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object:find
word class:verb

see also :::

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [1] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
find_the_Divine
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Big_Mind,_Big_Heart
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
City_of_God
Cold_Mountain
Dark_Night_of_the_Soul
DND_DM_Guide_5E
Enchiridion_text
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Essential_Integral
Evolution_II
Faust
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Guru_Bhakti_Yoga
Heart_of_Matter
How_to_think_like_Leonardo_Da_Vinci
Hymn_of_the_Universe
Journey_to_the_Lord_of_Power_-_A_Sufi_Manual_on_Retreat
Know_Yourself
Let_Me_Explain
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_IV
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Liber_ABA
Life_without_Death
Meditation__The_First_and_Last_Freedom
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Interpretation
On_the_Way_to_Supermanhood
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1950-1951
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Savitri
The_Bible
the_Book
The_Book_of_Secrets__Keys_to_Love_and_Meditation
the_Book_of_Wisdom2
The_Categories
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Companion
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Golden_Bough
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Mothers_Agenda
The_Mother_With_Letters_On_The_Mother
The_Red_Book_-_Liber_Novus
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Synthesis_Of_Yoga
The_Tarot_of_Paul_Christian
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Three_Books_on_Occult_Philosophy
Toward_the_Future
Twilight_of_the_Idols

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
1.37_-_Describes_the_excellence_of_this_prayer_called_the_Paternoster,_and_the_many_ways_in_which_we_shall_find_consolation_in_it.
1951-03-24_-_Descent_of_Divine_Love,_of_Consciousness_-_Earth-_a_symbolic_formation_-_the_Divine_Presence_-_The_psychic_being_and_other_worlds_-_Divine_Love_and_Grace_-_Becoming_consaious_of_Divine_Love_-_Finding_ones_psychic_being_-_Responsibility
1954-09-29_-_The_right_spirit_-_The_Divine_comes_first_-_Finding_the_Divine_-_Mistakes_-_Rejecting_impulses_-_Making_the_consciousness_vast_-_Firm_resolution
1955-11-02_-_The_first_movement_in_Yoga_-_Interiorisation,_finding_ones_soul_-_The_Vedic_Age_-_An_incident_about_Vivekananda_-_The_imaged_language_of_the_Vedas_-_The_Vedic_Rishis,_involutionary_beings_-_Involution_and_evolution
1956-02-01_-_Path_of_knowledge_-_Finding_the_Divine_in_life_-_Capacity_for_contact_with_the_Divine_-_Partial_and_total_identification_with_the_Divine_-_Manifestation_and_hierarchy
1958-08-13_-_Profit_by_staying_in_the_Ashram_-_What_Sri_Aurobindo_has_come_to_tell_us_-_Finding_the_Divine
1.fua_-_The_Birds_Find_Their_King
1.jh_-_Lord,_Where_Shall_I_Find_You?
1.jr_-_Reason,_leave_now!_Youll_not_find_wisdom_here!
1.jr_-_Whoever_finds_love
1.jt_-_How_the_Soul_Through_the_Senses_Finds_God_in_All_Creatures
1.lb_-_Looking_For_A_Monk_And_Not_Finding_Him
1.lla_-_Fool,_you_wont_find_your_way_out_by_praying_from_a_book
1.sig_-_Where_Will_I_Find_You
3.07.2_-_Finding_the_Real_Source

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
00.02_-_Mystic_Symbolism
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
0.00a_-_Introduction
000_-_Humans_in_Universe
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.00_-_The_Wellspring_of_Reality
0.01f_-_FOREWARD
0.01_-_I_-_Sri_Aurobindos_personality,_his_outer_retirement_-_outside_contacts_after_1910_-_spiritual_personalities-_Vibhutis_and_Avatars_-__transformtion_of_human_personality
0.01_-_Letters_from_the_Mother_to_Her_Son
0.01_-_Life_and_Yoga
0.02_-_II_-_The_Home_of_the_Guru
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life
0.04_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.04_-_The_Systems_of_Yoga
0.05_-_Letters_to_a_Child
0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems
0.06_-_INTRODUCTION
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.01_-_A_Yoga_of_the_Art_of_Life
01.01_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_The_Age_of_Sri_Aurobindo
01.01_-_The_One_Thing_Needful
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Creative_Soul
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.02_-_The_Object_of_the_Integral_Yoga
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_Rationalism
01.03_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_his_School
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.03_-_Yoga_and_the_Ordinary_Life
01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine
01.04_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Gita
01.04_-_The_Intuition_of_the_Age
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_Rabindranath_Tagore:_A_Great_Poet,_a_Great_Man
01.05_-_The_Nietzschean_Antichrist
01.06_-_On_Communism
01.06_-_Vivekananda
01.07_-_The_Bases_of_Social_Reconstruction
01.08_-_A_Theory_of_Yoga
01.08_-_Walter_Hilton:_The_Scale_of_Perfection
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.10_-_Principle_and_Personality
01.12_-_Goethe
01.12_-_Three_Degrees_of_Social_Organisation
01.13_-_T._S._Eliot:_Four_Quartets
01.14_-_Nicholas_Roerich
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.13_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0.14_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0_1954-08-25_-_what_is_this_personality?_and_when_will_she_come?
0_1955-04-04
0_1955-09-03
0_1955-09-15
0_1956-05-02
0_1957-07-03
0_1957-11-12
0_1957-12-21
0_1958-01-01
0_1958-02-03b_-_The_Supramental_Ship
0_1958-04-03
0_1958-05-10
0_1958-07-02
0_1958-07-06
0_1958-07-19
0_1958-07-21
0_1958-08-07
0_1958-09-16_-_OM_NAMO_BHAGAVATEH
0_1958-10-04
0_1958-11-04_-_Myths_are_True_and_Gods_exist_-_mental_formation_and_occult_faculties_-_exteriorization_-_work_in_dreams
0_1958-11-08
0_1958-11-20
0_1958-11-22
0_1958-11-27_-_Intermediaries_and_Immediacy
0_1958-12-04
0_1959-01-14
0_1959-01-21
0_1959-01-31
0_1959-04-07
0_1959-05-19_-_Ascending_and_Descending_paths
0_1959-05-25
0_1959-05-28
0_1959-08-11
0_1959-10-15
0_1960-04-20
0_1960-05-21_-_true_purity_-_you_have_to_be_the_Divine_to_overcome_hostile_forces
0_1960-05-24_-_supramental_flood
0_1960-08-10_-_questions_from_center_of_Education_-_reading_Sri_Aurobindo
0_1960-09-20
0_1960-10-02b
0_1960-10-11
0_1960-10-25
0_1960-11-08
0_1960-11-15
0_1960-11-26
0_1961-01-10
0_1961-01-12
0_1961-01-22
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-01-29
0_1961-01-31
0_1961-02-04
0_1961-02-07
0_1961-02-11
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-02-25
0_1961-03-04
0_1961-03-17
0_1961-03-27
0_1961-04-15
0_1961-04-25
0_1961-04-29
0_1961-05-19
0_1961-06-17
0_1961-06-24
0_1961-07-07
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-08-02
0_1961-08-05
0_1961-09-30
0_1961-10-02
0_1961-10-15
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-05
0_1961-11-06
0_1961-11-07
0_1961-11-16a
0_1961-11-16b
0_1961-12-16
0_1961-12-18
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-01-09
0_1962-01-12_-_supramental_ship
0_1962-01-21
0_1962-01-24
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-02-06
0_1962-02-13
0_1962-02-17
0_1962-02-24
0_1962-02-27
0_1962-03-03
0_1962-03-11
0_1962-04-03
0_1962-05-15
0_1962-05-24
0_1962-05-27
0_1962-05-29
0_1962-05-31
0_1962-06-02
0_1962-06-06
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-06-20
0_1962-06-23
0_1962-07-04
0_1962-07-07
0_1962-07-11
0_1962-07-14
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-08-04
0_1962-08-14
0_1962-08-25
0_1962-09-05
0_1962-09-22
0_1962-09-26
0_1962-09-29
0_1962-10-12
0_1962-10-27
0_1962-10-30
0_1962-11-07
0_1962-11-14
0_1962-11-20
0_1962-11-27
0_1962-12-12
0_1962-12-15
0_1962-12-19
0_1963-01-09
0_1963-01-12
0_1963-01-14
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-15
0_1963-02-19
0_1963-02-23
0_1963-03-09
0_1963-03-13
0_1963-03-16
0_1963-03-23
0_1963-03-27
0_1963-04-06
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0_1963-04-22
0_1963-04-25
0_1963-05-03
0_1963-05-11
0_1963-05-18
0_1963-05-25
0_1963-06-03
0_1963-06-08
0_1963-06-15
0_1963-06-19
0_1963-06-22
0_1963-06-26b
0_1963-06-29
0_1963-07-03
0_1963-07-10
0_1963-07-20
0_1963-07-24
0_1963-07-27
0_1963-08-03
0_1963-08-07
0_1963-08-10
0_1963-08-24
0_1963-08-28
0_1963-09-04
0_1963-09-07
0_1963-09-18
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0_1963-10-03
0_1963-10-05
0_1963-10-16
0_1963-10-19
0_1963-11-04
0_1963-11-20
0_1963-11-23
0_1963-12-03
0_1963-12-14
0_1963-12-18
0_1963-12-21
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-01-08
0_1964-01-15
0_1964-01-22
0_1964-01-25
0_1964-01-29
0_1964-02-05
0_1964-02-13
0_1964-03-18
0_1964-03-25
0_1964-03-28
0_1964-04-08
0_1964-04-23
0_1964-05-02
0_1964-07-18
0_1964-07-22
0_1964-07-31
0_1964-08-14
0_1964-08-22
0_1964-08-26
0_1964-09-16
0_1964-09-18
0_1964-09-26
0_1964-10-07
0_1964-10-10
0_1964-10-17
0_1964-10-24a
0_1964-11-04
0_1964-11-12
0_1964-11-14
0_1964-11-21
0_1964-11-25
0_1964-11-28
0_1964-12-07
0_1965-02-27
0_1965-03-06
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-03-27
0_1965-04-10
0_1965-04-17
0_1965-04-21
0_1965-04-23
0_1965-04-28
0_1965-05-08
0_1965-05-19
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-02
0_1965-06-09
0_1965-06-14
0_1965-06-18_-_supramental_ship
0_1965-06-23
0_1965-06-26
0_1965-06-30
0_1965-07-10
0_1965-07-14
0_1965-07-17
0_1965-07-24
0_1965-07-28
0_1965-07-31
0_1965-08-04
0_1965-08-18
0_1965-08-21
0_1965-09-15a
0_1965-09-25
0_1965-10-13
0_1965-10-20
0_1965-10-27
0_1965-11-06
0_1965-11-13
0_1965-11-15
0_1965-11-23
0_1965-11-27
0_1965-12-01
0_1965-12-10
0_1965-12-25
0_1966-01-08
0_1966-01-14
0_1966-01-22
0_1966-01-26
0_1966-02-19
0_1966-02-26
0_1966-03-04
0_1966-03-19
0_1966-03-26
0_1966-04-20
0_1966-04-27
0_1966-05-18
0_1966-05-22
0_1966-05-25
0_1966-06-02
0_1966-06-04
0_1966-06-11
0_1966-06-15
0_1966-06-25
0_1966-06-29
0_1966-07-30
0_1966-08-06
0_1966-08-27
0_1966-09-14
0_1966-09-17
0_1966-09-21
0_1966-09-30
0_1966-10-26
0_1966-10-29
0_1966-11-09
0_1966-11-19
0_1966-11-26
0_1966-11-30
0_1966-12-07
0_1966-12-17
0_1966-12-21
0_1967-01-11
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0_1967-02-18
0_1967-02-25
0_1967-03-02
0_1967-03-15
0_1967-03-22
0_1967-03-25
0_1967-03-29
0_1967-04-05
0_1967-04-15
0_1967-04-19
0_1967-04-27
0_1967-05-03
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0_1967-05-27
0_1967-05-30
0_1967-06-03
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0_1967-06-21
0_1967-07-12
0_1967-07-15
0_1967-07-19
0_1967-07-22
0_1967-07-26
0_1967-07-29
0_1967-08-02
0_1967-08-12
0_1967-08-16
0_1967-08-19
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0_1967-08-30
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0_1967-09-06
0_1967-09-16
0_1967-10-04
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0_1967-12-30
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0_1968-02-14
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0_1968-03-16
0_1968-04-10
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0_1968-06-08
0_1968-06-12
0_1968-06-15
0_1968-06-26
0_1968-07-03
0_1968-07-17
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0_1968-07-31
0_1968-09-04
0_1968-09-07
0_1968-09-11
0_1968-09-21
0_1968-09-25
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0_1968-10-30
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0_1968-11-06
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0_1968-12-21
0_1968-12-28
0_1969-01-08
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0_1969-01-29
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0_1969-02-08
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0_1969-03-12
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0_1969-04-16
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0_1970-10-28
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0_1971-01-27
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0_1971-04-17
0_1971-04-28
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0_1971-05-15
0_1971-05-26
0_1971-06-05
0_1971-06-12
0_1971-06-23
0_1971-07-14
0_1971-07-21
0_1971-08-18
0_1971-08-28
0_1971-09-04
0_1971-09-15
0_1971-10-16
0_1971-10-20
0_1971-10-30
0_1971-11-10
0_1971-11-13
0_1971-11-17
0_1971-11-24
0_1971-12-11
0_1971-12-18
0_1971-12-29b
0_1972-01-12
0_1972-01-15
0_1972-01-22
0_1972-02-01
0_1972-02-08
0_1972-02-09
0_1972-02-12
0_1972-02-23
0_1972-02-26
0_1972-03-08
0_1972-03-25
0_1972-03-29a
0_1972-03-29b
0_1972-03-30
0_1972-04-04
0_1972-04-05
0_1972-04-26
0_1972-05-17
0_1972-05-27
0_1972-06-14
0_1972-06-28
0_1972-07-01
0_1972-07-22
0_1972-07-26
0_1972-08-02
0_1972-08-05
0_1972-08-09
0_1972-09-16
0_1972-10-14
0_1972-11-11
0_1972-12-09
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0_1973-01-20
0_1973-01-24
0_1973-02-08
0_1973-02-14
0_1973-03-14
0_1973-04-14
02.01_-_A_Vedic_Story
02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth
02.01_-_The_World_War
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_Rishi_Dirghatama
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.02_-_The_Message_of_the_Atomic_Bomb
02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.05_-_Federated_Humanity
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_Boris_Pasternak
02.06_-_The_Integral_Yoga_and_Other_Yogas
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_George_Seftris
02.07_-_India_One_and_Indivisable
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.08_-_Jules_Supervielle
02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness
02.09_-_The_Paradise_of_the_Life-Gods
02.09_-_Two_Mystic_Poems_in_Modern_French
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.12_-_Mysticism_in_Bengali_Poetry
02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
02.14_-_Panacea_of_Isms
02.14_-_The_World-Soul
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.01_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness
03.01_-_The_Malady_of_the_Century
03.01_-_The_New_Year_Initiation
03.01_-_The_Pursuit_of_the_Unknowable
03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Body_Human
03.04_-_The_Other_Aspect_of_European_Culture
03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon
03.04_-_Towardsa_New_Ideology
03.05_-_Some_Conceptions_and_Misconceptions
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.06_-_Here_or_Otherwhere
03.06_-_The_Pact_and_its_Sanction
03.07_-_Brahmacharya
03.07_-_Some_Thoughts_on_the_Unthinkable
03.07_-_The_Sunlit_Path
03.08_-_The_Spiritual_Outlook
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.09_-_Sectarianism_or_Loyalty
03.10_-_Hamlet:_A_Crisis_of_the_Evolving_Soul
03.10_-_Sincerity
03.10_-_The_Mission_of_Buddhism
03.11_-_Modernist_Poetry
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
03.13_-_Dynamic_Fatalism
03.14_-_From_the_Known_to_the_Unknown?
03.15_-_Origin_and_Nature_of_Suffering
04.01_-_The_Divine_Man
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.02_-_A_Chapter_of_Human_Evolution
04.02_-_Human_Progress
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.03_-_The_Eternal_East_and_West
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.04_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.05_-_The_Freedom_and_the_Force_of_the_Spirit
04.06_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.07_-_Readings_in_Savitri
04.17_-_To_the_Heights-XVII
04.40_-_To_the_Heights-XL
05.01_-_Of_Love_and_Aspiration
05.02_-_Gods_Labour
05.02_-_Of_the_Divine_and_its_Help
05.02_-_Physician,_Heal_Thyself
05.02_-_Satyavan
05.03_-_Bypaths_of_Souls_Journey
05.03_-_Of_Desire_and_Atonement
05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri
05.04_-_The_Immortal_Person
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.05_-_Of_Some_Supreme_Mysteries
05.06_-_Physics_or_philosophy
05.07_-_Man_and_Superman
05.07_-_The_Observer_and_the_Observed
05.10_-_Children_and_Child_Mentality
05.11_-_The_Place_of_Reason
05.11_-_The_Soul_of_a_Nation
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
05.13_-_Darshana_and_Philosophy
05.14_-_The_Sanctity_of_the_Individual
05.16_-_A_Modernist_Mentality
05.18_-_Man_to_be_Surpassed
05.19_-_Lone_to_the_Lone
05.23_-_The_Base_of_Sincerity
05.24_-_Process_of_Purification
05.26_-_The_Soul_in_Anguish
05.27_-_The_Nature_of_Perfection
05.30_-_Theres_a_Divinity
05.33_-_Caesar_versus_the_Divine
05.34_-_Light,_more_Light
06.01_-_The_End_of_a_Civilisation
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
06.03_-_Types_of_Meditation
06.08_-_The_Individual_and_the_Collective
06.09_-_How_to_Wait
06.10_-_Fatigue_and_Work
06.11_-_The_Steps_of_the_Soul
06.12_-_The_Expanding_Body-Consciousness
06.14_-_The_Integral_Realisation
06.17_-_Directed_Change
06.19_-_Mental_Silence
06.23_-_Here_or_Elsewhere
06.26_-_The_Wonder_of_It_All
06.28_-_The_Coming_of_Superman
06.29_-_Towards_Redemption
06.31_-_Identification_of_Consciousness
06.32_-_The_Central_Consciousness
06.34_-_Selfless_Worker
06.35_-_Second_Sight
06.36_-_The_Mother_on_Herself
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.02_-_The_Spiral_Universe
07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries
07.03_-_This_Expanding_Universe
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
07.04_-_The_World_Serpent
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.05_-_This_Mystery_of_Existence
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.06_-_Record_of_World-History
07.07_-_Freedom_and_Destiny
07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness
07.08_-_The_Divine_Truth_Its_Name_and_Form
07.10_-_Diseases_and_Accidents
07.12_-_This_Ugliness_in_the_World
07.13_-_Divine_Justice
07.19_-_Bad_Thought-Formation
07.21_-_On_Occultism
07.26_-_Offering_and_Surrender
07.28_-_Personal_Effort_and_Will
07.30_-_Sincerity_is_Victory
07.32_-_The_Yogic_Centres
07.34_-_And_this_Agile_Reason
07.36_-_The_Body_and_the_Psychic
07.39_-_The_Homogeneous_Being
07.40_-_Service_Human_and_Divine
07.41_-_The_Divine_Family
07.42_-_The_Nature_and_Destiny_of_Art
07.44_-_Music_Indian_and_European
07.45_-_Specialisation
08.02_-_Order_and_Discipline
08.03_-_Organise_Your_Life
08.04_-_Doing_for_Her_Sake
08.07_-_Sleep_and_Pain
08.08_-_The_Mind_s_Bazaar
08.09_-_Spirits_in_Trees
08.11_-_The_Work_Here
08.12_-_Thought_the_Creator
08.15_-_Divine_Living
08.16_-_Perfection_and_Progress
08.17_-_Psychological_Perfection
08.18_-_The_Origin_of_Desire
08.19_-_Asceticism
08.20_-_Are_Not_The_Ascetic_Means_Helpful_At_Times?
08.21_-_Human_Birth
08.23_-_Sadhana_Must_be_Done_in_the_Body
08.24_-_On_Food
08.28_-_Prayer_and_Aspiration
08.30_-_Dealing_with_a_Wrong_Movement
08.32_-_The_Surrender_of_an_Inner_Warrior
08.34_-_To_Melt_into_the_Divine
08.35_-_Love_Divine
08.36_-_Buddha_and_Shankara
08.38_-_The_Value_of_Money
09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness
09.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
09.04_-_The_Divine_Grace
09.05_-_The_Story_of_Love
09.08_-_The_Modern_Taste
09.09_-_The_Origin
09.10_-_The_Supramental_Vision
09.11_-_The_Supramental_Manifestation_and_World_Change
09.12_-_The_True_Teaching
09.14_-_Education_of_Girls
09.15_-_How_to_Listen
09.17_-_Health_in_the_Ashram
100.00_-_Synergy
10.01_-_A_Dream
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal
10.02_-_Beyond_Vedanta
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
10.04_-_Transfiguration
10.06_-_Beyond_the_Dualities
1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice
10.07_-_The_World_is_One
1.008_-_The_Principle_of_Self-Affirmation
1.009_-_Perception_and_Reality
1.00a_-_DIVISION_A_-_THE_INTERNAL_FIRES_OF_THE_SHEATHS.
1.00a_-_Foreword
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00b_-_DIVISION_B_-_THE_PERSONALITY_RAY_AND_FIRE_BY_FRICTION
1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00b_-_Introduction
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00c_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00d_-_Introduction
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00f_-_DIVISION_F_-_THE_LAW_OF_ECONOMY
1.00h_-_Foreword
1.00_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00_-_Introduction_to_Alchemy_of_Happiness
1.00_-_INTRODUCTORY_REMARKS
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE
1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks
1.00_-_PRELUDE_AT_THE_THEATRE
1.00_-_PROLOGUE_IN_HEAVEN
1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga
10.11_-_Beyond_Love_and_Hate
1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
10.13_-_Go_Through
10.14_-_Night_and_Day
10.16_-_The_Relative_Best
1.01_-_About_the_Elements
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Appearance_and_Reality
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_Asana
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Foreward
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_Historical_Survey
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_Introduction
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_first_meeting,_December_1918
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_NIGHT
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_On_Love
1.01_-_On_renunciation_of_the_world
1.01_-_ON_THE_THREE_METAMORPHOSES
1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_Proem
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Sets_down_the_first_line_and_begins_to_treat_of_the_imperfections_of_beginners.
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure
1.01_-_The_Castle
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_Ego
1.01_-_The_First_Steps
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_The_Path_of_Later_On
1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
1.01_-_The_Three_Metamorphoses
1.01_-_The_True_Aim_of_Life
1.01_-_The_Unexpected
1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World
1.02.2.1_-_Brahman_-_Oneness_of_God_and_the_World
10.22_-_Short_Notes_-_5-_Consciousness_and_Dimensions_of_View
1.02.3.1_-_The_Lord
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
1.02.4.1_-_The_Worlds_-_Surya
1.02.4.2_-_Action_and_the_Divine_Will
1.024_-_Affiliation_With_Larger_Wholes
10.24_-_Savitri
1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame
1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication
1.02_-_BEFORE_THE_CITY-GATE
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_Education
1.02_-_Groups_and_Statistical_Mechanics
1.02_-_In_the_Beginning
1.02_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES
1.02_-_Karmayoga
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_second_meeting,_March_1921
1.02_-_Of_certain_spiritual_imperfections_which_beginners_have_with_respect_to_the_habit_of_pride.
1.02_-_On_detachment
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_On_the_Service_of_the_Soul
1.02_-_ON_THE_TEACHERS_OF_VIRTUE
1.02_-_Prana
1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga
1.02_-_Prayer_of_Parashara_to_Vishnu
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Self-Consecration
1.02_-_Shakti_and_Personal_Effort
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_7_Habits__An_Overview
1.02_-_The_Age_of_Individualism_and_Reason
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Divine_Is_with_You
1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher
1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics
1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law
1.02_-_The_Great_Process
1.02_-_The_Human_Soul
1.02_-_The_Magic_Circle
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_The_Pit
1.02_-_THE_POOL_OF_TEARS
1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES
1.02_-_THE_QUATERNIO_AND_THE_MEDIATING_ROLE_OF_MERCURIUS
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Soul_Being_of_Man
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial
1.02_-_The_Virtues
1.02_-_The_Vision_of_the_Past
1.02_-_THE_WITHIN_OF_THINGS
1.02_-_To_Zen_Monks_Kin_and_Koku
1.02_-_What_is_Psycho_therapy?
10.30_-_India,_the_World_and_the_Ashram
10.31_-_The_Mystery_of_The_Five_Senses
1.032_-_Our_Concept_of_God
10.32_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Five_Elements
10.33_-_On_Discipline
10.34_-_Effort_and_Grace
10.35_-_The_Moral_and_the_Spiritual
1.035_-_The_Recitation_of_Mantra
10.36_-_Cling_to_Truth
1.036_-_The_Rise_of_Obstacles_in_Yoga_Practice
1.037_-_Preventing_the_Fall_in_Yoga
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.038_-_Impediments_in_Concentration_and_Meditation
1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Fire_in_the_Earth
1.03_-_Hymns_of_Gritsamada
1.03_-_Man_-_Slave_or_Free?
1.03_-_Master_Ma_is_Unwell
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_Of_some_imperfections_which_some_of_these_souls_are_apt_to_have,_with_respect_to_the_second_capital_sin,_which_is_avarice,_in_the_spiritual_sense
1.03_-_On_exile_or_pilgrimage
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_ON_THE_AFTERWORLDLY
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_.REASON._IN_PHILOSOPHY
1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita
1.03_-_Some_Aspects_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.03_-_Some_Practical_Aspects
1.03_-_Spiritual_Realisation,_The_aim_of_Bhakti-Yoga
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_The_Coming_of_the_Subjective_Age
1.03_-_The_Desert
1.03_-_THE_EARTH_IN_ITS_EARLY_STAGES
1.03_-_The_End_of_the_Intellect
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple
1.03_-_THE_ORPHAN,_THE_WIDOW,_AND_THE_MOON
1.03_-_The_Psychic_Prana
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_The_Sunlit_Path
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_The_Uncreated
1.03_-_The_Void
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.03_-_YIBHOOTI_PADA
1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind
1.045_-_Piercing_the_Structure_of_the_Object
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_ALCHEMY_AND_MANICHAEISM
1.04_-_A_Leader
1.04_-_Body,_Soul_and_Spirit
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Communion
1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell
1.04_-_Feedback_and_Oscillation
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Nothing_Exists_Per_Se_Except_Atoms_And_The_Void
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_Pratyahara
1.04_-_Reality_Omnipresent
1.04_-_Relationship_with_the_Divine
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_Sounds
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Control_of_Psychic_Prana
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Nation-Soul
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Fork_in_the_Road
1.04_-_The_Future_of_Man
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Need_of_Guru
1.04_-_The_Origin_and_Development_of_Poetry.
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Qabalah__The_Best_Training_for_Memory
1.04_-_THE_RABBIT_SENDS_IN_A_LITTLE_BILL
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_To_the_Priest_of_Rytan-ji
1.04_-_Wake-Up_Sermon
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.04_-_Wherefore_of_World?
1.04_-_Yoga_and_Human_Evolution
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.052_-_Yoga_Practice_-_A_Series_of_Positive_Steps
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.056_-_Lack_of_Knowledge_is_the_Cause_of_Suffering
1.057_-_The_Four_Manifestations_of_Ignorance
1.05_-_Adam_Kadmon
1.05_-_ADVICE_FROM_A_CATERPILLAR
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.05_-_Consciousness
1.05_-_Dharana
1.05_-_Hsueh_Feng's_Grain_of_Rice
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_Knowledge_by_Aquaintance_and_Knowledge_by_Description
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.05_-_MORALITY_AS_THE_ENEMY_OF_NATURE
1.05_-_On_painstaking_and_true_repentance_which_constitute_the_life_of_the_holy_convicts;_and_about_the_prison.
1.05_-_On_the_Love_of_God.
1.05_-_Pratyahara_and_Dharana
1.05_-_Prayer
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_Ritam
1.05_-_Solitude
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_The_Creative_Principle
1.05_-_The_Destiny_of_the_Individual
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_THE_MASTER_AND_KESHAB
1.05_-_The_New_Consciousness
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_True_and_False_Subjectivism
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Work_and_Teaching
1.060_-_Tracing_the_Ultimate_Cause_of_Any_Experience
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_A_Summary_of_my_Phenomenological_View_of_the_World
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_BOOK_THE_SIXTH
1.06_-_Confutation_Of_Other_Philosophers
1.06_-_Dhyana
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_Five_Dreams
1.06_-_Gestalt_and_Universals
1.06_-_Iconography
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.06_-_Magicians_as_Kings
1.06_-_Man_in_the_Universe
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_gluttony.
1.06_-_On_Induction
1.06_-_On_remembrance_of_death.
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_On_Work
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.06_-_Psycho_therapy_and_a_Philosophy_of_Life
1.06_-_Quieting_the_Vital
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Desire_to_be
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_The_Four_Powers_of_the_Mother
1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_The_Third_Circle__The_Gluttonous._Cerberus._The_Eternal_Rain._Ciacco._Florence.
1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1
1.06_-_The_Transformation_of_Dream_Life
1.06_-_WITCHES_KITCHEN
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.070_-_The_Seven_Stages_of_Perfection
1.075_-_Self-Control,_Study_and_Devotion_to_God
1.078_-_Kumbhaka_and_Concentration_of_Mind
1.07_-_A_MAD_TEA-PARTY
1.07_-_A_STREET
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Medicine_and_Psycho_therapy
1.07_-_Note_on_the_word_Go
1.07_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_envy_and_sloth.
1.07_-_On_Dreams
1.07_-_On_mourning_which_causes_joy.
1.07_-_On_Our_Knowledge_of_General_Principles
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_Raja-Yoga_in_Brief
1.07_-_Samadhi
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Continuity_of_Consciousness
1.07_-_The_Ego_and_the_Dualities
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_The_Fire_of_the_New_World
1.07_-_THE_GREAT_EVENT_FORESHADOWED_-_THE_PLANETIZATION_OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_The_Literal_Qabalah_(continued)
1.07_-_The_Magic_Wand
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Primary_Data_of_Being
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_2
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.080_-_Pratyahara_-_The_Return_of_Energy
1.081_-_The_Application_of_Pratyahara
1.083_-_Choosing_an_Object_for_Concentration
1.08_-_Adhyatma_Yoga
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Civilisation_and_Barbarism
1.08_-_Departmental_Kings_of_Nature
1.08_-_Independence_from_the_Physical
1.08_-_Information,_Language,_and_Society
1.08_-_Introduction_to_Patanjalis_Yoga_Aphorisms
1.08_-_ON_THE_TREE_ON_THE_MOUNTAINSIDE
1.08_-_Phlegyas._Philippo_Argenti._The_Gate_of_the_City_of_Dis.
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_SPIRITUAL_REPERCUSSIONS_OF_THE_ATOM_BOMB
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_Summary
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Methods_of_Vedantic_Knowledge
1.08_-_THE_QUEEN'S_CROQUET_GROUND
1.08_-_The_Splitting_of_the_Human_Personality_during_Spiritual_Training
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.08_-_The_Synthesis_of_Movement
1.08_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_3
1.08_-_THINGS_THE_GERMANS_LACK
1.08_-_Wherein_is_expounded_the_first_line_of_the_first_stanza,_and_a_beginning_is_made_of_the_explanation_of_this_dark_night
1.096_-_Powers_that_Accrue_in_the_Practice
1.097_-_Sublimation_of_Object-Consciousness
1.098_-_The_Transformation_from_Human_to_Divine
1.099_-_The_Entry_of_the_Eternal_into_the_Individual
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_A_System_of_Vedic_Psychology
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_Equality_and_the_Annihilation_of_Ego
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.09_-_Man_-_About_the_Body
1.09_-_Of_the_signs_by_which_it_will_be_known_that_the_spiritual_person_is_walking_along_the_way_of_this_night_and_purgation_of_sense.
1.09_-_On_remembrance_of_wrongs.
1.09_-_ON_THE_PREACHERS_OF_DEATH
1.09_-_PROMENADE
1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts
1.09_-_SELF-KNOWLEDGE
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_The_Absolute_Manifestation
1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol
1.09_-_The_Chosen_Ideal
1.09_-_The_Greater_Self
1.09_-_The_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.09_-_The_Pure_Existent
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
1.09_-_To_the_Students,_Young_and_Old
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
1.1.01_-_The_Divine_and_Its_Aspects
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
1.1.02_-_Sachchidananda
1.1.02_-_The_Aim_of_the_Integral_Yoga
11.02_-_The_Golden_Life-line
11.03_-_Cosmonautics
1.1.03_-_Man
1.1.04_-_Philosophy
11.04_-_The_Triple_Cord
1.1.05_-_The_Siddhis
11.06_-_The_Mounting_Fire
1.107_-_The_Bestowal_of_a_Divine_Gift
11.08_-_Body-Energy
11.09_-_Towards_the_Immortal_Body
1.10_-_Aesthetic_and_Ethical_Culture
1.10_-_ALICE'S_EVIDENCE
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_Fate_and_Free-Will
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Harmony
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.10_-_Mantra_Yoga
1.10_-_On_our_Knowledge_of_Universals
1.10_-_On_slander_or_calumny.
1.10_-_ON_WAR_AND_WARRIORS
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_The_Absolute_of_the_Being
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Image_of_the_Oceans_and_the_Rivers
1.10_-_The_Magical_Garment
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_THE_NEIGHBORS_HOUSE
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Roughly_Material_Plane_or_the_Material_World
1.10_-_The_Scolex_School
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.10_-_The_Three_Modes_of_Nature
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
1.1.1.03_-_Creative_Power_and_the_Human_Instrument
1.1.1.06_-_Inspiration_and_Effort
1.1.1.08_-_Self-criticism
11.13_-_In_these_Fateful_Days
11.14_-_Our_Finest_Hour
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_A_STREET
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Problem
1.11_-_FAITH_IN_MAN
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_Legend_of_Dhruva,_the_son_of_Uttanapada
1.11_-_Oneness
1.11_-_On_Intuitive_Knowledge
1.11_-_Powers
1.1.1_-_Text
1.11_-_The_Broken_Rocks._Pope_Anastasius._General_Description_of_the_Inferno_and_its_Divisions.
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.1.1_-_The_Mind_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
1.11_-_The_Reason_as_Governor_of_Life
1.11_-_The_Second_Genesis
1.11_-_The_Seven_Rivers
1.11_-_The_Soul_or_the_Astral_Body
1.11_-_Transformation
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.11_-_Woolly_Pomposities_of_the_Pious_Teacher
1.11_-_Works_and_Sacrifice
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution
1.12_-_GARDEN
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_Independence
1.1.2_-_Intellect_and_the_Intellectual
1.12_-_Sleep_and_Dreams
1.12_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_RIGHTS_OF_MAN
1.12_-_The_Astral_Plane
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Herds_of_the_Dawn
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.12_-_Truth_and_Knowledge
1.13_-_A_GARDEN-ARBOR
1.13_-_And_Then?
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Dawn_and_the_Truth
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.1.3_-_Mental_Difficulties_and_the_Need_of_Quietude
1.13_-_On_despondency.
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT
1.13_-_System_of_the_O.T.O.
1.13_-_The_Divine_Maya
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_The_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_The_Pentacle,_Lamen_or_Seal
1.13_-_The_Supermind_and_the_Yoga_of_Works
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_FOREST_AND_CAVERN
1.14_-_IMMORTALITY_AND_SURVIVAL
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_On_the_clamorous,_yet_wicked_master-the_stomach.
1.14_-_Postscript
1.14_-_The_Limits_of_Philosophical_Knowledge
1.1.4_-_The_Physical_Mind_and_Sadhana
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.14_-_The_Supermind_as_Creator
1.14_-_The_Suprarational_Beauty
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_Conclusion
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_MARGARETS_ROOM
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_ON_THE_THOUSAND_AND_ONE_GOALS
1.15_-_Prayers
1.15_-_Sex_Morality
1.15_-_SILENCE
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.15_-_The_Supramental_Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_Supreme_Truth-Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Transformed_Being
1.15_-_The_Value_of_Philosophy
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.1.5_-_Thought_and_Knowledge
1.16_-_Advantages_and_Disadvantages_of_Evocational_Magic
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_On_Concentration
1.16_-_(Plot_continued.)_Recognition__its_various_kinds,_with_examples
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.16_-_Religion
1.16_-_THE_ESSENCE_OF_THE_DEMOCRATIC_IDEA
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_The_Triple_Status_of_Supermind
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_On_poverty_(that_hastens_heavenwards).
1.17_-_Religion_as_the_Law_of_Life
1.17_-_SUFFERING
1.17_-_The_Burden_of_Royalty
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.17_-_The_Seven-Headed_Thought,_Swar_and_the_Dashagwas
1.17_-_The_Spiritus_Familiaris_or_Serving_Spirits
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_Asceticism
1.18_-_Evocation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_Hiranyakasipu's_reiterated_attempts_to_destroy_his_son
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_Mind_and_Supermind
1.18_-_On_Friendship
1.18_-_On_insensibility,_that_is,_deadening_of_the_soul_and_the_death_of_the_mind_before_the_death_of_the_body.
1.18_-_ON_LITTLE_OLD_AND_YOUNG_WOMEN
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.18_-_The_Human_Fathers
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_Equality
1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED
1.19_-_NIGHT
1.19_-_On_sleep,_prayer,_and_psalm-singing_in_chapel.
1.19_-_ON_THE_PROBABLE_EXISTENCE_AHEAD_OF_US_OF_AN_ULTRA-HUMAN
1.19_-_Tabooed_Acts
1.19_-_The_Curve_of_the_Rational_Age
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.19_-_The_Practice_of_Magical_Evocation
1.19_-_The_Victory_of_the_Fathers
1.200-1.224_Talks
1.201_-_Socrates
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
12.01_-_The_Return_to_Earth
12.01_-_This_Great_Earth_Our_Mother
12.02_-_The_Stress_of_the_Spirit
1.2.03_-_The_Interpretation_of_Scripture
12.03_-_The_Sorrows_of_God
1.2.05_-_Aspiration
12.05_-_The_World_Tragedy
12.06_-_The_Hero_and_the_Nymph
1.2.07_-_Surrender
1.2.08_-_Faith
12.08_-_Notes_on_Freedom
12.09_-_The_Story_of_Dr._Faustus_Retold
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
1.20_-_HOW_MAY_WE_CONCEIVE_AND_HOPE_THAT_HUMAN_UNANIMIZATION_WILL_BE_REALIZED_ON_EARTH?
1.20_-_ON_CHILD_AND_MARRIAGE
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_Talismans_-_The_Lamen_-_The_Pantacle
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.20_-_The_Fourth_Bolgia__Soothsayers._Amphiaraus,_Tiresias,_Aruns,_Manto,_Eryphylus,_Michael_Scott,_Guido_Bonatti,_and_Asdente._Virgil_reproaches_Dante's_Pity.
1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven
1.2.1.03_-_Psychic_and_Esoteric_Poetry
1.2.1.06_-_Symbolism_and_Allegory
12.10_-_The_Sunlit_Path
1.2.1.11_-_Mystic_Poetry_and_Spiritual_Poetry
1.2.11_-_Patience_and_Perseverance
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_FROM_THE_PRE-HUMAN_TO_THE_ULTRA-HUMAN,_THE_PHASES_OF_A_LIVING_PLANET
1.21_-_IDOLATRY
1.2.1_-_Mental_Development_and_Sadhana
1.21_-_My_Theory_of_Astrology
1.21_-_ON_FREE_DEATH
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_The_Ascent_of_Life
1.21_-_The_Spiritual_Aim_and_Life
1.21_-_WALPURGIS-NIGHT
1.22_-_ADVICE_TO_AN_ACTOR
1.22_-_How_to_Learn_the_Practice_of_Astrology
1.22_-_On_Prayer
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_On_the_many_forms_of_vainglory.
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.2.2_-_The_Place_of_Study_in_Sadhana
1.22_-_The_Problem_of_Life
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.23_-_Escape_from_the_Malabranche._The_Sixth_Bolgia__Hypocrites._Catalano_and_Loderingo._Caiaphas.
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Describes_how_vocal_prayer_may_be_practised_with_perfection_and_how_closely_allied_it_is_to_mental_prayer
1.24_-_Matter
1.24_-_Necromancy_and_Spiritism
1.24_-_On_Beauty
1.24_-_On_meekness,_simplicity,_guilelessness_which_come_not_from_nature_but_from_habit,_and_about_malice.
1.24_-_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.2.4_-_Speech_and_Yoga
1.24_-_The_Advent_and_Progress_of_the_Spiritual_Age
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_Critical_Objections_brought_against_Poetry,_and_the_principles_on_which_they_are_to_be_answered.
1.25_-_Describes_the_great_gain_which_comes_to_a_soul_when_it_practises_vocal_prayer_perfectly._Shows_how_God_may_raise_it_thence_to_things_supernatural.
1.25_-_Fascinations,_Invisibility,_Levitation,_Transmutations,_Kinks_in_Time
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.25_-_The_Knot_of_Matter
1.26_-_Continues_the_description_of_a_method_for_recollecting_the_thoughts._Describes_means_of_doing_this._This_chapter_is_very_profitable_for_those_who_are_beginning_prayer.
1.26_-_FESTIVAL_AT_ADHARS_HOUSE
1.26_-_Mental_Processes_-_Two_Only_are_Possible
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_PERSEVERANCE_AND_REGULARITY
1.26_-_The_Ascending_Series_of_Substance
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_Describes_the_great_love_shown_us_by_the_Lord_in_the_first_words_of_the_Paternoster_and_the_great_importance_of_our_making_no_account_of_good_birth_if_we_truly_desire_to_be_the_daughters_of_God.
1.27_-_Guido_da_Montefeltro._His_deception_by_Pope_Boniface_VIII.
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.27_-_Structure_of_Mind_Based_on_that_of_Body
1.27_-_The_Sevenfold_Chord_of_Being
1.28_-_Describes_the_nature_of_the_Prayer_of_Recollection_and_sets_down_some_of_the_means_by_which_we_can_make_it_a_habit.
1.28_-_Need_to_Define_God,_Self,_etc.
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.28_-_Supermind,_Mind_and_the_Overmind_Maya
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.29_-_Continues_to_describe_methods_for_achieving_this_Prayer_of_Recollection._Says_what_little_account_we_should_make_of_being_favoured_by_our_superiors.
1.2_-_Katha_Upanishads
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
1.3.01_-_Peace__The_Basis_of_the_Sadhana
1.3.02_-_Equality__The_Chief_Support
13.03_-_A_Programme_for_the_Second_Century_of_the_Divine_Manifestation
1.3.03_-_Quiet_and_Calm
13.05_-_A_Dream_Of_Surreal_Science
1.30_-_Do_you_Believe_in_God?
1.3.1.02_-_The_Object_of_Our_Yoga
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.31_-_Continues_the_same_subject._Explains_what_is_meant_by_the_Prayer_of_Quiet._Gives_several_counsels_to_those_who_experience_it._This_chapter_is_very_noteworthy.
1.31_-_The_Giants,_Nimrod,_Ephialtes,_and_Antaeus._Descent_to_Cocytus.
1.3.2.01_-_I._The_Entire_Purpose_of_Yoga
1.32_-_Expounds_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Fiat_voluntas_tua_sicut_in_coelo_et_in_terra._Describes_how_much_is_accomplished_by_those_who_repeat_these_words_with_full_resolution_and_how_well
1.32_-_How_can_a_Yogi_ever_be_Worried?
1.32_-_The_Ninth_Circle__Traitors._The_Frozen_Lake_of_Cocytus._First_Division,_Caina__Traitors_to_their_Kindred._Camicion_de'_Pazzi._Second_Division,_Antenora__Traitors_to_their_Country._Dante_questions_Bocca_degli
1.33_-_Count_Ugolino_and_the_Archbishop_Ruggieri._The_Death_of_Count_Ugolino's_Sons.
1.33_-_The_Gardens_of_Adonis
1.33_-_The_Golden_Mean
1.3.4.01_-_The_Beginning_and_the_End
1.34_-_Continues_the_same_subject._This_is_very_suitable_for_reading_after_the_reception_of_the_Most_Holy_Sacrament.
1.34_-_The_Tao_1
1.3.5.01_-_The_Law_of_the_Way
1.3.5.04_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness
1.35_-_Describes_the_recollection_which_should_be_practised_after_Communion._Concludes_this_subject_with_an_exclamatory_prayer_to_the_Eternal_Father.
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.37_-_Describes_the_excellence_of_this_prayer_called_the_Paternoster,_and_the_many_ways_in_which_we_shall_find_consolation_in_it.
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.38_-_Treats_of_the_great_need_which_we_have_to_beseech_the_Eternal_Father_to_grant_us_what_we_ask_in_these_words:_Et_ne_nos_inducas_in_tentationem,_sed_libera_nos_a_malo._Explains_certain_temptations._This_chapter_is_noteworthy.
1.38_-_Woman_-_Her_Magical_Formula
1.39_-_Continues_the_same_subject_and_gives_counsels_concerning_different_kinds_of_temptation._Suggests_two_remedies_by_which_we_may_be_freed_from_temptations.135
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
1.4.01_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Guidance
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
14.02_-_Occult_Experiences
1.4.03_-_The_Guru
14.04_-_More_of_Yajnavalkya
14.05_-_The_Golden_Rule
14.06_-_Liberty,_Self-Control_and_Friendship
1.40_-_Describes_how,_by_striving_always_to_walk_in_the_love_and_fear_of_God,_we_shall_travel_safely_amid_all_these_temptations.
1.41_-_Are_we_Reincarnations_of_the_Ancient_Egyptians?
1.41_-_Speaks_of_the_fear_of_God_and_of_how_we_must_keep_ourselves_from_venial_sins.
1.42_-_Treats_of_these_last_words_of_the_Paternoster__Sed_libera_nos_a_malo._Amen._But_deliver_us_from_evil._Amen.
1.439
1.43_-_Dionysus
1.44_-_Demeter_and_Persephone
1.44_-_Serious_Style_of_A.C.,_or_the_Apparent_Frivolity_of_Some_of_my_Remarks
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.45_-_The_Corn-Mother_and_the_Corn-Maiden_in_Northern_Europe
1.45_-_Unserious_Conduct_of_a_Pupil
1.46_-_Selfishness
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.47_-_Reincarnation
1.48_-_The_Corn-Spirit_as_an_Animal
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
1.49_-_Thelemic_Morality
15.04_-_The_Mother_Abides
15.05_-_Twin_Prayers
15.06_-_Words,_Words,_Words...
1.50_-_A.C._and_the_Masters;_Why_they_Chose_him,_etc.
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.51_-_Homeopathic_Magic_of_a_Flesh_Diet
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Family_-_Public_Enemy_No._1
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_Mother-Love
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.54_-_Types_of_Animal_Sacrament
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.55_-_The_Transference_of_Evil
1.56_-_Marriage_-_Property_-_War_-_Politics
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Beings_I_have_Seen_with_my_Physical_Eye
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.58_-_Do_Angels_Ever_Cut_Themselves_Shaving?
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.59_-_Geomancy
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
1.60_-_Between_Heaven_and_Earth
1.60_-_Knack
1.61_-_Power_and_Authority
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.63_-_The_Interpretation_of_the_Fire-Festivals
1.65_-_Man
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.67_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Custom
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
1.68_-_The_Golden_Bough
1.69_-_Original_Sin
1.70_-_Morality_1
1.73_-_Monsters,_Niggers,_Jews,_etc.
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.76_-_The_Gods_-_How_and_Why_they_Overlap
1.77_-_Work_Worthwhile_-_Why?
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
18.03_-_Tagore
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.81_-_Method_of_Training
1.82_-_Epistola_Penultima_-_The_Two_Ways_to_Reality
1.83_-_Epistola_Ultima
19.04_-_The_Flowers
19.05_-_The_Fool
19.06_-_The_Wise
19.07_-_The_Adept
19.09_-_On_Evil
1912_11_02p
1913_05_11p
1913_11_29p
19.13_-_Of_the_World
1914_01_01p
1914_01_04p
1914_01_10p
1914_01_13p
1914_02_12p
1914_03_09p
1914_03_14p
1914_03_24p
1914_03_25p
1914_03_28p
1914_04_01p
1914_04_07p
1914_04_20p
1914_05_21p
1914_05_24p
1914_05_27p
1914_06_22p
1914_06_25p
1914_06_26p
1914_07_27p
1914_08_20p
1914_12_10p
19.14_-_The_Awakened
1915_01_17p
1915_03_07p
1915_05_24p
1916_01_15p
1916_01_23p
1916_06_07p
1916_12_05p
1916_12_12p
1916_12_20p
1916_12_30p
1917_01_05p
1917_03_27p
19.17_-_On_Anger
19.18_-_On_Impurity
19.20_-_The_Path
19.21_-_Miscellany
19.22_-_Of_Hell
1928_12_28p
1929-04-14_-_Dangers_of_Yoga_-_Two_paths,_tapasya_and_surrender_-_Impulses,_desires_and_Yoga_-_Difficulties_-_Unification_around_the_psychic_being_-_Ambition,_undoing_of_many_Yogis_-_Powers,_misuse_and_right_use_of_-_How_to_recognise_the_Divine_Will_-_Accept_things_that_come_from_Divine_-_Vital_devotion_-_Need_of_strong_body_and_nerves_-_Inner_being,_invariable
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1929-05-12_-_Beings_of_vital_world_(vampires)_-_Money_power_and_vital_beings_-_Capacity_for_manifestation_of_will_-_Entry_into_vital_world_-_Body,_a_protection_-_Individuality_and_the_vital_world
1929-05-19_-_Mind_and_its_workings,_thought-forms_-_Adverse_conditions_and_Yoga_-_Mental_constructions_-_Illness_and_Yoga
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1929-06-02_-__Divine_love_and_its_manifestation_-_Part_of_the_vital_being_in_Divine_love
1929-06-09_-_Nature_of_religion_-_Religion_and_the_spiritual_life_-_Descent_of_Divine_Truth_and_Force_-_To_be_sure_of_your_religion,_country,_family-choose_your_own_-_Religion_and_numbers
1929-06-16_-_Illness_and_Yoga_-_Subtle_body_(nervous_envelope)_-_Fear_and_illness
1929-06-23_-_Knowledge_of_the_Yogi_-_Knowledge_and_the_Supermind_-_Methods_of_changing_the_condition_of_the_body_-_Meditation,_aspiration,_sincerity
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1929-08-04_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Personality_and_surrender_-_Desire_and_passion_-_Spirituality_and_morality
1936_08_21p
1950-12-21_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams
1950-12-25_-_Christmas_-_festival_of_Light_-_Energy_and_mental_growth_-_Meditation_and_concentration_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams_-_Playing_a_game_well,_and_energy
1950-12-28_-_Correct_judgment.
1950-12-30_-_Perfect_and_progress._Dynamic_equilibrium._True_sincerity.
1951-01-08_-_True_vision_and_understanding_of_the_world._Progress,_equilibrium._Inner_reality_-_the_psychic._Animals_and_the_psychic.
1951-01-11_-_Modesty_and_vanity_-_Generosity
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-01-15_-_Sincerity_-_inner_discernment_-_inner_light._Evil_and_imbalance._Consciousness_and_instruments.
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-01-27_-_Sleep_-_desires_-_repression_-_the_subconscient._Dreams_-_the_super-conscient_-_solving_problems._Ladder_of_being_-_samadhi._Phases_of_sleep_-_silence,_true_rest._Vital_body_and_illness.
1951-02-03_-_What_is_Yoga?_for_what?_-_Aspiration,_seeking_the_Divine._-_Process_of_yoga,_renouncing_the_ego.
1951-02-05_-_Surrender_and_tapasya_-_Dealing_with_difficulties,_sincerity,_spiritual_discipline_-_Narrating_experiences_-_Vital_impulse_and_will_for_progress
1951-02-08_-_Unifying_the_being_-_ideas_of_good_and_bad_-_Miracles_-_determinism_-_Supreme_Will_-_Distinguishing_the_voice_of_the_Divine
1951-02-12_-_Divine_force_-_Signs_indicating_readiness_-_Weakness_in_mind,_vital_-_concentration_-_Divine_perception,_human_notion_of_good,_bad_-_Conversion,_consecration_-_progress_-_Signs_of_entering_the_path_-_kinds_of_meditation_-_aspiration
1951-02-15_-_Dreams,_symbolic_-_true_repose_-_False_visions_-_Earth-memory_and_history
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-19_-_Exteriorisation-_clairvoyance,_fainting,_etc_-_Somnambulism_-_Tartini_-_childrens_dreams_-_Nightmares_-_gurus_protection_-_Mind_and_vital_roam_during_sleep
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1951-02-24_-_Psychic_being_and_entity_-_dimensions_-_in_the_atom_-_Death_-_exteriorisation_-_unconsciousness_-_Past_lives_-_progress_upon_earth_-_choice_of_birth_-_Consecration_to_divine_Work_-_psychic_memories_-_Individualisation_-_progress
1951-02-26_-_On_reading_books_-_gossip_-_Discipline_and_realisation_-_Imaginary_stories-_value_of_-_Private_lives_of_big_men_-_relaxation_-_Understanding_others_-_gnostic_consciousness
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-03-03_-_Hostile_forces_-_difficulties_-_Individuality_and_form_-_creation
1951-03-05_-_Disasters-_the_forces_of_Nature_-_Story_of_the_charity_Bazar_-_Liberation_and_law_-_Dealing_with_the_mind_and_vital-_methods
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-03-10_-_Fairy_Tales-_serpent_guarding_treasure_-_Vital_beings-_their_incarnations_-_The_vital_being_after_death_-_Nightmares-_vital_and_mental_-_Mind_and_vital_after_death_-_The_spirit_of_the_form-_Egyptian_mummies
1951-03-12_-_Mental_forms_-_learning_difficult_subjects_-_Mental_fortress_-_thought_-_Training_the_mind_-_Helping_the_vital_being_after_death_-_ceremonies_-_Human_stupidities
1951-03-14_-_Plasticity_-_Conditions_for_knowing_the_Divine_Will_-_Illness_-_microbes_-_Fear_-_body-reflexes_-_The_best_possible_happens_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_True_knowledge_-_a_work_to_do_-_the_Ashram
1951-03-17_-_The_universe-_eternally_new,_same_-_Pralaya_Traditions_-_Light_and_thought_-_new_consciousness,_forces_-_The_expanding_universe_-_inexpressible_experiences_-_Ashram_surcharged_with_Light_-_new_force_-_vibrating_atmospheres
1951-03-19_-_Mental_worlds_and_their_beings_-_Understanding_in_silence_-_Psychic_world-_its_characteristics_-_True_experiences_and_mental_formations_-_twelve_senses
1951-03-24_-_Descent_of_Divine_Love,_of_Consciousness_-_Earth-_a_symbolic_formation_-_the_Divine_Presence_-_The_psychic_being_and_other_worlds_-_Divine_Love_and_Grace_-_Becoming_consaious_of_Divine_Love_-_Finding_ones_psychic_being_-_Responsibility
1951-03-26_-_Losing_all_to_gain_all_-_psychic_being_-_Transforming_the_vital_-_physical_habits_-_the_subconscient_-_Overcoming_difficulties_-_weakness,_an_insincerity_-_to_change_the_world_-_Psychic_source,_flash_of_experience_-_preparation_for_yoga
1951-03-29_-_The_Great_Vehicle_and_The_Little_Vehicle_-_Choosing_ones_family,_country_-_The_vital_being_distorted_-_atavism_-_Sincerity_-_changing_ones_character
1951-03-31_-_Physical_ailment_and_mental_disorder_-_Curing_an_illness_spiritually_-_Receptivity_of_the_body_-_The_subtle-physical-_illness_accidents_-_Curing_sunstroke_and_other_disorders
1951-04-02_-_Causes_of_accidents_-_Little_entities,_helpful_or_mischievous-_incidents
1951-04-05_-_Illusion_and_interest_in_action_-_The_action_of_the_divine_Grace_and_the_ego_-_Concentration,_aspiration,_will,_inner_silence_-_Value_of_a_story_or_a_language_-_Truth_-_diversity_in_the_world
1951-04-07_-_Origin_of_Evil_-_Misery-_its_cause
1951-04-09_-_Modern_Art_-_Trend_of_art_in_Europe_in_the_twentieth_century_-_Effect_of_the_Wars_-_descent_of_vital_worlds_-_Formation_of_character_-_If_there_is_another_war
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1951-04-17_-_Unity,_diversity_-_Protective_envelope_-_desires_-_consciousness,_true_defence_-_Perfection_of_physical_-_cinema_-_Choice,_constant_and_conscious_-_law_of_ones_being_-_the_One,_the_Multiplicity_-_Civilization-_preparing_an_instrument
1951-04-19_-_Demands_and_needs_-_human_nature_-_Abolishing_the_ego_-_Food-_tamas,_consecration_-_Changing_the_nature-_the_vital_and_the_mind_-_The_yoga_of_the_body__-_cellular_consciousness
1951-04-21_-_Sri_Aurobindos_letter_on_conditions_for_doing_yoga_-_Aspiration,_tapasya,_surrender_-_The_lower_vital_-_old_habits_-_obsession_-_Sri_Aurobindo_on_choice_and_the_double_life_-_The_old_fiasco_-_inner_realisation_and_outer_change
1951-04-26_-_Irrevocable_transformation_-_The_divine_Shakti_-_glad_submission_-_Rejection,_integral_-_Consecration_-_total_self-forgetfulness_-_work
1951-04-28_-_Personal_effort_-_tamas,_laziness_-_Static_and_dynamic_power_-_Stupidity_-_psychic_and_intelligence_-_Philosophies-_different_languages_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_Surrender_of_ones_being_and_ones_work
1951-05-03_-_Money_and_its_use_for_the_divine_work_-_problems_-_Mastery_over_desire-_individual_and_collective_change
1951-05-05_-_Needs_and_desires_-_Discernment_-_sincerity_and_true_perception_-_Mantra_and_its_effects_-_Object_in_action-_to_serve_-_relying_only_on_the_Divine
1951-05-11_-_Mahakali_and_Kali_-_Avatar_and_Vibhuti_-_Sachchidananda_behind_all_states_of_being_-_The_power_of_will_-_receiving_the_Divine_Will
1951-05-14_-_Chance_-_the_play_of_forces_-_Peace,_given_and_lost_-_Abolishing_the_ego
1953-03-18
1953-03-25
1953-04-29
1953-05-06
1953-05-13
1953-05-20
1953-05-27
1953-06-03
1953-06-10
1953-06-17
1953-06-24
1953-07-01
1953-07-08
1953-07-15
1953-07-22
1953-07-29
1953-08-05
1953-08-12
1953-08-26
1953-09-02
1953-09-16
1953-09-23
1953-09-30
1953-10-07
1953-10-14
1953-10-21
1953-10-28
1953-11-11
1953-11-18
1953-12-09
1953-12-16
1953-12-23
1953-12-30
1954-02-03_-_The_senses_and_super-sense_-_Children_can_be_moulded_-_Keeping_things_in_order_-_The_shadow
1954-02-10_-_Study_a_variety_of_subjects_-_Memory_-Memory_of_past_lives_-_Getting_rid_of_unpleasant_thoughts
1954-02-17_-_Experience_expressed_in_different_ways_-_Origin_of_the_psychic_being_-_Progress_in_sports_-Everything_is_not_for_the_best
1954-03-24_-_Dreams_and_the_condition_of_the_stomach_-_Tobacco_and_alcohol_-_Nervousness_-_The_centres_and_the_Kundalini_-_Control_of_the_senses
1954-04-07_-_Communication_without_words_-_Uneven_progress_-_Words_and_the_Word
1954-04-14_-_Love_-_Can_a_person_love_another_truly?_-_Parental_love
1954-04-28_-_Aspiration_and_receptivity_-_Resistance_-_Purusha_and_Prakriti,_not_masculine_and_feminine
1954-05-05_-_Faith,_trust,_confidence_-_Insincerity_and_unconsciousness
1954-05-12_-_The_Purusha_-_Surrender_-_Distinguishing_between_influences_-_Perfect_sincerity
1954-05-26_-_Symbolic_dreams_-_Psychic_sorrow_-_Dreams,_one_is_rarely_conscious
1954-06-16_-_Influences,_Divine_and_other_-_Adverse_forces_-_The_four_great_Asuras_-_Aspiration_arranges_circumstances_-_Wanting_only_the_Divine
1954-06-23_-_Meat-eating_-_Story_of_Mothers_vegetable_garden_-_Faithfulness_-_Conscious_sleep
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-07-07_-_The_inner_warrior_-_Grace_and_the_Falsehood_-_Opening_from_below_-_Surrender_and_inertia_-_Exclusive_receptivity_-_Grace_and_receptivity
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-07-21_-_Mistakes_-_Success_-_Asuras_-_Mental_arrogance_-_Difficulty_turned_into_opportunity_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Conversion_of_men_governed_by_adverse_forces
1954-07-28_-_Money_-_Ego_and_individuality_-_The_shadow
1954-08-04_-_Servant_and_worker_-_Justification_of_weakness_-_Play_of_the_Divine_-_Why_are_you_here_in_the_Ashram?
1954-08-25_-_Ananda_aspect_of_the_Mother_-_Changing_conditions_in_the_Ashram_-_Ascetic_discipline_-_Mothers_body
1954-09-08_-_Hostile_forces_-_Substance_-_Concentration_-_Changing_the_centre_of_thought_-_Peace
1954-09-15_-_Parts_of_the_being_-_Thoughts_and_impulses_-_The_subconscient_-_Precise_vocabulary_-_The_Grace_and_difficulties
1954-09-22_-_The_supramental_creation_-_Rajasic_eagerness_-_Silence_from_above_-_Aspiration_and_rejection_-_Effort,_individuality_and_ego_-_Aspiration_and_desire
1954-09-29_-_The_right_spirit_-_The_Divine_comes_first_-_Finding_the_Divine_-_Mistakes_-_Rejecting_impulses_-_Making_the_consciousness_vast_-_Firm_resolution
1954-10-06_-_What_happens_is_for_the_best_-_Blaming_oneself_-Experiences_-_The_vital_desire-soul_-Creating_a_spiritual_atmosphere_-Thought_and_Truth
1954-10-20_-_Stand_back_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Seeing_images_in_meditation_-_Berlioz_-Music_-_Mothers_organ_music_-_Destiny
1954-11-03_-_Body_opening_to_the_Divine_-_Concentration_in_the_heart_-_The_army_of_the_Divine_-_The_knot_of_the_ego_-Streng_thening_ones_will
1954-11-10_-_Inner_experience,_the_basis_of_action_-_Keeping_open_to_the_Force_-_Faith_through_aspiration_-_The_Mothers_symbol_-_The_mind_and_vital_seize_experience_-_Degrees_of_sincerity_-Becoming_conscious_of_the_Divine_Force
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-08_-_Cosmic_consciousness_-_Clutching_-_The_central_will_of_the_being_-_Knowledge_by_identity
1954-12-15_-_Many_witnesses_inside_oneself_-_Children_in_the_Ashram_-_Trance_and_the_waking_consciousness_-_Ascetic_methods_-_Education,_spontaneous_effort_-_Spiritual_experience
1954-12-22_-_Possession_by_hostile_forces_-_Purity_and_morality_-_Faith_in_the_final_success_-Drawing_back_from_the_path
1955-02-09_-_Desire_is_contagious_-_Primitive_form_of_love_-_the_artists_delight_-_Psychic_need,_mind_as_an_instrument_-_How_the_psychic_being_expresses_itself_-_Distinguishing_the_parts_of_ones_being_-_The_psychic_guides_-_Illness_-_Mothers_vision
1955-02-16_-_Losing_something_given_by_Mother_-_Using_things_well_-_Sadhak_collecting_soap-pieces_-_What_things_are_truly_indispensable_-_Natures_harmonious_arrangement_-_Riches_a_curse,_philanthropy_-_Misuse_of_things_creates_misery
1955-02-23_-_On_the_sense_of_taste,_educating_the_senses_-_Fasting_produces_a_state_of_receptivity,_drawing_energy_-_The_body_and_food
1955-03-09_-_Psychic_directly_contacted_through_the_physical_-_Transforming_egoistic_movements_-_Work_of_the_psychic_being_-_Contacting_the_psychic_and_the_Divine_-_Experiences_of_different_kinds_-_Attacks_of_adverse_forces
1955-03-23_-_Procedure_for_rejection_and_transformation_-_Learning_by_heart,_true_understanding_-_Vibrations,_movements_of_the_species_-_A_cat_and_a_Russian_peasant_woman_-_A_cat_doing_yoga
1955-04-06_-_Freuds_psychoanalysis,_the_subliminal_being_-_The_psychic_and_the_subliminal_-_True_psychology_-_Changing_the_lower_nature_-_Faith_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Psychic_contact_established_in_all_in_the_Ashram
1955-04-13_-_Psychoanalysts_-_The_underground_super-ego,_dreams,_sleep,_control_-_Archetypes,_Overmind_and_higher_-_Dream_of_someone_dying_-_Integral_repose,_entering_Sachchidananda_-_Organising_ones_life,_concentration,_repose
1955-04-27_-_Symbolic_dreams_and_visions_-_Curing_pain_by_various_methods_-_Different_states_of_consciousness_-_Seeing_oneself_dead_in_a_dream_-_Exteriorisation
1955-05-04_-_Drawing_on_the_universal_vital_forces_-_The_inner_physical_-_Receptivity_to_different_kinds_of_forces_-_Progress_and_receptivity
1955-05-18_-_The_Problem_of_Woman_-_Men_and_women_-_The_Supreme_Mother,_the_new_creation_-_Gods_and_goddesses_-_A_story_of_Creation,_earth_-_Psychic_being_only_on_earth,_beings_everywhere_-_Going_to_other_worlds_by_occult_means
1955-05-25_-_Religion_and_reason_-_true_role_and_field_-_an_obstacle_to_or_minister_of_the_Spirit_-_developing_and_meaning_-_Learning_how_to_live,_the_elite_-_Reason_controls_and_organises_life_-_Nature_is_infrarational
1955-06-01_-_The_aesthetic_conscience_-_Beauty_and_form_-_The_roots_of_our_life_-_The_sense_of_beauty_-_Educating_the_aesthetic_sense,_taste_-_Mental_constructions_based_on_a_revelation_-_Changing_the_world_and_humanity
1955-06-08_-_Working_for_the_Divine_-_ideal_attitude_-_Divine_manifesting_-_reversal_of_consciousness,_knowing_oneself_-_Integral_progress,_outer,_inner,_facing_difficulties_-_People_in_Ashram_-_doing_Yoga_-_Children_given_freedom,_choosing_yoga
1955-06-22_-_Awakening_the_Yoga-shakti_-_The_thousand-petalled_lotus-_Reading,_how_far_a_help_for_yoga_-_Simple_and_complicated_combinations_in_men
1955-06-29_-_The_true_vital_and_true_physical_-_Time_and_Space_-_The_psychics_memory_of_former_lives_-_The_psychic_organises_ones_life_-_The_psychics_knowledge_and_direction
1955-07-06_-_The_psychic_and_the_central_being_or_jivatman_-_Unity_and_multiplicity_in_the_Divine_-_Having_experiences_and_the_ego_-_Mental,_vital_and_physical_exteriorisation_-_Imagination_has_a_formative_power_-_The_function_of_the_imagination
1955-07-13_-_Cosmic_spirit_and_cosmic_consciousness_-_The_wall_of_ignorance,_unity_and_separation_-_Aspiration_to_understand,_to_know,_to_be_-_The_Divine_is_in_the_essence_of_ones_being_-_Realising_desires_through_the_imaginaton
1955-07-20_-_The_Impersonal_Divine_-_Surrender_to_the_Divine_brings_perfect_freedom_-_The_Divine_gives_Himself_-_The_principle_of_the_inner_dimensions_-_The_paths_of_aspiration_and_surrender_-_Linear_and_spherical_paths_and_realisations
1955-08-03_-_Nothing_is_impossible_in_principle_-_Psychic_contact_and_psychic_influence_-_Occult_powers,_adverse_influences;_magic_-_Magic,_occultism_and_Yogic_powers_-Hypnotism_and_its_effects
1955-08-17_-_Vertical_ascent_and_horizontal_opening_-_Liberation_of_the_psychic_being_-_Images_for_discovery_of_the_psychic_being_-_Sadhana_to_contact_the_psychic_being
1955-10-05_-_Science_and_Ignorance_-_Knowledge,_science_and_the_Buddha_-_Knowing_by_identification_-_Discipline_in_science_and_in_Buddhism_-_Progress_in_the_mental_field_and_beyond_it
1955-10-12_-_The_problem_of_transformation_-_Evolution,_man_and_superman_-_Awakening_need_of_a_higher_good_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_earths_history_-_Setting_foot_on_the_new_path_-_The_true_reality_of_the_universe_-_the_new_race_-_...
1955-10-19_-_The_rhythms_of_time_-_The_lotus_of_knowledge_and_perfection_-_Potential_knowledge_-_The_teguments_of_the_soul_-_Shastra_and_the_Gurus_direct_teaching_-_He_who_chooses_the_Infinite...
1955-10-26_-_The_Divine_and_the_universal_Teacher_-_The_power_of_the_Word_-_The_Creative_Word,_the_mantra_-_Sound,_music_in_other_worlds_-_The_domains_of_pure_form,_colour_and_ideas
1955-11-02_-_The_first_movement_in_Yoga_-_Interiorisation,_finding_ones_soul_-_The_Vedic_Age_-_An_incident_about_Vivekananda_-_The_imaged_language_of_the_Vedas_-_The_Vedic_Rishis,_involutionary_beings_-_Involution_and_evolution
1955-11-16_-_The_significance_of_numbers_-_Numbers,_astrology,_true_knowledge_-_Divines_Love_flowers_for_Kali_puja_-_Desire,_aspiration_and_progress_-_Determining_ones_approach_to_the_Divine_-_Liberation_is_obtained_through_austerities_-_...
1955-11-23_-_One_reality,_multiple_manifestations_-_Integral_Yoga,_approach_by_all_paths_-_The_supreme_man_and_the_divine_man_-_Miracles_and_the_logic_of_events
1956-01-04_-_Integral_idea_of_the_Divine_-_All_things_attracted_by_the_Divine_-_Bad_things_not_in_place_-_Integral_yoga_-_Moving_idea-force,_ideas_-_Consequences_of_manifestation_-_Work_of_Spirit_via_Nature_-_Change_consciousness,_change_world
1956-01-11_-_Desire_and_self-deception_-_Giving_all_one_is_and_has_-_Sincerity,_more_powerful_than_will_-_Joy_of_progress_Definition_of_youth
1956-01-18_-_Two_sides_of_individual_work_-_Cheerfulness_-_chosen_vessel_of_the_Divine_-_Aspiration,_consciousness,_of_plants,_of_children_-_Being_chosen_by_the_Divine_-_True_hierarchy_-_Perfect_relation_with_the_Divine_-_India_free_in_1915
1956-01-25_-_The_divine_way_of_life_-_Divine,_Overmind,_Supermind_-_Material_body__for_discovery_of_the_Divine_-_Five_psychological_perfections
1956-02-01_-_Path_of_knowledge_-_Finding_the_Divine_in_life_-_Capacity_for_contact_with_the_Divine_-_Partial_and_total_identification_with_the_Divine_-_Manifestation_and_hierarchy
1956-02-08_-_Forces_of_Nature_expressing_a_higher_Will_-_Illusion_of_separate_personality_-_One_dynamic_force_which_moves_all_things_-_Linear_and_spherical_thinking_-_Common_ideal_of_life,_microscopic
1956-02-22_-_Strong_immobility_of_an_immortal_spirit_-_Equality_of_soul_-_Is_all_an_expression_of_the_divine_Will?_-_Loosening_the_knot_of_action_-_Using_experience_as_a_cloak_to_cover_excesses_-_Sincerity,_a_rare_virtue
1956-03-07_-_Sacrifice,_Animals,_hostile_forces,_receive_in_proportion_to_consciousness_-_To_be_luminously_open_-_Integral_transformation_-_Pain_of_rejection,_delight_of_progress_-_Spirit_behind_intention_-_Spirit,_matter,_over-simplified
1956-03-14_-_Dynamic_meditation_-_Do_all_as_an_offering_to_the_Divine_-_Significance_of_23.4.56._-_If_twelve_men_of_goodwill_call_the_Divine
1956-03-21_-_Identify_with_the_Divine_-_The_Divine,_the_most_important_thing_in_life
1956-03-28_-_The_starting-point_of_spiritual_experience_-_The_boundless_finite_-_The_Timeless_and_Time_-_Mental_explanation_not_enough_-_Changing_knowledge_into_experience_-_Sat-Chit-Tapas-Ananda
1956-04-18_-_Ishwara_and_Shakti,_seeing_both_aspects_-_The_Impersonal_and_the_divine_Person_-_Soul,_the_presence_of_the_divine_Person_-_Going_to_other_worlds,_exteriorisation,_dreams_-_Telling_stories_to_oneself
1956-04-25_-_God,_human_conception_and_the_true_Divine_-_Earthly_existence,_to_realise_the_Divine_-_Ananda,_divine_pleasure_-_Relations_with_the_divine_Presence_-_Asking_the_Divine_for_what_one_needs_-_Allowing_the_Divine_to_lead_one
1956-05-16_-_Needs_of_the_body,_not_true_in_themselves_-_Spiritual_and_supramental_law_-_Aestheticised_Paganism_-_Morality,_checks_true_spiritual_effort_-_Effect_of_supramental_descent_-_Half-lights_and_false_lights
1956-05-23_-_Yoga_and_religion_-_Story_of_two_clergymen_on_a_boat_-_The_Buddha_and_the_Supramental_-_Hieroglyphs_and_phonetic_alphabets_-_A_vision_of_ancient_Egypt_-_Memory_for_sounds
1956-05-30_-_Forms_as_symbols_of_the_Force_behind_-_Art_as_expression_of_contact_with_the_Divine_-_Supramental_psychological_perfection_-_Division_of_works_-_The_Ashram,_idle_stupidities
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
1956-06-20_-_Hearts_mystic_light,_intuition_-_Psychic_being,_contact_-_Secular_ethics_-_True_role_of_mind_-_Realise_the_Divine_by_love_-_Depression,_pleasure,_joy_-_Heart_mixture_-_To_follow_the_soul_-_Physical_process_-_remember_the_Mother
1956-06-27_-_Birth,_entry_of_soul_into_body_-_Formation_of_the_supramental_world_-_Aspiration_for_progress_-_Bad_thoughts_-_Cerebral_filter_-_Progress_and_resistance
1956-07-04_-_Aspiration_when_one_sees_a_shooting_star_-_Preparing_the_bodyn_making_it_understand_-_Getting_rid_of_pain_and_suffering_-_Psychic_light
1956-07-11_-_Beauty_restored_to_its_priesthood_-_Occult_worlds,_occult_beings_-_Difficulties_and_the_supramental_force
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-08-22_-_The_heaven_of_the_liberated_mind_-_Trance_or_samadhi_-_Occult_discipline_for_leaving_consecutive_bodies_-_To_be_greater_than_ones_experience_-_Total_self-giving_to_the_Grace_-_The_truth_of_the_being_-_Unique_relation_with_the_Supreme
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1956-09-05_-_Material_life,_seeing_in_the_right_way_-_Effect_of_the_Supermind_on_the_earth_-_Emergence_of_the_Supermind_-_Falling_back_into_the_same_mistaken_ways
1956-09-12_-_Questions,_practice_and_progress
1956-09-19_-_Power,_predominant_quality_of_vital_being_-_The_Divine,_the_psychic_being,_the_Supermind_-_How_to_come_out_of_the_physical_consciousness_-_Look_life_in_the_face_-_Ordinary_love_and_Divine_love
1956-09-26_-_Soul_of_desire_-_Openness,_harmony_with_Nature_-_Communion_with_divine_Presence_-_Individuality,_difficulties,_soul_of_desire_-_personal_contact_with_the_Mother_-_Inner_receptivity_-_Bad_thoughts_before_the_Mother
1956-10-03_-_The_Mothers_different_ways_of_speaking_-_new_manifestation_-_new_element,_possibilities_-_child_prodigies_-_Laws_of_Nature,_supramental_-_Logic_of_the_unforeseen_-_Creative_writers,_hands_of_musicians_-_Prodigious_children,_men
1956-10-31_-_Manifestation_of_divine_love_-_Deformation_of_Love_by_human_consciousness_-_Experience_and_expression_of_experience
1956-11-14_-_Conquering_the_desire_to_appear_good_-_Self-control_and_control_of_the_life_around_-_Power_of_mastery_-_Be_a_great_yogi_to_be_a_good_teacher_-_Organisation_of_the_Ashram_school_-_Elementary_discipline_of_regularity
1956-11-21_-_Knowings_and_Knowledge_-_Reason,_summit_of_mans_mental_activities_-_Willings_and_the_true_will_-_Personal_effort_-_First_step_to_have_knowledge_-_Relativity_of_medical_knowledge_-_Mental_gymnastics_make_the_mind_supple
1956-11-28_-_Desire,_ego,_animal_nature_-_Consciousness,_a_progressive_state_-_Ananda,_desireless_state_beyond_enjoyings_-_Personal_effort_that_is_mental_-_Reason,_when_to_disregard_it_-_Reason_and_reasons
1956-12-12_-_paradoxes_-_Nothing_impossible_-_unfolding_universe,_the_Eternal_-_Attention,_concentration,_effort_-_growth_capacity_almost_unlimited_-_Why_things_are_not_the_same_-_will_and_willings_-_Suggestions,_formations_-_vital_world
1956-12-26_-_Defeated_victories_-_Change_of_consciousness_-_Experiences_that_indicate_the_road_to_take_-_Choice_and_preference_-_Diversity_of_the_manifestation
1957-01-02_-_Can_one_go_out_of_time_and_space?_-_Not_a_crucified_but_a_glorified_body_-_Individual_effort_and_the_new_force
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-01-16_-_Seeking_something_without_knowing_it_-_Why_are_we_here?
1957-01-23_-_How_should_we_understand_pure_delight?_-_The_drop_of_honey_-_Action_of_the_Divine_Will_in_the_world
1957-01-30_-_Artistry_is_just_contrast_-_How_to_perceive_the_Divine_Guidance?
1957-02-06_-_Death,_need_of_progress_-_Changing_Natures_methods
1957-02-13_-_Suffering,_pain_and_pleasure_-_Illness_and_its_cure
1957-03-15_-_Reminiscences_of_Tlemcen
1957-03-20_-_Never_sit_down,_true_repose
1957-03-22_-_A_story_of_initiation,_knowledge_and_practice
1957-04-03_-_Different_religions_and_spirituality
1957-04-17_-_Transformation_of_the_body
1957-05-15_-_Differentiation_of_the_sexes_-_Transformation_from_above_downwards
1957-05-29_-_Progressive_transformation
1957-06-05_-_Questions_and_silence_-_Methods_of_meditation
1957-06-12_-_Fasting_and_spiritual_progress
1957-06-19_-_Causes_of_illness_Fear_and_illness_-_Minds_working,_faith_and_illness
1957-07-03_-_Collective_yoga,_vision_of_a_huge_hotel
1957-07-10_-_A_new_world_is_born_-_Overmind_creation_dissolved
1957-07-17_-_Power_of_conscious_will_over_matter
1957-07-31_-_Awakening_aspiration_in_the_body
1957-08-07_-_The_resistances,_politics_and_money_-_Aspiration_to_realise_the_supramental_life
1957-08-28_-_Freedom_and_Divine_Will
1957-09-04_-_Sri_Aurobindo,_an_eternal_birth
1957-09-11_-_Vital_chemistry,_attraction_and_repulsion
1957-09-25_-_Preparation_of_the_intermediate_being
1957-10-02_-_The_Mind_of_Light_-_Statues_of_the_Buddha_-_Burden_of_the_past
1957-10-09_-_As_many_universes_as_individuals_-_Passage_to_the_higher_hemisphere
1957-10-23_-_The_central_motive_of_terrestrial_existence_-_Evolution
1957-10-30_-_Double_movement_of_evolution_-_Disappearance_of_a_species
1957-11-13_-_Superiority_of_man_over_animal_-_Consciousness_precedes_form
1957-11-27_-_Sri_Aurobindos_method_in_The_Life_Divine_-_Individual_and_cosmic_evolution
1957-12-04_-_The_method_of_The_Life_Divine_-_Problem_of_emergence_of_a_new_species
1957-12-11_-_Appearance_of_the_first_men
1958-01-08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_method_of_exposition_-_The_mind_as_a_public_place_-_Mental_control_-_Sri_Aurobindos_subtle_hand
1958-01-15_-_The_only_unshakable_point_of_support
1958-01-22_-_Intellectual_theories_-_Expressing_a_living_and_real_Truth
1958-02-05_-_The_great_voyage_of_the_Supreme_-_Freedom_and_determinism
1958-02-19_-_Experience_of_the_supramental_boat_-_The_Censors_-_Absurdity_of_artificial_means
1958-02-26_-_The_moon_and_the_stars_-_Horoscopes_and_yoga
1958-03-19_-_General_tension_in_humanity_-_Peace_and_progress_-_Perversion_and_vision_of_transformation
1958-04-09_-_The_eyes_of_the_soul_-_Perceiving_the_soul
1958-06-18_-_Philosophy,_religion,_occultism,_spirituality
1958-07-16_-_Is_religion_a_necessity?
1958-08-13_-_Profit_by_staying_in_the_Ashram_-_What_Sri_Aurobindo_has_come_to_tell_us_-_Finding_the_Divine
1958-08-27_-_Meditation_and_imagination_-_From_thought_to_idea,_from_idea_to_principle
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958-09-17_-_Power_of_formulating_experience_-_Usefulness_of_mental_development
1958_09_19
1958-09-24_-_Living_the_truth_-_Words_and_experience
1958_09_26
1958-10-29_-_Mental_self-sufficiency_-_Grace
1958_11_07
1958-11-12_-_The_aim_of_the_Supreme_-_Trust_in_the_Grace
1958_11_14
1958_12_05
1960_01_05
1960_01_27
1960_02_17
1960_04_06
1960_05_25
1960_06_22
1960_11_12?_-_49
1960_11_13?_-_50
1960_11_14?_-_51
1961_01_28
1961_03_11_-_58
1961_05_22?
1961_07_18
1962_02_27
1962_05_24
1963_01_14
1963_11_04
1964_03_25
1964_09_16
1966_07_06
1966_09_14
1969_08_19
1969_08_28
1969_09_14
1969_09_17
1969_09_26
1969_10_13
1969_11_18
1969_11_27?
1969_12_03
1969_12_15
1970_01_21
1970_01_23
1970_01_24
1970_03_03
1970_03_06?
1970_03_11
1970_03_13
1970_03_15
1970_04_10
1970_04_14
1970_04_22_-_482
1970_04_23_-_495
1970_04_28
1970_05_03?
1970_05_13?
1970_05_25
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_Optimist
1.ac_-_The_Garden_of_Janus
1.ac_-_The_Quest
1.ami_-_O_wave!_Plunge_headlong_into_the_dark_seas_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.ami_-_Selfhood_can_demolish_the_magic_of_this_world_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.ami_-_To_the_Saqi_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.anon_-_Enuma_Elish_(When_on_high)
1.anon_-_Others_have_told_me
1.anon_-_Song_of_Creation
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_XI_The_Story_of_the_Flood
1.anon_-_The_Poem_of_Antar
1.ap_-_The_Universal_Prayer
1.asak_-_If_you_do_not_give_up_the_crowds
1.at_-_If_thou_wouldst_hear_the_Nameless_(from_The_Ancient_Sage)
1.bni_-_Raga_Ramkali
1.bsf_-_Like_a_deep_sea
1.bs_-_If_the_divine_is_found_through_ablutions
1.bs_-_Love_Springs_Eternal
1.bs_-_One_Point_Contains_All
1.bts_-_The_Souls_Flight
1.cj_-_Inscribed_on_the_Wall_of_the_Hut_by_the_Lake
1.da_-_All_Being_within_this_order,_by_the_laws_(from_The_Paradiso,_Canto_I)
1.da_-_The_love_of_God,_unutterable_and_perfect
1.dd_-_So_priceless_is_the_birth,_O_brother
1f.lovecraft_-_Ashes
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Celephais
1f.lovecraft_-_Cool_Air
1f.lovecraft_-_Dagon
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Discarded_Draft_of
1f.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_From_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_H.P._Lovecrafts
1f.lovecraft_-_Ibid
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Nyarlathotep
1f.lovecraft_-_Old_Bugs
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Book
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Cats_of_Ulthar
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Curse_of_Yig
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Descendant
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Festival
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Ghost-Eater
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Martins_Beach
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Little_Glass_Bottle
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Loved_Dead
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Moon-Bog
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mysterious_Ship
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Grave-Yard
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Quest_of_Iranon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Secret_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Strange_High_House_in_the_Mist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Street
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Transition_of_Juan_Romero
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Unnamable
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Two_Black_Bottles
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.fs_-_Feast_Of_Victory
1.fs_-_Friendship
1.fs_-_Genius
1.fs_-_Melancholy_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Ode_To_Joy_-_With_Translation
1.fs_-_Odysseus
1.fs_-_Parables_And_Riddles
1.fs_-_Political_Precept
1.fs_-_Shakespeare's_Ghost_-_A_Parody
1.fs_-_The_Alpine_Hunter
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Complaint_Of_Ceres
1.fs_-_The_Count_Of_Hapsburg
1.fs_-_The_Cranes_Of_Ibycus
1.fs_-_The_Eleusinian_Festival
1.fs_-_The_Fight_With_The_Dragon
1.fs_-_The_Hostage
1.fs_-_Thekla_-_A_Spirit_Voice
1.fs_-_The_Knight_Of_Toggenburg
1.fs_-_The_Maiden's_Lament
1.fs_-_The_Playing_Infant
1.fs_-_The_Poetry_Of_Life
1.fs_-_The_Two_Paths_Of_Virtue
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fua_-_God_Speaks_to_David
1.fua_-_Looking_for_your_own_face
1.fua_-_The_Birds_Find_Their_King
1.fua_-_The_moths_and_the_flame
1.fua_-_The_Simurgh
1.gmh_-_The_Alchemist_In_The_City
1.grh_-_Gorakh_Bani
1.hcyc_-_16_-_When_I_consider_the_virtue_of_abusive_words_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_23_-_When_you_truly_awaken_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_45_-_Ah,_the_degenerate_materialistic_world!_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.he_-_Hakuins_Song_of_Zazen
1.hs_-_Cypress_And_Tulip
1.hs_-_Heres_A_Message_for_the_Faithful
1.hs_-_If_life_remains,_I_shall_go_back_to_the_tavern
1.hs_-_Mystic_Chat
1.hs_-_Several_Times_In_The_Last_Week
1.ia_-_An_Ocean_Without_Shore
1.jh_-_Lord,_Where_Shall_I_Find_You?
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Fancy
1.jk_-_Fragment._Wheres_The_Poet?
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_III
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Highlands_After_A_Visit_To_Burnss_Country
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Melancholy
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Autumn
1.jk_-_Ode._Written_On_The_Blank_Page_Before_Beaumont_And_Fletchers_Tragi-Comedy_The_Fair_Maid_Of_The_In
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_II
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Sonnet._If_By_Dull_Rhymes_Our_English_Must_Be_Chaind
1.jk_-_Sonnet_II._To_.........
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_Oh!_How_I_Love,_On_A_Fair_Summers_Eve
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_Leigh_Hunts_Poem_The_Story_of_Rimini
1.jk_-_Sonnet_V._To_A_Friend_Who_Sent_Me_Some_Roses
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Upon_The_Top_Of_Ben_Nevis
1.jk_-_Stanzas_To_Miss_Wylie
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jk_-_To_George_Felton_Mathew
1.jk_-_To_Some_Ladies
1.jk_-_Written_In_The_Cottage_Where_Burns_Was_Born
1.jlb_-_Browning_Decides_To_Be_A_Poet
1.jm_-_Response_to_a_Logician
1.jr_-_All_Through_Eternity
1.jr_-_Book_1_-_Prologue
1.jr_-_come
1.jr_-_I_Am_Only_The_House_Of_Your_Beloved
1.jr_-_If_continually_you_keep_your_hope
1.jr_-_Reason,_leave_now!_Youll_not_find_wisdom_here!
1.jr_-_The_glow_of_the_light_of_daybreak_is_in_your_emerald_vault,_the_goblet_of_the_blood_of_twilight_is_your_blood-measuring_bowl
1.jr_-_The_Seed_Market
1.jr_-_What_I_want_is_to_see_your_face
1.jr_-_When_I_Am_Asleep_And_Crumbling_In_The_Tomb
1.jr_-_Whoever_finds_love
1.jr_-_Who_Is_At_My_Door?
1.jr_-_Who_makes_these_changes?
1.jt_-_How_the_Soul_Through_the_Senses_Finds_God_in_All_Creatures
1.jt_-_Love_beyond_all_telling_(from_Self-Annihilation_and_Charity_Lead_the_Soul...)
1.jt_-_Oh,_the_futility_of_seeking_to_convey_(from_Self-Annihilation_and_Charity_Lead_the_Soul...)
1.jwvg_-_A_Legacy
1.jwvg_-_Answers_In_A_Game_Of_Questions
1.jwvg_-_April
1.jwvg_-_Book_Of_Proverbs
1.jwvg_-_Faithful_Eckhart
1.jwvg_-_From_The_Mountain
1.jwvg_-_Mahomets_Song
1.jwvg_-_Nemesis
1.jwvg_-_Solitude
1.jwvg_-_The_Buyers
1.jwvg_-_The_Drops_Of_Nectar
1.jwvg_-_The_Sea-Voyage
1.jwvg_-_The_Treasure_Digger
1.jwvg_-_The_Warning
1.jwvg_-_True_Enjoyment
1.kbr_-_Are_you_looking_for_me?
1.kbr_-_Chewing_Slowly
1.kbr_-_I_Laugh_When_I_Hear_That_The_Fish_In_The_Water_Is_Thirsty
1.kbr_-_I_Said_To_The_Wanting-Creature_Inside_Me
1.kbr_-_Lift_The_Veil
1.kbr_-_lift_the_veil
1.kbr_-_My_Body_And_My_Mind
1.kbr_-_O_Slave,_liberate_yourself
1.kbr_-_Poem_14
1.kbr_-_The_Drop_and_the_Sea
1.kbr_-_The_Dropp_And_The_Sea
1.kbr_-_The_Light_of_the_Sun
1.kbr_-_The_light_of_the_sun,_the_moon,_and_the_stars_shines_bright
1.kbr_-_The_Swan_flies_away
1.kbr_-_The_Time_Before_Death
1.kbr_-_The_Word
1.kbr_-_Where_do_you_search_me
1.khc_-_Idle_Wandering
1.ki_-_Where_there_are_humans
1.lb_-_Ch'ing_P'ing_Tiao
1.lb_-_Down_From_The_Mountain
1.lb_-_Drinking_Alone_in_the_Moonlight
1.lb_-_Gold_painted_jars_-_wines_worth_a_thousand
1.lb_-_Looking_For_A_Monk_And_Not_Finding_Him
1.lb_-_Lu_Mountain,_Kiangsi
1.lb_-_Reaching_the_Hermitage
1.lb_-_The_Roosting_Crows
1.lb_-_To_My_Wife_on_Lu-shan_Mountain
1.lb_-_Viewing_Heaven's_Gate_Mountains
1.lla_-_Fool,_you_wont_find_your_way_out_by_praying_from_a_book
1.lla_-_Meditate_within_eternity
1.lovecraft_-_An_Epistle_To_Rheinhart_Kleiner,_Esq.,_Poet-Laureate,_And_Author_Of_Another_Endless_Day
1.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1.lovecraft_-_Fact_And_Fancy
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_Poemata_Minora-_Volume_II
1.lovecraft_-_Psychopompos-_A_Tale_in_Rhyme
1.lovecraft_-_The_Garden
1.lovecraft_-_The_Poe-ets_Nightmare
1.lovecraft_-_The_Teutons_Battle-Song
1.lovecraft_-_To_Alan_Seeger-
1.mah_-_Seeking_Truth,_I_studied_religion
1.mah_-_Stillness
1.mb_-_The_Dagger
1.mm_-_Of_the_voices_of_the_Godhead
1.mm_-_The_devil_also_offers_his_spirit
1.ms_-_Clear_Valley
1.nmdv_-_When_I_see_His_ways,_I_sing
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_And_like_a_Dying_Lady,_Lean_and_Pale
1.pbs_-_An_Exhortation
1.pbs_-_Art_Thou_Pale_For_Weariness
1.pbs_-_Bereavement
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Epigram_IV_-_Circumstance
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_(Excerpt)
1.pbs_-_Evening_-_Ponte_Al_Mare,_Pisa
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_"Igniculus_Desiderii"
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_My_Head_Is_Wild_With_Weeping
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Of_An_Unfinished_Drama
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Supposed_To_Be_Parts_Of_Otho
1.pbs_-_From
1.pbs_-_Ginevra
1.pbs_-_HERE_I_sit_with_my_paper
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Letter_To_Maria_Gisborne
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_Among_The_Euganean_Hills
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_Orpheus
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_II.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IV.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_Song._--_Fierce_Roars_The_Midnight_Storm
1.pbs_-_Song_To_The_Men_Of_England
1.pbs_-_Song._Translated_From_The_German
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_From_The_Italian_Of_Cavalcanti
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Devils_Walk._A_Ballad
1.pbs_-_The_First_Canzone_Of_The_Convito
1.pbs_-_The_Mask_Of_Anarchy
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Sunset
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_The_Two_Spirits_-_An_Allegory
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.pbs_-_To_Edward_Williams
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Invitation
1.pbs_-_To-morrow
1.pbs_-_To_The_Men_Of_England
1.pbs_-_To_the_Moon
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley.
1.pbs_-_With_A_Guitar,_To_Jane
1.poe_-_An_Enigma
1.poe_-_A_Valentine
1.poe_-_Epigram_For_Wall_Street
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_Spirits_Of_The_Dead
1.poe_-_The_Conversation_Of_Eiros_And_Charmion
1.poe_-_To_My_Mother
1.pp_-_Raga_Dhanashri
1.rb_-_A_Grammarian's_Funeral_Shortly_After_The_Revival_Of_Learning
1.rb_-_Aix_In_Provence
1.rb_-_An_Epistle_Containing_the_Strange_Medical_Experience_of_Kar
1.rb_-_Any_Wife_To_Any_Husband
1.rb_-_A_Toccata_Of_Galuppi's
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_Bishop_Orders_His_Tomb_at_Saint_Praxed's_Church,_Rome,_The
1.rb_-_By_The_Fire-Side
1.rb_-_Caliban_upon_Setebos_or,_Natural_Theology_in_the_Island
1.rb_-_Childe_Roland_To_The_Dark_Tower_Came
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.rb_-_Evelyn_Hope
1.rb_-_Fra_Lippo_Lippi
1.rb_-_Garden_Francies
1.rb_-_In_A_Gondola
1.rb_-_Love_In_A_Life
1.rb_-_Master_Hugues_Of_Saxe-Gotha
1.rb_-_Mesmerism
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_III_-_Evening
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_II_-_Noon
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_I_-_Morning
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_IV_-_Night
1.rb_-_Rabbi_Ben_Ezra
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_The_Glove
1.rb_-_The_Guardian-Angel
1.rb_-_The_Italian_In_England
1.rb_-_The_Pied_Piper_Of_Hamelin
1.rb_-_Times_Revenges
1.rb_-_Waring
1.rmd_-_Raga_Basant
1.rmr_-_Adam
1.rmr_-_A_Sybil
1.rmr_-_Childhood
1.rmr_-_Child_In_Red
1.rmr_-_Early_Spring
1.rmr_-_Elegy_I
1.rmr_-_Elegy_X
1.rmr_-_Fear_of_the_Inexplicable
1.rmr_-_Lady_At_A_Mirror
1.rmr_-_Song_Of_The_Orphan
1.rmr_-_The_Apple_Orchard
1.rmr_-_The_Unicorn
1.rt_-_A_Dream
1.rt_-_All_These_I_Loved
1.rt_-_Birth_Story
1.rt_-_Brink_Of_Eternity
1.rt_-_Closed_Path
1.rt_-_Defamation
1.rt_-_Endless_Time
1.rt_-_Fairyland
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Flower
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_I
1.rt_-_In_The_Country
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_LVIII_-_Things_Throng_And_Laugh
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_XLII_-_Are_You_A_Mere_Picture
1.rt_-_Meeting
1.rt_-_My_Present
1.rt_-_Paper_Boats
1.rt_-_Playthings
1.rt_-_Poems_On_Man
1.rt_-_Signet_Of_Eternity
1.rt_-_Sleep-Stealer
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_01_-_10
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_21_-_30
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_31_-_40
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_81_-_90
1.rt_-_The_Astronomer
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XLIII_-_No,_My_Friends
1.rt_-_The_Homecoming
1.rt_-_The_Lost_Star
1.rt_-_The_Wicked_Postman
1.rt_-_Threshold
1.rvd_-_Upon_seeing_poverty
1.rwe_-_Boston
1.rwe_-_Brahma
1.rwe_-_Celestial_Love
1.rwe_-_Dmonic_Love
1.rwe_-_Freedom
1.rwe_-_Gnothi_Seauton
1.rwe_-_Hamatreya
1.rwe_-_Initial_Love
1.rwe_-_Life_Is_Great
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_Nature
1.rwe_-_Ode_-_Inscribed_to_W.H._Channing
1.rwe_-_Ode_To_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Politics
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_Saadi
1.rwe_-_Seashore
1.rwe_-_Self_Reliance
1.rwe_-_Solution
1.rwe_-_The_Adirondacs
1.rwe_-_The_Poet
1.rwe_-_The_Test
1.rwe_-_The_Titmouse
1.rwe_-_The_World-Soul
1.rwe_-_Threnody
1.rwe_-_To_Laugh_Often_And_Much
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.sig_-_Thou_Livest
1.sig_-_Where_Will_I_Find_You
1.sig_-_Who_could_accomplish_what_youve_accomplished
1.sjc_-_I_Live_Yet_Do_Not_Live_in_Me
1.sjc_-_Not_for_All_the_Beauty
1.sjc_-_The_Fountain
1.snt_-_O_totally_strange_and_inexpressible_marvel!
1.snt_-_What_is_this_awesome_mystery
1.srm_-_The_Marital_Garland_of_Letters
1.stav_-_I_Live_Without_Living_In_Me
1.stav_-_In_the_Hands_of_God
1.stl_-_The_Divine_Dew
1.tc_-_I_built_my_hut_within_where_others_live
1.tc_-_Unsettled,_a_bird_lost_from_the_flock
1.tm_-_The_Fall
1.tm_-_The_Sowing_of_Meanings
1.tm_-_When_in_the_soul_of_the_serene_disciple
1.tr_-_Blending_With_The_Wind
1.tr_-_No_Luck_Today_On_My_Mendicant_Rounds
1.tr_-_To_My_Teacher
1.wby_-_A_Bronze_Head
1.wby_-_Adams_Curse
1.wby_-_A_Dialogue_Of_Self_And_Soul
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_A_Last_Confession
1.wby_-_All_Souls_Night
1.wby_-_A_Lovers_Quarrel_Among_the_Fairies
1.wby_-_A_Memory_Of_Youth
1.wby_-_An_Image_From_A_Past_Life
1.wby_-_A_Prayer_For_My_Daughter
1.wby_-_At_Galway_Races
1.wby_-_A_Woman_Young_And_Old
1.wby_-_Baile_And_Aillinn
1.wby_-_Beggar_To_Beggar_Cried
1.wby_-_Brown_Penny
1.wby_-_Colonel_Martin
1.wby_-_Colonus_Praise
1.wby_-_Crazy_Jane_And_The_Bishop
1.wby_-_Demon_And_Beast
1.wby_-_Ego_Dominus_Tuus
1.wby_-_Her_Vision_In_The_Wood
1.wby_-_He_Tells_Of_A_Valley_Full_Of_Lovers
1.wby_-_Hound_Voice
1.wby_-_King_And_No_King
1.wby_-_Long-Legged_Fly
1.wby_-_Meditations_In_Time_Of_Civil_War
1.wby_-_Now_as_at_all_times
1.wby_-_On_Woman
1.wby_-_Owen_Aherne_And_His_Dancers
1.wby_-_Reconciliation
1.wby_-_Responsibilities_-_Closing
1.wby_-_Shepherd_And_Goatherd
1.wby_-_Solomon_And_The_Witch
1.wby_-_The_Collar-Bone_Of_A_Hare
1.wby_-_The_Fascination_Of_Whats_Difficult
1.wby_-_The_Fool_By_The_Roadside
1.wby_-_The_Gift_Of_Harun_Al-Rashid
1.wby_-_The_Hour_Before_Dawn
1.wby_-_The_Magi
1.wby_-_The_Mask
1.wby_-_The_Municipal_Gallery_Revisited
1.wby_-_The_Phases_Of_The_Moon
1.wby_-_The_Saint_And_The_Hunchback
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_Introduction
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Song_Of_Wandering_Aengus
1.wby_-_The_Tower
1.wby_-_The_Two_Kings
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_I
1.wby_-_The_Wild_Swans_At_Coole
1.wby_-_The_Winding_Stair
1.wby_-_Those_Images
1.wby_-_To_The_Rose_Upon_The_Rood_Of_Time
1.wby_-_Towards_Break_Of_Day
1.wby_-_Under_The_Moon
1.wby_-_Under_The_Round_Tower
1.wby_-_Vacillation
1.wby_-_Why_Should_Not_Old_Men_Be_Mad?
1.whitman_-_A_Boston_Ballad
1.whitman_-_After_an_Interval
1.whitman_-_Are_You_The_New_Person,_Drawn_Toward_Me?
1.whitman_-_As_Consequent,_Etc.
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Words
1.whitman_-_In_The_New_Garden_In_All_The_Parts
1.whitman_-_I_Sing_The_Body_Electric
1.whitman_-_Kosmos
1.whitman_-_Long_I_Thought_That_Knowledge
1.whitman_-_Mediums
1.whitman_-_Me_Imperturbe
1.whitman_-_Not_The_Pilot
1.whitman_-_Now_List_To_My_Mornings_Romanza
1.whitman_-_Of_Him_I_Love_Day_And_Night
1.whitman_-_One_Hour_To_Madness_And_Joy
1.whitman_-_Poems_Of_Joys
1.whitman_-_So_Long
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XIV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XL
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLVI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLVIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XX
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXXI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXXIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Open_Road
1.whitman_-_Spontaneous_Me
1.whitman_-_Starting_From_Paumanok
1.whitman_-_That_Shadow,_My_Likeness
1.whitman_-_The_Singer_In_The_Prison
1.whitman_-_The_Untold_Want
1.whitman_-_Think_Of_The_Soul
1.whitman_-_To_A_Certain_Civilian
1.whitman_-_Unnamed_Lands
1.whitman_-_Year_Of_Meteors,_1859_60
1.ww_-_20_-_Who_goes_there?_hankering,_gross,_mystical,_nude
1.ww_-_3-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_6-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_7-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_A_Character
1.ww_-_Address_To_A_Child_During_A_Boisterous_Winter_By_My_Sister
1.ww_-_Address_To_The_Scholars_Of_The_Village_School_Of_---
1.ww_-_A_Fact,_And_An_Imagination,_Or,_Canute_And_Alfred,_On_The_Seashore
1.ww_-_A_Flower_Garden_At_Coleorton_Hall,_Leicestershire.
1.ww_-_And_Is_It_Among_Rude_Untutored_Dales
1.ww_-_Andrew_Jones
1.ww_-_An_Evening_Walk
1.ww_-_A_Wren's_Nest
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourteenth_[conclusion]
1.ww_-_Book_Ninth_[Residence_in_France]
1.ww_-_Book_Second_[School-Time_Continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_By_The_Side_Of_The_Grave_Some_Years_After
1.ww_-_Character_Of_The_Happy_Warrior
1.ww_-_Composed_At_The_Same_Time_And_On_The_Same_Occasion
1.ww_-_Epitaphs_Translated_From_Chiabrera
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_From_The_Italian_Of_Michael_Angelo
1.ww_-_George_and_Sarah_Green
1.ww_-_Gipsies
1.ww_-_Guilt_And_Sorrow,_Or,_Incidents_Upon_Salisbury_Plain
1.ww_-_Her_Eyes_Are_Wild
1.ww_-_In_The_Pass_Of_Killicranky
1.ww_-_Mark_The_Concentrated_Hazels_That_Enclose
1.ww_-_Maternal_Grief
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803
1.ww_-_Memorials_of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_I._Departure_From_The_Vale_Of_Grasmere,_August_1803
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_X._Rob_Roys_Grave
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1814_I._Suggested_By_A_Beautiful_Ruin_Upon_One_Of_The_Islands_Of_Lo
1.ww_-_Michael-_A_Pastoral_Poem
1.ww_-_Nuns_Fret_Not_at_Their_Convent's_Narrow_Room
1.ww_-_Ode_on_Intimations_of_Immortality
1.ww_-_Personal_Talk
1.ww_-_Remembrance_Of_Collins
1.ww_-_Resolution_And_Independence
1.ww_-_Ruth
1.ww_-_Simon_Lee-_The_Old_Huntsman
1.ww_-_Song_Of_The_Wandering_Jew
1.ww_-_Stanzas_Written_In_My_Pocket_Copy_Of_Thomsons_Castle_Of_Indolence
1.ww_-_Stray_Pleasures
1.ww_-_Surprised_By_Joy
1.ww_-_The_Affliction_Of_Margaret
1.ww_-_The_Brothers
1.ww_-_The_Emigrant_Mother
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Forsaken
1.ww_-_The_French_Army_In_Russia,_1812-13
1.ww_-_The_French_Revolution_as_it_appeared_to_Enthusiasts
1.ww_-_The_Happy_Warrior
1.ww_-_The_Idiot_Boy
1.ww_-_The_Idle_Shepherd_Boys
1.ww_-_The_Kitten_And_Falling_Leaves
1.ww_-_The_Last_Of_The_Flock
1.ww_-_The_Morning_Of_The_Day_Appointed_For_A_General_Thanksgiving._January_18,_1816
1.ww_-_The_Old_Cumberland_Beggar
1.ww_-_The_Power_of_Armies_is_a_Visible_Thing
1.ww_-_The_Prioresss_Tale_[from_Chaucer]
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_The_Redbreast_Chasing_The_Butterfly
1.ww_-_The_Seven_Sisters
1.ww_-_The_Thorn
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_First
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Fourth
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Second
1.ww_-_Those_Words_Were_Uttered_As_In_Pensive_Mood
1.ww_-_To_A_Butterfly
1.ww_-_To_a_Sky-Lark
1.ww_-_To_Sir_George_Howland_Beaumont,_Bart_From_the_South-West_Coast_Or_Cumberland_1811
1.ww_-_To_The_Daisy_(2)
1.ww_-_To_The_Daisy_(Fourth_Poem)
1.ww_-_To_The_Daisy_(Third_Poem)
1.ww_-_To_The_Small_Celandine
1.ww_-_To_The_Supreme_Being_From_The_Italian_Of_Michael_Angelo
1.ww_-_To_Thomas_Clarkson
1.ww_-_To_Toussaint_LOuverture
1.ww_-_Tribute_To_The_Memory_Of_The_Same_Dog
1.ww_-_Vaudracour_And_Julia
1.ww_-_When_I_Have_Borne_In_Memory
1.ww_-_Where_Lies_The_Land_To_Which_Yon_Ship_Must_Go?
1.ww_-_Written_In_Germany_On_One_Of_The_Coldest_Days_Of_The_Century
1.ww_-_Written_With_A_Pencil_Upon_A_Stone_In_The_Wall_Of_The_House,_On_The_Island_At_Grasmere
1.ww_-_Yes!_Thou_Art_Fair,_Yet_Be_Not_Moved
1.ym_-_Mad_Words
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
20.04_-_Act_II:_The_Play_on_Earth
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_Isha_Upanishad__All_that_is_world_in_the_Universe
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_On_the_Concept_of_the_Archetype
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE_AND_THE_POINT
2.01_-_The_Attributes_of_Omega_Point_-_a_Transcendent_God
2.01_-_THE_CHILD_WITH_THE_MIRROR
2.01_-_The_Mother
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Preparatory_Renunciation
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.01_-_The_Tavern
2.01_-_The_Temple
2.01_-_The_Therapeutic_value_of_Abreaction
2.01_-_The_Two_Natures
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.01_-_War.
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Evolutionary_Creation_and_the_Expectation_of_a_Revelation
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_THE_SCINTILLA
2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.02_-_Yoga
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_Renunciation
2.03_-_The_Altar
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Mother-Complex
2.03_-_The_Naturalness_of_Bhakti-Yoga_and_its_Central_Secret
2.03_-_The_Purified_Understanding
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.03_-_The_Worlds
2.04_-_Absence_Of_Secondary_Qualities
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_On_Art
2.04_-_ON_PRIESTS
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.04_-_The_Forms_of_Love-Manifestation
2.04_-_The_Living_Church_and_Christ-Omega
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_Aspects_of_Sadhana
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_Infinite_Worlds
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_ON_THE_VIRTUOUS
2.05_-_Renunciation
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.05_-_The_Line_of_Light_and_The_Impression
2.05_-_The_Religion_of_Tomorrow
2.05_-_The_Tale_of_the_Vampires_Kingdom
2.05_-_Universal_Love_and_how_it_leads_to_Self-Surrender
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_ON_THE_RABBLE
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.06_-_Revelation_and_the_Christian_Phenomenon
2.06_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Disciplines_of_Knowledge
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_Two_Tales_of_Seeking_and_Losing
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_The_Cup
2.07_-_The_Knowledge_and_the_Ignorance
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Release_from_Subjection_to_the_Body
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.07_-_The_Triangle_of_Love
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_Concentration
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_Memory,_Self-Consciousness_and_the_Ignorance
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.08_-_The_God_of_Love_is_his_own_proof
2.08_-_The_Release_from_the_Heart_and_the_Mind
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.08_-_Three_Tales_of_Madness_and_Destruction
2.08_-_Victory_over_Falsehood
2.09_-_Human_representations_of_the_Divine_Ideal_of_Love
2.09_-_Meditation
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_SEVEN_REASONS_WHY_A_SCIENTIST_BELIEVES_IN_GOD
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.09_-_The_Pantacle
2.09_-_The_Release_from_the_Ego
2.0_-_Reincarnation_and_Karma
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
21.01_-_The_Mother_The_Nature_of_Her_Work
2.1.02_-_Classification_of_the_Parts_of_the_Being
2.1.02_-_Combining_Work,_Meditation_and_Bhakti
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.02_-_Nature_The_World-Manifestation
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.10_-_On_Vedic_Interpretation
2.10_-_THE_DANCING_SONG
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.10_-_The_Primordial_Kings__Their_Shattering
2.10_-_The_Realisation_of_the_Cosmic_Self
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.11_-_On_Education
2.11_-_The_Boundaries_of_the_Ignorance
2.11_-_The_Guru
2.11_-_The_Modes_of_the_Self
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.11_-_The_Shattering_And_Fall_of_The_Primordial_Kings
2.11_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_The_Double_Aspect
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.12_-_The_Origin_of_the_Ignorance
2.12_-_The_Realisation_of_Sachchidananda
2.12_-_The_Robe
2.12_-_The_Way_and_the_Bhakta
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.1.3.2_-_Study
2.1.3.3_-_Reading
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_ON_THOSE_WHO_ARE_SUBLIME
2.13_-_The_Book
2.13_-_The_Difficulties_of_the_Mental_Being
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.1.4.1_-_Teachers
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.1.4.5_-_Tests
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_On_Movements
2.14_-_ON_THE_LAND_OF_EDUCATION
2.1.4_-_The_Lower_Vital_Being
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.14_-_The_Passive_and_the_Active_Brahman
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.1.5.5_-_Other_Subjects
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_Reality_and_the_Integral_Knowledge
2.15_-_The_Cosmic_Consciousness
2.16_-_Oneness
2.16_-_Power_of_Imagination
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.16_-_The_Magick_Fire
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.05_-_On_the_Inspiration_and_Writing_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_ON_POETS
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.18_-_The_Evolutionary_Process_-_Ascent_and_Integration
2.18_-_The_Soul_and_Its_Liberation
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_Knowledge_of_the_Scientist_and_the_Yogi
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
2.19_-_The_Planes_of_Our_Existence
2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.02_-_Becoming_Conscious_in_Work
2.2.02_-_Consciousness_and_the_Inconscient
2.2.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
2.2.03_-_The_Science_of_Consciousness
2.2.04_-_Practical_Concerns_in_Work
2.2.05_-_Creative_Activity
22.05_-_On_The_Brink(2)
22.07_-_The_Ashram,_the_World_and_The_Individual[^4]
2.20_-_Nov-Dec_1939
2.20_-_ON_REDEMPTION
2.20_-_The_Infancy_and_Maturity_of_ZO,_Father_and_Mother,_Israel_The_Ancient_and_Understanding
2.20_-_The_Lower_Triple_Purusha
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.2.1.01_-_The_World's_Greatest_Poets
2.21_-_1940
2.2.1_-_Cheerfulness_and_Happiness
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_The_Ladder_of_Self-transcendence
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.21_-_The_Three_Heads,_The_Beard_and_The_Mazela
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_1941-1943
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.22_-_THE_MASTER_AT_COSSIPORE
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_Vijnana_or_Gnosis
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.23_-_The_Conditions_of_Attainment_to_the_Gnosis
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.24_-_Gnosis_and_Ananda
2.2.4_-_Sentimentalism,_Sensitiveness,_Instability,_Laxity
2.2.4_-_Taittiriya_Upanishad
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_Mercies_and_Judgements_of_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Higher_and_the_Lower_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_Samadhi
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.27_-_Hathayoga
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.28_-_Rajayoga
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.2.9.02_-_Plato
2.2.9.04_-_Plotinus
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.01_-_Concentration_and_Meditation
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.02_-_Opening,_Sincerity_and_the_Mother's_Grace
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.03_-_The_Mother's_Presence
2.3.04_-_The_Higher_Planes_of_Mind
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.05_-_Sadhana_through_Work_for_the_Mother
2.3.06_-_The_Mind
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.08_-_The_Mother's_Help_in_Difficulties
2.3.08_-_The_Physical_Consciousness
2.30_-_The_Uniting_of_the_Names_45_and_52
2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient
2.3.1.10_-_Inspiration_and_Effort
23.11_-_Observations_III
2.3.1_-_Ego_and_Its_Forms
2.3.1_-_Svetasvatara_Upanishad
2.3.2_-_Chhandogya_Upanishad
2.3.2_-_Desire
2.3.3_-_Anger_and_Violence
2.4.01_-_Divine_Love,_Psychic_Love_and_Human_Love
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
2.4.1_-_Human_Relations_and_the_Spiritual_Life
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
2.4.3_-_Problems_in_Human_Relations
25.03_-_Songs_of_Ramprasad
25.10_-_WHEREFORE_THIS_HURRY?
27.02_-_The_Human_Touch_Divine
28.01_-_Observations
29.03_-_In_Her_Company
29.04_-_Mothers_Playground
29.05_-_The_Bride_of_Brahman
29.06_-_There_is_also_another,_similar_or_parallel_story_in_the_Veda_about_the_God_Agni,_about_the_disappearance_of_this
29.07_-_A_Small_Talk
29.09_-_Some_Dates
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
3.00.1_-_Foreword
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.04_-_Intuition_and_Inspiration_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.06_-_The_Poet_and_The_Seer
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Hymn_To_Pan
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.12_-_The_Obscene_and_the_Ugly_-_Form_and_Essence
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.16_-_Tagore_the_Unique
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
30.18_-_Boris_Pasternak
3.01_-_Forms_of_Rebirth
3.01_-_Love_and_the_Triple_Path
3.01_-_Proem
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_The_Mercurial_Fountain
3.01_-_The_Principles_of_Ritual
3.01_-_THE_WANDERER
3.01_-_Towards_the_Future
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_Nature_And_Composition_Of_The_Mind
3.02_-_SOL
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Motives_of_Devotion
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.02_-_The_Soul_in_the_Soul_World_after_Death
3.03_-_Faith_and_the_Divine_Grace
3.03_-_ON_INVOLUNTARY_BLISS
3.03_-_On_Thought_-_II
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_The_Four_Foundational_Practices
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.03_-_The_Naked_Truth
3.03_-_The_Spirit_Land
3.04_-_Folly_Of_The_Fear_Of_Death
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.04_-_The_Formula_of_ALHIM
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.04_-_The_Way_of_Devotion
3.05_-_Cerberus_And_Furies,_And_That_Lack_Of_Light
3.05_-_ON_VIRTUE_THAT_MAKES_SMALL
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Central_Thought
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.05_-_The_Divine_Personality
3.05_-_The_Fool
3.05_-_The_Formula_of_I.A.O.
3.06_-_Charity
3.06_-_Death
3.06_-_The_Delight_of_the_Divine
3.06_-_The_Sage
3.06_-_Thought-Forms_and_the_Human_Aura
3.07.2_-_Finding_the_Real_Source
3.07_-_ON_PASSING_BY
3.07_-_The_Adept
3.07_-_The_Ananda_Brahman
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_Of_Equilibrium
3.08_-_Purification
3.08_-_The_Mystery_of_Love
3.09_-_Evil
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
3.0_-_THE_ETERNAL_RECURRENCE
3.1.01_-_Distinctive_Features_of_the_Integral_Yoga
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil
3.1.02_-_Asceticism_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
3.1.03_-_A_Realistic_Adwaita
31.03_-_The_Trinity_of_Bengal
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
3.1.04_-_Transformation_in_the_Integral_Yoga
31.05_-_Vivekananda
31.06_-_Jagadish_Chandra_Bose
31.08_-_The_Unity_of_India
3.1.08_-_To_the_Sea
31.09_-_The_Cause_of_Indias_Decline
3.10_-_ON_THE_THREE_EVILS
3.10_-_Punishment
3.10_-_The_New_Birth
3.1.16_-_The_Triumph-Song_of_Trishuncou
3.11_-_Epilogue
3.11_-_ON_THE_SPIRIT_OF_GRAVITY
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.23_-_The_Rishi
3.1.24_-_In_the_Moonlight
3.1.2_-_Levels_of_the_Physical_Being
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.12_-_ON_OLD_AND_NEW_TABLETS
3.1.3_-_Difficulties_of_the_Physical_Being
3.13_-_Of_the_Banishings
3.13_-_THE_CONVALESCENT
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.14_-_ON_THE_GREAT_LONGING
3.15_-_Of_the_Invocation
3.15_-_THE_OTHER_DANCING_SONG
3.16.1_-_Of_the_Oath
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
31_Hymns_to_the_Star_Goddess
3.2.01_-_On_Ideals
3.2.01_-_The_Newness_of_the_Integral_Yoga
32.01_-_Where_is_God?
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
3.2.02_-_Yoga_and_Skill_in_Works
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
32.03_-_In_This_Crisis
3.2.04_-_Sankhya_and_Yoga
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.05_-_Our_Ideal
32.05_-_The_Culture_of_the_Body
3.2.06_-_The_Adwaita_of_Shankaracharya
32.06_-_The_Novel_Alchemy
3.2.07_-_Tantra
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
32.08_-_Fit_and_Unfit_(A_Letter)
32.09_-_On_Karmayoga_(A_Letter)
3.2.09_-_The_Teachings_of_Some_Modern_Indian_Yogis
3.20_-_Of_the_Eucharist
32.10_-_A_Letter
3.2.10_-_Christianity_and_Theosophy
3.2.1_-_Food
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
3.3.01_-_The_Superman
3.3.02_-_All-Will_and_Free-Will
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
33.04_-_Deoghar
33.05_-_Muraripukur_-_II
33.07_-_Alipore_Jail
33.08_-_I_Tried_Sannyas
33.10_-_Pondicherry_I
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.12_-_Pondicherry_Cyclone
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
33.15_-_My_Athletics
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
33.18_-_I_Bow_to_the_Mother
3.3.1_-_Agni,_the_Divine_Will-Force
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.4.01_-_Evolution
34.01_-_Hymn_To_Indra
3.4.02_-_The_Inconscient
3.4.03_-_Materialism
34.09_-_Hymn_to_the_Pillar
3.4.1.01_-_Poetry_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.05_-_Fiction-Writing_and_Sadhana
3.4.1_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.4.2_-_Guru_Yoga
3.4.2_-_The_Inconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.5.01_-_Aphorisms
3.5.02_-_Thoughts_and_Glimpses
35.06_-_Who_Seeks_Holy_Places?
3-5_Full_Circle
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.09_-_THE_SIT_SUKTA
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.03_-_Satyakama_And_Upakoshala
37.07_-_Ushasti_Chakrayana_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
3.7.1.03_-_Rebirth,_Evolution,_Heredity
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.1.05_-_The_Significance_of_Rebirth
3.7.1.06_-_The_Ascending_Unity
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.1.08_-_Karma
3.7.1.09_-_Karma_and_Freedom
3.7.1.10_-_Karma,_Will_and_Consequence
3.7.1.11_-_Rebirth_and_Karma
3.7.1.12_-_Karma_and_Justice
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.03_-_Mind_Nature_and_Law_of_Karma
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
3.7.2.05_-_Appendix_I_-_The_Tangle_of_Karma
3.7.2.06_-_Appendix_II_-_A_Clarification
38.07_-_A_Poem
3.8.1.02_-_Arya_-_Its_Significance
3.8.1.03_-_Meditation
3.8.1.05_-_Occult_Knowledge_and_the_Hindu_Scriptures
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_Circumstances
4.01_-_Introduction
4.01_-_Prayers_and_Meditations
4.01_-_Sweetness_in_Prayer
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_THE_HONEY_SACRIFICE
4.01_-_The_Presence_of_God_in_the_World
4.01_-_The_Principle_of_the_Integral_Yoga
4.02_-_Autobiographical_Evidence
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_Difficulties
4.02_-_Divine_Consolations.
4.02_-_Humanity_in_Progress
4.02_-_THE_CRY_OF_DISTRESS
4.02_-_The_Integral_Perfection
4.02_-_The_Psychology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_CONVERSATION_WITH_THE_KINGS
4.03_-_Prayer_of_Quiet
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Psychology_of_Self-Perfection
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_Conclusion
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_THE_LEECH
4.04_-_The_Perfection_of_the_Mental_Being
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.05_-_THE_DARK_SIDE_OF_THE_KING
4.05_-_The_Instruments_of_the_Spirit
4.05_-_THE_MAGICIAN
4.05_-_The_Passion_Of_Love
4.06_-_Purification-the_Lower_Mentality
4.06_-_RETIRED
4.07_-_Purification-Intelligence_and_Will
4.07_-_THE_UGLIEST_MAN
4.08_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Spirit
4.08_-_THE_RELIGIOUS_PROBLEM_OF_THE_KINGS_RENEWAL
4.08_-_THE_VOLUNTARY_BEGGAR
4.09_-_REGINA
4.09_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Nature
4.09_-_THE_SHADOW
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
4.10_-_AT_NOON
4.10_-_The_Elements_of_Perfection
4.1.1.04_-_Foundations_of_the_Sadhana
4.1.1_-_The_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.11_-_The_Perfection_of_Equality
4.11_-_THE_WELCOME
4.1.2.03_-_Preparation_for_the_Supramental_Change
4.1.2_-_The_Difficulties_of_Human_Nature
4.12_-_The_Way_of_Equality
4.1.3_-_Imperfections_and_Periods_of_Arrest
4.13_-_ON_THE_HIGHER_MAN
4.13_-_The_Action_of_Equality
4.1.4_-_Resistances,_Sufferings_and_Falls
4.14_-_The_Power_of_the_Instruments
4.15_-_Soul-Force_and_the_Fourfold_Personality
4.16_-_The_Divine_Shakti
4.17_-_The_Action_of_the_Divine_Shakti
4.17_-_THE_AWAKENING
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.03_-_The_Birth_of_Sin
4.20_-_The_Intuitive_Mind
4.20_-_THE_SIGN
4.2.1.01_-_The_Importance_of_the_Psychic_Change
4.2.1.03_-_The_Psychic_Deep_Within
4.21_-_The_Gradations_of_the_supermind
4.2.1_-_The_Right_Attitude_towards_Difficulties
4.2.2_-_Steps_towards_Overcoming_Difficulties
4.22_-_The_supramental_Thought_and_Knowledge
4.2.3.04_-_Means_of_Bringing_Forward_the_Psychic
4.2.3.05_-_Obstacles_to_the_Psychic's_Emergence
4.23_-_The_supramental_Instruments_--_Thought-process
4.2.3_-_Vigilance,_Resolution,_Will_and_the_Divine_Help
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.2.4_-_Time_and_CHange_of_the_Nature
4.2.5.04_-_The_Psychic_Consciousness_and_the_Descent_from_Above
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.25_-_Towards_the_supramental_Time_Vision
4.2_-_Karma
4.3.1.06_-_A_Vision_of_the_Universal_Self
4.3.2.02_-_Breaking_into_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
4.3.2.03_-_Wideness_and_the_Higher_Consciousness
4.3.2_-_Attacks_by_the_Hostile_Forces
4.3.3_-_Dealing_with_Hostile_Attacks
4.3.4_-_Accidents,_Possession,_Madness
4.3_-_Bhakti
4.4.1.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Spiritual_Transformation
4.4.2.08_-_Fixing_the_Consciousness_Above
4.42_-_Chapter_Two
4.4.4.02_-_Peace,_Calm,_Quiet_as_a_Basis_for_the_Descent
4.4.4.05_-_The_Descent_of_Force_or_Power
5.01_-_ADAM_AS_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.01_-_On_the_Mysteries_of_the_Ascent_towards_God
5.01_-_Proem
5.01_-_The_Dakini,_Salgye_Du_Dalma
5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body
5.03_-_ADAM_AS_THE_FIRST_ADEPT
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.03_-_Towars_the_Supreme_Light
5.04_-_Supermind_and_the_Life_Divine
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.04_-_Three_Dreams
5.05_-_Origins_Of_Vegetable_And_Animal_Life
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.06_-_Supermind_in_the_Evolution
5.06_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.07_-_ROTUNDUM,_HEAD,_AND_BRAIN
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.5_-_The_Book_of_Achilles
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.1.03_-_The_Hostile_Forces_and_Hostile_Beings
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.2.02_-_Aryan_Origins_-_The_Elementary_Roots_of_Language
5.2.02_-_The_Meditations_of_Mandavya
5.2.03_-_The_An_Family
5.3.04_-_Roots_in_M
5.3.05_-_The_Root_Mal_in_Greek
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5.4.02_-_Occult_Powers_or_Siddhis
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.02_-_STAGES_OF_THE_CONJUNCTION
6.03_-_Extraordinary_And_Paradoxical_Telluric_Phenomena
6.05_-_THE_PSYCHOLOGICAL_INTERPRETATION_OF_THE_PROCEDURE
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.08_-_Intellectual_Visions
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
6.09_-_Imaginary_Visions
6.09_-_THE_THIRD_STAGE_-_THE_UNUS_MUNDUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7.01_-_The_Soul_(the_Psychic)
7.02_-_Courage
7.02_-_The_Mind
7.03_-_Cheerfulness
7.03_-_The_Heart
7.04_-_Self-Reliance
7.05_-_Patience_and_Perseverance
7.06_-_The_Body_(the_Physical)
7.06_-_The_Simple_Life
7.07_-_Prudence
7.07_-_The_Subconscient
7.08_-_Sincerity
7.09_-_Right_Judgement
7.10_-_Order
7.11_-_Building_and_Destroying
7.13_-_The_Conquest_of_Knowledge
7.14_-_Modesty
7.15_-_The_Family
7.4.02_-_The_Infinitismal_Infinite
7.5.32_-_Krishna
7.5.64_-_The_Iron_Dictators
7.6.09_-_Despair_on_the_Staircase
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Apology
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
A_Secret_Miracle
Avatars_of_the_Tortoise
Averroes_Search
Big_Mind_(non-dual)
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Proverbs
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
Chapter_III_-_WHEREIN_IS_RELATED_THE_DROLL_WAY_IN_WHICH_DON_QUIXOTE_HAD_HIMSELF_DUBBED_A_KNIGHT
Chapter_II_-_WHICH_TREATS_OF_THE_FIRST_SALLY_THE_INGENIOUS_DON_QUIXOTE_MADE_FROM_HOME
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XI
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Cratylus
Deutsches_Requiem
Diamond_Sutra_1
DM_2_-_How_to_Meditate
DS2
ENNEAD_01.01_-_The_Organism_and_the_Self.
ENNEAD_01.03_-_Of_Dialectic,_or_the_Means_of_Raising_the_Soul_to_the_Intelligible_World.
ENNEAD_01.04_-_Whether_Animals_May_Be_Termed_Happy.
ENNEAD_01.05_-_Does_Happiness_Increase_With_Time?
ENNEAD_01.06_-_Of_Beauty.
ENNEAD_01.07_-_Of_the_First_Good,_and_of_the_Other_Goods.
ENNEAD_02.01_-_Of_the_Heaven.
ENNEAD_02.02_-_About_the_Movement_of_the_Heavens.
ENNEAD_02.03_-_Whether_Astrology_is_of_any_Value.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.06_-_Of_Essence_and_Being.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.01_-_Concerning_Fate.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.03_-_Continuation_of_That_on_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.05_-_Of_Love,_or_Eros.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Things.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_03.08b_-_Of_Nature,_Contemplation_and_Unity.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.06a_-_Of_Sensation_and_Memory.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_04.08_-_Of_the_Descent_of_the_Soul_Into_the_Body.
ENNEAD_04.09_-_Whether_All_Souls_Form_a_Single_One?
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_05.05_-_That_Intelligible_Entities_Are_Not_External_to_the_Intelligence_of_the_Good.
ENNEAD_05.06_-_The_Superessential_Principle_Does_Not_Think_-_Which_is_the_First_Thinking_Principle,_and_Which_is_the_Second?
ENNEAD_05.07_-_Do_Ideas_of_Individuals_Exist?
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_05.09_-_Of_Intelligence,_Ideas_and_Essence.
ENNEAD_06.01_-_Of_the_Ten_Aristotelian_and_Four_Stoic_Categories.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_Is_Everywhere_Present_As_a_Whole.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.08_-_Of_the_Will_of_the_One.
ENNEAD_06.09_-_Of_the_Good_and_the_One.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Euthyphro
Ex_Oblivione
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Kafka_and_His_Precursors
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.04_-_LIBERATION
LUX.05_-_AUGOEIDES
LUX.07_-_ENCHANTMENT
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
Meno
MMM.01_-_MIND_CONTROL
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_07_15
r1912_07_21
r1912_12_06
r1912_12_17
r1912_12_25
r1913_01_31
r1913_02_02
r1913_02_04
r1913_11_18
r1914_04_04
r1914_05_09
r1915_02_27
r1915_05_21
r1917_02_16
r1918_02_20
r1919_07_29
r1919_08_04
r1919_08_10
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablet_1_-
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_001-025
Talks_026-050
Talks_051-075
Talks_076-099
Talks_100-125
Talks_125-150
Talks_151-175
Talks_176-200
Talks_225-239
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_Sand
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_(short_story)
the_Castle
The_Circular_Ruins
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_Five,_Ranks_of_The_Apparent_and_the_Real
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Gold_Bug
The_Golden_Sentences_of_Democrates
The_Golden_Verses_of_Pythagoras
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Great_Sense
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Immortal
The_Letter_to_the_Hebrews
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_Monadology
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Poems_of_Cold_Mountain
The_Revelation_of_Jesus_Christ_or_the_Apocalypse
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Second_Epistle_of_Paul_to_Timothy
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Theologians
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

find
God
the_Divine
SIMILAR TITLES
find
find the Divine
How to find the Psychic Being
One who loves God finds the object of his love everywhere.
wordlist (finding images)

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

findable ::: a. --> Capable of beong found; discoverable.

finder ::: n. --> One who, or that which, finds; specifically (Astron.), a small telescope of low power and large field of view, attached to a larger telescope, for the purpose of finding an object more readily.

findfaulting ::: a. --> Apt to censure or cavil; faultfinding; captious.

findfault ::: n. --> A censurer or caviler.

find him described in the 2nd book of the Sibylline

finding ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Find ::: n. --> That which is found, come upon, or provided; esp. (pl.), that which a journeyman artisan finds or provides for himself; as tools, trimmings, etc.
Support; maintenance; that which is provided for one;


finding such dating untenable, moved the time ahead to the 6th century. However, according to a French legend

findst ::: a native English form of the verb, to find, now only in formal and poetic usage.

find ::: v. t. --> To meet with, or light upon, accidentally; to gain the first sight or knowledge of, as of something new, or unknown; hence, to fall in with, as a person.
To learn by experience or trial; to perceive; to experience; to discover by the intellect or the feelings; to detect; to feel.
To come upon by seeking; as, to find something lost.
To discover by sounding; as, to find bottom.


findy ::: a. --> Full; heavy; firm; solid; substemtial.

Finder "operating system" The part of the {Macintosh Operating System} and {GUI} that simulates the {desktop}. The {multitasking} version of Finder was called "{MultiFinder}" until {multitasking} was integrated into the core of the OS with the introduction of System 7.0 in 1990. (2005-03-18)

Finder ::: (operating system) The part of the Macintosh Operating System and GUI that simulates the desktop. The multitasking version of Finder was called MultiFinder until multitasking was integrated into the core of the OS with the introduction of System 7.0 in 1990.(2005-03-18)


TERMS ANYWHERE

accuse ::: to charge with a fault; to find fault with, blame, censure. accused.

Address Resolution Protocol "networking, protocol" (ARP) A method for finding a {host}'s {Ethernet address} from its {Internet address}. The sender broadcasts an ARP {packet} containing the {Internet address} of another host and waits for it (or some other host) to send back its Ethernet address. Each host maintains a {cache} of address translations to reduce delay and loading. ARP allows the Internet address to be independent of the Ethernet address but it only works if all hosts support it. ARP is defined in {RFC 826}. The alternative for hosts that do not do ARP is {constant mapping}. See also {proxy ARP}, {reverse ARP}. (1995-03-20)

admissible "algorithm" A description of a {search algorithm} that is guaranteed to find a minimal solution path before any other solution paths, if a solution exists. An example of an admissible search algorithm is {A* search}. (1999-07-19)

AEGIS "operating system" A {Unix} variant that was used on {Apollo} {workstations} before Apollo was bought by {Hewlett Packard}. AEGIS has some advantages over standard {BSD} or {System V} Unix. It includes faster file access and a richer command set; there are commands to find out which {process} is running on a particular node, which process is locking a particular file, etc. (1997-02-25)

AESTHESIS. ::: The highest aim of aesthetic being is to find the Divine through beauty.

A form of this paradox due to Jourdain (1913) supposes a card upon the front of which are written the words, "On the other side of this card is written a true statement" -- and nothing else. It seems to be clear that these words constitute a significant statement, since, upon turning the card over one must either find some statements written or not, and, in the former case, either there will be one of them which is true or there will not. However, on turning the card over there appear the words. "On the other side of this card is written a false statement" -- and nothing else. Suppose the statement on the front of the card is true, then the statement on the back must be true, and hence the statement on the front must be false. This is a proof by reductio ad absurdum that the statement on the front of the card is false. But if the statement on the front is false, then the statement on the back must be false, and hence the statement on the front must be true. Thus the paradox.

  "A Godhead is seated in the heart of every man and is the Lord of this mysterious action of Nature. And though this Spirit of the universe, this One who is all, seems to be turning us on the wheel of the world as if mounted on a machine by the force of Maya, shaping us in our ignorance as the potter shapes a pot, as the weaver a fabric, by some skilful mechanical principle, yet is this spirit our own greatest self and it is according to the real idea, the truth of ourselves, that which is growing in us and finding always new and more adequate forms in birth after birth, in our animal and human and divine life, in that which we were, that which we are, that which we shall be, — it is in accordance with this inner soul-truth that, as our opened eyes will discover, we are progressively shaped by this spirit within us in its all-wise omnipotence.” *Essays on the Gita

“A Godhead is seated in the heart of every man and is the Lord of this mysterious action of Nature. And though this Spirit of the universe, this One who is all, seems to be turning us on the wheel of the world as if mounted on a machine by the force of Maya, shaping us in our ignorance as the potter shapes a pot, as the weaver a fabric, by some skilful mechanical principle, yet is this spirit our own greatest self and it is according to the real idea, the truth of ourselves, that which is growing in us and finding always new and more adequate forms in birth after birth, in our animal and human and divine life, in that which we were, that which we are, that which we shall be,—it is in accordance with this inner soul-truth that, as our opened eyes will discover, we are progressively shaped by this spirit within us in its all-wise omnipotence.” Essays on the Gita

"Ah! Since India is the cradle of religion and since so many gods preside over her destiny, who among them will accomplish the miracle of resuscitating the city?" A. Choumel (in an article on Pondicherry in 1928) Follows response by the Mother: "Blinded by false appearances, deceived by calumnies, held back by fear and prejudice, he has passed by the side of the god whose intervention he implores and saw him not; he has walked near to the forces which will accomplish the miracle he demands and had no will to recognise them. Thus has he lost the greatest opportunity of his life—a unique opportunity of entering into contact with the mysteries and marvelswhose existence his brain has divined and to which his heart obscurely aspires. In all times the aspirant, before receiving initiation, had to pass through tests. In the schools of antiquity these tests were artificial and by that they lost the greater part of their value. But it is no longer so now. The test hides behind some very ordinary every-day circumstance and wears an innocent air of coincidence and chance which makes it still more difficult and dangerous.It is only to those who can conquer the mind’s
   references and prejudices of race and education that India reveals the mystery of her treasures. Others depart disappointed, failing to find what they seek; for they have sought it in the wrong way and would not agree to pay the price of the Divine Discovery."
   Ref: CWM Vol. 13, Page: 372-373


AIM. ::: To return to the truth of the Divine now clouded over by Ignorance is the soul’s aim in life.
There is only one aim to be followed, the increase of Peace, Light, Power and the growth of a new consciousness in the being. With that new consciousness the true knowledge, understanding, strength, feeling will come.
Aim of yoga ::: to find the Divine is indeed the first reason for seeking the spiritual Truth and the spiritual life; it is the one thing indispensable and all the rest is nothing without it. The Divine once found, to manifest Him, - that is, first of all to transform one’s own limited consciousness into the Divine Consciousness, to live in the infinite Peace, Light, Love, Strength, Bliss, to become that in one’s essential nature and, as a consequence. to be its vessel, channel, instrument in one’s active nature.
Aim of Integral yoga ::: it is the rendering in personal experience of the truth which universal Nature has hidden in herself and which she travails to discover. It is the conversion of the human soul into the divine soul and of natural life into a divine living.


alchemy ::: n. --> An imaginary art which aimed to transmute the baser metals into gold, to find the panacea, or universal remedy for diseases, etc. It led the way to modern chemistry.
A mixed metal composed mainly of brass, formerly used for various utensils; hence, a trumpet.
Miraculous power of transmuting something common into something precious.


". . . all birth is a progressive self-finding, a means of self-realisation.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

“… all birth is a progressive self-finding, a means of self-realisation.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

Altair 8800 "computer" An {Intel 8080}-based machine made by {MITS}. The Altair was the first popular {microcomputer} kit. It appeared on the cover of the January 1975 "Popular Electronics" magazine with an article (probably) by Leslie Solomon. Leslie Solomon was an editor at Popular Electronics who had a knack for spotting kits that would interest people and make them buy the magazine. The Altair 8800 was one such. The MITS guys took the prototype Altair to New York to show Solomon, but couldn't get it to work after the flight. Nonetheless, he liked it, and it appeared on the cover as "The first minicomputer in a kit." Solomon's blessing was important enough that some MITS competitors named their product the "SOL" to gain his favour. Some wags suggested {SOL} was actually an abbreviation for the condition in which kit purchasers would find themselves. {Bill Gates} and Paul Allen saw the article on the Altair 8800 in Popular Electronics. They realised that the Altair, which was programmed via its binary front panel needed a {high level language}. Legend has it that they called MITS with the claim that they had a {BASIC} {interpreter} for the Altair. When MITS asked them to demo it in Albuquerque, they wrote one on the plane. On arrival, they entered the machine code via the front panel and demonstrated and sold their "product." Thus was born "Altair BASIC." The original Altair BASIC ran in less than 4K of RAM because a "loaded" Altair had 4K memory. Since there was no {operating system} on the Altair, Altair BASIC included what we now think of as {BIOS}. It was distributed on {paper tape} that could be read on a {Teletype}. Later versions supported the 8K Altair and the 16K {diskette}-based Altair (demonstrating that, even in the 1970s, {Microsoft} was committed to {software bloat}). Altair BASIC was ported to the {Motorola 6800} for the Altair 680 machine, and to other 8080-based microcomputers produced by MITS' competitors. {PC-History.org Altair 8800 page (http://pc-history.org/altair_8800.htm)}. [Forrest M. Mimms, article in "Computers and Electronics", (formerly "Popular Electronics"), Jan 1985(?)]. [Was there ever an "Altair 9000" microcomputer?] (2002-06-17)

Amal: “On the plane described, we find what is concealed on earth by the form of things. A wonder is revealed.”“By the way, the word ‘Here’ in the line: Here sheltered behind form’s insensible screen does not refer to the plane described but to our earth.”

Amal: “When Ashwapati enters the occult cave he finds among other wonders hidden from the outer consciousness an orderly guide, as in an index, to all the mysteries of existence, mysteries such as the Rig Veda offers though its system of ordinary objects like those we find in outer life—especially cows which were a very important part of the Vedic peoples day to day career.”

amateur packet radio "communications" (PR) The use of {packet radio} by amateurs to communicate between computers. PR is a complete amateur radio computer network with "digipeaters" (relays), mailboxes (BBS) and other special nodes. In Germany, it is on HF, say, 2m (300 and 1200 BPS), 70cm (1200 to 9600 BPS), 23cm (normally 9600 BPS and up, currently most links between digipeaters) and higher frequencies. There is a KW (short wave) Packet Radio at 300 BPS, too. Satellites with OSCAR (Orbiting Sattelite Carring Amateur Radio) transponders (mostly attached to commercial satellites by the AMateur SATellite (AMSAT) group) carry Packet Radio mailboxes or {digipeaters}. There are both on-line and off-line services on the packet radio network: You can send {electronic mail}, read bulletins, chat, transfer files, connect to on-line DX-Clusters (DX=far distance) to catch notes typed in by other HAMs about the hottest international KW connections currently coming up (so you can pile up). PR uses {AX.25} (an {X.25} derivative) as its {transport layer} and sometimes even {TCP/IP} is transmitted over AX.25. AX.25 is like X.25 but the adressing uses HAM "calls" like "DG8MGV". There are special "wormholes" all over the world which "tunnel" amateur radio traffic through the {Internet} to forward mail. Sometimes mails travels over satelites. Normally amateur satellites have strange orbits, however the mail forwarding or mailbox satellites have very predictable orbits. Some wormholes allow HAMs to bridge from Internet to {AMPR-NET}, e.g. db0fho.ampr.org or db0fho.et-inf.fho-emden.de, but only if you are registered HAM. Because amateur radio is not for profit, it must not be interconnected to the {Internet} but it may be connected through the Internet. All people on the (completely free) amateur radio net must be licensed radio amateurs and must have a "call" which is unique all over the world. There is a special {domain} AMPR.ORG (44.*.*.*) for amateur radio reserved in the IP space. This domain is split between countries, which can further subdivide it. For example 44.130.*.* is Germany, 44.130.58.* is Augsburg (in Bavaria), and 44.130.58.20 is dg8mgv.ampr.org (you may verify this with {nslookup}). Mail transport is only one aspect of packet radio. You can talk interactively (as in {chat}), read files, or play silly games built in the Packet Radio software. Usually you can use the autorouter to let the digipeater network find a path to the station you want. However there are many (sometimes software incompatible) digipeaters out there, which the router cannot use. Paths over 1000 km are unlikely to be useable for {real-time} communication and long paths can introduce significant delay times (answer latency). Other uses of amateur radio for computer communication include {RTTY} ({baudot}), {AMTOR}, {PACTOR}, and {CLOVER}. {A huge hamradio archive (ftp://ftp.ucsd.edu/hamradio/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:rec.radio.amateur.packet}. (2001-05-12)

AMD 1. "company" {Advanced Micro Devices}. 2. "jargon" According to Don Olivier "don@hsph.harvard.edu", his system manager came in to work one morning to find his IBM system down with a message on the console that said "AMD failure". After he and the service rep had puzzled over documentation for an hour or so they called headquarters and eventually learned that it the failure was in the cooling system: an AMD is an "air movement device", IBM for "fan". (1995-01-16)

anavashtitatvani. ::: unsteadiness; instability of mind; inability to find a footing

And again, in Book X, Canto II, The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal we find these lines:

And find her in the idols they adore;

“And though this Spirit of the universe, this One who is all, seems to be turning us on the wheel of the world as if mounted on a machine by the force of Maya, shaping us in our ignorance as the potter shapes a pot, as the weaver a fabric, by some skilful mechanical principle, yet is this spirit our own greatest self and it is according to the real idea, the truth of ourselves, that which is growing in us and finding always new and more adequate forms in birth after birth, in our animal and human and divine life, in that which we were, that which we are, that which we shall be,—it is in accordance with this inner soul-truth that, as our opened eyes will discover, we are progressively shaped by this spirit within us in its all-wise omnipotence.” Essays on the Gita

**Angel of the Way *Sri Aurobindo: "Love fulfilled does not exclude knowledge, but itself brings knowledge; and the completer the knowledge, the richer the possibility of love. ‘By Bhakti" says the Lord in the Gita ‘shall a man know Me in all my extent and greatness and as I am in the principles of my being, and when he has known Me in the principles of my being, then he enters into Me." Love without knowledge is a passionate and intense, but blind, crude, often dangerous thing, a great power, but also a stumbling-block; love, limited in knowledge, condemns itself in its fervour and often by its very fervour to narrowness; but love leading to perfect knowledge brings the infinite and absolute union. Such love is not inconsistent with, but rather throws itself with joy into divine works; for it loves God and is one with him in all his being, and therefore in all beings, and to work for the world is then to feel and fulfil multitudinously one"s love for God. This is the trinity of our powers, [work, knowledge, love] the union of all three in God to which we arrive when we start on our journey by the path of devotion with Love for the Angel of the Way to find in the ecstasy of the divine delight of the All-Lover"s being the fulfilment of ours, its secure home and blissful abiding-place and the centre of its universal radiation.” The Synthesis of Yoga*

Another cause of these alternations, when one is receiving, is the nature's need of closing *up to assimilate. It can take per- haps a great deal, but while the experience is going on it cannot absorb properly what h brings, so it closes do^vn for assimila- tion. A third cause comes in the period of transformation, — one part of the nature changes and one feels for a time as if there had been a complete and permanent change. But one is disappointed to find it cease and a period of barrenness or lowered consciousness follow. This is because another part of the cons- ciousness comes up for change and a period of preparation and veiled working follows which seems to he one of uoeolightenment or worse. These things alarm, disappoint or perplex the eager- ness and impatience of the sadhaka ; but if one takes them quietly and knows how to use them or adopt the right attitude, one can make these unenlightened periods also a part of the conscious sadhana.

Anschauung: A German term used in epistemology to mean intuition or perception with a quality of directness or immediacy. It is a basic term in Kant's philosophy, denoting that which presents materials to the intellect through the forms of space and time. These forms predetermine what types of objects (schemata) can be set up when the understanding applies its own forms to the facts of sense. Kant distinguished "empirical" intuitions (a posteriori) of objects through sensation, and "pure" intuitions (a priori) with space and time as the forms of sensibility. The characteristics and functions of Anschauung are discussed in the first division (Aesthetic) of the Critique of Pure Reason. Caird disputes the equivalence of the Kantian Anschauung with intuition; but it is difficult to find an English word more closely related to the German term. -- T.G.

anytime algorithm "algorithm" An {algorithm} that returns a sequence of approximations to the correct answer such that each approximation is no worse than the previous one, i.e. the algorithm can be stopped at _any time_. {Newton-Raphson iteration} applied to finding the {square root} of a number b is another example: x = (x + b / x) / 2 Each new x is closer to the square root than the previous one. Applications might include a {real-time} control system or a chess program that is allowed a fixed thinking time. (2007-06-19)

Arabic Philosophy: The contact of the Arabs with Greek civilization and philosophy took place partly in Syria, where Christian Arabic philosophy developed, partly in other countries, Asia Minor, Persia, Egypt and Spain. The effect of this contact was not a simple reception of Greek philosophy, but the gradual growth of an original mode of thought, determined chiefly by the religious and philosophical tendencies alive in the Arab world. Eastern influences had produced a mystical trend, not unlike Neo-Platonism; the already existing "metaphysics of light", noticeable in the religious conception of the Qoran, also helped to assimilate Plotinlan ideas. On the other hand, Aristotelian philosophy became important, although more, at least in the beginning, as logic and methodology. The interest in science and medicine contributed to the spread of Aristotelian philosophy. The history of philosophy in the Arab world is determined by the increasing opposition of Orthodoxy against a more liberal theology and philosophy. Arab thought became influential in the Western world partly through European scholars who went to Spain and elsewhere for study, mostly however through the Latin translations which became more and more numerous at the end of the 12th and during the 13th centuries. Among the Christian Arabs Costa ben Luca (864-923) has to be mentioned whose De Differentia spiritus et animae was translated by Johannes Hispanus (12th century). The first period of Islamic philosophy is occupied mainly with translation of Greek texts, some of which were translated later into Latin. The Liber de causis (mentioned first by Alanus ab Insulis) is such a translation of an Arab text; it was believed to be by Aristotle, but is in truth, as Aquinas recognized, a version of the Stoicheiosis theologike by Proclus. The so-called Theologia Aristotelis is an excerpt of Plotinus Enn. IV-VI, written 840 by a Syrian. The fundamental trends of Arab philosophy are indeed Neo-Platonic, and the Aristotelian texts were mostly interpreted in this spirit. Furthermore, there is also a tendency to reconcile the Greek philosophers with theological notions, at least so long as the orthodox theologians could find no reason for opposition. In spite of this, some of the philosophers did not escape persecution. The Peripatetic element is more pronounced in the writings of later times when the technique of paraphrasis and commentary on Aristotelian texts had developed. Beside the philosophy dependent more or less on Greek, and partially even Christian influences, there is a mystical theology and philosophy whose sources are the Qoran, Indian and, most of all, Persian systems. The knowledge of the "Hermetic" writings too was of some importance.

arayan.a (Nara-Narayana; NaraNarayana; Nara Narayana) —(in mythology) the names of two sages, Nara and Narayan.a, "the seers who do tapasya together for the knowledge", a "double figure" which in the "Vaishnava form of Vedantism . . . expresses the relation of God in man to man in God", Nara being "the human soul which, eternal companion of the Divine, finds itself only when it awakens to that companionship", while Narayan.a "is the divine Soul always present in our humanity, the secret guide, friend and helper of the human being"; an intermediate bhava of brahmadarsana in which there is a dualistic perception of Nara and Narayan.a in all, the "bodha of Narayana" not being extended "into the whole consciousness of the Nara", but kept "as a thing apart & containing & informing, but not identical with the Nara".

ARRESTS IN SADHANA. ::: A difficulty comes or an arrest in some movement which you have begun or have been carrying on for some time. Such arrests are inevitably frequent enough; one might almost say that every step forward is followed by an arrest. It is to be dealt with by becoming always more quiet, more firm in the will to go through, by opening oneself more and more so that any obstructing non-receptivity in the nature may diminish or disappear, by an affirmation of faith even in the midst of obscurity, faith in the presence of a Power that is working behind the cloud and the veil, in the guidance of the Guru, by an observation of oneself to find any cause of the arrest, not in a spirit of depression or discouragement but with the will to find out and remove it. This is the only right attitude and, if one is persistent in taking it, the periods of arrest are not abolished, - for that cannot be at this stage, - but greatly shortened and lightened in their incidence. Sometimes these arrests are periods, long or short, of assimilation or unseen preparation, their appearance of sterile immobility is deceptive ::: in that case, with the right attitude, one can after a time, by opening, by observation, by accumulated experience, begin to feel, to get some inkling of what is being prepared or done. Sometimes it is a period of true obstruction in which the Power at work has to deal with the obstacles in the way, obstacles in oneself, obstacles of the opposing cosmic forces or any other or of all together, and this kind of arrest may be long or short according to the magnitude or obstinacy or complexity of the impediments that are met. But here, too, the right attitude can alleviate or shorten and, if persistently taken, help to a more radical removal of the difficulties and greatly diminish the necessity of complete arrests hereafter.
On the contrary, an attitude of depression or unfaith in the help or the guidance or in the certitude of the victory of the guiding Power, a shutting up of yourself in the sense of the difficulties, helps the obstructions to recur with force instead of progressively diminishing in their incidence.


art ::: “The highest aim of the aesthetic being is to find the Divine through beauty; the highest Art is that which by an inspired use of significant and interpretative form unseals the doors of the spirit.” The Human Cycle etc.

arya (Aryan) ::: the good and noble man; the fighter; he who strives and overcomes all outside him and within him that stands opposed to the human advance; he who does the work of sacrifice, finds the sacred word of illumination, desires the gods and increases them and is increased by them into the largeness of the true existence; he is the warrior of the light and the traveller to the Truth.

ascertainment ::: n. --> The act of ascertaining; a reducing to certainty; a finding out by investigation; discovery.

ascertain ::: v. t. --> To render (a person) certain; to cause to feel certain; to make confident; to assure; to apprise.
To make (a thing) certain to the mind; to free from obscurity, doubt, or change; to make sure of; to fix; to determine.
To find out or learn for a certainty, by trial, examination, or experiment; to get to know; as, to ascertain the weight of a commodity, or the purity of a metal.


A* search "algorithm" A {graph} search {algorithm}. A* is guaranteed to find a minimal solution path before any other solution paths, if a solution exists, in other words, it is an "{admissible}" search algorithm. Each path is assigned a value based on the cost of the path (e.g. its length) and an (under)estimate of the cost of completing the path, i.e. the cost of a path from the end of the current path to a solution. (1995-03-31)

as sensible as a dictionary "humour" In Lewis Carroll's {Through the Looking Glass and what Alice found there (http://www.Germany.EU.net/books/carroll/alice.html)}, in the chapter {The Garden of Live Flowers (http://www.Germany.EU.net/books/carroll/alice_21.html

assize ::: n. --> An assembly of knights and other substantial men, with a bailiff or justice, in a certain place and at a certain time, for public business.
A special kind of jury or inquest.
A kind of writ or real action.
A verdict or finding of a jury upon such writ.
A statute or ordinance in general. Specifically: (1) A statute regulating the weight, measure, and proportions of ingredients


At a certain stage attacks fall heavily on the body because the opposing forces find it more difficult than before to upset the mind and vital directly, so they fall on the physical in the hope that that will do the trick, the physical bemg most vulnerable.

"A third step is to find out that there is something in him other than his instrumental mind, life and body, not only an immortal ever-developing individual soul that supports his nature but an eternal immutable self and spirit, and to learn what are the categories of his spiritual being, until he discovers that all in him is an expression of the spirit and distinguishes the link between his lower and his higher existence; thus he sets out to remove his constitutional self-ignorance. Discovering self and spirit he discovers God; he finds out that there is a Self beyond the temporal: he comes to the vision of that Self in the cosmic consciousness as the divine Reality behind Nature and this world of beings; his mind opens to the thought or the sense of the Absolute of whom self and the individual and the cosmos are so many faces; the cosmic, the egoistic, the original ignorance begin to lose the rigidness of their hold upon him.” The Life Divine

“A third step is to find out that there is something in him other than his instrumental mind, life and body, not only an immortal ever-developing individual soul that supports his nature but an eternal immutable self and spirit, and to learn what are the categories of his spiritual being, until he discovers that all in him is an expression of the spirit and distinguishes the link between his lower and his higher existence; thus he sets out to remove his constitutional self-ignorance. Discovering self and spirit he discovers God; he finds out that there is a Self beyond the temporal: he comes to the vision of that Self in the cosmic consciousness as the divine Reality behind Nature and this world of beings; his mind opens to the thought or the sense of the Absolute of whom self and the individual and the cosmos are so many faces; the cosmic, the egoistic, the original ignorance begin to lose the rigidness of their hold upon him.” The Life Divine

atma vichara. ::: enquiry into the Self; the practice of scrutinising or attending to the feeling "I" in order to find out "Who am I?"

attaint ::: v. t. --> To attain; to get act; to hit.
To find guilty; to convict; -- said esp. of a jury on trial for giving a false verdict.
To subject (a person) to the legal condition formerly resulting from a sentence of death or outlawry, pronounced in respect of treason or felony; to affect by attainder.
To accuse; to charge with a crime or a dishonorable act.


Aufklärung: In general, this German word and its English equivalent Enlightenment denote the self-emancipation of man from mere authority, prejudice, convention and tradition, with an insistence on freer thinking about problems uncritically referred to these other agencies. According to Kant's famous definition "Enlightenment is the liberation of man from his self-caused state of minority, which is the incapacity of using one's understanding without the direction of another. This state of minority is caused when its source lies not in the lack of understanding, but in the lack of determination and courage to use it without the assistance of another" (Was ist Aufklärung? 1784). In its historical perspective, the Aufklärung refers to the cultural atmosphere and contrlbutions of the 18th century, especially in Germany, France and England [which affected also American thought with B. Franklin, T. Paine and the leaders of the Revolution]. It crystallized tendencies emphasized by the Renaissance, and quickened by modern scepticism and empiricism, and by the great scientific discoveries of the 17th century. This movement, which was represented by men of varying tendencies, gave an impetus to general learning, a more popular philosophy, empirical science, scriptural criticism, social and political thought. More especially, the word Aufklärung is applied to the German contributions to 18th century culture. In philosophy, its principal representatives are G. E. Lessing (1729-81) who believed in free speech and in a methodical criticism of religion, without being a free-thinker; H. S. Reimarus (1694-1768) who expounded a naturalistic philosophy and denied the supernatural origin of Christianity; Moses Mendelssohn (1729-86) who endeavoured to mitigate prejudices and developed a popular common-sense philosophy; Chr. Wolff (1679-1754), J. A. Eberhard (1739-1809) who followed the Leibnizian rationalism and criticized unsuccessfully Kant and Fichte; and J. G. Herder (1744-1803) who was best as an interpreter of others, but whose intuitional suggestions have borne fruit in the organic correlation of the sciences, and in questions of language in relation to human nature and to national character. The works of Kant and Goethe mark the culmination of the German Enlightenment. Cf. J. G. Hibben, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, 1910. --T.G. Augustinianism: The thought of St. Augustine of Hippo, and of his followers. Born in 354 at Tagaste in N. Africa, A. studied rhetoric in Carthage, taught that subject there and in Rome and Milan. Attracted successively to Manicheanism, Scepticism, and Neo-Platontsm, A. eventually found intellectual and moral peace with his conversion to Christianity in his thirty-fourth year. Returning to Africa, he established numerous monasteries, became a priest in 391, Bishop of Hippo in 395. Augustine wrote much: On Free Choice, Confessions, Literal Commentary on Genesis, On the Trinity, and City of God, are his most noted works. He died in 430.   St. Augustine's characteristic method, an inward empiricism which has little in common with later variants, starts from things without, proceeds within to the self, and moves upwards to God. These three poles of the Augustinian dialectic are polarized by his doctrine of moderate illuminism. An ontological illumination is required to explain the metaphysical structure of things. The truth of judgment demands a noetic illumination. A moral illumination is necessary in the order of willing; and so, too, an lllumination of art in the aesthetic order. Other illuminations which transcend the natural order do not come within the scope of philosophy; they provide the wisdoms of theology and mysticism. Every being is illuminated ontologically by number, form, unity and its derivatives, and order. A thing is what it is, in so far as it is more or less flooded by the light of these ontological constituents.   Sensation is necessary in order to know material substances. There is certainly an action of the external object on the body and a corresponding passion of the body, but, as the soul is superior to the body and can suffer nothing from its inferior, sensation must be an action, not a passion, of the soul. Sensation takes place only when the observing soul, dynamically on guard throughout the body, is vitally attentive to the changes suffered by the body. However, an adequate basis for the knowledge of intellectual truth is not found in sensation alone. In order to know, for example, that a body is multiple, the idea of unity must be present already, otherwise its multiplicity could not be recognized. If numbers are not drawn in by the bodily senses which perceive only the contingent and passing, is the mind the source of the unchanging and necessary truth of numbers? The mind of man is also contingent and mutable, and cannot give what it does not possess. As ideas are not innate, nor remembered from a previous existence of the soul, they can be accounted for only by an immutable source higher than the soul. In so far as man is endowed with an intellect, he is a being naturally illuminated by God, Who may be compared to an intelligible sun. The human intellect does not create the laws of thought; it finds them and submits to them. The immediate intuition of these normative rules does not carry any content, thus any trace of ontologism is avoided.   Things have forms because they have numbers, and they have being in so far as they possess form. The sufficient explanation of all formable, and hence changeable, things is an immutable and eternal form which is unrestricted in time and space. The forms or ideas of all things actually existing in the world are in the things themselves (as rationes seminales) and in the Divine Mind (as rationes aeternae). Nothing could exist without unity, for to be is no other than to be one. There is a unity proper to each level of being, a unity of the material individual and species, of the soul, and of that union of souls in the love of the same good, which union constitutes the city. Order, also, is ontologically imbibed by all beings. To tend to being is to tend to order; order secures being, disorder leads to non-being. Order is the distribution which allots things equal and unequal each to its own place and integrates an ensemble of parts in accordance with an end. Hence, peace is defined as the tranquillity of order. Just as things have their being from their forms, the order of parts, and their numerical relations, so too their beauty is not something superadded, but the shining out of all their intelligible co-ingredients.   S. Aurelii Augustini, Opera Omnia, Migne, PL 32-47; (a critical edition of some works will be found in the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Vienna). Gilson, E., Introd. a l'etude de s. Augustin, (Paris, 1931) contains very good bibliography up to 1927, pp. 309-331. Pope, H., St. Augustine of Hippo, (London, 1937). Chapman, E., St. Augustine's Philos. of Beauty, (N. Y., 1939). Figgis, J. N., The Political Aspects of St. Augustine's "City of God", (London, 1921). --E.C. Authenticity: In a general sense, genuineness, truth according to its title. It involves sometimes a direct and personal characteristic (Whitehead speaks of "authentic feelings").   This word also refers to problems of fundamental criticism involving title, tradition, authorship and evidence. These problems are vital in theology, and basic in scholarship with regard to the interpretation of texts and doctrines. --T.G. Authoritarianism: That theory of knowledge which maintains that the truth of any proposition is determined by the fact of its having been asserted by a certain esteemed individual or group of individuals. Cf. H. Newman, Grammar of Assent; C. S. Peirce, "Fixation of Belief," in Chance, Love and Logic, ed. M. R. Cohen. --A.C.B. Autistic thinking: Absorption in fanciful or wishful thinking without proper control by objective or factual material; day dreaming; undisciplined imagination. --A.C.B. Automaton Theory: Theory that a living organism may be considered a mere machine. See Automatism. Automatism: (Gr. automatos, self-moving) (a) In metaphysics: Theory that animal and human organisms are automata, that is to say, are machines governed by the laws of physics and mechanics. Automatism, as propounded by Descartes, considered the lower animals to be pure automata (Letter to Henry More, 1649) and man a machine controlled by a rational soul (Treatise on Man). Pure automatism for man as well as animals is advocated by La Mettrie (Man, a Machine, 1748). During the Nineteenth century, automatism, combined with epiphenomenalism, was advanced by Hodgson, Huxley and Clifford. (Cf. W. James, The Principles of Psychology, Vol. I, ch. V.) Behaviorism, of the extreme sort, is the most recent version of automatism (See Behaviorism).   (b) In psychology: Psychological automatism is the performance of apparently purposeful actions, like automatic writing without the superintendence of the conscious mind. L. C. Rosenfield, From Beast Machine to Man Machine, N. Y., 1941. --L.W. Automatism, Conscious: The automatism of Hodgson, Huxley, and Clifford which considers man a machine to which mind or consciousness is superadded; the mind of man is, however, causally ineffectual. See Automatism; Epiphenomenalism. --L.W. Autonomy: (Gr. autonomia, independence) Freedom consisting in self-determination and independence of all external constraint. See Freedom. Kant defines autonomy of the will as subjection of the will to its own law, the categorical imperative, in contrast to heteronomy, its subjection to a law or end outside the rational will. (Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, § 2.) --L.W. Autonomy of ethics: A doctrine, usually propounded by intuitionists, that ethics is not a part of, and cannot be derived from, either metaphysics or any of the natural or social sciences. See Intuitionism, Metaphysical ethics, Naturalistic ethics. --W.K.F. Autonomy of the will: (in Kant's ethics) The freedom of the rational will to legislate to itself, which constitutes the basis for the autonomy of the moral law. --P.A.S. Autonymy: In the terminology introduced by Carnap, a word (phrase, symbol, expression) is autonymous if it is used as a name for itself --for the geometric shape, sound, etc. which it exemplifies, or for the word as a historical and grammatical unit. Autonymy is thus the same as the Scholastic suppositio matertalis (q. v.), although the viewpoint is different. --A.C. Autotelic: (from Gr. autos, self, and telos, end) Said of any absorbing activity engaged in for its own sake (cf. German Selbstzweck), such as higher mathematics, chess, etc. In aesthetics, applied to creative art and play which lack any conscious reference to the accomplishment of something useful. In the view of some, it may constitute something beneficent in itself of which the person following his art impulse (q.v.) or playing is unaware, thus approaching a heterotelic (q.v.) conception. --K.F.L. Avenarius, Richard: (1843-1896) German philosopher who expressed his thought in an elaborate and novel terminology in the hope of constructing a symbolic language for philosophy, like that of mathematics --the consequence of his Spinoza studies. As the most influential apostle of pure experience, the posltivistic motive reaches in him an extreme position. Insisting on the biologic and economic function of thought, he thought the true method of science is to cure speculative excesses by a return to pure experience devoid of all assumptions. Philosophy is the scientific effort to exclude from knowledge all ideas not included in the given. Its task is to expel all extraneous elements in the given. His uncritical use of the category of the given and the nominalistic view that logical relations are created rather than discovered by thought, leads him to banish not only animism but also all of the categories, substance, causality, etc., as inventions of the mind. Explaining the evolution and devolution of the problematization and deproblematization of numerous ideas, and aiming to give the natural history of problems, Avenarius sought to show physiologically, psychologically and historically under what conditions they emerge, are challenged and are solved. He hypothesized a System C, a bodily and central nervous system upon which consciousness depends. R-values are the stimuli received from the world of objects. E-values are the statements of experience. The brain changes that continually oscillate about an ideal point of balance are termed Vitalerhaltungsmaximum. The E-values are differentiated into elements, to which the sense-perceptions or the content of experience belong, and characters, to which belongs everything which psychology describes as feelings and attitudes. Avenarius describes in symbolic form a series of states from balance to balance, termed vital series, all describing a series of changes in System C. Inequalities in the vital balance give rise to vital differences. According to his theory there are two vital series. It assumes a series of brain changes because parallel series of conscious states can be observed. The independent vital series are physical, and the dependent vital series are psychological. The two together are practically covariants. In the case of a process as a dependent vital series three stages can be noted: first, the appearance of the problem, expressed as strain, restlessness, desire, fear, doubt, pain, repentance, delusion; the second, the continued effort and struggle to solve the problem; and finally, the appearance of the solution, characterized by abating anxiety, a feeling of triumph and enjoyment.   Corresponding to these three stages of the dependent series are three stages of the independent series: the appearance of the vital difference and a departure from balance in the System C, the continuance with an approximate vital difference, and lastly, the reduction of the vital difference to zero, the return to stability. By making room for dependent and independent experiences, he showed that physics regards experience as independent of the experiencing indlvidual, and psychology views experience as dependent upon the individual. He greatly influenced Mach and James (q.v.). See Avenarius, Empirio-criticism, Experience, pure. Main works: Kritik der reinen Erfahrung; Der menschliche Weltbegriff. --H.H. Averroes: (Mohammed ibn Roshd) Known to the Scholastics as The Commentator, and mentioned as the author of il gran commento by Dante (Inf. IV. 68) he was born 1126 at Cordova (Spain), studied theology, law, medicine, mathematics, and philosophy, became after having been judge in Sevilla and Cordova, physician to the khalifah Jaqub Jusuf, and charged with writing a commentary on the works of Aristotle. Al-mansur, Jusuf's successor, deprived him of his place because of accusations of unorthodoxy. He died 1198 in Morocco. Averroes is not so much an original philosopher as the author of a minute commentary on the whole works of Aristotle. His procedure was imitated later by Aquinas. In his interpretation of Aristotelian metaphysics Averroes teaches the coeternity of a universe created ex nihilo. This doctrine formed together with the notion of a numerical unity of the active intellect became one of the controversial points in the discussions between the followers of Albert-Thomas and the Latin Averroists. Averroes assumed that man possesses only a disposition for receiving the intellect coming from without; he identifies this disposition with the possible intellect which thus is not truly intellectual by nature. The notion of one intellect common to all men does away with the doctrine of personal immortality. Another doctrine which probably was emphasized more by the Latin Averroists (and by the adversaries among Averroes' contemporaries) is the famous statement about "two-fold truth", viz. that a proposition may be theologically true and philosophically false and vice versa. Averroes taught that religion expresses the (higher) philosophical truth by means of religious imagery; the "two-truth notion" came apparently into the Latin text through a misinterpretation on the part of the translators. The works of Averroes were one of the main sources of medieval Aristotelianlsm, before and even after the original texts had been translated. The interpretation the Latin Averroists found in their texts of the "Commentator" spread in spite of opposition and condemnation. See Averroism, Latin. Averroes, Opera, Venetiis, 1553. M. Horten, Die Metaphysik des Averroes, 1912. P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin, 2d ed., Louvain, 1911. --R.A. Averroism, Latin: The commentaries on Aristotle written by Averroes (Ibn Roshd) in the 12th century became known to the Western scholars in translations by Michael Scottus, Hermannus Alemannus, and others at the beginning of the 13th century. Many works of Aristotle were also known first by such translations from Arabian texts, though there existed translations from the Greek originals at the same time (Grabmann). The Averroistic interpretation of Aristotle was held to be the true one by many; but already Albert the Great pointed out several notions which he felt to be incompatible with the principles of Christian philosophy, although he relied for the rest on the "Commentator" and apparently hardly used any other text. Aquinas, basing his studies mostly on a translation from the Greek texts, procured for him by William of Moerbecke, criticized the Averroistic interpretation in many points. But the teachings of the Commentator became the foundation for a whole school of philosophers, represented first by the Faculty of Arts at Paris. The most prominent of these scholars was Siger of Brabant. The philosophy of these men was condemned on March 7th, 1277 by Stephen Tempier, Bishop of Paris, after a first condemnation of Aristotelianism in 1210 had gradually come to be neglected. The 219 theses condemned in 1277, however, contain also some of Aquinas which later were generally recognized an orthodox. The Averroistic propositions which aroused the criticism of the ecclesiastic authorities and which had been opposed with great energy by Albert and Thomas refer mostly to the following points: The co-eternity of the created word; the numerical identity of the intellect in all men, the so-called two-fold-truth theory stating that a proposition may be philosophically true although theologically false. Regarding the first point Thomas argued that there is no philosophical proof, either for the co-eternity or against it; creation is an article of faith. The unity of intellect was rejected as incompatible with the true notion of person and with personal immortality. It is doubtful whether Averroes himself held the two-truths theory; it was, however, taught by the Latin Averroists who, notwithstanding the opposition of the Church and the Thomistic philosophers, gained a great influence and soon dominated many universities, especially in Italy. Thomas and his followers were convinced that they interpreted Aristotle correctly and that the Averroists were wrong; one has, however, to admit that certain passages in Aristotle allow for the Averroistic interpretation, especially in regard to the theory of intellect.   Lit.: P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin au XIIIe Siecle, 2d. ed. Louvain, 1911; M. Grabmann, Forschungen über die lateinischen Aristotelesübersetzungen des XIII. Jahrhunderts, Münster 1916 (Beitr. z. Gesch. Phil. d. MA. Vol. 17, H. 5-6). --R.A. Avesta: See Zendavesta. Avicehron: (or Avencebrol, Salomon ibn Gabirol) The first Jewish philosopher in Spain, born in Malaga 1020, died about 1070, poet, philosopher, and moralist. His main work, Fons vitae, became influential and was much quoted by the Scholastics. It has been preserved only in the Latin translation by Gundissalinus. His doctrine of a spiritual substance individualizing also the pure spirits or separate forms was opposed by Aquinas already in his first treatise De ente, but found favor with the medieval Augustinians also later in the 13th century. He also teaches the necessity of a mediator between God and the created world; such a mediator he finds in the Divine Will proceeding from God and creating, conserving, and moving the world. His cosmogony shows a definitely Neo-Platonic shade and assumes a series of emanations. Cl. Baeumker, Avencebrolis Fons vitae. Beitr. z. Gesch. d. Philos. d. MA. 1892-1895, Vol. I. Joh. Wittman, Die Stellung des hl. Thomas von Aquino zu Avencebrol, ibid. 1900. Vol. III. --R.A. Avicenna: (Abu Ali al Hosain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina) Born 980 in the country of Bocchara, began to write in young years, left more than 100 works, taught in Ispahan, was physician to several Persian princes, and died at Hamadan in 1037. His fame as physician survived his influence as philosopher in the Occident. His medical works were printed still in the 17th century. His philosophy is contained in 18 vols. of a comprehensive encyclopedia, following the tradition of Al Kindi and Al Farabi. Logic, Physics, Mathematics and Metaphysics form the parts of this work. His philosophy is Aristotelian with noticeable Neo-Platonic influences. His doctrine of the universal existing ante res in God, in rebus as the universal nature of the particulars, and post res in the human mind by way of abstraction became a fundamental thesis of medieval Aristotelianism. He sharply distinguished between the logical and the ontological universal, denying to the latter the true nature of form in the composite. The principle of individuation is matter, eternally existent. Latin translations attributed to Avicenna the notion that existence is an accident to essence (see e.g. Guilelmus Parisiensis, De Universo). The process adopted by Avicenna was one of paraphrasis of the Aristotelian texts with many original thoughts interspersed. His works were translated into Latin by Dominicus Gundissalinus (Gondisalvi) with the assistance of Avendeath ibn Daud. This translation started, when it became more generally known, the "revival of Aristotle" at the end of the 12th and the beginning of the 13th century. Albert the Great and Aquinas professed, notwithstanding their critical attitude, a great admiration for Avicenna whom the Arabs used to call the "third Aristotle". But in the Orient, Avicenna's influence declined soon, overcome by the opposition of the orthodox theologians. Avicenna, Opera, Venetiis, 1495; l508; 1546. M. Horten, Das Buch der Genesung der Seele, eine philosophische Enzyklopaedie Avicenna's; XIII. Teil: Die Metaphysik. Halle a. S. 1907-1909. R. de Vaux, Notes et textes sur l'Avicennisme Latin, Bibl. Thomiste XX, Paris, 1934. --R.A. Avidya: (Skr.) Nescience; ignorance; the state of mind unaware of true reality; an equivalent of maya (q.v.); also a condition of pure awareness prior to the universal process of evolution through gradual differentiation into the elements and factors of knowledge. --K.F.L. Avyakta: (Skr.) "Unmanifest", descriptive of or standing for brahman (q.v.) in one of its or "his" aspects, symbolizing the superabundance of the creative principle, or designating the condition of the universe not yet become phenomenal (aja, unborn). --K.F.L. Awareness: Consciousness considered in its aspect of act; an act of attentive awareness such as the sensing of a color patch or the feeling of pain is distinguished from the content attended to, the sensed color patch, the felt pain. The psychologlcal theory of intentional act was advanced by F. Brentano (Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte) and received its epistemological development by Meinong, Husserl, Moore, Laird and Broad. See Intentionalism. --L.W. Axiological: (Ger. axiologisch) In Husserl: Of or pertaining to value or theory of value (the latter term understood as including disvalue and value-indifference). --D.C. Axiological ethics: Any ethics which makes the theory of obligation entirely dependent on the theory of value, by making the determination of the rightness of an action wholly dependent on a consideration of the value or goodness of something, e.g. the action itself, its motive, or its consequences, actual or probable. Opposed to deontological ethics. See also teleological ethics. --W.K.F. Axiologic Realism: In metaphysics, theory that value as well as logic, qualities as well as relations, have their being and exist external to the mind and independently of it. Applicable to the philosophy of many though not all realists in the history of philosophy, from Plato to G. E. Moore, A. N. Whitehead, and N, Hartmann. --J.K.F. Axiology: (Gr. axios, of like value, worthy, and logos, account, reason, theory). Modern term for theory of value (the desired, preferred, good), investigation of its nature, criteria, and metaphysical status. Had its rise in Plato's theory of Forms or Ideas (Idea of the Good); was developed in Aristotle's Organon, Ethics, Poetics, and Metaphysics (Book Lambda). Stoics and Epicureans investigated the summum bonum. Christian philosophy (St. Thomas) built on Aristotle's identification of highest value with final cause in God as "a living being, eternal, most good."   In modern thought, apart from scholasticism and the system of Spinoza (Ethica, 1677), in which values are metaphysically grounded, the various values were investigated in separate sciences, until Kant's Critiques, in which the relations of knowledge to moral, aesthetic, and religious values were examined. In Hegel's idealism, morality, art, religion, and philosophy were made the capstone of his dialectic. R. H. Lotze "sought in that which should be the ground of that which is" (Metaphysik, 1879). Nineteenth century evolutionary theory, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and economics subjected value experience to empirical analysis, and stress was again laid on the diversity and relativity of value phenomena rather than on their unity and metaphysical nature. F. Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra (1883-1885) and Zur Genealogie der Moral (1887) aroused new interest in the nature of value. F. Brentano, Vom Ursprung sittlicher Erkenntnis (1889), identified value with love.   In the twentieth century the term axiology was apparently first applied by Paul Lapie (Logique de la volonte, 1902) and E. von Hartmann (Grundriss der Axiologie, 1908). Stimulated by Ehrenfels (System der Werttheorie, 1897), Meinong (Psychologisch-ethische Untersuchungen zur Werttheorie, 1894-1899), and Simmel (Philosophie des Geldes, 1900). W. M. Urban wrote the first systematic treatment of axiology in English (Valuation, 1909), phenomenological in method under J. M. Baldwin's influence. Meanwhile H. Münsterberg wrote a neo-Fichtean system of values (The Eternal Values, 1909).   Among important recent contributions are: B. Bosanquet, The Principle of Individuality and Value (1912), a free reinterpretation of Hegelianism; W. R. Sorley, Moral Values and the Idea of God (1918, 1921), defending a metaphysical theism; S. Alexander, Space, Time, and Deity (1920), realistic and naturalistic; N. Hartmann, Ethik (1926), detailed analysis of types and laws of value; R. B. Perry's magnum opus, General Theory of Value (1926), "its meaning and basic principles construed in terms of interest"; and J. Laird, The Idea of Value (1929), noteworthy for historical exposition. A naturalistic theory has been developed by J. Dewey (Theory of Valuation, 1939), for which "not only is science itself a value . . . but it is the supreme means of the valid determination of all valuations." A. J. Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic (1936) expounds the view of logical positivism that value is "nonsense." J. Hessen, Wertphilosophie (1937), provides an account of recent German axiology from a neo-scholastic standpoint.   The problems of axiology fall into four main groups, namely, those concerning (1) the nature of value, (2) the types of value, (3) the criterion of value, and (4) the metaphysical status of value.   (1) The nature of value experience. Is valuation fulfillment of desire (voluntarism: Spinoza, Ehrenfels), pleasure (hedonism: Epicurus, Bentham, Meinong), interest (Perry), preference (Martineau), pure rational will (formalism: Stoics, Kant, Royce), apprehension of tertiary qualities (Santayana), synoptic experience of the unity of personality (personalism: T. H. Green, Bowne), any experience that contributes to enhanced life (evolutionism: Nietzsche), or "the relation of things as means to the end or consequence actually reached" (pragmatism, instrumentalism: Dewey).   (2) The types of value. Most axiologists distinguish between intrinsic (consummatory) values (ends), prized for their own sake, and instrumental (contributory) values (means), which are causes (whether as economic goods or as natural events) of intrinsic values. Most intrinsic values are also instrumental to further value experience; some instrumental values are neutral or even disvaluable intrinsically. Commonly recognized as intrinsic values are the (morally) good, the true, the beautiful, and the holy. Values of play, of work, of association, and of bodily well-being are also acknowledged. Some (with Montague) question whether the true is properly to be regarded as a value, since some truth is disvaluable, some neutral; but love of truth, regardless of consequences, seems to establish the value of truth. There is disagreement about whether the holy (religious value) is a unique type (Schleiermacher, Otto), or an attitude toward other values (Kant, Höffding), or a combination of the two (Hocking). There is also disagreement about whether the variety of values is irreducible (pluralism) or whether all values are rationally related in a hierarchy or system (Plato, Hegel, Sorley), in which values interpenetrate or coalesce into a total experience.   (3) The criterion of value. The standard for testing values is influenced by both psychological and logical theory. Hedonists find the standard in the quantity of pleasure derived by the individual (Aristippus) or society (Bentham). Intuitionists appeal to an ultimate insight into preference (Martineau, Brentano). Some idealists recognize an objective system of rational norms or ideals as criterion (Plato, Windelband), while others lay more stress on rational wholeness and coherence (Hegel, Bosanquet, Paton) or inclusiveness (T. H. Green). Naturalists find biological survival or adjustment (Dewey) to be the standard. Despite differences, there is much in common in the results of the application of these criteria.   (4) The metaphysical status of value. What is the relation of values to the facts investigated by natural science (Koehler), of Sein to Sollen (Lotze, Rickert), of human experience of value to reality independent of man (Hegel, Pringle-Pattlson, Spaulding)? There are three main answers:   subjectivism (value is entirely dependent on and relative to human experience of it: so most hedonists, naturalists, positivists);   logical objectivism (values are logical essences or subsistences, independent of their being known, yet with no existential status or action in reality);   metaphysical objectivism (values   --or norms or ideals   --are integral, objective, and active constituents of the metaphysically real: so theists, absolutists, and certain realists and naturalists like S. Alexander and Wieman). --E.S.B. Axiom: See Mathematics. Axiomatic method: That method of constructing a deductive system consisting of deducing by specified rules all statements of the system save a given few from those given few, which are regarded as axioms or postulates of the system. See Mathematics. --C.A.B. Ayam atma brahma: (Skr.) "This self is brahman", famous quotation from Brhadaranyaka Upanishad 2.5.19, one of many alluding to the central theme of the Upanishads, i.e., the identity of the human and divine or cosmic. --K.F.L.

A/UX "operating system" (Apple's UniX) {Apple}'s first version of {Unix} for {Macintosh} computers. A/UX merges the {Macintosh Finder} ({GUI}) with a Unix core, offering functions from both systems. It will run on some late-model {Motorola 68000} Macs, but not on the {Power Mac}. A/UX is based on {AT&T} Unix {System V}.2.2 with numerous extensions from V.3, V.4 and {BSD} 4.2/4.3. It also provides full {POSIX} compliance. A/UX 3.x.x incorporates {System 7} for the Macintosh, thus supporting the vast majority of Macintosh {applications}. System 7 and Unix are fully integrated under A/UX 3.x.x with the Unix file system being seen as a disk drive by the Finder. {jagubox's A/UX Home Page (http://jagubox.gsfc.nasa.gov/aux/Info/FAQ.auxl)}. (1997-12-13)

ava (madhurabhava; madhur bhava)—the sweet (madhura) relation (bhava) between the jiva and the isvara (or between Kali and Kr.s.n.a), the relation of lover and beloved which "is the most intense and blissful of all and carries up all the rest into its heights"(see composite bhava); the spiritual emotion proper to that relation, in which "the turning of human emotion Godwards finds its full meaning and discovers all the truth of which love is the human symbol, all its essential instincts divinised, raised, satisfied in the bliss from which our life was born and towards which by oneness it returns in the Ananda of the divine existence where love is absolute, eternal and unalloyed". madhura madhur a d dasi

A vicious circle in definition (circulus in definiendo) occurs if A1 is used in defining A2, A2 in defining A3, . . . , An-1 in defining An, and finally An in defining A1. (The simplest case is that in which n = l, A1 being defined in terms of itself.) There is, of course, a fallacy if A1, A2, . . . , An are then used as defined absolutely. Apparent exceptions, such as definition by recursion (q.v.), require special justification, e.g., by finding an equivalent form of definition which is not circular.

axiomatic set theory "theory" One of several approaches to {set theory}, consisting of a {formal language} for talking about sets and a collection of {axioms} describing how they behave. There are many different {axiomatisations} for set theory. Each takes a slightly different approach to the problem of finding a theory that captures as much as possible of the intuitive idea of what a set is, while avoiding the {paradoxes} that result from accepting all of it, the most famous being {Russell's paradox}. The main source of trouble in naive set theory is the idea that you can specify a set by saying whether each object in the universe is in the "set" or not. Accordingly, the most important differences between different axiomatisations of set theory concern the restrictions they place on this idea (known as "comprehension"). {Zermelo Fränkel set theory}, the most commonly used axiomatisation, gets round it by (in effect) saying that you can only use this principle to define subsets of existing sets. NBG (von Neumann-Bernays-Goedel) set theory sort of allows comprehension for all {formulae} without restriction, but distinguishes between two kinds of set, so that the sets produced by applying comprehension are only second-class sets. NBG is exactly as powerful as ZF, in the sense that any statement that can be formalised in both theories is a theorem of ZF if and only if it is a theorem of ZFC. MK (Morse-Kelley) set theory is a strengthened version of NBG, with a simpler axiom system. It is strictly stronger than NBG, and it is possible that NBG might be consistent but MK inconsistent. {NF (http://math.boisestate.edu/~holmes/holmes/nf.html)} ("New Foundations"), a theory developed by Willard Van Orman Quine, places a very different restriction on comprehension: it only works when the formula describing the membership condition for your putative set is "stratified", which means that it could be made to make sense if you worked in a system where every set had a level attached to it, so that a level-n set could only be a member of sets of level n+1. (This doesn't mean that there are actually levels attached to sets in NF). NF is very different from ZF; for instance, in NF the universe is a set (which it isn't in ZF, because the whole point of ZF is that it forbids sets that are "too large"), and it can be proved that the {Axiom of Choice} is false in NF! ML ("Modern Logic") is to NF as NBG is to ZF. (Its name derives from the title of the book in which Quine introduced an early, defective, form of it). It is stronger than ZF (it can prove things that ZF can't), but if NF is consistent then ML is too. (2003-09-21)

babbler ::: n. --> An idle talker; an irrational prater; a teller of secrets.
A hound too noisy on finding a good scent.
A name given to any one of family (Timalinae) of thrushlike birds, having a chattering note.


backstair ::: a. --> Private; indirect; secret; intriguing; -- as if finding access by the back stairs.

backtracking "algorithm" A scheme for solving a series of sub-problems each of which may have multiple possible solutions and where the solution chosen for one sub-problem may affect the possible solutions of later sub-problems. To solve the overall problem, we find a solution to the first sub-problem and then attempt to recursively solve the other sub-problems based on this first solution. If we cannot, or we want all possible solutions, we backtrack and try the next possible solution to the first sub-problem and so on. Backtracking terminates when there are no more solutions to the first sub-problem. This is the algorithm used by {logic programming} languages such as {Prolog} to find all possible ways of proving a {goal}. An optimisation known as "{intelligent backtracking}" keeps track of the dependencies between sub-problems and only re-solves those which depend on an earlier solution which has changed. Backtracking is one {algorithm} which can be used to implement {nondeterminism}. It is effectively a {depth-first search} of a {problem space}. (1995-04-13)

Bad command or file name "operating system" The error message printed by {MS DOS} when it can't find a program or command to execute due to a typing error, incorrect PATH variable, or misplaced or missing executable. (1996-04-07)

batfowler ::: n. --> One who practices or finds sport in batfowling.

(b) Deism is a term referring collectively and somewhat loosely to a group of religious thinkers of the 17th (and 18th) century in England and France who in attempting to justify religion, particularly Christianity, began by establishing the harmony of reason and revelation and developed what, in their time, was regarded as extreme views: assaults upon traditional supernaturalism, external revelation and dogmas implying mysteries, and concluding that revelation is superfluous, that reason is the touchstone to religious validity, that religion and ethics are natural phenomena, that the traditional God need hardly be appealed to since man finds in nature the necessary guides for moral and religious living. Not all deists, so called, went toward the more extreme expressions. Among the more important English deists were Toland, Collins, Tindal, Chubb and Morgan. Voltaire (1694-1778) influenced by English thought is the notable example of deism in France. On the whole the term represents a tendency rather than a school. -- V.F.

BEAUTY. ::: Beauty is as much an expression of the Divine as Knowledge, Power or Ananda.
"To find highest beauty is to find God ; to reveal, to embody, to create as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God.


Because the difference between phenomenological pure psychology and transcendental phenomenology depends on a difference in attitude towards "the same" subject matter, their contents are widely analogous. Husserl maintained, however, that genuine philosophy is possible only as transcendental phenomenology, because it alone is knowledge of that non-worldly nucleus of subjectivity in which everything intendable as immanent or as transcendent is constituted (produced, generated) as an essentially intentional object. As envisaged in the Ideen and later works, phenomenological analysis is chiefly "transcendental-constitutional" analysis of the subjective structures in which the concrete individual world is built up as an intersubjectively valid transcendent sense for transcendental subjectivity. In the course of such analysis, every legitimate philosophical problem must find its definitive solution. From the transcendental-phenomenological standpoint, however, one traditional problem, namely the relation between what are essentially objects of consciousness and "things-in-themselves" that are not essentially objects of consciousness, is seen to be spurious. On the one hand, it is evidently false that all directly presented objects of consciousness are immanent in the mind, on the other hand, the concept of an entity that is not an intentionally constituted object of transcendental consciousness is evidently self-contradictory. This is the central thesis of what Husserl called his "transcendental-phenomenological idealism."

findable ::: a. --> Capable of beong found; discoverable.

finder ::: n. --> One who, or that which, finds; specifically (Astron.), a small telescope of low power and large field of view, attached to a larger telescope, for the purpose of finding an object more readily.

findfaulting ::: a. --> Apt to censure or cavil; faultfinding; captious.

findfault ::: n. --> A censurer or caviler.

finding ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Find ::: n. --> That which is found, come upon, or provided; esp. (pl.), that which a journeyman artisan finds or provides for himself; as tools, trimmings, etc.
Support; maintenance; that which is provided for one;


findst ::: a native English form of the verb, to find, now only in formal and poetic usage.

find ::: v. t. --> To meet with, or light upon, accidentally; to gain the first sight or knowledge of, as of something new, or unknown; hence, to fall in with, as a person.
To learn by experience or trial; to perceive; to experience; to discover by the intellect or the feelings; to detect; to feel.
To come upon by seeking; as, to find something lost.
To discover by sounding; as, to find bottom.


findy ::: a. --> Full; heavy; firm; solid; substemtial.

Big bag of pages (BIBOP) Where data objects are tagged with some kind of descriptor (giving their size or type for example) memory can be saved by storing objects with the same descriptor in one "page" of memory. The most significant bits of an object's address are used as the BIBOP page number. This is looked up in a BIBOP table to find the descriptor for all objects in that page. This idea is similar to the "zones" used in some {Lisp} systems (e.g. {LeLisp}). [David R. Hanson. "A portable storage management system for the Icon programming language". Software - Practise and Experience, 10:489-500 1980]. (1994-11-29)

b) In Axiology: The doctrine that moral and aesthetic values represent the subjective feelings and reactions of individual minds and have no status independent of such reactions. Ethical subjectivism finds typical expression in Westermarck's doctrine that moral judgments have reference to our emotions of approval and disapproval. See The Origin and Development of Moral Ideas. Vol. 1, Ch. l. -- L.W.

biometrics "security, hardware" The use of special input devices to analyse some physical parameter assumed to be unique to an individual, in order to confirm their identity as part of an {authentication} procedure. Examples include {fingerprint scanning}, {iris recognition}, {facial recognition}, voice recognition ({speaker recognition}), {signature}, {vascular pattern recognition}. {(http://www.findbiometrics.com/Pages/guide2.html)}. (2007-02-22)

bit-paired keyboard "hardware" (Obsolete, or "bit-shift keyboard") A non-standard keyboard layout that seems to have originated with the {Teletype} {ASR-33} and remained common for several years on early computer equipment. The ASR-33 was a mechanical device (see {EOU}), so the only way to generate the character codes from keystrokes was by some physical linkage. The design of the ASR-33 assigned each character key a basic pattern that could be modified by flipping bits if the SHIFT or the CTRL key was pressed. In order to avoid making the thing more of a Rube Goldberg {kluge} than it already was, the design had to group characters that shared the same basic {bit pattern} on one key. Looking at the {ASCII} chart, we find: high low bits bits 0000 0001 0010 0011 0100 0101 0110 0111 1000 1001 010    !  "  

blameful ::: a. --> Faulty; meriting blame.
Attributing blame or fault; implying or conveying censure; faultfinding; censorious.


blame ::: v. t. --> To censure; to express disapprobation of; to find fault with; to reproach.
To bring reproach upon; to blemish. ::: v. --> An expression of disapprobation fir something deemed to be wrong; imputation of fault; censure.


Body consciousness ::: The body has its own consciousness and acts from it, even without any mental will of our own or even against that will, and our surface mind knows very little about this body consciousness, feels it only in an imperfect way, sees only its results and has the greatest dihiculty in finding out their causes. It is part of the yoga to become aware of this separate consciousness of the body, to sec and feel its movements and the forces that act upon it from inside or outside and to learn how to control and direct it even in its most hidden and (to us) subconscient processes.

Body-mind ::: There is an obscure mind of the body, of the very cells, molecules, corpuscles. This body-mind is a very tangible truth ; owing to its obscurity and mechanical clinging to past movements, and facile oblivion and rejection of the new. we find in it one of the chief obstacles to pemiealion by the Supermind

bookmark ::: n. --> Something placed in a book to guide in finding a particular page or passage; also, a label in a book to designate the owner; a bookplate.

bot 1. "networking, chat, web" (From "{robot}") Any type of autonomous {software} that operates as an {agent} for a user or a {program} or simulates a human activity. On the {Internet}, the most popular bots are programs (called {spiders} or crawlers) used for searching. They access {web sites}, retrieve documents and follow all the {hypertext links} in them; then they generate catalogs that are accessed by {search engines}. A {chatbot} converses with humans (or other bots). A {shopbot} searches the Web to find the best price for a product. Other bots (such as {OpenSesame}) observe a user's patterns in navigating a website and customises the site for that user. A {knowbot} collects specific information from {websites}. 2. "security" A computer that has been conscripted into a {botnet}. (2019-03-16)

bottom-up implementation "programming" The opposite of {top-down design}. It is now received wisdom in most programming cultures that it is best to design from higher levels of abstraction down to lower, specifying sequences of action in increasing detail until you get to actual code. Hackers often find (especially in exploratory designs that cannot be closely specified in advance) that it works best to *build* things in the opposite order, by writing and testing a clean set of primitive operations and then knitting them together. [{Jargon File}] (1996-05-10)

Boycott Apple "legal" Some time before 1989, {Apple Computer, Inc.} started a lawsuit against {Hewlett-Packard} and {Microsoft}, claiming they had breeched Apple's {copyright} on the {look and feel} of the {Macintosh user interface}. In December 1989, {Xerox} failed to sue {Apple Computer}, claiming that the software for Apple's {Lisa} computer and {Macintosh} {Finder}, both copyrighted in 1987, were derived from two {Xerox} programs: {Smalltalk}, developed in the mid-1970s and {Star}, copyrighted in 1981. Apple wanted to stop people from writing any program that worked even vaguely like a {Macintosh}. If such {look and feel} lawsuits succeed they could put an end to {free software} that could substitute for commercial software. In the weeks after the suit was filed, {Usenet} reverberated with condemnation for Apple. {GNU} supporters {Richard Stallman}, {John Gilmore} and Paul Rubin decided to take action against Apple. Apple's reputation as a force for progress came from having made better computers; but The {League for Programming Freedom} believed that Apple wanted to make all non-Apple computers worse. They therefore campaigned to discourage people from using Apple products or working for Apple or any other company threatening similar obstructionist tactics (e.g. {Lotus} and {Xerox}). Because of this boycott the {Free Software Foundation} for a long time didn't support {Macintosh} {Unix} in their software. In 1995, the LPF and the FSF decided to end the boycott. [Dates? Other events? Why did Xerox's case against Apple fail?] (1995-04-18)

  Brahma is Immortality, Vishnu is Eternity, Shiva is Infinity; Krishna is the Supreme"s eternal, infinite, immortal self-possession, self-issuing, self-manifestation, self-finding.” *Essays Divine and Human

Brahma is Immortality, Vishnu is Eternity, Shiva is Infinity; Krishna is the Supreme’s eternal, infinite, immortal self-possession, self-issuing, self-manifestation, self-finding.” Essays Divine and Human

brute force "programming" A primitive programming style in which the programmer relies on the computer's processing power instead of using his own intelligence to simplify the problem, often ignoring problems of scale and applying naive methods suited to small problems directly to large ones. The term can also be used in reference to programming style: brute-force programs are written in a heavy-handed, tedious way, full of repetition and devoid of any elegance or useful abstraction (see also {brute force and ignorance}). The {canonical} example of a brute-force algorithm is associated with the "{travelling salesman problem}" (TSP), a classical {NP-hard} problem: Suppose a person is in, say, Boston, and wishes to drive to N other cities. In what order should the cities be visited in order to minimise the distance travelled? The brute-force method is to simply generate all possible routes and compare the distances; while guaranteed to work and simple to implement, this algorithm is clearly very stupid in that it considers even obviously absurd routes (like going from Boston to Houston via San Francisco and New York, in that order). For very small N it works well, but it rapidly becomes absurdly inefficient when N increases (for N = 15, there are already 1,307,674,368,000 possible routes to consider, and for N = 1000 - well, see {bignum}). Sometimes, unfortunately, there is no better general solution than brute force. See also {NP-complete}. A more simple-minded example of brute-force programming is finding the smallest number in a large list by first using an existing program to sort the list in ascending order, and then picking the first number off the front. Whether brute-force programming should actually be considered stupid or not depends on the context; if the problem is not terribly big, the extra CPU time spent on a brute-force solution may cost less than the programmer time it would take to develop a more "intelligent" algorithm. Additionally, a more intelligent algorithm may imply more long-term complexity cost and bug-chasing than are justified by the speed improvement. When applied to {cryptography}, it is usually known as {brute force attack}. {Ken Thompson}, co-inventor of {Unix}, is reported to have uttered the epigram "When in doubt, use brute force". He probably intended this as a {ha ha only serious}, but the original {Unix} {kernel}'s preference for simple, robust and portable {algorithms} over {brittle} "smart" ones does seem to have been a significant factor in the success of that {operating system}. Like so many other tradeoffs in software design, the choice between brute force and complex, finely-tuned cleverness is often a difficult one that requires both engineering savvy and delicate aesthetic judgment. [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-14)

"But in a higher than our present mental consciousness we find that this duality is only a phenomenal appearance. The highest and real truth of existence is the one Spirit, the supreme Soul, Purushottama, and it is the power of being of this Spirit which manifests itself in all that we experience as universe. This universal Nature is not a lifeless, inert or unconscious mechanism, but informed in all its movements by the universal Spirit. The mechanism of its process is only an outward appearance and the reality is the Spirit creating or manifesting its own being by its own power of being in all that is in Nature. Soul and Nature in us too are only a dual appearance of the one existence.” The Synthesis of Yoga*

“But in a higher than our present mental consciousness we find that this duality is only a phenomenal appearance. The highest and real truth of existence is the one Spirit, the supreme Soul, Purushottama, and it is the power of being of this Spirit which manifests itself in all that we experience as universe. This universal Nature is not a lifeless, inert or unconscious mechanism, but informed in all its movements by the universal Spirit. The mechanism of its process is only an outward appearance and the reality is the Spirit creating or manifesting its own being by its own power of being in all that is in Nature. Soul and Nature in us too are only a dual appearance of the one existence.” The Synthesis of Yoga

But once concentrated here one must open the silent mental consciousness upward to all that is above mind. After a time one feels the consciousness rising upward and in the end it rises beyond the lid which has so long kept it tied in the body and finds a centre above the head where it is liberated into the

But to find that, liberation from the ordinary human way of approach is necessary.

:::   "By self-realisation of Brahman as our self we find the force, the divine energy which lifts us beyond the limitation, weakness, darkness, sorrow, all-pervading death of our mortal existence; by the knowledge of the one Brahman in all beings and in all the various movement of the cosmos we attain beyond these things to the infinity, the omnipotent being, the omniscient light, the pure beatitude of that divine existence.” The Upanishads

“By self-realisation of Brahman as our self we find the force, the divine energy which lifts us beyond the limitation, weakness, darkness, sorrow, all-pervading death of our mortal existence; by the knowledge of the one Brahman in all beings and in all the various movement of the cosmos we attain beyond these things to the infinity, the omnipotent being, the omniscient light, the pure beatitude of that divine existence.” The Upanishads

Calkins, Mary Whiton: (1863-1930) Professor of Philosophy at Wellesley College with which institution she was associated from 1891. She advanced an objective idealism of the Roycean character, styling her views as absolutistic personalism. She endeavored to find psychological justification for her views in the gestalt theory. Her works were in both fields of her interest: An Introduction to Psychology, The Persistent Problems of Philosophy, The Good Man and the Good, among others. -- L.E.D.

canonical name (CNAME) A host's official name as opposed to an alias. The official name is the first hostname listed for its {Internet address} in the hostname database, {/etc/hosts} or the {Network Information Service} (NIS) map hosts.byaddr ("hosts" for short). A host with multiple network interfaces may have more than one Internet address, each with its own canonical name (and zero or more aliases). You can find a host's canonical name using {nslookup} if you say set querytype=CNAME and then type a hostname. (1994-11-29)

captious ::: a. --> Apt to catch at faults; disposed to find fault or to cavil; eager to object; difficult to please.
Fitted to harass, perplex, or insnare; insidious; troublesome.


carping ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Carp ::: a. --> Fault-finding; censorious caviling. See Captious.

carp ::: v. i. --> To talk; to speak; to prattle.
To find fault; to cavil; to censure words or actions without reason or ill-naturedly; -- usually followed by at. ::: v. t. --> To say; to tell.
To find fault with; to censure.


Cartesianism: The philosophy of the French thinker, Rene Descartes (Cartesius) 1596-1650. After completing his formal education at the Jesuit College at La Fleche, he spent the years 1612-1621 in travel and military service. The reminder of his life was devoted to study and writing. He died in Sweden, where he had gone in 1649 to tutor Queen Christina. His principal works are: Discours de la methode, (preface to his Geometric, Meteores, Dieptrique) Meditationes de prima philosophia, Principia philosophiae, Passions de l'ame, Regulae ad directionem ingenii, Le monde. Descartes is justly regarded as one of the founders of modern epistemology. Dissatisfied with the lack of agreement among philosophers, he decided that philosophy needed a new method, that of mathematics. He began by resolving to doubt everything which could not pass the test of his criterion of truth, viz. the clearness and distinctness of ideas. Anything which could pass this test was to be readmitted as self-evident. From self-evident truths, he deduced other truths which logically follow from them. Three kinds of ideas were distinguished: innate, by which he seems to mean little more than the mental power to think things or thoughts; adventitious, which come to him from without; factitious, produced within his own mind. He found most difficulty with the second type of ideas. The first reality discovered through his method is the thinking self. Though he might doubt nearly all else, Descartes could not reasonably doubt that he, who was thinking, existed as a res cogitans. This is the intuition enunciated in the famous aphorism: I think, therefore I am, Cogito ergo sum. This is not offered by Descartes as a compressed syllogism, but as an immediate intuition of his own thinking mind. Another reality, whose existence was obvious to Descartes, was God, the Supreme Being. Though he offered several proofs of the Divine Existence, he was convinced that he knew this also by an innate idea, and so, clearly and distinctly. But he did not find any clear ideas of an extra-mental, bodily world. He suspected its existence, but logical demonstration was needed to establish this truth. His adventitious ideas carry the vague suggestion that they are caused by bodies in an external world. By arguing that God would be a deceiver, in allowing him to think that bodies exist if they do not, he eventually convinced himself of the reality of bodies, his own and others. There are, then, three kinds of substance according to Descartes: Created spirits, i.e. the finite soul-substance of each man: these are immaterial agencies capable of performing spiritual operations, loosely united with bodies, but not extended since thought is their very essence. Uncreated Spirit, i.e. God, confined neither to space nor time, All-Good and All-Powerful, though his Existence can be known clearly, his Nature cannot be known adequately by men on earth, He is the God of Christianity, Creator, Providence and Final Cause of the universe. Bodies, i.e. created, physical substances existing independently of human thought and having as their chief attribute, extension. Cartesian physics regards bodies as the result of the introduction of "vortices", i.e. whorls of motion, into extension. Divisibility, figurability and mobility, are the notes of extension, which appears to be little more thin what Descartes' Scholastic teachers called geometrical space. God is the First Cause of all motion in the physical universe, which is conceived as a mechanical system operated by its Maker. Even the bodies of animals are automata. Sensation is the critical problem in Cartesian psychology; it is viewed by Descartes as a function of the soul, but he was never able to find a satisfactory explanation of the apparent fact that the soul is moved by the body when sensation occurs. The theory of animal spirits provided Descartes with a sort of bridge between mind and matter, since these spirits are supposed to be very subtle matter, halfway, as it were, between thought and extension in their nature. However, this theory of sensation is the weakest link in the Cartesian explanation of cognition. Intellectual error is accounted for by Descartes in his theory of assent, which makes judgment an act of free will. Where the will over-reaches the intellect, judgment may be false. That the will is absolutely free in man, capable even of choosing what is presented by the intellect as the less desirable of two alternatives, is probably a vestige of Scotism retained from his college course in Scholasticism. Common-sense and moderation are the keynotes of Descartes' famous rules for the regulation of his own conduct during his nine years of methodic doubt, and this ethical attitude continued throughout his life. He believed that man is responsible ultimately to God for the courses of action that he may choose. He admitted that conflicts may occur between human passions and human reason. A virtuous life is made possible by the knowledge of what is right and the consequent control of the lower tendencies of human nature. Six primary passions are described by Descartes wonder, love, hatred, desire, joy and sorrow. These are passive states of consciousness, partly caused by the body, acting through the animal spirits, and partly caused by the soul. Under rational control, they enable the soul to will what is good for the body. Descartes' terminology suggests that there are psychological faculties, but he insists that these powers are not really distinct from the soul itself, which is man's sole psychic agency. Descartes was a practical Catholic all his life and he tried to develop proofs of the existence of God, an explanation of the Eucharist, of the nature of religious faith, and of the operation of Divine Providence, using his philosophy as the basis for a new theology. This attempted theology has not found favor with Catholic theologians in general.

Castration Anxiety ::: According to Freud&

caviling ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Cavil ::: a. --> Disposed to cavil; finding fault without good reason. See Captious.

cavil ::: v. i. --> To raise captious and frivolous objections; to find fault without good reason. ::: v. t. --> To cavil at. ::: n.

censor ::: n. --> One of two magistrates of Rome who took a register of the number and property of citizens, and who also exercised the office of inspector of morals and conduct.
One who is empowered to examine manuscripts before they are committed to the press, and to forbid their publication if they contain anything obnoxious; -- an official in some European countries.
One given to fault-finding; a censurer.
A critic; a reviewer.


censure ::: n. --> Judgment either favorable or unfavorable; opinion.
The act of blaming or finding fault with and condemning as wrong; reprehension; blame.
Judicial or ecclesiastical sentence or reprimand; condemnatory judgment. ::: v. i.


centrobaric ::: a. --> Relating to the center of gravity, or to the process of finding it.

challenge ::: n. --> An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons.
The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign.
A claim or demand.
The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game.


chide ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> To rebuke; to reprove; to scold; to find fault with.
Fig.: To be noisy about; to chafe against. ::: v. i. --> To utter words of disapprobation and displeasure; to find fault; to contend angrily.


Chit ::: Chit, the divine Consciousness, is not our mental selfawareness; that we shall find to be only a form, a lower and limited mode or movement. As we progress and awaken to the soul in us and things, we shall realise that there is a consciousness also in the plant, in the metal, in the atom, in electricity, in everything that belongs to physical nature; we shall find even that it is not really in all respects a lower or more limited mode than the mental, on the contrary it is in many "inanimate" forms more intense, rapid, poignant, though less evolved towards the surface. But this also, this consciousness of vital and physical Nature is, compared with Chit, a lower and th
   refore a limited form, mode and movement. These lower modes of consciousness are the conscious-stuff of inferior planes in one indivisible existence. In ourselves also there is in our subconscious being an action which is precisely that of the "inanimate" physical Nature whence has been constituted the basis of our physical being, another which is that of plantlife, and another which is that of the lower animal creation around us. All these are so much dominated and conditioned by the thinking and reasoning conscious-being in us that we have no real awareness of these lower planes; we are unable to perceive in their own terms what these parts of us are doing, and receive it very imperfectly in the terms and values of the thinking and reasoning mind. Still we know well enough that there is an animal in us as well as that which is characteristically human,—something which is a creature of conscious instinct and impulse, not
   reflective or rational, as well as that which turns back in thought and will on its experience, meets it from above with the light and force of a higher plane and to some degree controls, uses and modifies it. But the animal in man is only the head of our subhuman being; below it there is much that is also sub-animal and merely vital, much that acts by an instinct and impulse of which the constituting consciousness is withdrawn behind the surface. Below this sub-animal being, there is at a further depth the subvital. When we advance in that ultra-normal self-knowledge and experience which Yoga brings with it, we become aware that the body too has a consciousness of its own; it has habits, impulses, instincts, an inert yet effective will which differs from that of the rest of our being and can resist it and condition its effectiveness. Much of the struggle in our being is due to this composite existence and the interaction of these varied and heterogeneous planes on each other. For man here is the result of an evolution and contains in himself the whole of that evolution up from the merely physical and subvital conscious being to the mental creature which at the top he is. But this evolution is really a manifestation and just as we have in us these subnormal selves and subhuman planes, so are there in us above our mental being supernormal and superhuman planes. There Chit as the universal conscious-stuff of existence takes other poises, moves out in other modes, on other principles and by other faculties of action. There is above the mind, as the old Vedic sages discovered, a Truth-plane, a plane of self-luminous, self-effective Idea, which can be turned in light and force upon our mind, reason, sentiments, impulses, sensations and use and control them in the sense of the real Truth of things just as we turn our mental reason and will upon our sense-experience and animal nature to use and control them in the sense of our rational and moral perceptions. There is no seeking, but rather natural possession; no conflict or separation between will and reason, instinct and impulse, desire and experience, idea and reality, but all are in harmony, concomitant, mutually effective, unified in their origin, in their development and in their effectuation. But beyond this plane and attainable through it are others in which the very Chit itself becomes revealed, Chit the elemental origin and primal completeness of all this varied consciousness which is here used for various formation and experience. There will and knowledge and sensation and all the rest of our faculties, powers, modes of experience are not merely harmonious, concomitant, unified, but are one being of consciousness and power of consciousness. It is this Chit which modifies itself so as to become on the Truthplane the supermind, on the mental plane the mental reason, will, emotion, sensation, on the lower planes the vital or physical instincts, impulses, habits of an obscure force not in superficially conscious possession of itself. All is Chit because all is Sat; all is various movement of the original Consciousness because all is various movement of the original Being. When we find, see or know Chit, we find also that its essence is Ananda or delight of self-existence. To possess self is to possess self-bliss; not to possess self is to be in more or less obscure search of the delight of existence. Chit eternally possesses its self-bliss; and since Chit is the universal conscious-stuff of being, conscious universal being is also in possession of conscious self-bliss, master of the universal delight of existence. The Divine whether it manifests itself in All-Quality or in No-Quality, in Personality or Impersonality, in the One absorbing the Many or in the One manifesting its essential multiplicity, is always in possession of self-bliss and all-bliss because it is always Sachchidananda. For us also to know and possess our true Self in the essential and the universal is to discover the essential and the universal delight of existence, self-bliss and all-bliss. For the universal is only the pouring out of the essential existence, consciousness and delight; and wherever and in whatever form that manifests as existence, there the essential consciousness must be and th
   refore there must be an essential delight.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 387 - 88 - 89


colour "graphics" (US "color") Colours are usually represented as {RGB} triples in a {digital} {image} because this corresponds most closely to the electronic signals needed to drive a {CRT}. Several equivalent systems ("{colour models}") exist, e.g. {HSB}. A colour {image} may be stored as three separate images, one for each of red, green, and blue, or each {pixel} may encode the colour using separate {bit-fields} for each colour component, or each pixel may store a logical colour number which is looked up in a hardware {colour palette} to find the colour to display. Printers may use the {CMYK} or {Pantone} representations of colours as well as RGB. (1999-08-02)

comet-finder ::: n. --> Alt. of Comet- seeker

comet- seeker ::: n. --> A telescope of low power, having a large field of view, used for finding comets.

complainer ::: n. --> One who complains or laments; one who finds fault; a murmurer.

complaint ::: n. --> Expression of grief, regret, pain, censure, or resentment; lamentation; murmuring; accusation; fault-finding.
Cause or subject of complaint or murmuring.
An ailment or disease of the body.
A formal allegation or charge against a party made or presented to the appropriate court or officer, as for a wrong done or a crime committed (in the latter case, generally under oath); an information; accusation; the initial bill in proceedings in equity.


complain ::: v. i. --> To give utterance to expression of grief, pain, censure, regret. etc.; to lament; to murmur; to find fault; -- commonly used with of. Also, to creak or squeak, as a timber or wheel.
To make a formal accusation; to make a charge. ::: v. t. --> To lament; to bewail.


complementary nondeterministic polynomial "complexity" (Co-NP) The set (or property) of problems with a yes/no answer where the complementary no/yes problem takes {nondeterministic polynomial time} ({NP}). For example, "Is n prime" is Co-NP and "Is n not prime" is NP, since it is only necessary to find one {factor} to prove that n is not {prime} whereas to prove that it is prime all possible factors must be eliminated. (2009-05-21)

Confucianism (ju chia), on the other hand, advocated true manhood (jen) as the highest good, the superior man (chun tzu) as the ideal being, and cultivation of life (hsiu shen) as the supreme duty of man. It was toward this moralism and humanism that Confucius (551-479 B.C.) taught the doctrines of "chung," or being true to the principles of one's nature, and "shu," or the application of those principles in relation to others, as well as the doctrine of the Golden Mean (chung yung), i.e., "to find the central clue of our moral being and to be harmonious with the universe." Humanism was further strengthened by Mencius (371-289 B.C.) who insisted that man must develop his nature fully because benevolence (jen) and righteousness (i) are natural to his nature which is originally good, and again reinforced by Hsun Tzu (c. 335-286 BC) who, contending that human nature is evil, advocated the control of nature. Amid this antagonism between naturalism and humanism, however, both schools conceived reality as unceasing change (i) and incessant transformation, perpetually in progress due to the interaction of the active (yang) and passive (yin) cosmic principles.

Conquest of desire for food ::: There are two ways of con- quering it ::: one of detachment, learning to regard food as only a physical necessity and the vital satisfaction of the stomach and the palate as a thing of no importance ; the other is to be able to take without insistence or seeking any food given and to find in it the equal rasa, not of the food for its own sake, but of the universal ananda.

conviction ::: n. --> The act of convicting; the act of proving, finding, or adjudging, guilty of an offense.
A judgment of condemnation entered by a court having jurisdiction; the act or process of finding guilty, or the state of being found guilty of any crime by a legal tribunal.
The act of convincing of error, or of compelling the admission of a truth; confutation.
The state of being convinced or convicted; strong


crambo ::: a. --> A game in which one person gives a word, to which another finds a rhyme.
A word rhyming with another word.


Criterion ethical: In ethics the main problem is often said to be the finding of a criterion of virtue, or of rightness, or of goodness, depending on which of these concepts is taken as basic; and the quest for a moral standard, or for an ethical first principle, or for a summum bonum may generally be construed as a quest for such a criterion (e.g., Kant's first form of the categorical imperative may be interpreted as a criterion of rightness). Hence to find a criterion of, say, goodness is to find a characteristic whose presence, absence, or degree may be taken as a mark of the presence, absence, or degree of goodness. Thus hedonists hold pleasantness to be such a characteristic. Often, finding a criterion of a characteristic is taken as equivalent to finding a definition of that characteristic. Strictly, this is not the case, for a characteristic may serve as a criterion of another with which it is not identical. Pleasantness might be a criterion of goodness without being identical with it, if only the above relation held between pleasantness and goodness. However, the discovery of a definition of a characteristic does normally furnish a criterion of that characteristic. Vide the definition of a right act as an act conducive to the greatest happiness.

critical ::: n. --> Qualified to criticise, or pass judgment upon, literary or artistic productions.
Pertaining to criticism or the critic&


criticise ::: v. t. --> To examine and judge as a critic; to pass literary or artistic judgment upon; as, to criticise an author; to criticise a picture.
To express one&


critic ::: n. --> One skilled in judging of the merits of literary or artistic works; a connoisseur; an adept; hence, one who examines literary or artistic works, etc., and passes judgment upon them; a reviewer.
One who passes a rigorous or captious judgment; one who censures or finds fault; a harsh examiner or judge; a caviler; a carper.
The art of criticism.


critic ::: one who forms and expresses judgments of the merits, faults, value, or truth of a matter; esp. one who finds fault.

cul-de-sac ::: n. --> A passage with only one outlet, as a street closed at one end; a blind alley; hence, a trap.
a position in which an army finds itself with no way of exit but to the front.
Any bag-shaped or tubular cavity, vessel, or organ, open only at one end.


data flow analysis "programming" A process to discover the dependencies between different data items manipulated by a program. The order of execution in a {data driven} language is determined solely by the data dependencies. For example, given the equations 1. X = A + B 2. B = 2 + 2 3. A = 3 + 4 a data-flow analysis would find that 2 and 3 must be evaluated before 1. Since there are no data dependencies between 2 and 3, they may be evaluated in any order, including in parallel. This technique is implemented in {hardware} in some {pipelined} processors with multiple {functional units}. It allows instructions to be executed as soon as their inputs are available, independent of the original program order. (1996-05-13)

Dats ::: Forces of the night, i.c. ignorant movements finding a lodging in the obscurity of the unenlightened nature.

decipher ::: v. t. --> To translate from secret characters or ciphers into intelligible terms; as, to decipher a letter written in secret characters.
To find out, so as to be able to make known the meaning of; to make out or read, as words badly written or partly obliterated; to detect; to reveal; to unfold.
To stamp; to detect; to discover.


decision problem "theory" A problem with a yes/no answer. Determining whether some potential solution to a question is actually a solution or not. E.g. "Is 43669" a {prime number}?". This is in contrast to a "{search problem}" which must find a solution from scratch, e.g. "What is the millionth prime number?". See {decidability}. (1996-05-03)

decision theory "probability" A branch of statistics concerning strategies for decision making in non-{deterministic} systems. Decision theory seeks to find strategies that maximise the expected value of a {utility function} measuring the desirability of possible outcomes. (1995-09-22)

Dennis Ritchie "person" Dennis M. Ritchie, co-author of the {Unix} {operating system}, inventor of the {C} programming language and {demigod}. See also {K&R}, {Core War}, {If you want X, you know where to find it}. (2008-03-26)

deprehend ::: v. t. --> To take unwares or by surprise; to seize, as a person commiting an unlawful act; to catch; to apprehend.
To detect; to discover; to find out.


depth-first search "algorithm" A graph search {algorithm} which extends the current path as far as possible before {backtracking} to the last {choice point} and trying the next alternative path. Depth-first search may fail to find a solution if it enters a cycle in the graph. This can be avoided if we never extend a path to a node which it already contains. Opposite of {breadth first search}. See also {iterative deepening}. (1995-04-19)

desktop manager A {user interface} to system services, usually {icon} and {menu} based like the {Macintosh} {Finder}, enabling the user to run {application programs} and use a {file system} without directly using the command language of the {operating system}. (1994-12-07)

detect ::: a. --> Detected. ::: v. t. --> To uncover; to discover; to find out; to bring to light; as, to detect a crime or a criminal; to detect a mistake in an account.
To inform against; to accuse.


detecter ::: n. --> One who, or that which, detects or brings to light; one who finds out what another attempts to conceal; a detector.

Deustua, Alejandro: Born in Huancayo, Junin (Peru), 1849. Professor of Philosophy at the University of San Marcos in Lima, Peru. According to Deustua, there are two kinds of freedom, the Static and the Dynamic. The former accounts for the cosmic order and harmony of phenomena. Dynamic liberty, however, is, above all, creativity and novelty. The world, not as it is ontologically, but as we experience it, that is, as it comes within the area of consciousness, results from a Hegelian contraposition of the two types of freedom. In this contraposition, the synthesis is always more of the nature of dynamic freedom than it is static. With these presuppositions, Deustua finally works up a kind of practical philosophy leading up to an axiology which he himself finds implied in his concept of freedom. The following are among Deustua's most important works: Las Ideas de Orden Libertad en la Historia del Pensamiento Humano; Historia de las Ideas Esteticas; Estetica General; Estetica Aplicada. -- J.A.F.

Dhyana ::: There are two words used in English to express the Indian idea of Dhyana, "meditation" and "contemplation". Meditation means properly the concentration of the mind on a single train of ideas which work out a single subject. Contemplation means regarding mentally a single object, image, idea so that the knowledge about the object, image or idea may arise naturally in the mind by force of the concentration. Both these things are forms of dhyana; for the principle of dhyana is mental concentration whether in thought, vision or knowledge. There are other forms of dhyana. There is a passage in which Vivekananda advises you to stand back from your thoughts, let them occur in your mind as they will and simply observe them & see what they are. This may be called concentration in self-observation. This form leads to another, the emptying of all thought out of the mind so as to leave it a sort of pure vigilant blank on which the divine knowledge may come and imprint itself, undisturbed by the inferior thoughts of the ordinary human mind and with the clearness of a writing in white chalk on a blackboard. You will find that the Gita speaks of this rejection of all mental thought as one of the methods of Yoga and even the method it seems to prefer. This may be called the dhyana of liberation, as it frees the mind from slavery to the mechanical process of thinking and allows it to think or not think as it pleases and when it pleases, or to choose its own thoughts or else to go beyond thought to the pure perception of Truth called in our philosophy Vijnana. Meditation is the easiest process for the human mind, but the narrowest in its results; contemplation more difficult, but greater; self-observation and liberation from the chains of Thought the most difficult of all, but the widest and greatest in its fruits. One can choose any of them according to one’s bent and capacity. The perfect method is to use them all, each in its own place and for its own object.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 36, Page: 293-294


diffind ::: v. t. --> To split.

Diophantine equation "mathematics" Equations with {integer} coefficients to which integer solutions are sought. Because the results are restricted to integers, different {algorithms} must be used from those which find {real} solutions. [More details?] (1998-08-27)

discover ::: 1. To determine the existence, presence, or fact of. 2. To be the first to find or find out or about something. 3. To reveal or make known. discovers, discovered, discovering, all-discovering, new-discovering,

discover ::: v. t. --> To uncover.
To disclose; to lay open to view; to make visible; to reveal; to make known; to show (what has been secret, unseen, or unknown).
To obtain for the first time sight or knowledge of, as of a thing existing already, but not perceived or known; to find; to ascertain; to espy; to detect.
To manifest without design; to show.


discovery ::: n. --> The action of discovering; exposure to view; laying open; showing; as, the discovery of a plot.
A making known; revelation; disclosure; as, a bankrupt is bound to make a full discovery of his assets.
Finding out or ascertaining something previously unknown or unrecognized; as, Harvey&


disembogue ::: v. t. --> To pour out or discharge at the mouth, as a stream; to vent; to discharge into an ocean, a lake, etc.
To eject; to cast forth. ::: v. i. --> To become discharged; to flow out; to find vent; to pour out contents.


Dissociated Press [Play on "Associated Press"; perhaps inspired by a reference in the 1949 Bugs Bunny cartoon "What's Up, Doc?"] An algorithm for transforming any text into potentially humorous garbage even more efficiently than by passing it through a {marketroid}. The algorithm starts by printing any N consecutive words (or letters) in the text. Then at every step it searches for any random occurrence in the original text of the last N words (or letters) already printed and then prints the next word or letter. {Emacs} has a handy command for this. Here is a short example of word-based Dissociated Press applied to an earlier version of the {Jargon File}: wart: A small, crocky {feature} that sticks out of an array (C has no checks for this). This is relatively benign and easy to spot if the phrase is bent so as to be not worth paying attention to the medium in question. Here is a short example of letter-based Dissociated Press applied to the same source: window sysIWYG: A bit was named aften /bee't*/ prefer to use the other guy's re, especially in every cast a chuckle on neithout getting into useful informash speech makes removing a featuring a move or usage actual abstractionsidered interj. Indeed spectace logic or problem! A hackish idle pastime is to apply letter-based Dissociated Press to a random body of text and {vgrep} the output in hopes of finding an interesting new word. (In the preceding example, "window sysIWYG" and "informash" show some promise.) Iterated applications of Dissociated Press usually yield better results. Similar techniques called "travesty generators" have been employed with considerable satirical effect to the utterances of {Usenet} flamers; see {pseudo}. [{Jargon File}]

Dissociation ::: A separation from the self, with the most severe resulting in Dissociative Identity Disorder.  Most of us experience this in very mild forms such as when we are driving long distance and lose time or find ourselves day dreaming longer than we thought.

divine Reality ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Divine Reality is infinite in its being; in this infinite being, we find limited being everywhere, — that is the apparent fact from which our existence here seems to start and to which our own narrow ego and its ego-centric activities bear constant witness. But, in reality, when we come to an integral self-knowledge, we find that we are not limited, for we also are infinite.” *The Life Divine

Dreams from the subconscient ::: It is one of the most embar- rassing elements of yogic experience to find how obstinately the subconscient retains what has been settled and done with in the upper layers of the consciousness. But just for that reason these dreams are often a useful indication as they enable us to pursue things to their obscure roots in this underworld and excise them.

DRY PERIOD. ::: There is a long stage of preparation neces- sary in order to arrive at the moer psychologic^ condition in which the doors of experience can open and one can walk from vista to vista — though even then new gates may present them- selves and refuse to open until all is ready. This period can be dry and desert-like unless one has the ardour of self-introspec- tion and self-conquest and finds every step of the effort and struggle interesting or unless one has or gets the secret of trust and self-giving which secs the hand of the Divine in every step of the path and even in the difficulty the grace or the guidance.

Such interval periods come to all and cannot be avoided.

The main thing is to meet them with quietude and not become restless, depressed or despondent. A constant fire can be there only when a certain stage has been reached, that is when one is always inside consciously living in the psychic being, but for that all this preparation of the mind, vital, physical is necessary.

For this fire belongs to the psychic and one cannot command it always merely by the mind's effort. The psychic has to be fully liberated and that is what the Force is working to make fully possible.

The difficulty comes when either the vital with its desires or the physical with its past habitual movements comes in — as they do with almost everyone. It is then that the dryness and difficulty of spontaneous aspiration come. This dryness is a well- known obstacle in all sadhana. But one has to persist and not be discouraged. If one keep? the will fixed even in these barren periods, they pass and after their passage a greater force of aspiration and experience becomes possible.

Dryness comes usually when the vital dislikes a movement or' condition or the refusal of its desires and starts non-co-operation.

But sometimes it is a condition that has to be crossed through, e.g. the neutral or dry quietude which sometimes comes when the ordinary movements have been thrown out but nothing positive has yet come to take their place, i.e, peace, joy, a higher know- ledge or force or action.


dumpster diving /dump'-ster di:'-ving/ 1. The practice of sifting refuse from an office or technical installation to extract confidential data, especially security-compromising information ("dumpster" is an Americanism for what is elsewhere called a "skip"). Back in AT&T's monopoly days, before paper shredders became common office equipment, phone phreaks (see {phreaking}) used to organise regular dumpster runs against phone company plants and offices. Discarded and damaged copies of AT&T internal manuals taught them much. The technique is still rumored to be a favourite of crackers operating against careless targets. 2. The practice of raiding the dumpsters behind buildings where producers and/or consumers of high-tech equipment are located, with the expectation (usually justified) of finding discarded but still-valuable equipment to be nursed back to health in some hacker's den. Experienced dumpster-divers not infrequently accumulate basements full of moldering (but still potentially useful) {cruft}. [{Jargon File}]

Economy: An aspect of the scientific methodology of Ernst Mach (Die Analyse der Empfindungen, 5th ed., Jena, 1906); science and philosophy utilize ideas and laws which are not reproductive of sense data as such, but are simplified expressions of the functional relations discovered in the manifold of sense perceptions. -- V.J.B.

EDP auditor "job" A person who analyses system functions and operations to determine adequate security and controls. An EDP analyst evaluates systems and operational procedures and reports findings to senior management. He writes ad hoc report programs using {4GLs} and specialised audit software. (2004-03-11)

Effort ::: The personal effort required is a triple labour of aspiration, rejection and surrender." And "rejection of the movements of the lower nature—rejection of the mind’s ideas, opinions,
   references, habits, constructions, so that the true knowledge may find free room in a silent mind,—rejection of the vital nature’s desires . . .", etc.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 110


Ego-centric Predicament: (Lat. ego, self, Gr. kentrikon, center) The epistemological predicament of a knowing mind which, confined to the circle of its own ideas, finds it difficult, if not impossible, to escape to a knowledge of an external world (cf. R. B. Perry, Present Philosophical Tendencies, pp. 129-30). Descartes is largely responsible for having confronted modern philosophy with the ego-centric predicament. See Cogito Argument, The. -- L.W.

egoism ::: n. --> The doctrine of certain extreme adherents or disciples of Descartes and Johann Gottlieb Fichte, which finds all the elements of knowledge in the ego and the relations which it implies or provides for.
Excessive love and thought of self; the habit of regarding one&


EIA-232 "communications, standard" (Formerly "RS-232") The most common {asynchronous} {serial line} {standard}. EIA-232 is the {EIA} equivalent of {ITU-T} {V.24}, and {V.28}. EIA-232 specifies the {gender} and pin use of connectors, but not their physical type. {RS-423} specifies the electrical signals. 25-way {D-type} connectors are common but often only three wires are connected - one ground (pin 7) and one for data in each direction. The other pins are primarily related to {hardware handshaking} between sender and receiver and to {carrier detection} on {modems}, inoperative circuits, busy conditions etc. The standard classifies equipment as either {Data Communications Equipment} (DCE) or {Data Terminal Equipment} (DTE). DTE receives data on pin 3 and transmits on pin 2 (TD). A DCE EIA-232 interface has a female connector. DCE receives data from DTE on pin 2 (TD) and sends that data out the analog line. Data received from the analog line is sent by the DCE on pin 3(RD). Originally DCE was a modem and DTE was a computer or terminal. The terminal or computer was connected (via EIA-232) to two modems, which were connected via a telephone line. The above arrangement allows a computer or terminal to be connected to a modem with a straight-through (2-2, 3-3) cable. It is common, however, to find equipment with the wrong sex connector or with pins two and three reversed, requiring the insertion of a cable or adaptor wired as a {gender mender} or {null modem}. Such an adaptor is also required when connecting a computer directly to a terminal or to another computer without the use of modems. (1999-12-28)

EIA-423 "communications, standard" (Formerly "RS-423") An {EIA} {serial line} {standard} which specifies {single ended} communication. The mechanical connections for this interface are specified by {EIA-449}. Although it was originally intented as a successor of {EIA-232} it is not widely used. The {EIA-232} standard has its limits at 20kbps and 1.5m. EIA-423 can have a cable lenght of 1200m, and achieve a data rate of 100Kbps. When no data is being transmitted, the serial line is at a logical zero (+3 to +15 Volts). A logical one is represented as a signal level of -15 to -3 Volts. In practise, one often finds signals which switch between nominally +4.5 and +0.5 Volts. Such signals are large by modern standards, and because the impedance of the circuits is relatively high, the allowable bit rate is modest. The data is preceded by a start bit which is always a logical one. There may be seven or eight bits of data, possibly followed by an even or odd parity bit and one or two stop bits. A "break" condition is a continuous logical one on the line which is what would be observed if nothing was connected. {Comparing EIA-422, 423, 449 to RS-232-C (http://rad.com/networks/1995/rs232/rs449.htm)}. {Details on RS-232, 422, 423 and 485 (http://rs485.com/rs485spec.html)}. (2002-10-05)

Emacs "text, tool" /ee'maks/ (Editing MACroS, or Extensible MACro System, GNU Emacs) A popular {screen editor} for {Unix} and most other {operating systems}. Emacs is distributed by the {Free Software Foundation} and was {Richard Stallman}'s first step in the {GNU} project. Emacs is extensible - it is easy to add new functions; customisable - you can rebind keys, and modify the behaviour of existing functions; self-documenting - there is extensive on-line, context-sensitive help; and has a real-time "what you see is what you get" display. Emacs is writen in {C} and the higher levels are programmed in {Emacs Lisp}. Emacs has an entire {Lisp} system inside it. It was originally written in {TECO} under {ITS} at the {MIT} {AI lab}. AI Memo 554 described it as "an advanced, self-documenting, customisable, extensible real-time display editor". It includes facilities to view directories, run compilation subprocesses and send and receive {electronic mail} and {Usenet} {news} ({GNUS}). {W3} is a {web browser}, the ange-ftp package provides transparent access to files on remote {FTP} {servers}. {Calc} is a calculator and {symbolic mathematics} package. There are "modes" provided to assist in editing most well-known programming languages. Most of these extra functions are configured to load automatically on first use, reducing start-up time and memory consumption. Many hackers (including {Denis Howe}) spend more than 80% of their {tube time} inside Emacs. GNU Emacs is available for {Unix}, {VMS}, {GNU}/{Linux}, {FreeBSD}, {NetBSD}, {OpenBSD}, {MS Windows}, {MS-DOS}, and other systems. Emacs has been re-implemented more than 30 times. Other variants include {GOSMACS}, CCA Emacs, UniPress Emacs, Montgomery Emacs, and {XEmacs}. {Jove}, {epsilon}, and {MicroEmacs} are limited look-alikes. Some Emacs versions running under {window managers} iconify as an overflowing kitchen sink, perhaps to suggest the one feature the editor does not (yet) include. Indeed, some hackers find Emacs too {heavyweight} and {baroque} for their taste, and expand the name as "Escape Meta Alt Control Shift" to spoof its heavy reliance on keystrokes decorated with {bucky bits}. Other spoof expansions include "Eight Megabytes And Constantly Swapping", "Eventually "malloc()'s All Computer Storage", and "Emacs Makes A Computer Slow" (see {recursive acronym}). See also {vi}. Version 21.1 added a redisplay engine with support for {proportional text}, images, {toolbars}, {tool tips}, toolkit scroll bars and a mouse-sensitive mode line. {FTP} from your nearest {GNU archive site}. E-mail: (bug reports only) "bug-gnu-emacs@gnu.org". {Usenet} newsgroups: {news:gnu.emacs.help}, {news:gnu.emacs.bug}, {news:alt.religion.emacs}, {news:gnu.emacs.sources}, {news:gnu.emacs.announce}. [{Jargon File}] (1997-02-04)

Empiricism: (1) A proposition about the sources of knowledge: that the sole source of knowledge is experience, or that either no knowledge at all or no knowledge with existential reference is possible independently of experience. Experience (q.v.) may be understood as either all conscious content, data of the senses only, or other designated content. Such empiricism may take the form of denial that any knowledge or at least knowledge about existents can be obtained a priori (q.v.), that is, denial that there are universal and necessary truths, denial that there is knowledge which holds regardless of past, present, or future experience; denial that there is instinctive, innate, or inborn knowledge; denial that the test of truth is clarity to natural reason or self-evidence, denial that one can gain certain knowledge by finding something the opposite of which is inconceivable; denial thit there are any necessary presuppositions of all knowledge or of anything known certainly, denial that any truths can be established by the fact that to deny them implies their reaffirmation; or denial that conventional or aibitrary definitions or assumptions yield knowledge.

encouragement ::: n. --> The act of encouraging; incitement to action or to practice; as, the encouragement of youth in generosity.
That which serves to incite, support, promote, or advance, as favor, countenance, reward, etc.; incentive; increase of confidence; as, the fine arts find little encouragement among a rude people.


Energy, but this is only an appearance, for we find in the end that all the dispositions of the world can only have been arranged by the working of a supreme secret intelligence. The Being which is hidden in what seems to be an inconscient void emerges

enharbor ::: v. t. --> To find harbor or safety in; to dwell in or inhabit.

enjoy ::: 1. To receive pleasure or satisfaction from; take delight in. 2. To find or experience pleasure for (oneself). enjoyed, enjoying.

ensearch ::: v. i. --> To make search; to try to find something. ::: v. t. --> To search for.

environment variable "programming, operating system" A {variable} that is bound in the current environment. When evaluating an expression in some environment, the evaluation of a variable consists of looking up its name in the environment and substituting its value. Most programming languages have some concept of an environment but in {Unix} {shell scripts} it has a specific meaning slightly different from other contexts. In shell scripts, environment variables are one kind of {shell variable}. They differ from {local variables} and {command line arguments} in that they are inheritted by a {child process}. Examples are the PATH variable that tells the shell the {file system} {paths} to search to find command {executables} and the TZ variable which contains the local time zone. The variable called "SHELL" specifies the type of shell being used. These variables are used by commands or {shell scripts} to discover things about the environment they are operating in. Environment variables can be changed or created by the {user} or a program. To see a list of environment variables type "setenv" at the {csh} or {tcsh} {prompt} or "set" at the {sh}, {bash}, {jsh} or {ksh} prompt. In other programming languages, e.g. {functional programming} languages, the environment is extended with new bindings when a {function}'s {parameters} are bound to its {actual arguments} or when new variables are declared. In a {block-structured} {procedural} language, the environment usually consists of a {linked list} of {activation records}. (1999-01-26)

Eros ::: One of the four main drives of an individual holon, along with Agape, agency, and communion. The vertical drive of the lower to “reach up” towards the higher; selftranscendence. The urge to find higher, deeper, and wider wholeness. Its complementary opposite is Agape. Its pathological expression is Phobos.

error ::: “In our world error is continually the handmaid and pathfinder of Truth; for error is really a half-truth that stumbles because of its limitations; often it is Truth that wears a disguise in order to arrive unobserved near to its goal.” The Life Divine

Ethical formalism: (Kantian) Despite the historical over-shadowing of Kant's ethical position by the influence of The Critique of Pure Reason upon the philosophy of the past century and a half, Kant's own (declared) major interest, almost from the very beginning, was in moral philosophy. Even the Critique of Pure Reason itself was written only in order to clear the ground for dealing adequately with the field of ethics in the Grundlegung zur Metapkysik der Sttten (1785), in the Kritik der Praktischen Vernunft (1788), and in the Metaphysik der Sitten (1797). By the end of the seventeen-sixties Kant was ready to discard every prior ethical theory, from the earlv Greeks to Baumgarten, Rousseau, and the British moralists, finding, all of them, despite the wide divergencies among them, equally dogmatic and unacceptable. Each of the older theories he found covertly to rely upon some dogmatic criterion or other, be it a substantive "principle," an intuition, or an equally substantive "sense." Every such ethical theory fails to deal with ethical issues as genuinely problematic, since it is amenable to some "demonstrative" preconceived criterion.

Ethical rule: See Rule. Ethics: (Gr. ta ethika, from ethos) Ethics (also referred to as moral philosophy) is that study or discipline which concerns itself with judgments of approval and disapproval, judgments as to the rightness or wrongness, goodness or badness, virtue or vice, desirability or wisdom of actions, dispositions, ends, objects, or states of affairs. There are two main directions which this study may take. It may concern itself with a psychological or sociological analysis and explanation of our ethical judgments, showing what our approvals and disapprovals consist in and why we approve or disapprove what we do. Or it may concern itself with establishing or recommending certain courses of action, ends, or ways of life as to be taken or pursued, either as right or as good or as virtuous or as wise, as over against others which are wrong, bad, vicious, or foolish. Here the interest is more in action than in approval, and more in the guidance of action than in its explanation, the purpose being to find or set up some ideal or standard of conduct or character, some good or end or summum bonum, some ethical criterion or first principle. In many philosophers these two approaches are combined. The first is dominant or nearly so in the ethics of Hume, Schopenhauer, the evolutionists, Westermarck, and of M. Schlick and other recent positivists, while the latter is dominant in the ethics of most other moralists.

Euclid's Algorithm "algorithm" (Or "Euclidean Algorithm") An {algorithm} for finding the {greatest common divisor} (GCD) of two numbers. It relies on the identity gcd(a, b) = gcd(a-b, b) To find the GCD of two numbers by this algorithm, repeatedly replace the larger by subtracting the smaller from it until the two numbers are equal. E.g. 132, 168 -" 132, 36 -" 96, 36 -" 60, 36 -" 24, 36 -" 24, 12 -" 12, 12 so the GCD of 132 and 168 is 12. This algorithm requires only subtraction and comparison operations but can take a number of steps proportional to the difference between the initial numbers (e.g. gcd(1, 1001) will take 1000 steps). (1997-06-30)

eureka ::: --> The exclamation attributed to Archimedes, who is said to have cried out "Eureka! eureka!" (I have found it! I have found it!), upon suddenly discovering a method of finding out how much the gold of King Hiero&

Every conscious process intends its objects as in a context with others, some intended as presented, others intended as to become presented if intended future consciousness takes a particular course. In other words, consciousness is always an intentional predelineating of processes in which objects will be intended, as the same or different within an all inclusive objective context: the world. A pure phenomenology should therefore describe not only paiticular intended objects but also the intended world, as intended -- as part of the "noematic-objective" sense belonging to consciousness by virtue of the latter's intrinsic intentionality. To be sure, in such noematic-objective description the phenomenologist must still disregard the actual relations of the described subjective processes to other entities in the world. But, Husserl contended, when one disregards everything except the intrinsic nature of subjective processes, one still can see their intentionality; therefore all the entities and relations from which one has abstracted can -- and should -- reappear as noematic-intentional objects, within one's isolated field. In particular, the disregarded status of the observed stream of consciousness itself, its status as related to other entities in the world, reappears -- as a noematic-objective sense which the observed consciousness intends. Moreover, as purely eidetic, phenomenology finds that the intrinsic character of any actual consciousness, as intending a world and itself as in that world, is an essentially necessary determination of any possible consciousness.

Evolutionism: This is the view that the universe and life in all of its manifestations and nature in all of their aspects are the product of development. Apart from the religious ideas of initial creation by fiat, this doctrine finds variety of species to be the result of change and modification and growth and adaptation rather than from some form of special creation of each of the myriads of organic types and even of much in the inorganic realm. Contrary to the popular notion, evolution is not a product of modern thought. There has been an evolution of evolutionary hypotheses from earliest Indian and Greek speculation down to the latest pronouncement of scientific theory. Thales believed all life to have had a marine origin and Anaximander, Anaximenes, Empedocles, the Atomists and Aristotle all spoke in terms of development and served to lay a foundation for a true theory of evolution. It is in the work of Charles Darwin, however, that clarity and proof is presented for the explanation of his notion of natural selection and for the crystallization of evolution as a prime factor in man's explanation of all phases of his mundane existence. The chief criticism leveled at the evolutionists, aside from the attacks of the religionists, is based upon their tendency to forget that not all evolution means progress. See Charles Darwin, Herbert Spencer, Thomas Hemy Huxley, Natural Selection, Evolutionary Ethics. Cf. A. Lalande, L'Idee de dissolution opposee a celle de l'evolution (1899), revised ed. (1930): Les Illusions evolutionistes. -- L.E.D.

excogitate ::: v. t. --> To think out; to find out or discover by thinking; to devise; to contrive. ::: v. i. --> To cogitate.

exegesis ::: n. --> Exposition; explanation; especially, a critical explanation of a text or portion of Scripture.
The process of finding the roots of an equation.


expiscate ::: v. t. --> To fish out; to find out by skill or laborious investigation; to search out.

exponential-time algorithm "complexity" An {algorithm} (or {Turing Machine}) that is guaranteed to terminate within a number of steps which is a {exponential} function of the size of the problem. For example, if you have to check every number of n digits to find a solution, the {complexity} is O(10^n), and if you add an extra digit, you must check ten times as many numbers. Even if such an algorithm is practical for some given value of n, it is likely to become impractical for larger values. This is in contrast to a {polynomial-time algorithm} which grows more slowly. See also {computational complexity}, {polynomial-time}, {NP-complete}. (1995-04-27)

Factor – As a noun, it is a number or symbol which divides evenly into a larger number. As a verb, it means to find two or more values whose product equals the original value.

fall through "programming" (The American misspelling "fall thru" is also common) 1. To exit a loop by exhaustion, i.e. by having fulfilled its exit condition rather than via a break or exception condition that exits from the middle of it. This usage appears to be *really* old, dating from the 1940s and 1950s. 2. To fail a test that would have passed control to a subroutine or some other distant portion of code. 3. In C, "fall-through" occurs when the flow of execution in a {switch statement} reaches a "case" label other than by jumping there from the switch header, passing a point where one would normally expect to find a "break". A trivial example: switch (colour) { case GREEN:  do_green();  break; case PINK:  do_pink();  /* FALL THROUGH */ case RED:  do_red();  break; default:  do_blue();  break; } The effect of the above code is to "do_green()" when colour is "GREEN", "do_red()" when colour is "RED", "do_blue()" on any other colour other than "PINK", and (and this is the important part) "do_pink()" __and then__ "do_red()" when colour is "PINK". Fall-through is {considered harmful} by some, though there are contexts (such as the coding of state machines) in which it is natural; it is generally considered good practice to include a comment highlighting the fall-through where one would normally expect a break. See also {Duff's Device}.

fall ::: v. t. --> To Descend, either suddenly or gradually; particularly, to descend by the force of gravity; to drop; to sink; as, the apple falls; the tide falls; the mercury falls in the barometer.
To cease to be erect; to take suddenly a recumbent posture; to become prostrate; to drop; as, a child totters and falls; a tree falls; a worshiper falls on his knees.
To find a final outlet; to discharge its waters; to empty; -- with into; as, the river Rhone falls into the Mediterranean.


fand ::: --> imp. of Find.

faradise /far'*-di:z/ [US Geological Survey] To start any hyper-addictive process or trend, or to continue adding current to such a trend. Telling one user about a new octo-tetris game you compiled would be a faradising act - in two weeks you might find your entire department playing the faradic game.

fault-finder ::: n. --> One who makes a practice of discovering others&

fault-finding ::: n. --> The act of finding fault or blaming; -- used derogatively. Also Adj.

Fault-finding

FAULT-FINDING. ::: The lower vital takes a mean and petty pleasure in picking out the faults of others and thereby one hampers both one’s own progress and that of the subject of the criticism.

feedback "electronics" Part of a system output presented at its input. Feedback may be unintended. When used as a design feature, the output is usually transformed by passive components which attenuate it in some manner; the result is then presented at the system input. Feedback is positive or negative, depending on the sign with which a positive change in the original input reappears after transformation. Negative feedback was invented by Black to stabilise {vacuum tube} amplifiers. The behaviour becomes largely a function of the feedback transformation and only minimally a function of factors such as transistor gain which are imperfectly known. Positive feedback can lead to instability; it finds wide application in the construction of oscillators. Feedback can be used to control a system, as in {feedback control}. (1996-01-02)

fence 1. A sequence of one or more distinguished ({out-of-band}) characters (or other data items), used to delimit a piece of data intended to be treated as a unit (the computer-science literature calls this a "sentinel"). The NUL (ASCII 0000000) character that terminates strings in C is a fence. {Hex} FF is also (though slightly less frequently) used this way. See {zigamorph}. 2. An extra data value inserted in an array or other data structure in order to allow some normal test on the array's contents also to function as a termination test. For example, a highly optimised routine for finding a value in an array might artificially place a copy of the value to be searched for after the last slot of the array, thus allowing the main search loop to search for the value without having to check at each pass whether the end of the array had been reached. 3. [among users of optimising compilers] Any technique, usually exploiting knowledge about the compiler, that blocks certain optimisations. Used when explicit mechanisms are not available or are overkill. Typically a hack: "I call a dummy procedure there to force a flush of the optimiser's register-colouring info" can be expressed by the shorter "That's a fence procedure". [{Jargon File}] (1999-01-08)

Fermat prime "mathematics" A {prime number} of the form 2^2^n + 1. Any prime number of the form 2^n+1 must be a Fermat prime. {Fermat} conjectured in a letter to someone or other that all numbers 2^2^n+1 are prime, having noticed that this is true for n=0,1,2,3,4. {Euler} proved that 641 is a factor of 2^2^5+1. Of course nowadays we would just ask a computer, but at the time it was an impressive achievement (and his proof is very elegant). No further Fermat primes are known; several have been factorised, and several more have been proved composite without finding explicit factorisations. {Gauss} proved that a regular N-sided {polygon} can be constructed with ruler and compasses if and only if N is a power of 2 times a product of distinct Fermat primes. (1995-04-10)

Finder "operating system" The part of the {Macintosh Operating System} and {GUI} that simulates the {desktop}. The {multitasking} version of Finder was called "{MultiFinder}" until {multitasking} was integrated into the core of the OS with the introduction of System 7.0 in 1990. (2005-03-18)

  "Find the Guide secret within you or housed in an earthly body, hearken to his voice and follow always the way that he points. At the end is the Light that fails not, the Truth that deceives not, the Power that neither strays nor stumbles, the wide freedom, the ineffable Beatitude.” Essays Divine and Human

“Find the Guide secret within you or housed in an earthly body, hearken to his voice and follow always the way that he points. At the end is the Light that fails not, the Truth that deceives not, the Power that neither strays nor stumbles, the wide freedom, the ineffable Beatitude.” Essays Divine and Human

finnan haddie ::: --> Haddock cured in peat smoke, originally at Findon (pron. fin"an), Scotland. the name is also applied to other kinds of smoked haddock.

fint ::: --> 3d pers. sing. pr. of Find, for findeth.

first fit "algorithm" A {resource} allocation scheme that searches a list of free resources and returns the first one that can satisfy the request. For example, when allocating memory from a list of free blocks (a {heap}), first fit scans the list from the beginning until it finds a block which is big enough to satisfy the request. The requested size is allocated from this block and the rest of the block returned to the free pool. First fit is faster than a {best fit} scheme, but results in more {fragmentation} of the free space because it is more likely to split up a large free block when a smaller block could have been used. (2015-01-31)

fish (Adelaide University, Australia) 1. Another {metasyntactic variable}. See {foo}. Derived originally from the Monty Python skit in the middle of "The Meaning of Life" entitled "Find the Fish". 2. "storage" microfiche. A microfiche file cabinet may be referred to as a "fish tank". [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-01)

FIXME "programming" A standard tag often put in {comments} near a piece of code that needs work. The point of doing so is that a {grep} or a similar pattern-matching tool can find all such places quickly. This is common in {GNU} code. Compare {XXX}. [{Jargon File}] (2001-03-16)

FLYING. ::: When you find yourself flying it is always the vital being in the subtle body in the vital world that is doing it.

fond ::: --> imp. of Find. Found. ::: superl. --> Foolish; silly; simple; weak.
Foolishly tender and loving; weakly indulgent; over-affectionate.
Affectionate; loving; tender; -- in a good sense; as, a


"For if we examine carefully, we shall find that Intuition is our first teacher. Intuition always stands veiled behind our mental operations. Intuition brings to man those brilliant messages from the Unknown which are the beginning of his higher knowledge.” The Life Divine*

“For if we examine carefully, we shall find that Intuition is our first teacher. Intuition always stands veiled behind our mental operations. Intuition brings to man those brilliant messages from the Unknown which are the beginning of his higher knowledge.” The Life Divine

“For Mind as we know it is a power of the Ignorance seeking for Truth, groping with difficulty to find it, reaching only mental constructions and representations of it in word and idea, in mind formations, sense formations,—as if bright or shadowy photographs or films of a distant Reality were all that it could achieve.” The Life Divine

…for since the nature of the Knowledge is to find the Truth and the fundamental Truth is the One, —the Veda speaks repeatedly of it as "That Truth" and "That One",—Vidya, Knowledge in its highest spiritual sense, came to mean purely and trenchantly the knowledge of the One.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 508


FORTH 1. "language" An interactive extensible language using {postfix syntax} and a data stack, developed by Charles H. Moore in the 1960s. FORTH is highly user-configurable and there are many different implementations, the following description is of a typical default configuration. Forth programs are structured as lists of "words" - FORTH's term which encompasses language keywords, primitives and user-defined {subroutines}. Forth takes the idea of subroutines to an extreme - nearly everything is a subroutine. A word is any string of characters except the separator which defaults to space. Numbers are treated specially. Words are read one at a time from the input stream and either executed immediately ("interpretive execution") or compiled as part of the definition of a new word. The sequential nature of list execution and the implicit use of the data stack (numbers appearing in the lists are pushed to the stack as they are encountered) imply postfix syntax. Although postfix notation is initially difficult, experienced users find it simple and efficient. Words appearing in executable lists may be "{primitives}" (simple {assembly language} operations), names of previously compiled procedures or other special words. A procedure definition is introduced by ":" and ended with ";" and is compiled as it is read. Most Forth dialects include the source language structures BEGIN-AGAIN, BEGIN-WHILE-REPEAT, BEGIN-UNTIL, DO-LOOP, and IF-ELSE-THEN, and others can be added by the user. These are "compiling structures" which may only occur in a procedure definition. FORTH can include in-line {assembly language} between "CODE" and "ENDCODE" or similar constructs. Forth primitives are written entirely in {assembly language}, secondaries contain a mixture. In fact code in-lining is the basis of compilation in some implementations. Once assembled, primitives are used exactly like other words. A significant difference in behaviour can arise, however, from the fact that primitives end with a jump to "NEXT", the entry point of some code called the sequencer, whereas non-primitives end with the address of the "EXIT" primitive. The EXIT code includes the scheduler in some {multi-tasking} systems so a process can be {deschedule}d after executing a non-primitive, but not after a primitive. Forth implementations differ widely. Implementation techniques include {threaded code}, dedicated Forth processors, {macros} at various levels, or interpreters written in another language such as {C}. Some implementations provide {real-time} response, user-defined data structures, {multitasking}, {floating-point} arithmetic, and/or {virtual memory}. Some Forth systems support virtual memory without specific hardware support like {MMUs}. However, Forth virtual memory is usually only a sort of extended data space and does not usually support executable code. FORTH does not distinguish between {operating system} calls and the language. Commands relating to I/O, {file systems} and {virtual memory} are part of the same language as the words for arithmetic, memory access, loops, IF statements, and the user's application. Many Forth systems provide user-declared "vocabularies" which allow the same word to have different meanings in different contexts. Within one vocabulary, re-defining a word causes the previous definition to be hidden from the interpreter (and therefore the compiler), but not from previous definitions. FORTH was first used to guide the telescope at NRAO, Kitt Peak. Moore considered it to be a {fourth-generation language} but his {operating system} wouldn't let him use six letters in a program name, so FOURTH became FORTH. Versions include fig-FORTH, FORTH 79 and FORTH 83. {FAQs (http://complang.tuwien.ac.at/forth/faq/faq-general-2.html)}. {ANS Forth standard, dpANS6 (http://taygeta.com/forth/dpans.html)}. FORTH Interest Group, Box 1105, San Carlos CA 94070. See also {51forth}, {F68K}, {cforth}, {E-Forth}, {FORML}, {TILE Forth}. [Leo Brodie, "Starting Forth"]. [Leo Brodie, "Thinking Forth"]. [Jack Woehr, "Forth, the New Model"]. [R.G. Loeliger, "Threaded Interpretive Languages"]. 2. {FOundation for Research and Technology - Hellas}. (1997-04-16)

found ::: 1. To set up or establish on a firm basis or for enduring existence; to originate, create, initiate. 2. To establish or set up, especially with provision for continuing existence. Also fig. (All other references are to the word as the pp. or pt. of find. **half-found*.*) founds, founded.**

found ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Find ::: --> imp. & p. p. of Find. ::: v. t.

four-colour glossies 1. Literature created by {marketroids} that allegedly contains technical specs but which is in fact as superficial as possible without being totally {content-free}. "Forget the four-colour glossies, give me the tech ref manuals." Often applied as an indication of superficiality even when the material is printed on ordinary paper in black and white. Four-colour-glossy manuals are *never* useful for finding a problem. 2. [rare] Applied by extension to manual pages that don't contain enough information to diagnose why the program doesn't produce the expected or desired output.

Free On-line Dictionary of Computing "introduction" FOLDOC is a searchable dictionary of acronyms, jargon, programming languages, tools, architecture, operating systems, networking, theory, conventions, standards, mathematics, telecoms, electronics, institutions, companies, projects, products, history, in fact anything to do with computing. Copyright 1985 by Denis Howe Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, Front- or Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "{GNU Free Documentation License}". Please refer to the dictionary as "The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, http://foldoc.org/, Editor Denis Howe" or similar. Please make the URL both text (for humans) and a hyperlink (for Google). You can search the latest version of the dictionary at URL http://foldoc.org/. Where {LaTeX} commands for certain non-{ASCII} symbols are mentioned, they are described in their own entries. "\" is also used to represent the Greek lower-case lambda used in {lambda-calculus}. See {Pronunciation} for how to interpret the pronunciation given for some entries. Cross-references to other entries look {like this}. Note that not all cross-references actually lead anywhere yet, but if you find one that leads to something inappropriate, please let me know. Dates after entries indicate when that entry was last updated. {More about FOLDOC (about.html)}. (2018-05-22)

Frege, (Friedrich Ludwig) Gottlob, 1848-1925, German mathematician and logician. Professor of mathematics at the University of Jena, 1879-1918. Largely unknown to, or misunderstood by, his contemporaries, he is now regarded by many as "beyond question the greatest logician of the Nineteenth Century" (quotation from Tarski). He must be regarded -- after Boole (q. v.) -- as the second founder of symbolic logic, the essential steps in the passage from the algebra of logic to the logistic method (see the article Logistic system) having been taken in his Begriffsschrift of 1879. In this work there appear tor the first time the propositional calculus in substantially its modern form, the notion of propositional function, the use of quantifiers, the explicit statement of primitive rules of inference, the notion of an hereditary property and the logical analysis of proof by mathematical induction or recursion (q. v.). This last is perhaps the most important element in the definition of an inductive cardinal number (q.v.) and provided the basis for Frege's derivation of arithmetic from logic in his Grundlagen der Anthmetik (1884) and Grundgesetze der Arithmetik, vol. 1 (1893), and vol. 2 (1903). The first volume of Grundgesetze der Arithmetik is the culmination of Frege's work, and we find here many important further ideas. In particular, there is a careful distinction between using a formula to express something else and naming a formula in order to make a syntactical statement about it, quotation marks being used in order to distinguish the name of a formula from the formula itself. In an appendix to the second volume of Grundgesetze , Frege acknowledges the presence of an inconsistency in his system through what is now known as the Russel paradox (see Paradoxes , logical), as had been called to his attention by Russell when the book was nearly through the press. -- A.C.

fumble ::: v. i. --> To feel or grope about; to make awkward attempts to do or find something.
To grope about in perplexity; to seek awkwardly; as, to fumble for an excuse.
To handle much; to play childishly; to turn over and over. ::: v. t.


gedanken /g*-dahn'kn/ Ungrounded; impractical; not well-thought-out; untried; untested. "Gedanken" is a German word for "thought". A thought experiment is one you carry out in your head. In physics, the term "gedanken experiment" is used to refer to an experiment that is impractical to carry out, but useful to consider because it can be reasoned about theoretically. (A classic gedanken experiment of relativity theory involves thinking about a man in an elevator accelerating through space.) Gedanken experiments are very useful in physics, but must be used with care. It's too easy to idealise away some important aspect of the real world in constructing the "apparatus". Among hackers, accordingly, the word has a pejorative connotation. It is typically used of a project, especially one in artificial intelligence research, that is written up in grand detail (typically as a Ph.D. thesis) without ever being implemented to any great extent. Such a project is usually perpetrated by people who aren't very good hackers or find programming distasteful or are just in a hurry. A "gedanken thesis" is usually marked by an obvious lack of intuition about what is programmable and what is not, and about what does and does not constitute a clear specification of an algorithm. See also {AI-complete}, {DWIM}.

gif: is not a freak or an abnormaiity ; it is a universal faculty present in all human beings, but latent in most, in some rarely or intermittently active, occurring as if by accident in others, frequent or normally active in a few. But just as anyone can, uith some training, learn science and do things which would have seemed miracles to his forefathers, so almost anyone, if he wants, can with a little concentration and training develop the faculty of supraphjsical vision. When one starts Yoga, this power is often, though not in\'ariably — for some find it difficult — one of the first to come out from its latent condition and manifest itself, most often without any efTori, Intention or previous know- ledge on the part of the sadhaka. It comes more easily with the eyes shut than with the eyes open, but it does come in both ways. Tlic first sign of its opening in the externalised way is very often that seeing of “sparkles’* or small luminous dots, shapes, etc. ; a second is, often enough, most easily, round lumi- nous objects like a star ; seeing of colours 1$ a third initial experi- cnee — but (hey do not alw'ay's come in that order.

gift is not a freak or an abnonnality ; it is a universal faculty present in all human beings, but latent In most, in some rarely or intermittently active, occurring as if by accident in others, frequent or normally active in a few. But just as aayoas can, with some training, learn sdence and do things which would have seemed miracles to his forefathers, so almost anyone, if he wants, can with a little concentration and training develop the faculty of supraphysical rision. When one starts Yoga, this power is often, though not invariably — for some find it diScult — one of the first to come out from its latent condition and manifest itself, most often without any effort, intention or previous know- ledge on the part of the sadbaka. It comes more easily with the eyes shut than with the eyes open, but it does come in both ways. The first sign of its opening in the externalised way is very often that seeing of “ sparkles ” or small luminous dots, shapes, etc. ; a second is, often enough, most easily, round lumi- nous objects like a star ; seeing of colours is a third initial experi- ence'— but they do not always come in that order.

glean ::: 1. To gather laboriously, bit by bit. 2. To gather (grain or the like) after the reapers or regular gathers. 3. To learn, discover, of find out, usually little by little or slowly. gleaner.

gnomon ::: n. --> The style or pin, which by its shadow, shows the hour of the day. It is usually set parallel to the earth&

GNU superoptimiser (GSO) A function sequence generator that uses an exhaustive generate-and-test approach to find the shortest instruction sequence for a given function. Written by Torbjorn Granlund "tege@gnu.ai.mit.edu" and Tom Wood. You have to tell the superoptimiser which function and which {CPU} you want to get code for. This is useful for compiler writers. FTP superopt-2.2.tar.Z from a {GNU archive site}. Generates code for {DEC} {Alpha}, {SPARC}, {Intel 80386}, {88000}, {RS/6000}, {68000}, {29000} and {Pyramid} (SP, AP and XP). (1993-02-16)

grope ::: v. i. --> To feel with or use the hands; to handle.
To search or attempt to find something in the dark, or, as a blind person, by feeling; to move about hesitatingly, as in darkness or obscurity; to feel one&


grovel 1. To work interminably and without apparent progress. Often used transitively with "over" or "through". "The file scavenger has been groveling through the /usr directories for 10 minutes now." Compare {grind} and {crunch}. Emphatic form: "grovel obscenely". 2. To examine minutely or in complete detail. "The compiler grovels over the entire source program before beginning to translate it." "I grovelled through all the documentation, but I still couldn't find the command I wanted." [{Jargon File}]

HAKMEM "publication" /hak'mem/ MIT AI Memo 239 (February 1972). A legendary collection of neat mathematical and programming hacks contributed by many people at MIT and elsewhere. (The title of the memo really is "HAKMEM", which is a 6-letterism for "hacks memo".) Some of them are very useful techniques, powerful theorems, or interesting unsolved problems, but most fall into the category of mathematical and computer trivia. Here is a sampling of the entries (with authors), slightly paraphrased: Item 41 (Gene Salamin): There are exactly 23,000 prime numbers less than 2^18. Item 46 (Rich Schroeppel): The most *probable* suit distribution in bridge hands is 4-4-3-2, as compared to 4-3-3-3, which is the most *evenly* distributed. This is because the world likes to have unequal numbers: a thermodynamic effect saying things will not be in the state of lowest energy, but in the state of lowest disordered energy. Item 81 (Rich Schroeppel): Count the magic squares of order 5 (that is, all the 5-by-5 arrangements of the numbers from 1 to 25 such that all rows, columns, and diagonals add up to the same number). There are about 320 million, not counting those that differ only by rotation and reflection. Item 154 (Bill Gosper): The myth that any given programming language is machine independent is easily exploded by computing the sum of powers of 2. If the result loops with period = 1 with sign +, you are on a sign-magnitude machine. If the result loops with period = 1 at -1, you are on a twos-complement machine. If the result loops with period greater than 1, including the beginning, you are on a ones-complement machine. If the result loops with period greater than 1, not including the beginning, your machine isn't binary - the pattern should tell you the base. If you run out of memory, you are on a string or bignum system. If arithmetic overflow is a fatal error, some fascist pig with a read-only mind is trying to enforce machine independence. But the very ability to trap overflow is machine dependent. By this strategy, consider the universe, or, more precisely, algebra: Let X = the sum of many powers of 2 = ...111111 (base 2). Now add X to itself: X + X = ...111110. Thus, 2X = X - 1, so X = -1. Therefore algebra is run on a machine (the universe) that is two's-complement. Item 174 (Bill Gosper and Stuart Nelson): 21963283741 is the only number such that if you represent it on the {PDP-10} as both an integer and a {floating-point} number, the bit patterns of the two representations are identical. Item 176 (Gosper): The "banana phenomenon" was encountered when processing a character string by taking the last 3 letters typed out, searching for a random occurrence of that sequence in the text, taking the letter following that occurrence, typing it out, and iterating. This ensures that every 4-letter string output occurs in the original. The program typed BANANANANANANANA.... We note an ambiguity in the phrase, "the Nth occurrence of." In one sense, there are five 00's in 0000000000; in another, there are nine. The editing program TECO finds five. Thus it finds only the first ANA in BANANA, and is thus obligated to type N next. By Murphy's Law, there is but one NAN, thus forcing A, and thus a loop. An option to find overlapped instances would be useful, although it would require backing up N - 1 characters before seeking the next N-character string. Note: This last item refers to a {Dissociated Press} implementation. See also {banana problem}. HAKMEM also contains some rather more complicated mathematical and technical items, but these examples show some of its fun flavour. HAKMEM is available from MIT Publications as a {TIFF} file. {(ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/hb/hbaker)}. (1996-01-19)

heap 1. "programming" An area of memory used for {dynamic memory allocation} where blocks of memory are allocated and freed in an arbitrary order and the pattern of allocation and size of blocks is not known until {run time}. Typically, a program has one heap which it may use for several different purposes. Heap is required by languages in which functions can return arbitrary data structures or functions with {free variables} (see {closure}). In {C} functions {malloc} and {free} provide access to the heap. Contrast {stack}. See also {dangling pointer}. 2. "programming" A data structure with its elements partially ordered (sorted) such that finding either the minimum or the maximum (but not both) of the elements is computationally inexpensive (independent of the number of elements), while both adding a new item and finding each subsequent smallest/largest element can be done in O(log n) time, where n is the number of elements. Formally, a heap is a {binary tree} with a key in each {node}, such that all the {leaves} of the tree are on two adjacent levels; all leaves on the lowest level occur to the left and all levels, except possibly the lowest, are filled; and the key in the {root} is at least as large as the keys in its children (if any), and the left and right subtrees (if they exist) are again heaps. Note that the last condition assumes that the goal is finding the minimum quickly. Heaps are often implemented as one-dimensional {arrays}. Still assuming that the goal is finding the minimum quickly the {invariant} is  heap[i] "= heap[2*i] and heap[i] "= heap[2*i+1] for all i, where heap[i] denotes the i-th element, heap[1] being the first. Heaps can be used to implement {priority queues} or in {sort} algorithms. (1996-02-26)

Hedonistic Paradox: A paradox or apparent inconsistency in hedonistic theory arising from (1) the doctrine that since pleasure is the only good, one ought always to seek pleasure, and (2) the fact that whenever pleasure itself is the object sought it cannot be found. Human nature is such that pleasure normally arises as an accompaniment of satisfaction of desire for any end except when that end is pleasure itself. The way to attain pleasure is not to seek for it, but for something else which when found will have yielded pleasure through the finding. Likewise, one should not seek to avoid pain, but only actions which produce pain. -- A.J.B.

Heidegger, Martin: (1889-) Trained in Husserl's radical structural analysis of pure consciousness, Heidegger shares with phenomenology the effort to methodically analyze and describe the conceptual meanings of single phenomena. He aimed at a phenomenological analysis of human existence in respect to its temporal and historical character. Concentrating on the Greek tradition, and endeavoring to open a totally different approach from that of the Greek thinkers to the problem of being, he seeks to find his way back to an inner independence of philosophy from the special sciences. Before a start can be made in the radical analysis of human existence, the road has to be cleared of the objections of philosophical tradition, science, logic and common sense. As the moderns have forgotten the truths the great thinkers discovered, have lost the ability to penetrate to the real origins, the recovery of the hard-won, original, uncorrupted insights of man into metaphysical reality, is only possible through a "destructive" analysis of the traditional philosophies. By this recovery of the hidden sources, Heidegger aims to revive the genuine philosophizing which, not withstanding appearances, has vanished from us in the Western world because of autonomous science serious disputing of the position of philosophy. As human reality is so structured that it discloses itself immediately, he writes really an idealistic philosophy of homo faber. But instead of being a rationalistic idealist reading reason into the structure of the really real, he takes a more avowedly emotional phenomenon as the center of a new solution of the Seinsfrage.

Here, the living divine person in Aswapathy, finding earth too trifling, exceeds it and grows larger and larger, higher and higher, to encompass the unconquered worlds above.” The Book of the Divine Mother

heuristic ::: a. --> Serving to discover or find out.

Heuristic: (Gr. heuriskein, to discover) Serving to find out, helping to show how the qualities and relations of objects are to be sought. In Kant's philosophy, applying to ideas of God, freedom and immortality, as being undemonstrable but useful in the interpretation of things and events in time and space. In methodology, aiding in the discovery of truth. The heuristic method is the analytical method. Opposite of: ostensive. -- J.K.F.

hide-and-seek ::: a children"s game in which one player tries to find and catch others who are hiding.

Higgs Bugson "humour" A hypothetical {bug} predicted to exist based on a small number of possibly related event log entries and vague anecdotal user reports. The Higgs Bugson is difficult to reproduce because you don't really know if it's there, and if it is there what is causing it. To find one you will need a Large Hadron Debugger. [{Dodgy Coder (http://www.dodgycoder.net/2011/11/yoda-conditions-pokemon-exception.html)}]. (2012-08-31)

Historically, one may say that, in general, Greek ethics was teleological, though there are deontological strains in Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics. In Christian moralists one finds both kinds of ethics, according as the emphasis is on the will of God as the source of duties (the ordinary view) or on the goodness of God as somehow the end of human life (Augustine and Aquinas), theology and revelation taking a central role in either case. In modern philosophical ethics, again, both kinds of ethics are present, with the opposition between them coming out into the open. Starting in the 17th and 18th centuries in Britain are both "intuitionism" (Cambridge Platonists, Clarke, Butler, Price, Reid, Whewell, McCosh, etc.) and utilitarianism (q.v.), with British ethics largely a matter of controversy between the two, a controversy in which the teleological side has lately been taken by Cambridge and the deontological side by Oxford. Again, in Germany, England, and elsewhere there have been, on the one hand, the formalistic deontologism of Kant and his followers, and, on the other, the axiological or teleological ethics of the Hegelian self-realizationists and the Wertethik of Scheler and N. Hartmann.

hog "jargon" A term used to describe programs, hardware or people that use more than their share of a system's resources, especially those which noticeably degrade interactive response. The term is usually qualified, e.g. "memory hog", "core hog", "hog the processor", "hog the disk". E.g. "A {controller} that never gives up the {I/O bus} gets killed after the bus-hog timer expires." User also hog resources, particularly disk, where it seems that 10% of the people use 90% of the disk, no matter how big the disk is or how many people use it. Once a disk hog fills up one file system, he typically finds a new one to consume, claiming to the sysadmin that they have an important new project to complete. (2014-08-16)

home keys "hardware" The eight keys on a typewriter or computer keyboard on which a touch-typist positions their eight finger tips when starting to type or when resting between words or phrases. Typists learn the position of all keys on the keyboard in relation to the home keys. On a standard english keyboard layout, the home keys are ASDF for the left hand and JKL; for the right. Most keyboards have small raised bumps on the left and right index finger keys (F and J) so you can find the home keys by touch without looking. (2006-12-01)

Home Network Administration Protocol "protocol" (HNAP) A network {protocol} using {SOAP} over {HTTP} that lets manufacturers and administrtors to configure devices remotely. HNAP is typically used by {ISPs} to update {Internet} {routers} in customers' homes or workplaces. Because it runs on many devices on the Internet, HNAP is a target for remote attacks or probes. These may start by attempting to fetch the {URL} "/HNAP1/" on the remote device. [{Cisco whitepaper (https://www.cisco.com/web/partners/downloads/guest/hnap_protocol_whitepaper.pdf)}] [{SANS vulnerability post (https://isc.sans.edu/forums/diary/More+on+HNAP+What+is+it+How+to+Use+it+How+to+Find+it/17648/)}] (2018-08-09)

Hostile attacks very ordinarily become violent when the pro- gress is becoming rapid and on the way to be definite — espe- cially if they find they cannot carry out an effective aggression into the inner being, they try to shake by outside assaults. One must take it as a trial of strength, a call for gathering all one’s capacities of calm and openness to the Light and Power, so as to make oneself an instrument for the victory of the Divine over the undivine.

However, the test whether a given formula is a theorem, by the criterion that it is a theorem if a proof of it exists, is not effective -- since failure to find a proof upon search might mean lack of ingenuity rather than non-existence of a proof. The problem to give an effective test by means of which it can always be determined whether a given formula is a theorem is the decision problem, of the propositional calculus. This problem can be solved either by the process of reduction of a formula to disjunctive normal form, or by the truth-table decision procedure. We state the latter in detail.

Hume, David: Born 1711, Edinburgh; died at Edinburgh, 1776. Author of A Treatise of Human Nature, Enquiry Concerning the Human Understanding, Enquiry Concerning the Passions, Enquiry Concerning Morals, Natural History of Religion, Dialogues on Natural Religion, History of England, and many essays on letters, economics, etc. Hume's intellectual heritage is divided between the Cartesian Occasionalists and Locke and Berkeley. From the former, he obtained some of his arguments against the alleged discernment or demonstrability of causal connections, and from the latter his psychological opinions. Hume finds the source of cognition in impressions of sensation and reflection. All simple ideas are derived from and are copies of simple impressions. Complex ideas may be copies of complex impressions or may result from the imaginative combination of simple ideas. Knowledge results from the comparison of ideas, and consists solely of the intrinsic resemblance between ideas. As resemblance is nothing over and above the resembling ideas, there are no abstract general ideas: the generality of ideas is determined by their habitual use as representatives of all ideas and impressions similar to the representative ideas. As knowledge consists of relations of ideas in virtue of resemblance, and as the only relation which involves the connection of different existences and the inference of one existent from another is that of cause and effect, and as there is no resemblance necessary between cause and effect, causal inference is in no case experientially or formally certifiable. As the succession and spatio-temporal contiguity of cause and effect suggests no necessary connection and as the constancy of this relation, being mere repetition, adds no new idea (which follows from Hume's nominalistic view), the necessity of causal connection must be explained psychologically. Thus the impression of reflection, i.e., the felt force of association, subsequent to frequent repetitions of conjoined impressions is the source of the idea of necessity. Habit or custom sufficently accounts for the feeling that everything which begins must have a cause and that similar causes must have similar effects. The arguments which Hume adduced to show that no logically necessary connection between distinct existences can be intuited or demonstrated are among his most signal contributions to philosophy, and were of great importance in influencing the speculation of Kant. Hume explained belief in external existence (bodies) in terms of the propensity to feign the independent and continued existence of perceptual complexes during the interruptions of perception. This propensity is determined by the constancy and coherence which some perceptual complexes exhibit and by the transitive power of the imagination to go beyond the limits afforded by knowledge and ordinary causal belief. The sceptical principles of his epistemology were carried over into his views on ethics and religion. Because there are no logically compelling arguments for moral and religious propositions, the principles of morality and religion must be explained naturalistically in terms of human mental habits and social customs. Morality thus depends on such fundamental aspects of human nature as self-interest and altruistic sympathy. Hume's views on religion are difficult to determine from his Dialogues, but a reasonable opinion is that he is totally sceptical concerning the possibility of proving the existence or the nature of deity. It is certain that he found no connection between the nature of deity and the rules of morality. -- J.R.W.

Husserl noted, however, that even when one's analyses are thus pure, both abstractively and eidetically, one naturally takes it for granted that possible consciousness is possible in some (otherwise indefinite) possible world. That is to say, besides finding "the world" as part of the intentional objective sense posited in the consciousness under investigation, the investigator continues to apprehend this consciousness as essentially worldly, even though he successfully disregards even its possible relations to other worldly objects. At this point, what Husserl considered as the philosophically decisive change in his concept of phenomenology ensues.

  "I find it difficult to take these psycho-analysts at all seriously when they try to scrutinise spiritual experience by the flicker of their torch-lights, — yet perhaps one ought to, for half-knowledge is a powerful thing and can be a great obstacle to the coming in front of the true Truth. This new psychology looks to me very much like children learning some summary and not very adequate alphabet, exulting in putting their a-b-c-d of the subconscient and the mysterious underground super-ego together and imagining that their first book of obscure beginnings (c-a-t cat, t-r-e-e tree) is the very heart of the real knowledge. They look from down up and explain the higher lights by the lower obscurities; but the foundation of these things is above and not below, upari budhna esam.” Letters on Yoga

“I find it difficult to take these psycho-analysts at all seriously when they try to scrutinise spiritual experience by the flicker of their torch-lights,—yet perhaps one ought to, for half-knowledge is a powerful thing and can be a great obstacle to the coming in front of the true Truth. This new psychology looks to me very much like children learning some summary and not very adequate alphabet, exulting in putting their a-b-c-d of the subconscient and the mysterious underground super-ego together and imagining that their first book of obscure beginnings (c-a-t cat, t-r-e-e tree) is the very heart of the real knowledge. They look from down up and explain the higher lights by the lower obscurities; but the foundation of these things is above and not below, upari budhna esam.” Letters on Yoga

Identity-philosophy: In general the term has been applied to any theory which failed to distinguish between spirit and matter, subject and object, regarding them as an undifferentiated unity; hence such a philosophy is a species of monism. In the history of philosophy it usually signifies the system which has been called Identitätsphilosophie by Friedrich Wilhelm Schelling who held that spirit and nature are fundamentally the same, namely, the Absolute. Neither the ego nor the non-ego are the ultimate principles of being; they are both relative concepts which are contained in something absolute. This is the supreme principle of Absolute Identity of the ideal and the real. Reasoning does not lead us to the Absolute which can only be attained by immediate intellectual intuition. In it we find the eternal concepts of things and from it we can derive everything else. We are obliged to conceive the Absolute Identity as the indifference of the ideal and the real. Of course, this is God in Whom all opposites are united. He is the unity of thought and being, the subjective and the objective, form and essence, the general and infinite, and the particular and finite. This teaching is similar to that of Spinoza. -- J.J.R.

:::   "If there is an evolution in material Nature and if it is an evolution of being with consciousness and life as its two key-terms and powers, this fullness of being, fullness of consciousness, fullness of life must be the goal of development towards which we are tending and which will manifest at an early or later stage of our destiny. The Self, the Spirit, the Reality that is disclosing itself out of the first inconscience of life and matter, would evolve its complete truth of being and consciousness in that life and matter. It would return to itself, — or, if its end as an individual is to return into its Absolute, it could make that return also, — not through a frustration of life but through a spiritual completeness of itself in life. Our evolution in the Ignorance with its chequered joy and pain of self-discovery and world-discovery, its half-fulfilments, its constant finding and missing, is only our first state. It must lead inevitably towards an evolution in the Knowledge, a self-finding and self-unfolding of the Spirit, a self-revelation of the Divinity in things in that true power of itself in Nature which is to us still a Supernature.” The Life Divine

“If there is an evolution in material Nature and if it is an evolution of being with consciousness and life as its two key-terms and powers, this fullness of being, fullness of consciousness, fullness of life must be the goal of development towards which we are tending and which will manifest at an early or later stage of our destiny. The Self, the Spirit, the Reality that is disclosing itself out of the first inconscience of life and matter, would evolve its complete truth of being and consciousness in that life and matter. It would return to itself,—or, if its end as an individual is to return into its Absolute, it could make that return also,—not through a frustration of life but through a spiritual completeness of itself in life. Our evolution in the Ignorance with its chequered joy and pain of self-discovery and world-discovery, its half-fulfilments, its constant finding and missing, is only our first state. It must lead inevitably towards an evolution in the Knowledge, a self-finding and self-unfolding of the Spirit, a self-revelation of the Divinity in things in that true power of itself in Nature which is to us still a Supernature.” The Life Divine

"If you go deep enough, into a sufficiently complete silence from all outer things, you will find within you that flame about which I often speak, and in this flame you will see your destiny.} You will see the aspiration of centuries which has been concentrated gradually, to lead you through countless births to the great day of realisation — that preparation which has been made through thousands of years, and is reaching its culmination.” Questions and Answers MCW Vol. 6*.

“If you go deep enough, into a sufficiently complete silence from all outer things, you will find within you that flame about which I often speak, and in this flame you will see your destiny.} You will see the aspiration of centuries which has been concentrated gradually, to lead you through countless births to the great day of realisation—that preparation which has been made through thousands of years, and is reaching its culmination.” Questions and Answers MCW Vol. 6.

If you want X, you know where to find it. "exclamation" There is a legend that {Dennis Ritchie}, inventor of {C}, once responded to demands for features resembling those of what at the time was a much more popular language by observing "If you want {PL/I}, you know where to find it." Ever since, this has been hackish standard form for fending off requests to alter a new design to mimic some older (and, by implication, inferior and {baroque}) one. The case X = {Pascal} manifests semi-regularly on {Usenet}'s {news:comp.lang.c} {newsgroup}. Indeed, the case X = X has been reported in discussions of graphics software (see {X Window System}). [{Jargon File}] (1995-10-25)

ignoramus ::: n. --> We are ignorant; we ignore; -- being the word formerly written on a bill of indictment by a grand jury when there was not sufficient evidence to warrant them in finding it a true bill. The phrase now used is, "No bill," "No true bill," or "Not found," though in some jurisdictions "Ignored" is still used.
A stupid, ignorant person; a vain pretender to knowledge; a dunce.


II. Metaphysics of History: The metaphysical interpretations of the meaning of history are either supra-mundane or intra-mundane (secular). The oldest extra-mundane, or theological, interpretation has been given by St. Augustine (Civitas Dei), Dante (Divma Commedia) and J. Milton (Paradise Lost and Regained). All historic events are seen as having a bearing upon the redemption of mankind through Christ which will find its completion at the end of this world. Owing to the secularistic tendencies of modern times the Enlightenment Period considered the final end of human history as the achievement of public welfare through the power of reason. Even the ideal of "humanity" of the classic humanists, advocated by Schiller, Goethe, Fichte, Rousseau, Lord Byron, is only a variety of the philosophy of the Enlightenment, and in the same line of thought we find A. Comte, H. Spencer ("human moral"), Engels and K. Marx. The German Idealism of Kant and Hegel saw in history the materialization of the "moral reign of freedom" which achieves its perfection in the "objective spirit of the State". As in the earlier systems of historical logic man lost his individuality before the forces of natural laws, so, according to Hegel, he is nothing but an instrument of the "idea" which develops itself through the three dialectic stages of thesis, antithesis, and synthesis. (Example. Absolutism, Democracy, Constitutional Monarchy.) Even the great historian L. v. Ranke could not break the captivating power of the Hegelian mechanism. Ranke places every historical epoch into a relation to God and attributes to it a purpose and end for itself. Lotze and Troeltsch followed in his footsteps. Lately, the evolutionistic interpretation of H. Bergson is much discussed and disputed. His "vital impetus" accounts for the progressiveness of life, but fails to interpret the obvious setbacks and decadent civilizations. According to Kierkegaard and Spranger, merely human ideals prove to be too narrow a basis for the tendencies, accomplishments, norms, and defeats of historic life. It all points to a supra-mundane intelligence which unfolds itself in history. That does not make superfluous a natural interpretation, both views can be combined to understand history as an endless struggle between God's will and human will, or non-willing, for that matter. -- S.V.F.

imperfection ::: “… our imperfection is the sign of a transitional state, a growth not yet completed, an effort that is finding its way; …” The Life Divine

improve ::: v. t. --> To disprove or make void; to refute.
To disapprove; to find fault with; to reprove; to censure; as, to improve negligence.
To make better; to increase the value or good qualities of; to ameliorate by care or cultivation; as, to improve land.
To use or employ to good purpose; to make productive; to turn to profitable account; to utilize; as, to improve one&


In aesthetics: The general doctrine that the proper study of art is nature. In this broad sense, artistic naturalism is simply the thesis that the artist's sole concern and function should be to observe closely and report clearly the character and behavior of his physical environment. Similarly to philosophical naturalism, aesthetic naturalism derives much of its importance from its denials and from the manner in which it consequently restricts and directs art. The artist should not seek any "hidden" reality or essence; he should not attempt to correct or complete nature by either idealizing or generalizing; he should not impose value judgments upon nature; and he should not concern himself with the selection of "beautiful" subjects that will yield "aesthetic pleasure". He is simply to dissect and describe what he finds around him. Here, it is important to notice explicitly a distinction between naturalism and romanticism (q.v.): romanticism emphasizes the felt quality of things, and the romanticist is primarily interested in the experiences that nature will yield, naturalism emphasizes the objective character of things, and is interested in nature as an independent entity. Thus, romanticism stresses the intervention of the artist upon nature, while naturalism seeks to reduce this to a minimum.

indict ::: v. t. --> To write; to compose; to dictate; to indite.
To appoint publicly or by authority; to proclaim or announce.
To charge with a crime, in due form of law, by the finding or presentment of a grand jury; to find an indictment against; as, to indict a man for arson. It is the peculiar province of a grand jury to indict, as it is of a house of representatives to impeach.


Indra ::: "the Puissant", a Vedic god, lord of svar, the luminous world; the deva as "the master of mental force". As Agni2 "is one pole of Force instinct with knowledge that sends its current upward from earth to heaven, so Indra is the other pole of Light instinct with force which descends from heaven to earth"; he "comes down into our world as the Hero" and "slays darkness and division with his lightnings, pours down the life-giving heavenly waters [svarvatir apah.], finds in the trace of the hound, Intuition [Sarama], the lost or hidden illuminations, makes the Sun of Truth [sūrya1] mount high in the heaven of our mentality".

information "data, data processing" The result of applying {data processing} to {data}, giving it context and meaning. Information can then be further processed to yeild {knowledge}. People or computers can find patterns in data to perceive information, and information can be used to enhance {knowledge}. Since knowledge is prerequisite to wisdom, we always want more data and information. But, as modern societies verge on {information overload}, we especially need better ways to find patterns. 1234567.89 is data. "Your bank balance has jumped 8087% to $1234567.89" is information. "Nobody owes me that much money" is knowledge. "I'd better talk to the bank before I spend it, because of what has happened to other people" is wisdom. (2007-09-10)

Information Resource Management (IRM) A philosophical and practical approach to managing government information. Information is regarded as a valuable resource which should be managed like other resources, and should contribute directly to accomplishing organisational goals and objectives. IRM provides an integrated view for managing the entire life-cycle of information, from generation, to dissemination, to archiving and/or destruction, for maximising the overall usefulness of information, and improving service delivery and program management. IRM views information and {Information Technology} as an integrating factor in the organisation, that is, the various organisational positions that manage information are coordinated and work together toward common ends. Further, IRM looks for ways in which the management of information and the management of Information Technology are interrelated, and fosters that interrelationship and organisational integration. IRM includes the management of (1) the broad range of information resources, e.g., printed materials, electronic information, and microforms, (2) the various technologies and equipment that manipulate these resources, and (3) the people who generate, organise, and disseminate those resources. Overall the intent of IRM is to increase the usefulness of government information both to the government and to the public. [Gary D. Blass et al. "Finding Government Information: The Federal Information Locator System (FILS)", Government Information Quarterly, JAI Press, Inc., Greenwich, Connecticut. Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 11-32. 1991]. (1995-11-12)

In genera, Anglo-Catholic philosophy has been an incarnational or sacramental one, finding God in the Biblical revelation culminating in Christ, but unwilling to limit his self-disclosure to that series of events. Incarnationalism provides, it is said, the setting for the historic Incarnation; general revelation is on sacramental lines, giving meaning to the particular sacraments. For Anglo-Catholic philosophical theology, in its central stream, the key to dogma is the cumulative experience of Christian people, tested by the Biblical revelation as source and standard of that experience and hence "classical" in its value. Revelation is the ultimate authority; the Church possesses a trustworthiness about her central beliefs, but statement of these may change from age to age. Sometimes this main tendency of Anglo-Catholic thought has been sharply criticized by thinkers, themselves Anglicans (cf. Tennant's Philosophical Theology); but these have, in general, served as useful warnings rather than as normal expressions of the Anglican mind.

…in Nature each of us has a principle and will of our own becoming; each soul is a force of self-consciousness that formulates an idea of the Divine in it and guides by that its action and evolution, its progressive self-finding, its constant varying self-expression, its apparently uncertain but secretly inevitable growth to fullness. That is our Swabhava.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 19, Page: 519


In order to appreciate fully the meaning of the universe, man must comprehend Reason. This can be done by "investigating things to the utmost" (ko wu), that is, by "investigating the Reason of things to the utmost (ch'iung li)." When sufficient effort is made, and understanding naturally comes, one's nature will be realized and his destiny will be fulfilled, since "the exhaustive investigation of Reason, the full realization of one's nature, and the fulfillment of destiny are simultaneous." When one understands Reason, he will find that "All people are brothers and sisters, and all things are my companions," because all men have the same Reason in them. Consequently one should not entertain any distinction between things and the ego. This is the foundation of the Neo-Confucian ethics of jen, true manhood, benevolence or love. Both the understanding of Reason and the practice of jen require sincerity (ch'eng) and seriousness (ching) which to the Neo-Confucians almost assumed religious significance. As a matter of fact these have a certain correspondence with the Buddhist dhyana and prajna or meditation and insight. Gradually the Neo-Confucian movement became an inward movement, the mind assuming more and more importance.

inquest ::: n. --> Inquiry; quest; search.
Judicial inquiry; official examination, esp. before a jury; as, a coroner&


inquisition ::: n. --> The act of inquiring; inquiry; search; examination; inspection; investigation.
Judicial inquiry; official examination; inquest.
The finding of a jury, especially such a finding under a writ of inquiry.
A court or tribunal for the examination and punishment of heretics, fully established by Pope Gregory IX. in 1235. Its operations were chiefly confined to Spain, Portugal, and their


In relation to the universe the Supreme is Brahman, the one Reality which is not only the spiritual material and conscious substance of all the ideas and forces and forms of the universe, but their origin, support and possessor, the cosmic and supracosmic Spirit. All the last terms to which we can reduce the universe, Force and Matter, Name and Form, Purusha and Prakriti, are still not entirely that which the universe really is, either in itself or its nature. As all that we are is the play and form, the mental, psychic, vital and physical expression of a supreme Self unconditioned by mind and life and body, the universe too is the play and form and cosmic soul-expression and nature-expression of a supreme Existence which is unconditioned by force and matter, unconditioned by idea and name and form, unconditioned by the fundamental distinction of Purusha and Prakriti. Our supreme Self and the supreme Existence which has become the universe are one Spirit, one self and one existence. The individual is in nature one expression of the universal Being, in spirit an emanation of the Transcendence. For if he finds his self, he finds too that his own true self is not this natural personality, this created individuality, but is a universal being in its relations with others and with Nature and in its upward term a portion or the living front of a supreme transcendental Spirit.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 296


In Savitri, Book II, Canto V, we find these lines:*

In scholasticism: means either faith or opinion. Opinion is a statement lacking evidence. Faith is a supernatural act, due to God's grace, referring to things reason finds beyond its capacity of proof, though not contradicting its principles. Statements capable of experimental proof are not objects of faith. -- R.A.

insertion sort "algorithm" A sorting {algorithm} that inserts each item in the proper place into an initially empty list by comparing it with each item in the list until it finds the new element's successor or the end of the list. Compare {bubble sort}. (1997-02-12)

insist ::: v. i. --> To stand or rest; to find support; -- with in, on, or upon.
To take a stand and refuse to give way; to hold to something firmly or determinedly; to be persistent, urgent, or pressing; to persist in demanding; -- followed by on, upon, or that; as, he insisted on these conditions; he insisted on going at once; he insists that he must have money.


INSTRUMENT. ::: To be able to receive the Divine Power and let it act through you in the things of the outward life, there are three necessary conditions ::: (I) Quietude, equality — not to be disturbed by anything that happens, to keep the mind still and firm, seeing the play of forces, but itself tranquil. (2) Absolute faith — faith that what is for the best will happen, but also that if one can make oneself a true instrument, the fruit will be that which one's will guided by the Divine Light sees as the thing to be done. (3) Receptivity — the power to receive the Divine Force and to feel its presence and the presence of the Mother in it and allow it to work, guiding one’s sight and will and action.

If this power and presence can be felt and this plasticity made the habit of the consciousness in action, — but plasticity to the Divine Force alone without bringing in any foreign clement, — the eventual result is sure.

Conditions to become an instrument of the Divine ::: A receptive silence of the mind, an effacemenl of the mental ego and the reduction of the mental being to the position of a witness, a close find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity ; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasya needed too constant and intense.


INTEGRAL YOGA ::: This yoga accepts the value of cosmic existence and holds it to be a reality; its object is to enter into a higher Truth-Consciousness or Divine Supramental Consciousness in which action and creation are the expression not of ignorance and imperfection, but of the Truth, the Light, the Divine Ānanda. But for that, the surrender of the mortal mind, life and body to the Higher Consciousnessis indispensable, since it is too difficult for the mortal human being to pass by its own effort beyond mind to a Supramental Consciousness in which the dynamism is no longer mental but of quite another power. Only those who can accept the call to such a change should enter into this yoga.

Aim of the Integral Yoga ::: It is not merely to rise out of the ordinary ignorant world-consciousness into the divine consciousness, but to bring the supramental power of that divine consciousness down into the ignorance of mind, life and body, to transform them, to manifest the Divine here and create a divine life in Matter.

Conditions of the Integral Yoga ::: This yoga can only be done to the end by those who are in total earnest about it and ready to abolish their little human ego and its demands in order to find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasyā needed too constant and intense.

Method in the Integral Yoga ::: To concentrate, preferably in the heart and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness. One can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is the beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one’s own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother’s Power and Presence.

Integral method ::: The method we have to pursue is to put our whole conscious being into relation and contact with the Divine and to call Him in to transform Our entire being into His, so that in a sense God Himself, the real Person in us, becomes the sādhaka of the sādhana* as well as the Master of the Yoga by whom the lower personality is used as the centre of a divine transfiguration and the instrument of its own perfection. In effect, the pressure of the Tapas, the force of consciousness in us dwelling in the Idea of the divine Nature upon that which we are in our entirety, produces its own realisation. The divine and all-knowing and all-effecting descends upon the limited and obscure, progressively illumines and energises the whole lower nature and substitutes its own action for all the terms of the inferior human light and mortal activity.

In psychological fact this method translates itself into the progressive surrender of the ego with its whole field and all its apparatus to the Beyond-ego with its vast and incalculable but always inevitable workings. Certainly, this is no short cut or easy sādhana. It requires a colossal faith, an absolute courage and above all an unflinching patience. For it implies three stages of which only the last can be wholly blissful or rapid, - the attempt of the ego to enter into contact with the Divine, the wide, full and therefore laborious preparation of the whole lower Nature by the divine working to receive and become the higher Nature, and the eventual transformation. In fact, however, the divine strength, often unobserved and behind the veil, substitutes itself for the weakness and supports us through all our failings of faith, courage and patience. It” makes the blind to see and the lame to stride over the hills.” The intellect becomes aware of a Law that beneficently insists and a Succour that upholds; the heart speaks of a Master of all things and Friend of man or a universal Mother who upholds through all stumblings. Therefore this path is at once the most difficult imaginable and yet in comparison with the magnitude of its effort and object, the most easy and sure of all.

There are three outstanding features of this action of the higher when it works integrally on the lower nature. In the first place, it does not act according to a fixed system and succession as in the specialised methods of Yoga, but with a sort of free, scattered and yet gradually intensive and purposeful working determined by the temperament of the individual in whom it operates, the helpful materials which his nature offers and the obstacles which it presents to purification and perfection. In a sense, therefore, each man in this path has his own method of Yoga. Yet are there certain broad lines of working common to all which enable us to construct not indeed a routine system, but yet some kind of Shastra or scientific method of the synthetic Yoga.

Secondly, the process, being integral, accepts our nature such as it stands organised by our past evolution and without rejecting anything essential compels all to undergo a divine change. Everything in us is seized by the hands of a mighty Artificer and transformed into a clear image of that which it now seeks confusedly to present. In that ever-progressive experience we begin to perceive how this lower manifestation is constituted and that everything in it, however seemingly deformed or petty or vile, is the more or less distorted or imperfect figure of some elements or action in the harmony of the divine Nature. We begin to understand what the Vedic Rishis meant when they spoke of the human forefathers fashioning the gods as a smith forges the crude material in his smithy.

Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognise in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in Nature, in the other it becomes swift and selfconscious and the instrument confesses the hand of the Master. All life is a Yoga of Nature seeking to manifest God within itself. Yoga marks the stage at which this effort becomes capable of self-awareness and therefore of right completion in the individual. It is a gathering up and concentration of the movements dispersed and loosely combined in the lower evolution.

Key-methods ::: The way to devotion and surrender. It is the psychic movement that brings the constant and pure devotion and the removal of the ego that makes it possible to surrender.

The way to knowledge. Meditation in the head by which there comes the opening above, the quietude or silence of the mind and the descent of peace etc. of the higher consciousness generally till it envelops the being and fills the body and begins to take up all the movements.
Yoga by works ::: Separation of the Purusha from the Prakriti, the inner silent being from the outer active one, so that one has two consciousnesses or a double consciousness, one behind watching and observing and finally controlling and changing the other which is active in front. The other way of beginning the yoga of works is by doing them for the Divine, for the Mother, and not for oneself, consecrating and dedicating them till one concretely feels the Divine Force taking up the activities and doing them for one.

Object of the Integral Yoga is to enter into and be possessed by the Divine Presence and Consciousness, to love the Divine for the Divine’s sake alone, to be tuned in our nature into the nature of the Divine, and in our will and works and life to be the instrument of the Divine.

Principle of the Integral Yoga ::: The whole principle of Integral Yoga is to give oneself entirely to the Divine alone and to nobody else, and to bring down into ourselves by union with the Divine Mother all the transcendent light, power, wideness, peace, purity, truth-consciousness and Ānanda of the Supramental Divine.

Central purpose of the Integral Yoga ::: Transformation of our superficial, narrow and fragmentary human way of thinking, seeing, feeling and being into a deep and wide spiritual consciousness and an integrated inner and outer existence and of our ordinary human living into the divine way of life.

Fundamental realisations of the Integral Yoga ::: The psychic change so that a complete devotion can be the main motive of the heart and the ruler of thought, life and action in constant union with the Mother and in her Presence. The descent of the Peace, Power, Light etc. of the Higher Consciousness through the head and heart into the whole being, occupying the very cells of the body. The perception of the One and Divine infinitely everywhere, the Mother everywhere and living in that infinite consciousness.

Results ::: First, an integral realisation of Divine Being; not only a realisation of the One in its indistinguishable unity, but also in its multitude of aspects which are also necessary to the complete knowledge of it by the relative consciousness; not only realisation of unity in the Self, but of unity in the infinite diversity of activities, worlds and creatures.

Therefore, also, an integral liberation. Not only the freedom born of unbroken contact of the individual being in all its parts with the Divine, sāyujya mukti, by which it becomes free even in its separation, even in the duality; not only the sālokya mukti by which the whole conscious existence dwells in the same status of being as the Divine, in the state of Sachchidananda ; but also the acquisition of the divine nature by the transformation of this lower being into the human image of the divine, sādharmya mukti, and the complete and final release of all, the liberation of the consciousness from the transitory mould of the ego and its unification with the One Being, universal both in the world and the individual and transcendentally one both in the world and beyond all universe.

By this integral realisation and liberation, the perfect harmony of the results of Knowledge, Love and Works. For there is attained the complete release from ego and identification in being with the One in all and beyond all. But since the attaining consciousness is not limited by its attainment, we win also the unity in Beatitude and the harmonised diversity in Love, so that all relations of the play remain possible to us even while we retain on the heights of our being the eternal oneness with the Beloved. And by a similar wideness, being capable of a freedom in spirit that embraces life and does not depend upon withdrawal from life, we are able to become without egoism, bondage or reaction the channel in our mind and body for a divine action poured out freely upon the world.

The divine existence is of the nature not only of freedom, but of purity, beatitude and perfection. In integral purity which shall enable on the one hand the perfect reflection of the divine Being in ourselves and on the other the perfect outpouring of its Truth and Law in us in the terms of life and through the right functioning of the complex instrument we are in our outer parts, is the condition of an integral liberty. Its result is an integral beatitude, in which there becomes possible at once the Ānanda of all that is in the world seen as symbols of the Divine and the Ānanda of that which is not-world. And it prepares the integral perfection of our humanity as a type of the Divine in the conditions of the human manifestation, a perfection founded on a certain free universality of being, of love and joy, of play of knowledge and of play of will in power and will in unegoistic action. This integrality also can be attained by the integral Yoga.

Sādhanā of the Integral Yoga does not proceed through any set mental teaching or prescribed forms of meditation, mantras or others, but by aspiration, by a self-concentration inwards or upwards, by a self-opening to an Influence, to the Divine Power above us and its workings, to the Divine Presence in the heart and by the rejection of all that is foreign to these things. It is only by faith, aspiration and surrender that this self-opening can come.

The yoga does not proceed by upadeśa but by inner influence.

Integral Yoga and Gita ::: The Gita’s Yoga consists in the offering of one’s work as a sacrifice to the Divine, the conquest of desire, egoless and desireless action, bhakti for the Divine, an entering into the cosmic consciousness, the sense of unity with all creatures, oneness with the Divine. This yoga adds the bringing down of the supramental Light and Force (its ultimate aim) and the transformation of the nature.

Our yoga is not identical with the yoga of the Gita although it contains all that is essential in the Gita’s yoga. In our yoga we begin with the idea, the will, the aspiration of the complete surrender; but at the same time we have to reject the lower nature, deliver our consciousness from it, deliver the self involved in the lower nature by the self rising to freedom in the higher nature. If we do not do this double movement, we are in danger of making a tamasic and therefore unreal surrender, making no effort, no tapas and therefore no progress ; or else we make a rajasic surrender not to the Divine but to some self-made false idea or image of the Divine which masks our rajasic ego or something still worse.

Integral Yoga, Gita and Tantra ::: The Gita follows the Vedantic tradition which leans entirely on the Ishvara aspect of the Divine and speaks little of the Divine Mother because its object is to draw back from world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation beyond it.

The Tantric tradition leans on the Shakti or Ishvari aspect and makes all depend on the Divine Mother because its object is to possess and dominate the world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation through it.

This yoga insists on both the aspects; the surrender to the Divine Mother is essential, for without it there is no fulfilment of the object of the yoga.

Integral Yoga and Hatha-Raja Yogas ::: For an integral yoga the special methods of Rajayoga and Hathayoga may be useful at times in certain stages of the progress, but are not indispensable. Their principal aims must be included in the integrality of the yoga; but they can be brought about by other means. For the methods of the integral yoga must be mainly spiritual, and dependence on physical methods or fixed psychic or psychophysical processes on a large scale would be the substitution of a lower for a higher action. Integral Yoga and Kundalini Yoga: There is a feeling of waves surging up, mounting to the head, which brings an outer unconsciousness and an inner waking. It is the ascending of the lower consciousness in the ādhāra to meet the greater consciousness above. It is a movement analogous to that on which so much stress is laid in the Tantric process, the awakening of the Kundalini, the Energy coiled up and latent in the body and its mounting through the spinal cord and the centres (cakras) and the Brahmarandhra to meet the Divine above. In our yoga it is not a specialised process, but a spontaneous upnish of the whole lower consciousness sometimes in currents or waves, sometimes in a less concrete motion, and on the other side a descent of the Divine Consciousness and its Force into the body.

Integral Yoga and other Yogas ::: The old yogas reach Sachchidananda through the spiritualised mind and depart into the eternally static oneness of Sachchidananda or rather pure Sat (Existence), absolute and eternal or else a pure Non-exist- ence, absolute and eternal. Ours having realised Sachchidananda in the spiritualised mind plane proceeds to realise it in the Supramcntal plane.

The suprcfhe supra-cosmic Sachchidananda is above all. Supermind may be described as its power of self-awareness and W’orld- awareness, the world being known as within itself and not out- side. So to live consciously in the supreme Sachchidananda one must pass through the Supermind.

Distinction ::: The realisation of Self and of the Cosmic being (without which the realisation of the Self is incomplete) are essential steps in our yoga ; it is the end of other yogas, but it is, as it were, the beginning of outs, that is to say, the point where its own characteristic realisation can commence.

It is new as compared with the old yogas (1) Because it aims not at a departure out of world and life into Heaven and Nir- vana, but at a change of life and existence, not as something subordinate or incidental, but as a distinct and central object.

If there is a descent in other yogas, yet it is only an incident on the way or resulting from the ascent — the ascent is the real thing. Here the ascent is the first step, but it is a means for the descent. It is the descent of the new coosdousness attain- ed by the ascent that is the stamp and seal of the sadhana. Even the Tantra and Vaishnavism end in the release from life ; here the object is the divine fulfilment of life.

(2) Because the object sought after is not an individual achievement of divine realisation for the sake of the individual, but something to be gained for the earth-consciousness here, a cosmic, not solely a supra-cosmic acbievement. The thing to be gained also is the bringing of a Power of consciousness (the Supramental) not yet organised or active directly in earth-nature, even in the spiritual life, but yet to be organised and made directly active.

(3) Because a method has been preconized for achieving this purpose which is as total and integral as the aim set before it, viz., the total and integral change of the consciousness and nature, taking up old methods, but only as a part action and present aid to others that are distinctive.

Integral Yoga and Patanjali Yoga ::: Cilia is the stuff of mixed mental-vital-physical consciousness out of which arise the movements of thought, emotion, sensation, impulse etc.

It is these that in the Patanjali system have to be stilled altogether so that the consciousness may be immobile and go into Samadhi.

Our yoga has a different function. The movements of the ordinary consciousness have to be quieted and into the quietude there has to be brought down a higher consciousness and its powers which will transform the nature.


integrate ::: v. t. --> To form into one whole; to make entire; to complete; to renew; to restore; to perfect.
To indicate the whole of; to give the sum or total of; as, an integrating anemometer, one that indicates or registers the entire action of the wind in a given time.
To subject to the operation of integration; to find the integral of.


integration ::: n. --> The act or process of making whole or entire.
The operation of finding the primitive function which has a given function for its differential coefficient. See Integral.
In the theory of evolution: The process by which the manifold is compacted into the relatively simple and permanent. It is supposed to alternate with differentiation as an agent in development.


Intensively fixing itself on one or other to find itself, to achieve

interpolation ::: n. --> The act of introducing or inserting anything, especially that which is spurious or foreign.
That which is introduced or inserted, especially something foreign or spurious.
The method or operation of finding from a few given terms of a series, as of numbers or observations, other intermediate terms in conformity with the law of the series.


In the theory of obligation we find on the question of the meaning and status of right and wrong the same variety of views as obtain in the theory of value: "right," e.g., has only an emotive meaning (Ayer); or it denotes an intuited indefinable objective quality or relation of an act (Price, Reid, Clarke, Sidgwick, Ross, possibly Kant); or it stands for the attitude of some mind or group of minds towards an act (the Sophists, Hume, Westermarck). But it is also often defined as meaning that the act is conducive to the welfare of some individual or group -- the agent himself, or his group, or society as a whole. Many of the teleological and utilitarian views mentioned below include such a definition.

In this yoga there is no fixed Mantra, no stress is laid on Mantras although sadhakas can use one if they find it helpful or so long as they find it helpful. The stress is rather on an aspiration in the Consciousness and a concentration of the mind, heart, will, all the being. If a Mantra is found helpful for that, one uses if.

intuition ::: direct perception of truth, fact, etc., independent of any reasoning process. intuition"s, intuitions, half-intuition.

Sri Aurobindo: "Intuition is a power of consciousness nearer and more intimate to the original knowledge by identity; for it is always something that leaps out direct from a concealed identity. It is when the consciousness of the subject meets with the consciousness in the object, penetrates it and sees, feels or vibrates with the truth of what it contacts, that the intuition leaps out like a spark or lightning-flash from the shock of the meeting; or when the consciousness, even without any such meeting, looks into itself and feels directly and intimately the truth or the truths that are there or so contacts the hidden forces behind appearances, then also there is the outbreak of an intuitive light; or, again, when the consciousness meets the Supreme Reality or the spiritual reality of things and beings and has a contactual union with it, then the spark, the flash or the blaze of intimate truth-perception is lit in its depths. This close perception is more than sight, more than conception: it is the result of a penetrating and revealing touch which carries in it sight and conception as part of itself or as its natural consequence. A concealed or slumbering identity, not yet recovering itself, still remembers or conveys by the intuition its own contents and the intimacy of its self-feeling and self-vision of things, its light of truth, its overwhelming and automatic certitude.” *The Life Divine

   "Intuition is always an edge or ray or outleap of a superior light; it is in us a projecting blade, edge or point of a far-off supermind light entering into and modified by some intermediate truth-mind substance above us and, so modified, again entering into and very much blinded by our ordinary or ignorant mind-substance; but on that higher level to which it is native its light is unmixed and therefore entirely and purely veridical, and its rays are not separated but connected or massed together in a play of waves of what might almost be called in the Sanskrit poetic figure a sea or mass of ``stable lightnings"". When this original or native Intuition begins to descend into us in answer to an ascension of our consciousness to its level or as a result of our finding of a clear way of communication with it, it may continue to come as a play of lightning-flashes, isolated or in constant action; but at this stage the judgment of reason becomes quite inapplicable, it can only act as an observer or registrar understanding or recording the more luminous intimations, judgments and discriminations of the higher power. To complete or verify an isolated intuition or discriminate its nature, its application, its limitations, the receiving consciousness must rely on another completing intuition or be able to call down a massed intuition capable of putting all in place. For once the process of the change has begun, a complete transmutation of the stuff and activities of the mind into the substance, form and power of Intuition is imperative; until then, so long as the process of consciousness depends upon the lower intelligence serving or helping out or using the intuition, the result can only be a survival of the mixed Knowledge-Ignorance uplifted or relieved by a higher light and force acting in its parts of Knowledge.” *The Life Divine

  "I use the word ‘intuition" for want of a better. In truth, it is a makeshift and inadequate to the connotation demanded of it. The same has to be said of the word ‘consciousness" and many others which our poverty compels us to extend illegitimately in their significance.” *The Life Divine - Sri Aurobindo"s footnote.

"For intuition is an edge of light thrust out by the secret Supermind. . . .” The Life Divine

". . . intuition is born of a direct awareness while intellect is an indirect action of a knowledge which constructs itself with difficulty out of the unknown from signs and indications and gathered data.” The Life Divine

"Intuition is above illumined Mind which is simply higher Mind raised to a great luminosity and more open to modified forms of intuition and inspiration.” Letters on Yoga

"Intuition sees the truth of things by a direct inner contact, not like the ordinary mental intelligence by seeking and reaching out for indirect contacts through the senses etc. But the limitation of the Intuition as compared with the supermind is that it sees things by flashes, point by point, not as a whole. Also in coming into the mind it gets mixed with the mental movement and forms a kind of intuitive mind activity which is not the pure truth, but something in between the higher Truth and the mental seeking. It can lead the consciousness through a sort of transitional stage and that is practically its function.” Letters on Yoga


“Intuition is always an edge or ray or outleap of a superior light; it is in us a projecting blade, edge or point of a far-off supermind light entering into and modified by some intermediate truth-mind substance above us and, so modified, again entering into and very much blinded by our ordinary or ignorant mind-substance; but on that higher level to which it is native its light is unmixed and therefore entirely and purely veridical, and its rays are not separated but connected or massed together in a play of waves of what might almost be called in the Sanskrit poetic figure a sea or mass of ``stable lightnings’’. When this original or native Intuition begins to descend into us in answer to an ascension of our consciousness to its level or as a result of our finding of a clear way of communication with it, it may continue to come as a play of lightning-flashes, isolated or in constant action; but at this stage the judgment of reason becomes quite inapplicable, it can only act as an observer or registrar understanding or recording the more luminous intimations, judgments and discriminations of the higher power. To complete or verify an isolated intuition or discriminate its nature, its application, its limitations, the receiving consciousness must rely on another completing intuition or be able to call down a massed intuition capable of putting all in place. For once the process of the change has begun, a complete transmutation of the stuff and activities of the mind into the substance, form and power of Intuition is imperative; until then, so long as the process of consciousness depends upon the lower intelligence serving or helping out or using the intuition, the result can only be a survival of the mixed Knowledge-Ignorance uplifted or relieved by a higher light and force acting in its parts of Knowledge.” The Life Divine

invention ::: n. --> The act of finding out or inventing; contrivance or construction of that which has not before existed; as, the invention of logarithms; the invention of the art of printing.
That which is invented; an original contrivance or construction; a device; as, this fable was the invention of Esop; that falsehood was her own invention.
Thought; idea.
A fabrication to deceive; a fiction; a forgery; a


inventor ::: n. --> One who invents or finds out something new; a contriver; especially, one who invents mechanical devices.

invent ::: v. t. --> To come or light upon; to meet; to find.
To discover, as by study or inquiry; to find out; to devise; to contrive or produce for the first time; -- applied commonly to the discovery of some serviceable mode, instrument, or machine.
To frame by the imagination; to fabricate mentally; to forge; -- in a good or a bad sense; as, to invent the machinery of a poem; to invent a falsehood.


inverted index "database, information science" A sequence of ({key}, pointer) pairs where each pointer points to a {record} in a {database} which contains the key value in some particular field. The index is sorted on the key values to allow rapid searching for a particular key value, using e.g. {binary search}. The index is "inverted" in the sense that the key value is used to find the record rather than the other way round. For databases in which the records may be searched based on more than one field, multiple indices may be created that are sorted on those keys. An index may contain gaps to allow for new entries to be added in the correct sort order without always requiring the following entries to be shifted out of the way. (1995-02-08)

investigate ::: v. t. --> To follow up step by step by patient inquiry or observation; to trace or track mentally; to search into; to inquire and examine into with care and accuracy; to find out by careful inquisition; as, to investigate the causes of natural phenomena. ::: v. i. --> To pursue a course of investigation and study; to

iterative deepening "algorithm" A {graph} search {algorithm} that will find the shortest path with some given property, even when the graph contains {cycles}. When searching for a path through a graph, starting at a given initial {node}, where the path (or its end node) has some desired property, a {depth-first search} may never find a solution if it enters a cycle in the graph. Rather than avoiding cycles (i.e. never extend a path with a node it already contains), iterative deepening explores all paths up to length (or "depth") N, starting from N=0 and increasing N until a solution is found. (2004-01-26)

It is customary to distinguish between the nature of truth and the tests for truth. There are three traditional theories as to the nature of truth, each finding virious expression in the works of different exponents. According to the correspondence theory, a proposition (or meaning) is true if there is a fact to which it corresponds. if it expresses what is the case. For example, "It is raining here now" is true if it is the case that it is raining here now; otherwise it is false. The nature of the relation of correspondence between fact and true proposition is variously described by different writers, or left largely undescribed. Russell in The Problems of Philosophy speaks of the correspondence as consisting of an identity of the constituents of the fact and of the proposition. According to the coherence theory (see H. H. Joachim: The Nature of Truth), truth is systematic coherence. This is more than logical consistency. A proposition is true insofar is it is a necessary constituent of a systematically coherent whole. According to some (e.g., Brand Blanshard, The Nature of Truth), this whole must be such that every element in it necessitates, indeed entails, every other element. Strictly, on this view, truth, in its fullness, is a characteristic of only the one systematic coherent whole, which is the absolute. It attaches to propositions as we know them and to wholes as we know them only to a degree. A proposition has a degree of truth proportionate to the completeness of the systematic coherence of the system of entities to which it belongs. According to the pragmatic theory of truth, a proposition is true insofar as it works or satisfies, working or satisfying being described variously by different exponents of the view. Some writers insist that truth chiracterizes only those propositions (ideas) whose satisfactory working has actually verified them; others state that only verifiability through such consequences is necessary. In either case, writers differ as to the precise nature of the verifying experiences required. See Pragmatism. --C.A.B. Truth, semantical: Closely connected with the name relation (q.v.) is the property of a propositional formula (sentence) that it expresses a true proposition (or if it has free variables, that it expresses a true proposition for all values of these variables). As in the case of the name relation, a notation for the concept of truth in this sense often cannot be added, with its natural properties, to an (interpreted) logistic system without producing contradiction. A particular system may, however, be made the beginning of a hierarchy of systems each containing the truth concept appropriate to the preceding one.

It is here, when this foundation has been secured, that the practice of Asana and Pranayama come in and can then bear their perfect fruits. By itself the control of the mind and moral being only puts our normal consciousness into the right preliminary condition; it cannot bring about that evolution or manifestation of the higher psychic being which is necessary for the greater aims of Yoga. In order to bring about this manifestation the present nodus of the vital and physical body with the mental being has to be loosened and the way made clear for the ascent through the greater psychic being to the union with the superconscient Purusha. This can be done by Pranayama. Asana is used by the Rajayoga only in its easiest and most natural position, that naturally taken by the body when seated and gathered together, but with the back and head strictly erect and in a straight line, so that there may be no deflection of the spinal cord. The object of the latter rule is obviously connected with the theory of the six chakras and the circulation of the vital energy between the muladhara and the brahmarandhra. The Rajayogic Pranayama purifies and clears the nervous system; it enables us to circulate the vital energy equally through the body and direct it also where we will according to need, and thus maintain a perfect health and soundness of the body and the vital being; it gives us control of all the five habitual operations of the vital energy in the system and at the same time breaks down the habitual divisions by which only the ordinary mechanical processes of the vitality are possible to the normal life. It opens entirely the six centres of the psycho-physical system and brings into the waking consciousness the power of the awakened Shakti and the light of the unveiled Purusha on each of the ascending planes. Coupled with the use of the mantra it brings the divine energy into the body and prepares for and facilitates that concentration in Samadhi which is the crown of the Rajayogic method. Rajayogic concentration is divided into four stages; it commences with the drawing both of the mind and senses from outward things, proceeds to the holding of the one object of concentration to the exclusion of all other ideas and mental activities, then to the prolonged absorption of the mind in this object, finally, to the complete ingoing of the consciousness by which it is lost to all outward mental activity in the oneness of Samadhi. The real object of this mental discipline is to draw away the mind from the outward and the mental world into union with the divine Being. Th
   refore in the first three stages use has to be made of some mental means or support by which the mind, accustomed to run about from object to object, shall fix on one alone, and that one must be something which represents the idea of the Divine. It is usually a name or a form or a mantra by which the thought can be fixed in the sole knowledge or adoration of the Lord. By this concentration on the idea the mind enters from the idea into its reality, into which it sinks silent, absorbed, unified. This is the traditional method. There are, however, others which are equally of a Rajayogic character, since they use the mental and psychical being as key. Some of them are directed rather to the quiescence of the mind than to its immediate absorption, as the discipline by which the mind is simply watched and allowed to exhaust its habit of vagrant thought in a purposeless running from which it feels all sanction, purpose and interest withdrawn, and that, more strenuous and rapidly effective, by which all outward-going thought is excluded and the mind forced to sink into itself where in its absolute quietude it can only
   reflect the pure Being or pass away into its superconscient existence. The method differs, the object and the result are the same. Here, it might be supposed, the whole action and aim of Rajayoga must end. For its action is the stilling of the waves of consciousness, its manifold activities, cittavrtti, first, through a habitual replacing of the turbid rajasic activities by the quiet and luminous sattwic, then, by the stilling of all activities; and its object is to enter into silent communion of soul and unity with the Divine. As a matter of fact we find that the system of Rajayoga includes other objects,—such as the practice and use of occult powers,—some of which seem to be unconnected with and even inconsistent with its main purpose. These powers or siddhis are indeed frequently condemned as dangers and distractions which draw away the Yogin from his sole legitimate aim of divine union. On the way, th
   refore, it would naturally seem as if they ought to be avoided; and once the goal is reached, it would seem that they are then frivolous and superfluous. But Rajayoga is a psychic science and it includes the attainment of all the higher states of consciousness and their powers by which the mental being rises towards the superconscient as well as its ultimate and supreme possibility of union with the Highest. Moreover, the Yogin, while in the body, is not always mentally inactive and sunk in Samadhi, and an account of the powers and states which are possible to him on the higher planes of his being is necessary to the completeness of the science. These powers and experiences belong, first, to the vital and mental planes above this physical in which we live, and are natural to the soul in the subtle body; as the dependence on the physical body decreases, these abnormal activities become possible and even manifest themselves without being sought for. They can be acquired and fixed by processes which the science gives, and their use then becomes subject to the will; or they can be allowed to develop of themselves and used only when they come, or when the Divine within moves us to use them; or else, even though thus naturally developing and acting, they may be rejected in a single-minded devotion to the one supreme goal of the Yoga. Secondly, there are fuller, greater powers belonging to the supramental planes which are the very powers of the Divine in his spiritual and supramentally ideative being. These cannot be acquired at all securely or integrally by personal effort, but can only come from above, or else can become natural to the man if and when he ascends beyond mind and lives in the spiritual being, power, consciousness and ideation. They then become, not abnormal and laboriously acquired siddhis, but simply the very nature and method of his action, if he still continues to be active in the world-existence.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 539-40-41-42


It is not difficult to find examples of formulas A, containing no free individual variables, such that both A and ∼A are satisfiaMe. A simple example is the formula (x)F(x). More instructive is the following example, [(x)(y)(z)[[∼F{x,x)][F(x, y)F(y,z) ⊃ F(x,z)]]][(x)(Ey)F(x,y)], which is satisfiable in an infinite domain of individuals but not in any finite domain -- the negation is satisfiable in any non-empty domain.

It is not historically sound to find the essentia of Mysticism in ecstasy, or in a via negativa, or in some kind of esoteric knowledge, or in mysterious "communications". The essentia of Mysticism is the experience of direct communion with God.

Jacobi, Friedrich Heinrich: (1743-1819) German philosopher of "feeling" who opposed the Kantian tradition. He held that the system of absolute subjective idealism, to which he reduced Kant, could not grasp ultimate reality. He was equally opposed to a dogmatic rationalism such as the Spinozistic. He based his view upon feeling, belief or faith by which he purported to find truth as immediately revealed in consciousness. Main works: Ueber die Lehre des Spinoza in Briefen an Moses Mendelsohn, 1785; David Hume über den Glauben, 1787; Sendschreiben an Fichte, 1799. -- L.E.D.

Jhumur: “ I think Amal and many others have talked about it. Sri Aurobindo is talking about the mind. Two powers and yet it is the same bird. At a certain level of our mental approach we perceive by opposites, we only see half the truth and only understand this half in relation only to the other. If this is white, this has to be black. And yet, it is one bird. It is fundamentally one truth, that is the mystic truth. Beyond the opposition there is the wholeness which sometimes we don’t perceive. We are so busy looking at the black head or the white tail and finding opposites.”

Jower as weJJ as outer consdousness so that you have afterwards to recover the realisation ; (2) in which the work brings you out, but the realisation remains behind (or above), not felt while you work, but as soon as tbe svotk ceases you find it there just as it was ; (3) in which the work makes no difference, for the realisation or spiritual condition remains through the work itself.

Kali ::: (literally "the black") the "dark Mother", a name given in the Kali Hindu tradition to the "supreme Energy . . . beneficent even in the mask of destruction", represented "with her garland of skulls trampling naked in battle", symbolic of "the Nature Force [prakr.ti] in the ignorance surrounded by difficulties, wresting and breaking everything in a blind struggle to get through till she finds herself standing

Kevo "language" A {prototype}-based {object-oriented} language written for {Macintosh} by Antero Taivalsaari at UTA, Finland. Kevo is built around a {threaded code} {interpreter} and features a unique prototype-based {object} model (which is based neither on {classes} nor {Self}-style {delegation}), {pre-emptive multitasking}, {cooperative multitasking}, dynamic {memory management}, an icon-based {object browser} and editor modelled loosely after Mac {Finder}. Kevo's {syntax} is close to {Forth} and its {semantics} resembles {Self} and {Omega}. {(ftp://cs.uta.fi/pub/kevo/)}. E-mail: "kevo-interest@ursamajor.uvic.ca". [TR DCS-197-19, U Victoria, June 1992]. (1993-05-18)

Knuth /knooth/ 1. {Donald Knuth}. 2. ["The Art of Computer Programming", Donald E. Knuth] Mythically, the reference that answers all questions about data structures or algorithms. A safe answer when you do not know: "I think you can find that in Knuth." Contrast {literature}. See also {bible}. [{Jargon File}]

labyrinth ::: An intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one’s way; a maze. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

labyrinth ::: an intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one"s way; a maze. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

labyrinth ::: n. --> An edifice or place full of intricate passageways which render it difficult to find the way from the interior to the entrance; as, the Egyptian and Cretan labyrinths.
Any intricate or involved inclosure; especially, an ornamental maze or inclosure in a park or garden.
Any object or arrangement of an intricate or involved form, or having a very complicated nature.
An inextricable or bewildering difficulty.


Lace Language for Assembling Classes in Eiffel. Specifies how to assemble an Eiffel system : in which directories to find the clusters, which class to use as the root, permits class renaming to avoid name clashes. "Eiffel: The Language", Bertrand Meyer, P-H 1992.

lack ::: n. --> Blame; cause of blame; fault; crime; offense.
Deficiency; want; need; destitution; failure; as, a lack of sufficient food. ::: v. t. --> To blame; to find fault with.
To be without or destitute of; to want; to need.


lactodensimeter ::: n. --> A form of hydrometer, specially graduated, for finding the density of milk, and thus discovering whether it has been mixed with water or some of the cream has been removed.

Lamennais, R.: (1782-1854) Leader of a Platonic-Christian movement in the Catholic clergy of France. He advanced the idea of "inspired mankind." He attacked the eighteenth century for its principles and its method. In finding dissolution and destruction as its aftermath, he advocated a return to the Catholic Church as the solution.

League for Programming Freedom "body, legal" (LPF) A grass-roots organisation of professors, students, businessmen, programmers and users dedicated to bringing back the freedom to write programs. Once programmers were allowed to write programs using all the techniques they knew, and providing whatever features they felt were useful. Monopolies, {software patents} and {interface copyrights} have taken away freedom of expression and the ability to do a good job. "{Look and feel}" lawsuits attempt to monopolise well-known command languages; some have succeeded. Copyrights on command languages enforce gratuitous incompatibility, close opportunities for competition and stifle incremental improvements. {Software patents} are even more dangerous; they make every design decision in the development of a program carry a risk of a lawsuit, with draconian pre-trial seizure. It is difficult and expensive to find out whether the techniques you consider using are patented; it is impossible to find out whether they will be patented in the future. The League is not opposed to the legal system that Congress intended -- {copyright} on individual programs. They aim to reverse the changes made by judges in response to special interests, often explicitly rejecting the public interest principles of the Constitution. The League works to abolish the monopolies by publishing articles, talking with public officials, boycotting egregious offenders and in the future may intervene in court cases. On 1989-05-24, the League picketed {Lotus} headquarters on account of their lawsuits, and then again on 1990-08-02. These marches stimulated widespread media coverage for the issue. The League's funds are used for filing briefs; printing handouts, buttons and signs and whatever will persuade the courts, the legislators and the people. The League is a non-profit corporation, but not considered a tax-exempt charity. {LPF Home (http://progfree.org/)}. (2007-02-28)

Lempel-Ziv Welch compression (LZW) The {algorithm} used by the {Unix} {compress} command to reduce the size of files, e.g. for archival or transmission. LZW was designed by Terry Welch in 1984 for implementation in hardware for high-performance disk controllers. It is a variant of {LZ78}, one of the two {Lempel-Ziv compression} schemes. The LZW algorithm relies on reoccurrence of byte sequences (strings) in its input. It maintains a table mapping input strings to their associated output codes. The table initially contains mappings for all possible strings of length one. Input is taken one byte at a time to find the longest initial string present in the table. The code for that string is output and then the string is extended with one more input byte, b. A new entry is added to the table mapping the extended string to the next unused code (obtained by incrementing a counter). The process repeats, starting from byte b. The number of bits in an output code, and hence the maximum number of entries in the table is usually fixed and once this limit is reached, no more entries are added. LZW compression and decompression are licensed under {Unisys} Corporation's 1984 U.S. Patent 4,558,302 and equivalent foreign patents. This kind of patent isn't legal in most coutries of the world (including the UK) except the USA. Patents in the UK can't describe {algorithms} or mathematical methods. [A Technique for High Performance Data Compression, Terry A. Welch, IEEE Computer, 17(6), June 1984, pp. 8-19] [J. Ziv and A. Lempel, "A Universal Algorithm for Sequential Data Compression," IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, Vol. IT-23, No. 3, May 1977, pp. 337-343].

leveling ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Level ::: n. --> The act or operation of making level.
The art or operation of using a leveling instrument for finding a horizontal line, for ascertaining the differences of level between different points of the earth&


:::   "Liberty in one shape or another ranks among the most ancient and certainly among the most difficult aspirations of our race: it arises from a radical instinct of our being and is yet opposed to all our circumstances, it is our eternal good and our condition of perfection, but our temporal being has failed to find its key. That perhaps is because true freedom is only possible if we live in the infinite, live, as the Vedanta bids us, in and from our self-existent being; but our natural and temporal energies seek for it first not in ourselves, but in our external conditions. This great indefinable thing, liberty, is in its highest and ultimate sense a state of being; it is self living in itself and determining by its own energy what is shall be inwardly and, eventually, by the growth of a divine spiritual power within determining too what it shall make of its external circumstances and environment." War and Self-Determination

“Liberty in one shape or another ranks among the most ancient and certainly among the most difficult aspirations of our race: it arises from a radical instinct of our being and is yet opposed to all our circumstances, it is our eternal good and our condition of perfection, but our temporal being has failed to find its key. That perhaps is because true freedom is only possible if we live in the infinite, live, as the Vedanta bids us, in and from our self-existent being; but our natural and temporal energies seek for it first not in ourselves, but in our external conditions. This great indefinable thing, liberty, is in its highest and ultimate sense a state of being; it is self living in itself and determining by its own energy what is shall be inwardly and, eventually, by the growth of a divine spiritual power within determining too what it shall make of its external circumstances and environment.” War and Self-Determination

liberty ::: “… liberty is at once the condition of vigorous variation and the condition of self-finding.” The Human Cycle

Life, finds something more of itself in Mind and finds its true self in a spiritual consciousness and finally a Supramental consciousness through which we become aware of the Reality, enter into it and unite ourselves with it. This is rvhal we call evolution which is an evolution of consciousness and an evolu-

linear programming "application" A procedure for finding the maximum or minimum of a {linear function} where the arguments are subject to linear {constraints}. The {simplex method} is one well known {algorithm}. (1995-04-06)

Lorem ipsum "text" A common piece of text used as mock-{content} when testing a given page layout or {font}. The following text is often used: "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetaur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum." This continues at length and variously. The text is not really Greek, but badly garbled Latin. It started life as extracted phrases from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of Cicero's "De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" ("The Extremes of Good and Evil"), which read: Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur? At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Temporibus autem quibusdam et aut officiis debitis aut rerum necessitatibus saepe eveniet ut et voluptates repudiandae sint et molestiae non recusandae. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat. Translation: But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure? On the other hand, we denounce with righteous indignation and dislike men who are so beguiled and demoralized by the charms of pleasure of the moment, so blinded by desire, that they cannot foresee the pain and trouble that are bound to ensue; and equal blame belongs to those who fail in their duty through weakness of will, which is the same as saying through shrinking from toil and pain. These cases are perfectly simple and easy to distinguish. In a free hour, when our power of choice is untrammelled and when nothing prevents our being able to do what we like best, every pleasure is to be welcomed and every pain avoided. But in certain circumstances and owing to the claims of duty or the obligations of business it will frequently occur that pleasures have to be repudiated and annoyances accepted. The wise man therefore always holds in these matters to this principle of selection: he rejects pleasures to secure other greater pleasures, or else he endures pains to avoid worse pains. -- Translation by H. Rackham, from his 1914 edition of De Finibus. However, since textual fidelity was unimportant to the goal of having {random} text to fill a page, it has degraded over the centuries, into "Lorem ipsum...". The point of using this text, or some other text of incidental intelligibility, is that it has a more-or-less normal (for English and Latin, at least) distribution of ascenders, descenders, and word-lengths, as opposed to just using "abc 123 abc 123", "Content here content here", or the like. The text is often used when previewing the layout of a document, as the use of more understandable text would distract the user from the layout being examined. A related technique is {greeking}. {Lorem Ipsum - All the facts (http://lipsum.com/)}. (2006-09-18)

lost ::: v. t. --> Parted with unwillingly or unintentionally; not to be found; missing; as, a lost book or sheep.
Parted with; no longer held or possessed; as, a lost limb; lost honor.
Not employed or enjoyed; thrown away; employed ineffectually; wasted; squandered; as, a lost day; a lost opportunity or benefit.
Having wandered from, or unable to find, the way;


lotus (as chakra) ::: Sri Aurobindo: "This arrangement of the psychic body is reproduced in the physical with the spinal column as a rod and the ganglionic centres as the chakras which rise up from the bottom of the column, where the lowest is attached, to the brain and find their summit in the brahmarandhra at the top of the skull. These chakras or lotuses, however, are in physical man closed or only partly open, with the consequence that only such powers and only so much of them are active in him as are sufficient for his ordinary physical life, and so much mind and soul only is at play as will accord with its need. This is the real reason, looked at from the mechanical point of view, why the embodied soul seems so dependent on the bodily and nervous life, — though the dependence is neither so complete nor so real as it seems. The whole energy of the soul is not at play in the physical body and life, the secret powers of mind are not awake in it, the bodily and nervous energies predominate. But all the while the supreme energy is there, asleep; it is said to be coiled up and slumbering like a snake, — therefore it is called the kundalinî sakti, — in the lowest of the chakras, in the mûlâdhâra.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

:::   "Love is, in its essence, the joy of identity; it finds its ultimate expression in the bliss of union.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

“Love is, in its essence, the joy of identity; it finds its ultimate expression in the bliss of union.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

"Love is the crown of all being and its way of fulfilment, that by which it rises to all intensity and all fullness and the ecstasy of utter self-finding.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“Love is the crown of all being and its way of fulfilment, that by which it rises to all intensity and all fullness and the ecstasy of utter self-finding.” The Synthesis of Yoga

". . . love is the crown of knowledge; for love is the delight of union, and unity must be conscious of joy of union to find all the riches of its own delight. Perfect knowledge indeed leads to perfect love, integral knowledge to a rounded and multitudinous richness of love.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“… love is the crown of knowledge; for love is the delight of union, and unity must be conscious of joy of union to find all the riches of its own delight. Perfect knowledge indeed leads to perfect love, integral knowledge to a rounded and multitudinous richness of love.” The Synthesis of Yoga

ly only an active memory which will disappear wlien it is able to find no welcome in any part of the nature.

LZ77 compression The first {algorithm} to use the {Lempel-Ziv} {substitutional compression} schemes, proposed in 1977. LZ77 compression keeps track of the last n bytes of data seen, and when a phrase is encountered that has already been seen, it outputs a pair of values corresponding to the position of the phrase in the previously-seen buffer of data, and the length of the phrase. In effect the compressor moves a fixed-size "window" over the data (generally referred to as a "sliding window"), with the position part of the (position, length) pair referring to the position of the phrase within the window. The most commonly used {algorithms} are derived from the {LZSS} scheme described by James Storer and Thomas Szymanski in 1982. In this the compressor maintains a window of size N bytes and a "lookahead buffer", the contents of which it tries to find a match for in the window: while (lookAheadBuffer not empty) {   get a pointer (position, match) to the longest match in   the window for the lookahead buffer;   if (length " MINIMUM_MATCH_LENGTH)   {    output a (position, length) pair;    shift the window length characters along;   }   else   {    output the first character in the lookahead buffer;    shift the window 1 character along;   } } Decompression is simple and fast: whenever a (POSITION, LENGTH) pair is encountered, go to that POSITION in the window and copy LENGTH bytes to the output. Sliding-window-based schemes can be simplified by numbering the input text characters mod N, in effect creating a circular buffer. The sliding window approach automatically creates the {LRU} effect which must be done explicitly in {LZ78} schemes. Variants of this method apply additional compression to the output of the LZSS compressor, which include a simple variable-length code ({LZB}), dynamic {Huffman coding} ({LZH}), and {Shannon-Fano} coding ({ZIP} 1.x), all of which result in a certain degree of improvement over the basic scheme, especially when the data are rather random and the LZSS compressor has little effect. An algorithm was developed which combines the ideas behind LZ77 and LZ78 to produce a hybrid called {LZFG}. LZFG uses the standard sliding window, but stores the data in a modified {trie} data structure and produces as output the position of the text in the trie. Since LZFG only inserts complete *phrases* into the dictionary, it should run faster than other LZ77-based compressors. All popular archivers ({arj}, {lha}, {zip}, {zoo}) are variations on LZ77. [comp.compression {FAQ}]. (1995-04-07)

MacBinary "file format" An eight-bit wide representation of the data and {resource forks} of an {Macintosh} file and of relevant {Finder} information. MacBinary files are recognised as "special" by several MacIntosh {terminal emulators}. These emulators, using {Kermit} or {XMODEM} or any other file transfer protocol, can separate the incoming file into {forks} and appropriately modify the {Desktop} to display {icons}, types, creation dates, and the like. (1995-03-08)

Macintosh file system "file system" A file on the {Macintosh} consists of two parts, called forks. The "data fork" contains the data which would normally be stored in the file on other operating systems. The "resource fork" contains a collection of arbitrary attribute/value pairs, including program segments, {icon} {bitmaps}, and parametric values. Yet more information regarding Macintosh files is stored by the {Finder} in a hidden file, called the "Desktop Database". Because of the complications in storing different parts of a Macintosh file in non-Macintosh file systems that only handle consecutive data in one part, it is common to only send the Data fork or to convert the Macintosh file into some other format before transferring it. (1996-03-03)

Macintosh Operating System "operating system" (Mac OS) {Apple Computer, Inc.}'s proprietary {operating system} for their {Macintosh} family of {personal computers}. The part of the operating system that simulates the desktop is called "{Finder}." The {multitasking} version of Finder was called "{MultiFinder}" until {multitasking} was integrated into the core of the OS with the introduction of System 7.0 in 1990. The Macintosh series provides a built-in graphics language, called "{QuickDraw}", which provides a {standard} for software developers. Mac OS 8, scheduled for delivery in July 1997, included new human-interface features, increased system stability and performance, a {PowerPC} processor-native Finder, tighter integration of {Internet} access through panel-based "assistants," Personal Web Sharing and the ability to run {Java applets} and programs through Mac OS Run Time for {Java}. Version 9.2 was the last version of the bespoke Mac OS. The next version, {Mac OS X} is quite different, being based on {Unix}. See also {Macintosh file system}, {Macintosh user interface}. (2007-03-15)

Madhav: “In the Vedas, the power of intuition is named the hound of heaven. . . The ‘questing hound’ is a Vedic imagery always denoting the power of intuition which at one bound finds out where is the light, where is the truth that has been stolen and covered by the adversaries.” Sat-Sang Vol. IX

Madhav: “the zero means apparently there is nothing: but this is not an empty zero, it is fathomless, you cannot plumb and find out its depth. Everything comes out of that.” Sat-Sang Vol. VIII

Madhav: “This is another key idea in Sri Aurobindo’s philosophy, that Nature, what is called Prakriti in Indian philosophy, is not different, not alien to the Purusha. Nature is not foreign to the soul, to God. It is a conscious front of God. Scratch Nature, look behind the exterior of Nature and you will find God. The apparent difference, distinction between Nature and God is only a superficial appearance. Nature is really a power of God. It is devatma shakti, the self-power of God—svagunair nigudham lost in its qualitative workings. She is not separate; conscious, not something unconscious. Nature is aware that it is only a front of God behind.” The Book of the Divine Mother

magnetic tape "storage" (Or "magtape", "tape" - {paper tape} is now obsolete) A data storage medium consisting of a magnetisable oxide coating on a thin plastic strip, commonly used for {backup} and {archiving}. Early industry-standard magnetic tape was half an inch wide and wound on removable reels 10.5 inches in diameter. Different lengths were available with 2400 feet and 4800 feet being common. {DECtape} was a variation on this "{round tape}". In modern magnetic tape systems the reels are much smaller and are fixed inside a {cartridge} to protect the tape and for ease of handling ("{square tape}" - though it's really rectangular). Cartridge formats include {QIC}, {DAT}, and {Exabyte}. Tape is read and written on a tape drive (or "deck") which winds the tape from one reel to the other causing it to move past a read/write head. Early tape had seven parallel tracks of data along the length of the tape allowing six bit characters plus {parity} written across the tape. A typical recording density was 556 characters per inch. The tape had reflective marks near its end which signaled beginning of tape (BOT) and end of tape (EOT) to the hardware. Data is written to tape in {blocks} with {inter-block gaps} between them. Each block is typically written in a single operation with the tape running continuously during the write. The larger the block the larger the data {buffer} required in order to supply or receive the data written to or read from the tape. The smaller the block the more tape is wasted as inter-block gaps. Several logical {records} may be combined into one physical block to reduce wastage ("{blocked records}"). Finding a certain block on the tape generally involved reading sequentially from the beginning, in contrast to {magnetic disks}. Tape is not suitable for {random access}. The exception to this is that some systems allow {tape marks} to be written which can be detected while winding the tape forward or rewinding it at high speed. These are typically used to separate logical files on a tape. Most tape drives now include some kind of {data compression}. There are several {algorithms} which provide similar results: {LZ} (most), {IDRC} ({Exabyte}), {ALDC} ({IBM}, {QIC}) and {DLZ1} ({DLT}). See also {cut a tape}, {flap}, {Group Code Recording}, {spool}, {macrotape}, {microtape}, {Non Return to Zero Inverted}, {Phase Encoded}. (1997-04-05)

Main works: Tonpsychologie, 2 vols., 1883-90; Die Anfange der Musik, 1911; Empfindung u. Vorstellung, 1918; Gefühl u. Gefühlsempfindung, 1928; Erkenntnislehre, I, 1939. Sturm und Drang: (German, "Storm and Stress"), a period sweeping the German countries about 1770-1785, in which men like Hamann, Herder, the young Goethe, Schiller, Wagner, Christian Schubart, and Friedrich Maximilian Klinger (from whose play the movement got its name) advocated, in a flush of creative enthusiasm, the forces of native talent, the value of emotion, and the power of genius as a conscious reaction against the enlightenment which had spread from France. -- K.F.L.

managed code "operating system" Code that is executed by the {.NET} {common language runtime} (CLR). {VB.NET} code is always managed code but {C++ .NET} can optionally use unmanaged code. Managed code provides {metadata} allowing the CLR to manage security (role-based as well as new approaches to code access security). The CLR also handles errors, manages the program {stack} and finds {methods} in assembly modules. Managed data is memory that's subject to {garbage collection}. There are additional restrictions to permit interoperability of different languages, for example, {Visual Basic} {arrays} must be zero-based. (2007-07-13)

Man is a developing spirit trying here to find and fulfil itself in the forms of mind, life and body.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 25, Page: 125


meme "philosophy" /meem/ [By analogy with "gene"] Richard Dawkins's term for an idea considered as a {replicator}, especially with the connotation that memes parasitise people into propagating them much as viruses do. Memes can be considered the unit of cultural evolution. Ideas can evolve in a way analogous to biological evolution. Some ideas survive better than others; ideas can mutate through, for example, misunderstandings; and two ideas can recombine to produce a new idea involving elements of each parent idea. The term is used especially in the phrase "meme complex" denoting a group of mutually supporting memes that form an organised belief system, such as a religion. However, "meme" is often misused to mean "meme complex". Use of the term connotes acceptance of the idea that in humans (and presumably other tool- and language-using sophonts) cultural evolution by selection of adaptive ideas has become more important than biological evolution by selection of hereditary traits. Hackers find this idea congenial for tolerably obvious reasons. See also {memetic algorithm}. [{Jargon File}] (1996-08-11)

memetic algorithm "algorithm" A {genetic algorithm} or {evolutionary algorithm} which includes a non-genetic local search to improve genotypes. The term comes from the Richard Dawkin's term "{meme}". One big difference between memes and genes is that memes are processed and possibly improved by the people that hold them - something that cannot happen to genes. It is this advantage that the memetic algorithm has over simple genetic or evolutionary algorithms. These algorithms are useful in solving complex problems, such as the "{Travelling Salesman Problem}," which involves finding the shortest path through a large number of nodes, or in creating {artificial life} to test evolutionary theories. Memetic algorithms are one kind of {metaheuristic}. {UNLP memetic algorithms home page (http://ing.unlp.edu.ar/cetad/mos/memetic_home.html)}. (07 July 1997)

Memory Management Unit "hardware, memory management" (MMU, "Paged Memory Management Unit", PMMU) A {hardware} device or circuit that supports {virtual memory} and {paging} by translating {virtual addresses} into {physical addresses}. The virtual {address space} (the range of addresses used by the processor) is divided into {pages}, whose size is 2^N, usually a few {kilobytes}. The bottom N {bits} of the address (the offset within a page) are left unchanged. The upper address bits are the (virtual) {page number}. The MMU contains a {page table} which is indexed (possibly associatively) by the page number. Each page table entry (PTE) gives the physical page number corresponding to the virtual one. This is combined with the page offset to give the complete physical address. A PTE may also include information about whether the page has been written to, when it was last used (for a {least recently used} {replacement algorithm}), what kind of processes ({user mode}, {supervisor mode}) may read and write it, and whether it should be {cache}d. It is possible that no physical memory ({RAM}) has been allocated to a given virtual page, in which case the MMU will signal a "{page fault}" to the {CPU}. The {operating system} will then try to find a spare page of RAM and set up a new PTE to map it to the requested virtual address. If no RAM is free it may be necessary to choose an existing page, using some {replacement algorithm}, and save it to disk (this is known as "{paging}"). There may also be a shortage of PTEs, in which case the OS will have to free one for the new mapping. In a {multitasking} system all processes compete for the use of memory and of the MMU. Some {memory management} architectures allow each process to have its own area or configuration of the page table, with a mechanism to switch between different mappings on a process switch. This means that all processes can have the same virtual address space rather than require load-time relocation. An MMU also solves the problem of {fragmentation} of memory. After blocks of memory have been allocated and freed, the free memory may become fragmented (discontinuous) so that the largest contiguous block of free memory may be much smaller than the total amount. With {virtual memory}, a contiguous range of virtual addresses can be mapped to several non-contiguous blocks of physical memory. In early designs memory management was performed by a separate {integrated circuit} such as the {MC 68851} used with the {Motorola 68020} {CPU} in the {Macintosh II} or the {Z8015} used with the {Zilog Z80} family of processors. Later CPUs such as the {Motorola 68030} and the {ZILOG Z280} have MMUs on the same IC as the CPU. (1999-05-24)

mensuration ::: n. --> The act, process, or art, of measuring.
That branch of applied geometry which gives rules for finding the length of lines, the areas of surfaces, or the volumes of solids, from certain simple data of lines and angles.


menuitis /men"yoo-i:"tis/ A notional disease suffered by software with an obsessively simple-minded {menu} interface and no escape. Hackers find this intensely irritating and much prefer the flexibility of command-line or language-style interfaces, especially those customisable via {macros} or a special-purpose language in which one can encode useful hacks. See {user-obsequious}, {drool-proof paper}, {WIMP}, {for the rest of us}. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-02)

mesolabe ::: n. --> An instrument of the ancients for finding two mean proportionals between two given lines, required in solving the problem of the duplication of the cube.

mind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The ‘Mind" in the ordinary use of the word covers indiscriminately the whole consciousness, for man is a mental being and mentalises everything; but in the language of this yoga the words ‘mind" and ‘mental" are used to connote specially the part of the nature which has to do with cognition and intelligence, with ideas, with mental or thought perceptions, the reactions of thought to things, with the truly mental movements and formations, mental vision and will, etc., that are part of his intelligence.” *Letters on Yoga

"Mind in its essence is a consciousness which measures, limits, cuts out forms of things from the indivisible whole and contains them as if each were a separate integer.” The Life Divine

"Mind is an instrument of analysis and synthesis, but not of essential knowledge. Its function is to cut out something vaguely from the unknown Thing in itself and call this measurement or delimitation of it the whole, and again to analyse the whole into its parts which it regards as separate mental objects.” The Life Divine

"The mind proper is divided into three parts — thinking Mind, dynamic Mind, externalising Mind — the former concerned with ideas and knowledge in their own right, the second with the putting out of mental forces for realisation of the idea, the third with the expression of them in life (not only by speech, but by any form it can give).” Letters on Yoga

"The difference between the ordinary mind and the intuitive is that the former, seeking in the darkness or at most by its own unsteady torchlight, first, sees things only as they are presented in that light and, secondly, where it does not know, constructs by imagination, by uncertain inference, by others of its aids and makeshifts things which it readily takes for truth, shadow projections, cloud edifices, unreal prolongations, deceptive anticipations, possibilities and probabilities which do duty for certitudes. The intuitive mind constructs nothing in this artificial fashion, but makes itself a receiver of the light and allows the truth to manifest in it and organise its own constructions.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"He [man] has in him not a single mentality, but a double and a triple, the mind material and nervous, the pure intellectual mind which liberates itself from the illusions of the body and the senses, and a divine mind above intellect which in its turn liberates itself from the imperfect modes of the logically discriminative and imaginative reason.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"Our mind is an observer of actuals, an inventor or discoverer of possibilities, but not a seer of the occult imperatives that necessitate the movements and forms of a creation. . . .” *The Life Divine

"The human mind is an instrument not of truth but of ignorance and error.” Letters on Yoga

"For Mind as we know it is a power of the Ignorance seeking for Truth, groping with difficulty to find it, reaching only mental constructions and representations of it in word and idea, in mind formations, sense formations, — as if bright or shadowy photographs or films of a distant Reality were all that it could achieve.” The Life Divine

The Mother: "The true role of the mind is the formation and organization of action. The mind has a formative and organizing power, and it is that which puts the different elements of inspiration in order for action, for organizing action. And if it would only confine itself to that role, receiving inspirations — whether from above or from the mystic centre of the soul — and simply formulating the plan of action — in broad outline or in minute detail, for the smallest things of life or the great terrestrial organizations — it would amply fulfil its function. It is not an instrument of knowledge. But is can use knowledge for action, to organize action. It is an instrument of organization and formation, very powerful and very capable when it is well developed.” Questions and Answers 1956, MCW Vol. 8.*


miss ::: n. --> A title of courtesy prefixed to the name of a girl or a woman who has not been married. See Mistress, 5.
A young unmarried woman or a girl; as, she is a miss of sixteen.
A kept mistress. See Mistress, 4.
In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.
The act of missing; failure to hit, reach, find, obtain, etc.


Mneme: (Gr. Mneme, memory) Term proposed by Semon (Die Mneme, 1904; Die mnemeschen Empfindungen, 1909) and adopted by B. Russell (Analysis of Mind) to designate the conservation in a living organism of the effects of earlier stimulation. Ordinary memory is interpreted as an instance of mnemic conservation. -- L.W.

modem "hardware, communications" (Modulator/demodulator) An electronic device for converting between serial data (typically {EIA-232}) from a computer and an audio signal suitable for transmission over a telephone line connected to another modem. In one scheme the audio signal is composed of silence (no data) or one of two frequencies representing zero and one. Modems are distinguished primarily by the maximum data rate they support. Data rates can range from 75 bits per second up to 56000 and beyond. Data from the user (i.e. flowing from the local terminal or computer via the modem to the telephone line) is sometimes at a lower rate than the other direction, on the assumption that the user cannot type more than a few characters per second. Various data {compression} and error correction {algorithms} are required to support the highest speeds. Other optional features are {auto-dial} (auto-call) and {auto-answer} which allow the computer to initiate and accept calls without human intervention. Most modern modems support a number of different {protocols}, and two modems, when first connected, will automatically negotiate to find a common protocol (this process may be audible through the modem or computer's loudspeakers). Some modem protocols allow the two modems to renegotiate ("retrain") if the initial choice of data rate is too high and gives too many transmission errors. A modem may either be internal (connected to the computer's {bus}) or external ("stand-alone", connected to one of the computer's {serial ports}). The actual speed of transmission in characters per second depends not just the modem-to-modem data rate, but also on the speed with which the processor can transfer data to and from the modem, the kind of compression used and whether the data is compressed by the processor or the modem, the amount of noise on the telephone line (which causes retransmissions), the serial character format (typically {8N1}: one {start bit}, eight data bits, no {parity}, one {stop bit}). See also {acoustic coupler}, {adaptive answering}, {baud barf}, {Bulletin Board System}, {Caller ID}, {SoftModem}, {U.S. Robotics}, {UUCP}, {whalesong}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.dcom.modems}. (2002-05-04)

Monte Carlo "algorithm" (After Monte Carlo, Monaco - a gambling mecca) Any one of various methods involving statistical techniques for finding the solutions to mathematical or physical problems. For example, to calculate {pi}: draw a square then draw the biggest circle that fits exactly inside it. Pick random points on the square. The proportion of these that lie within the circle should tend to pi/4. (2005-04-05)

Montesquieu, Charles De Secondat: (1689-1755) French historian and writer in the field of politics. His Lettres persanes, thinly disguise trenchant criticism of the decadence of French society through the letters of two Persian visitors. His masterpiece, L'Esprit des Lois, gives a political and social philosophy in pointing the relation between the laws and the constitution of government. He finds a relation between all laws in the laws of laws, the necessary relations derived from the nature of things. In his analysis of the English constitution, he stressed the separation of powers in a manner that has had lasting influence though based on historical inaccuracy. -- L.E.D.

Most of the basic problems and theories of cosmology seem to have been discussed by the pre-Socratic philosophers. Their views are modified and expanded in the Timaeus of Plato, and rehearsed and systematized in Aristotle's Physics. Despite multiple divergencies, all these Greek philosophers seem to be largely agreed that the universe is limited in space, has neither a beginning nor end in time, is dominated by a set of unalterable laws, and has a definite and recurring rhythm. The cosmology of the Middle Ages diverges from the Greek primarily through the introduction of the concepts of divine creation and annihilation, miracle and providence. In consonance with the tendencies of the new science, the cosmologies of Descartes, Leibniz and Newton bring the medieval views into closer harmony with those of the Greeks. The problems of cosmology were held to be intrinsically insoluble by Kant. After Kant there was a tendency to merge the issues of cosmology with those of metaphysics. The post-Kantians attempted to deal with both in terms of more basic principles and a more flexible dialectic, their opponents rejected both as without significance or value. The most radical modern cosmology is that of Peirce with its three cosmic principles of chance, law and continuity; the most recent is that of Whitehead, which finds its main inspiration in Plato's Timaeus.

mouse mat "hardware" (U.S.: "mouse pad") A small sheet with a special surface for a rolling ball {mouse} to move on. Most mouse mats are sheets of rubber or foam about 20cm by 25cm and about 5mm thick with one side covered with cloth or sometimes hard plastic. Deluxe versions come combined with a {wrist rest}. It is rare to find a mouse mat which does not carry some form of advertisement for some company or other. They are such a common free gift that few people actually have to buy one. Mats are supposed to provide better traction and a clean, lint-free surface over which to move but it debatable whether they are useful at all, or whether any appropriate surface (preferably hard, even, flat, and clean) is as good. Howevever, some mice which use optical (e.g. {Sun}) or radio-frequency sensors (e.g. ?) to detect motion (instead of using a rolling ball) will only work on specially designed mouse mats. Critics may consider this to be part of the {connector conspiracy}, though the designers would claim greater reliability due to the absence of moving parts. (1997-04-14)

mouse trails "operating system" A feature (usually of {Graphical User Interfaces}) which causes the {mouse} {pointer} to leave a trail across the screen. This is done by keeping track of the last eight or so (maybe configurable) pointer positions, and only erasing the oldest. This means that at any time, there may be up to eight pointers on the screen, but if the mouse is still, they will all be in the same position, and so only one will be visible. When the mouse moves, it appears to leave a trail of pointers behind it, and this can dramatically increase the visibility of the pointer when using {LCD} screens. The older ones had such long {persistence} that a single mouse pointer, when moving, tended to be completely invisible, and on a cluttered screen, was very difficult to find. (1996-07-08)

multiply ::: v. t. --> To increase in number; to make more numerous; to add quantity to.
To add (any given number or quantity) to itself a certain number of times; to find the product of by multiplication; thus 7 multiplied by 8 produces the number 56; to multiply two numbers. See the Note under Multiplication.
To increase (the amount of gold or silver) by the arts of alchemy.


nadger "jargon" /nad'jr/ [Great Britain] To modify software or hardware in a hidden manner, generally so that it conforms better to some format. For instance, an {assembly code} {string} printing {subroutine} that takes its string {argument} from the instruction stream would be called like this: jsr print:"Hello world" The print routine would use the saved {instruction pointer} (its return address) to find its argument and would have to "nadger" it so that the processor returns to the instruction after the string. [{Jargon File}] (2014-07-09)

nagging ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Nag ::: a. --> Fault-finding; teasing; persistently annoying; as, a nagging toothache.

natter ::: v. i. --> To find fault; to be peevish.

Naturalistic ethics: Any view according to which ethics is an empirical science, natural or social, ethical notions being reduced to those of of the natural sciences and ethical questions being answered wholly on basis of the findings of those sciences. -- W.K.F.

navigation "web" Finding your way around a {website}. Many sites have some kind of {navigation bar}. One of the first {web browsers} was called {Netscape Navigator}. (2008-11-17)

Netfind A research prototype that provides a simple {Internet} "{white pages}" user directory. It runs on {SunOS} 4.0 or more recent systems that are connected to the Internet (however, you can run Netfind on one server at your site, and let the others use Netfind on that server). Given the name of a person on the Internet and a rough description of where the person works, Netfind attempts to locate telephone and electronic mailbox information about the person. {(ftp://ftp.cs.colorado.edu/pub/cs/distribs/netfind)}.

nomadize ::: v. i. --> To lead the life of a nomad; to wander with flocks and herds for the sake of finding pasturage.

Nominalism: (Lat. nominalis, belonging to a name) In scholastic philosophy, the theory that abstract or general terms, or universals, represent no objective real existents, but are mere words or names, mere vocal utterances, "flatus vocis". Reality is admitted only to actual physical particulars. Universals exist only post res. Opposite of Realism (q.v.) which maintains that universals exist ante res. First suggested by Boethius in his 6th century Latin translation of the Introduction to the Categories (of Aristotle) by Porphyry (A.D. 233-304). Porphyry had raised the question of how Aristotle was to be interpreted on this score, and had decided the question in favor of what was later called nominalism. The doctrine did not receive any prominence until applied to the Sacrament of the Eucharist by Berengar in the 11th century. Berengar was the first scholastic to insist upon the evidence of his senses when examining the nature of the Eucharist. Shortly after, Roscellinus, who had broadened the doctrine to the denial of the reality of all universals and the assertion of the sole reality of physical particulars, was forced by the Council of Soissons to recant. Thereafter, despite Abelard's unsuccessful attempt to reconcile the doctrine with realism by finding a half-way position between the two, nominalism was not again explicitly held until William of Occam (1280-1349) revived it and attempted to defend it within the limits allowed by Church dogma. In the first frankly nominalistic system Occam distinguished between the real and the grammatical meanings of terms or universal. He assigned a real status to universals in the mind, and thus was the first to see that nominalism can have a subjective as well as an objective aspect. He maintained that to our intellects, however, everything real must be some particular individual thing. After Occam, nominalism as an explicitly held doctrine disappeared until recently, when it has been restated in certain branches of Logical Positivism. -- J.K.F.

non-constructive proof "logic" (Or "existence proof") A {proof} that something exists that does not provide an example of that thing or a method for finding an example. (A {constructive proof} does provide such an example or method). For example, for any pair of finite real numbers n " 0 and p " 0 there exists a real number 0 " k " 1 such that f(k) = (1-k)*n + k*p = 0. A non-constructive proof might proceed by observing that as k changes continuously from 0 to 1, f(k) changes continuously from n to p and, since they lie either side of zero, f(k) must pass through zero for some intermediate value of k. This proof does not tell us what that value of k is, only that it exists. {Cantor}'s proof that the {real numbers} are {uncountable} can be thought of as a non-constructive proof that {irrational numbers} exist. There are existence theorems with no known constructive proof. (2014-08-23)

no-op /noh'op/ alt. NOP /nop/ [no operation] 1. A machine instruction that does nothing (sometimes used in assembler-level programming as filler for data or patch areas, or to overwrite code to be removed in binaries). See also {JFCL}. 2. A person who contributes nothing to a project, or has nothing going on upstairs, or both. As in "He's a no-op." 3. Any operation or sequence of operations with no effect, such as circling the block without finding a parking space, or putting money into a vending machine and having it fall immediately into the coin-return box, or asking someone for help and being told to go away. "Oh, well, that was a no-op." Hot-and-sour soup that is insufficiently either is "no-op soup"; so is wonton soup if everybody else is having hot-and-sour. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-02)

nslookup "networking" A {Unix} {utility program}, originally by Andrew Cherenson, for querying {Internet} {domain name servers}. The basic use is to find the {IP address} corresponding to a given {hostname} (or vice versa). By changing the query type (e.g. "set type=CNAME") other types of information can be obtained including CNAME - the {canonical name} for an alias; HINFO - the host {CPU} and {operating system} type; MINFO - mailbox or mail list information; {MX} - {mail exchanger} information; NS - the {name server} for the named zone; PTR - the hostname if the query is an IP address, otherwise the pointer to other information; SOA the domain's start-of-authority information; TXT - text information; UINFO - user information; WKS - supported {well-known services}. Other types (ANY, AXFR, MB, MD, MF, NULL) are described in {RFC 1035}. {(ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/computing/operating-systems/unix/bsd-sources/usr.sbin/named/tools/nslookup/)}. (1994-10-27)

Numerous solutions of these paradoxes have been proposed. Many, however, have the fault that, while they purport to find a flaw in the arguments leading to the paradoxes, no effective criterion is given by which to discover in the case of other (e.g., mathematical) proofs whether they have the same flaw.

object-oriented programming "programming" (OOP) The use of a class of programming languages and techniques based on the concept of an "{object}" which is a data structure ({abstract data type}) encapsulated with a set of routines, called "{methods}", which operate on the data. Operations on the data can __only__ be performed via these methods, which are common to all objects that are instances of a particular "{class}". Thus the interface to objects is well defined, and allows the code implementing the methods to be changed so long as the interface remains the same. Each class is a separate {module} and has a position in a "{class hierarchy}". Methods or code in one class can be passed down the hierarchy to a {subclass} or inherited from a {superclass}. This is called "{inheritance}". A {procedure} call is described as invoking a method on an object (which effectively becomes the procedure's first {argument}), and may optionally include other arguments. The method name is looked up in the object's class to find out how to perform that operation on the given object. If the method is not defined for the object's class, it is looked for in its superclass and so on up the class hierarchy until it is found or there is no higher superclass. OOP started with {SIMULA-67} around 1970 and became all-pervasive with the advent of {C++}, and later {Java}. Another popular object-oriented programming language (OOPL) is {Smalltalk}, a seminal example from {Xerox}'s {Palo Alto Research Center} (PARC). Others include {Ada}, {Object Pascal}, {Objective C}, {DRAGOON}, {BETA}, {Emerald}, {POOL}, {Eiffel}, {Self}, {Oblog}, {ESP}, {LOOPS}, {POLKA}, and {Python}. Other languages, such as {Perl} and {VB}, permit, but do not enforce OOP. {FAQ (http://iamwww.unibe.ch/~scg/OOinfo/FAQ/)}. {(http://zgdv.igd.fhg.de/papers/se/oop/)}. {(http://cuiwww.unige.ch/Chloe/OOinfo)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.object}. (2001-10-11)

Occult and spiritual ::: The spiritual realisation is of primary importance and indispensable. I would consider it best to have the spiritual and psychic development first and have it with the same fullness before entering the occult regions. Those who enter the latter first may find their spiritual realisation much delayed ; others fall into the ma^ traps of the occult and do not come out in this life. Some no doubt can cany on both together, the occult and the spiritual, and make them help each other ; but the process I suggest is the safer.

One day I began researching all that I could find on this unique word, ‘remembrancer’.

"One must go deep and find the soul, the self, the Divine Reality within us and only then can life become a true expression of what we can be instead of a blind and always repeated confused blur of the inadequate and imperfect thing we were. The choice is between remaining in the old jumble and groping about in the hope of stumbling on some discovery or standing back and seeking the Light within till we discover and can build the Godhead within and without us. "Letters on Yoga

“One must go deep and find the soul, the self, the Divine Reality within us and only then can life become a true expression of what we can be instead of a blind and always repeated confused blur of the inadequate and imperfect thing we were. The choice is between remaining in the old jumble and groping about in the hope of stumbling on some discovery or standing back and seeking the Light within till we discover and can build the Godhead within and without us.”Letters on Yoga

one-way hash function "algorithm" (Or "message digest function") A {one-way function} which takes a variable-length message and produces a fixed-length hash. Given the hash it is computationally infeasible to find a message with that hash; in fact one can't determine any usable information about a message with that hash, not even a single bit. For some one-way hash functions it's also computationally impossible to determine two messages which produce the same hash. A one-way hash function can be private or public, just like an {encryption} function. {MD5}, {SHA} and {Snefru} are examples of public one-way hash functions. A public one-way hash function can be used to speed up a public-key {digital signature} system. Rather than sign a long message, which can take a long time, compute the one-way hash of the message, and sign the hash. {sci.crypt FAQ (ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/usenet/usenet-by-group/sci.crypt/)}. (2001-05-10)

on the satisfaction of cgo-dcsire or on the eating up of the fuel it embraces. It is a while flame, not a red one ; but white heat is not inferior to the red variety in its ardour. It is true that the psychic love does not usually get its full play in human rela- tions and human nature ; it finds the fullness of -its fire and ecstasy more easily when it is lifted towards the Divine. In the human relation the psychic love gets mixed up with other ele- ments which seek at once to use it and overshadow it. It gels an outlet for its o^vn full intensities only at rare moments. Other- wise it comes in only as an element, but even so it contributes all the higher things in a love fundamentally vital-— all the finer sweetness, tenderness, fidelity, self-giving, self-sacrifice, rcachings of soul to soul, idealising sublimations that lift up human love beyond itself, come from the psychic. If it could dominate and govern and transmute the other elements, mental, vital, phj-sieal, of human love, then love could be on the earth some reflection or preparation of the real thing, an integral union of the soul and its instruments in a dual life.

or troubled or depressed or despondent, to go on with a steady faith in the Divine’s Will. But equality docs not include inert acceptance. If, for instance, then? is a temporary failure of some endeavour in the sadhana, one has to keep equality, not to be troubled or despondent, but one has not to accept the failure as an indication of the Divine Will and give up the endeavour. You ought rather to find out the reason and mean- ing of the failure and go forward in faith towards victory.

:::   "Out of imperfection we have to construct perfection, out of limitation to discover infinity, out of death to find immortality, out of grief to recover divine bliss, out of ignorance to rescue divine self-knowledge, out of matter to reveal Spirit. To work out this end for ourselves and for humanity is the object of our Yogic practice.” *Essays Divine and Human

“Out of imperfection we have to construct perfection, out of limitation to discover infinity, out of death to find immortality, out of grief to recover divine bliss, out of ignorance to rescue divine self-knowledge, out of matter to reveal Spirit. To work out this end for ourselves and for humanity is the object of our Yogic practice.” Essays Divine and Human

Pantheism, medieval: True pantheistic ideas are rare in medieval literature. The accusation raised against Scotus Eriugena seems unfounded and was caused more by his writings being quoted as authorities by the followers of Amalric of Bene (1206-7) whose views were condemned in 1210. His writings are lost, he apparently taught the identity of Creator and creature and called God the essence of all beings A contemporary was David of Dinant of whom still less is known, he identified, as it seems, God with prime matter. Master Eckhardt too has been accused of pantheism and some modern authors have believed to find confirmation in his writings. A more thorough study of them, especially of the Latin texts, shows this to be a misinterpretation. -- R.A.

patch "software" 1. A temporary addition to a piece of code, usually as a {quick-and-dirty} remedy to an existing {bug} or {misfeature}. A patch may or may not work, and may or may not eventually be incorporated permanently into the program. Distinguished from a {diff} or {mod} by the fact that a patch is generated by more primitive means than the rest of the program; the classical examples are instructions modified by using the front panel switches, and changes made directly to the binary executable of a program originally written in an {HLL}. Compare {one-line fix}. 2. To insert a patch into a piece of code. 3. [in the Unix world] A {diff}. 4. A set of modifications to binaries to be applied by a patching program. {IBM} systems often receive updates to the {operating system} in the form of absolute {hexadecimal} patches. If you have modified your OS, you have to disassemble these back to the {source code}. The patches might later be corrected by other patches on top of them (patches were said to "grow scar tissue"). The result was often a convoluted {patch space} and headaches galore. There is a classic story of a {tiger team} penetrating a secure military computer that illustrates the danger inherent in binary patches (or, indeed, any patches that you can't - or don't - inspect and examine before installing). They couldn't find any {trap doors} or any way to penetrate security of IBM's OS, so they made a site visit to an IBM office (remember, these were official military types who were purportedly on official business), swiped some IBM stationery, and created a fake patch. The patch was actually the trapdoor they needed. The patch was distributed at about the right time for an IBM patch, had official stationery and all accompanying documentation, and was dutifully installed. The installation manager very shortly thereafter learned something about proper procedures. 5. {Larry Wall}'s "patch" {utility program}, which automatically applies a patch to a set of {source code} or other text files. Patch accepts input in any of the four forms output by the {Unix} {diff} utility. When the files being patched are not identical to those on which the diffs were based, patch uses {heuristics} to determine how to proceed. Diff and patch are the standard way of producing and applying updates under {Unix}. Both have been ported to other {operating systems}. {Patch Home (http://gnu.org/software/patch/patch.html)}. [{Jargon File}] (2005-05-16)

pathfinder ::: n. --> One who discovers a way or path; one who explores untraversed regions.

path coverage testing "testing" Testing a program by examining which lines of {executable code} are visited (as in {code coverage testing}) and also the ways of getting to each line of code and the subsequent sequence of execution. Path coverage testing is the most comprehensive type of testing that a {test suite} can provide. It can find more {bugs}, especially those that are caused by {data coupling}. However, path coverage is hard and usually only used for small and/or critical sections of code. (2005-01-25)

PEEK The command in most {microcomputer} {BASICs} for reading memory contents (a byte) at an absolute address. POKE is the corresponding command to write a value to an absolute address. This is often extended to mean the corresponding constructs in any {High Level Language}. Much hacking on small {microcomputers} without {MMUs} consists of "peek"ing around memory, more or less at random, to find the location where the system keeps interesting stuff. Long (and variably accurate) lists of such addresses for various computers circulate (see {interrupt list}). The results of "poke"s at these addresses may be highly useful, mildly amusing, useless but neat, or total {lossage} (see {killer poke}). Since a {real operating system} provides useful, higher-level services for the tasks commonly performed with peeks and pokes on micros, and real languages tend not to encourage low-level memory groveling, a question like "How do I do a peek in C?" is diagnostic of the {newbie}. Of course, {operating system} {kernels} often have to do exactly this; a real {C} hacker would unhesitatingly, if unportably, assign an absolute address to a pointer variable and indirect through it. [{Jargon File}] (1995-01-31)

permutation "mathematics" 1. An ordering of a certain number of elements of a given set. For instance, the permutations of (1,2,3) are (1,2,3) (2,3,1) (3,1,2) (3,2,1) (1,3,2) (2,1,3). Permutations form one of the canonical examples of a "{group}" - they can be composed and you can find an inverse permutation that reverses the action of any given permutation. The number of permutations of r things taken from a set of n is n P r = n! / (n-r)! where "n P r" is usually written with n and r as subscripts and n! is the {factorial} of n. What the football pools call a "permutation" is not a permutation but a {combination} - the order does not matter. 2. A {bijection} for which the {domain} and {range} are the same set and so f(f'(x)) = f'(f(x)) = x. (2001-05-10)

phase 1. The offset of one's waking-sleeping schedule with respect to the standard 24-hour cycle; a useful concept among people who often work at night and/or according to no fixed schedule. It is not uncommon to change one's phase by as much as 6 hours per day on a regular basis. "What's your phase?" "I've been getting in about 8 P.M. lately, but I'm going to {wrap around} to the day schedule by Friday." A person who is roughly 12 hours out of phase is sometimes said to be in "night mode". (The term "day mode" is also (but less frequently) used, meaning you're working 9 to 5 (or, more likely, 10 to 6).) The act of altering one's cycle is called "changing phase"; "phase shifting" has also been recently reported from Caltech. 2. "change phase the hard way": To stay awake for a very long time in order to get into a different phase. 3. "change phase the easy way": To stay asleep, etc. However, some claim that either staying awake longer or sleeping longer is easy, and that it is *shortening* your day or night that is really hard (see {wrap around}). The "jet lag" that afflicts travelers who cross many time-zone boundaries may be attributed to two distinct causes: the strain of travel per se, and the strain of changing phase. Hackers who suddenly find that they must change phase drastically in a short period of time, particularly the hard way, experience something very like jet lag without travelling.

Physico-Theology: A theology which finds corroboration in natural philosophy. A term now in general disuse. -- V.F.

plan file "operating system" On {Unix} systems that support {finger}, the ".plan" file in a user's {home directory} is displayed when the user is fingered. This feature was originally intended to be used to keep potential fingerers apprised of one's location and near-future plans, but has been turned almost universally to humorous and self-expressive purposes (like a {sig block}). See also {Hacking X for Y}. A later innovation in plan files was the introduction of "scrolling plan files" which are one-dimensional animations made using only the printable {ASCII} character set, {carriage return} and {line feed}, avoiding terminal specific {escape sequences}, since the {finger} command will (for security reasons; see {letterbomb}) not pass the {escape} character. Scrolling .plan files have become art forms in miniature, and some sites have started competitions to find who can create the longest running, funniest, and most original animations. A compiler (ASP) is available on {Usenet} for producing them. Typical animation components include: Centipede: mmmmme Lorry/Truck: oo-oP Andalusian Video Snail: _@/ In the mid-1990s {WWW} {home pages} largely supplanted .plan files, providing a much richer forum for the publication of personal minutiae and digital creativity. See also {twirling baton}. [{Jargon File}] (1998-01-16)

Platonism as a political philosophy finds its best known exposition in the theory of the ideal state in the Republic. There, Plato described a city in which social justice would be fully realized. Three classes of men are distinguished: the philosopher kings, apparently a very small group whose education has been alluded to above, who would be the rulers because by nature and by training they were the best men for the job. They must excel particularly in their rational abilities: their special virtue is philosophic wisdom; the soldiers, or guardians of the state, constitute the second class; their souls must be remarkable for the development of the spirited, warlike element, under the control of the virtue of courage; the lowest class is made up of the acquisitive group, the workers of every sort whose characteristic virtue is temperance. For the two upper classes, Plato suggested a form of community life which would entail the abolition of monogamous marriage, family life, and of private property. It is to be noted that this form of semi-communism was suggested for a minority of the citizens only (Repub. III and V) and it is held to be a practical impossibility in the Laws (V, 739-40), though Plato continued to think that some form of community life is theoretically best for man. In Book VIII of the Republic, we find the famous classification of five types of political organization, ranging from aristocracy which is the rule of the best men, timocracy, in which the rulers are motivated by a love of honor, oligarchy, in which the rulers seek wealth, democracy, the rule of the masses who are unfit for the task, to tyranny, which is the rule of one man who may have started as the champion of the people but who governs solely for the advancement of his own, selfish interests.

plokta "jargon, humour" /plok't*/ Press Lots Of Keys To Abort. To press random keys in an attempt to get some response from the system. One might plokta when the abort procedure for a program is not known, or when trying to figure out if the system is just sluggish or really {hung}. Plokta can also be used while trying to figure out any unknown key sequence for a particular operation. Someone going into "plokta mode" usually places both hands flat on the keyboard and mashes them down, hoping for some useful response. A slightly more directed form of plokta can be seen in mail messages or {Usenet} articles from new users - the text might end with    ^X^C    q    quit    :q    ^C    end    x    exit    ZZ    ^D    ?    help as the user vainly tries to find the right exit sequence, with the incorrect tries piling up at the end of the message. [{Jargon File}] (2017-12-08)

plumming ::: n. --> The operation of finding, by means of a mine dial, the place where to sink an air shaft, or to bring an adit to the work, or to find which way the lode inclines.

Pluralism: This is the doctrine that there is not one (Monism), not two (Dualism) but many ultimate substances. From the earliest Ionian fundamentals of air, earth, fire and water, to the hierarchy of monads of Leibniz, the many things-in-themselves of Herbart and the theory of the many that "works" in the latter day Pragmatism of James and others, we get a variety of theories that find philosophic solace in variety rather than in any knowable or unknowable one. See Dualism, Idealism, Materialism, Monism, Political Philosophy (Laski). -- L.E.D.

Pons asinorum: The literal meaning of the Latin expression, asses' bridge, has been figuratively applied to a diagram constructed by Petrus Tartaretus about 1480, whose purpose was to aid the student of logic in finding the middle term of a syllogism and disclose its relations. It was assumed that it was as difficult to persuade students to do this as to get asses to pass over a bridge. Hence the expression has also been applied to any relatively easy test. Euclids proposition, that if two sides of a triangle are equal the angles opposite to those sides must also be equal, has been called a pons asinorum for students of geometry -- J.J.R.

porism ::: n. --> A proposition affirming the possibility of finding such conditions as will render a certain determinate problem indeterminate or capable of innumerable solutions.
A corollary.


post office problem "algorithm" Given a set of points (in N dimensions), find another point which minimises the sum of the distances from that point to each of the others. (2007-03-07)

Potentiality: See Dynamis. Power: In general: the physical, mental and moral ability to act or to receive an action; the general faculty of doing, making, performing, realizing, achieving, producing or succeeding; ability, capacity, virtue, virtuality, potency, potentiality, faculty, efficacy, efficacity, efficiency, operative causality, process of change or becoming; natural operative force, energy, vigor, strength, or effective condition applied or applicable to work; person, agent, body, institution, government or state, having or exercising an ability to act in accordance with its nature and functions; spirit, divinity, deity, superhuman agent, supernatural principle of activity; an attribute or name of God; in theology, an order of angels; in law the authority, capacity or right to exercise certain natural and legal prerogatives, also, the authority vestcd in a person by law; influence, prerogative, force. A. In psychology, power is sometimes synonymous with faculty (q.v.). It also means a quality which renders the nature of an individual agent apt to elicit certain physical and moral actions. Hence, power is a natural endowment enabling the intellect to condition the will and thus create hibits and virtues, in a higher degree, power is a moral disposition enabling the individual to cultivate his perfectibility. The distinction between powers is given by the distinction of their actions. Powers are acthe or operative, and passive or receptive; they are immediate or remote. Even impotence and incapacity are not different in kind from power, but simply in degree. These Aristotelian views on power, including its ontological interpretation, have held the ground for centuries, and we find them partly also in Hobbes and Locke who defined power as the ability to make or to receive change. Hume's analysis of power showed it to be an illusion; and with the advent of positivism and experimental psychology, this concept lost much of its value. The notion of power has been used by Fechner in his doctrine and law concerning the relation between stimuli and sensations.

Power ::: The strength or the data to find a difference when there truly is a difference. Power is abbreviated with the capital Greek letter beta (b).

problem ::: n. --> A question proposed for solution; a matter stated for examination or proof; hence, a matter difficult of solution or settlement; a doubtful case; a question involving doubt.
Anything which is required to be done; as, in geometry, to bisect a line, to draw a perpendicular; or, in algebra, to find an unknown quantity.


Psychic centre is behind the heart and it is through the puri- fied emotions that the psychic most easily finds an outlet.

Psychic love finds itself wholly when it is the radiation of the diviner consciousness for t^hich uc arc seeking; till then it is diflicult for it to put out its undimmed integral self and figure.

Psychic Summation: See Psychic Fusion. Psycho-analysis: The psychological method and therapeutic technique developed by Freud (see Freud, Sigmund). This method consists in the use of such procedures as free association, automatic writing and especially dream-analysis to recover forgotten memories, suppressed desires and other subconscious items which exert a disturbing influence on the conscious life of an individual. The cure of the psychic disturbances is effected by bringing the suppressed items into the full of consciousness of the individual. Psycho-analytic theory has posited a subconscious mind as a repository for the suppressed elements. Freud exaggerated the sexual origin of the suppressed desires but other psycho-analysts, notably Jung and Adler, corrected this exaggeration. The psycho-analytical school has developed its terminology in which the following are characteristic. Free association is the method of encouraging the patient to recall in random fashion experiences, particularly of childhood. A "complex" is a more or less permanent emotional system or mechjnism responsible for the mental disturbances of the patient. Libido designates the underlying sexual drive or impulse, the suppression of which is responsible for the psychic disturbance. Suppression or repression is the rejection from consciousness of desires and urges which it finds intolerable. Sublimation is the transference of a suppressed desire to a new object. These terms are only a few samples of the elaborate and at times highly mythological terminology of psycho-analysis. -- L.W.

quadrature ::: a. --> The act of squaring; the finding of a square having the same area as some given curvilinear figure; as, the quadrature of a circle; the operation of finding an expression for the area of a figure bounded wholly or in part by a curved line, as by a curve, two ordinates, and the axis of abscissas.
A quadrate; a square.
The integral used in obtaining the area bounded by a curve; hence, the definite integral of the product of any function of


querulous ::: v. --> Given to quarreling; quarrelsome.
Apt to find fault; habitually complaining; disposed to murmur; as, a querulous man or people.
Expressing complaint; fretful; whining; as, a querulous tone of voice.


quest ::: n. --> The act of seeking, or looking after anything; attempt to find or obtain; search; pursuit; as, to rove in quest of game, of a lost child, of property, etc.
Request; desire; solicitation.
Those who make search or inquiry, taken collectively.
Inquest; jury of inquest.
To search for; to examine.


rajas ::: (etymologically) "the shining"; (in the Veda) the antariks.a,"the middle world, the vital or dynamic plane" between heaven (the mental plane) and earth (the physical); "luminous power" established in this intermediate realm; (post-Vedic) the second of the three modes (trigun.a) of the energy of the lower prakr.ti, the gun.a that is "the seed of force and action" and "creates the workings of energy"; it is a deformation of tapas or pravr.tti, the corresponding quality in the higher prakr.ti, and is converted back into pure tapas or pravr.tti in the process of traigun.yasiddhi. This kinetic force "has its strongest hold on the vital nature", where it "turns always to action and desire", but "finding itself in a world of matter which starts from the principle of inconscience and a mechanical driven inertia, has to work against an immense contrary force; therefore its whole action takes on the nature of an effort, a struggle, a besieged and an impeded conflict for possession which is distressed in its every step by a limiting incapacity, disappointment and suffering".

Rajayoga must cod. For its action is the stilling of the waves of consciousness, its manifold activities, cinovfUl, first, through a habitual replacing of the turbid rajaslc activities by the quiet and luminous sattwic, then, by the stilling of all activities, and its object is to enter into silent communion of soul and unity with the Divine. As a matter of fact we find that the system of Raja- yoga includes other objects, — such as the practice and use of occult powers, — some of which seem to be unconnected with and even inconsistent with its main purpose. These powers or siddhis arc indeed frequently condemned as dangers and dis- tractions wWch draw away the Yogin from his sole legitimate aim of divine union. On the way, therefore, it would naturally seem as if they ought to bfe* avoided; and once the goal is reached, it would seem that they are then frivolous and super- fluous. But Rajayoga is a psychic science and it includes the attainment of all the higher slates of consciousness and their powers by which the mental being rises towards the super- conscient as well as its ultimate and supreme possibility of union wnth the Highest. Moreover, the Yo^n, while in the body, is not always mentally inactive and sunk in Samadhi and an account of the powers and states which arc possible to him on the higher planes of his being is necessary to the completeness of the science.

Realistic Advaita ::: There is possible a realistic as well as an illusionist Adwaita. The philosophy of The Life Divine is such a realistic Adwaita. The world is a manifestation of the Real and th
   refore is itself real. The reality is the infinite and eternal Divine, infinite and eternal Being, Consciousness-Force and Bliss. This Divine by his power has created the world or rather manifested it in his own infinite Being. But here in the material world or at its basis he has hidden himself in what seem to be his opposites, Non-Being, Inconscience and Insentience. This is what we nowadays call the Inconscient which seems to have created the material universe by its inconscient Energy; but this is only an appearance, for we find in the end that all the dispositions of theworld can only have been arranged by the working of a supreme secret intelligence. The Being which is hidden in what seems to be an inconscient void emerges in the world first in Matter, then in Life, then in Mind and finally as the Spirit. The apparently inconscient Energy which creates is in fact the Consciousness-Force of the Divine and its aspect of consciousness, secret in Matter, begins to emerge in Life, finds something more of itself in Mind and finds its true self in a spiritual consciousness and finally a supramental consciousness through which we become aware of the Reality, enter into it and unite ourselves with it. This is what we call evolution which is an evolution of consciousness and an evolution of the Spirit in things and only outwardly an evolution of species. Thus also, the delight of existence emerges from the original insentience first in the contrary forms of pleasure and pain and then has to find itself in the bliss of the Spirit or as it is called in the Upanishads, the bliss of the Brahman.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 91-92


Reality ::: There is a Reality, a truth of all existence which is greater and more abiding than all its formations and manifestations; to find that truth and Reality and live in it, achieve the most perfect manifestation and formation possible of it, must be the secret of perfection whether of individual or communal being. This Reality is there within each thing and gives to each of its formations its power of being and value of being.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 489


refind ::: v. t. --> To find again; to get or experience again.

recover ::: 1. To get back; regain. 2. To find again or obtain the return of (something lost). 3. To regain a normal or usual condition, as of health. recovers, recovered, recovering. *adj. *recovered. 4. Restored, regained something; brought back to its normal state.

Reformation: The Protestant Reformation may be dated from 1517, the year Martin Luther (1483-1546), Augustinian monk and University professor in Wittenberg, publicly attacked the sale of indulgences by the itinerant Tetzel, Dominican ambassador of the Roman Church. The break came first in the personality of the monk who could not find in his own religious and moral endeavors to win divine favor the peace demanded by a sensitive conscience; and when it came he found to his surprise that he had already parted company with a whole tradition. The ideology which found a response in his inner experience was set forth by Augustine, a troubled soul who had surrendered himself completely to divine grace and mercy. The philosophers who legitimized man's endeavor to get on in the world, the church which demanded unquestioned loyalty to its codes and commands, he eschewed as thoroughly inconsonant with his own inner life. Man is wholly dependent upon the merits of Christ, the miracle of faith alone justifies before God. Man's conscience, his reason, and the Scriptures together became his only norm and authority. He could have added a fourth: patriotism, since Luther became the spokesman of a rising tide of German nationalism already suspect of the powers of distant Rome. The humanist Erasmus (see Renaissance) supported Luther by his silence, then broke with him upon the reformer's extreme utterances concerning man's predestination. This break with the humanists shows clearly the direction which the Protestant Reformation was taking: it was an enfranchised religion only to a degree. For while Erasmus pleaded for tolerance and enlightenment the new religious movement called for decision and faith binding men's consciences to a new loyalty. At first the Scriptures were taken as conscience permitted, then conscience became bound by the Scuptures. Luther lacked a systematic theology for the simple reason that he himself was full of inconsistencies. A reformer is often not a systematic thinker. Lutheran princes promoted the reconstruction of institutions and forms suggested by the reformer and his learned ally, Melanchthon, and by one stroke whole provinces became Protestant. The original reformers were reformed by new reformers. Two of such early reformers were Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531) in Switzerland and John Calvin (1509-1564) who set up a rigid system and rule of God in Geneva. Calvinism crossed the channel under the leadership of John Knox in Scotland. The English (Anglican) Reformation rested on political rather than strictly religious considerations. The Reformation brought about a Counter-Reformation within the Roman Church in which abuses were set right and lines against the Protestants more tightly drawn (Council of Trent, 1545-1563). -- V.F.

refound ::: v. t. --> To found or cast anew.
To found or establish again; to re/stablish. ::: --> imp. & p. p. of Refind, v. t.


refuge ::: 1. Protection or shelter, as from danger or hardship, trouble, etc. 2. A place providing protection or shelter; sanctuary; haven. ::: To take refuge: To find asylum, safety, protection in something.

Regnlolion of food ::: Too much eating makes the body mate- rial and heavy, eating too little makes it weak and nervous ; one has to find the true hamtony and balance between the body's need and the food taken.

REJECTION. ::: The jjersonal effort required is a itficdon of the movements of the lower nature — rejection of the mind’s ideas, opinions, preferences, habits, constructions, so that the true knowledge may find free room in a silent mind ; rejection of

religion ::: Sri Aurobindo: "There is no word so plastic and uncertain in its meaning as the word religion. The word is European and, therefore, it is as well to know first what the Europeans mean by it. In this matter we find them, — when they can be got to think clearly on the matter at all, which is itself unusual, — divided in opinion. Sometimes they use it as equivalent to a set of beliefs, sometimes as equivalent to morality coupled with a belief in God, sometimes as equivalent to a set of pietistic actions and emotions. Faith, works and pious observances, these are the three recognised elements of European religion . . . . ::: Religion in India is a still more plastic term and may mean anything from the heights of Yoga to strangling your fellowman and relieving him of the worldly goods he may happen to be carrying with him. It would therefore take too long to enumerate everything that can be included in Indian religion. Briefly, however, it is Dharma or living religiously, the whole life being governed by religion.” *From an unpublished essay

religion ::: “There is no word so plastic and uncertain in its meaning as the word religion. The word is European and, therefore, it is as well to know first what the Europeans mean by it. In this matter we find them,—when they can be got to think clearly on the matter at all, which is itself unusual,—divided in opinion. Sometimes they use it as equivalent to a set of beliefs, sometimes as equivalent to morality coupled with a belief in God, sometimes as equivalent to a set of pietistic actions and emotions. Faith, works and pious observances, these are the three recognised elements of European religion . . . .

repertitious ::: a. --> Found; gained by finding.

Resuming certain ideas of Locke and Berkeley, it was first propounded by the physicist Kirchhoff, and found its best representation by Richard Avenarius (1843-96) in Menschlicher Welthegriff, and, independently, by Ernst Mach (1838-1916) in Anal, d. Empfindungen. Many psychologists (Wm. Wundt, 0. Kuelpe, Harold Hoeffding, E. B. Titchener) approved of it, while H. Rickert and W. Moog discredited it forcefully. Charles Peirce (Popular Science Monthly, Jan. 1878) and Wm. James (Principles of Psych. 1898) applied Avenarius' ideas, somewhat roughly though, for the foundation of ''Pragmatism". John Dewey (Reconstruction in Philos.) used it in his "Instrumentalism", while F. C. S. Schiller (Humanism) based his ethical theory on it. -- S.v.F.

retriever ::: n. --> One who retrieves.
A dor, or a breed of dogs, chiefly employed to retrieve, or to find and recover game birds that have been killed or wounded.


retrieve ::: v. t. --> To find again; to recover; to regain; to restore from loss or injury; as, to retrieve one&

salable ::: a. --> Capable of being sold; fit to be sold; finding a ready market.

Samsara: (Skr.) "Going about", the passage of the soul in the cycle of births and deaths, the round of existence, transmigration, a universally accepted dogma in India, early justified philosophically on the basis of karma (q.v.). and the nature of atman (q.v.), but its modus operandi variously explained. It is the object of practically every Indian philosophy to find a way to escape from samsara and attain moksa (q.v.). -- K.F.L.

sarvam karmakhilam (partha) jnane parisamapyate ::: all the totality of works [O Partha (Arjuna)] finds its rounded culmination in knowledge. [Gita 4.33]

Scepticism, Fourteenth Century: At the beginning of the 14th century, Duns Scotus adopted a position which is not formally sceptical, though his critical attitude to earlier scholasticism may contain the germs of the scepticism of his century. Among Scotistic pre-sceptical tendencies may be mentioned the stress on self-knowledge rather than the knowledge of extra-mental reality, psychological voluntarism which eventuallj made the assent of judgment a matter of will rather than of intellect, and a theory of the reality of universal essences which led to a despair of the intellect's capacity to know such objects and thus spawned Ockhamism. Before 1317, Henry of Harclay noticed that, since the two terms of efficient causal connection are mutually distinct and absolute things, God, by his omnipotent will, can cause anything which naturally (naturaliter) is caused by a finite agent. He inferred from this that neither the present nor past existence of a finite external agent is necessarily involved in cognition (Pelstex p. 346). Later Petrus Aureoli and Ockham made the sime observation (Michalski, p. 94), and Ockham concluded that natural knowledge of substance and causal connection is possible only on the assumption that nature is pursuing a uniform, uninterrupted course at the moment of intuitive cognition. Without this assumption, observed sequences might well be the occasion of direct divine causal action rather than evidence of natural causation. It is possible that these sceptical views were suggested by reading the arguments of certain Moslem theologians (Al Gazali and the Mutakallimun), as well as by a consideration of miracles. The most influential sceptical author of the fourteenth century was Nicholas of Autrecourt (fl. 1340). Influenced perhaps by the Scotist conception of logical demonstration, Nicholas held that the law of noncontradiction is the ultimate and sole source of certainty. In logical inference, certainty is guaranteed because the consequent is identical with part or all of the antecedent. No logical connection can be established, therefore, between the existence or non-existence of one thing and the existence or non-existence of another and different thing. The inference from cause to effect or conversely is thus not a matter of certainty. The existence of substance, spiritual or physical, is neither known nor probable. We are unable to infer the existence of intellect or will from acts of intellection or volition, and sensible experience provides no evidence of external substances. The only certitudes properly so-called are those of immediate experience and those of principles known ex terminis together with conclusions immediately dependent on them. This thoroughgoing scepticism appears to have had considerable influence in its time, for we find many philosophers expressing, expounding, or criticizing it. John Buridan has a detailed criticism in his commentary on Aristotle's Physics (in 1 I, q. 4), Fitz-Ralph, Jacques d'Eltville, and Pierre d'Ailly maintain views similar to Nicholas', with some modifications, and there is at least one exposition of Nicholas' views in an anonymous commentary on the Sentences (British Museum, Ms. Harley 3243). These sceptical views were usually accompanied by a kind of probabilism. The condemnation of Nicholas in 1347 put a damper on the sceptical movement, and there is probably no continuity from these thinkers to the French sceptics of the 16th century. Despite this lack of direct influence, the sceptical arguments of 14th century thinkers bear marked resemblances to those employed by the French Occasionalists, Berkeley and Hume.

scold ::: v. i. --> To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or coarsely; -- often with at; as, to scold at a servant. ::: v. t. --> To chide with rudeness and clamor; to rate; also, to rebuke or reprove with severity.

search ::: v. t. --> To look over or through, for the purpose of finding something; to examine; to explore; as, to search the city.
To inquire after; to look for; to seek.
To examine or explore by feeling with an instrument; to probe; as, to search a wound.
To examine; to try; to put to the test.
The act of seeking or looking for something; quest; inquiry; pursuit for finding something; examination.


seek ::: a. --> Sick. ::: v. t. --> To go in search of; to look for; to search for; to try to find.
To inquire for; to ask for; to solicit; to bessech.
To try to acquire or gain; to strive after; to aim at; as,


seer ::: “The seer does not need the aid of thought in its process as a means of knowledge, but only as a means of representation and expression,—thought is to him a lesser power and used for a secondary purpose. If a further extension of knowledge is required, he can come at it by new seeing without the slower thought processes that are the staff of support of the mental search and its feeling out for truth,—even as we scrutinise with the eye to find what escaped our first observation” The Synthesis of Yoga

SELF-JUSTIFICATION. ::: Always a sign of ego and ignor- ance. ^Vhen one has a wider consciousness, one knows that each one has his o>vn way of looking at things and finds in that way his own justification so that both parties in a quarrel believe

Semi-Pelagianism: A movement in Christian theology which attempted to find a middle ground between the extreme doctrine of total depravity and predestination as over against the doctrine of the determinative character of the human will in the matter of salvation. The Semi-Pelagian view held that regeneration was the result of the cooperation of divine grace and the human will. Although the view was condemned by church councils in favor of predestination (q.v.), Semi-Pelagianism has continually reappeared in Christian theology without its label. -- V.F.

Sensation: (Ger. Empfindung) In Kant: The content of sensuous intuition, or the way in which a conscious subject is modified by the presence of an object. Kant usually employs the term to designate the content sensed instead of the process of sensing. The process he calls 'intuition' (q.v.); the faculty he names 'sensibility' (q.v.). See Kantianism. -- O.F.K.

"shadows", and ru ::: means "He who disperses them"&

Shaftesbury, Anthony Ashley Cooper, Third Earl of: (1671-1713) He was a pupil and later a patron of Locke although in the field of morals, for which he remains best known, he was opposed to the Lockean position. He advocated the so-called moral sense view which finds a sense of right and wrong in man, guiding him with social or natural affections to the good of the species rather than to seif-interest. He was a lover of liberty in thought and in political affairs. He was numbered among the deists but remained a churchman throughout his life. His most famous work was his Characteristics of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times. -- L.E.D.

Singular proposition: See logic, formal, §§4, 5. Skepticism: Sec Scepticism. Skolem paradox: See Löwenheim's theorem. Smith, Adam: (1723-1790) Professor of Moral Philosophy and Logic at Glasgow. He is best known for his The Wealth of Nations, but he is not to be forgotten for his contributions to the study of ethics, expressed principally in his "The Theory of Moral Sentiments." He finds sympathy as the fundamental fact of the moral consciousness and he makes of sympathy the test of morality, the sympathy of the impartial and well informed spectator. -- L.E.D.

&

smell-feast ::: n. --> One who is apt to find and frequent good tables; a parasite; a sponger.
A feast at which the guests are supposed to feed upon the odors only of the viands.


smither ::: n. --> Light, fine rain.
Fragments; atoms; finders.


Sri Aurobindo: "And though this Spirit of the universe, this One who is all, seems to be turning us on the wheel of the world as if mounted on a machine by the force of Maya, shaping us in our ignorance as the potter shapes a pot, as the weaver a fabric, by some skilful mechanical principle, yet is this spirit our own greatest self and it is according to the real idea, the truth of ourselves, that which is growing in us and finding always new and more adequate forms in birth after birth, in our animal and human and divine life, in that which we were, that which we are, that which we shall be, — it is in accordance with this inner soul-truth that, as our opened eyes will discover, we are progressively shaped by this spirit within us in its all-wise omnipotence.” *Essays on the Gita

*Sri Aurobindo: "In our world error is continually the handmaid and pathfinder of Truth; for error is really a half-truth that stumbles because of its limitations; often it is Truth that wears a disguise in order to arrive unobserved near to its goal.” The Life Divine

*Sri Aurobindo: ". . . liberty is at once the condition of vigorous variation and the condition of self-finding.” The Human Cycle

Sri Aurobindo: “Love fulfilled does not exclude knowledge, but itself brings knowledge; and the completer the knowledge, the richer the possibility of love. ‘By Bhakti’ says the Lord in the Gita ‘shall a man know Me in all my extent and greatness and as I am in the principles of my being, and when he has known Me in the principles of my being, then he enters into Me.’ Love without knowledge is a passionate and intense, but blind, crude, often dangerous thing, a great power, but also a stumbling-block; love, limited in knowledge, condemns itself in its fervour and often by its very fervour to narrowness; but love leading to perfect knowledge brings the infinite and absolute union. Such love is not inconsistent with, but rather throws itself with joy into divine works; for it loves God and is one with him in all his being, and therefore in all beings, and to work for the world is then to feel and fulfil multitudinously one’s love for God. This is the trinity of our powers, [work, knowledge, love] the union of all three in God to which we arrive when we start on our journey by the path of devotion with Love for the Angel of the Way to find in the ecstasy of the divine delight of the All-Lover’s being the fulfilment of ours, its secure home and blissful abiding-place and the centre of its universal radiation.” The Synthesis of Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: ". . . our imperfection is the sign of a transitional state, a growth not yet completed, an effort that is finding its way; . . . .” *The Life Divine

Sri Aurobindo: "The cosmic consciousness is that of the universe, of the cosmic spirit and cosmic Nature with all the beings and forces within it. All that is as much conscious as a whole as the individual separately is, though in a different way. The consciousness of the individual is part of this, but a part feeling itself as a separate being. Yet all the time most of what he is comes into him from the cosmic consciousness. But there is a wall of separative ignorance between. Once it breaks down he becomes aware of the cosmic Self, of the consciousness of the cosmic Nature, of the forces playing in it, etc. He feels all that as he now feels physical things and impacts. He finds it all to be one with his larger or universal self.” *Letters on Yoga

*Sri Aurobindo: "The highest aim of the aesthetic being is to find the Divine through beauty; the highest Art is that which by an inspired use of significant and interpretative form unseals the doors of the spirit.” The Human Cycle etc.*

Sri Aurobindo: *"The seer does not need the aid of thought in its process as a means of knowledge, but only as a means of representation and expression, — thought is to him a lesser power and used for a secondary purpose. If a further extension of knowledge is required, he can come at it by new seeing without the slower thought processes that are the staff of support of the mental search and its feeling out for truth, — even as we scrutinise with the eye to find what escaped our first observation” The Synthesis of Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "Weakness puts the same test and question to the strengths and energies and greatnesses in which we glory. Power is the play of life, shows its degree, finds the value of its expression; weakness is the play of death pursuing life in its movement and stressing the limit of its acquired energy.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "What the "void" feels as a clutch is felt by the Mother only as a reminding finger laid on her cheek. It is one advantage of the expression ‘as if" that it leaves the field open for such variation. It is intended to suggest without saying it that behind the sombre void is the face of a mother. The two other ‘as if"s have the same motive and I do not find them jarring upon me. The second is at a sufficient distance from the first and it is not obtrusive enough to prejudice the third which more nearly follows. . . .” Letters on Savitri

staktometer ::: n. --> A drop measurer; a glass tube tapering to a small orifice at the point, and having a bulb in the middle, used for finding the number of drops in equal quantities of different liquids. See Pipette.

Stoic School: Founded by Zeno (of Citium, in Cyprus) in the year 308 B.C. in Athens. For Stoicism virtue alone is the only good and the virtuous man is the one who has attained happiness through knowledge, as Socrites had taught. The virtuous man thus finds happiness in himself and is independent of the external world which he has succeeded in overcoming by mastering himself, his passions and emotions. As for the Stoic conception of the universe as a whole, their doctrine is pantheistic. All things and all natural laws follow by a conscious determination from the basic World Reason, and it is this rational order by which, according to Stoicism, the wise man seeks to regulate his life as his highest duty. -- M.F.

streetwalker ::: n. --> A common prostitute who walks the streets to find customers.

studious ::: a. --> Given to study; devoted to the acquisition of knowledge from books; as, a studious scholar.
Given to thought, or to the examination of subjects by contemplation; contemplative.
Earnest in endeavors; aiming sedulously; attentive; observant; diligent; -- usually followed by an infinitive or by of; as, be studious to please; studious to find new friends and allies.
Planned with study; deliberate; studied.


Such methods of introducing new concepts, functions, etc. as definition by abstraction (q. v.), definition by recursion (q. v.), definition by composition (see Recursiveness) may be dealt with by reducing them to nominal definitions; i.e., by finding a nominal definition such that the definiens (and therefore also the definiendum) turns out, under an intended interpretation of the logistic system, to mean the concept, function, etc. which is to be introduced.

svarvid ::: a finder or knower of svar. [Ved.]

Swabhava ::: Swabhava means one thing in the highest spiritual nature and takes quite another form and significance in the lower nature of the three gunas. There too it acts, but is not in full possession of itself, is seeking as it were for its own true law in a half light or a darkness and goes on its way through many lower forms, many false forms, endless imperfections, perversions, self-losings, self-findings, seekings after norm and rule before it arrives at self-discovery and perfection. Our nature here is amixed weft of knowledge and ignorance, of truth and falsehood, of success and failure, of right and wrong, of finding and losing, of sin and virtue.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 19, Page: 520-21


Swadharma ::: ...our own real nature; that is our truth of being which is finding now only a constant partial expression in our various becoming in the world. The law of action determined by this Swabhava is our right law of self-shaping, function, working, our Swadharma.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 19, Page: 519 ::: .Swapna ::: The dream-state is a consciousness corresponding to the subtler life-plane and mind-plane behind, which to us, even when we get intimations of them, have not the same concrete reality as the things of the physical existence.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 520


Tapas is the will of the transcendent spirit who creates the universal movement, of the universal spirit who supports and informs it, of the free individual spirit who is the soul centre of its multiplicities. It is one will, free in all these at once, comprehensive, harmonious, unified; we find it, when we live and act in the spirit, to be an effortless and desireless, a spontaneous and illumined, a self-fulfilling and self-possessing, a satisfied and blissful will of the spiritual delight of being.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 675-76


“The cosmic consciousness is that of the universe, of the cosmic spirit and cosmic Nature with all the beings and forces within it. All that is as much conscious as a whole as the individual separately is, though in a different way. The consciousness of the individual is part of this, but a part feeling itself as a separate being. Yet all the time most of what he is comes into him from the cosmic consciousness. But there is a wall of separative ignorance between. Once it breaks down he becomes aware of the cosmic Self, of the consciousness of the cosmic Nature, of the forces playing in it, etc. He feels all that as he now feels physical things and impacts. He finds it all to be one with his larger or universal self.” Letters on Yoga

The decision problem, of the pure functional calculus of first order has two forms the so-called proof-theoretic decision problem, to find an effective test (decision procedure) by means of which it can always be determined whether a given formula is a theorem; the so-called set-theoretic decision problem, to find an effective test by means of which it can always be determined whether a given formula containing no free individual variables is satisfiable. It follows from Gödel's completeness theorem that these two forms of the decision problem are equivalent: a solution of either would lead immediately to a solution of the other.

The difficulty of its coming when you are at work is only at the beginning — afterwards when it is more settled one finds that one can carry on all the activities of life whether in the pervading silence itself or at least with that as the support and background.

“The Divine Reality is infinite in its being; in this infinite being, we find limited being everywhere,—that is the apparent fact from which our existence here seems to start and to which our own narrow ego and its ego-centric activities bear constant witness. But, in reality, when we come to an integral self-knowledge, we find that we are not limited, for we also are infinite.” The Life Divine

The employment of definition by recursion in the development of arithmetic from Peano's postulates, or in the Frege-Russell derivation of arithmetic from logic, requires justification, which most naturallv takes the form of finding a method of replacing a definition by recursion by a nominal definition, or a contextual definition, serving the same purpose. In particular it is possible, by a method due to Dedekind or by any one of a number of modifications of it, to prove the existence of a function f satisfying the conditions expressed by an admissible set of recursion equations, and f may then be given a definition employing descriptions as the function f such that the recursion equations, with suitable quantifiers prefixed, hold. See the paper of Kalmar cited below.

The fear of death shows a vital weakness which is also contrary to a capacity for yoga. Equally, one who is under the domination of his passions, would find the yoga dilhcuU and, unless supported by a true inner call and a sincere and strong aspiration for the spiritual consciousness and union with the Divine, might very easily fall fatally and his effort come to nothing.

The first paper of Tarski cited below is devoted to the problem of finding a definition of semantical truth for a logistic system L, not in L itself but in another system (metasystem) containing notations for the formulas of L and for syntactical relations between them. This is attractive as an alternative to the method of introducing the concept of truth by arbitrarily adding a notation for it, with appropriate new primitive formulas, to the metasystem, but in many important cases it is possible only if the metasystcm is in some essential respect logically stronger than L.

The function of a mantra is to create vibrations in the inner consciousness that will prepare it for the realisation of what the mantra symbolises and is supposed indeed to carry within itself. As a rule the only mantra used in this sadhana is that of the Mother or of my name and the Mother.In this Yoga there is no fixed mantra, no stress is laid on mantras, although sadhaks can use one if they find it helpful or so long as they find it helpful. The stress is rather on an aspiration in the consciousness and a concentration of the mind, heart, will, all the being. If a mantra is found helpful for that, one uses it.
   Ref: SABCL Vol. 22-23-24, Page: 745


“The Godhead has built this universe in a complex system of worlds which we find both within us and without, subjectively cognised and objectively sensed. It is a rising tier of earths and heavens; it is a stream of diverse waters; it is a Light of seven rays, or of eight or nine or ten; it is a Hill of many plateaus. The seers often image it in a series of trios; there are three earths and three heavens. More, there is a triple world below,—Heaven, Earth and the intervening mid-region; a triple world between, the shining heavens of the Sun; a triple world above, the supreme and rapturous abodes of the Godhead.” The Secret of the Veda

The gunas affect every part of our natural being. They have indeed their strongest relative hold in the three different members of it, mind, life and body. Tamas, the principle of inertia, is strongest in material nature and in our physical being. The action of this principle is of two kinds, inertia of force and inertia of knowledge. Whatever is predominantly governed by Tamas, tends in its force to a sluggish inaction and immobility or else to a mechanical action which it does not possess, but is possessed by obscure forces which drive it in a mechanical round of energy; equally in its consciousness it turns to an inconscience or enveloped subconscience or to a reluctant, sluggish or in some way mechanical conscious action which does not possess the idea of its own energy, but is guided by an idea which seems external to it or at least concealed from its active awareness. Thus the principle of our body is in its nature inert, subconscient, incapable of anything but a mechanical and habitual self-guidance and action: though it has like everything else a principle of kinesis and a principle of equilibrium of its state and action, an inherent principle of response and a secret consciousness, the greatest portion of its rajasic motions are contributed by the lifepower and all the overt consciousness by the mental being. The principle of rajas has its strongest hold on the vital nature. It is the Life within us that is the strongest kinetic motor power, but the life-power in earthly beings is possessed by the force of desire, th
   refore rajas turns always to action and desire; desire is the strongest human and animal initiator of most kinesis and action, predominant to such an extent that many consider it the father of all action and even the originator of our being. Moreover, rajas finding itself in a world of matter which starts from the principle of inconscience and a mechanical driven inertia, has to work against an immense contrary force; th
   refore its whole action takes on the nature of an effort, a struggle, a besieged and an impeded conflict for possession which is distressed in its every step by a limiting incapacity, disappointment and suffering: even its gains are precarious and limited and marred by the reaction of the effort and an aftertaste of insufficiency and transience. The principle of sattwa has its strongest hold in the mind; not so much in the lower parts of the mind which are dominated by the rajasic life-power, but mostly in the intelligence and the will of the reason. Intelligence, reason, rational will are moved by the nature of their predominant principle towards a constant effort of assimilation, assimilation by knowledge, assimilation by a power of understanding will, a constant effort towards equilibrium, some stability, rule, harmony of the conflicting elements of natural happening and experience. This satisfaction it gets in various ways and in various degrees of acquisition. The attainment of assimilation, equilibrium and harmony brings with it always a relative but more or less intense and satisfying sense of ease, happiness, mastery, security, which is other than the troubled and vehement pleasures insecurely bestowed by the satisfaction of rajasic desire and passion. Light and happiness are the characteristics of the sattwic guna. The whole nature of the embodied living mental being is determined by these three gunas.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 684-685


The Imfjcnonal Brahnj.in is inactive, aloof, indifferent, not concerned with what happens in the universe. Whatever imper- sonal Truth or Light (here is, you have to find It, use it, do what you can with it.

The impulse towards Itiya Is a creation of the mind, it is not the sole possible destiny of the soul. When the mind tries to abolish its own Ignorance, it finds no escape from it except by laya, because it supposes that there is no higher principle of cosmic experience beyond itself — beyond itself is only the pure

"The individual is in nature one expression of the universal Being, in spirit an emanation of the Transcendence. For if he finds his self, he finds too that his own true self is not this natural personality, this created individuality, but is a universal being in its relations with others and with Nature and in its upward term a portion or the living front of a supreme transcendental Spirit.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“The individual is in nature one expression of the universal Being, in spirit an emanation of the Transcendence. For if he finds his self, he finds too that his own true self is not this natural personality, this created individuality, but is a universal being in its relations with others and with Nature and in its upward term a portion or the living front of a supreme transcendental Spirit.” The Synthesis of Yoga

The most strange development was Ch'an (Meditation, Zen, c. 500). It is basically a method of "direct intuition into the heart to find Buddha-nature," a method based, on the one hand, on the eightfold negation of production and extinction, annihilation and permanence, unity and diversity, and coming and departing, and, on the other hand, on the affirmation of the reality of the Buddha-nature in all things. Its sole reliance on meditation was most un-Chinese, but it imposed on the Chinese mind a severe mental and spiritual discipline which was invigorating as well as fascinating. For this reason, it exerted tremendous influence not only on Taoism which had much in common with it and imitated it in every way, but also on Neo-Confucianism, which stood in diametrical opposition to it.

The personal effort required Is a triple labour of aspiration, rejection and surrender ; an aspiration vigilant, constant, un- ceasing — the mind’s will, the heart's seeking, the assent of the vital being, the will to open and make plastic the physical consciousness and nature ; rejection of the movements of the lower nature — rejection of the mind’s ideas, opinions, prefer- ences, habits, constructions, so that the true knowledge may find room in a silent mind, — rejection of the vital nature’s desires, demands, cravings, sensations, passions, selfishness, pride, arro- gance, lust, greed, jealousy, envy, hostility to the Truth, so that the true power and joy may pour from above into a calm, large, strong and consecrated vital being, — rejection of the physical nature’s stupidity, doubt, disbelief, obscurity, obstinacy, pettiness, laziness, unwillingness to change, tamas, so that the true stability of Light, Power, Ananda may establish itself in a body growing always more divine ; surrender of oneself and all one is and has and every plane of the consciousness and every movement to the Divine and the ShaUi.

The physical mind is that which is fixed on physical objects and happenings, sees and understands these only, and deals with them according to their own nature, but can with difficulty respond to the higher forces. Left to itself, it Is skeptical of the existence of supra-physical things of which it has no direct experience and to which it can find no due ; even when it has spiritual experi- ences, it forgets them easily, loses (he impression and result and finds it difficult to believe. To enlighten the physical mind by the consciousness of the higher spiritual and Supramental planes is one object of this yoga, just as to enlighten it by the power of the higher vital and higher mental elements of the being is the greatest part of human self-development, civilisation and culture.

The principle of rajas has its strongest hold on the vital nature. It is the Life within us that is the strongest kinetic motor power, but the life-power in earthly beings is possessed by the force of desire, th
   refore rajas turns always to action and desire; desire is the strongest human and animal initiator of most kinesis and action, predominant to such an extent that many consider it the father of all action and even the originator of our being. Moreover, rajas finding itself in a world of matter which starts from the principle of inconscience and a mechanical driven inertia, has to work against an immense contrary force; th
   refore its whole action takes on the nature of an effort, a struggle, a besieged and an impeded conflict for possession which is distressed in its every step by a limiting incapacity, disappointment and suffering: even its gains are precarious and limited and marred by the reaction of the effort and an aftertaste of insufficiency and transience.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 684-85


  "The progress of Life involves the development and interlocking of an immense number of things that are in conflict with each other and seem often to be absolute oppositions and contraries. To find amid these oppositions some principle or standing-ground of unity, some workable lever of reconciliation which will make possible a larger and better development on a basis of harmony and not of conflict and struggle, must be increasingly the common aim of humanity in its active life-evolution, if it at all means to rise out of life"s more confused, painful and obscure movement, out of the compromises made by Nature with the ignorance of the Life-mind and the nescience of Matter. This can only be truly and satisfactorily done when the soul discovers itself in its highest and completest spiritual reality and effects a progressive upward transformation of its life-values into those of the spirit; for there they will all find their spiritual truth and in that truth their standing-ground of mutual recognition and reconciliation. The spiritual is the one truth of which all others are the veiled aspects, the brilliant disguises or the dark disfigurements, and in which they can find their own right form and true relation to each other.” *The Human Cycle, etc.

“The progress of Life involves the development and interlocking of an immense number of things that are in conflict with each other and seem often to be absolute oppositions and contraries. To find amid these oppositions some principle or standing-ground of unity, some workable lever of reconciliation which will make possible a larger and better development on a basis of harmony and not of conflict and struggle, must be increasingly the common aim of humanity in its active life-evolution, if it at all means to rise out of life’s more confused, painful and obscure movement, out of the compromises made by Nature with the ignorance of the Life-mind and the nescience of Matter. This can only be truly and satisfactorily done when the soul discovers itself in its highest and completest spiritual reality and effects a progressive upward transformation of its life-values into those of the spirit; for there they will all find their spiritual truth and in that truth their standing-ground of mutual recognition and reconciliation. The spiritual is the one truth of which all others are the veiled aspects, the brilliant disguises or the dark disfigurements, and in which they can find their own right form and true relation to each other.” The Human Cycle, etc.

"The real source of knowledge is the Lord in the heart; ‘I am seated in the heart of every man and from me is knowledge," says the Gita; the Scripture is only a verbal form of that inner Veda, of that self-luminous Reality, it is sabdabrahma: the mantra, says the Veda, has risen from the heart, from the secret place where is the seat of the truth, sadanâd rtasya, guhâyâm. That origin is its sanction; but still the infinite Truth is greater than its word. Nor shall you say of any Scripture that it alone is all-sufficient and no other truth can be admitted, as the Vedavadins said of the Veda, nânyad astîti vâdinah. This is a saving and liberating word which must be applied to all the Scriptures of the world. Take all the Scriptures that are or have been, Bible and Koran and the books of the Chinese, Veda and Upanishads and Purana and Tantra and Shastra and the Gita itself and the sayings of thinkers and sages, prophets and Avatars, still you shall not say that there is nothing else or that the truth your intellect cannot find there is not true because you cannot find it there. That is the limited thought of the sectarian or the composite thought of the eclectic religionist, not the untrammelled truth-seeking of the free and illumined mind and God-experienced soul. Heard or unheard before, that always is the truth which is seen by the heart of man in its illumined depths or heard within from the Master of all knowledge, the knower of the eternal Veda.” Essays on the Gita*

“The real source of knowledge is the Lord in the heart; ‘I am seated in the heart of every man and from me is knowledge,’ says the Gita; the Scripture is only a verbal form of that inner Veda, of that self-luminous Reality, it is sabdabrahma: the mantra, says the Veda, has risen from the heart, from the secret place where is the seat of the truth, sadanâd rtasya, guhâyâm. That origin is its sanction; but still the infinite Truth is greater than its word. Nor shall you say of any Scripture that it alone is all-sufficient and no other truth can be admitted, as the Vedavadins said of the Veda, nânyad astîti vâdinah. This is a saving and liberating word which must be applied to all the Scriptures of the world. Take all the Scriptures that are or have been, Bible and Koran and the books of the Chinese, Veda and Upanishads and Purana and Tantra and Shastra and the Gita itself and the sayings of thinkers and sages, prophets and Avatars, still you shall not say that there is nothing else or that the truth your intellect cannot find there is not true because you cannot find it there. That is the limited thought of the sectarian or the composite thought of the eclectic religionist, not the untrammelled truth-seeking of the free and illumined mind and God-experienced soul. Heard or unheard before, that always is the truth which is seen by the heart of man in its illumined depths or heard within from the Master of all knowledge, the knower of the eternal Veda.” Essays on the Gita

“The real source of knowledge is the Lord in the heart; ‘I am seated in the heart of every man and from me is knowledge,’ says the Gita; the Scripture is only a verbal form of that inner Veda, of that self-luminous Reality, it is sabdabrahma: the mantra, says the Veda, has risen from the heart, from the secret place where is the seat of the truth, sadanâdrtasya, guhâyâm. That origin is its sanction; but still the infinite Truth is greater than its word. Nor shall you say of any Scripture that it alone is all-sufficient and no other truth can be admitted, as the Vedavadins said of the Veda, nânyadastîtivâdinah. This is a saving and liberating word which must be applied to all the Scriptures of the world. Take all the Scriptures that are or have been, Bible and Koran and the books of the Chinese, Veda and Upanishads and Purana and Tantra and Shastra and the Gita itself and the sayings of thinkers and sages, prophets and Avatars, still you shall not say that there is nothing else or that the truth your intellect cannot find there is not true because you cannot find it there. That is the limited thought of the sectarian or the composite thought of the eclectic religionist, not the untrammelled truth-seeking of the free and illumined mind and God-experienced soul. Heard or unheard before, that always is the truth which is seen by the heartof man in its illumined depths or heard within from the Master of all knowledge, the knower of the eternal Veda.” Essays on the Gita

  ". . . there are a series of subtler and subtler formulations of substance which escape from and go beyond the formula of the material universe. Without going deeply into matters which are too occult and difficult for our present inquiry, we may say, adhering to the system on which we have based ourselves, that these gradations of substance, in one important aspect of their formulation in series, can be seen to correspond to the ascending series of Matter, Life, Mind, Supermind and that other higher divine triplicity of Sachchidananda. In other words, we find that substance in its ascension bases itself upon each of these principles and makes itself successively a characteristic vehicle for the dominating cosmic self-expression of each in their ascending series.” The Life Divine

“… there are a series of subtler and subtler formulations of substance which escape from and go beyond the formula of the material universe. Without going deeply into matters which are too occult and difficult for our present inquiry, we may say, adhering to the system on which we have based ourselves, that these gradations of substance, in one important aspect of their formulation in series, can be seen to correspond to the ascending series of Matter, Life, Mind, Supermind and that other higher divine triplicity of Sachchidananda. In other words, we find that substance in its ascension bases itself upon each of these principles and makes itself successively a characteristic vehicle for the dominating cosmic self-expression of each in their ascending series.” The Life Divine

There are two major points of reference for tracing1 the path that Soviet philosophy has taken -- the successive controversies around the issues of mechanism and of idealism. The first began in the early twenties as a discussion centering on the philosophy of science, and eventually spread to all phases of philosophy. The central issue was whether materialism could be identified with mechanism. Those who answered in the affirmative, among them Timiriazev, Timinski, Axelrod and Stepanov, were called mechanistic materialists. Their position tended to an extreme empiricism which was suspicious of generalization and theory, saw little if any value in Hegel's philosophy, or in dialectical as distinguished from formal logic, and even went so far, in some cases, as to deny the necessity of philosophy in general, resting content with the findings of the specific sciences. It was considered that they tended to deny the reality of quality, attempting to reduce it mechanically to quantity, and to interpret evolution as a mere quantitative increase or decrease of limited factors, neglecting the significance of leaps, breaks and the precipitation of new qualities. In opposition to their views, a group of thinkers, led by Deborin, asserted the necessity of philosophic generalizition and the value of the dialectical method in Hegel as a necessary element in Marxian materialism. In 1929, at a conference of scientific institutions attended by 229 delegates from all parts of the country, the issues were discussed by both sides. A general lack of satisfaction with the mechanist position was expressed in the form of a resolution at the close of the conference. However, the Deborin group was also criticized, not only by the mechanists, but by many who were opposed to the mechanists as well. It was felt by Mitin, Yudin and a group of predominantly younger thinkers that neither camp was really meeting the obligations of philosophy. While they felt there was much that was valuable in Deborin's criticism of mechanism, it seemed to them that he had carried it too far and had fallen over backward into the camp of the idealists. They called his group menshevizing idealists, that is to say, people who talked like the Mensheviks, a pre-revolutionary faction of the Russian Social Democratic Party. By this was meant that they were unduly abstract, vague and tended to divorce theory from practice. In particular, they seemed to accept Hegelian dialectics as such, overlooking the deeper implications of the materialist reconstruction of it which Marx insisted upon. Moreover, they had neglected the field of social problems, and consequently made no significant philosophic contribution to momentous social issues of the times such as collectivization of the land, abandonment of NEP, the possibility of a Five Year Plan. At a three day conference in 1930, the situation was discussed at length by all interested parties. Deborin, Karev and Sten leading the discussion on one side, Mitin and Yudin on the other. The sense of the meetings was that the criticisms made of the Deborin group were valid.

"There is no such thing as death, for it is the body that dies and the body is not the man. That which really is, cannot go out of existence, though it may change the forms through which it appears, just as that which is non-existent cannot come into being. The soul is and cannot cease to be. This opposition of is and is not, this balance of being and becoming which is the mind"s view of existence, finds its end in the realisation of the soul as the one imperishable self by whom all this universe has been extended. Finite bodies have an end, but that which possesses and uses the body, is infinite, illimitable, eternal, indestructible. It casts away old and takes up new bodies as a man changes worn-out raiment for new; and what is there in this to grieve at and recoil and shrink? This is not born, nor does it die, nor is it a thing that comes into being once and passing away will never come into being again. It is unborn, ancient, sempiternal; it is not slain with the slaying of the body. Who can slay the immortal spirit? Weapons cannot cleave it, nor the fire burn, nor do the waters drench it, nor the wind dry. Eternally stable, immobile, all-pervading, it is for ever and for ever. Not manifested like the body, but greater than all manifestation, not to be analysed by the thought, but greater than all mind, not capable of change and modification like the life and its organs and their objects, but beyond the changes of mind and life and body, it is yet the Reality which all these strive to figure.” Essays on the Gita

“There is no such thing as death, for it is the body that dies and the body is not the man. That which really is, cannot go out of existence, though it may change the forms through which it appears, just as that which is non-existent cannot come into being. The soul is and cannot cease to be. This opposition of is and is not, this balance of being and becoming which is the mind’s view of existence, finds its end in the realisation of the soul as the one imperishable self by whom all this universe has been extended. Finite bodies have an end, but that which possesses and uses the body, is infinite, illimitable, eternal, indestructible. It casts away old and takes up new bodies as a man changes worn-out raiment for new; and what is there in this to grieve at and recoil and shrink? This is not born, nor does it die, nor is it a thing that comes into being once and passing away will never come into being again. It is unborn, ancient, sempiternal; it is not slain with the slaying of the body. Who can slay the immortal spirit? Weapons cannot cleave it, nor the fire burn, nor do the waters drench it, nor the wind dry. Eternally stable, immobile, all-pervading, it is for ever and for ever. Not manifested like the body, but greater than all manifestation, not to be analysed by the thought, but greater than all mind, not capable of change and modification like the life and its organs and their objects, but beyond the changes of mind and life and body, it is yet the Reality which all these strive to figure.” Essays on the Gita

The spiritual life, on the contrary, proceeds directly by a change of consciousness, a change from the ordinary consciousocss, ignorant and separated from its true self and from God, to a greater consciousness in which one finds one’s true being and comes first into direct and liviug contact and then into union with the Divine. ‘ ■ ’ j

The study of society, societal relations. Originally called Social Physics, meaning that the methods of the natural sciences were to be applied to the study of society. Whereas the pattern originally was physics and the first sociologists thought that it was possible to find laws of nature in the social realm (Quetelet, Comte, Buckle), others turned to biological considerations. The "organic" conception of society (Lilienfeld, Schaeffle) treated society as a complex organism, the evolutionists, Gumplowicz, Ratzenhofer, considered the struggle between different ethnic groups the basic factor in the evolution of social structures and institutions. Other sociologists accepted a psychological conception of society; to them psychological phenomena (imitation, according to Gabriel Tarde, consciousness of kind, according to F. H. Giddings) were the basic elements in social interrelations (see also W. McDougall, Alsworth Ross, etc.). These relations themselves were made the main object of sociological studies by G. Simmel, L. Wiese, Howard Becker. A kind of sociological realism was fostered by the French sociologist, Emile Durkheim, and his school. They considered society a reality, the group-mind an actual fact, the social phenomena "choses sociales". The new "sociology of knowledge", inaugurated by these French sociologists, has been further developed by M. Scheler, K. Mannheim and W. Jerusalem. Recently other branches of social research have separated somewhat from sociology proper: Anthropogeography, dealing with the influences of the physical environment upon society, demography, social psychology, etc. Problems of the methodology of the social sciences have also become an important topic of recent studies. -- W.E.

"The universe is certainly or has been up to now in appearance a rough and wasteful game with the dice of chance loaded in favour of the Powers of darkness, the Lords of obscurity, falsehood, death and suffering. But we have to take it as it is and find out — if we reject the way out of the old sages — the way to conquer. Spiritual experience shows that there is behind it all a wide terrain of equality, peace, calm, freedom, and it is only by getting into it that we can have the eye that sees and hope to gain the power that conquers.” Letters on Yoga

“The universe is certainly or has been up to now in appearance a rough and wasteful game with the dice of chance loaded in favour of the Powers of darkness, the Lords of obscurity, falsehood, death and suffering. But we have to take it as it is and find out—if we reject the way out of the old sages—the way to conquer. Spiritual experience shows that there is behind it all a wide terrain of equality, peace, calm, freedom, and it is only by getting into it that we can have the eye that sees and hope to gain the power that conquers.” Letters on Yoga

The will, like the intellect, reaches after and finds its peace in the Absolute. The moral life lies in seeking the ever widening meaning of our individual lives and identifying ourselves with it. This self-identification with larger meaning is loyalty -- the basis and the essence of all human virtue. -- B.A.G.F.

“This arrangement of the psychic body is reproduced in the physical with the spinal column as a rod and the ganglionic centres as the chakras which rise up from the bottom of the column, where the lowest is attached, to the brain and find their summit in the brahmarandhra at the top of the skull. These chakras or lotuses, however, are in physical man closed or only partly open, with the consequence that only such powers and only so much of them are active in him as are sufficient for his ordinary physical life, and so much mind and soul only is at play as will accord with its need. This is the real reason, looked at from the mechanical point of view, why the embodied soul seems so dependent on the bodily and nervous life,—though the dependence is neither so complete nor so real as it seems. The whole energy of the soul is not at play in the physical body and life, the secret powers of mind are not awake in it, the bodily and nervous energies predominate. But all the while the supreme energy is there, asleep; it is said to be coiled up and slumbering like a snake,—therefore it is called the kundalinî sakti,—in the lowest of the chakras, in the mûlâdhâra.” The Synthesis of Yoga

This something larger is the cosmic drama written, staged, and acted by the Absolute, who is artist and actor as well as a rational intelligence, intent no less upon dramatic than upon intelligible unity and self-expression. The world-process is tragic, witness the sin and suffering and imperfection with which it is fraught. But in the infinite tragedy, as well as in the tragedies composed by men, evil is contributory to the perfection of the whole, and, when seen and accepted as such by the finite individual, not only loses its sting but produces a "catharsis" of his attitude towards it, in which he cheerfully accepts it, battles with it, and finds his triumph over it in nobly enduring it. This "catharsis," identifying him as it does with the meaning of the life of the Absolute, is his peace and his salvation. Main works: Logic, 1888; The Philosophical Theory of the State, 1899; Value and Destiny of the Individual, 1913. -- B.A.G.F.

Thomists: John Capreolus, Thomistarum princeps, (+1444), Denis the Carthusian (+1471) and Peter Nigri (+c. 1484). Two other important schools of this period are the Latin Averroists and the Mystics. In the first group we find Peter d'Abano (+1315) who made Padua the center of this movement, John of Jandun (+1328), John Baconthorp (+1348), Averroistarum princeps, Paul of Perusio, Paul of Venice (+1429), Cajetan of Tiene (+1465).

Three senses of "Ockhamism" may be distinguished: Logical, indicating usage of the terminology and technique of logical analysis developed by Ockham in his Summa totius logicae; in particular, use of the concept of supposition (suppositio) in the significative analysis of terms. Epistemological, indicating the thesis that universality is attributable only to terms and propositions, and not to things as existing apart from discourse. Theological, indicating the thesis that no tneological doctrines, such as those of God's existence or of the immortality of the soul, are evident or demonstrable philosophically, so that religious doctrine rests solely on faith, without metaphysical or scientific support. It is in this sense that Luther is often called an Ockhamist.   Bibliography:   B. Geyer,   Ueberwegs Grundriss d. Gesch. d. Phil., Bd. II (11th ed., Berlin 1928), pp. 571-612 and 781-786; N. Abbagnano,   Guglielmo di Ockham (Lanciano, Italy, 1931); E. A. Moody,   The Logic of William of Ockham (N. Y. & London, 1935); F. Ehrle,   Peter von Candia (Muenster, 1925); G. Ritter,   Studien zur Spaetscholastik, I-II (Heidelberg, 1921-1922).     --E.A.M. Om, aum: (Skr.) Mystic, holy syllable as a symbol for the indefinable Absolute. See Aksara, Vac, Sabda. --K.F.L. Omniscience: In philosophy and theology it means the complete and perfect knowledge of God, of Himself and of all other beings, past, present, and future, or merely possible, as well as all their activities, real or possible, including the future free actions of human beings. --J.J.R. One: Philosophically, not a number but equivalent to unit, unity, individuality, in contradistinction from multiplicity and the mani-foldness of sensory experience. In metaphysics, the Supreme Idea (Plato), the absolute first principle (Neo-platonism), the universe (Parmenides), Being as such and divine in nature (Plotinus), God (Nicolaus Cusanus), the soul (Lotze). Religious philosophy and mysticism, beginning with Indian philosophy (s.v.), has favored the designation of the One for the metaphysical world-ground, the ultimate icility, the world-soul, the principle of the world conceived as reason, nous, or more personally. The One may be conceived as an independent whole or as a sum, as analytic or synthetic, as principle or ontologically. Except by mysticism, it is rarely declared a fact of sensory experience, while its transcendent or transcendental, abstract nature is stressed, e.g., in epistemology where the "I" or self is considered the unitary background of personal experience, the identity of self-consciousness, or the unity of consciousness in the synthesis of the manifoldness of ideas (Kant). --K.F.L. One-one: A relation R is one-many if for every y in the converse domain there is a unique x such that xRy. A relation R is many-one if for every x in the domain there is a unique y such that xRy. (See the article relation.) A relation is one-one, or one-to-one, if it is at the same time one-many and many-one. A one-one relation is said to be, or to determine, a one-to-one correspondence between its domain and its converse domain. --A.C. On-handedness: (Ger. Vorhandenheit) Things exist in the mode of thereness, lying- passively in a neutral space. A "deficient" form of a more basic relationship, termed at-handedness (Zuhandenheit). (Heidegger.) --H.H. Ontological argument: Name by which later authors, especially Kant, designate the alleged proof for God's existence devised by Anselm of Canterbury. Under the name of God, so the argument runs, everyone understands that greater than which nothing can be thought. Since anything being the greatest and lacking existence is less then the greatest having also existence, the former is not really the greater. The greatest, therefore, has to exist. Anselm has been reproached, already by his contemporary Gaunilo, for unduly passing from the field of logical to the field of ontological or existential reasoning. This criticism has been repeated by many authors, among them Aquinas. The argument has, however, been used, if in a somewhat modified form, by Duns Scotus, Descartes, and Leibniz. --R.A. Ontological Object: (Gr. onta, existing things + logos, science) The real or existing object of an act of knowledge as distinguished from the epistemological object. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ontologism: (Gr. on, being) In contrast to psychologism, is called any speculative system which starts philosophizing by positing absolute being, or deriving the existence of entities independently of experience merely on the basis of their being thought, or assuming that we have immediate and certain knowledge of the ground of being or God. Generally speaking any rationalistic, a priori metaphysical doctrine, specifically the philosophies of Rosmini-Serbati and Vincenzo Gioberti. As a philosophic method censored by skeptics and criticists alike, as a scholastic doctrine formerly strongly supported, revived in Italy and Belgium in the 19th century, but no longer countenanced. --K.F.L. Ontology: (Gr. on, being + logos, logic) The theory of being qua being. For Aristotle, the First Philosophy, the science of the essence of things. Introduced as a term into philosophy by Wolff. The science of fundamental principles, the doctrine of the categories. Ultimate philosophy; rational cosmology. Syn. with metaphysics. See Cosmology, First Principles, Metaphysics, Theology. --J.K.F. Operation: "(Lit. operari, to work) Any act, mental or physical, constituting a phase of the reflective process, and performed with a view to acquiring1 knowledge or information about a certain subject-nntter. --A.C.B.   In logic, see Operationism.   In philosophy of science, see Pragmatism, Scientific Empiricism. Operationism: The doctrine that the meaning of a concept is given by a set of operations.   1. The operational meaning of a term (word or symbol) is given by a semantical rule relating the term to some concrete process, object or event, or to a class of such processes, objectj or events.   2. Sentences formed by combining operationally defined terms into propositions are operationally meaningful when the assertions are testable by means of performable operations. Thus, under operational rules, terms have semantical significance, propositions have empirical significance.   Operationism makes explicit the distinction between formal (q.v.) and empirical sentences. Formal propositions are signs arranged according to syntactical rules but lacking operational reference. Such propositions, common in mathematics, logic and syntax, derive their sanction from convention, whereas an empirical proposition is acceptable (1) when its structure obeys syntactical rules and (2) when there exists a concrete procedure (a set of operations) for determining its truth or falsity (cf. Verification). Propositions purporting to be empirical are sometimes amenable to no operational test because they contain terms obeying no definite semantical rules. These sentences are sometimes called pseudo-propositions and are said to be operationally meaningless. They may, however, be 'meaningful" in other ways, e.g. emotionally or aesthetically (cf. Meaning).   Unlike a formal statement, the "truth" of an empirical sentence is never absolute and its operational confirmation serves only to increase the degree of its validity. Similarly, the semantical rule comprising the operational definition of a term has never absolute precision. Ordinarily a term denotes a class of operations and the precision of its definition depends upon how definite are the rules governing inclusion in the class.   The difference between Operationism and Logical Positivism (q.v.) is one of emphasis. Operationism's stress of empirical matters derives from the fact that it was first employed to purge physics of such concepts as absolute space and absolute time, when the theory of relativity had forced upon physicists the view that space and time are most profitably defined in terms of the operations by which they are measured. Although different methods of measuring length at first give rise to different concepts of length, wherever the equivalence of certain of these measures can be established by other operations, the concepts may legitimately be combined.   In psychology the operational criterion of meaningfulness is commonly associated with a behavioristic point of view. See Behaviorism. Since only those propositions which are testable by public and repeatable operations are admissible in science, the definition of such concepti as mind and sensation must rest upon observable aspects of the organism or its behavior. Operational psychology deals with experience only as it is indicated by the operation of differential behavior, including verbal report. Discriminations, or the concrete differential reactions of organisms to internal or external environmental states, are by some authors regarded as the most basic of all operations.   For a discussion of the role of operational definition in phvsics. see P. W. Bridgman, The Logic of Modern Physics, (New York, 1928) and The Nature of Physical Theory (Princeton, 1936). "The extension of operationism to psychology is discussed by C. C. Pratt in The Logic of Modem Psychology (New York. 1939.)   For a discussion and annotated bibliography relating to Operationism and Logical Positivism, see S. S. Stevens, Psychology and the Science of Science, Psychol. Bull., 36, 1939, 221-263. --S.S.S. Ophelimity: Noun derived from the Greek, ophelimos useful, employed by Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) in economics as the equivalent of utility, or the capacity to provide satisfaction. --J.J.R. Opinion: (Lat. opinio, from opinor, to think) An hypothesis or proposition entertained on rational grounds but concerning which doubt can reasonably exist. A belief. See Hypothesis, Certainty, Knowledge. --J.K.F- Opposition: (Lat. oppositus, pp. of oppono, to oppose) Positive actual contradiction. One of Aristotle's Post-predicaments. In logic any contrariety or contradiction, illustrated by the "Square of Opposition". Syn. with: conflict. See Logic, formal, § 4. --J.K.F. Optimism: (Lat. optimus, the best) The view inspired by wishful thinking, success, faith, or philosophic reflection, that the world as it exists is not so bad or even the best possible, life is good, and man's destiny is bright. Philosophically most persuasively propounded by Leibniz in his Theodicee, according to which God in his wisdom would have created a better world had he known or willed such a one to exist. Not even he could remove moral wrong and evil unless he destroyed the power of self-determination and hence the basis of morality. All systems of ethics that recognize a supreme good (Plato and many idealists), subscribe to the doctrines of progressivism (Turgot, Herder, Comte, and others), regard evil as a fragmentary view (Josiah Royce et al.) or illusory, or believe in indemnification (Henry David Thoreau) or melioration (Emerson), are inclined optimistically. Practically all theologies advocating a plan of creation and salvation, are optimistic though they make the good or the better dependent on moral effort, right thinking, or belief, promising it in a future existence. Metaphysical speculation is optimistic if it provides for perfection, evolution to something higher, more valuable, or makes room for harmonies or a teleology. See Pessimism. --K.F.L. Order: A class is said to be partially ordered by a dyadic relation R if it coincides with the field of R, and R is transitive and reflexive, and xRy and yRx never both hold when x and y are different. If in addition R is connected, the class is said to be ordered (or simply ordered) by R, and R is called an ordering relation.   Whitehcid and Russell apply the term serial relation to relations which are transitive, irreflexive, and connected (and, in consequence, also asymmetric). However, the use of serial relations in this sense, instead ordering relations as just defined, is awkward in connection with the notion of order for unit classes.   Examples: The relation not greater than among leal numbers is an ordering relation. The relation less than among real numbers is a serial relation. The real numbers are simply ordered by the former relation. In the algebra of classes (logic formal, § 7), the classes are partially ordered by the relation of class inclusion.   For explanation of the terminology used in making the above definitions, see the articles connexity, reflexivity, relation, symmetry, transitivity. --A.C. Order type: See relation-number. Ordinal number: A class b is well-ordered by a dyadic relation R if it is ordered by R (see order) and, for every class a such that a ⊂ b, there is a member x of a, such that xRy holds for every member y of a; and R is then called a well-ordering relation. The ordinal number of a class b well-ordered by a relation R, or of a well-ordering relation R, is defined to be the relation-number (q. v.) of R.   The ordinal numbers of finite classes (well-ordered by appropriate relations) are called finite ordinal numbers. These are 0, 1, 2, ... (to be distinguished, of course, from the finite cardinal numbers 0, 1, 2, . . .).   The first non-finite (transfinite or infinite) ordinal number is the ordinal number of the class of finite ordinal numbers, well-ordered in their natural order, 0, 1, 2, . . .; it is usually denoted by the small Greek letter omega. --A.C.   G. Cantor, Contributions to the Founding of the Theory of Transfinite Numbers, translated and with an introduction by P. E. B. Jourdain, Chicago and London, 1915. (new ed. 1941); Whitehead and Russell, Princtpia Mathematica. vol. 3. Orexis: (Gr. orexis) Striving; desire; the conative aspect of mind, as distinguished from the cognitive and emotional (Aristotle). --G.R.M.. Organicism: A theory of biology that life consists in the organization or dynamic system of the organism. Opposed to mechanism and vitalism. --J.K.F. Organism: An individual animal or plant, biologically interpreted. A. N. Whitehead uses the term to include also physical bodies and to signify anything material spreading through space and enduring in time. --R.B.W. Organismic Psychology: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, an instrument) A system of theoretical psychology which construes the structure of the mind in organic rather than atomistic terms. See Gestalt Psychology; Psychological Atomism. --L.W. Organization: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, work) A structured whole. The systematic unity of parts in a purposive whole. A dynamic system. Order in something actual. --J.K.F. Organon: (Gr. organon) The title traditionally given to the body of Aristotle's logical treatises. The designation appears to have originated among the Peripatetics after Aristotle's time, and expresses their view that logic is not a part of philosophy (as the Stoics maintained) but rather the instrument (organon) of philosophical inquiry. See Aristotelianism. --G.R.M.   In Kant. A system of principles by which pure knowledge may be acquired and established.   Cf. Fr. Bacon's Novum Organum. --O.F.K. Oriental Philosophy: A general designation used loosely to cover philosophic tradition exclusive of that grown on Greek soil and including the beginnings of philosophical speculation in Egypt, Arabia, Iran, India, and China, the elaborate systems of India, Greater India, China, and Japan, and sometimes also the religion-bound thought of all these countries with that of the complex cultures of Asia Minor, extending far into antiquity. Oriental philosophy, though by no means presenting a homogeneous picture, nevertheless shares one characteristic, i.e., the practical outlook on life (ethics linked with metaphysics) and the absence of clear-cut distinctions between pure speculation and religious motivation, and on lower levels between folklore, folk-etymology, practical wisdom, pre-scientiiic speculation, even magic, and flashes of philosophic insight. Bonds with Western, particularly Greek philosophy have no doubt existed even in ancient times. Mutual influences have often been conjectured on the basis of striking similarities, but their scientific establishment is often difficult or even impossible. Comparative philosophy (see especially the work of Masson-Oursel) provides a useful method. Yet a thorough treatment of Oriental Philosophy is possible only when the many languages in which it is deposited have been more thoroughly studied, the psychological and historical elements involved in the various cultures better investigated, and translations of the relevant documents prepared not merely from a philological point of view or out of missionary zeal, but by competent philosophers who also have some linguistic training. Much has been accomplished in this direction in Indian and Chinese Philosophy (q.v.). A great deal remains to be done however before a definitive history of Oriental Philosophy may be written. See also Arabian, and Persian Philosophy. --K.F.L. Origen: (185-254) The principal founder of Christian theology who tried to enrich the ecclesiastic thought of his day by reconciling it with the treasures of Greek philosophy. Cf. Migne PL. --R.B.W. Ormazd: (New Persian) Same as Ahura Mazdah (q.v.), the good principle in Zoroastrianism, and opposed to Ahriman (q.v.). --K.F.L. Orphic Literature: The mystic writings, extant only in fragments, of a Greek religious-philosophical movement of the 6th century B.C., allegedly started by the mythical Orpheus. In their mysteries, in which mythology and rational thinking mingled, the Orphics concerned themselves with cosmogony, theogony, man's original creation and his destiny after death which they sought to influence to the better by pure living and austerity. They taught a symbolism in which, e.g., the relationship of the One to the many was clearly enunciated, and believed in the soul as involved in reincarnation. Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Plato were influenced by them. --K.F.L. Ortega y Gasset, Jose: Born in Madrid, May 9, 1883. At present in Buenos Aires, Argentine. Son of Ortega y Munillo, the famous Spanish journalist. Studied at the College of Jesuits in Miraflores and at the Central University of Madrid. In the latter he presented his Doctor's dissertation, El Milenario, in 1904, thereby obtaining his Ph.D. degree. After studies in Leipzig, Berlin, Marburg, under the special influence of Hermann Cohen, the great exponent of Kant, who taught him the love for the scientific method and awoke in him the interest in educational philosophy, Ortega came to Spain where, after the death of Nicolas Salmeron, he occupied the professorship of metaphysics at the Central University of Madrid. The following may be considered the most important works of Ortega y Gasset:     Meditaciones del Quijote, 1914;   El Espectador, I-VIII, 1916-1935;   El Tema de Nuestro Tiempo, 1921;   España Invertebrada, 1922;   Kant, 1924;   La Deshumanizacion del Arte, 1925;   Espiritu de la Letra, 1927;   La Rebelion de las Masas, 1929;   Goethe desde Adentio, 1934;   Estudios sobre el Amor, 1939;   Ensimismamiento y Alteracion, 1939;   El Libro de las Misiones, 1940;   Ideas y Creencias, 1940;     and others.   Although brought up in the Marburg school of thought, Ortega is not exactly a neo-Kantian. At the basis of his Weltanschauung one finds a denial of the fundamental presuppositions which characterized European Rationalism. It is life and not thought which is primary. Things have a sense and a value which must be affirmed independently. Things, however, are to be conceived as the totality of situations which constitute the circumstances of a man's life. Hence, Ortega's first philosophical principle: "I am myself plus my circumstances". Life as a problem, however, is but one of the poles of his formula. Reason is the other. The two together function, not by dialectical opposition, but by necessary coexistence. Life, according to Ortega, does not consist in being, but rather, in coming to be, and as such it is of the nature of direction, program building, purpose to be achieved, value to be realized. In this sense the future as a time dimension acquires new dignity, and even the present and the past become articulate and meaning-full only in relation to the future. Even History demands a new point of departure and becomes militant with new visions. --J.A.F. Orthodoxy: Beliefs which are declared by a group to be true and normative. Heresy is a departure from and relative to a given orthodoxy. --V.S. Orthos Logos: See Right Reason. Ostensible Object: (Lat. ostendere, to show) The object envisaged by cognitive act irrespective of its actual existence. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ostensive: (Lat. ostendere, to show) Property of a concept or predicate by virtue of which it refers to and is clarified by reference to its instances. --A.C.B. Ostwald, Wilhelm: (1853-1932) German chemist. Winner of the Nobel prize for chemistry in 1909. In Die Uberwindung des wissenschaftlichen Materialistmus and in Naturphilosophie, his two best known works in the field of philosophy, he advocates a dynamic theory in opposition to materialism and mechanism. All properties of matter, and the psychic as well, are special forms of energy. --L.E.D. Oupnekhat: Anquetil Duperron's Latin translation of the Persian translation of 50 Upanishads (q.v.), a work praised by Schopenhauer as giving him complete consolation. --K.F.L. Outness: A term employed by Berkeley to express the experience of externality, that is the ideas of space and things placed at a distance. Hume used it in the sense of distance Hamilton understood it as the state of being outside of consciousness in a really existing world of material things. --J.J.R. Overindividual: Term used by H. Münsterberg to translate the German überindividuell. The term is applied to any cognitive or value object which transcends the individual subject. --L.W. P

thrid ::: a. --> Third. ::: v. t. --> To pass through in the manner of a thread or a needle; to make or find a course through; to thread.
To make or effect (a way or course) through something; as, to thrid one&


"To find highest beauty is to find God; to reveal, to embody, to create, as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God.” The Human Cycle

“To find highest beauty is to find God; to reveal, to embody, to create, as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God.” The Human Cycle

To some minds the ethical quest results in a failure to find and in a denial of the existence of any single moral criterion -- this is the position of such intuitionists as G. E. Moore and W. D. Ross and of some relativists. -- W.K.F.

To spend all the energy in japa or meditation is a strain which even those who arc accustomed to successful meditation find it difficult to maintain — unless in periods when there is an uninterrupted flow of experiences from above.

Transpathy: (Lat. trans, across + pathos, feeling) As distinct from sympathy is feeling engendered by 'contigion'. In sympathy the function of 'after-experiencing' is so interwoven with true sympathy that in experienced separation of the two never occurs. In the case of transpathy, the two functions are distinctly separated from eich other in experience. Transpathy takes place between emotional states, presupposes no knowledge of the other's joy or sorrow. One detects afterwards that an emotion which one finds in oneself derives from 'contagion', which took place in an earlier gathering. See Sympathy. -- H.H.

treasure-trove ::: n. --> Any money, bullion, or the like, found in the earth, or otherwise hidden, the owner of which is not known. In England such treasure belongs to the crown; whereas similar treasure found in the sea, or upon the surface of the land, belongs to the finder if no owner appears.

trichina ::: n. --> A small, slender nematoid worm (Trichina spiralis) which, in the larval state, is parasitic, often in immense numbers, in the voluntary muscles of man, the hog, and many other animals. When insufficiently cooked meat containing the larvae is swallowed by man, they are liberated and rapidly become adult, pair, and the ovoviviparous females produce in a short time large numbers of young which find their way into the muscles, either directly, or indirectly by means of the blood. Their presence in the muscles and the intestines

triple world ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Godhead has built this universe in a complex system of worlds which we find both within us and without, subjectively cognised and objectively sensed. It is a rising tier of earths and heavens; it is a stream of diverse waters; it is a Light of seven rays, or of eight or nine or ten; it is a Hill of many plateaus. The seers often image it in a series of trios; there are three earths and three heavens. More, there is a triple world below, — Heaven, Earth and the intervening mid-region; a triple world between, the shining heavens of the Sun; a triple world above, the supreme and rapturous abodes of the Godhead.” *The Secret of the Veda

trover ::: n. --> The gaining possession of any goods, whether by finding or by other means.
An action to recover damages against one who found goods, and would not deliver them to the owner on demand; an action which lies in any case to recover the value of goods wrongfully converted by another to his own use. In this case the finding, though alleged, is an immaterial fact; the injury lies in the conversion.


Un of the Spirit in things, and only outwardly an evolution of species. Thus also, the delight of existence emerges from the original insentience, first in the contrary forms of pleasure and pain and then has to find itself in the bliss of the Spirit or as it is called in the Upanishads, the bliss of the Brahman.

verdict ::: n. --> The answer of a jury given to the court concerning any matter of fact in any cause, civil or criminal, committed to their examination and determination; the finding or decision of a jury on the matter legally submitted to them in the course of the trial of a cause.
Decision; judgment; opinion pronounced; as, to be condemned by the verdict of the public.


Verification, Confirmation: Verification: the procedure of finding out whether a sentence (or proposition) is true or false. A sentence is verifiable (in principle) if a (positive or negative) verification of it is possible under suitable conditions, leaving aside technical difficulties. Many philosophical doctrines (e.g. Scientific Empiricism, q.v.) hold that a verification is replaced here by the concept of confirmation. A certain hypothesis is said to be confirmed to a certain degree by a certain amount of evidence. The concept of degree of confirmation is closely connected or perhaps identical (Reichenbach) with the statistical concept of probability (q.v.). A sentence is confirmable if suitable (possible, not necessarily actual) experiences could contribute positively or negatively to its confirmation. Many etnpiricists (see e.g. Scientific Empiricism 1C) regard either verifiability (e.g. Wittgenstein, the Vienna Circle in its earlier phase) or confirimability as a criterion of meaningfulness (in the sense of factual meaning, see Meaning, Kinds of, 2). This view leads to a rejection of certain metaphysical doctrines (see Anti-metaphysics, 2)

vertigo ::: n. --> Dizziness or swimming of the head; an affection of the head in which objects, though stationary, appear to move in various directions, and the person affected finds it difficult to maintain an erect posture; giddiness.
Any one of numerous species of small land snails belonging to the genus Vertigo, having an elongated or conical spiral shell and usually teeth in the aperture.


Vital mind ::: The function of this mind is not to think and reason, to perceive, consider and find out or value things, for that is the function of the thinking mind proper, buddhi, — but to plan or dream or imagine what can be done. It makes forma- tions for the future which the will can try to carry out if oppor* tunity and circumstances become favourable or even it can work to make them favourable.

Vital-Plane / Life World ::: A whole vital plane connected with the life-world or desire-world is hidden in us, a secret consciousness in which life and desire find their untrammelled play and their easy self-expression and from there throw their influences and formations on our outer life.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 468


vital plane ::: the plane connected with the life-world or desire-world, a plane in which life and desire find their untrammeled play and their easy self-expression and from there throw their influences and formations on our outer life.

Vital — weak and strong ::: A weak vital has not the strength to turn spirituaUy — and being weak, more easily falls under a wrong inSuence and even when it wants, finds it difficult to accept anything beyond its own habitual nature.

vituperate ::: v. t. --> To find fault with; to scold; to overwhelm with wordy abuse; to censure severely or abusively; to rate.

wainage ::: n. --> A finding of carriages, carts, etc., for the transportation of goods, produce, etc.
See Gainage, a.


Wang Yang-ming considered desire as an obstacle to the mind. The Neo-Confucians of the Ch'ing period, especially Tai Tung-yuan (1723-1777), however, argued that since desire is part of our nature, it has its rightful place, just as the vital force has its rightful place beside Reason. The main problem then would be to attain the harmony of human passion (ch'ing) and the originally good human nature (hsing). Thus Neo-Confucianism reasserted the principle of central harmony (chung yung), and central harmony is the Moral Law (tao). This Law finds expression in constant and orderly transformation, the realization of which is Reason. It will be seen that Neo-Confucianism is essentially compatible with western philosophy and science. It is to be expected, therefore, that both Neo-Confucianism and western thought will play a great role in any future philosophy in China. -- W.T.C

way-wise ::: a. --> Skillful in finding the way; well acquainted with the way or route; wise from having traveled.

weakness ::: “Weakness puts the same test and question to the strengths and energies and greatnesses in which we glory. Power is the play of life, shows its degree, finds the value of its expression; weakness is the play of death pursuing life in its movement and stressing the limit of its acquired energy.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

"We are ignorant also of the superconscient, that which we ordinarily call spirit or oversoul; yet this we find to be our highest and widest self, Sachchidananda creating and governing all that we are and become by His divine Maya.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga*

“We are ignorant also of the superconscient, that which we ordinarily call spirit or oversoul; yet this we find to be our highest and widest self, Sachchidananda creating and governing all that we are and become by His divine Maya.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

We are ignorant also of the superconscient, that which we ordinarily call spirit or oversoul; yet this we find to be our highest and widest self, Sachchidananda creating and governing all that we are and become by His divine Maya.

“What the ’void’ feels as a clutch is felt by the Mother only as a reminding finger laid on her cheek. It is one advantage of the expression ‘as if’ that it leaves the field open for such variation. It is intended to suggest without saying it that behind the sombre void is the face of a mother. The two other ‘as if’s have the same motive and I do not find them jarring upon me. The second is at a sufficient distance from the first and it is not obtrusive enough to prejudice the third which more nearly follows….” Letters on Savitri

YOGIC POWERS. ::: The idea that yogins do not or ought not to use these powers I regard as an ascetic superstition. I believe that all yogins who have these powers do use them whenever they find that that they are called from within to do so. They may refrain if they think the use in a particular case is contrary to the Divine Will or see that prevcofing one evil may-be open- ing the door to worse or for any other veiled reason, but not

yuva kavih, priyo atithir amartyo mandrajihvah rtacit rtava ::: the Youth, the Seer, the beloved and immortal Guest vith his honeyed tongue of ecstasy, the Truthconscious, the Truth-finder. [Ved.]



QUOTES [626 / 626 - 1500 / 65810]


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   93 Sri Aurobindo
   41 The Mother
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   9 Saint Augustine of Hippo
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   1 Mitar Tarabich
   1 Michel Henry
   1 Meng-Tse II. 7.3
   1 Meng-Tse
   1 Matthew VII. 7
   1 Mark Twain
   1 Marilyn Monroe
   1 Marijn Haverbeke
   1 Manly P Hall
   1 Manapurush Swami Shivananda
   1 Mahatma Gandhi
   1 Madeline Delbrêl
   1 Machig Labdron
   1 Ludwig Wittgenstein
   1 Lilly Wachowski
   1 Lewis Carroll
   1 Leo the Great
   1 ken-wilber
   1 Ken Wilber
   1 Keiji Nishitani
   1 Karen Maezen Miller
   1 J. Tauler
   1 Joseph Goldstein
   1 John Steinbeck
   1 John Paul II
   1 Jeff Foster
   1 JB
   1 James V. Schall
   1 Jalaluddin Rumi
   1 Jac O'Keeffe
   1 Jack Kerouac
   1 Israel Regardie
   1 Isaac Newton
   1 Imitation of Christ
   1 id
   1 Ian Tucker
   1 Iamblichus
   1 Iain McGilchrist
   1 Howard Gardner
   1 Hermes
   1 Heraclitus
   1 Henri J M Nouwen
   1 Henri Bergson
   1 Helwa
   1 Haruki Murakami
   1 Groucho Marx
   1 Gospel of Thomas
   1 Gertrude Stein
   1 George Harrison
   1 George Bernard Shaw
   1 George A. Moore
   1 Gautam Dasgupta (1976:125-26)
   1 Fyodor Dostoevsky
   1 F. Scott Fitzgerald
   1 Francis Bacon
   1 Fo-shu-hing-tsan-king
   1 Fo-sho-hing-tsan-king
   1 Federico Garcia Lorca
   1 Ernest Holmes
   1 Emerald Tablet
   1 Eliphas Levi
   1 Edward Schon
   1 Eckhart Tolle:
   1 Dr Robert A Hatch
   1 Don Edward Beck
   1 Didymus of Alexandria
   1 Dhammapada 280
   1 Denis Diderot
   1 Deepak Chopra
   1 Dainin Katagiri Roshi
   1 C. S. Lewis
   1 Claudio Naranjo
   1 Chatral Rinpoche
   1 Charles Bukowski
   1 Catherine of Siena
   1 Carlyle
   1 Buddhist Text
   1 Buddha
   1 Bruce Lee
   1 Bhagavad Gita IV. 38
   1 Bessie Anderson Stanley
   1 Bertrand Russell
   1 Basil the Great
   1 Bankei
   1 Baha ullah
   1 Anselm
   1 Anon.
   1 and yet
   1 Anandamayi Ma
   1 Amiel
   1 Alice Bailey
   1 al-Habib Omar bin Hafiz
   1 Albert Einstein
   1 Albert Camus
   1 Alan Cohen
   1 Plotinus
   1 Meister Eckhart
   1 Leonardo da Vinci
   1 Kobayashi Issa
   1 Heraclitus
   1 Chuang Tzu
   1 Angelus Silesius
   1 Abu Hamid al-Ghazali
   1 Ahmed Halif: Mystic Odes
   1 Ahmad Halif
   1

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   29 Anonymous
   20 Rumi
   12 John Green
   11 Charles Bukowski
   9 Mark Twain
   9 Jane Austen
   8 Pablo Picasso
   8 Mason Cooley
   7 Suzanne Collins
   7 Stephen King
   7 Joseph Finder
   7 J K Rowling
   7 C S Lewis
   7 Colleen Hoover
   6 Jeanette Winterson
   6 George Herbert
   5 William Shakespeare
   5 Timothy Findley
   5 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   5 Publilius Syrus

1:The answers will find you. ~ Jeff Foster,
2:Will the mind find itself? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
3:Find out who has bound you," said the Master., ~ ?,
4:Find what you love and let it kill you. ~ Charles Bukowski,
5:What's meant to be will always find a way. ~ Trisha Yearwood,
6:Inspiration does exist, but it must find you working. ~ Pablo Picasso,
7:The right people will always find you at the right time." ~ R.M. Drake,
8:I lifted up my hands to find a lamp amidst the darkness. ~ Omar Khayyam,
9:Search for Jesus and in Him you'll find me. ~ Saint Terese of the Andes,
10:To find our real being and know it truly is to acquire wisdom. ~ Porphyry,
11:Whoso seeketh with diligence, he shall find. ~ Bahaullah: the Seven Valleys,
12:One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple. ~ Jack Kerouac,
13:It is in changing that we find purpose. ~ Heraclitus,
14:Cherish those who seek the truth but beware of those who find it.
   ~ Voltaire,
15:If you want to find God, hang out in the space between your thoughts. ~ Alan Cohen,
16:Remain with Me and you will find peace. ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
17:Whatever you do to find your Self will take your attention from it. ~ Jac O'Keeffe,
18:Where can I find a man who has forgotten words so I can talk with him?" ~ Zhuangzi,
19:You must find the place inside yourself where nothing is impossible." ~ Deepak Chopra,
20:If Truth isn't right where you are, where else do you expect to find it?" ~ Zen Saying,
21:All books will become light in proportion as you find light in them. ~ Mortimer J Adler,
22:So, I love you because the entire universe conspired to help me find you. ~ Paulo Coelho,
23:Be ever engaged, so that whenever the devil calls he may find you occupied. ~ Saint Jerome,
24:I came to this earth so that I could find my way back to my Beloved (God). ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
25:Those who love her discover her easily and those that seek her do find her. ~ Book of Wisdom,
26:And you will seek Me and find Me, when you search for Me with all your heart. ~ Old Testament,
27:Seek and ye, shall find. ~ Matthew VII. 7, the Eternal Wisdom
28:Within tears, find hidden laughter. Seek treasures amid ruins, sincere one. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
29:The problem is not to find the answer, it's to face the answer ~ Terence McKenna, [T5],
30:Lose yourself wholly; and the more you lose, the more you will find. ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
31:Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go." ~ T. S. Eliot,
32:People do not wander around and then find themselves at the top of Mount Everest." ~ Zig Ziglar,
33:To find the Beloved, you must become the Beloved. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
34:We never find out the strength of the evil impulse inside us until we try to fight it. ~ C S Lewis,
35:Where there are humans, you'll find flies and Buddhas. ~ Kobayashi Issa,
36:A man travels the world over in search of what he needs and returns home to find it." ~ George A. Moore,
37:For you and I both have in our lives some people whom we find it pretty hard to love. ~ Mother Angelica,
38:Intelligence is not the ability to store information, but to know where to find it.
   ~ Albert Einstein,
39:I've often lost myself, in order to find the burn that keeps everything awake
   ~ Federico Garcia Lorca,
40:When you've seen beyond yourself, then you may find, peace of mind is waiting there." ~ George Harrison,
41:I will no longer mutilate and destroy myself in order to find a secret behind the ruins. ~ Hermann Hesse,
42:A good teacher must be able to put himself in the place of those who find learning hard.
   ~ Eliphas Levi,
43:Feel the sweetness in your heart,
then you may find the sweetness
in every heart. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
44:We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. ~ C S Lewis, The Abolition of Man (1943),
45:I find that the more I relinquish my old habits of thought, the happier I am. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
46:I love those who love me, and those who seek me diligently find me. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Proverbs, 8:17,
47:Here is a test to find whether your mission on earth is finished. If you're alive it isn't." ~ Richard Bach,
48:The Self cannot be found in books. You have to find it for yourself, within yourself. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
49:The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. ~ Mark Twain,
50:When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe. ~ John Muir,
51:To find god you must offer to Him your body, mind, and riches.. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
52:In the interior of each atom that thou shalt cleave thou shalt find imprisoned a sun. ~ Ahmed Halif, Mystic Odes,
53:You know that you know nothing. Find out that knowledge. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
54:Awareness isn't hidden. But you can only find it right now. It's only now. ~ Bodhidharma,
55:Live the life in front of you, be the life you are, and see what you find out for yourself." ~ Karen Maezen Miller,
56:Where can I find a man who has forgotten words so I can have a word with him? ~ Chuang Tzu,
57:Flying from work is never the way to find peace. ~ Swami Vivekananda, (C.W. IV. 130),
58:If I tell you something, you will stick to it and limit your own capacity to find out for yourself. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
59:It is impossible to find a saint who did not take the two P's" seriously: prayer and penance. ~ Saint Francis Xavier,
60:And come you now, O Lord my God, teach my heart where and how it may seek you, where and how it may find you. ~ Anselm,
61:If one completes the journey to one's own heart, one will find oneself in the heart of everyone else. ~ Thomas Keating,
62:If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think, in terms of energy, frequency and vibrations." ~ Nikola Tesla,
63:Lift the veil that obscures the heart, and there you will find what you are looking for.
   ~ Kabir,
64:Never say, I cannot. Look more closely, you will find that it means in reality, I want not. ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, [T5],
65:Seek the Truth, though you must go to China to find it. ~ Mohammed, the Eternal Wisdom
66:Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
67:Wherever you find movement, there you find life and a soul. ~ Thales, the Eternal Wisdom
68:Approach what you find repulsive, help the ones you think you cannot help, and go places that scare you. ~ Machig Labdron,
69:We swallow greedily any lie that flatters us, but we sip only little by little at a truth we find bitter. ~ Denis Diderot,
70:Books are a poor substitute for female companionship, but they are easier to find. ~ Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear
71:A good means to discovery is to take away certain parts of a system to find out how the rest behaves. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
72:If you find me not within you, you will never find me. For, I have been with you, from the beginning of me. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
73:To find our real being and know it truly is to acquire wisdom. ~ Porphyry, the Eternal Wisdom
74:Whoso seeketh with diligence, he shall find. ~ Bahaullah: the Seven Valleys, the Eternal Wisdom
75:I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. ~ Groucho Marx,
76:If you cannot find the truth right where you are, where else do you expect to find it?
   ~ Dogen Zenji, [T5],
77:If you are unable to find the truth right where you are, where else do you expect to find it?
   ~ Dogen Zenji,
78:If you seek the Cross of Christ, take my heart. There you will find the suffering Lord." ~ Saint Clare of Montefalco, (1268-1308),
79:The devotee who goes on patiently with his devotions is sure to find God at last. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
80:Unless one always speaks the truth, one cannot find God who is the soul of truth. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
81:When we go to confession, we ought to persuade ourselves to find Jesus Christ in the person of our confessor." ~ Saint Philip Neri,
82:Amazing, isn't it, that most people find the same religion that their parents have. And naturally this is the true religion." ~ Anon.,
83:The Self cannot be the doer. Find out who is the doer and the Self is revealed. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
84:Find the source. The false 'I' will disappear and the real 'I' will be realized. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
85:Let the man [woman] find out his undying Self and die and be immortal and happy. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
86:The Self cannot be found in books. You have to find it for yourself in yourself. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
87:Who is the doubter? Who is the thinker? Find him [her]. These doubts will vanish. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
88:Why was I born, O God, if not to find Thee?
   Why do I die, O God, if not to come to Thee?
   ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan, Sayings of Hazrat Khan,
89:Divine goodness not only does not reject the repentant soul, but always seeks to find even the obstinate. ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
90:A dreamer is man who can find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
91:Let the man find out his undying Self and die and be immortal and happy. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks, 64,
92:Seek in reading and thou shalt find in meditation; knock in prayer and it shall be opened in contemplation. ~ Saint John of the Cross, [T5],
93:When we realize the everlasting truth of "everything changes" and find our composure in it, we find ourselves in Nirvana." ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
94:One has sometimes to deny God in order to find him. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Spiritual Aim and Life,
95:If we are calm and persevering, we shall find not only ourselves, but our souls, and with that, God Himself. ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
96:When you investigate by turning inwards, you find there is no such thing as the mind. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
97:He has need of death to find a greater life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Vision and the Boon,
98:Those who love her discover her easily and those that seek her do find her. ~ Book of Wisdom, the Eternal Wisdom
99:Do you believe there is some place that will make the soul less thirsty? In that great absence you will find nothing. ~ Kabir,
100:The only Zen you can find on the tops of mountains is the Zen you bring up there." ~ Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance),
101:The seat of Realization is within and the seeker cannot find it as an object outside him. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
102:We renounce ourselves in order to find ourselves. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads, The Supramental Godhead,
103:You ignore what is real and hold on to that which is unreal, then try to find what it is. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
104:Keep an open mind, dive within and find out the Self. The truth will itself dawn upon you. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
105:Among the thousands one can hardly find more than a hundred of them who are being saved, and even about that I am doubtful. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
106:Find out who you are, but don't cling to any definition. Mutate as many times as necessary to live in the totality of your being. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
107:Look within, and you will find the inner teacher, since he is in you and with you. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
108:We find in others what is in us. If we always find mud around us, it proves that there is mud somewhere in us. ~ The Mother,
109:The most advanced technology and the most valuable asset that you will ever own is your mind. You will not find anything greater. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
110:Be quiet and confident and try to find me inside yourself, it will help you to sleep.
   ~ The Mother, White Roses, Aug 5 1959,
111:The answers are out there, and they are looking for you, and they will find you if you want them to...
   ~ Lilly Wachowski, The Matrix, Trinity to Neo,
112:How difficult it is to find a good name for a function is a good indication of how clear a concept it is that
   ~ Marijn Haverbeke, Eloquent Javascript,
113:When a savior becomes incarnate, innumerable are the beings who find salvation by taking refuge in him. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
114:Your business is to find the real nature of the mind. Then you will know that there is no mind. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
115:Find wherefrom thoughts emerge. Then you will abide in the ever-present inmost Self and be free. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
116:If I find, near the end of this life, to have been a mere Wizard, it is likely due to the limits of aspiration. In my desire to Know without Being. ~ JB,
117:As the drowning man pants hard for breath, so must ones heart yearn for the Lord before one can find Him. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
118:I am always seated in your heart, consciously living in you.
Open your heart and you will find me already there. ~ The Mother,
119:A great joy is always deep in our heart, and always we can find it there. With my blessings
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
120:Every man who returns into himself, will find there traces of the Divinity. ~ Cicero, "De Regibus. I. 22, the Eternal Wisdom
121:Keep an open mind, dive within and find out the Self. The truth will itself dawn upon you. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks, 63
122:Your greatness is within and only in yourselves can you find a spectacle worthy of your regard. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
123:Oh beloved, seeking and searching the seeker is lost. And the ocean has fallen into the dewdrop; now it is impossible to find it. ~ Kabir,
124:I write to keep from going mad from the contradictions I find among mankind - and to work some of those contradictions out for myself.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
125:Like one who wakes to find his dreams were true
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Dream Twilight of the Ideal,
126:The malady of the world is that the individual cannot find his real soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Double Soul in Man,
127:Samsara is the tendency to find fault with others, an unbearable fire-bowl, a dungeon dark, a deep swamp of three poisons, a fearful wave of evil lives. ~ Naropa,
128:A man should be glad of heart. If you have joy no longer, find out where you have fallen into error. ~ Tolstoi, the Eternal Wisdom
129:Amateurs believe that the world should work the way they want it to. Professionals realize that they have to work with the world as they find it." ~ Shane Parrish,
130:Does the world say that it exists? It is you who say that there is a world. Find out the Self who says it. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
131:The Self cannot be found in books. You have to find it out for yourself, in yourself. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day by Day, 16-3-45,
132:The true path is shadowy and still, far away and hard to find; embracing none but empty thoughts, let me walk through past and present ~ Natsume Soseki, 1867-1916,
133:Those who wait on the Lord will find new strength. ... They will run and not grow weary. They will walk and not fain'
   ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Isaiah, 40:31 NLT.,
134:We always find that those who walked closest to Christ were those who had to bear the greatest trials. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
135:One way or another, we all have to find what best fosters the flowering of our humanity in this contemporary life and dedicate ourselves to that. ~ Joseph Campbell,
136:In the interior of each atom that thou shalt cleave thou shalt find imprisoned a sun. ~ Ahmed Halif: Mystic Odes, the Eternal Wisdom
137:You must dive again and again into the ocean to find pearls. God is in the world, but you must persevere to see Him. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
138:... People will think and think, but they will not be able to find the right cure, which will be with God's help, all around them and in themselves." ~ Mitar Tarabich,
139:Travel to all the four corners of the earth, you will find nothing anywhere. Whatever there is, is here, in the heart. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
140:When we can draw from ourselves all our felicity, we find nothing vexatious to us in the order of Nature. ~ Cicero, the Eternal Wisdom
141:One must lose one's little lower self to find the greater self. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Supermind and the Yoga of Works,
142:The Great spiritual geniuses, whether it was Moses, Buddha, Plato, Socrates, Jesus, or Emerson... have taught man to look within himself to find God.
   ~ Ernest Holmes,
143:He who wants to find God, finds God. Go and verify it in your own life! Try for three days and thou art sure to succeed. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
144:In the silence and not in the thought we shall find the Self. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Release from the Heart and the Mind,
145:Every one of us is precious in the cosmic perspective. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another. ~ Carl Sagan,
146:It is in the Divine that we shall always find all that we need. 17 April 1954
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, The Divine Is with You [10],
147:Persevere in thy quest and thou shalt find what thou seekest. Pursue thy aim unswervingly and thou shalt gain victory. Struggle earnestly and thou shalt triumph. ~ Buddha,
148:We are not here to make our life easy and comfortable; we are here to find the Divine, to become the Divine, to manifest the Divine. ~ The Mother,
149:Your search is like searching all over the world, ceaselessly straining to find the necklace around your own neck. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
150:Let the world bother about its reality or falsehood. Find out about your own reality. Then all things become clear. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
151:Dive deep into the chambers of your heart. Find out the real, infinite 'I'. Rest there peacefully for ever and become identical with the Supreme Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
152:Every heart sings a song, incomplete, until another heart whispers back. Those who wish to sing always find a song. At the touch of a lover, everyone becomes a poet. ~ Plato,
153:One who worships God but also cherishes worldly desires will find their devotion wasted, run through the rat-holes of desire. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
154:Thought is projected from the Self. Find out from where it rises. Thoughts will cease and the Self alone will remain. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
155:Trying to trace it [the ego, "I"] and find its source, we see it has no separate existence but merges in the real 'I'. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
156:`Who am I to meditate on an object ?' Such a one must be told to find the Self. That is the finality. That is vichara. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
157:Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
158:If thou canst raise thy spirit above Space and Time, thou shalt find thyself at every moment in eternity. ~ Angelus Silesius, the Eternal Wisdom
159:Keep thyself from all evil in thought, in word, in act. If thou transgress not these three frontiers of wisdom, thou shalt find the way pursued by the saints. ~ Magghima Nikaya,
160:Delve down into That which only is, for when you achieve this you find 'That am I'; there is and can be nothing but That. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
161:Perhaps what is inexpressible (what I find mysterious and am not able to express) is the background against which whatever I could express has its meaning. ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein,
162:'Tis Love, 'tis Love fills up the gulfs of Time!
By Love we find our kinship with the stars. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
163:If you can detect and find out the universal illusion of Maya, it will fly away from you just as a thief runs away when found out. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
164:The model we choose to use to understand something determines what we find. ~ Iain McGilchrist, The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World,
165:What you really need to find is your true purpose in life, and how to accomplish it. This is what will make you truly happy and at ease. ~ Walt Whitman,
166:Becoming liberated from samsara is an inner journey. You can travel across the world and universe, and you will not find a way out. To get out, you must go in. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
167:But from there you will seek the Lord your God and you will find him, if you search after him with all your heart and with all your soul. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Deuteronomy, 4:29,
168:When you have made progress in wisdom, you will find no situation troublesome to you; every condition will be happy. ~ Plntarch, the Eternal Wisdom
169:Almost everything that I've ever worried about has never happened." ~ Ian Tucker, English author, wrote "Your Simple Path: Find happiness in every step,", (2014), etc. More quotes:,
170:I love the dark hours of my being. My mind deepens into them.There I can find, as in old letters, the days of my life, already lived, and held like a legend, and understood. ~ Rilke,
171:I must attain perfection in this life! I must find God with a single utterance!" By such violent love, the Lord is quickly attracted. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
172:Indeed, I am a forest and a night of dark trees: but he who is not afraid of my darkness will also find rose slopes under my cypresses. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra,
173:Dwell, O mind, within yourself;
Enter no other's home.
If you but seek there, you will find
All you are searching for. . . . ~ Sri Ramakrishna, The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna,
174:Go deep inside the temple and you will find me there.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I, The Mother, Relations with Others, 'I am with You', [T1],
175:If you find it complicated to answer someone's question, do not answer it, for his container is already full and does not have room for the answer ~ Ibn Arabi,
176:Why are we on earth?

   To find the Divine who is in each of us and in all things.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, The True Aim of Life [3],
177:Let the world bother about its reality or falsehood. Find out first about your own reality. Then all things will become clear. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
178:"If you find all your roads and paths
blocked, He will show you a secret
way that no one knows......." ~ Jalaluddin Rumi, @Sufi_Path
179:l that the seeker can find is his own absence." ~ Terence James Stannus Gray, (1895 - 1986), under the pen name "Wei Wu Wei", he published eight books on Taoist philosophy, Wikipedia.,
180:Seek and you shall find.... It is when we seek for the things which are within us that quest leads to discovery. ~ Meng-Tse II. 7.3, the Eternal Wisdom
181:Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will hear you. You will seek me and find me, when you seek me with all your heart. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Jeremiah, 29:12-13,
182:God is the embodiment of all happiness and pleasure at once. Those who realize God can find no attraction in the pleasures of the world. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
183:We do not have to visit a madhouse to find disordered minds; our planet is the mental institution of the universe. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
184:Just as a hemp smoker finds no pleasure in smoking alone, so the pious find no pleasure in singing all alone the praises of the almighty. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
185:A thinker sees his own actions as experiments and questions — as attempts to find out something. Success and failure are for him answers above all. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science,
186:Turn not thy head from this path till thou art led to its end; keep ever near to this door till it is opened. Let not thy eyes be shut; seek well and thou shalt find. ~ Attar of Nishapur,
187:You cannot get rid of the ego until you have realized God. If you find a person free from ego, then know for certain that he has seen God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
188:By continual peeling of the onion, we find nothing is left, so on analyzing the ego we found that there is not any real entity that is ego. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
189:Have faith in the Lord; He is ever present...But no one can find God without continuous love for Him in the heart. To feel that love for God, one must practice it. ~ PARAMAHAMSA YOGANANDA,
190:You see many stars at night in the sky but find them not in the day -- just as in the days of your ignorance, you say that there is no God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
191:And allow me again to assure you that when you've got yourself going, doing your True Will, you won't find you have any time to get bored. ~ Aleister Crowley,
192:And he departed from our sight that we might return to our hearts and find him there. For he left us, and behold, he is here. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
193:Organize your devotional practices and you will find your time is extended due to the baraka (blessings) in it. ~ Shaykh Ahmad al Zarruq], @Sufi_Path
194:Do not tell this path to all. Only the few who manifest anxiety to know the Truth and an eagerness to find it, should be told. With all others be silent and keep it secret. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
195:What offering should be made that we may attain to the Eternal? To find the Eternal thou must offer him thy body, thy mind and all thy possessions. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
196:Love is gone ere grief can find him;
    But his way
Tears that, falling, lag behind him
    Still betray. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
197:Spirits of darkness are going to inspire their human hosts to find a vaccine that will drive all inclination towards spirituality out of people's soul. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
198:Whatever you're no longer holding on to, no longer holds on to you. And as you let go of your opinions toward person, place and things, you find that you're growing, you're evolving. ~ Robert Adams,
199:The value of life lies not in the length of days, but in the use we make of them... Whether you find satisfaction in life depends not on your tale of years, but on your will.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
200:And at last thou shalt come into that place where thou shalt find only one sole being in place of the world and its mortal creatures. ~ Ahmad Halif, the Eternal Wisdom
201:Thoughts too great and deep to find a voice,
Thoughts whose desire new-makes the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
202:A boat can be in the water, but the water ought not to be in the boat. So the aspirant may live in the world, but the world should find no place in him. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
203:If thy first endeavour to find the Eternal bears no fruit, lose not courage. Persevere and at last thou shalt obtain the divine grace. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
204:Mind your business.
Take care of what you came here for.

Find the 'I' first and you may afterwards speak of other matters. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks, 161,
205:So it is now that you find yourselves at the vigil of the great trial which I foretold to you: it will be the supreme manifestation of the divine justice and mercy." ~ Our Lady to Father Stefano Gobbi,
206:You cannot find any peace by escaping from human pain and suffering; you have to find peace and harmony right in the midst of human pain. That is the purpose of spiritual life. ~ Dainin Katagiri Roshi,
207:Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi, @Sufi_Path
208:If you learn not to react to the conditions, you will find that the conditions will change by themselves. If you do not react to conditioning then the conditioning will change by itself. ~ Robert Adams,
209:Find God and forget yourself. Be wholly surrendered, the moment you can give up everything and know your own nothingness, that moment God-vision will come and your will be free. ~ Swami Ramakrishnananda,
210:it can only find itself in changing forms." ~ Rabindranath Tagore, (1861-1941), a Bengali poet & musician, reshaped Bengali literature & music, as well as Indian art with Contextual Modernism, Wikipedia.,
211:Keep quiet and turn your energies within; you'll find the source of the inexhaustible power and learn the art of keeping it under control. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
212:To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek him the greatest adventure; to find him, the greatest human achievement.
   ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, [T5],
213:Confess your hidden faults.
Approach what you find repulsive.
Help those you think you cannot help.
Anything you are attached to, let it go.
Go to the places that scare you. ~ Padampa Sangye,
214:Humanity is not the highest godhead; God is more than humanity; but in humanity too we have to find and to serve him. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga, Materialism,
215:Someone who tasted the sweetness of being close to Allah, will surely find bitter anything that may distant him from Allah." ~ al-Habib Omar bin Hafiz, @Sufi_Path
216:Thou shalt leave behind thee the embarrassments with which wealth surrounds thee and thou shalt find the immensity of the spiritual kingdom. ~ Ahmed Halif, the Eternal Wisdom
217:Try, but thou shalt not find the frontiers of the soul even if thou scourest all its ways; so profound is the extension of its reasoning being. ~ Heraclitus, the Eternal Wisdom
218:We may find when all the rest has failed
Hid in ourselves the key of perfect change. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
219:All mathematical laws which we find in Nature are always suspect to me, in spite of their beauty. They give me no pleasure. They are merely auxiliaries. At close range it is all not true. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
220:O mortal, bear, but ask not for the stroke,
Too soon will grief and anguish find thee out. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
221:The entire world, from its beginning to end, is nothing more than the dream of a man, who becomes captivated by what he sees, only to awaken and find that it was nothing (fa idhā lā shayy). ~ Umar b. Al-Khaṭṭāb
222:There is such a thing as abhyasayoga, yoga through practice. Keep up the practice and you will find that your mind will follow in whatever direction you lead it. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
223:For what it's worth: it's never too late to be whoever you want to be. I hope you live a life you're proud of, and if you find you're not, I hope you have the strength to start over again. ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald,
224:The traveller in the valley of knowledge who sees the end of each thing, knows how to find peace amid contest and reconciliation amidst disunion. ~ Baha ullah, the Eternal Wisdom
225:When you really look for me, you will see me instantly— you will find me in the tiniest house of time. Kabir says: Student, tell me what is God? He is the breath inside the breath." ~ Kabir,
226:Bestow upon me, O Lord my God, understanding to know thee, diligence to seek thee, wisdom to find thee, and a faithfulness that may finally embrace thee. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
227:He will provide the way and the means, such as you could never have imagined. Leave it all to Him, let go of yourself, lose yourself on the Cross, and you will find yourself entirely." ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
228:Loneliness does not come from having no people about one, but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible. ~ Carl Jung,
229:For the good that I would do, I do not; but the evil that I would not, that I do.. I find then a law that, when I would dogood, evil is present with me. ~ Pascal, the Eternal Wisdom
230:What offering should be made that we may attain to the Eternal? To find the Eternal thou must offer him thy body, thy mind and all thy possessions. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
231:Always keep your mind spotless. Don't allow impure thoughts to enter it. If you find such desires tormenting you, pray to God and chant His name. He will protect you. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
232:Indeed, the more spiritual progress a person makes, so much heavier will he frequently find the cross, because as his love increases, the pain of his exile also increases. ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
233:Jesus said, 'I am the light that is over all things. I am all: from me all came forth, and to me all attained. Split a piece of wood; I am there. Lift up the stone, and you will find me there.'
   ~ Gospel of Thomas,
234:To seek for delight is therefore the fundamental impulse and sense of Life; to find and possess and fulfil it is its whole motive. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Double Soul in Man,
235:We find ourselves in this earth as in a tempestuous sea, in a desert, in a vale of tears. Now then, Mary is the Star of the Sea, the solace of our desert, the light that guides us towards heaven." ~ Saint John Bosco,
236:What is the best method to find the Divine who is in each of us and in all things?

   Aspiration. Silence. Concentration in the solar plexus region.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
237:Advance towards God, my child; the more you go towards Him, the more peace you will get. There is no peace in anything in the world. At the feet of God alone one find the abode of peace. ~ Manapurush Swami Shivananda,
238:When I return upon myself and find the heart upright, although my adversaries may be a thousand or ten thousand, I would march without fear on the enemy. ~ Meng-Tse, the Eternal Wisdom
239:Without tormenting yourself, work hard, then you will find joy. In the beginning you are to drudge on as if you were learning the alphabet. Do not worry, do not complain, gradually peace will come. ~ SWAMI BRAHMANANDA,
240:A boat can be in the water, but the water ought not to be in the boat. So the aspirant may live in the world, but the world should find no place in him. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
241:Action like inaction can find a place in thee; if thy body agitates itself, let thy mind be calm, let thy soul be limpid as a mountain lake. ~ Book of Golden Precepts, the Eternal Wisdom
242:At the end of the valley of sin; do not be surprised if you find virtue standing." ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan, (1882 - 1927) founder of the Sufi Order in the West in 1914, (London) and teacher of Universal Sufism, Wikipedia.,
243:Go on practicing Japa and meditation with great devotion, perseverance, and patience. Gradually the mind will become tranquil and meditation will deepen. You will find a craving for your meditation. ~ Swami Virajananda,
244:More deeply than the bounded senses can
Which grasp externally and find to lose, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Journey in Eternal Night and the Voice of the Darkness,
245:Our Lady received through the ineffable kindness of Jesus the strength to endure the trials of her love until the end. May you also find the strength to endure with the Lord to Calvary! " ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
246:To live in the Supreme Truth, if only for a minute, is worth more than writing or reading hundreds of books on the methods or processes by which to find it.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
247:A sharp mind will find a truth for itself.
A humble spirit will find a truth higher than itself.
Truth is not the property of intellectuals, but of those who know how to escape their own selves. ~ Rabbi Tzvi Freeman,
248:The idea of the future, pregnant with an infinity of possibilities, is thus more fruitful than the future itself, and this is why we find more charm in hope than in possession, in dreams than in reality.
   ~ Henri Bergson,
249:Action like inaction may find its place in thee; if thy body is in movement, let thy mind be calm, let thy soul be as limpid as a mountain lake. ~ Book of Golden Precepts, the Eternal Wisdom
250:If we do not believe within ourselves this deeply rooted feeling that there is something higher than ourselves, we shall never find the strength to evolve into something higher. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
251:In the faces of men and women I see God, and in my own face in the glass, I find letters from God dropt in the street, and every one is signed by God's name. ~ Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass, (1855)
252:One can be solitary in a secluded and temporary environment ; but each of our thoughts and each of our feelings finds, has found and will find an echo in humanity. ~ Amiel, the Eternal Wisdom
253:The crossis always ready; it awaits you everywhere. No matter where you may go, you cannot escape it, for wherever you go you take yourself with you and shall always find yourself. ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
254:All that is real in me is God; all that is real in God is I. The gulf between God and me is thus bridged. Thus by knowing God, we find that the kingdom of heaven is within us. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
255:Look between the thoughts, rather than at the thoughts. When you happen to walk in a crowd, you do not fight every man you meet - you just find your way between. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
256:Some of thy attributes are those of animals, some of devils, and some of angels, and thou hast to find out which of these attributes are accidental and which essential. ~ Abu Hamid al-Ghazali,
257:Desire to see God, be fearful of losing Him, and find joy in everything that can lead to Him. If you act in this way, you will always live in great peace. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila, [T5],
258:Keep thyself from all evil in thought, in word, in act. If thou transgress not these three frontiers of wisdom, thou shalt find the way pursued by the saints. ~ Magghima Nikaya, the Eternal Wisdom
259:Never give up prayer, and should you find dryness and difficulty, persevere in it for this very reason. God often desires to see what love your soul has, and love is not tried by ease and satisfaction." ~ Saint John of the Cross,
260:So we find the humility of the God-man praiseworthy in the extreme when He bore those abject things which He was called on to suffer for the salvation of men ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 4.55).,
261:The survivors will find themselves so desolate that they will envy the dead. The only arms which will remain for you will be The Rosary and The Sign Left by My Son. Each day recite the Prayers of the Rosary." ~ Our Lady of Akita,
262:If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for me will find it.
   ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Matthew, 16:24-25,
263:If one cannot believe in God it does not matter. I suppose he believes in himself, in his own existence. Let him find out the source from which he came. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day by Day, 22-3-46,
264:If someone wants to study the deeds of our ancestors and imitate the best of them, he can find a single psalm that contains the whole of their history, a complete treasury of past memories in just one short reading. ~ Saint Ambrose,
265:You asked me what linguistics I find most pernicious. I started with "is". The "either/or" habit is very pernicious. It seems very pernicious to me, I mean. Two-valued situations are relatively rare, actually. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
266:Do not speak of Jesus Christ, and yet set your desires on the world. Let not envy find a dwelling-place among you; nor even should I, when present with you, exhort you to it, be persuaded to listen to me. ~ Saint Ignatius of Antioch,
267:Zen is a path of liberation. It liberates you. It is freedom from the first step to the last. You are not required to follow any rules; you are required to find out your own rules and your own life in the light of awareness." ~ Osho,
268:The spiritual path is not one where we find our way to God, but rather one where we remove everything that prevents us from seeing that we're already in the divine court. ~ Helwa, @Sufi_Path
269:What is Truth and who can find her form
Amid the specious images of sense,
Amid the crowding guesses of the mind ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
270:Anyone who is honestly trying to be a Christian will soon find his intelligence being sharpened: one of the reasons why it needs no special education to be a Christian is that Christianity is an education itself." ~ C. S. Lewis, p. 78,
271:Having thought of these things, meditating on them in my heart and having considered that I shall find immortality in the union with wisdom, I went in search of her on all sides, that I might take her for my companion. ~ Book of Wisdom,
272:Who loves her loves life and they that keep vigil to find her shall enjoy her peace. Whosoever possesses her, shall have life for his inheritance. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Ecclesiastes, the Eternal Wisdom
273:Let not the favourable moment pass thee by, for those who have suffered it to escape them, shall lament when they find themselves on the path which leads to the abyss. ~ Buddhist Texts, the Eternal Wisdom
274:Whenever we come to church, we must prepare our hearts to be as beautiful as we expect this church to be. Do you wish to find this basilica immaculately clean? Then do not soil your soul with the filth of sins. ~ Saint Caesarius of Arles,
275:Turn not thy head from this path till thou art led to its end; keep ever near to this door till it is opened. Let not thy eyes be shut; seek well and thou shalt find. ~ Attar of Nishapur, the Eternal Wisdom
276:In rational creatures, in which we find a procession of the WORD in the intellect, and a procession of LOVE in the will, there exists an image of the uncreated Trinity ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1.93.6).,
277:Run through all the words of the holy prayers [in Scripture], and I do not think that you will find anything in them that is not contained and included in the Lord's Prayer. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
278:The beginning of love is the will to let those we love be perfectly themselves, the resolution not to twist them to fit our own image. Otherwise we love only the reflection of ourselves we find in them. ~ Thomas merton. "No man is an island",
279:'Why do you turn your face away?' We think that God has turned his face away from us when we find ourselves suffering, so that shadows overwhelm our feelings and stop our eyes from seeing the brilliance of the truth. ~ Saint Ambrose of Milan,
280:I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of the time. To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
281:Only one thing is important, it is to find the Divine. For each one and for the whole world anything becomes useful if it helps to find the Divine.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, The True Aim of Life [T0],
282:I've never fooled anyone. I've let people fool themselves. They didn't bother to find out who and what I was. Instead they would invent a character for me. I wouldn't argue with them. They were obviously loving somebody I wasn't. ~ Marilyn Monroe,
283:Grant me, O Lord my God, a mind to know you, a heart to seek you, wisdom to find you, conduct pleasing to you, faithful perseverance in waiting for you, and a hope of finally embracing you." ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
284:How sweet will be the death of one who has done penance for all his sins, of one who won't have to go to purgatory! Even from here below you can begin to enjoy glory! You will find no fear within yourself but complete peace. ~ Saint Teresa of Ávila,
285:Have confidence in yourself! The mind must be made steady. Analyze it and find out if it wants what is right or if it is only trying to deceive you. As you continue to analyze in this manner, you will gain confidence in yourself. ~ Swami Turiyananda,
286:It is the soul that has its door, it is the soul that has its gates. To that door Christ comes and knocks, he knocks at the door. Open to him, therefore: he wishes to come in, the Bridegroom wishes to find you keeping watch. ~ Saint Ambrose of Milan,
287:You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. Fools stand on their island of opportunities and look toward another land. There is no other land; there is no other life but this. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
288:The greatest Guru is your inner self. But you must have the strong desire to find him and do nothing that will create obstacles and delays. And do not waste energy and time on regrets. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
289:What then was the commencement of the whole matter? Existence that multiplied itself for the sheer delight of being and plunged into numberless trillions of forms so that it might find itself innumerably.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo,
290:Who is it that loves and who that suffers? The individual suffers because he perceives duality. It is duality which causes all sorrow and grief. Find the One everywhere and in everything and there will be an end to pain and suffering. ~ Anandamayi Ma,
291:If a person possesses sincere yearning for the Lord and is eager to follow the spiritual path, he is sure to find a real Guru through the grace of the Lord. Therefore a spiritual aspirant need not feel anxious about finding a Guru. ~ SWAMI BRAHMANANDA,
292:Yes, my brother, if we think of each world, we shall find there a hundred thousand wonderful sciences. One of these worlds is Sleep.What problems it contains! what wisdom is there concealed! how many worlds it includes! ~ Baha-ullah: The Seven Valleys,
293:You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. Fools stand on their island of opportunities and look toward another land. There is no other land; there is no other life but this.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
294:Always go too far because that is where you will find the truth." ~ Albert Camus, (1913 - 1960) French philosopher, author, and journalist, won the Nobel Prize in Literature at the age of 44 in 1957, the second youngest recipient in history, Wikipedia.,
295:If you don't find God in the next person you meet, it is a waste of time looking for him further." ~ Mahatma Gandhi, (1869 -1948) an Indian activist, leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule, led India to independence, Wikipedia.,
296:And I tell you, ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Luke, 11:9-10,
297:If you find from your own experience that something is a fact and it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority and base your reasoning on your own findings.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
298:Meditation was invented as a way for the soul to venture inward, there ultimately to find supreme identity with Godhead. Whatever else it does, and it does many beneficial things, meditation is first and foremost a search for the God within. ~ ken-wilber,
299:Should I spend some time in solitude?

   It is the old methods of yoga which demand silence and solitude. The yoga of tomorrow is to find the Divine in work and in relation with the world.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
300:There is nothing more beautiful than to unite with the divine Consciousness. One is sure to find what one seeks - if one seeks it in all sincerity; for what one seeks is within oneself.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, [T3],
301:Education is a creative activity with persons as its only possible object... all that is by nature present in the human being to be educated is material for the educators, material which their love must find and mould. ~ John Paul II, Love & Responsibility,
302:In whatever state I find myself, I have learned to be content." ~ Paul of Tursus, (c. 5 - c. 64 or 67), commonly known as Saint Paul, an apostle, (though not one of the Twelve Apostles) who taught the gospel of Christ to the first century world, Wikipedia.,
303:He [the Divine] wants that you first find yourself; that with your true being, your psychic being, you master and govern the lower being, and then you will quite naturally take your proper place in the great Divine Work. ~ The Mother,
304: Dwell upon just being by saying, 'IAM,' 'I AM,' 'I AM,' to yourself… and without warning you will find yourself slipping the anchor that tied you to the shallow of your problems and moving out into the deep." ~ Neville Goddard, "The Complete Reader,", (2013),
305:In the Ineffable who is the indivisible and eternal bliss, are centred all pleasure and happiness. Those who enjoy him, can find no attraction in the facile and valueless pleasures of the world. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
306:Meditation will help you to find your bonds, loosen them, untie them and cast your moorings. When you are no longer attached to anything, you have done your share. The rest will be done for you. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
307:And out of that hopeless attempt has come nearly all that we call human history-money, poverty, ambition, war, prostitution, classes, empires, slavery-the long terrible story of man trying to find something other than God which will make him happy.
   ~ C S Lewis,
308:The 'I' is always there - in deep sleep, in dream and in wakefulness. The one in sleep is the same as that who now speaks. There is always the feeling of 'I'. Otherwise do you deny your existence? You do not. You say 'I am'. Find out who is. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
309:Ego sum ostium. Per me si quis introierit, salvabitur: et ingredietur, et egredietur, et pascua inveniet."
(I am the dooR By me, if any man enter in, he shall be saved: and he shall go in, and go out, and shall find pastures.) ~ Anonymous, The Bible, John, 10:9,
310:Our Lord does not come down from Heaven every day to lie in a golden ciborium. He comes to find another heaven which is infinitely dearer to him - the heaven of our souls, created in His Image, the living temples of the Adorable Trinity. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
311:The angler, anxious to hook a big fish, waits calmly for hours together, having thrown the bait and the hook into water. Similarly the devotee who patiently goes on with his devotions is sure at last to find his God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
312:To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering." ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, (1844 - 1900) German philosopher, cultural critic, composer, poet, philologist, whose work has exerted a profound influence on modern intellectual history, Wikipedia.,
313:We can easily lift a heavy stone under water, but as soon as we take it out we find how heavy it is, and in the same way, we don't feel the weight of the body as long as a Chaitanya or Life-force permeates it. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
314:Whatever you may do, you will find better and better things if only you go forward. You may feel a little ecstasy as the result of japa, but don't conclude from this that you have achieved everything in spiritual life. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
315:I must attain God in this very life; yea, in three days I must find Him; nay, with a single utterance of His name I will draw Him to me" - with such violent Love the devotee can attract the Lord and realize Him quickly. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
316:Rarely indeed is a man so spiritual as to strip himself of all things. And who shall find a man so truly poor in spirit as to be free from every creature? His value is like that of things brought from the most distant lands. ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
317:You are a mystery as deep as the sea; the more I search, the more I find, and the more I find the more I search for you. But I can never be satisfied... When you fill my soul I have an even greater hunger, and I grow more famished for your light. ~ Catherine of Siena,
318:Buddhism teaches that joy and happiness arise from letting go. Please sit down and take an inventory of your life. There are things you've been hanging on to that really are not useful and deprive you of your freedom. Find the courage to let them go." ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
319:Trace every action to its selfish motive and look at the motive intently till it dissolves. Discard every self-seeking motive as soon as it is seen and you need not search for truth; truth will find you. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
320:This Yoga can only be done to the end by those who are in total earnest about it and ready to abolish their little human ego and its demands in order to find themselves in the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, The Lower Vital Being,
321:Truths they could find and hold but not the one Truth:
The Highest was to them unknowable.
By knowing too much they missed the whole to be known: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
322:What though the radiance which was once so bright
   Be now for ever taken from my sight,
   Though nothing can bring back the hour
   Of splendor in the grass, of glory in the flower;
   We will grieve not, rather find
   Strength in what remains behind.
   ~ William Wordsworth,
323:You will find that there are many subtle impressions, habits of thought and action lying dormant and hidden in the subconscious regions of the mind. Analyze yourself in solitude, find out the obstacles and then struggle without compromise to remove them. ~ SWAMI PREMANANDA,
324:Some persons, however, find a difficulty in this faith; when they hear that the Father is God, and the Son God, and the Holy Spirit God, and yet that this Trinity is not three Gods, but one God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, De Trinitate,
325:The medicine for my suffering I had within me from the very beginning, But I did not take it. My ailment came from within myself, But I did not observe it. Until this moment. Now I see that I will never find the light Unless, like the candle, I am my own fuel.
   ~ Bruce Lee,
326:What narrowness of spiritual life we find in Frazer! …how impossible for him to understand a different way of life from the English one of his time! Frazer cannot imagine a priest who is not basically an English Parson of our times… ~ Wittgenstein, On Frazier's Golden Bough,
327:Death is a stripping away of all that is not you. The secret of life is to 'die before you die' - and find that there is no death." ~ Eckhart Tolle:, (b. 1948) Spiritual teacher, author of "The Power of Now", (late 1990s). Sold 5 million copies in N. America alone, Wikipedia,
328:Here too it’s masquerade, I find:
As everywhere, the dance of mind.
I grasped a lovely masked procession,
And caught things from a horror show…
I’d gladly settle for a false impression,
If it would last a little longer, though.
~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
329:Inside the body there is desire and greed; inside the mind there is doubt; inside the world there is change, there is death. Go beyond these and you will find peace and bliss. Until you go beyond them, you can never realize what peace and bliss mean. ~ Swami Ramakrishnananda,
330:Dwell upon just saying, 'I AM,' , 'I AM,' , 'I AM,' to yourself… and without warning you will find yourself slipping the anchor that tied you to the shallow of your problems and moving out into the deep." ~ Neville Goddard, (1905-1972), mystic, "The Complete Reader,", (2013).,
331:Heed these Words, You who Wish to Probe the Depths of Nature: If You Do Not Find Within Yourself that Which You Seek, Neither will You Find it Outside. In You is Hidden the Treasure of Treasures. Know Thyself and You Will Know the Universe and the Gods. ~ The Oracle of Delphi,
332:The inner teacher is in you & with you. Look within, and you will find him. Your own self is your ultimate teacher. The outer teacher (Guru) is merely a milestone. It is only your inner teacher, that will walk with you to the goal, for he is the goal. ~ SRI NISARGATTA MAHARAJ,
333:There is a genius within every one of us - we don't know it. We must find the way to make it come out - but it is there sleeping, it asks for nothing better than to manifest; we must open the door to it.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958,
334:What we want... is for students to get more interested in things, more involved in them, more engaged in wanting to know; to have projects that they can get excited about and work on over long periods of time, to be stimulated to find things out on their own. ~ Howard Gardner,
335:Why do we exist at all?…If there is a meaning or significance to it all [i.e human life], where do we find it? When we come to doubt the meaning of our existence in this way, when we have become a question to ourselves, the religious quest awakens within us. ~ Keiji Nishitani,
336:As by God's gift, I find you with the zeal necessary to attain this end, and you on your part help me with your prayers. I will try to fan into flame the spark of divine love that is hidden within you, as far as I am able through the power of the Holy Spirit. ~ Basil the Great,
337:For the Kaliyuga the path of devotion described by Nārada is best. Where can people find time now to perform their duties according to the scriptural injunctions? I say that it will be enough for them to repeat the Gayatri alone. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
338:It is the Divine Presence that gives value to life. This Presence is the source of all peace, all joy, all security. Find this Presence in yourself and all your difficulties will disappear.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, The Divine Is with You,
339:Open your heart and you will find me already there.
Don't be restless, remain quietly concentrated in your heart and you will find me there.
1 October 1935 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I, The Mother, Relations with Others, 'I am with You',
340:When you lie down, speak so that the sleep of death may not steal upon you. Listen and learn how you are to speak as you lie down; I will not give sleep to my eyes or slumber to my eyelids until I find a place for the Lord, a dwelling place for the God of Jacob. ~ Saint Ambrose,
341:As long as you are clinging to the idea of self and trying to improve your practice or find something out, trying to create an improved, better self, then your practice has gone astray." ~ Shunryu Suzuki, (1904-1971), Japanesse Zen master. Came to the U.S. in 1954. See Wikipedia.,
342:Because we find that love is work enough for us, we don't take the time to categorize what we are doing as either "contemplation" or "action." We find that prayer is action and that action is prayer. It seems to us that truly loving action is filled with light. ~ Madeline Delbrêl,
343:When you find yourself tensing because of pain, carefully examine the quality of unpleasantness, the quality of painfulness. Become mindful of that feeling and the mind will naturally come to a state of balance." ~ Joseph Goldstein, (b. 1944), "The Experience of Insight,", (1987),
344:Is it the mind that wants to kill itself? The mind cannot kill itself. Your business is to find the real nature of the mind. Then you will find there is no mind. When the Self is discovered, the mind ceases to exist. Abiding in the Self, one need not worry about the mind. ~ Ramana,
345:Persevere in labors that lead to salvation. Always be busy in spiritual actions. In this way, no matter how often the enemy of our souls approaches, no matter how many times he may try to come near us, he'll find our hearts closed and armed against him. ~ Saint Cyprian of Carthage,
346:Pursue the enquiry 'Who am I?' relentlessly. Analyse your entire personality. Try to find out where the I-thought begins. Go on with your meditations. Keep turning your attention within. One day the wheel of thought will slow down and an intuition will mysteriously arise. ~ Ramana,
347:You see many stars in the sky at night, but not when the sun rises. Can you therefore say that there are no stars in the heavens during the day? Because you cannot find God in the days of your ignorance, say not that there is no God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
348:He who knows how to find instructors for himself, arrives at the supreme mastery...He who loves to ask, extends his knowledge; but whoever considers only his own personal opinion becomes constantly narrower than he was. ~ Tsu-King, the Eternal Wisdom
349:You need not eliminate the wrong 'I'. How can 'I' eliminate itself? All that you need do is to find out its origin and abide there. Your efforts can extend only thus far. Then the Beyond will take care of itself. You are helpless there. No effort can reach it. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
350:If someone wants to study the law and find out what gives it its force (it is the bond of love, for whoever loves his neighbour has fulfilled the law) let him read in the psalms how love led one man to undergo great dangers to wipe out the shame of his entire people. ~ Saint Ambrose,
351:When a man has studied all sciences and learned what men know and have known, he will find that all these sciences taken as a whole are so insignificant that they bring with them no possibility of understanding the world. ~ Tolstoi, the Eternal Wisdom
352:History instructs us, the law teaches, prophecy foretells, correction punishes, morality persuades; but the book of psalms goes further. It is medicine for our spiritual health. Whoever reads it will find in it a medicine to cure the wounds caused by his own passions. ~ Saint Ambrose,
353:The day-bringer must walk in darkest night.
He who would save the world must share its pain.
If he knows not grief, how shall he find grief's cure? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
354:If you make a stern effort to reject every thought when it rises, you will soon find that you are going deeper & deeper into your own inner Self where there is no need for your effort to reject the thoughts. The effort is sublimated in just awareness of the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
355:You goal is not to seek love, but merely to seek, find and remove all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it" ~ Jalaluddin Rumi, (1207 - 1273), 13th-century Persian poet, jurist, Islamic scholar, theologian, and Sufi mystic, Wikipedia.,
356:But I tell you one thing-if you want peace of mind, do not find fault with others. Rather, see your own faults. Learn to make the whole world your own. No one is a stranger, my child: this whole world is your own!" ~ Sri Sarada Devi, [This is considered as her last message to the world.]
357:Having thought of these things, meditating on them in my heart and having considered that I shall find immortality in the union with wisdom, I went in search of her on all sides, that I might take her for my companion. ~ Book of Wisdom, the Eternal Wisdom
358:Truth is wider, greater than her forms.
A thousand icons they have made of her
And find her in the idols they adore;
But she remains herself and infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, Comments on Specific Lines and Passages of the Poem,
359:Repression of passions is bad. Unless the mind is directed toward a high ideal, they will find expression through other channels. Place your mind in God, then all evil will fall away by itself. That is what is meant by self-control; it arises from devotion to the Lord ~ Swami Turiyananda,
360:You see many stars in the sky at night, but not when the sun rises. Can you therefore say that there are no stars in the heavens during the day? O man, because you cannot find God in the days of your ignorance, say not that there is no God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
361:Thou hast lost thyself in the search for the mystery of life and death; but seek out thy path before thy life be taken from thee. If living thou find it not, hopest thou to reach this great mystery when thou art dead? ~ Attar of Nishapur, the Eternal Wisdom
362:He who shows not zeal where zeal should be shown, who young and strong gives himself up to indolence, who lets his will and intelligence sleep, that do-nothing, that coward shall not find the way of the perfect knowledge. ~ Dhammapada 280, the Eternal Wisdom
363:Jul 9 First thing you should learn is how to be still physically. Take one month for stilling the body. You will find that you are able to easily arrest the twitching, tremors, & jerks. When the body is still, you will find great joy & confidence. Learn to enjoy that stillness.~ Swami Rama,
364:What is true love and how to find it?‡
Do you know what is true love?
There is only one true love, the love from the Divine, which, in human beings, turns into love for the Divine. Shall we say that the nature of the Divine is Love. ~ The Mother, On Education,
365:It is in our inner spiritual experiences that we shall find the proof and source of the world's Scriptures, the law of knowledge, love and conduct, the basis and inspiration of Karmayoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga, The Ideal of the Karmayogin,
366:Money is such a thing that one develops an attachment for it, if one is associated with it for long! You may think that you have no attachment for it. Oh, no! Never harbour such an idea in your mind. Money will find its way somehow to grip you unawares by the neck, as it were ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
367:The best means to find or create the Superman is always to put yourself to a test, to go into your own solitude, to strengthen yourself, in order to find out whether you are by chance the Superman. That is what people do who want to become holy or saints. ~ Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminars, 844,
368:If you practice spiritual disciplines for some time in a solitary place u will find that your mind has gained in strength, & then you can live in any place or in the company of anyone without being in the least affected by it. Spiritual practice in a solitary place is essentia ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
369:God is always inside and also outside, telling us to shed fears and worries. 'You can't run away from Me,' says He. But I am ever inside you; seek and you shall find,The moment you attain complete mastery over your passions, you will get Me within you, effulgent and blissful ~ Swami Vijnanananda,
370:Love men, love God. Fear not to love, O King,
Fear not to enjoy;
For Death's a passage, grief a fancied thing
Fools to annoy.
From self escape and find in love alone
A higher joy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Rishi,
371:But it is in itself a secondary aim[transcending the ego]; to find, know and possess the Divine existence, consciousness and nature and to live in it for the Divine is our true aim and the one perfection to which we must aspire.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
372:
   Sweet Mother, I will try to do whatever You wish. Where are You?


Cross beyond the ignorance of a mind that judges without knowing, plunge into the depths of a calm and unassuming silence: there you will find me.
   ~ The Mother, More Answers From The Mother,
373:It is He who is revealed in every face, sought in every sign, gazed upon by every eye, worshipped in every object of worship, and pursued in the unseen and the visible. Not a single one of His creatures can fail to find Him in its primordial and original nature. ~ Ibn Arabi,
374:The true aim of life is to find the Divine's Presence deep inside oneself and to surrender to It so that It takes the lead of the life, all the feelings and all the actions of the body. This gives a true and luminous aim to existence.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
375:See how he himself provides you with a way of singing. Do not search for words, as if you could find a lyric which would give God pleasure. Sing to him 'with songs of joy.' This is singing well to God, just singing with songs of joy. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
376:People keep busy because they find it difficult to bear their own consciousness. They look for various forms of entertainment to escape from themselves. The greatest challenge lies in looking at oneself - by being "alone" with oneself. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
377:Not only is there hope for godheads pure;
The violent and darkened deities
Leaped down from the one breast in rage to find
What the white gods had missed: they too are safe; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal,
378:The moment you feel unhappy, you may write beneath it: I am not sincere! These two sentences go together: I FEEL UNHAPPY. I AM NOT SINCERE. Now, what is it that is wrong? Then one begins to take a look, it is easy to find out...
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954, [T2],
379:19. Ever dost thou crush the demon-sorcerer, O Fire, never have the Rakshasas conquered thee in the battles; burn one by one from their roots the eaters of raw flesh, may they find no release from thy divine missile. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns To The Mystic Fire, 2 - Other Hymns,
380:Yes, my brother, if we think of each world, we shall find there a hundred thousand wonderful sciences. One of these worlds is Sleep.What problems it contains! what wisdom is there concealed! how many worlds it includes! ~ Baha-ullah: The Seven Valleys, the Eternal Wisdom
381:O soul, bare not thy kingdom to the foe;
Consent to hide thy royalty of bliss
Lest Time and Fate find out its avenues
And beat with thunderous knock upon thy gates. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
382:You see many stars in the sky at night, but not when the sun rises. Can you therefore say that there are no stars in the heavens during the day? Because you cannot find God in the days of your ignorance, say not that there is no God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, Sayings of Ramakrishna,
383:At times I try to silence the mind, at times to surrender and at times to find my psychic being. Thus I cannot fix my attention on a single thing. Which one should I try first?

   All should be done and each one when it comes spontaneously.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
384:It is not in order to be happy that we are upon earth, for in the present conditions of terrestrial life happiness is an impossibility. We are upon earth to find and realise the Divine, for the Divine Consciousness alone can give true happiness.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
385:You will not let yourself be found by the proud... Many true statements do they [the philosophers] make about creation, but they do not find the Truth who is artificer of creation because they do not seek him with reverence. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, Confessions. 5.3,5,
386:Know thyself and thou shalt know the Non-ego and the Lord of all. Meditate deeply, thou shalt find there is nothing thou canst call "I". The innermost result of all analysis is the eternal divine. When egoism vanishes, divinity manifests itself. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
387:When something goes wrong, one must always find the reason in oneself, not superficially but deep inside oneself, and not in order to uselessly bewail the fault, but to cure it by calling one's aid the all-powerful force of the Divine.
   ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother, [T2],
388:We must find the Self, the Divine, then only can we know what is the work the Self or the Divine demands from us. Until then our life and action can only be a help or means towards finding the Divine and it ought not to have any other purpose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II, [T5],
389:When you want to think and find a solution, instead of following the deductions of thought, you stop everything and try to concentrate and concentrate, intensify the point of the problem. You stop everything and wait until, by the intensity of the concentration, you obtain an answer. ~ The Mother,
390:He whom you address as Brahman is none other than She whom I call Śakti, the Primal Energy. It is called Brahman in the Vedas & is without attributes and action. I call it Śakti, Ādyāśakti, when I find it creating, preserving, and destroying the universe. Mother is a sweet name ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
391:Just try to find out who this 'I' is. While you are searching for 'I', 'He' comes out. 'I am the machine & He is the Operator.' God alone is the Doer. Do your duties in the world as if you were the doer, but knowing all the time that God alone is the Doer & you are the instrumen ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
392:Attraction is possessed by all things here:
Warmth draws warm things, the cold pulls cold things near;
Eternal ones attract each other, while
The worthless just attract the vain and vile;
Those made of fire attract just the same kind;
Those filled with light draw their own sort, you'll find... ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
393:Some people read books in order to find God. Yet there is great book, the very appearance of created things. Look above you; look below you! Note it; read it! God, whom you wish to find, never wrote that book with ink. He set before your eyes the things He had made. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
394:Your weakness is due to the conviction that you were born in this world. In reality the world is ever recreated in you & by you. See everything emanating from the light which is the source of your own being. You'll find in that light there is love & infinite energy. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
395:Someday you'll find the right person, and you'll learn to have a lot more confidence in yourself. That's what I think. So don't settle for anything less. In this world, there are things you can only do alone, and things you can only do with somebody else. It's important to combine the two in just the right amount. ~ Haruki Murakami,
396:If you study every word of the petitions of Scripture, you will find, I think, nothing that is not contained and included in the Lord's Prayer. When we pray, then, we may use different words to say the same things, but we may not say different things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, Letter to Proba,
397:In ancient times, anterior to our history, the temples of the spirit were also outwardly visible; today, because our life has become so unspiritual, they are not to be found in the world visible to external sight; yet they are present spiritually everywhere, and all who seek may find them. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
398:How can I make my soul progress?

   To have any action on your soul you must be first conscious of it. And then when you will be conscious of your soul, you will probably find out that instead of you making your soul progress, it is your soul who will help you to progress.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
399:And if we can thus be free in the spirit, we shall find out all the wonder of God's workings; we shall find that in inwardly renouncing everything we have lost nothing. 'By all this abandoned thou shalt come to enjoy the All.'
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Integral Knowledge, Renunciation,
400:Sin makes a man unhappy and makes him feel inferior. Being unhappy, he is likely to make claims upon other people which are excessive and which prevent him from enjoying happiness in personal relations. Feeling inferior, he will have a grudge against those who seem superior. He will find admiration difficult and envy easy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
401:There are so many ways of making the approach to meditation as joyful as possible. You can find the music that most exalts you and use it to open your heart and mind. You can collect pieces of poetry, or quotations of lines of teachings that over the years have moved you, and keep them always at hand to elevate your spirit. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche,
402:If a book is easy and fits nicely into all your language conventions and thought forms, then you probably will not grow much from reading it. It may be entertaining, but not enlarging to your understanding. It's the hard books that count. Raking is easy, but all you get is leaves; digging is hard, but you might find diamonds. ~ Mortimer J Adler,
403:A world that knows not its inhabiting Self
Labours to find its cause and need to be;
A spirit ignorant of the world it made,
Obscured by Matter, travestied by Life,
Struggles to emerge, to be free, to know and reign; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
404:Stolen by the robbers of the Deep,
The golden shekels of the Eternal lie,
Hoarded from touch and view and thought's desire,
Locked in blind antres of the ignorant flood,
Lest men should find them and be even as Gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King, The Yoga of the Soul's Release,
405:What I really need is to get clear about what I must do, not what I must know, except insofar as knowledge must precede every act. What matters is to find a purpose, to see what it really is that God wills that I shall do; the crucial thing is to find a truth which is truth for me, to find the idea for which I am willing to live and die.
   ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
406:It is more important to find out the truth about oneself than to find out the truth about heaven and hell, or about many other things which are of less importance and are apart from oneself. However, every man's pursuit is according to his state of evolution, and so each soul is in pursuit of something-but he does not know where it leads him. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
407:The more we rise towards the summit, towards the identity, both through the form and in the essence, and the more we turn away from particular things towards the whole, the more do we find the unity that abides for ever, and behold it as supreme, dominant, comprehensive of diversity and multiplicity. ~ Iamblichus, the Eternal Wisdom
408:If we call in rajas again to correct this error and bid it ally itself to sattwa and by their united agency endeavour to get rid of the dark principle, we find that we have elevated our action, but that there is again subjection to rajasic eagerness, passion, disappointment, suffering, anger.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, 250,
409:Afterwards we may more easily find the one common principle and the one common power from which all derive their being and tendency, towards which all subconsciously move and in which, therefore, it is possible for all consciously to unite.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Conditions of the Synthesis, The Three Steps of Nature [9],
410:Talk 12.

A man asked the Maharshi to say something to him. When asked what he wanted to know, he said that he knew nothing and wanted to hear something from the Maharshi.

M.: You know that you know nothing. Find out that knowledge. That is liberation (mukti). ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi, Sri Ramanasramam,
411:Bhagavan: God is of course necessary, for most people. They can go on with one, till they find out that they and God are not different.
The Swami continued, "In actual practice, sadhakas, even sincere ones, sometimes become dejected and lose faith in God. How to restore their faith? What should we do for them?" ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day by Day,
412:The book exists for us perchance which will explain our miracles and and reveal new ones. The at present unutterable things we may find somewhere uttered. These same questions that disturb and puzzle and confound us have in their turn occurred to all the wise men; not one has been omitted; and each has answered them, according to his ability, by his words and his life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
413:O Mother, what should I do? I am completely unconscious. Mother, where are You?

   In your psychic being - I am always present there. It is there that you can find me and must find me, and when you have found me there, in the depths of your heart, you will also recognise me in my physical form. 31 October 1934
   ~ The Mother, More Answers From The Mother, [T0],
414:Addicts of drunkenness or other habit-forming vices cannot possibly hope to be students of concentration for the simple reason that their real will-power is too close to zero. If they cannot stop their bad habits, which they know perfectly well are harmful for them, where then would they find enough inner strength to overcome their mental apathy and laziness? ~ Mouni Sadhu, Concentration, Obstacles and Aids,
415:Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. ~ Sir Francis Bacon, The Essays,
416:468 - I may question God, my guide and teacher, and ask Him, 'Am I right or hast Thou in thy love and wisdom suffered my mind to deceive me?' Doubt thy mind, if thou wilt, but doubt not that God leads thee.
   Life is given to us to find the Divine and unite with Him. The mind tries to persuade us that it is not so. Shall we believe this liar?
   ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms,
417:Every man has in him something divine, something his own, a chance of strength and perfection in however small a sphere, which God offers him to take or refuse. The task is to find it, develop it, use it. The chief aim of education should be to help the growing soul to draw out that in itself which is best and make it perfect for a noble use. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings,
418:Who am I?' is not a mantra. It means that you must find out where in you the 'I-thought' arises, which is the source of all other thoughts. But if you find that vichara marga (path of enquiry) is too hard for you, you go on repeating 'I-I' and that will lead you to the same goal. There is no harm in using 'I' as a mantra. It is the first name of God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Gems,
419:My son, if you receive my words and treasure up my commandments with you, making your ear atentive to wisdom and inclining your heart to understanding; yes, if you call out for insight and raise your voice for understanding, if you seek it like silver and search for it as for hidden treasures, then you will understand the fear of the Lord and find the knowledge of God. ...
   ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Proverbs, 2:1-22,
420:Hang on to the one who is searching. That is all you need do, and indeed, there is nothing else you could really do. If you do this i.e. never leaving the one-in-search to escape, you- will ultimately find that the seeker is none other than consciousness seeking its source and that the seeker himself is both the seeking and the sought, and that is you. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
421:Sometimes, looking at the many books I have at home, I feel I shall die before I come to the end of them, yet I cannot resist the temptation of buying new books. Whenever I walk into a bookstore and find a book on one of my hobbies - for example, Old English or Old Norse poetry - I say to myself, "What a pity I can't buy that book, for I already have a copy at home.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
422:For the rest of your life to be as meaningful as possible, engage in spiritual practice if you can. It is nothing more than acting out of concern for others. If you practice sincerely and with persistence, little by little, step by step you will gradually reorder your habits and attitudes so as to think less about your own narrow concerns and more about others' - and thereby find peace and happiness yourself. ~ Dalai Lama,
423:Everyone wants a happy life without difficulties or suffering. We create many of the problems we face. No one intentionally creates problems, but we tend to be slaves to powerful emotions like anger, hatred and attachment that are based on misconceived projections about people and things. We need to find ways of reducing these emotions by eliminating the ignorance that underlies them and applying opposing forces. ~ Dalai Lama,
424:Scrutinise the heavens, sound the earth and they will reveal to thee always their impermanence, consider the world all around thee and it will reveal to thee always its impermanence: but when thou shalt have acquired spiritual illumination, thou shalt find wisdom and the intelligence that thou shalt have so attained will guide thee at once on the path. ~ Sutra in 42 Articles, the Eternal Wisdom
425:Some dislike prayer; if they entered deep into their heart, they would find it was pride — worse than that, vanity. And then there are those who have no aspiration, they try and they cannot aspire; it is because they do not have the flame of the will, it is because they do not have the flame of humility. Both are needed. There must be a very great humility and a very great will to change one's Karma. ~ The Mother,
426:People use drugs, legal and illegal, because their lives are intolerably painful or dull. They hate their work and find no rest in their leisure. They are estranged from their families and their neighbors. It should tell us something that in healthy societies drug use is celebrative, convivial, and occasional, whereas among us it is lonely, shameful, and addictive. We need drugs, apparently, because we have lost each other. ~ Wendell Berry,
427:Krishna is the immanent Divine, the Divine Presence in everyone and in all things. Thus to see Krishna means to find the inner Godhead, to play with Krishna means to be identified with the inner Godhead and to share in his consciousness. When you achieve this state, you enter immediately into the bliss of the divine play; and the more complete the identification, the more perfect the state. 6 April 1960 ~ The Mother,
428:Let each contemplate himself, not shut up in narrow walls, not cabined in a corner of the earth, but a citizen of the whole world. From the height of the sublime meditations which the spectacle of Nature and the knowledge of it will procure for him, how well will he know himself how he will disdain, how base he will find all the futilities to which the vulgar attach so high a price. ~ Cicero, the Eternal Wisdom
429:So, the only thing to do is to accept quietly the conditions in which you find yourself, knowing that for him who has faith in the Divine it is always the best for him that happens. The Divine does not want human beings to suffer, but, in their ignorance, human beings react in such a way that they bring suffering upon themselves. In peace, quietness and surrender is the only solution.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
430:Are you looking for me?
I am in the next seat.

My shoulder is against
your own neck

You won't find me in the mosque
or the sadhus temple.

You wont find me in holy books
or behind the lips of priests.

Nor in eating nothing but vegetables

You will find me in the tiniest house of time.

Kabir says : Student, tell me, what is God?

He is the breath inside the breath.... ~ Kabir,
431:My son, do not forget my teaching, but let your heart keep my commandments, for length of days and years of life and peace they will add to you. Let not steadfast love and faithfulness forsake you; bind them around your neck; write them on the tablet of your heart. So you will find favor and good success in the sight of God and man. Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. ... ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Proverbs, 3:1-35,
432:When you find a writer who really is saying something to you, read everything that writer has written and you will get more education and depth of understanding out of that than reading a scrap here and a scrap there and elsewhere. Then go to people who influenced that writer, or those who were related to him, and your world builds together in an organic way that is really marvelous. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero's Journey: Joseph Campbell on His Life & Works,
433:One must have a very clear memory for ideas to really understand what he says.

I am emphasising this because, unless you proceed systematically, you won't derive much benefit from this reading; it will appear to you like a maze where it is very difficult to find one's way.... All the ideas are joined at the centre, and at the circumference they go in altogether different directions. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958,
434:In India the healers by faith comm and their sick to repeat with absolute conviction the words, "There is no malady in me, Sickness is not." The sick man repeats and, so mentally denied, his malady disappears. Thus if you believe yourself to be mortally weak, you find yourself actually in that condition. Know and believe that you can have an immense power, and the power will come to you in the end. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
435:Watch and pray that you not come to be in the flesh, but rather that you come forth from the bondage of the bitterness of this life. And as you pray, you will find rest, for you have left behind the suffering and the disgrace. For when you come forth from the sufferings and passions of the body, you will receive rest from the good one, and you will reign with the King, you joined with Him and He with you, from now on, for ever and ever, Amen. ~ The Book of Thomas,
436:We also know life passes quickly and death is certain, yet in our busy lives we find it difficult to practice as much as we wish we could. Perhaps we meditate for an hour or two each day, but that leaves the other twenty-two hours in which to be distracted and tossed about on the waves of samsara. But there is always time for sleep; the third of our lives we spend sleeping can be used for practice.
   ~ Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Yogas Of Dream And Sleep,
437:Life has a purpose. This purpose is to find and to serve the Divine. The Divine is not far, He is in ourselves, deep inside and above the feelings and the thoughts. With the Divine is peace and certitude and even the solution of all difficulties. Hand over your problems to the Divine and He will pull you out of all difficulties.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Man's relationship with the Divine, The True Aim of Life[T0],
438: To make it more simple for general comprehension: after initiation, the mystic is merged in the occultist, for he has become a student of occult law; he has to work with matter, with its manipulation and uses, and he has to master and control all lower forms of manifestation, and learn the rules... yet he will still have to find the God within his own being, before he can safely venture on the path of occult law. ~ Alice Bailey, in Letters on Occult Meditation, p. 147, (1922)
439:One must find out for oneself, and make sure beyond doubt, 'who' one is, 'what' one is, 'why' one is... Being thus conscious of the proper course to pursue, the next thing is to understand the conditions necessary to following it out. After that, one must eliminate from oneself every element alien or hostile to success, and develop those parts of oneself which are specially needed to control the aforesaid conditions. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, [T4],
440:Humans are great experimenters, constantly exploring, searching, and struggling to gain power over themselves, over nature, even over the gods. Through this entire struggle and self-torture, we have also made ourselves "sick," and it is no wonder that we find the ascetic ideal springing up everywhere. Though it may seem to deny life, the ascetic ideal is supremely life affirming, as it says "yes" to life in the face of hardship and sickness. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals,
441:I pray to the unknown gods that some man-even a single man, tens of centuries ago-has perused and read that book. If the honor and wisdom and joy of such a reading are not to be my own, then let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my own place be in hell. Let me be tortured and battered and annihilated, but let there be one instant, one creature, wherein thy enormous Library may find its justification. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel,
442:Q: I wrote to the Mother a prayer in French. Her answer to it was: "Ouvre ton cæur et tu me trouveras déjà là." ("Open your heart and you will find me already there.") What exactly does this signify?
   A: What the Mother meant was this that when there is a certain opening of the heart, you find that there was always the eternal union there (the same that you experience always in the Self above).
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother, 2-7-1935,
443:You Will Find Me

The Mother: Take the trouble to find me. Follow the path that I have traced before you. Nothing is as important as this work. Nothing can be compared to this. Only the Divine. To find the Divine. This is life, this the aim, this the joy! To love the Divine so that He is always with you. Let it be Him who does all. He works with you. He strives with you. He guides you at every instant.
Au revoir, my child. ~ The Mother, The Supreme, Mona Sarkar,
444:I often think . . . that the bookstores that will save civilization are not online, nor on campuses, nor named Borders, Barnes & Noble, Dalton, or Crown. They are the used bookstores, in which, for a couple of hundred dollars, one can still find, with some diligence, the essential books of our culture, from the Bible and Shakespeare to Plato, Augustine, and Pascal. ~ James V. Schall, On the Unseriousness of Human Affairs: Teaching, Writing, Playing, Believing, Lecturing, Philosophizing, Singing, Dancing,
445:One says, When my son Harish shall have grown up, I will marry him off, give up the burden of the family, renounce the world and begin to practise Yoga. To him the Lord replies: You will never find the opportune moment to practise Yoga; for you will then say, 'Harish and Girish are very fond of me and cannot do without me', you will no doubt desire that Harish should have a son and the son marry. There will never be an end to your desires. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
446:In a splendid extravagance of the waste of God
Dropped carelessly in creation's spendthrift work,
Left in the chantiers of the bottomless world
And stolen by the robbers of the Deep,
The golden shekels of the Eternal lie,
Hoarded from touch and view and thought's desire,
Locked in blind antres of the ignorant flood,
Lest men should find them and be even as Gods.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Souls Release,
447:The most dangerous thing you can do is to take any one impulse of your own nature and set it up as the thing you ought to follow at all costs. There is not one of them which will not make us into devils if we set it up as an absolute guide. You might think love of humanity in general was safe, but it is not. If you leave out justice you will find yourself breaking agreements and faking evidence in trials 'for the sake of humanity', and become in the end a cruel and treacherous man. ~ C S Lewis, Mere Christianity,
448:In tonglen practice, when we see or feel suffering, we  breathe in with the notion of completely feeling it, accepting it, and owning it. Then we breathe out, radiating compassion, lovingkindness, freshness - anything that encourages relaxation and openness.  So you're training in softening, rather than tightening, your heart. In this practice, it's not uncommon to find yourself blocked, because you come face to face with your own fear, resistance, or whatever your personal "stuckness" happens to be at that moment. ~ Pema Chodron,
449:If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story. ~ John Steinbeck,
450:For the first time, we have the power to decide the fate of our planet and ourselves. This is a time of great danger, but our species is young, and curious, and brave. It shows much promise.
   We wish to pursue the truth no matter where it leads. But to find the truth, we need imagination and skepticism both. We will not be afraid to speculate, but we will be careful to distinguish speculation from fact. The cosmos is full beyond measure of elegant truths; of exquisite interrelationships; of the awesome machinery of nature. ~ Carl Sagan,
451:To laugh often and love much; to win the respect of intelligent persons and the affection of children; to earn the approbation of honest citizens and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to give of one's self; to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to have played and laughed with enthusiasm and sung with exultation; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived~this is to have succeeded. ~ Bessie Anderson Stanley,
452:Another approach is actually to build the job around the person, to create a virtual job portfolio to match what he/she does best. Say you find a highly competent human being. Rather than asking the person to conform, you find appropriate things for th