accordingly take, not only with our
  Food, and Clothing, and Shelter, but with our beds, which are our night-clothes, robbing the nests and breasts of birds to prepare this shelter within a shelter, as the mole has its bed of grass and leaves at the end of its burrow! The poor man is wont to complain that this is a cold world; and to cold, no less physical than social, we refer directly a great part of our ails. The summer, in some climates, makes possible to man a sort of Elysian life. Fuel, except to cook his Food, is then unnecessary; the sun is his fire, and many of the fruits are sufficiently cooked by its rays; while Food generally is more various, and more easily obtained, and Clothing and Shelter are wholly or half unnecessary. At the present day, and in this country, as I find by my own experience, a few implements, a knife, an axe, a spade, a wheelbarrow, &c., and for the studious, lamplight, stationery, and access to a few books, rank next to necessaries, and can all be obtained at a trifling cost. Yet some, not wise, go to the other side of the globe, to barbarous and unhealthy regions, and devote themselves to trade for ten or twenty years, in order that they may live,that is, keep comfortably warm,and die in new England at last. The luxuriously rich are not simply kept comfortably warm, but unnaturally hot; as I implied before, they are cooked, of course _ la mode_.
  
  --
  
  So many autumn, ay, and winter days, spent outside the town, trying to hear what was in the wind, to hear and carry it express! I well-nigh sunk all my capital in it, and lost my own breath into the bargain, running in the face of it. If it had concerned either of the political parties, depend upon it, it would have appeared in the Gazette with the earliest intelligence. At other times watching from the observatory of some cliff or tree, to telegraph any new arrival; or waiting at evening on the hill-tops for the sky to fall, that I might catch something, though I never caught much, and that, manna-wise, would dissolve again in the sun.
  
  --
  
  I have always endeavored to acquire strict business habits; they are indispensable to every man. If your trade is with the Celestial Empire, then some small counting house on the coast, in some Salem harbor, will be fixture enough. You will export such articles as the country affords, purely native products, much ice and pine timber and a little granite, always in native bottoms. These will be good ventures. To oversee all the details yourself in person; to be at once pilot and captain, and owner and underwriter; to buy and sell and keep the accounts; to read every letter received, and write or read every letter sent; to superintend the discharge of imports night and day; to be upon many parts of the coast almost at the same time;often the richest freight will be discharged upon a Jersey shore;to be your own telegraph, unweariedly sweeping the horizon, speaking all passing vessels bound coastwise; to keep up a steady despatch of commodities, for the supply of such a distant and exorbitant market; to keep yourself informed of the state of the markets, prospects of war and peace every where, and anticipate the tendencies of trade and civilization,taking advantage of the results of all exploring expeditions, using new passages and all improvements in navigation;charts to be studied, the position of reefs and new lights and buoys to be ascertained, and ever, and ever, the logarithmic tables to be corrected, for by the error of some calculator the vessel often splits upon a rock that should have reached a friendly pier,there is the untold fate of La Perouse;universal science to be kept pace with, studying the lives of all great discoverers and navigators, great adventurers and merchants, from Hanno and the Phnicians down to our day; in fine, account of stock to be taken from time to time, to know how you stand. It is a labor to task the faculties of a man,such problems of profit and loss, of interest, of tare and tret, and gauging of all kinds in it, as demand a universal knowledge.
  
  --
  Every day our garments become more assimilated to ourselves, receiving the impress of the wearers character, until we hesitate to lay them aside, without such delay and medical appliances and some such solemnity even as our bodies. No man ever stood the lower in my estimation for having a patch in his clothes; yet I am sure that there is greater anxiety, commonly, to have fashionable, or at least clean and unpatched clothes, than to have a sound conscience. But even if the rent is not mended, perhaps the worst vice betrayed is improvidence. I sometimes try my acquaintances by such tests as this;who could wear a patch, or two extra seams only, over the knee? Most behave as if they believed that their prospects for life would be ruined if they should do it. It would be easier for them to hobble to town with a broken leg than with a broken pantaloon. Often if an accident happens to a gentlemans legs, they can be mended; but if a similar accident happens to the legs of his pantaloons, there is no help for it; for he considers, not what is truly respectable, but what is respected. We know but few men, a great many coats and breeches. Dress a scarecrow in your last shift, you standing shiftless by, who would not soonest salute the scarecrow? Passing a cornfield the other day, close by a hat and coat on a stake, I recognized the owner of the farm. He was only a little more weather-beaten than when I saw him last. I have heard of a dog that barked at every stranger who approached his masters premises with clothes on, but was easily quieted by a naked thief. It is an interesting question how far men would retain their relative rank if they were divested of their clothes. Could you, in such a case, tell surely of any company of civilized men, which belonged to the most respected class? When Madam Pfeiffer, in her adventurous travels round the world, from east to west, had got so near home as Asiatic Russia, she says that she felt the necessity of wearing other than a travelling dress, when she went to meet the authorities, for she was now in a civilized country, where people are judged of by their clothes.
  Even in our democratic new England towns the accidental possession of wealth, and its manifestation in dress and equipage alone, obtain for the possessor almost universal respect. But they yield such respect, numerous as they are, are so far heathen, and need to have a missionary sent to them. Beside, clothes introduced sewing, a kind of work which you may call endless; a womans dress, at least, is never done.
  
  
  A man who has at length found something to do will not need to get a new suit to do it in; for him the old will do, that has lain dusty in the garret for an indeterminate period. Old shoes will serve a hero longer than they have served his valet,if a hero ever has a valet,bare feet are older than shoes, and he can make them do. Only they who go to soires and legislative halls must have new coats, coats to change as often as the man changes in them. But if my jacket and trousers, my hat and shoes, are fit to worship God in, they will do; will they not? Who ever saw his old clothes,his old coat, actually worn out, resolved into its primitive elements, so that it was not a deed of charity to bestow it on some poor boy, by him perchance to be bestowed on some poorer still, or shall we say richer, who could do with less? I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes. If there is not a new man, how can the new clothes be made to fit? If you have any enterprise before you, try it in your old clothes. All men want, not something to _do with_, but something to _do_, or rather something to _be_. Perhaps we should never procure a new suit, however ragged or dirty the old, until we have so conducted, so enterprised or sailed in some way, that we feel like new men in the old, and that to retain it would be like keeping new wine in old bottles. Our moulting season, like that of the fowls, must be a crisis in our lives. The loon retires to solitary ponds to spend it. Thus also the snake casts its slough, and the caterpillar its wormy coat, by an internal industry and expansion; for clothes are but our outmost cuticle and mortal coil. Otherwise we shall be found sailing under false colors, and be inevitably cashiered at last by our own opinion, as well as that of mankind.
  
  --
  
  On the whole, I think that it cannot be maintained that dressing has in this or any country risen to the dignity of an art. At present men make shift to wear what they can get. Like shipwrecked sailors, they put on what they can find on the beach, and at a little distance, whether of space or time, laugh at each others masquerade. Every generation laughs at the old fashions, but follows religiously the new. We are amused at beholding the costume of Henry VIII., or Queen Elizabeth, as much as if it was that of the King and Queen of the Cannibal Islands.
  
  --
  
  The childish and savage taste of men and women for new patterns keeps how many shaking and squinting through kaleidoscopes that they may discover the particular figure which this generation requires today.
  
  --
  they burrow themselves in the earth for their first shelter under some hillside, and, casting the soil aloft upon timber, they make a smoky fire against the earth, at the highest side. They did not provide them houses, says he, till the earth, by the Lords blessing, brought forth bread to feed them, and the first years crop was so light that
  they were forced to cut their bread very thin for a long season. The secretary of the Province of new Netherland, writing in Dutch, in 1650, for the information of those who wished to take up land there, states more particularly that those in new Netherland, and especially in new
  England, who have no means to build farmhouses at first according to their wishes, dig a square pit in the ground, cellar fashion, six or seven feet deep, as long and as broad as they think proper, case the earth inside with wood all round the wall, and line the wood with the bark of trees or something else to prevent the caving in of the earth; floor this cellar with plank, and wainscot it overhead for a ceiling, raise a roof of spars clear up, and cover the spars with bark or green sods, so that they can live dry and warm in these houses with their entire families for two, three, and four years, it being understood that partitions are run through those cellars which are adapted to the size of the family. The wealthy and principal men in new England, in the beginning of the colonies, commenced their first dwelling houses in this fashion for two reasons; firstly, in order not to waste time in building, and not to want food the next season; secondly, in order not to discourage poor laboring people whom they brought over in numbers from Fatherland. In the course of three or four years, when the country became adapted to agriculture, they built themselves handsome houses, spending on them several thousands.
  
  --
  
  I hewed the main timbers six inches square, most of the studs on two sides only, and the rafters and floor timbers on one side, leaving the rest of the bark on, so that they were just as straight and much stronger than sawed ones. Each stick was carefully mortised or tenoned by its stump, for I had borrowed other tools by this time. My days in the woods were not very long ones; yet I usually carried my dinner of bread and butter, and read the newspaper in which it was wrapped, at noon, sitting amid the green pine boughs which I had cut off, and to my bread was imparted some of their fragrance, for my hands were covered with a thick coat of pitch. Before I had done I was more the friend than the foe of the pine tree, though I had cut down some of them, having become better acquainted with it. Sometimes a rambler in the wood was attracted by the sound of my axe, and we chatted pleasantly over the chips which I had made.
  
  
  By the middle of April, for I made no haste in my work, but rather made the most of it, my house was framed and ready for the raising. I had already bought the shanty of James Collins, an Irishman who worked on the Fitchburg Railroad, for boards. James Collins shanty was considered an uncommonly fine one. When I called to see it he was not at home. I walked about the outside, at first unobserved from within, the window was so deep and high. It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap. The roof was the soundest part, though a good deal warped and made brittle by the sun. Door-sill there was none, but a perennial passage for the hens under the door board. Mrs. C. came to the door and asked me to view it from the inside. The hens were driven in by my approach. It was dark, and had a dirt floor for the most part, dank, clammy, and aguish, only here a board and there a board which would not bear removal. She lighted a lamp to show me the inside of the roof and the walls, and also that the board floor extended under the bed, warning me not to step into the cellar, a sort of dust hole two feet deep. In her own words, they were good boards overhead, good boards all around, and a good window,of two whole squares originally, only the cat had passed out that way lately. There was a stove, a bed, and a place to sit, an infant in the house where it was born, a silk parasol, gilt-framed looking-glass, and a patent new coffee mill nailed to an oak sapling, all told. The bargain was soon concluded, for James had in the meanwhile returned. I to pay four dollars and twenty-five cents to-night, he to vacate at five to-morrow morning, selling to nobody else meanwhile: I to take possession at six. It were well, he said, to be there early, and anticipate certain indistinct but wholly unjust claims on the score of ground rent and fuel. This he assured me was the only encumbrance. At six I passed him and his family on the road. One large bundle held their all,bed, coffee-mill, looking-glass, hens,all but the cat, she took to the woods and became a wild cat, and, as I learned afterward, trod in a trap set for woodchucks, and so became a dead cat at last.
  
  --
  
  True, there are architects so called in this country, and I have heard of one at least possessed with the idea of making architectural ornaments have a core of truth, a necessity, and hence a beauty, as if it were a revelation to him. All very well perhaps from his point of view, but only a little better than the common dilettantism. A sentimental reformer in architecture, he began at the cornice, not at the foundation. It was only how to put a core of truth within the ornaments, that every sugar plum in fact might have an almond or caraway seed in it,though I hold that almonds are most wholesome without the sugar,and not how the inhabitant, the indweller, might build truly within and without, and let the ornaments take care of themselves. What reasonable man ever supposed that ornaments were something outward and in the skin merely,that the tortoise got his spotted shell, or the shellfish its mother-o-pearl tints, by such a contract as the inhabitants of Broadway their Trinity Church? But a man has no more to do with the style of architecture of his house than a tortoise with that of its shell: nor need the soldier be so idle as to try to paint the precise color of his virtue on his standard. The enemy will find it out. He may turn pale when the trial comes. This man seemed to me to lean over the cornice, and timidly whisper his half truth to the rude occupants who really knew it better than he. What of architectural beauty I now see, I know has gradually grown from within outward, out of the necessities and character of the indweller, who is the only builder,out of some unconscious truthfulness, and nobleness, without ever a thought for the appearance and whatever additional beauty of this kind is destined to be produced will be preceded by a like unconscious beauty of life. The most interesting dwellings in this country, as the painter knows, are the most unpretending, humble log huts and cottages of the poor commonly; it is the life of the inhabitants whose shells they are, and not any peculiarity in their surfaces merely, which makes them _picturesque;_ and equally interesting will be the citizens suburban box, when his life shall be as simple and as agreeable to the imagination, and there is as little straining after effect in the style of his dwelling. A great proportion of architectural ornaments are literally hollow, and a September gale would strip them off, like borrowed plumes, without injury to the substantials. They can do without _architecture_ who have no olives nor wines in the cellar. What if an equal ado were made about the ornaments of style in literature, and the architects of our bibles spent as much time about their cornices as the architects of our churches do? So are made the _belles-lettres_ and the _beaux-arts_ and their professors.
  
  --
  Those things for which the most money is demanded are never the things which the student most wants. Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made. The mode of founding a college is, commonly, to get up a subscription of dollars and cents, and then following blindly the principles of a division of labor to its extreme, a principle which should never be followed but with circumspection,to call in a contractor who makes this a subject of speculation, and he employs
  Irishmen or other operatives actually to lay the foundations, while the students that are to be are said to be fitting themselves for it; and for these oversights successive generations have to pay. I think that it would be _better than this_, for the students, or those who desire to be benefited by it, even to lay the foundation themselves. The student who secures his coveted leisure and retirement by systematically shirking any labor necessary to man obtains but an ignoble and unprofitable leisure, defrauding himself of the experience which alone can make leisure fruitful. But, says one, you do not mean that the students should go to work with their hands instead of their heads? I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not _play_ life, or _study_ it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly _live_ it from beginning to end. How could youths better learn to live than by at once trying the experiment of living? Methinks this would exercise their minds as much as mathematics. If I wished a boy to know something about the arts and sciences, for instance, I would not pursue the common course, which is merely to send him into the neighborhood of some professor, where any thing is professed and practised but the art of life;to survey the world through a telescope or a microscope, and never with his natural eye; to study chemistry, and not learn how his bread is made, or mechanics, and not learn how it is earned; to discover new satellites to Neptune, and not detect the motes in his eyes, or to what vagabond he is a satellite himself; or to be devoured by the monsters that swarm all around him, while contemplating the monsters in a drop of vinegar.
  
  --
  
  As with our colleges, so with a hundred modern improvements; there is an illusion about them; there is not always a positive advance. The devil goes on exacting compound interest to the last for his early share and numerous succeeding investments in them. Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end, an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at; as railroads lead to Boston or new York. We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate. Either is in such a predicament as the man who was earnest to be introduced to a distinguished deaf woman, but when he was presented, and one end of her ear trumpet was put into his hand, had nothing to say. As if the main object were to talk fast and not to talk sensibly. We are eager to tunnel under the Atlantic and bring the old world some weeks nearer to the new; but perchance the first news that will leak through into the broad, flapping American ear will be that the Princess Adelaide has the whooping cough. After all, the man whose horse trots a mile in a minute does not carry the most important messages; he is not an evangelist, nor does he come round eating locusts and wild honey. I doubt if Flying Childers ever carried a peck of corn to mill.
  
  --
  
  Every new Englander might easily raise all his own breadstuffs in this land of rye and Indian corn, and not depend on distant and fluctuating markets for them. Yet so far are we from simplicity and independence that, in Concord, fresh and sweet meal is rarely sold in the shops, and hominy and corn in a still coarser form are hardly used by any. For the most part the farmer gives to his cattle and hogs the grain of his own producing, and buys flour, which is at least no more wholesome, at a greater cost, at the store. I saw that I could easily raise my bushel or two of rye and Indian corn, for the former will grow on the poorest land, and the latter does not require the best, and grind them in a hand-mill, and so do without rice and pork; and if I must have some concentrated sweet, I found by experiment that I could make a very good molasses either of pumpkins or beets, and I knew that I needed only to set out a few maples to obtain it more easily still, and while these were growing I could use various substitutes beside those which I have named. For, as the Forefathers sang,
  
  --
  Thus I could avoid all trade and barter, so far as my food was concerned, and having a shelter already, it would only remain to get clothing and fuel. The pantaloons which I now wear were woven in a farmers family,thank Heaven there is so much virtue still in man; for
  I think the fall from the farmer to the operative as great and memorable as that from the man to the farmer;and in a new country, fuel is an encumbrance. As for a habitat, if I were not permitted still to squat, I might purchase one acre at the same price for which the land I cultivated was soldnamely, eight dollars and eight cents. But as it was, I considered that I enhanced the value of the land by squatting on it.
  
  --
  Indeed, the more you have of such things the poorer you are. Each load looks as if it contained the contents of a dozen shanties; and if one shanty is poor, this is a dozen times as poor. Pray, for what do we
  _move_ ever but to get rid of our furniture, our _exuvi_; at last to go from this world to another newly furnished, and leave this to be burned? It is the same as if all these traps were buckled to a mans belt, and he could not move over the rough country where our lines are cast without dragging them,dragging his trap. He was a lucky fox that left his tail in the trap. The muskrat will gnaw his third leg off to be free. No wonder man has lost his elasticity. How often he is at a dead set! Sir, if I may be so bold, what do you mean by a dead set?
  If you are a seer, whenever you meet a man you will see all that he owns, ay, and much that he pretends to disown, behind him, even to his kitchen furniture and all the trumpery which he saves and will not burn, and he will appear to be harnessed to it and making what headway he can. I think that the man is at a dead set who has got through a knot hole or gateway where his sledge load of furniture cannot follow him. I cannot but feel compassion when I hear some trig, compact-looking man, seemingly free, all girded and ready, speak of his
  --
  
  The customs of some savage nations might, perchance, be profitably imitated by us, for they at least go through the semblance of casting their slough annually; they have the idea of the thing, whether they have the reality or not. Would it not be well if we were to celebrate such a busk, or feast of first fruits, as Bartram describes to have been the custom of the Mucclasse Indians? When a town celebrates the busk, says he, having previously provided themselves with new clothes, new pots, pans, and other household utensils and furniture, they collect all their worn out clothes and other despicable things, sweep and cleanse their houses, squares, and the whole town of their filth, which with all the remaining grain and other old provisions they cast together into one common heap, and consume it with fire. After having taken medicine, and fasted for three days, all the fire in the town is extinguished. During this fast they abstain from the gratification of every appetite and passion whatever. A general amnesty is proclaimed; all malefactors may return to their town.
  
  On the fourth morning, the high priest, by rubbing dry wood together, produces new fire in the public square, from whence every habitation in the town is supplied with the new and pure flame.
  
  They then feast on the new corn and fruits, and dance and sing for three days, and the four following days they receive visits and rejoice with their friends from neighboring towns who have in like manner purified and prepared themselves.
  
  --
  
  There is no odor so bad as that which arises from goodness tainted. It is human, it is divine, carrion. If I knew for a certainty that a man was coming to my house with the conscious design of doing me good, I should run for my life, as from that dry and parching wind of the
  African deserts called the simoom, which fills the mouth and nose and ears and eyes with dust till you are suffocated, for fear that I should get some of his good done to me,some of its virus mingled with my blood. No,in this case I would rather suffer evil the natural way. A man is not a good _man_ to me because he will feed me if I should be starving, or warm me if I should be freezing, or pull me out of a ditch if I should ever fall into one. I can find you a newfoundland dog that will do as much. Philanthropy is not love for ones fellow-man in the broadest sense. Howard was no doubt an exceedingly kind and worthy man in his way, and has his reward; but, comparatively speaking, what are a hundred Howards to _us_, if their philanthropy do not help _us_ in our best estate, when we are most worthy to be helped? I never heard of a philanthropic meeting in which it was sincerely proposed to do any good to me, or the like of me.
  
  
  The Jesuits were quite balked by those Indians who, being burned at the stake, suggested new modes of torture to their tormentors. Being superior to physical suffering, it sometimes chanced that they were superior to any consolation which the missionaries could offer; and the law to do as you would be done by fell with less persuasiveness on the ears of those who, for their part, did not care how they were done by, who loved their enemies after a new fashion, and came very near freely forgiving them all they did.
  
  --
  
  Philanthropy is almost the only virtue which is sufficiently appreciated by mankind. Nay, it is greatly overrated; and it is our selfishness which overrates it. A robust poor man, one sunny day here in Concord, praised a fellow-townsman to me, because, as he said, he was kind to the poor; meaning himself. The kind uncles and aunts of the race are more esteemed than its true spiritual fathers and mothers. I once heard a reverend lecturer on England, a man of learning and intelligence, after enumerating her scientific, literary, and political worthies, Shakespeare, Bacon, Cromwell, Milton, newton, and others, speak next of her Christian heroes, whom, as if his profession required it of him, he elevated to a place far above all the rest, as the greatest of the great. They were Penn, Howard, and Mrs. Fry. Every one must feel the falsehood and cant of this. The last were not Englands best men and women; only, perhaps, her best philanthropists.
  
  --
  Being a microcosm himself, he discovers, and it is a true discovery, and he is the man to make it,that the world has been eating green apples; to his eyes, in fact, the globe itself is a great green apple, which there is danger awful to think of that the children of men will nibble before it is ripe; and straightway his drastic philanthropy seeks out the Esquimaux and the Patagonian, and embraces the populous
  Indian and Chinese villages; and thus, by a few years of philanthropic activity, the powers in the mean while using him for their own ends, no doubt, he cures himself of his dyspepsia, the globe acquires a faint blush on one or both of its cheeks, as if it were beginning to be ripe, and life loses its crudity and is once more sweet and wholesome to live. I never dreamed of any enormity greater than I have committed. I never knew, and never shall know, a worse man than myself.
  
  --
     Achilles, Theseus. Back to thy loathd cell;
     And when thou seest the new enlightened sphere,
     Study to know but what those worthies were.

1.01_-_Foreward, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  up their own conjectural meanings of the Vedic verses and give
  a new presentation often arbitrary and imaginative. What they
  sought for in the Veda was the early history of India, its society,
  --
  
  That was the general aspect of the ancient worship in Greece, Rome, India and among other ancient peoples. But in all these countries these gods began to assume a higher, a psychological function; Pallas Athene who may have been originally a Dawn-Goddess springing in flames from the head of Zeus, the Sky-God, Dyaus of the Veda, has in classical Greece a higher function and was identified by the Romans with their Minerva, the Goddess of learning and wisdom; similarly, Saraswati, a river Goddess, becomes in India the goddess of wisdom, learning and the arts and crafts: all the Greek deities have undergone a change in this direction - Apollo, the Sun-God, has become a god of poetry and prophecy, Hephaestus the Fire-God a divine smith, god of labour. In India the process was arrested half-way, and the Vedic Gods developed their psychological functions but retained more fixedly their external character and for higher purposes gave place to a new pantheon. They had to give precedence to Puranic deities who developed out of the early company but assumed larger cosmic functions, Vishnu, Rudra, Brahma - developing from the Vedic Brihaspati, or Brahmanaspati, - Shiva, Lakshmi, Durga. Thus in India the change in the gods was less complete, the earlier deities became the inferior divinities of the Puranic pantheon and this was largely due to the survival of the Rig Veda in which their psychological and their external functions co-existed and are both given a powerful emphasis; there was no such early literary record to maintain the original features of the Gods of Greece and Rome.
  
  --
  the knowledge and the inner sense of the Veda were almost
  lost and the Rishis who still knew had to save it by handing it
  down through initiation to disciples and at a last stage outward

1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  
  Fundamental Considerations Anyone today who considers the emergence of a new era of mankind as a certainty and expresses the conviction that our rescue from collapse and chaos could come about by virtue of a new attitude and a new formation of mans consciousness, will surely elicit less credence than those who have heralded the decline of the West. Contemporaries of totalitarianism, World War II, and the atom bomb seem more likely to abandon even their very last stand than to realize the possibility of a transition, a new constellation or a transformation, or even to evince any readiness to take a leap into tomorrow, although the harbingers of tomorrow, the evidence of transformation, and other signs of the new and imminent cannot have gone entirely unnoticed. Such a reaction, the reaction of a mentality headed for a fall, is only too typical of man in transition.
  
  The present book is, in fact, the account of the nascence of a new world and a new consciousness. It is based not an ideas or speculations but on insights into mankinds mutations from its primordial beginnings up to the present - on perhaps novel insights into the forms of consciousness manifest in the various epochs of mankind: insights into the powers behind their realization as manifest between origin and the present, and active in origin and the present.
  
  --
  
  By returning to the very sources of human development as we observe all of the structures of consciousness, and moving from there toward our present day and our contemporary situation and consciousness, we can not only discover the past and the present moment of our existence but also gain a view into the future which reveals the traits of a new reality amidst the decline of our age.
  
  It is our belief that the essential traits of a new age and a new reality are discernible in nearly all forms of contemporary expression, whether in the creations of modern art, or in the recent findings of the natural sciences, or in the results of the humanities and sciences of the mind. Moreover we are in a position to define this new reality in such a way as to emphasize one of its most significant elements. Our definition is a natural corollary of the recognition that mans coming to awareness is inseparably bound to his consciousness of space and time.
  
  Scarcely five hundred years ago, during the Renaissance, an unmistakable reorganization of our consciousness occurred: the discovery of perspective which opened up the three-dimensionality of space. This discovery is so closely linked with the entire intellectual attitude of the modern epoch that we have felt obliged to call this age the age of perspectivity and characterize the age immediately preceding it as the unperspectival age. These definitions, by recognizing a fundamental characteristic of these eras, lead to the further appropriate definition of the age of the dawning new consciousness as the aperspectival age, a definition supported not only by the results of modern physics, but also by developments in the visual arts and literature, where the incorporation of time as a fourth dimension into previously spatial conceptions has formed the initial basis for manifesting the new.Aperspectival is not to be thought of as merely the opposite or negation of perspectival; the antithesis of perspectival is unperspectival. The distinction in meaning suggested by the three terms unperspectival, perspectival, and aperspectival is analogous to that of the terms illogical, logical, and alogical or immoral, moral, and amoral. We have employed here the designation aperspectival to clearly emphasize the need of overcoming the mere antithesis of affirmation and negation. The so-called primal words (Urworte), for example, evidence two antithetic connotations: Latin altus meant high as well as low; sacer meant sacred as well as cursed. Such primal words as these formed an undifferentiated psychically-stressed unity whose bivalent nature was definitely familiar to the early Egyptians and Greeks. This is no longer the case with our present sense of language; consequently, we have required a term that transcends equally the ambivalence of the primal connotations and the dualism of antonyms or conceptual opposites.
  
  --
  
  When we have grasped this it is at once apparent that we can extricate ourselves from our dangerous situation only by ordering ou relationships to ourselves, to our I or Ego, and not just our relationships with others, to the Thou, that is to God, the world, our fellow man and neighbor. That seems possible only if we are willing to assimilate the entirety of our human existence into our awareness. This means that all of our structures of awareness that form and support our present consciousness structure will have to be integrated into a new and more intensive form, which would in fact unlock a new reality. To that end we must constantly relive and re-experience in a decisive sense the full depth of our past. The adage that anyone who denies and condemns his past also abnegates his future is valid for the individual as well as for mankind. Our plea for an appropriate ordering and conscious realization of our relationships to the I as well as the Thou chiefly concerns the ordering and conscious recognition of our origin, and of all factors leading to the present. It is only in terms of man in his entirety that we shall achieve the necessary detachment from the present situation, Le., from both our unperspectival ties to the group or collective, and our perspectival attachment to the separated, individual Ego. When we become aware of the exhausted residua of past or passing forms of our understanding of reality we will recognize more clearly the signs of the inevitable new. We will also sense that there are new sources which can be tapped: the sources of the aperspectival world that can liberate us from the two exhausted and deficient forms which have become almost completely invalid and are certainly no longer all-inclusive or decisive.
  
  --
  
  1. A mere interpretation of our times is inadequate. We must furnish concrete evidence of phenomena that are clearly revealed as being new and that transform not only our countenance, but the very countenance of time.
  
  --
  
  It will be our task to demonstrate that the first stirrings of the new can be found in all areas of human expression, and that they inherently share a common character. This demonstration can succeed only if we have certain knowledge about the manifestations of both our past and our present. Consequently, the task of the present work will be to work out the foundations of the past and the present which are also the basis of the new consciousness and the new reality arising therefrom. It will be the task of the second part to define the new emergent consciousness structure to the extent that its inceptions are already visible.
  
  We shall therefore beginwith the evidence and not with idealistic constructions; in the face of present-day weapons of annihilation, such constructions have less chance of survival than ever before. But as we shall see, weapons and nuclear fission are not the only realities to be dealt with; spiritual reality in its intensified form is also becoming effectual and real. This new spiritual reality is without question our only security that the threat of material destruction can be averted. Its realization alone seems able to guarantee mans continuing existence in the face of the powers of technology, rationality, and chaotic emotion. If our consciousness, that is, the individual persons awareness, vigilance, and clarity of vision, cannot master the new reality and make possible its realization, then the prophets of doom will have been correct. Other alternatives are an illusion; consequently, great demands are placed on us, and each one of us have been given a grave responsibility, not merely to survey but to actually traverse the path opening before us.
  
  --
  
  What is of interest to us within the present context is not the historical predicament occasioned by the collision of peoples of differing might, but rather the supersession of the magic group-consciousness and its most potent weapon, spell-casting, by rational, ego-consciousness. Today this rational consciousness, with nuclear fission its strongest weapon, is confronted by a similar catastrophic situation of failure; consequently, it too can be vanquished by a new consciousness structure. We are convinced that there are powers arising from within ourselves that are already at work overcoming the deficiency and dubious nature of our rational ego-consciousness via the new aperspectival awareness whose manifestations are surging forth everywhere. The aperspective consciousness structure is a consciousness of the whole, an integral consciousness encompassing all time and embracing both mans distant past and his approaching future as a living present. The new spiritual attitude can take root only through an insightful process of intensive awareness. This attitude must emerge from its present concealment and latency and become effective, and thereby prepare the transparency of the world and man in which spirituality can manifest itself.
  
  The first part of the present work, which is devoted to the foundations of the aperspectival world, is intended to furnish convincing evidence for this new spiritual attitude. This evidence rests an two guiding principles whose validity will gradually become clear:
  
  --
  
  Since the second part of this work is devoted to manifestations of the new consciousness, the first part must clarify questions relating to the manifestations of previous and present consciousness structures. We shall attempt to demonstrate the incipient concretion of time and the spiritual dimension which are preconditions of the aperspectival world. We shall also attempt to furnish evidence of the increasing efficacy of that spiritual reality (which is neither a mere psychic state nor an intellectual-rational form of representation). This will bring out the validity of our second guiding principle:
  
  --
  
  It is perhaps unnecessary to reiterate that we cannot employ the methods derived from and dependent an our present consciousness structure to investigate different structures of consciousness, but will have to adapt our method to the specific structure under investigation. Yet if we relinquish a unitary methodology we do not necessarily regress to an unmethodological or irrational attitude, or to a kind of conjuration or mystical contemplation. Contemporary methods employ predominantly dualistic procedures that do not extend beyond simple subject-object relationships; they limit our understanding to what is commensurate with the present Western mentality. Even where the measurements of contemporary methodologies are based primarily an quantitative criteria, they are all vitiated by the problem of the antithesis between measure and mass (as we will discuss later in detail). Our method is not just a measured assessment, but above and beyond this an attempt at diaphany or rendering transparent. With its aid, whatever lies behind (past) and ahead of (future) the currently dominant mentality becomes accessible to the new subject-object relationship. Although this new relationship is no longer dualistic, it does not threaten man with a loss of identity, or with his being equated with an object.
  
  Although this new method is still in its infancy, we are nevertheless compelled to make use of it.
  
  In summary, it should be said that our description does not deal with a new image of the world, nor with a new Weltanschauung, nor with a new conception of the world. A new Image would be no more than the creation of a myth, since all imagery has a predominantly mythical nature. A new Weltanschauung wouldbe nothing else than a new mysticism and irrationality, as mythical characteristics are inherent in all contemplation to the extent that it is merely visionary; and a new conception of the world would be nothing else than yet another standard rationalistic construction of the present, for conceptualization has an essentially rational and abstract nature.
  
  Our concern is with a new reality - a reality functioning and effectual integrally, in which intensity and action, the effective and the effect co-exist; one where origin, by virtue of presentiation, blossoms forth anew; and one in which the present is all-encompassing and entire. Integral reality is the worlds transparency, a perceiving of the world as truth: a mutual perceiving and imparting of truth of the world and of man and of all that transluces both.
  

1.01_-_Historical_Survey, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  The great Jewish historian, Graetz, too, holds the unhistoric view that Jewish mysticism is a morbid and late growth, foreign to the religious genius of Israel, and that it has its origin in the speculations of one Isaac the Blind in Spain somewhere between the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Graetz regards the Qabalah, the Zohar in particular, as a " false doctrine which, although new, styled itself a genuine teaching of Israel " ( History of the Jews,
  Vol. Ill, p. 565).
  --
  God, the doctrine of Emanations, the evolution of the
  Universe, the Soul and its transmigrations, and its final return to the Source of All. The new era in the history of the Qabalah created by the appearance of this storehouse of legend, philosophy, and anecdote, has continued right down to the present day. Yet nearly every writer who has since espoused the doctrines of the Qabalah has made the
  Zohar his principal textbook, and its exponents have applied themselves assiduously to commentaries, epitomes, and translations - missing, however, with only a few exceptions, the real underlying possibilities of the Qabalistic

1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
  
  Every moment that we set ourselves to discover in our consciousness whatever there remains in it of adverse, disparaging and critical judgement of the world and of life; every such moment brings us nearer to higher knowledge. And we rise rapidly when we fill our consciousness in such moments with thoughts evoking in us admiration, respect and veneration for the world and for life. It is well known to those experienced in these matters that in every such moment powers are awakened which otherwise remain dormant. In this way the spiritual eyes of man are opened. He begins to see things around him which he could not have seen before. He begins to understand that hitherto he had only seen a part of the world around him. A human being standing before him now presents a new and
   p. 12
  --
  
  The student is told to set apart moments in his daily life in which to withdraw into himself, quietly and alone. He is not to occupy himself at such moments with the affairs of his own ego. This would result in the contrary of what is intended. He should rather let his experiences and the messages from the outer world re-echo within his own completely silent self. At such silent moments every flower, every animal, every action will unveil to him secrets undreamt of. And thus he will prepare himself to receive quite new impressions of the outer world through quite different eyes. The desire to enjoy impression after impression merely blunts the faculty of cognition; the latter, however, is nurtured and cultivated if the enjoyment once experienced is allowed to reveal its message. Thus the student must accustom himself not merely to let the enjoyment
   p. 16
  --
   p. 22
   and applies equally to exceptional circumstances and to the daily affairs of life. The student must seek the power of confronting himself, at certain times, as a stranger. He must stand before himself with the inner tranquility of a judge. When this is attained, our own experiences present themselves in a new light. As long as we are interwoven with them and stand, as it were, within them, we cling to the non-essential just as much as to the essential. If we attain the calm inner survey, the essential is severed from the non-essential. Sorrow and joy, every thought, every resolve, appear different when we confront ourselves in this way. It is as though we had spent the whole day in a place where we beheld the smallest objects at the same close range as the largest, and in the evening climbed a neighboring hill and surveyed the whole scene at a glance. Then the various parts appear related to each other in different proportions from those they bore when seen from within. This exercise will not and need not succeed with present occurrences of destiny, but it should be attempted by the student in connection with the events of destiny already experienced in the past. The value of
   p. 23
  --
  
  For every human being bears a higher man within himself besides what we may call the work-a-day man. This higher man remains hidden until he is awakened. And each human being can himself alone awaken this higher being within himself. As long as this higher being is not awakened, the higher faculties slumbering in every human being, and leading to supersensible knowledge, will remain concealed. The student must resolve to persevere in the strict and earnest observation of the rule here given, so long as he does not feel within himself the fruits of this inner tranquility. To all who thus persevere the day will come when spiritual light will envelop them, and a new world will be revealed to an organ of sight of whose presence within them they were never aware.
  
  
  And no change need take place in the outward life of the student in consequence of this new rule. He performs his duties and, at first, feels the same joys, sorrows, and experiences as before.
  
  --
  
  [paragraph continues] In no way can it estrange him from life; he can rather devote himself the more thoroughly to this life for the remainder of the day, having gained a higher life in the moments set apart. Little by little this higher life will make its influence felt on his ordinary life. The tranquility of the moments set apart will also affect everyday existence. In his whole being he will grow calmer; he will attain firm assurance in all his actions, and cease to be put out of countenance by all manner of incidents. By thus advancing he will gradually become more and more his own guide, and allow himself less and less to be led by circumstances and external influences. He will soon discover how great a source of strength is available to him in these moments thus set apart. He will begin no longer to get angry at things which formerly annoyed him; countless things he formerly feared cease to alarm him. He acquires a new outlook on life. Formerly he may have approached some occupation in a fainthearted way. He would say: "Oh, I lack the power to do this as well as I could wish." Now this thought does not occur to him, but rather a quite different thought. Henceforth he says
   p. 25
  --
  
  Now, the scope and significance of these facts must be realized. We must bear in mind that the higher man within us is in constant development. But only the state of calm and serenity here described renders an orderly development possible. The waves of outward life constrain the inner man from all sides if, instead of mastering this outward life, it masters him. Such a man is like a plant which tries to expand in a cleft in the rock and is stunted in growth until new
   p. 27
   space is given it. No outward forces can supply space to the inner man. It can only be supplied by the inner calm which man himself gives to his soul. Outward circumstances can only alter the course of his outward life; they can never awaken the inner spiritual man. The student must himself give birth to a new and higher man within himself.
  
  --
  
  Through such meditation a complete transformation takes place in the student. He begins to form quite new conceptions of reality. All things acquire a fresh value for him. It cannot be repeated too often that this transformation
   p. 32
   does not alienate him from the world. He will in no way be estranged from his daily tasks and duties, for he comes to realize that the most insignificant action he has to accomplish, the most insignificant experience which offers itself to him, stands in connection with cosmic beings and cosmic events. When once this connection is revealed to him in his moments of contemplation, he comes to his daily activities with a new, fuller power. For now he knows that his labor and his suffering are given and endured for the sake of a great, spiritual, cosmic whole. Not weariness, but strength to live springs from meditation.
  
  
  With firm step the student passes through life. No matter what it may bring him, he goes forward erect. In the past he knew not why he labored and suffered, but now he knows. It is obvious that such meditation leads more surely to the goal if conducted under the direction of experienced persons who know of themselves how everything may best be done; and their advice and guidance should be sought. Truly, no one loses his freedom thereby. What would otherwise be mere uncertain groping in the dark becomes under this direction purposeful work. All who
   p. 33

1.01_-_Isha_Upanishad, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  8. It is He that has gone abroad - That which is bright, bodiless, without scar of imperfection, without sinews, pure, unpierced by evil. The Seer, the Thinker,8 the One who becomes everywhere, the Self-existent has ordered objects perfectly according to their nature from years sempiternal.
  

1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  
  Contentment preserves one even from catching cold. Has a woman who knew
  that she was well-dressed ever caught cold?--No, not even when she had

1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  It may therefore be useful in approaching an ancient Scripture, such as the Veda, Upanishads or Gita, to indicate precisely the spirit in which we approach it and what exactly we think we may derive from it that is of value to humanity and its future. First of all, there is undoubtedly a Truth one and eternal which we are seeking, from which all other truth derives, by the light of which all other truth finds its right place, explanation and relation to the scheme of knowledge. But precisely for that reason it cannot be shut up in a single trenchant formula, it is not likely to be found in its entirety or in all its bearings in any single philosophy or scripture or uttered altogether and for ever by any one teacher, thinker, prophet or Avatar. Nor has it been wholly found by us if our view of it necessitates the intolerant exclusion of the truth underlying other systems; for when we reject passionately, we mean simply that we cannot appreciate and explain. Secondly, this Truth, though it is one and eternal, expresses itself in Time and through the mind of man; therefore every Scripture must necessarily contain two elements, one temporary, perishable, belonging to the ideas of the period and country in which it was produced, the other eternal and imperishable and applicable in all ages and countries. Moreover, in the statement of the Truth the actual form given to it, the system and arrangement, the metaphysical and intellectual mould, the precise expression used must be largely subject to the mutations of Time and cease to have the same force; for the human intellect modifies itself always; continually dividing and putting together it is obliged to shift its divisions continually and to rearrange its syntheses; it is always leaving old expression and symbol for new or, if it uses the old, it so changes its connotation or at least
  
  --
  
  Only those Scriptures, religions, philosophies which can be thus constantly renewed, relived, their stuff of permanent truth constantly reshaped and developed in the inner thought and spiritual experience of a developing humanity, continue to be of living importance to mankind. The rest remain as monuments of the past, but have no actual force or vital impulse for the future.
  
  --
  
  We of the coming day stand at the head of a new age of development which must lead to such a new and larger synthesis. We are not called upon to be orthodox Vedantins of any of the three schools or Tantrics or to adhere to one of the theistic religions of the past or to entrench ourselves within the four corners of the teaching of the Gita. That would be to limit ourselves and to attempt to create our spiritual life out of the being, knowledge and nature of others, of the men of the past, instead of building it out of our own being and potentialities. We do not belong to the past dawns, but to the noons of the future. A mass of new material is flowing into us; we have not only to assimilate the influences of the great theistic religions of India and of the world and a recovered sense of the meaning of Buddhism, but to take full account of the potent though limited revelations of modern knowledge and seeking; and, beyond that, the remote and dateless past which seemed to be dead is returning upon us with an effulgence of many luminous secrets long lost to the consciousness of mankind but now breaking out again from behind the veil. All this points to a new, a very rich, a very vast synthesis; a fresh and widely embracing harmonisation of our gains is both an intellectual and a spiritual necessity of the future.
  

1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  has reached beyond the senses, and thirdly that what he says
  does not contradict the past knowledge of humanity. Any new
  
  --
  yourselves always in that way. When you are going to be
  angry or miserable, reason it out, how it is that some news that
  has come to you is throwing your mind into Vrttis.
  --
  represents a character, a bundle of habits, and these can be
  checked by new and better ones. Character is repeated habits,
  and repeated habits alone can reform character.
  --
  body that you had before the practice. That is very rational,
  and can be explained, because every new thought that we
  have must make, as it were, a new channel through the brain,
  and that explains the tremendous conservatism of human
  --
  channels are present in everyones brain, and it is only
  necessary to recur to them. But whenever a new subject
  comes new channels have to be made, so it is not understood
  so readily. And that is why the brain (it is the brain, and not
  the people themselves) refuses unconsciously to be acted
  upon by new ideas. It resists. The Prana is trying to make
  new channels, and the brain will not allow it. This is the secret
  of conservatism. The less channels there have been in the
  --
  passages, the more conservative will be the brain, the more it
  will struggle against new thoughts. The more thoughtful the
  mane, the more complicated will be the streets in his brain,
  and the more easily he will take to new ideas, and understand
  them. So with every fresh idea; we make a new impression in
  the brain, cut new channels though the brain- stuff, and that is
  why we find that in the practice of Yoga (it being an entirely
  new set of thoughts and motives) there is so much physical
  resistance at first. That is why we find that the part of
  --
  from time immemorial. The part of religion which deals with
  the Infinite beyond comes entirely new to us, and getting
  ideas about it produces new channels in the brain, disturbing
  the whole system, and that is why you find in the practice of

1.01_-_Sets_down_the_first_line_and_begins_to_treat_of_the_imperfections_of_beginners., #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  
  2. It must be known, then, that the soul, after it has been definitely converted to the service of God, is, as a rule, spiritually nurtured and caressed by God, even as is the tender child by its loving mother, who warms it with the heat of her bosom and nurtures it with sweet milk and soft and pleasant food, and carries it and caresses it in her arms; but, as the child grows bigger, the mother gradually ceases caressing it, and, hiding her tender love, puts bitter aloes upon her sweet breast, sets down the child from her arms and makes it walk upon its feet, so that it may lose the habits of a child and betake itself to more important and substantial occupations. The loving mother is like the grace of God, for, as soon as the soul is regenerated by its new warmth and fervour for the service of God, He treats it in the same way; He makes it to find spiritual milk, sweet and delectable, in all the things of God, without any labour of its own, and also great pleasure in spiritual exercises, for here God is giving to it the breast of His tender love, even as to a tender child.
  

1.01_-_Soul_and_God, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Yoga
  
  You took away where I thought to take hold, and you gave me where I did not expect anything and time and again you brought about fate from new and unexpected quarters. Where I sowed, you robbed me of the harvest, and where I did not sow, you give me fruit a hundredfold. And time and again I lost the path and found it again where I would never have foreseen it. You upheld my belief when I was alone and near despair. At every decisive moment you let me believe in myself"
  [2] Like a tired wanderer who had sought nothing in the world apart from her, shall I come closer to my soul. I shall learn that my soul finally lies behind everything, and if I cross the world, I am ultimately doing this to find my soul. Even the dearest are themselves not the goal and end of the love that goes on seeking, they are symbols of their own souls.
  --
  
  55. In 1912, Jung argued that scholarliness was insufficient if one wanted to become a knower of the human soul. To do this, one had to hang up exact science and put away the scholar's gown, to say farewell to his study and wander with human heart through the world, through the horror of prisons, mad houses and hospitals, through drab suburban pubs, in brothels and gambling dens, through the salons of elegant society, the stock exchanges, the socialist meetings, the churches, the revivals and ecstasies of the sects, to experience love, hate and passion in every form in one's body (new paths of psychology, cw 7, 409).
  

1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  Westerners, however, find themselves in the
  presence of a new universe which seemingly has no
  equivalent in their culture. This leads them to ask
  --
  unsuccessful. Were they killed? Were they made
  prisoners by the Chinese? No one knew.
  .
  --
  their hiding places. Talking with the nomads, we also
  knew that horsemen from the East would soon arrive.
  Although we had been warned, it was impossible
  --
  area, between Kashmir and Ladakh, he was called
  "Kunu Lama." Besides.the Tibetan language, he knew
  Sanskrit and had perfectly studied the doctrines of all
  --
  years later-at the age of seventy-the same process
  was repeated. Requested to realize a new statue, he
  obtained ten more years.

1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  Between the Catholic mystics of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and the Quakers of the seventeenth there yawns a wide gap of time made hideous, so far as religion is concerned, with interdenominational wars and persecutions. But the gulf was bridged by a succession of men, whom Rufus Jones, in the only accessible English work devoted to their lives and teachings, has called the Spiritual Reformers. Denk, Franck, Castellio, Weigel, Everard, the Cambridge Platonistsin spite of the murdering and the madness, the apostolic succession remains unbroken. The truths that had been spoken in the Theologia Germanicathat book which Luther professed to love so much and from which, if we may judge from his career, he learned so singularly littlewere being uttered once again by Englishmen during the Civil War and under the Cromwellian dictatorship. The mystical tradition, perpetuated by the Protestant Spiritual Reformers, had become diffused, as it were, in the religious atmosphere of the time when George Fox had his first great opening and knew by direct experience.
  
  --
  
  The doctrine of the Inner Light achieved a clearer formulation in the writings of the second generation of Quakers. There is, wrote William Penn, something nearer to us than Scriptures, to wit, the Word in the heart from which all Scriptures come. And a little later Robert Barclay sought to explain the direct experience of tat tvam asi in terms of an Augustinian theology that had, of course, to be considerably stretched and trimmed before it could fit the facts. Man, he declared in his famous theses, is a fallen being, incapable of good, unless united to the Divine Light. This Divine Light is Christ within the human soul, and is as universal as the seed of sin. All men, heathen as well as Christian, are endowed with the Inward Light, even though they may know nothing of the outward history of Christs life. Justification is for those who do not resist the Inner Light and so permit of a new birth of holiness within them.
  

1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  Evelyn Underhill, Mysticism, A Study in the Nature and Development of
  Man's Spiritual Consciousness (new York: E. P. Dutton and Co., 1911), Part II,
  "The Mystic Way," Chapter II, "The Awakening of the Self."
  --
  congestion of the blood, etc., of the crisis of birth. Conversely,
  all moments of separation and new birth produce anxiety.
  Whether it be the king's child about to be taken from the felicity
  --
  transformation. The first is the dream of a young man seeking
  the way to a new world-orientation:
  "I am in a green land where many sheep are at pasture. It is
  --
  
  C. G. Jung, Psychology and Alchemy (Collected Works, vol. 12; new York
  and London, 1953), pars. 71, 73. (Orig. 1935.)
  --
  mosphere of irresistible fascination about the figure that appears
  suddenly as guide, marking a new period, a new stage, in the bi
  ography. That which has to be faced, and is somehow profoundly

1.01_-_The_Dark_Forest._The_Hill_of_Difficulty._The_Panther,_the_Lion,_and_the_Wolf._Virgil., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  What was this forest savage, rough, and stern,
  Which in the very thought renews the fear.
  So bitter is it, death is little more;

1.01_-_The_Ego, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  Investigation of the psychology of the unconscious con-
  fronted me with facts which required the formulation of new
  concepts. One of these concepts is the self. The entity so denoted

1.01_-_The_First_Steps, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  The next step is Asana, posture. A series of exercises, physical and mental, is to be gone through every day, until certain higher states are reached. Therefore it is quite necessary that we should find a posture in which we can remain long. That posture which is the easiest for one should be the one chosen. For thinking, a certain posture may be very easy for one man, while to another it may be very difficult. We will find later on that during the study of these psychological matters a good deal of activity goes on in the body. Nerve currents will have to be displaced and given a new channel. new sorts of vibrations will begin, the whole constitution will be remodelled as it were. But the main part of the activity will lie along the spinal column, so that the one thing necessary for the posture is to hold the spinal column free, sitting erect, holding the three parts the chest, neck, and head in a straight line. Let the whole weight of the body be supported by the ribs, and then you have an easy natural postures with the spine straight. You will easily see that you cannot think very high thoughts with the chest in. This portion of the Yoga is a little similar to the Hatha-Yoga which deals entirely with the physical body, its aim being to make the physical body very strong. We have nothing to do with it here, because its practices are very difficult, and cannot be learned in a day, and, after all, do not lead to much spiritual growth. Many of these practices you will find in Delsarte and other teachers, such as placing the body in different postures, but the object in these is physical, not psychological. There is not one muscle in the body over which a man cannot establish a perfect control. The heart can be made to stop or go on at his bidding, and each part of the organism can be similarly controlled.
  
  --
  
  This world has a good many of these demoniac natures, but there are some gods too. If one proposes to teach any science to increase the power of sense-enjoyment, one finds multitudes ready for it. If one undertakes to show the supreme goal, one finds few to listen to him. Very few have the power to grasp the higher, fewer still the patience to attain to it. But there are a few also who know that even if the body can be made to live for a thousand years, the result in the end will be the same. When the forces that hold it together go away, the body must fall. No man was ever born who could stop his body one moment from changing. Body is the name of a series of changes. "As in a river the masses of water are changing before you every moment, and new masses are coming, yet taking similar form, so is it with this body." Yet the body must be kept strong and healthy. It is the best instrument we have.
  

1.01_-_The_Four_Aids, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  8:Another kind of Shastra is not Scripture, but a statement of the science and methods, the effective principles and way of working of the path of Yoga which the Sadhaka elects to follow. Each path has its Shastra, either written or traditional, passing from mouth to mouth through a long line of Teachers. In India a great authority, a high reverence even is ordinarily attached to the written or traditional teaching. All the lines of the Yoga are supposed to be fixed and the Teacher who has received the Shastra by tradition and realised it in practice guides the disciple along the immemorial tracks. One often even hears the objection urged against a new practice, a new Yogic teaching, the adoption of a new formula, "It is not according to the Shastra." But neither in fact nor in the actual practice of the Yogins is there really any such entire rigidity of an iron door shut against new truth, fresh revelation, widened experience. The written or traditional teaching expresses the knowledge and experiences of many centuries systematised, organised, made attainable to the beginner. Its importance and utility are therefore immense. But a great freedom of variation and development is always practicable. Even so highly scientific a system as Rajayoga can be practised on other lines than the organised method of Patanjali. Each of the three paths, trimarga 51, breaks into many bypaths which meet again at the goal. The general knowledge on which the Yoga depends is fixed, but the order, the succession, the devices, the forms must be allowed to vary, for the needs and particular impulsions of the individual nature have to be satisfied even while the general truths remain firm and constant.
  
  9:An integral and synthetic Yoga needs especially not to be bound by any written or traditional Shastra; for while it embraces the knowledge received from the past, it seeks to organise it anew for the present and the future. An absolute liberty of experience and of the restatement of knowledge in new terms and new combinations is the condition of its self-formation. Seeking to embrace all life in itself, it is in the position not of a pilgrim following the highroad to his destination, but, to that extent at least, of a path-finder hewing his way through a virgin forest. For Yoga has long diverged from life and the ancient systems which sought to embrace it, such as those of our Vedic forefathers, are far away from us, expressed in terms which are no longer accessible, thrown into forms which are no longer applicable. Since then mankind has moved forward on the current of eternal Time and the same problem has to be approached from a new starting-point.
  

1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  5:Thus the eternal paradox and eternal truth of a divine life in an animal body, an immortal aspiration or reality inhabiting a mortal tenement, a single and universal consciousness representing itself in limited minds and divided egos, a transcendent, indefinable, timeless and spaceless Being who alone renders time and space and cosmos possible, and in all these the higher truth realisable by the lower term, justify themselves to the deliberate reason as well as to the persistent instinct or intuition of mankind. Attempts are sometimes made to have done finally with questionings which have so often been declared insoluble by logical thought and to persuade men to limit their mental activities to the practical and immediate problems of their material existence in the universe; but such evasions are never permanent in their effect. Mankind returns from them with a more vehement impulse of inquiry or a more violent hunger for an immediate solution. By that hunger mysticism profits and new religions arise to replace the old that have been destroyed or stripped of significance by a scepticism which itself could not satisfy because, although its business was inquiry, it was unwilling sufficiently to inquire. The attempt to deny or stifle a truth because it is yet obscure in its outward workings and too often represented by obscurantist superstition or a crude faith, is itself a kind of obscurantism. The will to escape from a cosmic necessity because it is arduous, difficult to justify by immediate tangible results, slow in regulating its operations, must turn out eventually to have been no acceptance of the truth of Nature but a revolt against the secret, mightier will of the great Mother It is better and more rational to accept what she will not allow us as a race to reject and lift it from the sphere of blind instinct, obscure intuition and random aspiration into the light of reason and an instructed and consciously self-guiding will. And if there is any higher light of illumined intuition or self-revealing truth which is now in man either obstructed and inoperative or works with intermittent glancings as if from behind a veil or with occasional displays as of the northern lights in our material skies, then there also we need not fear to aspire. For it is likely that such is the next higher state of consciousness of which Mind is only a form and veil, and through the splendours of that light may lie the path of our progressive self-enlargement into whatever highest state is humanity's ultimate resting-place.
  

1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  NATION is building in India today before the eyes of the world so swiftly, so palpably that all can watch the process and those who have sympathy and intuition distinguish the forces at work, the materials in use, the lines of the divine architecture. This nation is not a new race raw from the workshop of Nature or created by modern circumstances.
  
  --
  
  Formerly a congeries of kindred nations with a single life and a single culture, always by the law of this essential oneness tending to unity, always by its excess of fecundity engendering fresh diversities and divisions, it has never yet been able to overcome permanently the almost insuperable obstacles to the organisation of a continent. The time has now come when those obstacles can be overcome. The attempt which our race has been making throughout its long history, it will now make under entirely new circumstances. A keen observer would predict its success because the only important obstacles have been or are in the process of being removed. But we go farther and believe that it is sure to succeed because the freedom, unity and greatness of India have now become necessary to the world.
  
  --
  
  We do not believe that by multiplying new sects limited within the narrower and inferior ideas of religion imported from the West or by creating organisations for the perpetuation of the mere dress and body of Hinduism we can recover our spiritual health, energy and greatness. The world moves through an indispensable interregnum of free thought and materialism to a new synthesis of religious thought and experience, a new religious world-life free from intolerance, yet full of faith and fervour, accepting all forms of religion because it has an unshakable faith in the One. The religion which embraces Science and faith,
  Theism, Christianity, Mahomedanism and Buddhism and yet is none of these, is that to which the World-Spirit moves. In our own, which is the most sceptical and the most believing of all, the most sceptical because it has questioned and experimented the most, the most believing because it has the deepest experience and the most varied and positive spiritual knowledge, - that wider Hinduism which is not a dogma or combination of dogmas but a law of life, which is not a social framework but the spirit of a past and future social evolution, which rejects nothing but insists on testing and experiencing everything and when tested and experienced turning it to the soul's uses, in this

1.01_-_The_Lord_of_hosts, #Sefer Yetzirah The Book of Creation In Theory and Practice, #Anonymous, #Various
  
  When 44 the patriarch Abraham comprehended the great truism, revolved it in his mind, conceived it perfectly, made careful investigations and profound inquiries, pondered upon it and succeeded in contemplations, the Lord of the Universe appeared to him, called him his friend, made with him a covenant between the ten fingers of his hands, which is the covenant of the tongue, 45 and the covenant between the ten toes of his feet, which is the covenant of circumcision, and said of him: "Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee." (Jer. I, 5.)
  

1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living, #On Education, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  to convince it and awaken in it the goodwill which has been veiled for a time. By means of such patient intervention
  each crisis can be turned into a new progress, into one more step towards the goal. Progress may be slow, relapses
  may be frequent, but if a courageous will is maintained, one is sure to triumph one day and see all difficulties
  --
  demanded of it, for it will have learnt to find rest in action and to recuperate, through contact with the universal
  forces, the energies it expends consciously and usefully. In this sound and balanced life a new harmony will
  manifest in the body, reflecting the harmony of the higher regions, which will give it perfect proportions and ideal

1.01_-_The_Three_Metamorphoses, #Thus Spoke Zarathustra, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  18:My brethren, wherefore is there need of the lion in the spirit? Why sufficeth not the beast of burden, which renounceth and is reverent?
  19:To create new values--that, even the lion cannot yet accomplish: but to create itself freedom for new creating--that can the might of the lion do.
  20:To create itself freedom, and give a holy Nay even unto duty: for that, my brethren, there is need of the lion.
  21:To assume the right to new values--that is the most formidable assumption for a load-bearing and reverent spirit. Verily, unto such a spirit it is preying, and the work of a beast of prey.
  22:As its holiest, it once loved "Thou-shalt": now is it forced to find illusion and arbitrariness even in the holiest things, that it may capture freedom from its love: the lion is needed for this capture.
  23:But tell me, my brethren, what the child can do, which even the lion could not do? Why hath the preying lion still to become a child?
  24:Innocence is the child, and forgetfulness, a new beginning, a game, a self-rolling wheel, a first movement, a holy Yea.
  25:Aye, for the game of creating, my brethren, there is needed a holy Yea unto life: ITS OWN will, willeth now the spirit; HIS OWN world winneth the world's outcast.

1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  
  Years later this brief letter became the basis for The Cloth Drum Refitted [with a new Drumhead], a series of accounts of retribution for unfilial behavior that appeared as a single volume in 1747. It was greatly enlarged and reissued in 1753 in a five-volume edition. This edition opens with the letter to
  Watanabe Sukefusa, which takes up less than a third of volume one, and is followed by twenty-two more stories of karmic cause and effect. Hakuin returned to this genre in later collections such as
  --
  
  Today his son cherishes the letter as a family treasure. Recently, on the occasion of an annual festival, some elderly laymen who frequent my temple borrowed the letter and brought it to my temple. They asked me to copy it out and write some prefatory remarks. I complied with their wishes, and have taken the opportunity to add much new material as well.
  
  --
  In the spring of 1746, shortly before writing this preface, Hakuin had acted on the advice he had given thirty-three years earlier about recycling the letter. Learning that one Murabayashi Tokusabur, the son of a friend and a student in Edo, whom the father had praised as an "extremely sincere, mildmannered, and obedient young man, loved by one and all," was in fact given to wild drinking sprees and other generally reprehensible behavior, Hakuin retrieved the letter, made some necessary revisions, and sent it to the young man (also see Letter 9). As this occurred only months before
  Hakuin prepared The Cloth Drum Refitted for publication, it seems reasonable to conjecture that revamping the letter for Tokusabur stimulated Hakuin to write and publish this almost entirely new
  23

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