classes ::: adjective, noun,
children :::
branches ::: essential, Essential Integral
see also :::

Instances - Classes - See Also - Object in Names
Definitions - Quotes - Chapters


object:essential
word class:adjective
word class:noun


questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or via the comments below
or join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



--- OBJECT INSTANCES [0]




--- PRIMARY CLASS


--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [1]


1957-01-09 - God is essentially Delight - God and Nature play at hide-and-seek - Why, and when, are you grave?
2.3.1.01 - Three Essentials for Writing Poetry
As It Is - Volume I - Essential Teachings from the Dzogchen Perspective
ENNEAD 05.06 - The Superessential Principle Does Not Think - Which is the First Thinking Principle, and Which is the Second?
essential
Essential Books of Computer Science
Essential Integral
Guided Buddhist Meditations Essential Practices on the Stages of the Path
The Essential Epicurus
The Essential Rumi
The Essentials of Buddhist Meditation
The Essentials of Education
The Essential Writings
Total Freedom The Essential Krishnamurti
Zen Buddhism - The Essential Books
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


essential ::: a. --> Belonging to the essence, or that which makes an object, or class of objects, what it is.
Hence, really existing; existent.
Important in the highest degree; indispensable to the attainment of an object; indispensably necessary.
Containing the essence or characteristic portion of a substance, as of a plant; highly rectified; pure; hence, unmixed; as, an essential oil.

essentiality ::: n. --> The quality of being essential; the essential part.

essential mukti — the liberation of the spirit, the “freedom of the soul” which is “an opening out of mortal limitation into the illimitable immortality of the Spirit”.

essential trinity of Sachchidananda, — Existence, Consciousness, Bliss with self-awareness and self-force, Chit and Tapas, for double terms of Consciousness”.

Essentially, Yoga is a generic name for the processes and the result of processes by which we transcend or shred off our present modes of being and rise to a new, a higher, a wider mode of consciousness which is not that of the ordinary animal and intellectual man. Yoga is the exchange of an egoistic for a universal or cosmic consciousness lifted towards or informed by the supra-cosmic, transcendent Unnameable who is the source and support of all things. Yoga is the passage of the human thinking animal towards the God-consciousness from which he has descended.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 13, Page: 119

Essential Coordination: Term employed bv R. Avenarius (Kritik der reinen Erfahrung, 1888) to designate the essential solidarity existing between the knowing subject and the object of knowledge. The theory of "essential coordination" is contrasted by Avenarius with the allegedly false theory of introjection (q.v.). -- L.W.

essential complexity
A measure of the "structuredness" of a program.
(1996-05-13)

essential ::: a. --> Belonging to the essence, or that which makes an object, or class of objects, what it is.
Hence, really existing; existent.
Important in the highest degree; indispensable to the attainment of an object; indispensably necessary.
Containing the essence or characteristic portion of a substance, as of a plant; highly rectified; pure; hence, unmixed; as, an essential oil.

essentiality ::: n. --> The quality of being essential; the essential part.

Essentials of Demonology. See Langton.

essential complexity ::: (programming) A measure of the structuredness of a program. (1996-05-13)

essential discontinuity: A discontinuity where the left-hand limit or the right-hand limit doesn't exist (or neither exists). Some authors consider a jump discontinuity to be an essential discontinuity, which makes the definition of essential discontinuity any discontinuity that is not a removable discontinuity.

ESSENTIALIZATION The monad&

ESSENTIALITY Synonym of ESSENTIAL CONSCIOUSNESS




ESSENTIAL QUALITIES Twelve qualities, manifestations of causal consciousness and will, which the monad must acquire 100 per cent in order to pass to the essential kingdom, the fifth natural kingdom. They sum up all positive human qualities, also those that are possible only at the stages of humanity and ideality. Their true content, therefore, is inaccessible to lower consciousness, and information given about them will unfailingly be emotionalized.

Tentatively, the following symbolical keywords have been used about them: 1) Trust in life, 2) Trust in self, 3) Obedience to law, 4) Uprightness, 5) Impersonality, 6)
Willingness to sacrifice, 7) Faithfulness, 8) Reticence, 9) Joy in life, 10) Purpose, 11)
Wisdom, 12) Unity. (K 1.34.23, 7.23.3)




ESSENTIAL SELF, 46-SELF Monad having envelope and self-consciousness in the essential world of the planet (46). The essential self has centred itself in the second triad essential atom and is a member of the fifth natural kingdom.

The 46-self is omniscient in the worlds 46-49.

As an essential self, the individual has to acquire by himself through his own research complete knowledge of everything of importance in the human worlds (47-49).

Essential monads form a collective being of their own having a common total consciousness.

The essential self does not need to incarnate further, since he has no more to learn in the kingdom of man. He often does incarnate, however, in order by all means and by personal contact to help those preparing for their entrance into this higher kingdom. K 1.35.8, 10ff




ESSENTIAL WORLD Atomic world 46 in the cosmos and in the planets of the solar system, molecular world 46:2-7 in the planets.




essential mukti — the liberation of the spirit, the “freedom of the soul” which is “an opening out of mortal limitation into the illimitable immortality of the Spirit”.

essential trinity of Sachchidananda, — Existence, Consciousness, Bliss with self-awareness and self-force, Chit and Tapas, for double terms of Consciousness”.

essentialism ::: The belief and practice centered on a philosophical claim that for any specific kind of entity it is at least theoretically possible to specify a finite list of characteristics, all of which any entity must have to belong to the group defined.


--- QUOTES [114 / 114 - 500 / 10224] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   55 Sri Aurobindo
   14 The Mother
   5 Essential Integral
   4 Aleister Crowley
   3 Alfred Korzybski
   2 James Clerk Maxwell
   1 William Gibson
   1 Wikipedia
   1 Venerable Bede
   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 The Mahasiddha Shantideva
   1 Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche
   1 Sri Aurobindo?
   1 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   1 Peter J Carroll
   1 Patrul Rinpoche
   1 Nichiren
   1 M Scott Peck
   1 Miyamoto Musashi
   1 Meister Eckhart
   1 Manly P Hall
   1 Lewis Hyde
   1 Lewis Carroll
   1 Ken Wilber
   1 Joseph Campbell
   1 Jorge Luis Borges
   1 James V. Schall
   1 Hermann Hesse
   1 Friedrich Nietzsche
   1 Dzogchen Rinpoche III
   1 Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche
   1 Daniel C Matt
   1 Bill Hicks
   1 Bertrand Russell
   1 Bernhard Guenther
   1 Arthur C Clarke
   1 Aldous Huxley

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   6 Bryant McGill

   4 Ralph Waldo Emerson

   4 Mahatma Gandhi

   4 Eckhart Tolle

   4 Albert Einstein

   4 Albert Camus

   3 Paulo Coelho

   3 Hillary Clinton

   3 Gautama Buddha

   3 C S Lewis

   3 Bruce Lee

   3 Antoine de Saint Exup ry

   3 Anonymous

   2 Sri Ramakrishna

   2 Sri Aurobindo

   2 Randy Pausch

   2 Pierre de Coubertin

   2 Noam Chomsky

   2 Napoleon Hill

   2 Mark Twain

   2 Marie Kond

   2 Karen Marie Moning

   2 Julia Child

   2 Joseph A Schumpeter

   2 John D Rockefeller

   2 J K Rowling

   2 Jeff Goins

   2 Jaggi Vasudev

   2 Haruki Murakami

   2 George Washington

   2 George Santayana

   2 George MacDonald

   2 George Leonard

   2 Frederick Lenz

   2 Emma Goldman

   2 Emily St John Mandel

   2 Elizabeth Gilbert

   2 Elizabeth Barrett Browning

   2 Donna Tartt

   2 D H Lawrence

   2 Denis Diderot

   2 Dean Koontz

   2 Cassandra Clare

   2 B K S Iyengar

   2 Billy Graham

   2 Ben Shapiro

   2 Aristotle

   2 Anais Nin

   2 Alexander Hamilton


1:Sight is the essential poetic gift. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
2:Renunciation of desires: the essential condition for realisation. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
3:It is the essentials alone that matter. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.2.01 - The Call and the Capacity,
4:All problems of existence are essentially problems of harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.01 - The Human Aspiration,
5:Self-conscious existence is the essential nature of the Being; that is Sat or Purusha. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
6:Essential mentality is idealistic and a seeker after perfection. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.03 - The Threefold Life,
7:My undertaking is not difficult, essentially. ... I should only have to be immortal to carry it out. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths ,
8:The essential is to think that anything you are doing has to become the occasion for slashing. You must examine this well. ~ Miyamoto Musashi,
9:In its essentiality all is divine even if the form baffles or repels us. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.04 - The Divine and the Undivine,
10:Purification is an essential means towards self-perfection. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.04 - The Perfection of the Mental Being,
11:The widest spirituality does not exclude or discourage any essential human activity or faculty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Reason and Religion,
12:It is the great sun that finally removes⁣ The misty ignorance of the world,⁣ It is the quintessential butter from the churning of the milk of Dharma. ~ The Mahasiddha Shantideva,
13:Even divine realisations must not be clung to, if they are not the divine realisation in its utter essentiality and completeness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
14:To get the universal Ananda all our instruments must learn to take not any partial or perverse, but the essential joy of all things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.12 - The Way of Equality,
15:The difference between suppression and an inward essential rejection is the difference between mental or moral control and a spiritual purification. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Desire,
16:The external renunciation is not the essential, but even that is necessary for a time, indispensable in many things and sometimes useful in all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
17:Essentially there is but one single true reason for living: it is to know oneself. We are here to learn - to learn what we are, why we are here, and what we have to do. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
18:It is essential to happiness that our way of living should spring from our own deep impulses and not from the accidental tastes and desires of those who happen to be our neighbors, or even our relations. ~ Bertrand Russell,
19:Philosophy is only a way of formulating to ourselves intellectually in their essential significance the psychological and physical facts of existence and their relation to any ultimate reality that may exist. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
20:Psychic love is distinguished by an essential purity and selflessness—but the vital can put on a very brilliant imitation of that character. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Human Relations and the Spiritual Life,
21:While diversity is essential for power and fruitfulness of life, unity is necessary for its order, arrangement and stability. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Nature’s Law in Our Progress - Unity in Diversity,
22:If one concentrates on a thought or a word, one has to dwell on the essential idea contained in the word with the aspiration to feel the thing which it expresses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 2.3.01 - Concentration and Meditation,
23:To know and possess our true Self in the essential and the universal is to discover the essential and the universal delight of existence, self-bliss and all-bliss. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.12 - The Realisation of Sachchidananda,
24:The absolute is not in itself a thing of magnitude; it is beyond measure, not in the sole sense of vastness, but in the freedom of its essential being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine The Origin and Remedy of Falsehood,
25:A Divine perfection of the human being is our aim. We must know then first what are the essential elements that constitute man's total perfection; secondly, what we mean by a divine as distinguished from a human perfection of our being. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
26:It goes without saying that for admission to live in this ideal place (Sri Aurobindo Ashram) the essential conditions that need to be fulfilled are good character, good conduct, honest, regular and efficient work and a general goodwill. ~ The Mother, CWM 13 ,
27:We are to move inwardly towards a greater consciousness and a supreme existence, not by a total exclusion of our cosmic nature, but by a higher, a spiritual fulfilment of all that we now essentially are. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.03 - The Supreme Divine,
28:To "invoke" is to "call in", just as to "evoke" is to "call forth". This is the essential difference between the two branches of Magick. In invocation, the macrocosm floods the consciousness. In evocation, the magician, having become the macrocosm, creates a microcosm. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
29:An essential portion of any artist's labor is not creation so much as invocation. Part of the work cannot be made, it must be received; and we cannot have this gift except, perhaps, by supplication, by courting, by creating within ourselves that 'begging bowl' to which the gift is drawn. ~ Lewis Hyde,
30:The perfect dictatorship would have the appearance of a democracy, but would basically be a prison without walls in which the prisoners would not even dream of escaping. It would essentially be a system of slavery where, through consumption and entertainment, the slaves would love their servitudes. ~ Aldous Huxley,
31:An essential movement of the Yoga is to draw back from the outward ego sense by which we are identified with the action of mind, life and body and live inwardly in the soul. The liberation from an externalised ego sense is the first step towards the soul's freedom and mastery. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 633,
32:As for cancer, the first thing is that you should drive off all fear. \* If you want to get cured there are two conditions. First you must be without fear, absolutely fearless, you understand, and secondly you must have a complete faith in the Divine protection. These two things are essential. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
33:A magical diary is the magicians most essential and powerful tool. It should be large enough to allow a full page for each day. Students should record the time, duration and degree of success of any practice undertaken. They should make notes about environmental factors conducive (or otherwise) to the work. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null Liber MMM [13],
34:A mind now clouded by the illusions of the innate darkness of life is like a tarnished mirror, but when polished, it is sure to become like a clear mirror, reflecting the essential nature of phenomena and the true aspect of reality. Arouse deep faith, and diligently polish your mirror day and night. How should you polish it? Only by chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo ~ Nichiren,
35:Man carries within himself perfect power, perfect wisdom, and perfect knowledge, and if he wants to possess them, he must discover them in the depth of his being, by introspection and concentration. These divine qualities are identical at the centre, at the heart of all beings; this implies the essential unity of all, and all the consequences of solidarity and fraternity that follow from it. ~ The Mother,
36:When I start writing a new imaginary future, I have no idea what it is. The characters arrive first. They help me figure out where they are living and I get to fill in the gaps with that and where we are. So when I get to the end of the process of composition, if I feel that I have really done my job, I have no idea what I've got - and I then spend essentially the rest of my life figuring out what it might mean. ~ William Gibson,
37:Practice in a straightforward way. There is no need to live in fantasy and 'pretend' to be anything other than what you are. Be honest and open with yourself - if you are a good person, recognize that goodness and build upon it. If you are a deluded person, recognize that delusion and begin to disentangle yourself from it, be rid of it. It is essential that your practice be pure, straightforward and honest. ~ Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche,
38:It should never be forgotten for a single moment that the central and essential work of the Magician is the attainment of the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. Once he has achieved this he must of course be left entirely in the hands of that Angel, who can be invariably and inevitably relied upon to lead him to the further great step-crossing of the Abyss and the attainment of the grade of Master of the Temple. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magic Without Tears ,
39:What you say is quite true. A simple, straight and sincere call and aspiration from the heart is the one important thing and more essential and effective than capacities. Also to get the consciousness to turn inwards, not remain outward-going is of great importance - to arrive at the inner call, the inner experience, the inner Presence. The help you ask will be with you. Let the aspiration grow and open the inner consciousness altogether. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I ,
40:If you want to understand a society, take a good look at the drugs it uses. And what can this tell you about American culture? Well, look at the drugs we use. Except for pharmaceutical poison, there are essentially only two drugs that Western civilization tolerates: Caffeine from Monday to Friday to energize you enough to make you a productive member of society, and alcohol from Friday to Monday to keep you too stupid to figure out the prison that you are living in. ~ Bill Hicks,
41:But if we desire to make the most of the opportunity that this life gives us, if we wish to respond adequately to the call we have received and to attain to the goal we have glimpsed, not merely advance a little towards it, it is essential that there should be an entire self-giving. The secret of success in Yoga is to regard it not as one of the aims to be pursued in life, but as the one and only aim, not as an important part of life, but as the whole of life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
42:I often think . . . that the bookstores that will save civilization are not online, nor on campuses, nor named Borders, Barnes & Noble, Dalton, or Crown. They are the used bookstores, in which, for a couple of hundred dollars, one can still find, with some diligence, the essential books of our culture, from the Bible and Shakespeare to Plato, Augustine, and Pascal. ~ James V. Schall, On the Unseriousness of Human Affairs: Teaching 3.8.1.04 - Different Methods of Writing,
43:For all problems of existence are essentially problems of harmony. They arise from the perception of an unsolved discord and the instinct of an undiscovered agreement or unity. To rest content with an unsolved discord is possible for the practical and more animal part of man, but impossible for his fully awakened mind, and usually even his practical parts only escape from the general necessity either by shutting out the problem or by accepting a rough, utilitarian and unillumined compromise. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
44:There are four conditions for knowing the divine Will: The first essential condition: an absolute sincerity. Second: to overcome desires and preferences. Third: to silence the mind and listen. Fourth, to obey immediately when you receive the order. If you persist, you will perceive the Divine Will more and more clearly. But even before you know what it is, you can make an offering of your own will and you will see that all circumstances will be so arranged as to make you do the right thing ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951 ,
45:Few of us can escape being neurotic or character disordered to at least some degree (which is why essentially everyone can benefit from psychotherapy if he or she is seriously willing to participate in the process). The reason for this is that the problem of distinguishing what we are and what we are not responsible for in this life is one of the greatest problems of human existence. It is never completely solved; for the entirety of our lives we must continually assess and reassess where our responsibilities lie in the ever-changing course of events. ~ M Scott Peck,
46:"The essential difference between living and non-living matter consists then in this: the living cell synthesizes its own complicated specific material from indifferent or nonspecific simple compounds of the surrounding medium, while the crystal simply adds the molecules found in its supersaturated solution. This synthetic power of transforming small building stones, into the complicated compounds specific for each organism is the 'secret of life, or rather one of the secrets of life." (The Organism as a Whole, by Jacques Loeb.) ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity Questions And Answers 1957-1958,
47:Purusha and Prakriti in their union and duality arise from the being of Sachchidananda. Self-conscious existence is the essential nature of the Being; that is Sat or Purusha. The Power of self-aware existence, whether drawn into itself or acting in the works of its consciousness and force, its knowledge and its will, Chit and Tapas, Chit and its Shakti,-that is Prakriti. Delight of being, Ananda, is the eternal truth of the union of this conscious being and its conscious force whether absorbed in itself or else deployed in the inseparable duality of its two aspects. ~ Sri Aurobindo?,
48:Essentially, Yoga is a generic name for the processes and the result of processes by which we transcend or shred off our present modes of being and rise to a new, a higher, a wider mode of consciousness which is not that of the ordinary animal and intellectual man. Yoga is the exchange of an egoistic for a universal or cosmic consciousness lifted towards or informed by the supra-cosmic, transcendent Unnameable who is the source and support of all things. Yoga is the passage of the human thinking animal towards the God-consciousness from which he has descended. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga ,
49:The Divine is in his essence infinite and his manifestation too is multitudinously infinite. If that is so, it is not likely that our true integral perfection in being and in nature can come by one kind of realisation alone; it must combine many different strands of divine experience. It cannot be reached by the exclusive pursuit of a single line of identity till that is raised to its absolute; it must harmonise many aspects of the Infinite. An integral consciousness with a multiform dynamic experience is essential for the complete transformation of our nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga p. 114,
50:So, first of all, it is most important to turn inwards and change your motivation.If you can correct your attitude, skilful means will permeate your positive actions, and you will have set out on the path of great beings.If you cannot, you might think that you are studying and practising the Dharma but it will be no more than a semblance of the real thing.Therefore, whenever you listen to the teachings and whenever you practise, be it meditating on a deity, doing prostrations and circumambulations, or reciting a mantra-even a single mani it is always essential to give rise to bodhicitta. ~ Patrul Rinpoche,
51:Purusha and Prakriti in their union and duality arise from the being of Sachchidananda. Self-conscious existence is the essential nature of the Being; that is Sat or Purusha. The Power of self-aware existence, whether drawn into itself or acting in the works of its consciousness and force, its knowledge and its will, Chit and Tapas, Chit and its Shakti,-that is Prakriti. Delight of being, Ananda, is the eternal truth of the union of this conscious being and its conscious force whether absorbed in itself or else deployed in the inseparable duality of its two aspects. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.17 - The Soul and Nature,
52:I have devoted my energies to the study of the scriptures, observing monastic discipline, and singing the daily services in church; study, teaching, and writing have always been my delight . . . The ultimate Mystery of being, the ultimate Truth, is Love. This is the essential structure of reality. When Dante spoke of the 'love which moves the sun and the other stars', he was not using a metaphor, but was describing the nature of reality. There is in Being an infinite desire to give itself in love and this gift of Self in love is for ever answered by a return of love....and so the rhythm of the universe is created. ~ Venerable Bede,
53:DR. MANILAL: How can one succeed in meditation?SRI AUROBINDO: By quietude of mind. There is not only the Infinite in itself, but also an infinite sea of peace, joy, light, power above the head. The golden Lid, Hiranmaya Patram, intervenes between the mind and what is above the mind. Once you break this lid ( making a movement of the hands above the head ) they can come down any time at your will. But for that, quietude is essential. Of course, there are people who can get them without first establishing the quietude, but it is very difficult. ( On 13-12-1938 ) ~ Sri Aurobindo, TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO VOLUME 1 BY NIRODBARAN (Page no.17),
54:Sweet Mother, how can we find the Divine who is hidden in us? ... This we have explained many, many times. But the first thing is to want it, and know precisely that this comes first, before all other things, that this is the important thing. That is the first condition; all the rest may come later, this is the essential condition. You see, if once in a while, from time to time, when you have nothing to do and all goes well and you are unoccupied, suddenly you tell yourself, Ah, I would like so much to find the Divine! - well, this - it may take a hundred thousand years, in this way. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
55:the essential conditions for the growth of the psychic ::: In order to strengthen the contact and aid, if possible, the development of the conscious psychic personality, one should, while concentrating, turn towards it, aspire to know it and feel it, open oneself to receive its influence, and take great care, each time that one receives an indication from it, to follow it very scrupulously and sincerely. To live in a great aspiration, to take care to become inwardly calm and remain so always as far as possible, to cultivate a perfect sincerity in all the activities of one's being - these are the essential conditions for the growth of the psychic being. ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother ,
56:2. What should be the object or ideas for meditation? Whatever is most consonant with your nature and highest aspirations. But if you ask me for an absolute answer, then I must say that Brahman is always the best object for meditation or contemplation and the idea on which the mind should fix is that of God in all, all in God and all as God. It does not matter essentially whether it is the Impersonal or the Personal God, or subjectively, the One Self. But this is the idea I have found the best, because it is the highest and embraces all other truths, whether truths of this world or of the other worlds or beyond all phenomenal existence, - 'All this is the Brahman.' ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes ,
57:I am not this, not that, neti, neti ::: We say then to the mind This is a working of Prakriti, this is neither thyself nor myself; stand back from it. We shall find, if we try, that the mind has this power of detachment and can stand back from the body not only in idea, but in act and as it were physically or rather vitally. This detachment of the mind must be strengthened by a certain attitude of indifference to the things of the body; we must not care essentially about its sleep or its waking, its movement or its rest, its pain or its pleasure, its health or ill-health, its vigour or its fatigue, its comfort or its discomfort, or what it eats or drinks. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.07 - The Release from Subjection to the Body,
58:I mean by the Higher Mind a first plane of spiritual [consciousness] where one becomes constantly and closely aware of the Self, the One everywhere and knows and sees things habitually with that awareness; but it is still very much on the mind level although highly spiritual in its essential substance; and its instrumentation is through an elevated thought-power and comprehensive mental sight-not illumined by any of the intenser upper lights but as if in a large strong and clear daylight. It acts as an intermediate state between the Truth-Light above and the human mind; communicating the higher knowledge in a form that the Mind intensified, broadened, made spiritually supple, can receive without being blinded or dazzled by a Truth beyond it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art game test3,
59:But it is evident that all analogies of this kind depend on principles of a more fundamental nature; and that, if we had a true mathematical classification of quantities, we should be able at once to detect the analogy between any system of quantities presented to us and other systems of quantities in known sciences, so that we should lose no time in availing ourselves of the mathematical labors of those who had already solved problems essentially the same. [...] At the same time, I think that the progress of science, both in the way of discovery, and in the way of diffusion, would be greatly aided if more attention were paid in a direct way to the classification of quantities. ~ James Clerk Maxwell, Remarks on the mathematical classification of physical quantities Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society,
60:... if we conceive of a being whose faculties are so sharpened that he can follow every molecule in its course, such a being, whose attributes are as essentially finite as our own, would be able to do what is impossible to us. For we have seen that molecules in a vessel full of air at uniform temperature are moving with velocities by no means uniform, though the mean velocity of any great number of them, arbitrarily selected, is almost exactly uniform. Now let us suppose that such a vessel is divided into two portions, A and B, by a division in which there is a small hole, and that a being, who can see the individual molecules, opens and closes this hole, so as to allow only the swifter molecules to pass from A to B, and only the slower molecules to pass from B to A. He will thus, without expenditure of work, raise the temperature of B and lower that of A, in contradiction to the second law of thermodynamics. ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
61:Mother, how can one strengthen one's will?Oh, as one strengthens muscles, by a methodical exercise. You take one little thing, something you want to do or dont want to do. Begin with a small thing, not something very essential to the being, but a small detail. And then, if, for instance, it is something you are in the habit of doing,you insist on it with the same regularity, you see, either not to do it or to do it - you insist on it and compel yourself to do it as you compel yourself to life a weight - its the same thing. You make the same kind of effort, but it is more of an inner effort. And after having taken little things like this - things relatively easy, you know - after taking these and succeeding with them, you can unite with a greater force and try a more complicated experiment. And gradually, if you do this regularly, you will end up by acquiring an independent and very strong will. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 391,
62:the best we can conceive as the thing to be done ::: The work itself is at first determined by the best light we can command in our ignorance. It is that which we conceive as the thing that should be done. And whether it be shaped by our sense of duty, by our feeling for our fellow-creatures, by our idea of what is for the good of others or the good of the world or by the direction of one whom we accept as a human Master, wiser than ourselves and for us the representative of that Lord of all works in whom we believe but whom we do not yet know, the principle is the same. The essential of the sacrifice of works must be there and the essential is the surrender of all desire for the fruit of our works, the renunciation of all attachment to the result for which yet we labour. For so long as we work with attachment to the result, the sacrifice is offered not to the Divine, but to our ego... ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.09 - Equality and the Annihilation of Ego,
63:an all-inclusive concentration is required for an Integral Yoga ::: Concentration is indeed the first condition of any Yoga, but it is an all-receiving concentration that is the very nature of the integral Yoga. A separate strong fixing of the thought, of the emotions or of the will on a single idea, object, state, inner movement or principle is no doubt a frequent need here also; but this is only a subsidiary helpful process. A wide massive opening, a harmonised concentration of the whole being in all its parts and through all its powers upon the One who is the All is the larger action of this Yoga without which it cannot achieve its purpose. For it is the consciousness that rests in the One and that acts in the All to which we aspire; it is this that we seek to impose on every element of our being and on every movement of our nature. This wide and concentrated totality is the essential character of the sadhana and its character must determine its practice. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
64:Even on Earth, the first steps in this direction had been taken. There were millions of men, doomed in earlier ages, who now lived active and happy lives thanks to artificial limbs, kidneys, lungs, and hearts. To this process there could be only one conclusion - however far off it might be.And eventually even the brain might go. As the seat of consciousness, It was not essential; the development of electronic intelligence had proved that. The conflict between mind and machine might be resolved at last in the eternal truce of complete symbiosis.But was even this the end? A few mystically inclined biologists went still further. They speculated, taking their cues from the beliefs of many religions, that mind would eventually free itself from matter. The robot body, like the flesh-and-blood one, would be no more than a stepping-stone to something which, long ago, men bad called "spirit."And if there was anything beyond that, its name could only be God. ~ Arthur C Clarke, Bernhard Guenther,
66:Prayer helps to prepare this relation for us at first on the lower plane even while it is there consistent with much that is mere egoism and self-delusion; but afterwards we can draw towards the spiritual truth which is behind it. It is not then the giving of the thing asked for that matters, but the relation itself, the contact of mans life with God, the conscious interchange. In spiritual matters and in the seeking of spiritual gains, this conscious relation is a great power; it is a much greater power than our own entirely self-reliant struggle and effort and it brings a fuller spiritual growth and experience. Necessarily, in the end prayer either ceases in the greater thing for which it prepared us, -- in fact the form we call prayer is not itself essential so long as the faith, the will, the aspiration are there, -- or remains only for the joy of the relation. Also its objects, the artha or interest it seeks to realise, become higher and higher until we reach the highest motiveless devotion, which is that of divine love pure and simple without any other demand or longing. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Love,
67:Here I want to make it very clear that mathematics is not what many people think it is; it is not a system of mere formulas and theorems; but as beautifully defined by Professor Cassius J. Keyser, in his book The Human Worth of Rigorous Thinking (Columbia University Press, 1916), mathematics is the science of "Exact thought or rigorous thinking," and one of its distinctive characteristics is "precision, sharpness, completeness of definitions." This quality alone is sufficient to explain why people generally do not like mathematics and why even some scientists bluntly refuse to have anything to do with problems wherein mathematical reasoning is involved. In the meantime, mathematical philosophy has very little, if anything, to do with mere calculations or with numbers as such or with formulas; it is a philosophy wherein precise, sharp and rigorous thinking is essential. Those who deliberately refuse to think "rigorously"-that is mathematically-in connections where such thinking is possible, commit the sin of preferring the worse to the better; they deliberately violate the supreme law of intellectual rectitude. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
68:God reveals himself everywhere, beneath our groping efforts, as a universal milieu, only because he is the ultimate point upon which all realities converge. Each element of the world, whatever it may be, only subsists, hic et nunc, in the manner of a cone whose generatrices meet in God who draws them together-(meeting at .the term of their individual perfection and at the term of the general perfection of the world which contains them). It follows that all created things, every one of them, cannot be looked at, in their nature and action, without the same reality being found in their innermost being-like sunlight in the fragments of a broken mirror-one beneath its multiplicity, unattainable beneath its proximity, and spiritual beneath its materiality. No object can influence us by its essence without our being touched by the radiance of the focus of the universe. Our minds are incapable of grasping a reality, our hearts and hands of seizing the essentially desirable in it, without our being compelled by the very structure of things to go back to the first source of its perfections. This focus, this source, is thus everywhere. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Divine Milieu ,
69:witness and non-dual states ::: The Witness and Non-Dual states are everpresent capacities which hold the special relationship to the other states. The Witness state, or Witnessing, is the capacity to observe, see or witness phenomenon arising in the other states. Meaning for example, its the capacity to hold unbroken attention in the gross states, and the capacity to witness the entire relative world of form arise as object viewed by the pure witness, the pure subject that is never itself a seen object but always the pure seer or pure Self, that is actually no-self. Next we have Non-Dual which refers to both the suchness and is-ness of reality right now. It is the not-two-ness or everpresent unity of subject and object, form and emptiness, heaven and earth, relative and absolute. When the Witness dissolves and pure seer and all that is seen become not seperate or not two, the Non-Duality of absolute emptiness and relative form or the luminous identity of unqualifiable spirit and all of its manifestations appear as play of radiant natural and spontaneous and present love. Absolute and relative are already always not-two but nor are they one, nor both nor neither. ~ Essential Integral, L5-18 ,
70:I accept, will not give up, and will practice each of the Three Jewels, And will not let go of my guru or my yidam deity. As the samaya of the Buddha, first among the Three Jewels, I will apply myself to the true, essential reality. As the samaya of sacred Dharma, second among the Three Jewels, I will distill the very essence of all the vehicles' teachings. As the samaya of the Sangha, the third and final Jewel, I will look upon reality; I will behold pure awareness. And as the samaya of the guru and the yidam deity, I will take my very own mind, my pure mind, as a witness. Generally speaking, the Three Jewels should be regarded as the ultimate place to take refuge. As was taught in the section on taking refuge, your mind should be focused one-pointedly, with all your hopes and trust placed in their care. The gurus are a lamp that dispels the darkness of ignorance. As the guides who lead you along the path to liberation, they are your sole source of refuge and protection, from now until you attain enlightenment. For these reasons, you should act with unwavering faith, pure view and devotion, and engage in the approach and accomplishment of the divine yidam deity. ~ Dzogchen Rinpoche III, Great Perfection Outer and Inner Preliminaries ,
71:Our highest insights must - and should! - sound like stupidities, or possibly crimes, when they come without permission to people whose ears have no affinity for them and were not predestined for them. The distinction between the exoteric and the esoteric, once made by philosophers, was found among the Indians as well as among Greeks, Persians, and Muslims. Basically, it was found everywhere that people believed in an order of rank and not in equality and equal rights. The difference between these terms is not that the exoteric stands outside and sees, values, measures, and judges from this external position rather than from some internal one.What is more essential is that the exoteric sees things up from below - while the esoteric sees them down from above! There are heights of the soul from whose vantage point even tragedy stops having tragic effects; and who would dare to decide whether the collective sight of the world's many woes would necessarily compel and seduce us into a feeling of pity, a feeling that would only serve to double these woes?... What helps feed or nourish the higher type of man must be almost poisonous to a very different and lesser type. The virtues of a base man could indicate vices and weaknesses in a philosopher. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil The Free Spirit,
72:But before entering into the details of I. A. O. as a magical formula it should be remarked that it is essentially the formula of Yoga or meditation; in fact, of elementary mysticism in all its branches. In beginning a meditation practice, there is always a quiet pleasure, a gentle natural growth; one takes a lively interest in the work; it seems easy; one is quite pleased to have started. This stage represents Isis. Sooner or later it is succeeded by depression-the Dark Night of the Soul, an infinite weariness and detestation of the work. The simplest and easiest acts become almost impossible to perform. Such impotence fills the mind with apprehension and despair. The intensity of this loathing can hardly be understood by any person who has not experienced it. This is the period of Apophis. It is followed by the arising not of Isis, but of Osiris. The ancient condition is not restored, but a new and superior condition is created, a condition only rendered possible by the process of death. The Alchemists themselves taught this same truth. The first matter of the work was base and primitive, though 'natural.' After passing through various stages the 'black dragon' appeared; but from this arose the pure and perfect gold ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
73:"Because I have called, and ye refused . . . I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh; when your fear cometh as desolation, and your destruction cometh as a whirlwind; when distress and anguish cometh upon you." "For the turning away of the simple shall slay them, and the prosperity of fools shall destroy them."Time Jesum transeuntem et non revertentem: "Dread the passage of Jesus, for he does not return."The myths and folk tales of the whole world make clear that the refusal is essentially a refusal to give up what one takes to be one's own interest. The future is regarded not in terms of an unremitting series of deaths and births, but as though one's present system of ideals, virtues, goals, and advantages were to be fixed and made secure. King Minos retained the divine bull, when the sacrifice would have signified submission to the will of the god of his society; for he preferred what he conceived to be his economic advantage. Thus he failed to advance into the liferole that he had assumed-and we have seen with what calamitous effect. The divinity itself became his terror; for, obviously, if one is oneself one's god, then God himself, the will of God, the power that would destroy one's egocentric system, becomes a monster. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces ,
74:Supermind and the human mind are a number of ranges, planes or layers of consciousness - one can regard it in various ways - in which the element or substance of mind and consequently its movements also become more and more illumined and powerful and wide. The Overmind is the highest of these ranges; it is full of lights and powers; but from the point of view of what is above it, it is the line of the soul's turning away from the complete and indivisible knowledge and its descent towards the Ignorance. For although it draws from the Truth, it is here that begins the separation of aspects of the Truth, the forces and their working out as if they were independent truths and this is a process that ends, as one descends to ordinary Mind, Life and Matter, in a complete division, fragmentation, separation from the indivisible Truth above. There is no longer the essential, total, perfectly harmonising and unifying knowledge, or rather knowledge for ever harmonious because for ever one, which is the character of Supermind. In the Supermind mental divisions and oppositions cease, the problems created by our dividing and fragmenting mind disappear and Truth is seen as a luminous whole. In the Overmind there is not yet the actual fall into Ignorance, but the first step is taken which will make the fall inevitable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I ,
75:From above to below, the sefirot depict the drama of emanation, the transition from Ein Sof to creation. In the words of Azriel of Gerona, "They constitute the process by which all things come into being and pass away." From below to above, the sefirot constitute a ladder of ascent back to the One. The union of Tif'eret and Shekhinah gives birth to the human soul, and the mystical journey begins with the awareness of this spiritual fact of life. Shekhinah is the opening to the divine: "One who enters must enter through this gate." Once inside, the sefirot are no longer an abstract theological system; they become a map of consciousness. The mystic climbs and probes, discovering dimensions of being. Spiritual and psychological wholeness is achieved by meditating on the qualities of each sefirah, by imitating and integrating the attributes of God. "When you cleave to the sefirot, the divine holy spirit enters into you, into every sensation and every movement." But the path is not easy. Divine will can be harsh: Abraham was commanded to sacrifice Isaac in order to balance love with rigor. From the Other Side, demonic forces threaten and seduce. [The demonic is rooted in the divine]. Contemplatively and psychologically, evil must be encountered, not evaded. By knowing and withstanding the dark underside of wisdom, the spiritual seeker is refined. ~ Daniel C Matt, The Essential Kabbalah ,
76:The supramental memory is different from the mental, not a storing up of past knowledge and experience, but an abiding presence of knowledge that can be brought forward or, more characteristically, offers itself, when it is needed: it is not dependent on attention or on conscious reception, for the things of the past not known actually or not observed can be called up from latency by an action which is yet essentially a remembrance. Especially on a certain level all knowledge presents itself as a remembering, because all is latent or inherent in the self of supermind. The future like the past presents itself to knowledge in the supermind as a memory of the preknown. The imagination transformed in the supermind acts on one side as a power of true image and symbol, always all image or index of some value or significance or other truth of being, on the other as an inspiration or interpretative seeing of possibilities and potentialities not less true than actual or realised things. These are put in their place either by an attendant intuitive or interpretative judgment or by one inherent in the vision of the image, symbol or potentiality, or by a supereminent revelation of that which is behind the image or symbol or which determines the potential and the actual and their relations and, it may be, overrides and overpasses them, imposing ultimate truths and supreme certitudes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
77:"Listen to Erwin Schroedinger,the Nobel Prize-winning cofounder of quantum mechanics,and how can I convince you that he means this literally?Consciousness is a singular of which the plural is unknown.It is not possible that this unity of knowledge,feelings,and choice which you call your own should have sprung into being from nothingness at a given moment not so long ago;rather,this knowledge,feeling, and choice are essentially eternal and unchangeable and numerically one in all people,nay in all sensitive beings.The conditions for your existence are almost as old as rocks.For thousands of years men have striven and suffered and begotten and women have brought in pain.A hundred years ago (there's the test),another man sat on this spot;like you he gazed with awe and yearning in his heart at the dying light on the glaciers. Like you he was begotten of man and born of woman.He felt pain and brief joy as you do.Was he someone else? Was it not you yourself?WAS IT NOT YOU,YOURSELF? Are you not humanity itself? Do you not touch all things human,because you are it's only Witness? Do you not therefore love the world,and love all people,and love the Kosmos,because you are its only Self? Do you not weep when one person is hurt,do you not cry when one child goes hungry,do you not scream when one soul is tortured? You know you suffer when others suffer.You already know this! "Was it someone else? Was it not you yourself?" ~ Ken Wilber, One Taste p. 342-343,
78:Here the formula of the supreme knowledge comes to our help; we have nothing to do in our essential standpoint with these distinctions, for there is no I nor thou, but only one divine Self equal in all embodiments, equal in the individual and the group, and to realise that, to express that, to serve that, to fulfil that is all that matters. Self-satisfaction and altruism, enjoyment and indifference are not the essential thing. If the realisation, fulfilment, service of the one Self demands from us an action that seems to others self-service or self-assertion in the egoistic sense or seems egoistic enjoyment and self-indulgence, that action we must do; we must be governed by the guide within rather than by the opinions of men. The influence of the environment works often with great subtlety; we prefer and put on almost unconsciously the garb which will look best in the eye that regards us from outside and we allow a veil to drop over the eye within; we are impelled to drape ourselves in the vow of poverty, or in the garb of service, or in outward proofs of indifference and renunciation and a spotless sainthood because that is what tradition and opinion demand of us and so we can make best an impression on our environment. But all this is vanity and delusion. We may be called upon to assume these things, for that may be the uniform of our service; but equally it may not. The eye of man outside matters nothing; the eye within is all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
79:Why God sometimes allows people who are genuinely good to be hindered in the good that they do. God, who is faithful, allows his friends to fall frequently into weakness only in order to remove from them any prop on which they might lean. For a loving person it would be a great joy to be able to achieve many great feats, whether keeping vigils, fasting, performing other ascetical practices or doing major, difficult and unusual works. For them this is a great joy, support and source of hope so that their works become a prop and a support upon which they can lean. But it is precisely this which our Lord wishes to take from them so that he alone will be their help and support. This he does solely on account of his pure goodness and mercy, for God is prompted to act only by his goodness, and in no way do our works serve to make God give us anything or do anything for us. Our Lord wishes his friends to be freed from such an attitude, and thus he removes their support from them so that they must henceforth find their support only in him. For he desires to give them great gifts, solely on account of his goodness, and he shall be their comfort and support while they discover themselves to be and regard themselves as being a pure nothingness in all the great gifts of God. The more essentially and simply the mind rests on God and is sustained by him, the more deeply we are established in God and the more receptive we are to him in all his precious gifts - for human kind should build on God alone. ~ Meister Eckhart,
80:This ego or "I" is not a lasting truth, much less our essential part; it is only a formation of Nature, a mental form of thought centralisation in the perceiving and discriminating mind, a vital form of the centralisation of feeling and sensation in our parts of life, a form of physical conscious reception centralising substance and function of substance in our bodies. All that we internally are is not ego, but consciousness, soul or spirit. All that we externally and superficiallyare and do is not ego but Nature. An executive cosmic force shapes us and dictates through our temperament and environment and mentality so shaped, through our individualised formulation of the cosmic energies, our actions and their results. Truly, we do not think, will or act but thought occurs in us, will occurs in us, impulse and act occur in us; our ego-sense gathers around itself, refers to itself all this flow of natural activities. It is cosmic Force, it is Nature that forms the thought, imposes the will, imparts the impulse. our body, mind and ego are a wave of that sea of force in action and do not govern it, but by it are governed and directed. The Sadhaka in his progress towards truth and self-knowledge must come to a point where the soul opens its eyes of vision and recognises this truth of ego and this truth of works. He gives up the idea of a mental, vital, physical, "I" that acts or governs action; he recognises that Prakriti, Force of cosmic nature following her fixed modes, is the one and only worker in him and in all things and creatures. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.08 - The Supreme Will,
81:science of consciousness, the soul and objective matter ::: When the ancient thinkers of India set themselves to study the soul of man in themselves and others, they, unlike any other nation or school of early thought, proceeded at once to a process which resembles exactly enough the process adopted by modern science in its study of physical phenomena. For their object was to study, arrange and utilise the forms, forces and working movements of consciousness, just as the modern physical Sciences study, arrange and utilize the forms, forces and working movements of objective Matter. The material with which they had to deal was more subtle, flexible and versatile than the most impalpable forces of which the physical Sciences have become aware; its motions were more elusive, its processes harder to fix; but once grasped and ascertained, the movements of consciousness were found by Vedic psychologists to be in their process and activity as regular, manageable and utilisable as the movements of physical forces. The powers of the soul can be as perfectly handled and as safely, methodically and puissantly directed to practical life-purposes of joy, power and light as the modern power of electricity can be used for human comfort, industrial and locomotive power and physical illumination; but the results to which they give room and effect are more wonderful and momentous than the results of motorpower and electric luminosity. For there is no difference of essential law in the physical and the psychical, but only a difference and undoubtedly a great difference of energy, instrumentation and exact process. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human Towards a True Scientific Psychology,
82:Here lies the whole importance of the part of the Yoga of Knowledge which we are now considering, the knowledges of those essential principles of Being, those essential modes of self-existence on which the absolute Divine has based its self-manifestation. If the truth of our being is an infinite unity in which alone there is perfect wideness, light, knowledge, power, bliss, and if all our subjection to darkness, ignorance, weakness, sorrow, limitation comes of our viewing existence as a clash of infinitely multiple separate existences, then obviously it is the most practical and concrete and utilitarian as well as the most lofty and philosophical wisdom to find a means by which we can get away from the error and learn to live in the truth. So also, if that One is in its nature a freedom from bondage to this play of qualities which constitute our psychology and if from subjection to that play are born the struggle and discord in which we live, floundering eternally between the two poles of good and evil, virtue and sin, satisfaction and failure, joy and grief, pleasure and pain, then to get beyond the qualities and take our foundation in the settled peace of that which is always beyond them is the only practical wisdom. If attachment to mutable personality is the cause of our self-ignorance, of our discord and quarrel with ourself and with life and with others, and if there is an impersonal One in which no such discord and ignorance and vain and noisy effort exist because it is in eternal identity and harmony with itself, then to arrive in our souls at that impersonality and untroubled oneness of being is the one line and object of human effort to which our reason can consent to give the name of practicality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
83:IN OUR scrutiny of the seven principles of existence it was found that they are one in their essential and fundamental reality: for if even the matter of the most material universe is nothing but a status of being of Spirit made an object of sense, envisaged by the Spirit's own consciousness as the stuff of its forms, much more must the life-force that constitutes itself into form of Matter, and the mind-consciousness that throws itself out as Life, and the Supermind that develops Mind as one of its powers, be nothing but Spirit itself modified in apparent substance and in dynamism of action, not modified in real essence. All are powers of one Power of being and not other than that All-Existence, All-Consciousness, All-Will, All-Delight which is the true truth behind every appearance. And they are not only one in their reality, but also inseparable in the sevenfold variety of their action. They are the seven colours of the light of the divine consciousness, the seven rays of the Infinite, and by them the Spirit has filled in on the canvas of his self-existence conceptually extended, woven of the objective warp of Space and the subjective woof of Time, the myriad wonders of his self-creation great, simple, symmetrical in its primal laws and vast framings, infinitely curious and intricate in its variety of forms and actions and the complexities of relation and mutual effect of all upon each and each upon all. These are the seven Words of the ancient sages; by them have been created and in the light of their meaning are worked out and have to be interpreted the developed and developing harmonies of the world we know and the worlds behind of which we have only an indirect knowledge. The Light, the Sound is one; their action is sevenfold. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.07 - The Knowledge and the Ignorance,
84:To analyse the classes of life we have to consider two very different kinds of phenomena: the one embraced under the collective name-Inorganic chemistry-the other under the collective nameOrganic chemistry, or the chemistry of hydro-carbons. These divisions are made because of the peculiar properties of the elements chiefly involved in the second class. The properties of matter are so distributed among the elements that three of them- Oxygen, Hydrogen, and Carbon-possess an ensemble of unique characteristics. The number of reactions in inorganic chemistry are relatively few, but in organic chemistry-in the chemistry of these three elements the number of different compounds is practically unlimited. Up to 1910, we knew of more than 79 elements of which the whole number of reactions amounted to only a few hundreds, but among the remaining three elements-Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen-the reactions were known to be practically unlimited in number and possibilities; this fact must have very far reaching consequences. As far as energies are concerned, we have to take them as nature reveals them to us. Here more than ever, mathematical thinking is essential and will help enormously. The reactions in inorganic chemistry always involve the phenomenon of heat, sometimes light, and in some instances an unusual energy is produced called electricity. Until now, the radioactive elements represent a group too insufficiently known for an enlargement here upon this subject. The organic compounds being unlimited in number and possibilities and with their unique characteristics, represent of course, a different class of phenomena, but being, at the same time, chemical they include the basic chemical phenomena involved in all chemical reactions, but being unique in many other respects, they also have an infinitely vast field of unique characteristics. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity Questions And Answers 1953,
85:When, in last week's aphorism, Sri Aurobindo opposed - as one might say - "knowledge" to "Wisdom", he was speaking of knowledge as it is lived in the average human consciousness, the knowledge which is obtained through effort and mental development, whereas here, on the contrary, the knowledge he speaks of is the essential Knowledge, the supramental divine Knowledge, Knowledge by identity. And this is why he describes it here as "vast and eternal", which clearly indicates that it is not human knowledge as we normally understand it.Many people have asked why Sri Aurobindo said that the river is "slender". This is an expressive image which creates a striking contrast between the immensity of the divine, supramental Knowledge - the origin of this inspiration, which is infinite - and what a human mind can perceive of it and receive from it.Even when you are in contact with these domains, the portion, so to say, which you perceive, is minimal, slender. It is like a tiny little stream or a few falling drops and these drops are so pure, so brilliant, so complete in themselves, that they give you the sense of a marvellous inspiration, the impression that you have reached infinite domains and risen very high above the ordinary human condition. And yet this is nothing in comparison with what is still to be perceived.I have also been asked if the psychic being or psychic consciousness is the medium through which the inspiration is perceived.Generally, yes. The first contact you have with higher regions is a psychic one. Certainly, before an inner psychic opening is achieved, it is difficult to have these inspirations. It can happen as an exception and under exceptional conditions as a grace, but the true contact comes through the psychic; because the psychic consciousness is certainly the medium with the greatest affinity with the divine Truth. ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms ,
86:A supreme divine Love is a creative Power and, even though it can exist in itself silent and unchangeable, yet rejoices in external form and expression and is not condemned to be a speechless and bodiless godhead. It has even been said that creation itself was an act of love or at least the building up of a field in which Divine Love could devise its symbols and fulfil itself in act of mutuality and self-giving, and, if not the initial nature of creation, this may well be its ultimate object and motive. It does not so appear now because, even if a Divine Love is there in the world upholding all this evolution of creatures, yet the stuff of life and its action is made up of an egoistic formation, a division, a struggle of life and consciousness to exist and survive in an apparently indifferent, inclement or even hostile world of inanimate and inconscient Matter. In the confusion and obscurity of this struggle all are thrown against each other with a will in each to assert its own existence first and foremost and only secondarily to assert itself in others and very partially for others; for even man's altruism remains essentially egoistic and must be so till the soul finds the secret of the divine Oneness. It is to discover that at its supreme source, to bring it from within and to radiate it out up to the extreme confines of life that is turned the effort of the Yoga. All action, all creation must be turned into a form, a symbol of the cult, the adoration, the sacrifice; it must carry something that makes it bear in it the stamp of a dedication, a reception and translation of the Divine Consciousness, a service of the Beloved, a self-giving, a surrender. This has to be done wherever possible in the outward body and form of the act; it must be done always in its inward emotion and an intentsity that shows it to be an outflow from the soul towards the Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 2,
87:What is the most useful idea to spread and what is the best example to set?The question can be considered in two ways, a very general one applicable to the whole earth, and another specific one which concerns our present social environment.From the general point of view, it seems to me that the most useful idea to spread is twofold:1) Man carries within himself perfect power, perfect wisdom and perfect knowledge, and if he wants to possess them, he must discover them in the depth of his being, by introspection and concentration.2) These divine qualities are identical at the centre, at the heart of all beings; this implies the essential unity of all, and all the consequences of solidarity and fraternity that follow from it.The best example to give would be the unalloyed serenity and immutably peaceful happiness which belong to one who knows how to live integrally this thought of the One God in all.From the point of view of our present environment, here is the idea which, it seems to me, it is most useful to spread:True progressive evolution, an evolution which can lead man to his rightful happiness, does not lie in any external means, material improvement or social change. Only a deep and inner process of individual self-perfection can make for real progress and completely transform the present state of things, and change suffering and misery into a serene and lasting contentment.Consequently, the best example is one that shows the first stage of individual self-perfection which makes possible all the rest, the first victory to be won over the egoistic personality: disinterestedness.At a time when all rush upon money as the means to sat- isfy their innumerable cravings, one who remains indifferent to wealth and acts, not for the sake of gain, but solely to follow a disinterested ideal, is probably setting the example which is most useful at present. ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago Volume-2,
88:middle vision logic or paradigmatic ::: (1:25) Cognition is described as middle-vision logic, or paradigmatic in that it is capable of co-ordinating the relations between systems of systems, unifying them into principled frameworks or paradigms. This is an operation on meta-systems and allows for the view described above, a view of human development itself. Self-sense at teal is called Autonomous or Strategist and is characterized by the emergent capacity to acknowledge and cope with inner conflicts in needs, ... and values. All of which are part of a multifacted and complex world. Teal sees our need for autonomy and autonomy itself as limited because emotional interdependence is inevitable. The contradictory aspects of self are weaved into an identity that is whole, integrated and commited to generating a fulfilling life.Additionally, Teal allows individuals to link theory and practice, perceive dynamic systems interactions, recognize and strive for higher principles, understand the social construction of reality, handle paradox and complexity, create positive-sum games and seek feedback from others as a vital source for growth. Values embrace magnificence of existence, flexibility, spontaneioty, functionality, the integration of differences into interdependent systems and complimenting natural egalitarianism with natural ranking. Needs shift to self-actualization, and morality is in both terms of universal ethical principles and recognition of the developmental relativity of those universals. Teal is the first wave that is truly able to see the limitations of orange and green morality, it is able to uphold the paradox of universalism and relativism. Teal in its decision making process is able to see ... deep and surface features of morality and is able to take into consideration both those values when engaging in moral action. Currently Teal is quite rare, embraced by 2-5% of the north american and european population according to sociological research. ~ Essential Integral, L4.1-53 Middle Vision Logic,
89:indifference to things of the body ::: This detachment of the mind must be strengthened by a certain attitude of indifference to the things of the body; we must not care essentially about its sleep or its waking, its movement or its rest, its pain or its pleasure, its health or ill-health, its vigour or its fatigue, its comfort or its discomfort, or what it eats or drinks. This does not mean that we shall not keep the body in right order so far as we can; we have not to fall into violent asceticisms or a positive neglect of the physical frame. But we have not either to be affected in mind by hunger or thirst or discomfort or ill-health or attach the importance which the physical and vital man attaches to the things of the body, or indeed any but a quite subordinate and purely instrumental importance. Nor must this instrumental importance be allowed to assume the proportions of a necessity; we must not for instance imagine that the purity of the mind depends on the things we eat or drink, although during a certain stage restrictions in eating and drinking are useful to our inner progress; nor on the other hand must we continue to think that the dependence of the mind or even of the life on food and drink is anything more than a habit, a customary relation which Nature has set up between these principles. As a matter of fact the food we take can be reduced by contrary habit and new relation to a minimum without the mental or vital vigour being in any way reduced; even on the contrary with a judicious development they can be trained to a greater potentiality of vigour by learning to rely on the secret fountains of mental and vital energy with which they are connected more than upon the minor aid of physical aliments. This aspect of self-discipline is however more important in the Yoga of self-perfection than here; for our present purpose the important point is the renunciation by the mind of attachment to or dependence on the things of the body. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.07 - The Release from Subjection to the Body,
90:formal-operational ::: The orange altitude emerged a few hundred years ago with the European Rennisance. Its modern, rational view grew in prominance through the Age of Enlightenment and came to its fullest expression during the Industrial Revolution.Fueling this age of reason and science was the emergence of formal operational cognition, or the ability to operate on thoughts themselves. No longer limited to reflection on concrete objects, cognition moves from representations to abstractions and can now operate on a range of non-tangiable propositions that may not reflect the concrete world. This is the basis of scientific reasoning through hypothesis. Orange also brings multiplistic thinking, or the realization that there are several possible ways of approaching a situation, even though one is still considered most right. Self-sense at orange features two shifts, first to expert and then to achiever, these moves feature an increase in self-awareness and appreciation for multiple possibilities in a given situation. Recognition that one doesnt always live up to idealized social expectations is fueled by an awareness that begins to penetrate the inner world of subjectivity. This is the beginning of introspection. An objectifiable self-sense and the capacity to take a third person perspective. Needs shift from belonging to self-esteem. And values land on pragmatic utiliarian approaches to life that rely on ... and thinking to earn progress, prosperity and self-reliance. Morality at orange sees right defined by universal ethical principles. The emergence of formal operational thinking at orange enables a world-centric care for universal human rights and the right of each individual for autonomy and the pursuit of happiness. A desire for individual dignity and self-respect are also driving forces behind orange morality. A significant number of the founding fathers of the United States harbored orange values. ...Faith at orange is called Individual Reflective and so far as identity and world-view are differentiated from others, and faith takes on an essence of critical thought. Demythologizing symbols into conceptual meanings. At orange we see the emergence of rational deism and secularism. ~ Essential Integral, 4.1-51 Formal Operational,
91:higher mind or late vision logic ::: Even more rare, found stably in less than 1% of the population and even more emergent is the turquoise altitude.Cognition at Turquoise is called late vision-logic or cross-paradigmatic and features the ability to connect meta-systems or paradigms, with other meta-systems. This is the realm of coordinating principles. Which are unified systems of systems of abstraction to other principles. ... Aurobindo indian sage and philosopher offers a more first-person account of turquoise which he called higher-mind, a unitarian sense of being with a powerful multiple dynamism capable of formation of a multitude of aspects of knowledge, ways of action, forms and significances of becoming of all of which a spontaneous inherient knowledge.Self-sense at turquoise is called Construct-aware and is the first stage of Cook-Greuter's extension of Loveigers work on ego-development. The Construct-aware stage sees individuals for the first time as exploring more and more complex thought-structures with awareness of the automatic nature of human map making and absurdities which unbridaled complexity and logical argumentation can lead. Individuals at this stage begin to see their ego as a central point of reference and therefore a limit to growth. They also struggle to balance unique self-expressions and their concurrent sense of importance, the imperical and intuitive knowledge that there is no fundamental subject-object separation and the budding awareness of self-identity as temporary which leads to a decreased ego-desire to create a stable self-identity. Turquoise individuals are keenly aware of the interplay between awareness, thought, action and effects. They seek personal and spiritual transformation and hold a complex matrix of self-identifications, the adequecy of which they increasingly call into question. Much of this already points to Turquoise values which embrace holistic and intuitive thinking and alignment to universal order in a conscious fashion.Faith at Turquoise is called Universalising and can generate faith compositions in which conceptions of Ultimate Reality start to include all beings. Individuals at Turquoise faith dedicate themselves to transformation of present reality in the direction of transcendent actuality. Both of these are preludes to the coming of Third Tier. ~ Essential Integral, L4.1-54 the Higher Mind,
92:But this is not always the manner of the commencement. The sadhaka is often led gradually and there is a long space between the first turning of the mind and the full assent of the nature to the thing towards which it turns. There may at first be only a vivid intellectual interest, a forcible attraction towards the idea and some imperfect form of practice. Or perhaps there is an effort not favoured by the whole nature, a decision or a turn imposed by an intellectual influence or dictated by personal affection and admiration for someone who is himself consecrated and devoted to the Highest. In such cases, a long period of preparation may be necessary before there comes the irrevocable consecration; and in some instances it may not come. There may be some advance, there may be a strong effort, even much purification and many experiences other than those that are central or supreme; but the life will either be spent in preparation or, a certain stage having been reached, the mind pushed by an insufficient driving-force may rest content at the limit of the effort possible to it. Or there may even be a recoil to the lower life, - what is called in the ordinary parlance of Yoga a fall from the path. This lapse happens because there is a defect at the very centre. The intellect has been interested, the heart attracted, the will has strung itself to the effort, but the whole nature has not been taken captive by the Divine. It has only acquiesced in the interest, the attraction or the endeavour. There has been an experiment, perhaps even an eager experiment, but not a total self-giving to an imperative need of the soul or to an unforsakable ideal. Even such imperfect Yoga has not been wasted; for no upward effort is made in vain. Even if it fails in the present or arrives only at some preparatory stage or preliminary realisation, it has yet determined the soul's future.But if we desire to make the most of the opportunity that this life gives us, if we wish to respond adequately to the call we have received and to attain to the goal we have glimpsed, not merely advance a little towards it, it is essential that there should be an entire self-giving. The secret of success in Yoga is to regard it not as one of the aims to be pursued in life, but as the one and only aim, not as an important part of life, but as the whole of life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.02 - Self-Consecration,
93:meta-systemic operations ::: As the 1950's and 60s begin to roll around the last stage of first tier emerged as a cultural force. With the Green Altitude we see the emergence of Pluralistic, Multicultural, Post-Modern world-views.Cognition is starting to move beyond formal-operations into the realm of co-ordinating systems of abstractions, in what is called Meta-systemic Cognition. While formal-operations acted upon the classes and relations between members of classes. Meta-systemic operations start at the level of relating systems to systems. The focus of these investigations is placed upon comparing, contrasting, transforming and synthesizing entire systems, rather than components of one system. This emergent faculty allows self-sense to focus around a heightened sense of individuality and an increased ability for emotional resonance. The recognition of individual differences, the ability to tolerate paradox and contradiction, and greater conceptual complexity all provide for an understanding of conflict as being both internally and externally caused. Context plays a major role in the creation of truth and individual perspective. With each being context dependent and open to subjective interpretation, meaning each perspective and truth are rendered relative and are not able to be judged as better or more true than any other. This fuels a value set that centers on softness over cold rationality. Sensitivity and preference over objectivity.Along with a focus on community harmony and equality which drives the valuing of sensitivity to others, reconcilation, consensus, dialogue, relationship, human development, bonding, and a seeking of a peace with the inner-self. Moral decisions are based on rights, values, or principles that are agreeable to all individuals composing a society based on fair and beneficial practices. All of this leads to the Equality movements and multiculturalism. And to the extreme form of relativitism which we saw earlier as context dependant nature of all truth including objective facts.Faith at the green altitude is called Conjunctive, and allows the self to integrate what was unrecognized by the previous stages self-certainty and cognitive and affective adaptation to reality. New features at this level of faith include the unification of symbolic power with conceptual meaning, an awareness of ones social unconscious, a reworking of ones past, and an opening to ones deeper self. ~ Essential Integral, 4.1-52 Meta-systemic Operations,
94:There is also the consecration of the thoughts to the Divine. In its inception this is the attempt to fix the mind on the object of adoration, -for naturally the restless human mind is occupied with other objects and, even when it is directed upwards, constantly drawn away by the world, -- so that in the end it habitually thinks of him and all else is only secondary and thought of only in relation to him. This is done often with the aid of a physical image or, more intimately and characteristically, of a Mantra or a divine name through which the divine being is realised. There are supposed by those who systematise, to be three stages of the seeking through the devotion of the mind, first, the constant hearing of the divine name, qualities and all that has been attached to them, secondly, the constant thinking on them or on the divine being or personality, thirdly, the settling and fixing of the mind on the object; and by this comes the full realisation. And by these, too, there comes when the accompanying feeling or the concentration is very intense, the Samadhi, the ecstatic trance in which the consciousness passes away from outer objects. But all this is really incidental; the one thing essential is the intense devotion of the thought in the mind to the object of adoration. Although it seems akin to the contemplation of the way of knowledge, it differs from that in its spirit. It is in its real nature not a still, but an ecstatic contemplation; it seeks not to pass into the being of the Divine, but to bring the Divine into ourselves and to lose ourselves in the deep ecstasy of his presence or of his possession; and its bliss is not the peace of unity, but the ecstasy of union. Here, too, there may be the separative self-consecration, which ends in the giving up of all other thought of life for the possession of this ecstasy, eternal afterwards in planes beyond, or the comprehensive consecration in which all the thoughts are full of the Divine and even in the occupations of life every thought remembers him. As in the other Yogas, so in this, one comes to see the Divine everywhere and in all and to pour out the realisation of the Divine in all ones inner activities and outward actions. But all is supported here by the primary force of the emotional union: for it is by love that the entire self-consecration and the entire possession is accomplished, and thought and action become shapes and figures of the divine love which possesses the spirit and its members. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.04 - The Way of Devotion,
95:reading ::: 50 Spiritual Classics: List of Books Covered: Muhammad Asad - The Road To Mecca (1954) St Augustine - Confessions (400) Richard Bach - Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1970) Black Elk Black - Elk Speaks (1932) Richard Maurice Bucke - Cosmic Consciousness (1901) Fritjof Capra - The Tao of Physics (1976) Carlos Castaneda - Journey to Ixtlan (1972) GK Chesterton - St Francis of Assisi (1922) Pema Chodron - The Places That Scare You (2001) Chuang Tzu - The Book of Chuang Tzu (4th century BCE) Ram Dass - Be Here Now (1971) Epictetus - Enchiridion (1st century) Mohandas Gandhi - An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments With Truth (1927) Al-Ghazzali - The Alchemy of Happiness (1097) Kahlil Gibran - The Prophet (1923) GI Gurdjieff - Meetings With Remarkable Men (1960) Dag Hammarskjold - Markings (1963) Abraham Joshua Heschel - The Sabbath (1951) Hermann Hesse - Siddartha (1922) Aldous Huxley - The Doors of Perception (1954) William James - The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902) Carl Gustav Jung - Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1955) Margery Kempe - The Book of Margery Kempe (1436) J Krishnamurti - Think On These Things (1964) CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters (1942) Malcolm X - The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1964) Daniel C Matt - The Essential Kabbalah (1994) Dan Millman - The Way of the Peaceful Warrior (1989) W Somerset Maugham - The Razor's Edge (1944) Thich Nhat Hanh - The Miracle of Mindfulness (1975) Michael Newton - Journey of Souls (1994) John O'Donohue - Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom (1998) Robert M Pirsig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974) James Redfield - The Celestine Prophecy (1994) Miguel Ruiz - The Four Agreements (1997) Helen Schucman & William Thetford - A Course in Miracles (1976) Idries Shah - The Way of the Sufi (1968) Starhawk - The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess (1979) Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind (1970) Emanuel Swedenborg - Heaven and Hell (1758) Teresa of Avila - Interior Castle (1570) Mother Teresa - A Simple Path (1994) Eckhart Tolle - The Power of Now (1998) Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism (1973) Neale Donald Walsch - Conversations With God (1998) Rick Warren - The Purpose-Driven Life (2002) Simone Weil - Waiting For God (1979) Ken Wilber - A Theory of Everything (2000) Paramahansa Yogananda - Autobiography of a Yogi (1974) Gary Zukav - The Seat of the Soul (1990) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Spirital Classics (2017 Edition) ,
96:The fundamental nature of this supermind is that, all its knowledge is originally a knowledge by identity and oneness and even when it makes numberless apparent divisions and discriminating modifications in itself, still all the knowledge that operates in its workings even in these divisions, is founded upon and sustained and lit and guided by this perfect knowledge by identity and oneness. The Spirit is one everywhere and it knows all things as itself and in itself, so sees them always and therefore knows them intimately, completely, in their reality as well as their appearance, in their truth, their law, the entire spirit and sense and figure of their nature and their workings. When it sees anything as an object of knowledge, it yet sees it as itself and in itself, and not as a thing other than or divided from it about which therefore it would at first be ignorant of the nature, constitution and workings and have to learn about them, as the mind is at first ignorant of its object and has to learn about it because the mind is separated from its object and regards and senses and meets it as something other than itself and external to its own being. ..... This is the second character of the supreme supermind that its knowledge is a real because a total knowledge. It has in the first place a transcendental vision and sees the universe not only in the universal terms, but in its right relation to the supreme and eternal reality from which it proceeds and of which it is an expression. It knows the spirit and truth and whole sense of the universal expression because it knows all the essentiality and all the infinite reality and all the consequent constant potentiality of that which in part it expresses. It knows rightly the relative because it knows the Absolute and all its absolutes to which the relatives refer back and of which they are the partial or modified or suppressed figures. It is in the second place universal and sees all that is individual in the terms of the universal as well as in its own individual terms and holds all these individual figures in their right and complete relation to the universe. It is in the third place, separately with regard to individual things, total in its view because it knows each in its inmost essence of which all else is the resultant, in its totality which is its complete figure and in its parts and their connections and dependences, -- as well as in its connections with and its dependences upon other things and its nexus with the total implications and the explicits of the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
97:10000 ::: The True Object of Spiritual Seeking: To find the Divine is indeed the first reason for seeking the spiritual Truth and the spiritual life; it is the one thing indispensable and all the rest is nothing without it. The Divine once found, to manifest Him,-that is, first of all to transform one's own limited consciousness into the Divine Consciousness, to live in the infinite Peace, Light, Love, Strength, Bliss, to become that in one's essential nature and, as a consequence, to be its vessel, channel, instrument in one's active nature. To bring into activity the principle of oneness on the material plane or to work for humanity is a mental mistranslation of the Truth-these things cannot be the first or true object of spiritual seeking. We must find the Self, the Divine, then only can we know what is the work the Self or the Divine demands from us. Until then our life and action can only be a help or means towards finding the Divine and it ought not to have any other purpose. As we grow in the inner consciousness, or as the spiritual Truth of the Divine grows in us, our life and action must indeed more and more flow from that, be one with that. But to decide beforehand by our limited mental conceptions what they must be is to hamper the growth of the spiritual Truth within. As that grows we shall feel the Divine Light and Truth, the Divine Power and Force, the Divine Purity and Peace working within us, dealing with our actions as well as our consciousness, making use of them to reshape us into the Divine Image, removing the dross, substituting the pure gold of the Spirit. Only when the Divine Presence is there in us always and the consciousness transformed, can we have the right to say that we are ready to manifest the Divine on the material plane. To hold up a mental ideal or principle and impose that on the inner working brings the danger of limiting ourselves to a mental realisation or of impeding or even falsifying by a half-way formation the true growth into the full communion and union with the Divine and the free and intimate outflowing of His will in our life. This is a mistake of orientation to which the mind of today is especially prone. It is far better to approach the Divine for the Peace or Light or Bliss that the realisation of Him gives than to bring in these minor things which can divert us from the one thing needful. The divinisation of the material life also as well as the inner life is part of what we see as the Divine Plan, but it can only be fulfilled by an outflowing of the inner realisation, something that grows from within outward, not by the working out of a mental principle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
98:Workshops, churches, and palaces were full of these fatal works of art; he had even helped with a few himself. They were deeply disappointing be­ cause they aroused the desire for the highest and did not fulfill it. They lacked the most essential thing-mystery. That was what dreams and truly great works of art had in common : mystery. Goldmund continued his thought: It is mystery I love and pursue. Several times I have seen it beginning to take shape; as an artist, I would like to capture and express it. Some day, perhaps, I'll be able to. The figure of the universal mother, the great birthgiver, for example. Unlike other fi gures, her mystery does not consist of this or that detail, of a particular voluptuousness or sparseness, coarseness or delicacy, power or gracefulness. It consists of a fusion of the greatest contrasts of the world, those that cannot otherwise be combined, that have made peace only in this figure. They live in it together: birth and death, tenderness and cruelty, life and destruction. If I only imagined this fi gure, and were she merely the play of my thoughts, it would not matter about her, I could dismiss her as a mistake and forget about heR But the universal mother is not an idea of mine; I did not think her up, I saw her! She lives inside me. I've met her again and again. She appeared to me one winter night in a village when I was asked to hold a light over the bed of a peasant woman giving birth: that's when the image came to life within me. I often lose it; for long periods it re­ mains remote; but suddenly it Hashes clear again, as it did today. The image of my own mother, whom I loved most of all, has transformed itself into this new image, and lies encased within the new one like the pit in the cherry. As his present situation became clear to him, Goldmund was afraid to make a decision. It was as difficult as when he had said farewell to Narcissus and to the cloister. Once more he was on an impor­ tant road : the road to his mother. Would this mother-image one day take shape, a work of his hands, and become visible to all? Perhaps that was his goal, the hidden meaning of his life. Perhaps; he didn't know. But one thing he did know : it was good to travel toward his mother, to be drawn and called by her. He felt alive. Perhaps he'd never be able to shape her image, perhaps she'd always remain a dream, an intuition, a golden shimmer, a sacred mystery. At any rate, he had to follow her and submit his fate to her. She was his star. And now the decision was at his fingertips; everything had become clear. Art was a beautiful thing, but it was no goddess, no goal-not for him. He was not to follow art, but only the call of his mother. ~ Hermann Hesse, Narcissus and Goldmund ,
99:The Teacher of the integral Yoga will follow as far as he may the method of the Teacher within us. He will lead the disciple through the nature of the disciple. Teaching, example, influence, - these are the three instruments of the Guru. But the wise Teacher will not seek to impose himself or his opinions on the passive acceptance of the receptive mind; he will throw in only what is productive and sure as a seed which will grow under the divine fostering within. He will seek to awaken much more than to instruct; he will aim at the growth of the faculties and the experiences by a natural process and free expansion. He will give a method as an aid, as a utilisable device, not as an imperative formula or a fixed routine. And he will be on his guard against any turning of the means into a limitation, against the mechanising of process. His whole business is to awaken the divine light and set working the divine force of which he himself is only a means and an aid, a body or a channel.The example is more powerful than the instruction; but it is not the example of the outward acts nor that of the personal character which is of most importance. These have their place and their utility; but what will most stimulate aspiration in others is the central fact of the divine realisation within him governing his whole life and inner state and all his activities. This is the universal and essential element; the rest belongs to individual person and circumstance. It is this dynamic realisation that the sadhaka must feel and reproduce in himself according to his own nature; he need not strive after an imitation from outside which may well be sterilising rather than productive of right and natural fruits.Influence is more important than example. Influence is not the outward authority of the Teacher over his disciple, but the power of his contact, of his presence, of the nearness of his soul to the soul of another, infusing into it, even though in silence, that which he himself is and possesses. This is the supreme sign of the Master. For the greatest Master is much less a Teacher than a Presence pouring the divine consciousness and its constituting light and power and purity and bliss into all who are receptive around him.And it shall also be a sign of the teacher of the integral Yoga that he does not arrogate to himself Guruhood in a humanly vain and self-exalting spirit. His work, if he has one, is a trust from above, he himself a channel, a vessel or a representative. He is a man helping his brothers, a child leading children, a Light kindling other lights, an awakened Soul awakening souls, at highest a Power or Presence of the Divine calling to him other powers of the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis of Yoga ,
100:Ekajaṭī or Ekajaṭā, (Sanskrit: "One Plait Woman"; Wylie: ral gcig ma: one who has one knot of hair),[1] also known as Māhacīnatārā,[2] is one of the 21 Taras. Ekajati is, along with Palden Lhamo deity, one of the most powerful and fierce goddesses of Vajrayana Buddhist mythology.[1][3] According to Tibetan legends, her right eye was pierced by the tantric master Padmasambhava so that she could much more effectively help him subjugate Tibetan demons. Ekajati is also known as "Blue Tara", Vajra Tara or "Ugra Tara".[1][3] She is generally considered one of the three principal protectors of the Nyingma school along with Rāhula and Vajrasādhu (Wylie: rdo rje legs pa). Often Ekajati appears as liberator in the mandala of the Green Tara. Along with that, her ascribed powers are removing the fear of enemies, spreading joy, and removing personal hindrances on the path to enlightenment. Ekajati is the protector of secret mantras and "as the mother of the mothers of all the Buddhas" represents the ultimate unity. As such, her own mantra is also secret. She is the most important protector of the Vajrayana teachings, especially the Inner Tantras and termas. As the protector of mantra, she supports the practitioner in deciphering symbolic dakini codes and properly determines appropriate times and circumstances for revealing tantric teachings. Because she completely realizes the texts and mantras under her care, she reminds the practitioner of their preciousness and secrecy.[4] Düsum Khyenpa, 1st Karmapa Lama meditated upon her in early childhood. According to Namkhai Norbu, Ekajati is the principal guardian of the Dzogchen teachings and is "a personification of the essentially non-dual nature of primordial energy."[5] Dzogchen is the most closely guarded teaching in Tibetan Buddhism, of which Ekajati is a main guardian as mentioned above. It is said that Sri Singha (Sanskrit: Śrī Siṃha) himself entrusted the "Heart Essence" (Wylie: snying thig) teachings to her care. To the great master Longchenpa, who initiated the dissemination of certain Dzogchen teachings, Ekajati offered uncharacteristically personal guidance. In his thirty-second year, Ekajati appeared to Longchenpa, supervising every ritual detail of the Heart Essence of the Dakinis empowerment, insisting on the use of a peacock feather and removing unnecessary basin. When Longchenpa performed the ritual, she nodded her head in approval but corrected his pronunciation. When he recited the mantra, Ekajati admonished him, saying, "Imitate me," and sang it in a strange, harmonious melody in the dakini's language. Later she appeared at the gathering and joyously danced, proclaiming the approval of Padmasambhava and the dakinis.[6] ~ Wikipedia,
101:The modern distinction is that the poet appeals to the imagination and not to the intellect. But there are many kinds of imagination; the objective imagination which visualises strongly the outward aspects of life and things; the subjective imagination which visualises strongly the mental and emotional impressions they have the power to start in the mind; the imagination which deals in the play of mental fictions and to which we give the name of poetic fancy; the aesthetic imagination which delights in the beauty of words and images for their own sake and sees no farther. All these have their place in poetry, but they only give the poet his materials, they are only the first instruments in the creation of poetic style. The essential poetic imagination does not stop short with even the most subtle reproductions of things external or internal, with the richest or delicatest play of fancy or with the most beautiful colouring of word or image. It is creative, not of either the actual or the fictitious, but of the more and the most real; it sees the spiritual truth of things, - of this truth too there are many gradations, - which may take either the actual or the ideal for its starting-point. The aim of poetry, as of all true art, is neither a photographic or otherwise realistic imitation of Nature, nor a romantic furbishing and painting or idealistic improvement of her image, but an interpretation by the images she herself affords us, not on one but on many planes of her creation, of that which she conceals from us, but is ready, when rightly approached, to reveal. This is the true, because the highest and essential aim of poetry; but the human mind arrives at it only by a succession of steps, the first of which seems far enough from its object. It begins by stringing its most obvious and external ideas, feelings and sensations of things on a thread of verse in a sufficient language of no very high quality. But even when it gets to a greater adequacy and effectiveness, it is often no more than a vital, an emotional or an intellectual adequacy and effectiveness. There is a strong vital poetry which powerfully appeals to our sensations and our sense of life, like much of Byron or the less inspired mass of the Elizabethan drama; a strong emotional poetry which stirs our feelings and gives us the sense and active image of the passions; a strong intellectual poetry which satisfies our curiosity about life and its mechanism, or deals with its psychological and other "problems", or shapes for us our thoughts in an effective, striking and often quite resistlessly quotable fashion. All this has its pleasures for the mind and the surface soul in us, and it is certainly quite legitimate to enjoy them and to enjoy them strongly and vividly on our way upward; but if we rest content with these only, we shall never get very high up the hill of the Muses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry ,
102:There is one fundamental perception indispensable towards any integral knowledge or many-sided experience of this Infinite. It is to realise the Divine in its essential self and truth unaltered by forms and phenomena. Otherwise we are likely to remain caught in the net of appearances or wander confusedly in a chaotic multitude of cosmic or particular aspects, and if we avoid this confusion, it will be at the price of getting chained to some mental formula or shut up in a limited personal experience. The one secure and all-reconciling truth which is the very foundation of the universe is this that life is the manifestation of an uncreated Self and Spirit, and the key to life's hidden secret is the true relation of this Spirit with its own created existences. There is behind all this life the look of an eternal Being upon its multitudinous becomings; there is around and everywhere in it the envelopment and penetration of a manifestation in time by an unmanifested timeless Eternal. But this knowledge is valueless for Yoga if it is only an intellectual and metaphysical notion void of life and barren of consequence; a mental realisation alone cannot be sufficient for the seeker. For what Yoga searches after is not truth of thought alone or truth of mind alone, but the dynamic truth of a living and revealing spiritual experience. There must awake in us a constant indwelling and enveloping nearness, a vivid perception, a close feeling and communion, a concrete sense and contact of a true and infinite Presence always and everywhere. That Presence must remain with us as the living, pervading Reality in which we and all things exist and move and act, and we must feel it always and everywhere, concrete, visible, inhabiting all things; it must be patent to us as their true Self, tangible as their imperishable Essence, met by us closely as their inmost Spirit. To see, to feel, to sense, to contact in every way and not merely to conceive this Self and Spirit here in all existences and to feel with the same vividness all existences in this Self and Spirit, is the fundamental experience which must englobe all other knowledge. This infinite and eternal Self of things is an omnipresent Reality, one existence everywhere; it is a single unifying presence and not different in different creatures; it can be met, seen or felt in its completeness in each soul or each form in the universe. For its infinity is spiritual and essential and not merely a boundlessness in Space or an endlessness in Time; the Infinite can be felt in an infinitesimal atom or in a second of time as convincingly as in the stretch of the aeons or the stupendous enormity of the intersolar spaces. The knowledge or experience of it can begin anywhere and express itself through anything; for the Divine is in all, and all is the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,
103:3. Conditions internal and external that are most essential for meditation. There are no essential external conditions, but solitude and seculsion at the time of meditation as well as stillness of the body are helpful, sometimes almost necessary to the beginning. But one should not be bound by external conditions. Once the habit of meditation is formed, it should be made possible to do it in all circumstances, lying, sitting, walking, alone, in company, in silence or in the midst of noise etc. The first internal condition necessary is concentration of the will against the obstacles to meditation, i.e. wandering of the mind, forgetfulness, sleep, physical and nervous impatience and restlessness etc. If the difficulty in meditation is that thoughts of all kinds come in, that is not due to hostile forces but to the ordinary nature of the human mind. All sadhaks have this difficulty and with many it lasts for a very long time. There are several was of getting rid of it. One of them is to look at the thoughts and observe what is the nature of the human mind as they show it but not to give any sanction and to let them run down till they come to a standstill - this is a way recommended by Vivekananda in his Rajayoga. Another is to look at the thoughts as not one's own, to stand back as the witness Purusha and refuse the sanction - the thoughts are regarded as things coming from outside, from Prakriti, and they must be felt as if they were passers-by crossing the mind-space with whom one has no connection and in whom one takes no interest. In this way it usually happens that after the time the mind divides into two, a part which is the mental witness watching and perfectly undisturbed and quiet and a part in which the thoughts cross or wander. Afterwards one can proceed to silence or quiet the Prakriti part also. There is a third, an active method by which one looks to see where the thoughts come from and finds they come not from oneself, but from outside the head as it were; if one can detect them coming, then, before enter, they have to be thrown away altogether. This is perhaps the most difficult way and not all can do it, but if it can be done it is the shortest and most powerful road to silence. It is not easy to get into the Silence. That is only possible by throwing out all mental-vital activities. It is easier to let the Silence descend into you, i.e., to open yourself and let it descend. The way to do this and the way to call down the higher powers is the same. It is to remain quiet at the time of efforts to pull down the Power or the Silence but keeping only a silent will and aspiration for them. If the mind is active one has to learn to look at it, drawn back and not giving sanction from within, until its habitual or mechanical activities begin to fall quiet for want of support from within. if it is too persistent, a steady rejection without strain or struggle is the one thing to be done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes ,
104:An integral Yoga includes as a vital and indispensable element in its total and ultimate aim the conversion of the whole being into a higher spiritual consciousness and a larger divine existence. Our parts of will and action, our parts of knowledge, our thinking being, our emotional being, our being of life, all our self and nature must seek the Divine, enter into the Infinite, unite with the Eternal. But mans present nature is limited, divided, unequal, -- it is easiest for him to concentrate in the strongest part of his being and follow a definite line of progress proper to his nature: only rare individuals have the strength to take a large immediate plunge straight into the sea of the Divine Infinity. Some therefore must choose as a starting-point a concentration in thought or contemplation or the minds one-pointedness to find the eternal reality of the Self in them; others can more easily withdraw into the heart to meet there the Divine, the Eternal: yet others are predominantly dynamic and active; for these it is best to centre themselves in the will and enlarge their being through works. United with the Self and source of all by their surrender of their will into its infinity, guided in their works by the secret Divinity within or surrendered to the Lord of the cosmic action as the master and mover of all their energies of thought, feeling, act, becoming by this enlargement of being selfless and universal, they can reach by works some first fullness of a spiritual status. But the path, whatever its point of starting, must debouch into a vaster dominion; it must proceed in the end through a totality of integrated knowledge, emotion, will of dynamic action, perfection of the being and the entire nature. In the supramental consciousness, on the level of the supramental existence this integration becomes consummate; there knowledge, will, emotion, the perfection of the self and the dynamic nature rise each to its absolute of itself and all to their perfect harmony and fusion with each other, to a divine integrality, a divine perfection. For the supermind is a Truth-Consciousness in which the Divine Reality, fully manifested, no longer works with the instrumentation of the Ignorance; a truth of status of being which is absolute becomes dynamic in a truth of energy and activity of the being which is self-existent and perfect. Every movement there is a movement of the self-aware truth of Divine Being and every part is in entire harmony with the whole. Even the most limited and finite action is in the Truth-Consciousness a movement of the Eternal and Infinite and partakes of the inherent absoluteness and perfection of the Eternal and Infinite. An ascent into the supramental Truth not only raises our spiritual and essential consciousness to that height but brings about a descent of this Light and Truth into all our being and all our parts of nature. All then becomes part of the Divine Truth, an element and means of the supreme union and oneness; this ascent and descent must be therefore an ultimate aim of this Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,
105:The supreme Truth aspect which thus manifests itself to us is an eternal and infinite and absolute self-existence, self-awareness, self-delight of being; this bounds all things and secretly supports and pervades all things. This Self-existence reveals itself again in three terms of its essential nature,-self, conscious being or spirit, and God or the Divine Being. The Indian terms are more satisfactory,-Brahman the Reality is Atman, Purusha, Ishwara; for these terms grew from a root of Intuition and, while they have a comprehensive preciseness, are capable of a plastic application which avoids both vagueness in the use and the rigid snare of a too limiting intellectual concept. The Supreme Brahman is that which in Western metaphysics is called the Absolute: but Brahman is at the same time the omnipresent Reality in which all that is relative exists as its forms or its movements; this is an Absolute which takes all relativities in its embrace. [...] Brahman is the Consciousness that knows itself in all that exists; Brahman is the force that sustains the power of God and Titan and Demon, the Force that acts in man and animal and the forms and energies of Nature; Brahman is the Ananda, the secret Bliss of existence which is the ether of our being and without which none could breathe or live. Brahman is the inner Soul in all; it has taken a form in correspondence with each created form which it inhabits. The Lord of Beings is that which is conscious in the conscious being, but he is also the Conscious in inconscient things, the One who is master and in control of the many that are passive in the hands of Force-Nature. He is the Timeless and Time; He is Space and all that is in Space; He is Causality and the cause and the effect: He is the thinker and his thought, the warrior and his courage, the gambler and his dice-throw. All realities and all aspects and all semblances are the Brahman; Brahman is the Absolute, the Transcendent and incommunicable, the Supracosmic Existence that sustains the cosmos, the Cosmic Self that upholds all beings, but It is too the self of each individual: the soul or psychic entity is an eternal portion of the Ishwara; it is his supreme Nature or Consciousness-Force that has become the living being in a world of living beings. The Brahman alone is, and because of It all are, for all are the Brahman; this Reality is the reality of everything that we see in Self and Nature. Brahman, the Ishwara, is all this by his Yoga-Maya, by the power of his Consciousness-Force put out in self-manifestation: he is the Conscious Being, Soul, Spirit, Purusha, and it is by his Nature, the force of his conscious self-existence that he is all things; he is the Ishwara, the omniscient and omnipotent All-ruler, and it is by his Shakti, his conscious Power, that he manifests himself in Time and governs the universe. These and similar statements taken together are all-comprehensive: it is possible for the mind to cut and select, to build a closed system and explain away all that does not fit within it; but it is on the complete and many-sided statement that we must take our stand if we have to acquire an integral knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Book 02: The Knowledge and the Ignorance - The Spiritual Evolution,
106:Sometimes while reading a text one has ideas, then Sweet Mother, how can one distinguish between the other person's idea and one's own?Oh! This, this doesn't exist, the other person's idea and one's own idea. Nobody has ideas of his own: it is an immensity from which one draws according to his personal affinity; ideas are a collective possession, a collective wealth. Only, there are different stages. So there is the most common level, the one where all our brains bathe; this indeed swarms here, it is the level of "Mr. Everybody". And then there is a level that's slightly higher for people who are called thinkers. And then there are higher levels still - many - some of them are beyond words but they are still domains of ideas. And then there are those capable of shooting right up, catching something which is like a light and making it come down with all its stock of ideas, all its stock of thoughts. An idea from a higher domain if pulled down organises itself and is crystallised in a large number of thoughts which can express that idea differently; and then if you are a writer or a poet or an artist, when you make it come lower down still, you can have all kinds of expressions, extremely varied and choice around a single little idea but one coming from very high above. And when you know how to do this, it teaches you to distinguish between the pure idea and the way of expressing it. Some people cannot do it in their own head because they have no imagination or faculty for writing, but they can do it through study by reading what others have written. There are, you know, lots of poets, for instance, who have expressed the same idea - the same idea but with such different forms that when one reads many of them it becomes quite interesting to see (for people who love to read and read much). Ah, this idea, that one has said it like this, that other has expressed it like that, another has formulated it in this way, and so on. And so you have a whole stock of expressions which are expressions by different poets of the same single idea up there, above, high above. And you notice that there is an almost essential difference between the pure idea, the typal idea and its formulation in the mental world, even the speculative or artistic mental world. This is a very good thing to do when one loves gymnastics. It is mental gymnastics. Well, if you want to be truly intelligent, you must know how to do mental gymnastics; as, you see, if you want really to have a fairly strong body you must know how to do physical gymnastics. It is the same thing. People who have never done mental gymnastics have a poor little brain, quite over-simple, and all their life they think like children. One must know how to do this - not take it seriously, in the sense that one shouldn't have convictions, saying, "This idea is true and that is false; this formulation is correct and that one is not and this religion is the true one and that religion is false", and so on and so forth... this, if you enter into it, you become absolutely stupid. But if you can see all that and, for example, take all the religions, one after another and see how they have expressed the same aspiration of the human being for some Absolute, it becomes very interesting; and then you begin... yes, you begin to be able to juggle with all that. And then when you have mastered it all, you can rise above it and look at all the eternal human discussions with a smile. So there you are master of the thought and can no longer fly into a rage because someone else does not think as you, something that's unfortunately a very common malady here. Now, there we are. Nobody has any questions, no? That's enough? Finished! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
107:All Yoga is a turning of the human mind and the human soul, not yet divine in realisation, but feeling the divine impulse and attraction in it, towards that by which it finds its greater being. Emotionally, the first form which this turning takes must be that of adoration. In ordinary religion this adoration wears the form of external worship and that again develops a most external form of ceremonial worship. This element is ordinarily necessary because the mass of men live in their physical minds, cannot realise anything except by the force of a physical symbol and cannot feel that they are living anything except by the force of a physical action. We might apply here the Tantric gradation of sadhana, which makes the way of the pasu, the herd, the animal or physical being, the lowest stage of its discipline, and say that the purely or predominantly ceremonial adoration is the first step of this lowest part of the way. It is evident that even real religion, - and Yoga is something more than religion, - only begins when this quite outward worship corresponds to something really felt within the mind, some genuine submission, awe or spiritual aspiration, to which it becomes an aid, an outward expression and also a sort of periodical or constant reminder helping to draw back the mind to it from the preoccupations of ordinary life. But so long as it is only an idea of the Godhead to which one renders reverence or homage, we have not yet got to the beginning of Yoga. The aim of Yoga being union, its beginning must always be a seeking after the Divine, a longing after some kind of touch, closeness or possession. When this comes on us, the adoration becomes always primarily an inner worship; we begin to make ourselves a temple of the Divine, our thoughts and feelings a constant prayer of aspiration and seeking, our whole life an external service and worship. It is as this change, this new soul-tendency grows, that the religion of the devotee becomes a Yoga, a growing contact and union. It does not follow that the outward worship will necessarily be dispensed with, but it will increasingly become only a physical expression or outflowing of the inner devotion and adoration, the wave of the soul throwing itself out in speech and symbolic act. Adoration, before it turns into an element of the deeper Yoga of devotion, a petal of the flower of love, its homage and self-uplifting to its sun, must bring with it, if it is profound, an increasing consecration of the being to the Divine who is adored. And one element of this consecration must be a self-purifying so as to become fit for the divine contact, or for the entrance of the Divine into the temple of our inner being, or for his selfrevelation in the shrine of the heart. This purifying may be ethical in its character, but it will not be merely the moralist's seeking for the right and blameless action or even, when once we reach the stage of Yoga, an obedience to the law of God as revealed in formal religion; but it will be a throwing away, katharsis, of all that conflicts whether with the idea of the Divine in himself or of the Divine in ourselves. In the former case it becomes in habit of feeling and outer act an imitation of the Divine, in the latter a growing into his likeness in our nature. What inner adoration is to ceremonial worship, this growing into the divine likeness is to the outward ethical life. It culminates in a sort of liberation by likeness to the Divine,1 a liberation from our lower nature and a change into the divine nature. Consecration becomes in its fullness a devoting of all our being to the Divine; therefore also of all our thoughts and our works. Here the Yoga takes into itself the essential elements of the Yoga of works and the Yoga of knowledge, but in its own manner and with its own peculiar spirit. It is a sacrifice of life and works to the Divine, but a sacrifice of love more than a tuning of the will to the divine Will. The bhakta offers up his life and all that he is and all that he has and all that he does to the Divine. This surrender may take the ascetic form, as when he leaves the ordinary life of men and devotes his days solely to prayer ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.04 - The Way of Devotion,
108:Although a devout student of the Bible, Paracelsus instinctively adopted the broad patterns of essential learning, as these had been clarified by Pythagoras of Samos and Plato of Athens. Being by nature a mystic as well as a scientist, he also revealed a deep regard for the Neoplatonic philosophy as expounded by Plotinus, Iamblichus, and Proclus. Neo­platonism is therefore an invaluable aid to the interpretation of the Paracelsian doctrine. Paracelsus held that true knowledge is attained in two ways, or rather that the pursuit of knowledge is advanced by a two-fold method, the elements of which are completely interdependent. In our present terminology, we can say that these two parts of method are intuition and experience. To Paracelsus, these could never be divided from each other. The purpose of intuition is to reveal certain basic ideas which must then be tested and proven by experience. Experience, in turn, not only justifies intuition, but contributes certain additional knowledge by which the impulse to further growth is strengthened and developed. Paracelsus regarded the separation of intuition and experience to be a disaster, leading inevitably to greater error and further disaster. Intuition without experience allows the mind to fall into an abyss of speculation without adequate censorship by practical means. Experience without intuition could never be fruitful because fruitfulness comes not merely from the doing of things, but from the overtones which stimulate creative thought. Further, experience is meaningless unless there is within man the power capable of evaluating happenings and occurrences. The absence of this evaluating factor allows the individual to pass through many kinds of experiences, either misinterpreting them or not inter­ preting them at all. So Paracelsus attempted to explain intuition and how man is able to apprehend that which is not obvious or apparent. Is it possible to prove beyond doubt that the human being is capable of an inward realization of truths or facts without the assistance of the so-called rational faculty? According to Paracelsus, intuition was possible because of the existence in nature of a mysterious substance or essence-a universal life force. He gave this many names, but for our purposes, the simplest term will be appropriate. He compared it to light, further reasoning that there are two kinds of light: a visible radiance, which he called brightness, and an invisible radiance, which he called darkness. There is no essential difference between light and darkness. There is a dark light, which appears luminous to the soul but cannot be sensed by the body. There is a visible radiance which seems bright to the senses, but may appear dark to the soul. We must recognize that Paracelsus considered light as pertaining to the nature of being, the total existence from which all separate existences arise. Light not only contains the energy needed to support visible creatures, and the whole broad expanse of creation, but the invisible part of light supports the secret powers and functions of man, particularly intuition. Intuition, therefore, relates to the capacity of the individual to become attuned to the hidden side of life. By light, then, Paracelsus implies much more than the radiance that comes from the sun, a lantern, or a candle. To him, light is the perfect symbol, emblem, or figure of total well-being. Light is the cause of health. Invisible light, no less real if unseen, is the cause of wisdom. As the light of the body gives strength and energy, sustaining growth and development, so the light of the soul bestows understanding, the light of the mind makes wisdom possible, and the light of the spirit confers truth. Therefore, truth, wisdom, understanding, and health are all manifesta­ tions or revelations ot one virtue or power. What health is to the body, morality is to the emotions, virtue to the soul, wisdom to the mind, and reality to the spirit. This total content of living values is contained in every ray of visible light. This ray is only a manifestation upon one level or plane of the total mystery of life. Therefore, when we look at a thing, we either see its objective, physical form, or we apprehend its inner light Everything that lives, lives in light; everything that has an existence, radiates light. All things derive their life from light, and this light, in its root, is life itself. This, indeed, is the light that lighteth every man who cometh into the world. ~ Manly P Hall, Paracelsus ,
109:GURU YOGA Guru yoga is an essential practice in all schools of Tibetan Buddhism and Bon. This is true in sutra, tantra, and Dzogchen. It develops the heart connection with the masteR By continually strengthening our devotion, we come to the place of pure devotion in ourselves, which is the unshakeable, powerful base of the practice. The essence of guru yoga is to merge the practitioner's mind with the mind of the master. What is the true master? It is the formless, fundamental nature of mind, the primordial awareness of the base of everything, but because we exist in dualism, it is helpful for us to visualize this in a form. Doing so makes skillful use of the dualisms of the conceptual mind, to further strengthen devotion and help us stay directed toward practice and the generation of positive qualities. In the Bon tradition, we often visualize either Tapihritsa* as the master, or the Buddha ShenlaOdker*, who represents the union of all the masters. If you are already a practitioner, you may have another deity to visualize, like Guru Rinpoche or a yidam or dakini. While it is important to work with a lineage with which you have a connection, you should understand that the master you visualize is the embodiment of all the masters with whom you are connected, all the teachers with whom you have studied, all the deities to whom you have commitments. The master in guru yoga is not just one individual, but the essence of enlightenment, the primordial awareness that is your true nature. The master is also the teacher from whom you receive the teachings. In the Tibetan tradition, we say the master is more important than the Buddha. Why? Because the master is the immediate messenger of the teachings, the one who brings the Buddha's wisdom to the student. Without the master we could not find our way to the Buddha. So we should feel as much devotion to the master as we would to the Buddha if the Buddha suddenly appeared in front of us. Guru yoga is not just about generating some feeling toward a visualized image. It is done to find the fundamental mind in yourself that is the same as the fundamental mind of all your teachers, and of all the Buddhas and realized beings that have ever lived. When you merge with the guru, you merge with your pristine true nature, which is the real guide and masteR But this should not be an abstract practice. When you do guru yoga, try to feel such intense devotion that the hair stands upon your neck, tears start down your face, and your heart opens and fills with great love. Let yourself merge in union with the guru's mind, which is your enlightened Buddha-nature. This is the way to practice guru yoga. The Practice After the nine breaths, still seated in meditation posture, visualize the master above and in front of you. This should not be a flat, two dimensional picture-let a real being exist there, in three dimensions, made of light, pure, and with a strong presence that affects the feeling in your body,your energy, and your mind. Generate strong devotion and reflect on the great gift of the teachings and the tremendous good fortune you enjoy in having made a connection to them. Offer a sincere prayer, asking that your negativities and obscurations be removed, that your positive qualities develop, and that you accomplish dream yoga. Then imagine receiving blessings from the master in the form of three colored lights that stream from his or her three wisdom doors- of body, speech, and mind-into yours. The lights should be transmitted in the following sequence: White light streams from the master's brow chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your entire body and physical dimension. Then red light streams from the master's throat chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your energetic dimension. Finally, blue light streams from the master's heart chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your mind. When the lights enter your body, feel them. Let your body, energy, and mind relax, suffused inwisdom light. Use your imagination to make the blessing real in your full experience, in your body and energy as well as in the images in your mind. After receiving the blessing, imagine the master dissolving into light that enters your heart and resides there as your innermost essence. Imagine that you dissolve into that light, and remain inpure awareness, rigpa. There are more elaborate instructions for guru yoga that can involve prostrations, offerings, gestures, mantras, and more complicated visualizations, but the essence of the practice is mingling your mind with the mind of the master, which is pure, non-dual awareness. Guru yoga can be done any time during the day; the more often the better. Many masters say that of all the practices it is guru yoga that is the most important. It confers the blessings of the lineage and can open and soften the heart and quiet the unruly mind. To completely accomplish guru yoga is to accomplish the path. ~ Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Yogas Of Dream And Sleep ,
110:CHAPTER XIIIOF THE BANISHINGS: AND OF THE PURIFICATIONS.Cleanliness is next to Godliness, and had better come first. Purity means singleness. God is one. The wand is not a wand if it has something sticking to it which is not an essential part of itself. If you wish to invoke Venus, you do not succeed if there are traces of Saturn mixed up with it.That is a mere logical commonplace: in magick one must go much farther than this. One finds one's analogy in electricity. If insulation is imperfect, the whole current goes back to earth. It is useless to plead that in all those miles of wire there is only one-hundredth of an inch unprotected. It is no good building a ship if the water can enter, through however small a hole.That first task of the Magician in every ceremony is therefore to render his Circle absolutely impregnable. If one littlest thought intrude upon the mind of the Mystic, his concentration is absolutely destroyed; and his consciousness remains on exactly the same level as the Stockbroker's. Even the smallest baby is incompatible with the virginity of its mother. If you leave even a single spirit within the circle, the effect of the conjuration will be entirely absorbed by it.> {101}The Magician must therefore take the utmost care in the matter of purification, "firstly", of himself, "secondly", of his instruments, "thirdly", of the place of working. Ancient Magicians recommended a preliminary purification of from three days to many months. During this period of training they took the utmost pains with diet. They avoided animal food, lest the elemental spirit of the animal should get into their atmosphere. They practised sexual abstinence, lest they should be influenced in any way by the spirit of the wife. Even in regard to the excrements of the body they were equally careful; in trimming the hair and nails, they ceremonially destroyed> the severed portion. They fasted, so that the body itself might destroy anything extraneous to the bare necessity of its existence. They purified the mind by special prayers and conservations. They avoided the contamination of social intercourse, especially the conjugal kind; and their servitors were disciples specially chosen and consecrated for the work.In modern times our superior understanding of the essentials of this process enables us to dispense to some extent with its external rigours; but the internal purification must be even more carefully performed. We may eat meat, provided that in doing so we affirm that we eat it in order to strengthen us for the special purpose of our proposed invocation.> {102}By thus avoiding those actions which might excite the comment of our neighbours we avoid the graver dangers of falling into spiritual pride.We have understood the saying: "To the pure all things are pure", and we have learnt how to act up to it. We can analyse the mind far more acutely than could the ancients, and we can therefore distinguish the real and right feeling from its imitations. A man may eat meat from self-indulgence, or in order to avoid the dangers of asceticism. We must constantly examine ourselves, and assure ourselves that every action is really subservient to the One Purpose.It is ceremonially desirable to seal and affirm this mental purity by Ritual, and accordingly the first operation in any actual ceremony is bathing and robing, with appropriate words. The bath signifies the removal of all things extraneous to antagonistic to the one thought. The putting on of the robe is the positive side of the same operation. It is the assumption of the fame of mind suitable to that one thought.A similar operation takes place in the preparation of every instrument, as has been seen in the Chapter devoted to that subject. In the preparation of theplace of working, the same considerations apply. We first remove from that place all objects; and we then put into it those objects, and only those {103} objects, which are necessary. During many days we occupy ourselves in this process of cleansing and consecration; and this again is confirmed in the actual ceremony.The cleansed and consecrated Magician takes his cleansed and consecrated instruments into that cleansed and consecrated place, and there proceeds to repeat that double ceremony in the ceremony itself, which has these same two main parts. The first part of every ceremony is the banishing; the second, the invoking. The same formula is repeated even in the ceremony of banishing itself, for in the banishing ritual of the pentagram we not only command the demons to depart, but invoke the Archangels and their hosts to act as guardians of the Circle during our pre-occupation with the ceremony proper.In more elaborate ceremonies it is usual to banish everything by name. Each element, each planet, and each sign, perhaps even the Sephiroth themselves; all are removed, including the very one which we wished to invoke, for that force ... ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
111:The Supermind [Supramental consciousness] is in its very essence a truth-consciousness, a consciousness always free from the Ignorance which is the foundation of our present natural or evolutionary existence and from which nature in us is trying to arrive at self-knowledge and world-knowledge and a right consciousness and the right use of our existence in the universe. The Supermind, because it is a truth-consciousness, has this knowledge inherent in it and this power of true existence; its course is straight and can go direct to its aim, its field is wide and can even be made illimitable. This is because its very nature is knowledge: it has not to acquire knowledge but possesses it in its own right; its steps are not from nescience or ignorance into some imperfect light, but from truth to greater truth, from right perception to deeper perception, from intuition to intuition, from illumination to utter and boundless luminousness, from growing widenesses to the utter vasts and to very infinitude. On its summits it possesses the divine omniscience and omnipotence, but even in an evolutionary movement of its own graded self-manifestation by which it would eventually reveal its own highest heights, it must be in its very nature essentially free from ignorance and error: it starts from truth and light and moves always in truth and light. As its knowledge is always true, so too its will is always true; it does not fumble in its handling of things or stumble in its paces. In the Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Supermind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural imperfections and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Supermind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness. All the life and action and leading of the Supermind is guarded in its very nature from the falsehoods and uncertainties that are our lot; it moves in safety towards its perfection. Once the truth-consciousness was established here on its own sure foundation, the evolution of divine life would be a progress in felicity, a march through light to Ananda. Supermind is an eternal reality of the divine Being and the divine Nature. In its own plane it already and always exists and possesses its own essential law of being; it has not to be created or to emerge or evolve into existence out of involution in Matter or out of non-existence, as it might seem to the view of mind which itself seems to its own view to have so emerged from life and Matter or to have evolved out of an involution in life and Matter. The nature of Supermind is always the same, a being of knowledge, proceeding from truth to truth, creating or rather manifesting what has to be manifested by the power of a pre-existent knowledge, not by hazard but by a self-existent destiny in the being itself, a necessity of the thing in itself and therefore inevitable. Its -manifestation of the divine life will also be inevitable; its own life on its own plane is divine and, if Supermind descends upon the earth, it will bring necessarily the divine life with it and establish it here. Supermind is the grade of existence beyond mind, life and Matter and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power: if it acts, it is through these inferior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arrival of the descending Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life. It is indeed so that life and mind involved in Matter have realised themselves here; for only what is involved can evolve, otherwise there could be no emergence. The manifestation of a supramental truth-consciousness is therefore the capital reality that will make the divine life possible. It is when all the movements of thought, impulse and action are governed and directed by a self-existent and luminously automatic truth-consciousness and our whole nature comes to be constituted by it and made of its stuff that the life divine will be complete and absolute. Even as it is, in reality though not in the appearance of things, it is a secret self-existent knowledge and truth that is working to manifest itself in the creation here. The Divine is already there immanent within us, ourselves are that in our inmost reality and it is this reality that we have to manifest; it is that which constitutes the urge towards the divine living and makes necessary the creation of the life divine even in this material existence. A manifestation of the Supermind and its truth-consciousness is then inevitable; it must happen in this world sooner or lateR But it has two aspects, a descent from above, an ascent from below, a self-revelation of the Spirit, an evolution in Nature. The ascent is necessarily an effort, a working of Nature, an urge or nisus on her side to raise her lower parts by an evolutionary or revolutionary change, conversion or transformation into the divine reality and it may happen by a process and progress or by a rapid miracle. The descent or self-revelation of the Spirit is an act of the supreme Reality from above which makes the realisation possible and it can appear either as the divine aid which brings about the fulfilment of the progress and process or as the sanction of the miracle. Evolution, as we see it in this world, is a slow and difficult process and, indeed, needs usually ages to reach abiding results; but this is because it is in its nature an emergence from inconscient beginnings, a start from nescience and a working in the ignorance of natural beings by what seems to be an unconscious force. There can be, on the contrary, an evolution in the light and no longer in the darkness, in which the evolving being is a conscious participant and cooperator, and this is precisely what must take place here. Even in the effort and progress from the Ignorance to Knowledge this must be in part if not wholly the endeavour to be made on the heights of the nature, and it must be wholly that in the final movement towards the spiritual change, realisation, transformation. It must be still more so when there is a transition across the dividing line between the Ignorance and the Knowledge and the evolution is from knowledge to greater knowledge, from consciousness to greater consciousness, from being to greater being. There is then no longer any necessity for the slow pace of the ordinary evolution; there can be rapid conversion, quick transformation after transformation, what would seem to our normal present mind a succession of miracles. An evolution on the supramental levels could well be of that nature; it could be equally, if the being so chose, a more leisurely passage of one supramental state or condition of things to something beyond but still supramental, from level to divine level, a building up of divine gradations, a free growth to the supreme Supermind or beyond it to yet undreamed levels of being, consciousness and Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga 558,
112:[The Gods and Their Worlds] [...] According to traditions and occult schools, all these zones of realities, these planes of realities have got different names; they have been classified in a different way, but there is an essential analogy, and if you go back far enough into the traditions, you see only the words changing according to the country and the language. Even now, the experiences of Western occultists and those of Eastern occultists offer great similarities. All who set out on the discovery of these invisible worlds and make a report of what they saw, give a very similar description, whether they be from here or there; they use different words, but the experience is very similar and the handling of forces is the same. This knowledge of the occult worlds is based on the existence of subtle bodies and of subtle worlds corresponding to those bodies. They are what the psychological method calls "states of consciousness", but these states of consciousness really correspond to worlds. The occult procedure consists then in being aware of these various inner states of being or subtle bodies and in becoming sufficiently a master of them so as to be able to go out of them successively, one after another. There is indeed a whole scale of subtleties, increasing or decreasing according to the direction in which you go, and the occult procedure consists in going out of a denser body into a subtler body and so on again, up to the most ethereal regions. You go, by successive exteriorisations, into bodies or worlds more and more subtle. It is somewhat as if every time you passed into another dimension. The fourth dimension of the physicists is nothing but the scientific transcription of an occult knowledge. To give another image, one can say that the physical body is at the centre - it is the most material, the densest and also the smallest - and the inner bodies, more subtle, overflow more and more the central physical body; they pass through it, extending themselves farther and farther, like water evaporating from a porous vase and forming a kind of steam all around. And the greater the subtlety, the more the extension tends to unite with that of the universe: one ends by universalising oneself. And it is altogether a concrete process which gives an objective experience of invisible worlds and even enables one to act in these worlds. There are, then, only a very small number of people in the West who know that these gods are not merely subjective and imaginary - more or less wildly imaginary - but that they correspond to a universal truth. All these regions, all these domains are filled with beings who exist, each in its own domain, and if you are awake and conscious on a particular plane - for instance, if on going out of a more material body you awake on some higher plane, you have the same relation with the things and people of that plane as you had with the things and people of the material world. That is to say, there exists an entirely objective relation that has nothing to do with the idea you may have of these things. Naturally, the resemblance is greater and greater as you approach the physical world, the material world, and there even comes a time when the one region has a direct action upon the other. In any case, in what Sri Aurobindo calls the overmental worlds, you will find a concrete reality absolutely independent of your personal experience; you go back there and again find the same things, with the differences that have occurred during your absence. And you have relations with those beings that are identical with the relations you have with physical beings, with this difference that the relation is more plastic, supple and direct - for example, there is the capacity to change the external form, the visible form, according to the inner state you are in. But you can make an appointment with someone and be at the appointed place and find the same being again, with certain differences that have come about during your absence; it is entirely concrete with results entirely concrete. One must have at least a little of this experience in order to understand these things. Otherwise, those who are convinced that all this is mere human imagination and mental formation, who believe that these gods have such and such a form because men have thought them to be like that, and that they have certain defects and certain qualities because men have thought them to be like that - all those who say that God is made in the image of man and that he exists only in human thought, all these will not understand; to them this will appear absolutely ridiculous, madness. One must have lived a little, touched the subject a little, to know how very concrete the thing is. Naturally, children know a good deal if they have not been spoilt. There are so many children who return every night to the same place and continue to live the life they have begun there. When these faculties are not spoilt with age, you can keep them with you. At a time when I was especially interested in dreams, I could return exactly to a place and continue a work that I had begun: supervise something, for example, set something in order, a work of organisation or of discovery, of exploration. You go until you reach a certain spot, as you would go in life, then you take a rest, then you return and begin again - you begin the work at the place where you left off and you continue it. And you perceive that there are things which are quite independent of you, in the sense that changes of which you are not at all the author, have taken place automatically during your absence. But for this, you must live these experiences yourself, you must see them yourself, live them with sufficient sincerity and spontaneity in order to see that they are independent of any mental formation. For you can do the opposite also, and deepen the study of the action of mental formation upon events. This is very interesting, but it is another domain. And this study makes you very careful, very prudent, because you become aware of how far you can delude yourself. So you must study both, the dream and the occult reality, in order to see what is the essential difference between the two. The one depends upon us; the other exists in itself; entirely independent of the thought that we have of it. When you have worked in that domain, you recognise in fact that once a subject has been studied and something has been learnt mentally, it gives a special colour to the experience; the experience may be quite spontaneous and sincere, but the simple fact that the subject was known and studied lends a particular quality. Whereas if you had learnt nothing about the question, if you knew nothing at all, the transcription would be completely spontaneous and sincere when the experience came; it would be more or less adequate, but it would not be the outcome of a previous mental formation. Naturally, this occult knowledge or this experience is not very frequent in the world, because in those who do not have a developed inner life, there are veritable gaps between the external consciousness and the inmost consciousness; the linking states of being are missing and they have to be constructed. So when people enter there for the first time, they are bewildered, they have the impression they have fallen into the night, into nothingness, into non-being! I had a Danish friend, a painter, who was like that. He wanted me to teach him how to go out of the body; he used to have interesting dreams and thought that it would be worth the trouble to go there consciously. So I made him "go out" - but it was a frightful thing! When he was dreaming, a part of his mind still remained conscious, active, and a kind of link existed between this active part and his external being; then he remembered some of his dreams, but it was a very partial phenomenon. And to go out of one's body means to pass gradually through all the states of being, if one does the thing systematically. Well, already in the subtle physical, one is almost de-individualised, and when one goes farther, there remains nothing, for nothing is formed or individualised. Thus, when people are asked to meditate or told to go within, to enter into themselves, they are in agony - naturally! They have the impression that they are vanishing. And with reason: there is nothing, no consciousness! These things that appear to us quite natural and evident, are, for people who know nothing, wild imagination. If, for example, you transplant these experiences or this knowledge to the West, well, unless you have been frequenting the circles of occultists, they stare at you with open eyes. And when you have turned your back, they hasten to say, "These people are cranks!" Now to come back to the gods and conclude. It must be said that all those beings who have never had an earthly existence - gods or demons, invisible beings and powers - do not possess what the Divine has put into man: the psychic being. And this psychic being gives to man true love, charity, compassion, a deep kindness, which compensate for all his external defects. In the gods there is no fault because they live according to their own nature, spontaneously and without constraint: as gods, it is their manner of being. But if you take a higher point of view, if you have a higher vision, a vision of the whole, you see that they lack certain qualities that are exclusively human. By his capacity of love and self-giving, man can have as much power as the gods and even more, when he is not egoistic, when he has surmounted his egoism. If he fulfils the required condition, man is nearer to the Supreme than the gods are. He can be nearer. He is not so automatically, but he has the power to be so, the potentiality. If human love manifested itself without mixture, it would be all-powerful. Unfortunately, in human love there is as much love of oneself as of the one loved; it is not a love that makes you forget yourself. - 4 November 1958 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III 355
,
113:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step. But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort. Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection. You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, WIKI am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: WIKI have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages. In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything. It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM. My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga. All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind. These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness. And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed. And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen. My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal. Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967 ~ The Mother, Sweet Mother The Mother to Mona Sarkar,
114:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passageOmnes eodem cogimur, omniumVersatur urna serius ociusSors exitura et nos in aeternumExilium impositura cymbae.Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vainUpon the axis of its pain,Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!'Farewell, farewell! but this I tellTo thee, thou Wedding-Guest!He prayeth well, who loveth wellBoth man and bird and beast.He prayeth best, who loveth bestAll things both great and small;For the dear God who loveth us,He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Make chance essential. ~ Paul Klee
2:WE ARE ESSENTIALLY alone. ~ Matt Haig
3:Dreams are essential to life. ~ Anais Nin
4:I am essentially a loner. ~ Lauren Bacall
5:I cannot touch my essential self. ~ Sarah Kane
6:Religion is life essential. ~ George MacDonald
7:The essential doesn't change. ~ Samuel Beckett
8:Lies are essential to humanity. ~ Marcel Proust
9:Trust your own essential nature. ~ Wayne W Dyer
10:Formal art is essentially rational. ~ Sol LeWitt
11:time is the quintessential mother. ~ Tayari Jones
12:American leadership is essential. ~ Hillary Clinton
13:Good writing is essentially rewriting. ~ Roald Dahl
14:Stillness is your essential nature. ~ Eckhart Tolle
15:Friendship is essentially a partnership. ~ Aristotle
16:Government is essentially immoral. ~ Herbert Spencer
17:Bhakti is the one essential thing. ~ Sri Ramakrishna
18:Confidence is essential, but ego is not. ~ Sam Mendes
19:Rage is essentially vulgar. ~ Samuel Taylor Coleridge
20:The visual and the popular are essential. ~ Rawi Hage
21:Accuracy is essential to beauty. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
22:All children are essentially criminal. ~ Denis Diderot
23:Authenticity is essential to the soul! ~ Brian Houston
24:Echo was becoming essential, like air. ~ Katie McGarry
25:Economy is essential to all good art. ~ Jerry Seinfeld
26:essential prayer is conversational. It ~ John Eldredge
27:Having a job is essential for sanity. ~ Graeme Simsion
28:The essential thing is to run period! ~ Bernd Heinrich
29:There is no time for anything inessential. ~ Anonymous
30:Everybody needs one essential friend. ~ William Glasser
31:Life is essentially a question of values. ~ Meir Kahane
32:People are essentially red meat. They are. ~ Max Cannon
33:The West Bank is essentially imprisoned. ~ Noam Chomsky
34:What is essential is invisible to the eye. ~ Wendy Mass
35:Sin is essentially a departure from God. ~ Martin Luther
36:Human relations are essentially imperfect. ~ Rebecca West
37:I use only essential oils for perfumes. ~ Jessica Capshaw
38:Mistakes are an essential part of progress. ~ Liz Wiseman
39:Most men are essentially dead by thirty. ~ Romain Rolland
40:Plastic is essentially frozen gasoline. ~ Neal Stephenson
41:The most essential point is lowliness. ~ Francois Fenelon
42:We read because we are essentially alone. ~ Jessica Zafra
43:Life if curious when reduced to its essentials ~ Jean Rhys
44:Love seems to be as Essential as Sunlight ~ Diane Ackerman
45:Mental toughness is essential to success. ~ Vince Lombardi
46:Only what is essential must be said. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer
47:The ball is an essential part of the game. ~ Johan Cruijff
48:The basic and essential human is the woman. ~ Orson Welles
49:A wise ignorance is an essential part of knowledge. ~ Plato
50:Essentially what photography is is life lit up. ~ Sam Abell
51:Love is essential, gregariousness is optional. ~ Susan Cain
52:Paint the essential character of things. ~ Camille Pissarro
53:Simplicity is the pursuit of the essential. ~ Mark Sheppard
54:A Great Answer is essentially a new answer. It ~ Gary Keller
55:Business is essentially applied rationality: ~ Josh Kaufman
56:Few things are as essential as education. ~ Walter Annenberg
57:For mass struggles, nonviolence is essential. ~ Bhagat Singh
58:Knowledge is essential to freedom. ~ William Ellery Channing
59:Music is essentially useless, as is life. ~ George Santayana
60:Music is essentially useless, as life is. ~ George Santayana
61:Failure is a stripping away of the inessential. ~ J K Rowling
62:Help, Thanks, Wow: The Three Essential Prayers. ~ Anne Lamott
63:Notes are absolutely essential to the process. ~ Ransom Riggs
64:People were, essentially, the secrets they kept. ~ Penny Reid
65:The essential is invisible to eyes ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
66:Buying and selling is essentially antisocial. ~ Edward Bellamy
67:Forgiveness is essential as the ultimate detox ~ Doreen Virtue
68:It is essential that America's word be good. ~ Hillary Clinton
69:The life of active virtue is essentially pleasant. ~ Aristotle
70:When an essential one comes along, you’ll know, ~ Laini Taylor
71:A big mirror to exercise in front of is essential. ~ Jane Fonda
72:A watch is the most essential part of a lecture. ~ Willa Cather
73:Being a president is being a CEO, essentially. ~ Geraldo Rivera
74:Being religious is quintessentially American. ~ Denis McDonough
75:Poetry is a language pared down to its essentials. ~ Ezra Pound
76:Water for me is so essential, like swimming. ~ Nastassja Kinski
77:Courage is essentially competitive and imitative. ~ Max Hastings
78:es·se n. [PHILOSOPHY] essential nature or essence. ~ Erin McKean
79:Failure means a stripping away of the inessential. ~ J K Rowling
80:Human being's essential nature is perfect and faultless. ~ Laozi
81:Magic is essentially a force of creation, of life. ~ Jim Butcher
82:Science is an essentially anarchic enterprise. ~ Paul Feyerabend
83:The freedom of all is essential to my freedom. ~ Mikhail Bakunin
84:The journey is essential to the dream. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi
85:To abstain from lying is essentially wholesome. ~ Gautama Buddha
86:Writing novels is an essentially amateur activity. ~ Jane Smiley
87:Essentially, yoga means dissolving your identity. ~ Jaggi Vasudev
88:Our essential nature is one of pure potentiality. ~ Deepak Chopra
89:Silence is the essential condition of happiness. ~ Heinrich Heine
90:Solitude is an essential quality of wilderness. ~ Robert Lucas Jr
91:High-functioning sleepwalkers, essentially. ~ Emily St John Mandel
92:If anything happiness is a feeling of being essential ~ Fay Weldon
93:I meditate. Daily practice is essential to my life. ~ Richard Gere
94:Meditation essentially means having a great time. ~ Frederick Lenz
95:My father was the quintessential husband and dad. ~ Sidney Poitier
96:(Djinn are essentially vapor.)
"I blew him away. ~ Rachel Caine
97:Failure is not just acceptable, it's often essential ~ Randy Pausch
98:Fear is essential in horror fiction. Gore is optional. ~ Rayne Hall
99:Food is Essential to life, therefore make it good. ~ S Truett Cathy
100:Hope is an essential constituent of human life. ~ Benjamin Franklin
101:Perhaps love is essential because it's unnecessary. ~ Julian Barnes
102:Plans are useless, but planning is essential. ~ Dwight D Eisenhower
103:A full and fair discussion is essential to democracy. ~ George Soros
104:A reading appetite is quirky, singular, and essential ~ Penny Kittle
105:Being pro-life is an essential part of being a writer. ~ Nat Hentoff
106:Flight is essential, but I can't let my fear show. ~ Suzanne Collins
107:For me, temperance is essential to good work. ~ Edgar Rice Burroughs
108:Freshness is essential. That makes all the difference. ~ Julia Child
109:I am essentially an entertainer and a storyteller. ~ Bryce Courtenay
110:Learning is the essential unit of progress for startups. ~ Eric Ries
111:Mystery is the essential element of every work of art. ~ Luis Bunuel
112:Mystery is the essential element of every work of art. ~ Luis Bu uel
113:Those who consider the inessential to be essential ~ Gautama Buddha
114:Worry is essentially a misuse of imagination. ~ Alex Faickney Osborn
115:Active waiting is essential to the spiritual life. ~ Henri J M Nouwen
116:Essentially, body weight is a useless thing to lose. ~ Rujuta Diwekar
117:Exaggerate the essential, leave the obvious vague. ~ Vincent Van Gogh
118:What is essential is invisible to the eye. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
119:Excess is essential to the production of austerity. ~ Patricia Duncker
120:Knowledge is essential, but it’s not sufficient. ~ John F MacArthur Jr
121:No matter what, I find that surrendering is essential. ~ Nikki DeLoach
122:The existence of other people is essentially awkward. ~ Lionel Shriver
123:What foods are, essentially, are idea-neutral drugs. ~ Terence McKenna
124:...any life ending in death is essentially pointless. ~ Gary Shteyngart
125:Dignified theatricality is an essential element of power. ~ Jon Meacham
126:Goals are as essential to success as air is to life. ~ David J Schwartz
127:Long life wore away everything that was not essential. ~ Michael Chabon
128:Novelty is an essential attribute of the beautiful. ~ Benjamin Disraeli
129:The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth. ~ Albert Camus
130:Being understood is not the most essential thing in life. ~ Jodie Foster
131:Conceptions are artificial. Perceptions are essential. ~ Wallace Stevens
132:For what is essential is invisible to the eye ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
133:Humiliation is so essential to Catholics. And to faggots! ~ Larry Kramer
134:I essentially am not in madness, but mad in craft. ~ William Shakespeare
135:I essentially get to represent my community on television. ~ Megan Hilty
136:If there is one area where equity is crucial and essential, ~ Kofi Annan
137:Nature conceals her mystery by her essential grandeur. ~ Albert Einstein
138:Power is in nature the essential measure of right. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
139:Secrecy is the first essential in affairs of state. ~ Cardinal Richelieu
140:What is essential in war is victory, not prolonged operations. ~ Sun Tzu
141:But essential never means simple, nor does it mean sufficient ~ Anonymous
142:Empathy is an essential part of living a life of meaning. ~ Daniel H Pink
143:Good moral character is the first essential in a man. ~ George Washington
144:You are your own essential ally. Get right with yourself. ~ Bryant McGill
145:At 46 one must be a miser; only have time for essentials. ~ Virginia Woolf
146:at my age an hour’s reading before bedtime is essential, ~ Shirley Jackson
147:Conflict is essential to evolution.
-Aleph, Paulo Coelho ~ Paulo Coelho
148:Direct access to sea is an essential part of foreign policy. ~ Carlos Mesa
149:Giving to the poor is an essential part of Christian morality. ~ C S Lewis
150:Our essential nature is happiness. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi #MondayMotivation
151:Relaxation is essential for the full expression of power. ~ George Leonard
152:The family is the first essential cell of human society. ~ Pope John XXIII
153:To live among friends is the primary essential of happiness. ~ Lord Kelvin
154:We live in a society where detachment is almost essential. ~ Philip K Dick
155:An essential aspect of creativity is not being afraid to fail. ~ Edwin Land
156:Divorcing developmental and evaluative feedback is essential. ~ Laszlo Bock
157:Eloquence is the essential thing in a speech, not information. ~ Mark Twain
158:For me, reading is my essential palliative, my daily fix. ~ Penelope Lively
159:Hard work and humility are essential for spiritual sadhana. ~ B K S Iyengar
160:Humility is essential greatness, the inside of grandeur. ~ George MacDonald
161:I thought cars were essential ingredients of life itself. ~ Edward Herrmann
162:It's quintessentially American to transform your family. ~ Howard Rheingold
163:Opposition to divine sovereignty is essentially atheism. ~ Charles Spurgeon
164:The ability to play is essential to being a creative artist. ~ Dewitt Jones
165:The essential quality of living life lies simply in the living. ~ Bruce Lee
166:The first essentials, of course, is to know what you want. ~ Robert Collier
167:This is the essential evil of vice: it debases a man. ~ Edwin Hubbel Chapin
168:And hence the poet must seek to be essentially anonymous, ~ Delmore Schwartz
169:Essentially, blood left the body in a number of ways. It ~ Tanya Anne Crosby
170:I think all humans are essentially proud and I certainly am. ~ Sienna Miller
171:Mercy stood in the cloud, with eye that wept Essential love. ~ Robert Pollok
172:Naturalism and materialism mean essentially the same thing. ~ Philip Johnson
173:People essentially like local news better than network news. ~ Roone Arledge
174:Singleness of purpose is essential for success in life. ~ John D Rockefeller
175:The genius of Canada remains essentially a deflationary genius. ~ Jan Morris
176:The most essential thing in dance discipline is devotion. ~ Merce Cunningham
177:The White House is now essentially a TV performance. ~ Edmund Snow Carpenter
178:Wine is one of the agreeable and essential ingredients of life ~ Julia Child
179:a certain amount of boredom is...essential to a happy life ~ Bertrand Russell
180:Always being there was the essential secret for a wife. ~ Elizabeth von Arnim
181:It is not so essential to think much as to love much. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila
182:Make linking to the rest an essential part of what you do best. ~ Jeff Jarvis
183:Marxism is essentially a product of the bourgeois mind. ~ Joseph A Schumpeter
184:Pleasure is, after all, a luxury. It's love that's essential. ~ John Dufresne
185:The ascent of money has been essential to the ascent of man. ~ Niall Ferguson
186:Very few of us were taught that we’re essentially good. ~ Marianne Williamson
187:All problems of existence are essentially problems of Harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo
188:covering the essentials, and holds out a larger fluffy white towel ~ E L James
189:Employment is nature's physician, and is essential to human happiness. ~ Galen
190:Enjoying life was essential, but sometimes it was an effort. ~ Cassandra Clare
191:I believe empathy is the most essential quality of civilization. ~ Roger Ebert
192:Liberty is the essential basis, the sine qua non, of morality. ~ Henry Hazlitt
193:Plans are of little importance, but planning is essential. ~ Winston Churchill
194:Playfullness is the essential feature of productive thought. ~ Albert Einstein
195:The United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem. ~ Walt Whitman
196:Art is a necessity, an essential part of our enlightenment process. ~ Ken Danby
197:Essential in a concept of power is the role of purpose. ~ James MacGregor Burns
198:Even the rats carry bike chains as essential defence accessories. ~ Manda Scott
199:I believe that thrift is essential to well-ordered living. ~ John D Rockefeller
200:It was essential that I never show doubt about what I was doing. ~ Steve Martin
201:People see essentialism embedded in bloodlines—i.e., genes. ~ Robert M Sapolsky
202:Questioning ourselves and our country is healthy and essential. ~ Bryant McGill
203:Ultimately, growth is essential for increasing a company's value. ~ Stuart Rose
204:Unreason is an essential medicine as long as you do not overdose. ~ Dean Koontz
205:Why should it be essential to love rarely in order to love much? ~ Albert Camus
206:Writers are essential. Readers are essential. Publishers are not. ~ J A Konrath
207:Conceit, arrogance, and egotism are the essentials of patriotism. ~ Emma Goldman
208:Essentially a soldier, the Christian is always on the lookout. ~ Romano Guardini
209:Essentially, Goodell is a water boy who makes eight figures. ~ Gregg Easterbrook
210:I spent most of my adult life essentially agnostic or an atheist. ~ Jim Gaffigan
211:The Arts are man's most useless ... and essential ... activity. ~ Eugene Ionesco
212:The essential respect is the one in your own heart for yourself. ~ Bryant McGill
213:The human heart, as of course we all know is essentially good ~ Charles Bukowski
214:The less you talk, the more time you have for the essential things. ~ Niki Lauda
215:Two qualities essential for the artist: moralityand perspective. ~ Denis Diderot
216:We all have time to expend on what is essential to our nature. ~ Thornton Wilder
217:World peace is the most essential outer realization of our time. ~ Anodea Judith
218:You are never more essentially yourself, than when you are still ~ Eckhart Tolle
219:Accepting your shadow side is an essential part of being authentic. ~ Bill George
220:All money is essentially merchandize. ~ Anne Robert Jacques Turgot Baron de Laune
221:At the heart of all great art is an essential melancholy. ~ Federico Garc a Lorca
222:At the heart of all great art is an essential melancholy. ~ Federico Garcia Lorca
223:Courage is the essential element in any great public man or woman. ~ Paul Johnson
224:Creativity is essentially a lonely art. An even lonelier struggle. ~ Lou Dorfsman
225:Death is the essential condition of life, not an evil. ~ Charlotte Perkins Gilman
226:I came into adult life equipped with an essentially romantic ethic. ~ Joan Didion
227:Imperfection is in some sort essential to all that we know in life. ~ John Ruskin
228:Intelligence is useful. Energy is valuable. Integrity is essential. ~ Ron Kaufman
229:Kindness is an essential part of Gods work and ours here on earth. ~ Billy Graham
230:Lack of fairness to an opponent is essentially a sign of weakness. ~ Emma Goldman
231:People to people contact is essential for Nations to come closer. ~ Narendra Modi
232:Protracted self-promotion drains something essential from the soul, ~ Dean Koontz
233:The wisdom of life consists in the elimination of the nonessentials. ~ Lin Yutang
234:Trust is essential when you're planning to lie to everyone you know. ~ Lydia Kang
235:Vigor of government is essential to the security of liberty. ~ Alexander Hamilton
236:Creative Destruction is the essential fact about capitalism. ~ Joseph A Schumpeter
237:Deep down, Clark's essentially a good person... and deep down, I'm not ~ Jeph Loeb
238:For all problems of existence are essentially problems of harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo
239:He suddenly saw the enterprise of literature as essentially mad. ~ Mark Beauregard
240:Judging people together was an essential part of best friendship ~ Cassandra Clare
241:Music is the soundtrack of our lives, it's essential for our lives. ~ Tavis Smiley
242:people who choose to work seven days a week are essentially slaves ~ Dennis Prager
243:The Christian ethic played an essential part in my upbringing. ~ David Rockefeller
244:The materials I use are absolutely essential to the work I make. ~ David Batchelor
245:The position of the artist is humble. He is essentially a channel. ~ Piet Mondrian
246:A certain amount of danger is essential to the quality of life. ~ Charles Lindbergh
247:Avoid all haste; calmness is an essential ingredient of politeness. ~ Alphonse Karr
248:But as I always say to people I'm essentially a public service person. ~ Tony Blair
249:Coffee? Hell yes, coffee! Caffeine being one of the essential drugs. ~ Ben Fountain
250:Flexibility is just as essential for divinity as is discipline. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert
251:It is essential of the happy life that a man would have almost no mail. ~ C S Lewis
252:It is existentially, hyperbolically, quintessentially unknowable. ~ Gregory Maguire
253:Laughter. An essential ingredient for survival. And we laughed a lot. ~ Patti Smith
254:She could not beat to be irrelevant. Virginia lives to be essential. ~ Priya Parmar
255:The essential element of love is a belief in its own eternity. ~ W Somerset Maugham
256:Then he threw me another essential tool of demigod heroes—duct tape. ~ Rick Riordan
257:to avoid dullness may help to filter out the nonessential.) ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb
258:Unalloyed love of God is the essential thing. All else is unreal. ~ Sri Ramakrishna
259:[V]igor of government is essential to the security of liberty. ~ Alexander Hamilton
260:An independent and free media is essential to ensure democracy. ~ Warren Christopher
261:Beauty is essentially spiritual. The authentic beauty lies in the heart. ~ Sivananda
262:I get ideas about what's essential when packing my suitcase. ~ Diane von Furstenberg
263:I think sex with him might undo my essential cellular cohesion. ~ Karen Marie Moning
264:It is an essential attribute of the jurisdiction of every country ~ Thomas Jefferson
265:Life is essentially an endless series of problems," the panda told me. ~ Mark Manson
266:man’s being is essentially his own deed. ~ Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling
267:Music used to be essential and meaningful, but now it's disposable. ~ Brian McKnight
268:Ours is essentially a tragic age, so we refuse to take it tragically. ~ D H Lawrence
269:Rightness of limitation is essential for growth of reality. ~ Alfred North Whitehead
270:Studying the work of masters is an essential part of becoming amaster. ~ Chad Fowler
271:The essential in this time of moral poverty is to create enthusiasm. ~ Pablo Picasso
272:* The essential respect is the one in your own heart for yourself. ~ Bryant H McGill
273:Unalienable rights are essential limitations to all governments. ~ Francis Hutcheson
274:And to shape up my future it is not essential that I forget my past. ~ Ravinder Singh
275:A warrior has to believe, for belief is an essential part of his being. ~ Th un Mares
276:Big-heartednes s is the most essential virtue on the spiritual journey. ~ Matthew Fox
277:College was just so essential for my sense of self and my development. ~ Claire Danes
278:Dignity is as essential to human life as water, food, and oxygen. ~ Laura Hillenbrand
279:Essentially the soul of the planet is being controlled by corporations. ~ Paul Morley
280:Every individual is essentially now a small business and entrepreneur. ~ Reid Hoffman
281:Gandhi: The Essential Writings. Oxford University Press: London, 2008, ~ Stephen Cope
282:If we want spiritual development, the practice of patience is essential. ~ Dalai Lama
283:If you can intuit well, you're essentially meeting the future faster. ~ Peter Buffett
284:It is the basic evasion of the essential which is the problem of man. ~ Wilhelm Reich
285:Leadership is essentially an other-centred activity not self centred one ~ John Adair
286:Meditation is essential because meditation opens the mind to itself. ~ Frederick Lenz
287:Our self image, strongly held, essentially determines what we become. ~ Maxwell Maltz
288:Ours is essentially a tragic age, so we refuse to take it tragically . ~ D H Lawrence
289:Religion and morality are the essential pillars of civil society. ~ George Washington
290:Seek the insignificant small but essential qualities, essential to life ~ Jonas Mekas
291:slicing down your fluff to the core essentials is how you get to genius. ~ Jeff Goins
292:The essential point of view of Christianity is sin. ~ Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel
293:The final goal of all religions is to realise the essential oneness. ~ Mahatma Gandhi
294:There is no question of any erosion of essential national sovereignty. ~ Edward Heath
295:There is no sun without shadow, and it is essential to know the night. ~ Albert Camus
296:the surest way to feel rich was to invest in quality nonessentials. ~ Jeannette Walls
297:The urge to revolt is one of the essential dimensions of human nature. ~ Albert Camus
298:An essential part of a happy, healthy life is being of service to others. ~ Sue Thoele
299:Failure is not just acceptable, it's often essential." The Last Lecture ~ Randy Pausch
300:Hope is life's essential nutrient, and love is what gives life meaning ~ Dick Van Dyke
301:How I wish everyone had decent work! It is essential for human dignity. ~ Pope Francis
302:I am a critic - as essential to the theatre as ants to a picnic. ~ Joseph L Mankiewicz
303:I love Evensong. There's something sad and essentially English about it. ~ Barbara Pym
304:"In the last analysis, the essential thing is the life of the individual." ~ Carl Jung
305:Launching a business is essentially an adventure in problem-solving. ~ Richard Branson
306:Love what is simple and beautiful.
These are the essentials. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
307:Photography is essentially a personal matter - a search for inner truth. ~ Inge Morath
308:Real success always contains an unseen essential of deep spirituality. ~ Bryant McGill
309:TDF is more essential today than it was when it was first founded in 1968. ~ Joel Grey
310:The General was essentially a man of peace, except in his domestic life. ~ Oscar Wilde
311:The socks and stockings stored in your drawer are essentially on holiday. ~ Marie Kond
312:To a great experience one thing is essential, an experiencing nature. ~ Walter Bagehot
313:Beautiful Girl, wake the fuck up, can't eviscerate essential self. ~ Karen Marie Moning
314:Grains are essentially sugar with enough opioids to make them addictive. ~ Lierre Keith
315:If you had an essentially happy childhood, that tends to dwell with you. ~ Tracy Kidder
316:Knowing when to take your losses is an essential part of eventual success. ~ Tom Peters
317:Security is the essential roadblock to achieving the road map to peace. ~ George W Bush
318:Spirit and body differ not essentially, but gradually. ~ Anne Conway Viscountess Conway
319:There is an essential goodness in Americans. They love this country. ~ Kellyanne Conway
320:The unseen essential awaits your enlightened heart's ascension to love. ~ Bryant McGill
321:Wine is sort of thrilling and sensual, and bread is familiar and essential. ~ Lily King
322:Yoga essentially means finding the keys to the nature of the existence. ~ Jaggi Vasudev
323:Another essential to a universal and durable peace is social justice. ~ Arthur Henderson
324:Confidence, clarity and compassion are essential qualities of a teacher. ~ B K S Iyengar
325:Fire is not essential. Fire is warm comfort. From fire, cultures are born. ~ Aspen Matis
326:Frankly, I've never felt voting to be all that essential to the process. ~ Gerald R Ford
327:Having knowledge of the Bible is essential to a rich and meaningful life. ~ Billy Graham
328:Hope is as essential to your life as air and water. You need hope to cope. ~ Rick Warren
329:I have never lost faith in America's essential goodness and greatness. ~ Hillary Clinton
330:In essentials, unity; in inessentials, diversity; in all things, charity. ~ Peter Kreeft
331:It is essential to the triumph of reform that it should never succeed. ~ William Hazlitt
332:not have the privilege of living in ignorance of this essential fact. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates
333:Spotting talent is one of the essential elements of great leadership. ~ David McCullough
334:Such a quintessentially Human thing, to express sorrow through apology. ~ Becky Chambers
335:The framing of a problem is often far more essential than its solution ~ Albert Einstein
336:The likeness we bear to Jesus is more essential than our notions of him. ~ Lucretia Mott
337:Unlike the novel, a short story may be, for all purposes, essential. ~ Jorge Luis Borges
338:Was his death an essential stage in the continuation of his life? ~ Jonathan Safran Foer
339:And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient! ~ Thomas Keller
340:Feeling good about ourselves is essential in our being able to love others. ~ Fred Rogers
341:[H]istorians have powerful imaginations, which are essential and dangerous. ~ Bob Stinson
342:It is essential to practice spiritual disciplines along with academic studies. ~ Sai Baba
343:It's not the daily increase but daily decrease. Hack away at the unessential. ~ Bruce Lee
344:Since I essentially knew nothing, I had an almost completely free choice. ~ Francis Crick
345:The essential thing is to WANT to sing. This then is a song. I am singing. ~ Henry Miller
346:The essential thing is to work in a state of mind that approaches prayer. ~ Henri Matisse
347:The human body is essentially something other than an animal organism. ~ Martin Heidegger
348:There is only one time when it is essential to awaken. That time is now. ~ Gautama Buddha
349:There should essentially be no limits to the voluntary definition of marriage. ~ Ron Paul
350:THE WISDOM OF LIFE CONSISTS IN THE ELIMINATION OF NON-ESSENTIALS. —Lin Yutang ~ Anonymous
351:Women, I hope you know how essential you really are. Keep that crown on. ~ Alexandra Elle
352:a society of essential oils and self-esteem has replaced a society of logic. ~ Ben Shapiro
353:Breaking and entering was an essential part of the shapeshifter courtship. ~ Ilona Andrews
354:Darkness had been essentially banished from the Earth. It had become a choice. ~ Anne Rice
355:I just spend my money on the essentials. Just basically food and shelter. ~ David Duchovny
356:In short: I felt my existence was tainted, in some subtle but essential way. ~ Donna Tartt
357:Most women do not want to be liberated from their essential natures as women. ~ Dan Quayle
358:Old age and sickness bring out the essential characteristics of a man. ~ Felix Frankfurter
359:Political differences essentially depend on disagreement in moral principles. ~ Lord Acton
360:Possessing a powerful worldwide brand is essential for sustained success. ~ Warren Buffett
361:Sleep is an essential part of life-but more important, sleep is a gift. ~ William C Dement
362:Solitude is essentially the discovery and acceptance of our uniqueness. ~ Laurence Freeman
363:The basic essential of a great actor is that he loves himself in acting. ~ Charlie Chaplin
364:The best teacher of children, in brief, is one who is essentially childlike. ~ H L Mencken
365:The enjoyment of one's tools is an essential ingredient of successful work. ~ Donald Knuth
366:The essential business of language is to assert or deny facts. Given ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein
367:The medium is as unimportant as I myself. Essential is only the forming. ~ Kurt Schwitters
368:The paralysis of potential is essential to the manufacturing of victims. ~ Stefan Molyneux
369:The present and future of knowledge attainment and essential business skills. ~ Bill Gates
370:The social order, though necessary, is essentially evil, whatever it may be. ~ Simone Weil
371:To believe yourself brave is to be brave; it is the one only essential thing. ~ Mark Twain
372:Why is meditation essential? By meditating we take our garbage out. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi
373:According to Christian teachers, the essential vice, the utmost evil, is Pride. ~ C S Lewis
374:A writer is essentially a man who does not resign himself to loneliness. ~ Francois Mauriac
375:Combinatory play seems to be the essential feature in productive thought. ~ Albert Einstein
376:essential differences between generative grammar and structural linguistics. ~ Noam Chomsky
377:Every vivid memory holds some essential truth about your vision of the world ~ Kim Stafford
378:Happiness is essentially a gift; we are not the forgers of our own felicity. ~ Josef Pieper
379:Important? It’s essential,” I said. “I’m always at least ten minutes early. ~ Richelle Mead
380:In any form of attack it is essential to assail your opponent from behind. ~ Oswald Boelcke
381:I think the theatre is as essential to civilization as safe, pure water. ~ Vanessa Redgrave
382:It seems that for success in science or art, a dash of autism is essential. ~ Hans Asperger
383:Man is essentially ignorant, and becomes learned through acquiring knowledge. ~ Ibn Khaldun
384:My ignorance is essential. I do not write what I know but what I need to know. ~ Don Murray
385:Outside of family, writing is essential. To me, it's like breathing. ~ Patricia Reilly Giff
386:Please make a list of every possession you consider essential to your life. I ~ J P Delaney
387:The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well. ~ Pierre de Coubertin
388:An appearance of delicacy, and even fragility, is almost essential to beauty. ~ Edmund Burke
389:As you open your heart to wisdom you will begin to see the unseen essential. ~ Bryant McGill
390:Being an extrovert isn't essential to evangelism - obedience and love are. ~ Rebecca Pippert
391:Boys were a very essential part of rock & roll. The girls were more onlookers. ~ Mick Jagger
392:Community is essential, but the fundamental calling of the church is global. ~ Calvin Miller
393:Etiquette means behaving yourself a little better than is absolutely essential. ~ Will Cuppy
394:In essentials, unity; in differences, liberty; in all things, charity. ~ Philipp Melanchthon
395:In most cases learning something essential in life requires physical pain. ~ Haruki Murakami
396:In short: I felt my existence was tainted, in some subtle but essential way. I ~ Donna Tartt
397:It is essential that we stop worrying about money and stop resenting our bills. ~ Louise Hay
398:It is not a daily increase, but a daily decrease. Hack away at the inessentials. ~ Bruce Lee
399:It seems to me that love, if it is fine, is essentially a discipline. ~ William Butler Yeats
400:Perhaps all love stories no matter how varied are essentially the same. ~ Roy L Pickering Jr
401:Self-sacrifice is essential to leadership. You will give, give all the time. ~ Napoleon Hill
402:This type of price action is essential to 'shake' sellers out of the market. ~ Anna Coulling
403:What we eat is an essential part of who we are and how we define ourselves. ~ Fuchsia Dunlop
404:You must practice to be able to return to essential principles at any moment. ~ Koichi Tohei
405:Attention and focus are essential skills for writers in a noise-filled world. ~ Anne H Janzer
406:Believing in yourself is essential to creating lasting change and a happy life. ~ Tara Stiles
407:Hillary Clinton wants to abolish - essentially abolish - the Second Amendment. ~ Donald Trump
408:I'm working for the women in the world, today; that's my essential issue. ~ Michelle Bachelet
409:In essentials unity, in non-essentials liberty, in all things charity and love. ~ Greg Laurie
410:Initiative is as essential to success as a hub is essential to a wagon wheel. ~ Napoleon Hill
411:I put a drop of lavender essential oil on my pillow before I go to sleep. ~ Melissa Joan Hart
412:Knowing where things are, and why, is essential to rational decision making ~ Jack Dangermond
413:Simplicity boils down to two steps: Identify the essential. Eliminate the rest. ~ Leo Babauta
414:The essential thing in life is not so much conquering as fighting well. ~ Pierre de Coubertin
415:To plunder, to lie, to show your arse, are three essentials for climbing high. ~ Aristophanes
416:When one lived a life that was, essentially, a lie, appearances were everything. ~ C S Harris
417:All actual heroes are essential men, And all men possible heroes. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning
418:An essential portion of any artist’s labor is not creation so much as invocation. ~ Lewis Hyde
419:Chess mastery essentially consists of analyzing Chess positions accurately ~ Mikhail Botvinnik
420:Courage is, on all hands, considered as an essential of high character. ~ James Anthony Froude
421:Essentially, Romney’s campaign slogan was this: “Obama: Good Guy, Bad President. ~ Ben Shapiro
422:If the artist's will is not strong he will see all kinds of unessential things. ~ Robert Henri
423:I realized that modern flirting was essentially just being mean while smiling. ~ Anna Kendrick
424:Living holy lives is the goal of the Christian life and our essential purpose. ~ Matthew Kelly
425:Nothing is so essential as dignity, girls, and time will reveal who has it ~ Elizabeth Gilbert
426:The essential element in nurturing our creativity lies in nurturing ourselves. ~ Julia Cameron
427:The essential question is not, "How busy are you?" but "What are you busy at?" ~ Oprah Winfrey
428:The essential reason for my loneliness is that I don't even know where I belong. ~ Orhan Pamuk
429:The three essentials for great preaching are: truth, clarity, and passion. ~ G Campbell Morgan
430:To get rid of the infatuation for English is one of the essentials of Swaraj. ~ Mahatma Gandhi
431:Trying to divine some essential truth about evil is toxic, like inhaling fumes. ~ Carla Norton
432:What do you do?’ I asked, nosey as ever – an essential attribute for a writer. ~ Karen Perkins
433:Without animals, something essential is removed from the minds of the farmers. ~ Wendell Berry
434:You are never more essentially, more deeply, yourself than when you are still. ~ Eckhart Tolle
435:After all, the essential point in running a risk is that the returns justify it. ~ Isaac Asimov
436:Diets are essentially traning courses in how to feel fat and feel like a failure ~ Paul McKenna
437:Expression and communication are essential; without these, civilization ends. ~ Haruki Murakami
438:How could he claim to love her, when he did not love what was essential in her? ~ Cecilia Grant
439:I grew up counterculture. I'm essentially a hippie, and I'm essentially a folkie. ~ Steve Earle
440:Individual liberty and interdependence are both essential for life in society. ~ Mahatma Gandhi
441:Inner child work is essential. It's the essence of growth as a whole person ~ Cheryl Richardson
442:I was fucked-up in some essential way that other people could see, but I couldn’t. ~ Jane Devin
443:parents might not be keen on the idea of seeing each other, but then essentially ~ Emily Giffin
444:Passion is essential for a meaningful existence. Life is about what you feel. ~ Jonathan Cainer
445:Staying engaged with God is absolutely essential for getting through a tough time. ~ Max Lucado
446:that the chance to shape one’s story is essential to sustaining meaning in life; ~ Atul Gawande
447:The essential job of government is to facilitate, not frustrate, job development ~ Andrew Cuomo
448:The sex curriculum will be essentially by taught by the local gay community. ~ Michele Bachmann
449:Adulthood’s full of ghosts... High-functioning sleepwalkers, essentially. ~ Emily St John Mandel
450:Agents are essential, because publishers will not read unsolicited manuscripts. ~ Jackie Collins
451:Anger is the quintessential individual-signature emotion: I am what makes me mad. ~ Gina Barreca
452:A person who is gifted sees the essential point and leaves the rest as surplus. ~ Thomas Carlyle
453:But down deep, at the molecular heart of life we're essentially identical to trees. ~ Carl Sagan
454:Courage is the quality most essential to understanding the Language of the World. ~ Paulo Coelho
455:Courage is the quality most essential to understanding the language of the world. ~ Paulo Coelho
456:Essentially, filmmakers have to be free and not directed by power or politicians. ~ Costa Gavras
457:Food may be essential as fuel for the body, but good food is fuel for the soul. ~ Malcolm Forbes
458:Knowing how to suffer well is essential to realizing true happiness. SUFFERING ~ Thich Nhat Hanh
459:Letting go emotionally is the quintessential asana for yoga of the heart. ~ Khang Kijarro Nguyen
460:Taking time out each day to relax and renew is essential to living well. ~ Judith Hanson Lasater
461:Theater and film are essentially the same - just different kinds of storytelling. ~ Howard Shore
462:The capacity to still feel wonder is essential to the creative process. ~ Donald Woods Winnicott
463:The idea of narcissism, essentially, is and will be accepted as a virtue. ~ Nicolas Winding Refn
464:The wisdom of life consists in the elimination of non-essentials.” —Lin Yutang ~ Timothy Ferriss
465:War with all its glorification of brute force is essentially a degrading thing. ~ Mahatma Gandhi
466:What is the essential difference between banknotes, coins, and chicken shit? None. ~ Ajahn Brahm
467:A child reminds us that playtime is an essential part of our daily routine. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
468:All actual heroes are essential men,
And all men possible heroes. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning
469:Grass stain?” “Annoying, probably permanent, essentially harmless. Kind of ugly. ~ Laurie Frankel
470:Molecular biology is essentially the practice of biochemistry without a license. ~ Erwin Chargaff
471:My version of Superman is essentially of a guy who has spent his whole life alone. ~ Henry Cavill
472:New York seems conducted by jazz, animated by it. It is essentially a city of rhythm. ~ Anais Nin
473:No amount of skillful invention can replace the essential element of imagination. ~ Edward Hopper
474:No offence to Nicki Minaj, but her career has essentially been a Lil’ Kim tribute ~ Azealia Banks
475:Practice is essential not only to achieve excellence but to clarify the call itself. ~ Jeff Goins
476:Simon became inarticulate in his effort to express mankind's essential illness. ~ William Golding
477:The essential characteristic of socialism is the denial of individual property rights. ~ Ayn Rand
478:The essential thing is to bear always in mind that trouble can appear at any time. ~ Jeff Cooper
479:To love the plateau is to love what is most essential and enduring in your life. ~ George Leonard
480:But a wild democracy . . . too often disdains the essential principles of justice. ~ Edward Gibbon
481:Drawing Muslims toward Jesus is our essential task, not drawing them away from Islam. ~ J D Greear
482:For that again, is what all manner of religion essentially is: childish dependency. ~ Albert Ellis
483:Free education and health care are essential for the welfare of the population. ~ Jose Ramos Horta
484:I'm Irish but I design something that is quintessentially English and I love hats. ~ Philip Treacy
485:it is essential to create a quiet space in which to evaluate the things in your life. ~ Marie Kond
486:It might be said that all knowledge is linked to the essential forms of cruelty. ~ Michel Foucault
487:Losing is essential to anyone's success. The more you lose, the more you want to win. ~ Brett Hull
488:Pardon,Periel, like Love, is only ours for fun: essentially we don't and can't. ~ Charles Williams
489:That is what life meant, a unique presence, and it was essential in every creature. ~ David Malouf
490:The gladiator is formulating his plan in the arena or essentially Too late. ~ Seneca the Younger
491:(T)hey were at ease with each other, which was essential to a productive workshop. ~ Jincy Willett
492:Adapting a book is essentially a collaboration, whether the author is alive or dead. ~ James Franco
493:A degree of self-deception, she said, was an essential part of the talent for living. ~ Rachel Cusk
494:All the essentials of humanity's artistic treasures can be found in New York. ~ Claude Levi Strauss
495:All this stuff was like air: essential and expected, missed only when taken away. ~ Rebecca Forster
496:A teacher or teaching is not essential for spiritual awakening, but they save time. ~ Eckhart Tolle
497:Education is not a luxury in modern American society-it is essential for survival. ~ John M Perkins
498:Helping people in need is a good and essential part of my life, a kind of destiny. ~ Princess Diana
499:He was essentially a truth-speaking man, if only he know how to speak the truth. ~ Anthony Trollope
500:I can't turn off the way I think, and that's essentially who I am, who anybody is. ~ Marilyn Manson

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



0

  482 Integral Yoga
  134 Occultism
   85 Christianity
   73 Philosophy
   57 Psychology
   28 Yoga
   25 Science
   18 Poetry
   14 Theosophy
   14 Integral Theory
   14 Fiction
   11 Education
   3 Hinduism
   2 Kabbalah
   2 Buddhism
   1 Mythology
   1 Alchemy


  359 Sri Aurobindo
  232 The Mother
  136 Satprem
  109 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   57 Carl Jung
   51 Aleister Crowley
   42 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   36 Plotinus
   34 James George Frazer
   20 Swami Krishnananda
   17 Rudolf Steiner
   17 Aldous Huxley
   16 A B Purani
   14 H P Lovecraft
   8 Sri Ramakrishna
   8 Paul Richard
   8 Jorge Luis Borges
   8 George Van Vrekhem
   7 Swami Vivekananda
   7 Friedrich Nietzsche
   7 Alice Bailey
   6 Plato
   6 Jordan Peterson
   5 Thubten Chodron
   5 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   5 Franz Bardon
   4 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   4 Saint John of Climacus
   4 Aristotle
   3 Jalaluddin Rumi
   2 Walt Whitman
   2 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   2 Nirodbaran
   2 Jean Gebser
   2 Bokar Rinpoche


   58 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   50 The Life Divine
   36 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   34 The Golden Bough
   34 Record of Yoga
   31 Magick Without Tears
   29 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03
   24 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01
   23 Questions And Answers 1957-1958
   23 Liber ABA
   23 Letters On Yoga II
   23 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04
   21 Essays On The Gita
   20 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   20 Agenda Vol 03
   18 Mysterium Coniunctionis
   17 The Practice of Psycho therapy
   17 The Perennial Philosophy
   17 The Human Cycle
   17 The Future of Man
   17 Questions And Answers 1956
   16 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   16 Agenda Vol 08
   15 The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious
   15 Agenda Vol 02
   14 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   13 The Phenomenon of Man
   13 On Thoughts And Aphorisms
   13 Letters On Yoga IV
   13 Letters On Yoga I
   13 Isha Upanishad
   12 Questions And Answers 1954
   12 Questions And Answers 1950-1951
   11 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   11 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   11 Letters On Yoga III
   11 Essays Divine And Human
   11 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02
   11 Agenda Vol 07
   11 Agenda Vol 01
   10 Questions And Answers 1953
   10 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 02
   10 Agenda Vol 04
   9 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04
   9 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 03
   9 Agenda Vol 09
   9 Agenda Vol 05
   8 Questions And Answers 1955
   8 Preparing for the Miraculous
   8 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 01
   8 Let Me Explain
   8 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   7 The Secret Of The Veda
   7 Theosophy
   7 A Treatise on Cosmic Fire
   7 Aion
   7 Agenda Vol 13
   6 Twilight of the Idols
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 Talks
   6 Maps of Meaning
   6 Letters On Poetry And Art
   6 Kena and Other Upanishads
   5 Walden
   5 The Essentials of Education
   5 On Education
   5 How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator
   5 City of God
   5 Agenda Vol 06
   4 The Practice of Magical Evocation
   4 The Ladder of Divine Ascent
   4 The Interior Castle or The Mansions
   4 The Integral Yoga
   4 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   4 Questions And Answers 1929-1931
   4 Poetics
   4 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   4 Hymn of the Universe
   4 Agenda Vol 11
   4 Agenda Vol 10
   3 Words Of The Mother II
   3 The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma
   3 The Problems of Philosophy
   3 Raja-Yoga
   3 Prayers And Meditations
   3 Labyrinths
   3 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   3 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05
   3 Borges - Poems
   3 Bhakti-Yoga
   2 Words Of The Mother III
   2 Whitman - Poems
   2 Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo
   2 The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep
   2 The Red Book Liber Novus
   2 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   2 The Lotus Sutra
   2 The Ever-Present Origin
   2 The Bible
   2 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   2 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   2 On the Way to Supermanhood
   2 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 08
   2 Book of Certitude
   2 Agenda Vol 12


change font "color":
change "background-color":
change "font-family":
change "padding": 345652 site hits