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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
Enchiridion_text
Heart_of_Matter
Life_without_Death
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
On_Interpretation
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Sex_Ecology_Spirituality
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Practice_of_Magical_Evocation
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Tarot_of_Paul_Christian
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Yoga_Sutras
Toward_the_Future

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1955-10-26_-_The_Divine_and_the_universal_Teacher_-_The_power_of_the_Word_-_The_Creative_Word,_the_mantra_-_Sound,_music_in_other_worlds_-_The_domains_of_pure_form,_colour_and_ideas

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.01_-_The_Approach_to_Mysticism
00.02_-_Mystic_Symbolism
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Wellspring_of_Reality
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.04_-_The_Systems_of_Yoga
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.01_-_A_Yoga_of_the_Art_of_Life
01.02_-_Natures_Own_Yoga
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.04_-_The_Intuition_of_the_Age
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.07_-_Blaise_Pascal_(1623-1662)
01.07_-_The_Bases_of_Social_Reconstruction
01.09_-_The_Parting_of_the_Way
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.12_-_Goethe
01.12_-_Three_Degrees_of_Social_Organisation
0_1958-02-03b_-_The_Supramental_Ship
0_1958-10-04
0_1960-05-16
0_1961-01-22
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-01-27
0_1961-03-07
0_1961-04-07
0_1961-06-02
0_1961-06-27
0_1961-07-15
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-09-03
0_1961-11-05
0_1961-11-07
0_1962-03-11
0_1962-06-27
0_1962-07-04
0_1962-09-26
0_1962-10-06
0_1962-10-27
0_1962-11-27
0_1963-03-06
0_1963-03-16
0_1963-06-03
0_1963-06-19
0_1963-07-03
0_1963-07-06
0_1963-07-20
0_1963-07-31
0_1963-09-04
0_1963-10-19
0_1963-11-04
0_1964-01-22
0_1964-09-26
0_1964-09-30
0_1964-10-30
0_1965-03-03
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-03-24
0_1965-03-27
0_1965-05-19
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-02
0_1965-06-14
0_1965-07-21
0_1965-11-20
0_1965-12-18
0_1966-07-09
0_1966-07-30
0_1966-08-03
0_1967-01-14
0_1967-06-17
0_1967-07-22
0_1967-12-06
0_1969-07-12
0_1970-03-25
0_1971-07-10
0_1972-07-22
02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth
02.01_-_The_World_War
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_Rishi_Dirghatama
02.02_-_The_Message_of_the_Atomic_Bomb
02.03_-_An_Aspect_of_Emergent_Evolution
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.09_-_Two_Mystic_Poems_in_Modern_French
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.01_-_The_Malady_of_the_Century
03.02_-_The_Gradations_of_Consciousness__The_Gradation_of_Planes
03.02_-_The_Philosopher_as_an_Artist_and_Philosophy_as_an_Art
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.03_-_Modernism_-_An_Oriental_Interpretation
03.04_-_Towardsa_New_Ideology
03.05_-_Some_Conceptions_and_Misconceptions
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.08_-_The_Democracy_of_Tomorrow
03.10_-_Hamlet:_A_Crisis_of_the_Evolving_Soul
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
03.12_-_The_Spirit_of_Tapasya
03.17_-_The_Souls_Odyssey
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.02_-_Human_Progress
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.04_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.05_-_The_Freedom_and_the_Force_of_the_Spirit
04.06_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
05.01_-_Man_and_the_Gods
05.02_-_Physician,_Heal_Thyself
05.04_-_Of_Beauty_and_Ananda
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.05_-_Man_the_Prototype
05.05_-_Of_Some_Supreme_Mysteries
05.06_-_Physics_or_philosophy
05.06_-_The_Role_of_Evil
05.07_-_Man_and_Superman
05.07_-_The_Observer_and_the_Observed
05.11_-_The_Soul_of_a_Nation
05.28_-_God_Protects
05.31_-_Divine_Intervention
05.33_-_Caesar_versus_the_Divine
06.01_-_The_End_of_a_Civilisation
06.05_-_The_Story_of_Creation
06.06_-_Earth_a_Symbol
06.30_-_Sweet_Holy_Tears
06.33_-_The_Constants_of_the_Spirit
07.01_-_Realisation,_Past_and_Future
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.07_-_Freedom_and_Destiny
07.10_-_Diseases_and_Accidents
07.14_-_The_Divine_Suffering
07.20_-_Why_are_Dreams_Forgotten?
07.21_-_On_Occultism
07.32_-_The_Yogic_Centres
07.36_-_The_Body_and_the_Psychic
07.37_-_The_Psychic_Being,_Some_Mysteries
07.42_-_The_Nature_and_Destiny_of_Art
07.43_-_Music_Its_Origin_and_Nature
08.08_-_The_Mind_s_Bazaar
08.14_-_Poetry_and_Poetic_Inspiration
08.21_-_Human_Birth
08.28_-_Prayer_and_Aspiration
08.36_-_Buddha_and_Shankara
09.01_-_Prayer_and_Aspiration
09.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
09.11_-_The_Supramental_Manifestation_and_World_Change
09.18_-_The_Mother_on_Herself
10.02_-_Beyond_Vedanta
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
10.08_-_Consciousness_as_Freedom
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
10.10_-_Education_is_Organisation
1.017_-_The_Night_Journey
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine
1.01_-_The_Divine_and_The_Universe
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
10.24_-_Savitri
10.26_-_A_True_Professor
1.02_-_In_the_Beginning
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Human_Soul
1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial
10.32_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Five_Elements
10.33_-_On_Discipline
10.35_-_The_Moral_and_the_Spiritual
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.03_-_APPRENTICESHIP_AND_ENCULTURATION_-_ADOPTION_OF_A_SHARED_MAP
1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_Physical_Education
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Phenomenon_of_Man
1.03_-_The_Two_Negations_2_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Ascetic
1.03_-_The_Uncreated
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Future_of_Man
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_Wherefore_of_World?
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_The_Destiny_of_the_Individual
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.06_-_A_Summary_of_my_Phenomenological_View_of_the_World
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Desire_to_be
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_On_Dreams
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_The_Primary_Data_of_Being
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Synthesis_of_Movement
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_The_Absolute_Manifestation
1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
11.06_-_The_Mounting_Fire
11.07_-_The_Labours_of_the_Gods:_The_five_Purifications
11.09_-_Towards_the_Immortal_Body
1.10_-_The_Scolex_School
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
11.14_-_Our_Finest_Hour
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_The_Reason_as_Governor_of_Life
1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_The_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.14_-_The_Supermind_as_Creator
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_Truth
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED
12.02_-_The_Stress_of_the_Spirit
12.04_-_Love_and_Death
12.05_-_The_World_Tragedy
1.2.08_-_Faith
12.08_-_Notes_on_Freedom
1.2.1.06_-_Symbolism_and_Allegory
12.10_-_The_Sunlit_Path
1.28_-_Supermind,_Mind_and_the_Overmind_Maya
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
13.03_-_A_Programme_for_the_Second_Century_of_the_Divine_Manifestation
14.08_-_A_Parable_of_Sea-Gulls
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
1.60_-_Between_Heaven_and_Earth
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
1.72_-_Education
19.06_-_The_Wise
19.10_-_Punishment
1914_03_13p
1914_05_15p
1914_05_20p
1914_05_27p
1914_09_30p
1914_10_05p
1914_10_11p
1916_12_07p
1917_01_04p
19.18_-_On_Impurity
19.26_-_The_Brahmin
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1929-05-12_-_Beings_of_vital_world_(vampires)_-_Money_power_and_vital_beings_-_Capacity_for_manifestation_of_will_-_Entry_into_vital_world_-_Body,_a_protection_-_Individuality_and_the_vital_world
1929-06-23_-_Knowledge_of_the_Yogi_-_Knowledge_and_the_Supermind_-_Methods_of_changing_the_condition_of_the_body_-_Meditation,_aspiration,_sincerity
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1951-01-04_-_Transformation_and_reversal_of_consciousness.
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-01-20_-_Developing_the_mind._Misfortunes,_suffering;_developed_reason._Knowledge_and_pure_ideas.
1951-01-27_-_Sleep_-_desires_-_repression_-_the_subconscient._Dreams_-_the_super-conscient_-_solving_problems._Ladder_of_being_-_samadhi._Phases_of_sleep_-_silence,_true_rest._Vital_body_and_illness.
1951-02-08_-_Unifying_the_being_-_ideas_of_good_and_bad_-_Miracles_-_determinism_-_Supreme_Will_-_Distinguishing_the_voice_of_the_Divine
1951-02-15_-_Dreams,_symbolic_-_true_repose_-_False_visions_-_Earth-memory_and_history
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-24_-_Psychic_being_and_entity_-_dimensions_-_in_the_atom_-_Death_-_exteriorisation_-_unconsciousness_-_Past_lives_-_progress_upon_earth_-_choice_of_birth_-_Consecration_to_divine_Work_-_psychic_memories_-_Individualisation_-_progress
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-03-03_-_Hostile_forces_-_difficulties_-_Individuality_and_form_-_creation
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-03-10_-_Fairy_Tales-_serpent_guarding_treasure_-_Vital_beings-_their_incarnations_-_The_vital_being_after_death_-_Nightmares-_vital_and_mental_-_Mind_and_vital_after_death_-_The_spirit_of_the_form-_Egyptian_mummies
1951-03-12_-_Mental_forms_-_learning_difficult_subjects_-_Mental_fortress_-_thought_-_Training_the_mind_-_Helping_the_vital_being_after_death_-_ceremonies_-_Human_stupidities
1951-03-31_-_Physical_ailment_and_mental_disorder_-_Curing_an_illness_spiritually_-_Receptivity_of_the_body_-_The_subtle-physical-_illness_accidents_-_Curing_sunstroke_and_other_disorders
1951-04-02_-_Causes_of_accidents_-_Little_entities,_helpful_or_mischievous-_incidents
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1951-04-17_-_Unity,_diversity_-_Protective_envelope_-_desires_-_consciousness,_true_defence_-_Perfection_of_physical_-_cinema_-_Choice,_constant_and_conscious_-_law_of_ones_being_-_the_One,_the_Multiplicity_-_Civilization-_preparing_an_instrument
1951-05-14_-_Chance_-_the_play_of_forces_-_Peace,_given_and_lost_-_Abolishing_the_ego
1953-05-06
1953-05-27
1953-06-03
1953-06-10
1953-06-24
1953-07-01
1953-07-08
1953-07-22
1953-07-29
1953-08-05
1953-09-09
1953-09-16
1953-09-23
1953-09-30
1953-10-14
1953-11-18
1953-11-25
1954-03-03_-_Occultism_-_A_French_scientists_experiment
1954-04-07_-_Communication_without_words_-_Uneven_progress_-_Words_and_the_Word
1954-05-19_-_Affection_and_love_-_Psychic_vision_Divine_-_Love_and_receptivity_-_Get_out_of_the_ego
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-08-18_-_Mahalakshmi_-_Maheshwari_-_Mahasaraswati_-_Determinism_and_freedom_-_Suffering_and_knowledge_-_Aspects_of_the_Mother
1954-09-08_-_Hostile_forces_-_Substance_-_Concentration_-_Changing_the_centre_of_thought_-_Peace
1954-09-15_-_Parts_of_the_being_-_Thoughts_and_impulses_-_The_subconscient_-_Precise_vocabulary_-_The_Grace_and_difficulties
1954-10-06_-_What_happens_is_for_the_best_-_Blaming_oneself_-Experiences_-_The_vital_desire-soul_-Creating_a_spiritual_atmosphere_-Thought_and_Truth
1954-10-20_-_Stand_back_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Seeing_images_in_meditation_-_Berlioz_-Music_-_Mothers_organ_music_-_Destiny
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-29_-_Difficulties_and_the_world_-_The_experience_the_psychic_being_wants_-_After_death_-Ignorance
1955-03-09_-_Psychic_directly_contacted_through_the_physical_-_Transforming_egoistic_movements_-_Work_of_the_psychic_being_-_Contacting_the_psychic_and_the_Divine_-_Experiences_of_different_kinds_-_Attacks_of_adverse_forces
1955-04-13_-_Psychoanalysts_-_The_underground_super-ego,_dreams,_sleep,_control_-_Archetypes,_Overmind_and_higher_-_Dream_of_someone_dying_-_Integral_repose,_entering_Sachchidananda_-_Organising_ones_life,_concentration,_repose
1955-04-27_-_Symbolic_dreams_and_visions_-_Curing_pain_by_various_methods_-_Different_states_of_consciousness_-_Seeing_oneself_dead_in_a_dream_-_Exteriorisation
1955-05-18_-_The_Problem_of_Woman_-_Men_and_women_-_The_Supreme_Mother,_the_new_creation_-_Gods_and_goddesses_-_A_story_of_Creation,_earth_-_Psychic_being_only_on_earth,_beings_everywhere_-_Going_to_other_worlds_by_occult_means
1955-05-25_-_Religion_and_reason_-_true_role_and_field_-_an_obstacle_to_or_minister_of_the_Spirit_-_developing_and_meaning_-_Learning_how_to_live,_the_elite_-_Reason_controls_and_organises_life_-_Nature_is_infrarational
1955-06-01_-_The_aesthetic_conscience_-_Beauty_and_form_-_The_roots_of_our_life_-_The_sense_of_beauty_-_Educating_the_aesthetic_sense,_taste_-_Mental_constructions_based_on_a_revelation_-_Changing_the_world_and_humanity
1955-06-29_-_The_true_vital_and_true_physical_-_Time_and_Space_-_The_psychics_memory_of_former_lives_-_The_psychic_organises_ones_life_-_The_psychics_knowledge_and_direction
1955-07-06_-_The_psychic_and_the_central_being_or_jivatman_-_Unity_and_multiplicity_in_the_Divine_-_Having_experiences_and_the_ego_-_Mental,_vital_and_physical_exteriorisation_-_Imagination_has_a_formative_power_-_The_function_of_the_imagination
1955-07-20_-_The_Impersonal_Divine_-_Surrender_to_the_Divine_brings_perfect_freedom_-_The_Divine_gives_Himself_-_The_principle_of_the_inner_dimensions_-_The_paths_of_aspiration_and_surrender_-_Linear_and_spherical_paths_and_realisations
1955-08-17_-_Vertical_ascent_and_horizontal_opening_-_Liberation_of_the_psychic_being_-_Images_for_discovery_of_the_psychic_being_-_Sadhana_to_contact_the_psychic_being
1955-10-26_-_The_Divine_and_the_universal_Teacher_-_The_power_of_the_Word_-_The_Creative_Word,_the_mantra_-_Sound,_music_in_other_worlds_-_The_domains_of_pure_form,_colour_and_ideas
1955-11-09_-_Personal_effort,_egoistic_mind_-_Man_is_like_a_public_square_-_Natures_work_-_Ego_needed_for_formation_of_individual_-_Adverse_forces_needed_to_make_man_sincere_-_Determinisms_of_different_planes,_miracles
1955-11-23_-_One_reality,_multiple_manifestations_-_Integral_Yoga,_approach_by_all_paths_-_The_supreme_man_and_the_divine_man_-_Miracles_and_the_logic_of_events
1955-12-14_-_Rejection_of_life_as_illusion_in_the_old_Yogas_-_Fighting_the_adverse_forces_-_Universal_and_individual_being_-_Three_stages_in_Integral_Yoga_-_How_to_feel_the_Divine_Presence_constantly
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
1956-07-04_-_Aspiration_when_one_sees_a_shooting_star_-_Preparing_the_bodyn_making_it_understand_-_Getting_rid_of_pain_and_suffering_-_Psychic_light
1956-07-11_-_Beauty_restored_to_its_priesthood_-_Occult_worlds,_occult_beings_-_Difficulties_and_the_supramental_force
1956-08-22_-_The_heaven_of_the_liberated_mind_-_Trance_or_samadhi_-_Occult_discipline_for_leaving_consecutive_bodies_-_To_be_greater_than_ones_experience_-_Total_self-giving_to_the_Grace_-_The_truth_of_the_being_-_Unique_relation_with_the_Supreme
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1956-09-05_-_Material_life,_seeing_in_the_right_way_-_Effect_of_the_Supermind_on_the_earth_-_Emergence_of_the_Supermind_-_Falling_back_into_the_same_mistaken_ways
1956-10-24_-_Taking_a_new_body_-_Different_cases_of_incarnation_-_Departure_of_soul_from_body
1956-11-07_-_Thoughts_created_by_forces_of_universal_-_Mind_Our_own_thought_hardly_exists_-_Idea,_origin_higher_than_mind_-_The_Synthesis_of_Yoga,_effect_of_reading
1956-11-21_-_Knowings_and_Knowledge_-_Reason,_summit_of_mans_mental_activities_-_Willings_and_the_true_will_-_Personal_effort_-_First_step_to_have_knowledge_-_Relativity_of_medical_knowledge_-_Mental_gymnastics_make_the_mind_supple
1957-01-02_-_Can_one_go_out_of_time_and_space?_-_Not_a_crucified_but_a_glorified_body_-_Individual_effort_and_the_new_force
1957-06-19_-_Causes_of_illness_Fear_and_illness_-_Minds_working,_faith_and_illness
1958-01-22_-_Intellectual_theories_-_Expressing_a_living_and_real_Truth
1958-02-05_-_The_great_voyage_of_the_Supreme_-_Freedom_and_determinism
1958-02-12_-_Psychic_progress_from_life_to_life_-_The_earth,_the_place_of_progress
1958-03-05_-_Vibrations_and_words_-_Power_of_thought,_the_gift_of_tongues
1958-06-25_-_Sadhana_in_the_body
1958-07-30_-_The_planchette_-_automatic_writing_-_Proofs_and_knowledge
1958-08-27_-_Meditation_and_imagination_-_From_thought_to_idea,_from_idea_to_principle
1958-09-03_-_How_to_discipline_the_imagination_-_Mental_formations
1958_09_19
1958_09_26
1958-11-05_-_Knowing_how_to_be_silent
1960_01_05
1961_01_28
1962_02_27
1962_10_06
1963_03_06
1963_05_15
1963_11_04
1964_03_25
1965_03_03
1965_05_29
1966_07_06
1969_08_09
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1.fs_-_Melancholy_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.jk_-_Answer_To_A_Sonnet_By_J.H.Reynolds
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_IV
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_In_Answer_To_A_Sonnet_By_J._H._Reynolds
1.lovecraft_-_An_American_To_Mother_England
1.lovecraft_-_Revelation
1.lovecraft_-_To_Edward_John_Moreton_Drax_Plunkelt,
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Supposed_To_Be_An_Epithalamium_Of_Francis_Ravaillac_And_Charlotte_Corday
1.pbs_-_Love-_Hope,_Desire,_And_Fear
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_The_Irishmans_Song
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.rwe_-_Hamatreya
1.rwe_-_Lover's_Petition
1.rwe_-_The_Titmouse
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Exposition
1.ww_-_1-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_7-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_A_Morning_Exercise
1.ww_-_A_Parsonage_In_Oxfordshire
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Fourth_[Summer_Vacation]
1.ww_-_Book_Ninth_[Residence_in_France]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_X._Rob_Roys_Grave
1.ww_-_Stanzas
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_I-_Dedication-_To_the_Right_Hon.William,_Earl_of_Lonsdalee,_K.G.
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IX-_Book_Eighth-_The_Parsonage
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Horn_Of_Egremont_Castle
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_First
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_(John_Dyer)
1.ww_-_Water-Fowl_Observed_Frequently_Over_The_Lakes_Of_Rydal_And_Grasmere
1.ww_-_When_To_The_Attractions_Of_The_Busy_World
1.ww_-_Written_In_Germany_On_One_Of_The_Coldest_Days_Of_The_Century
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_The_Attributes_of_Omega_Point_-_a_Transcendent_God
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Monstrance
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.04_-_ON_PRIESTS
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.10_-_Conclusion
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.12_-_The_Realisation_of_Sachchidananda
2.1.2_-_The_Vital_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_Reality_and_the_Integral_Knowledge
2.17_-_The_Masculine_Feminine_World
2.18_-_The_Evolutionary_Process_-_Ascent_and_Integration
2.2.03_-_The_Science_of_Consciousness
22.05_-_On_The_Brink(2)
2.20_-_Chance
2.20_-_The_Infancy_and_Maturity_of_ZO,_Father_and_Mother,_Israel_The_Ancient_and_Understanding
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.23_-_Supermind_and_Overmind
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.3.01_-_The_Planes_or_Worlds_of_Consciousness
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient
24.05_-_Vision_of_Dante
29.03_-_In_Her_Company
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.06_-_The_Poet_and_The_Seer
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
3.01_-_Natural_Morality
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Soul_in_the_Soul_World_after_Death
3.03_-_Faith_and_the_Divine_Grace
3.03_-_On_Thought_-_II
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.06_-_The_Sage
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.03_-_The_Trinity_of_Bengal
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
31.06_-_Jagadish_Chandra_Bose
31.07_-_Shyamakanta
31.10_-_East_and_West
32.01_-_Where_is_God?
32.03_-_In_This_Crisis
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
34.01_-_Hymn_To_Indra
34.06_-_Hymn_to_Sindhu
34.07_-_The_Bride_of_Brahman
3.4.1_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3-5_Full_Circle
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
38.02_-_Hymns_and_Prayers
4.01_-_Conclusion_-_My_intellectual_position
4.01_-_Prayers_and_Meditations
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_The_Presence_of_God_in_the_World
4.02_-_Autobiographical_Evidence
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_Humanity_in_Progress
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.13_-_The_Action_of_Equality
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti
4.2.03_-_The_Birth_of_Sin
4.21_-_The_Gradations_of_the_supermind
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.01_-_On_the_Mysteries_of_the_Ascent_towards_God
5.01_-_Proem
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.08_-_Supermind_and_Mind_of_Light
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
Aeneid
Apology
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
DS4
ENNEAD_01.03_-_Of_Dialectic,_or_the_Means_of_Raising_the_Soul_to_the_Intelligible_World.
ENNEAD_01.06_-_Of_Beauty.
ENNEAD_01.08_-_Of_the_Nature_and_Origin_of_Evils.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_03.09_-_Fragments_About_the_Soul,_the_Intelligence,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_04.02_-_How_the_Soul_Mediates_Between_Indivisible_and_Divisible_Essence.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.06a_-_Of_Sensation_and_Memory.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.08_-_Of_the_Will_of_the_One.
Euthyphro
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Maps_of_Meaning_text
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1913_12_28
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time

PRIMARY CLASS

Place
SIMILAR TITLES
domain
Public Domain
Public Domain Day (copyright)

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

domain ::: 1. A sphere of activity, concern, or function; a field. 2. A region characterized by a specific feature, type of growth or wildlife, etc. domains.

domain ::: 1. (mathematics) In the theory of functions, the set of argument values for which a function is defined.See domain theory.2. (networking) A group of computers whose hostnames share a common suffix, the domain name. The last component of this is the top-level domain.See administrative domain, Domain Name System, fully qualified domain name.3. Distributed Operating Multi Access Interactive Network.4. (programming) A specific phase of the software life cycle in which a developer works. Domains define developers' and users' areas of responsibility and the scope of possible relationships between products.5. The subject or market in which a piece of software is designed to work. (1997-12-26)

domain 1. "networking" A group of computers whose {fully qualified domain names} (FQDN) share a common suffix, the "domain name". The {Domain Name System} maps {hostnames} to {Internet address} using a hierarchical {namespace} where each level in the hierarchy contributes one component to the FQDN. For example, the computer foldoc.doc.ic.ac.uk is in the doc.ic.ac.uk domain, which is in the ic.ac.uk domain, which is in the ac.uk domain, which is in the uk {top-level domain}. A domain name can contain up to 67 characters including the dots that separate components. These can be letters, numbers and hyphens. 2. An {administrative domain} is something to do with {routing}. 3. {Distributed Operating Multi Access Interactive Network}. 4. "mathematics" In the theory of functions, the set of argument values for which a {function} is defined. See {domain theory}. 5. "programming" A specific phase of the {software life cycle} in which a developer works. Domains define developers' and users' areas of responsibility and the scope of possible relationships between products. 6. The subject or market in which a piece of software is designed to work. (2007-10-01)

domain address "networking" The name of a {host} on the {Internet} belonging to the {hierarchy} of Internet {domains}. (1994-10-27)

domain address ::: (networking) The name of a host on the Internet belonging to the hierarchy of Internet domains. (1994-10-27)

domain architecture "systems analysis" A generic, organisational structure or design for software systems in a {domain}. The domain architecture contains the designs that are intended to satisfy requirements specified in the {domain model}. A domain architecture can be adapted to create designs for software systems within a domain and also provides a framework for configuring {assets} within individual software systems. (1997-12-26)

domain architecture ::: (systems analysis) A generic, organisational structure or design for software systems in a domain. The domain architecture contains the designs that domain and also provides a framework for configuring assets within individual software systems. (1997-12-26)

domain calculus "database" A form of {relational calculus} in which {scalar} variables take values drawn from a given {domain}. Examples of the domain calculus are {ILL}, {FQL}, {DEDUCE} and the well known {Query By Example} (QBE). {INGRES} is a {relational DBMS} whose {DML} is based on the relational calculus.

domain calculus ::: (database) A form of relational calculus in which scalar variables take values drawn from a given domain.Examples of the domain calculus are ILL, FQL, DEDUCE and the well known Query By Example (QBE). INGRES is a relational DBMS whose DML is based on the relational calculus.

domain engineering ::: (systems analysis) 1. The development and evolution of domain specific knowledge and artifacts to support the development and evolution of systems in the domain. Domain engineering includes engineering of domain models, components, methods and tools and may also include asset management.2. The engineering process of analysing and modelling a domain, designing and modelling a generic solution architecture for a product line within that domain, implementing and using reusable components of that architecture and maintaining and evolving the domain, architecture and implementation models.3. A reuse-based approach to defining the scope (domain definition), specifying the structure (domain architecture) and building the Assets (requirements, applications. Domain engineering can include domain definition, domain analysis, developing the domain architecture domain implementation.

domain engineering "systems analysis" 1. The development and evolution of {domain} specific knowledge and artifacts to support the development and evolution of systems in the domain. Domain engineering includes engineering of {domain models}, components, methods and tools and may also include {asset management}. 2. The engineering process of analysing and modelling a domain, designing and modelling a generic solution architecture for a product line within that domain, implementing and using reusable components of that architecture and maintaining and evolving the domain, architecture and implementation models. 3. A reuse-based approach to defining the scope ({domain definition}), specifying the structure ({domain architecture}) and building the Assets (requirements, designs, software code, documentation) for a class of systems, subsystems or applications. Domain engineering can include domain definition, domain analysis, developing the domain architecture domain implementation.

domain handle "networking" Information held by a {domain name} registrar about a registrant (the person or organisation that owns the name). Typically the registrar stores one copy of this information and refers to that copy for each additional domain registered by the same person. The information would include basic contact details: name, e-mail address, etc. and billing information. Some of this information would be used to populate the {whois} database entry for a domain. {(http://www.easyname.eu/support/domains/20-what-is-a-domain-handle)}. (2009-09-17)

domainist "jargon" /doh-mayn'ist/ 1. Said of a domain address (as opposed to a {bang path}) because the part to the right of the "@" specifies a nested series of "domains"; for example, esr@snark.thyrsus.com specifies the machine called snark in the subdomain called thyrsus within the top-level domain called com. See also {big-endian}. 2. Said of a site, mailer or routing program which knows how to handle domainist addresses. 3. Said of a person (especially a site admin) who prefers domain addressing, supports a domainist mailer, or proselytises for domainist addressing and disdains {bang paths}. This term is now (1993) semi-obsolete, as most sites have converted. [{Jargon File}] (1995-04-21)

domainist ::: (jargon) /doh-mayn'ist/ 1. Said of a domain address (as opposed to a bang path) because the part to the right of the @ specifies a nested series of in the subdomain called thyrsus within the top-level domain called com. See also big-endian.2. Said of a site, mailer or routing program which knows how to handle domainist addresses.3. Said of a person (especially a site admin) who prefers domain addressing, supports a domainist mailer, or proselytises for domainist addressing and disdains bang paths. This term is now (1993) semi-obsolete, as most sites have converted.[Jargon File] (1995-04-21)

domain maturity "systems analysis" The level of stability and depth of understanding that has been achieved in an area for which {applications} are developed. (1997-12-26)

domain maturity ::: (systems analysis) The level of stability and depth of understanding that has been achieved in an area for which applications are developed. (1997-12-26)

domain model ::: (systems analysis) 1. A definition of the functions, objects, data, requirements, relationships and variations in a particular domain.2. A product of domain analysis which provides a representation of the requirements of the domain. The domain model identifies and describes the Domain Model describes commonalities and variabilities among requirements for software systems in the domain. (1997-12-26)

domain model "systems analysis" 1. A definition of the functions, objects, data, requirements, relationships and variations in a particular {domain}. 2. A product of {domain analysis} which provides a representation of the requirements of the domain. The domain model identifies and describes the structure of data, flow of information, functions, constraints and controls within the Domain that are included in software systems in the domain. The Domain Model describes commonalities and variabilities among requirements for software systems in the domain. (1997-12-26)

domain name {fully qualified domain name}

domain ::: n. --> Dominion; empire; authority.
The territory over which dominion or authority is exerted; the possessions of a sovereign or commonwealth, or the like. Also used figuratively.
Landed property; estate; especially, the land about the mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne.
Ownership of land; an estate or patrimony which one has in his own right; absolute proprietorship; paramount or sovereign


domain selection "systems analysis" The prioritisation and selection of one or more {domains} for which specific {software reuse} engineering projects are to be initiated. (1997-12-26)

domain selection ::: (systems analysis) The prioritisation and selection of one or more domains for which specific software reuse engineering projects are to be initiated. (1997-12-26)

domains (Heaven and Hell). [Rf. Ambelain, La

domain-specific language "language" A machine-processable language whose terms are derived from a {domain model} and that is used for the definition of components or software architectures supporting that domain. A domain-specific language is often used as input to an application generator. (1997-12-26)

domain-specific language ::: (language) A machine-processable language whose terms are derived from a domain model and that is used for the definition of components or software architectures supporting that domain. A domain-specific language is often used as input to an application generator. (1997-12-26)

domain squatter "web" An unscrupulous person who registers a {domain name} in the hope of selling it to the rightful, expected owner at a profit. E.g. {(http://foldoc.com/)}. (2007-07-15)

domain theory ::: (theory) A branch of mathematics introduced by Dana Scott in 1970 as a mathematical theory of programming languages, and for nearly a quarter of a century developed almost exclusively in connection with denotational semantics in computer science.In denotational semantics of programming languages, the meaning of a program is taken to be an element of a domain. A domain is a mathematical structure consisting of a set of values (or points) and an ordering relation, = on those values. Domain theory is the study of such structures.(= is written in LaTeX as \subseteq)Different domains correspond to the different types of object with which a program deals. In a language containing functions, we might have a domain X -> Y functions or applications of functions to other functions. To represent the meaning of such programs, we must solve the recursive equation over domains, D = D -> D equivalent equation has no non-trivial solution in set theory.There are many definitions of domains, with different properties and suitable for different purposes. One commonly used definition is that of Scott domains, often simply called domains, which are omega-algebraic, consistently complete CPOs.There are domain-theoretic computational models in other branches of mathematics including dynamical systems, fractals, measure theory, integration theory, probability theory, and stochastic processes.See also abstract interpretation, bottom, pointed domain. (1999-12-09)

domain theory "theory" A branch of mathematics introduced by Dana Scott in 1970 as a mathematical theory of programming languages, and for nearly a quarter of a century developed almost exclusively in connection with {denotational semantics} in computer science. In {denotational semantics} of programming languages, the meaning of a program is taken to be an element of a domain. A domain is a mathematical structure consisting of a set of values (or "points") and an ordering relation, "= on those values. Domain theory is the study of such structures. (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\subseteq}) Different domains correspond to the different types of object with which a program deals. In a language containing functions, we might have a domain X -" Y which is the set of functions from domain X to domain Y with the ordering f "= g iff for all x in X, f x "= g x. In the {pure lambda-calculus} all objects are functions or {applications} of functions to other functions. To represent the meaning of such programs, we must solve the {recursive} equation over domains, D = D -" D which states that domain D is ({isomorphic} to) some {function space} from D to itself. I.e. it is a {fixed point} D = F(D) for some operator F that takes a domain D to D -" D. The equivalent equation has no non-trivial solution in {set theory}. There are many definitions of domains, with different properties and suitable for different purposes. One commonly used definition is that of Scott domains, often simply called domains, which are {omega-algebraic}, {consistently complete} {CPOs}. There are domain-theoretic computational models in other branches of mathematics including {dynamical systems}, {fractals}, {measure theory}, {integration theory}, {probability theory}, and {stochastic processes}. See also {abstract interpretation}, {bottom}, {pointed domain}. (1999-12-09)

domain: The set of values as arguments for a function for which the values are defined.

Domain Analysis "systems analysis" 1. Determining the operations, data objects, properties and {abstractions} appropriate for designing solutions to problems in a given {domain}. 2. The {domain engineering} activity in which domain knowledge is studied and formalised as a domain definition and a domain specification. A {software reuse} approach that involves combining software components, subsystems, etc., into a single application system. 3. The process of identifying, collecting organising, analysing and representing a {domain model} and software architecture from the study of existing systems, underlying theory, emerging technology and development histories within the domain of interest. 4. The analysis of systems within a domain to discover commonalities and differences among them. (1997-12-26)

Domain Analysis ::: (systems analysis) 1. Determining the operations, data objects, properties and abstractions appropriate for designing solutions to problems in a given domain.2. The domain engineering activity in which domain knowledge is studied and formalised as a domain definition and a domain specification. A software reuse approach that involves combining software components, subsystems, etc., into a single application system.3. The process of identifying, collecting organising, analysing and representing a domain model and software architecture from the study of existing systems, underlying theory, emerging technology and development histories within the domain of interest.4. The analysis of systems within a domain to discover commonalities and differences among them. (1997-12-26)

Domain Architecture Model "systems analysis" A set of software architectures generic to a {domain} that define organising frameworks for constructing new application designs and implementations within the domain, consistent with the domain requirements model. (1997-12-26)

Domain Architecture Model ::: (systems analysis) A set of software architectures generic to a domain that define organising frameworks for constructing new application designs and implementations within the domain, consistent with the domain requirements model. (1997-12-26)

Domain Name Server "spelling" {Domain Name System}. (1997-12-15)

Domain Name Server ::: (spelling) Domain Name System. (1997-12-15)

Domain Name System "networking" (DNS) A general-purpose distributed, replicated, data query service chiefly used on {Internet} for translating {hostnames} into {Internet addresses}. Also, the style of {hostname} used on the Internet, though such a name is properly called a {fully qualified domain name}. DNS can be configured to use a sequence of name servers, based on the domains in the name being looked for, until a match is found. The name resolution client (e.g. Unix's gethostbyname() library function) can be configured to search for host information in the following order: first in the local {hosts file}, second in {NIS} and third in DNS. This sequencing of Naming Services is sometimes called "name service switching". Under {Solaris} is configured in the file /etc/nsswitch.conf. DNS can be queried interactively using the command {nslookup}. It is defined in {STD 13}, {RFC 1034}, {RFC 1035}, {RFC 1591}. {BIND} is a common DNS server. {Info from Virtual Office, Inc. (http://virtual.office.com/domains.html)}. (2001-05-14)

Domain Name System ::: (networking) (DNS) A general-purpose distributed, replicated, data query service chiefly used on Internet for translating hostnames into Internet sequence of name servers, based on the domains in the name being looked for, until a match is found.The name resolution client (e.g. Unix's gethostbyname() library function) can be configured to search for host information in the following order: first in the Services is sometimes called name service switching. Under Solaris is configured in the file /etc/nsswitch.conf.DNS can be queried interactively using the command nslookup. It is defined in STD 13, RFC 1034, RFC 1035, RFC 1591.BIND is a common DNS server. .(2001-05-14)

Domain Software Engineering Environment "programming" (DSEE) A proprietary {CASE} framework and {configuration management} system from {Apollo}. (1996-05-29)

Domain Software Engineering Environment ::: (programming) (DSEE) A proprietary CASE framework and configuration management system from Apollo. (1996-05-29)


TERMS ANYWHERE

100BaseVG "networking" A 100 {MBps} {Ethernet} standard specified to run over four pairs of {category 3} {UTP} wires (known as voice grade, hence the "VG"). It is also called 100VG-AnyLAN because it was defined to carry both {Ethernet} and {token ring} {frame} types. 100BaseVG was originally proposed by {Hewlett-Packard}, ratified by the {ISO} in 1995 and practically extinct by 1998. 100BaseVG started in the IEEE 802.3u committee as {Fast Ethernet}. One faction wanted to keep {CSMA/CD} in order to keep it pure Ethernet, even though the {collision domain} problem limited the distances to one tenth that of {10baseT}. Another faction wanted to change to a polling architecture from the hub (they called it "demand priority") in order to maintain the 10baseT distances, and also to make it a {deterministic} {protocol}. The CSMA/CD crowd said, "This is 802.3 -- the Ethernet committee. If you guys want to make a different protocol, form your own committee". The IEEE 802.12 committee was thus formed and standardised 100BaseVG. The rest is history. (1998-06-30)

8. ALGEBRA OF RELATIONS or algebra of relatives deals with relations (q. v.) in extension whose domains and converse domains are each contained in a fixed universe of discourse (which must be a class having at least two members), in a way similar to that in which the algebra of classes deals with classes. Fundamental ideas involved are those of the universal relation and the null relation; the relations of identity and diversity; the contrary and the converse of a relation; the logical sum, the logical product, the relative sum, and the relative product of two relations.

9PAC "tool" 709 PACkage. A {report generator} for the {IBM 7090}, developed in 1959. [Sammet 1969, p.314. "IBM 7090 Prog Sys, SHARE 7090 9PAC Part I: Intro and Gen Princs", IBM J28-6166, White Plains, 1961]. (1995-02-07):-) {emoticon}; {semicolon}" {less than}"g" "chat" grin. An alternative to {smiley}. [{Jargon File}] (1998-01-18)"gr&d" "chat" Grinning, running and ducking. See {emoticon}. (1995-03-17)= {equals}" {greater than}? {question mark}?? "programming" A {Perl} quote-like {operator} used to delimit a {regular expression} (RE) like "?FOO?" that matches FOO at most once. The normal "/FOO/" form of regular expression will match FOO any number of times. The "??" operator will match again after a call to the "reset" operator. The operator is usually referred to as "??" but, taken literally, an empty RE like this (or "//") actually means to re-use the last successfully matched regular expression or, if there was none, empty string (which will always match). {Unix manual page}: perlop(1). (2009-05-28)@ {commercial at}@-party "event, history" /at'par-tee/ (Or "@-sign party") An antiquated term for a gathering of {hackers} at a science-fiction convention (especially the annual Worldcon) to which only people who had an {electronic mail address} were admitted. The term refers to the {commercial at} symbol, "@", in an e-mail address and dates back to the era when having an e-mail address was a distinguishing characteristic of the select few who worked with computers. Compare {boink}. [{Jargon File}] (2012-11-17)@Begin "text" The {Scribe} equivalent of {\begin}. [{Jargon File}] (2014-11-06)@stake "security, software" A computer security development group and consultancy dedicated to researching and documenting security flaws that exist in {operating systems}, {network} {protocols}, or software. @stake publishes information about security flaws through advisories, research reports, and tools. They release the information and tools to help system administrators, users, and software and hardware vendors better secure their systems. L0pht merged with @stake in January 2000. {@stake home (http://atstake.com/research/redirect.html)}. (2003-06-12)@XX "programming" 1. Part of the syntax of a {decorated name}, as used internally by {Microsoft}'s {Visual C} or {Visual C++} {compilers}. 2. The name of an example {instance variable} in the {Ruby} {programming language}. (2018-08-24)[incr Tcl] "language" An extension of {Tcl} that adds {classes} and {inheritence}. The name is a pun on {C++} - an {object-oriented} extension of {C} - [incr variable] is the Tcl {syntax} for adding one to a variable. [Origin? Availability?] (1998-11-27)\ {backslash}\begin "text, chat" The {LaTeX} command used with \end to delimit an environment within which the text is formatted in a certain way. E.g. \begin{table}...\end{table}. Used humorously in writing to indicate a context or to remark on the surrounded text. For example: \begin{flame} Predicate logic is the only good programming language. Anyone who would use anything else is an idiot. Also, all computers should be tredecimal instead of binary. \end{flame} {Scribe} users at {CMU} and elsewhere used to use @Begin/@End in an identical way (LaTeX was built to resemble Scribe). On {Usenet}, this construct would more frequently be rendered as ""FLAME ON"" and ""FLAME OFF"" (a la {HTML}), or "

abstract interpretation "theory" A partial execution of a program which gains information about its {semantics} (e.g. control structure, flow of information) without performing all the calculations. Abstract interpretation is typically used by compilers to analyse programs in order to decide whether certain optimisations or transformations are applicable. The objects manipulated by the program (typically values and functions) are represented by points in some {domain}. Each abstract domain point represents some set of real ("{concrete}") values. For example, we may take the abstract points "+", "0" and "-" to represent positive, zero and negative numbers and then define an abstract version of the multiplication operator, *

abstract interpretation ::: (theory) A partial execution of a program which gains information about its semantics (e.g. control structure, flow of information) without performing analyse programs in order to decide whether certain optimisations or transformations are applicable.The objects manipulated by the program (typically values and functions) are represented by points in some domain. Each abstract domain point represents some set of real (concrete) values.For example, we may take the abstract points +, 0 and - to represent positive, zero and negative numbers and then define an abstract version of the multiplication operator, *

across ihc border s\hcrc the espcricncc of spiritualised mind ceases and the unmodified divine Consciousness begins the domain of the supreme Nature, Para PraJcriti. It is that Light of which the Vedte mj-slics got a glimpse and it is the opposite of the intervening darkness of the Christian mystics, for the

AD {Administrative Domain}

ADDD "tool" A Depository of Development Documents. A {public domain} Software Engineering Environment from {GMD} developed as part of the {STONE} project. (1995-02-03)

ADDD ::: (tool) A Depository of Development Documents.A public domain Software Engineering Environment from GMD developed as part of the STONE project. (1995-02-03)

ADMD {Administration Management Domain}

Administration Management Domain ::: (networking) (ADMD) An X.400 Message Handling System public service carrier. The ADMDs in all countries worldwide together provide the X.400 backbone. Examples: MCImail and ATTmail in the U.S., British Telecom Gold400mail in the U.K.See also PRMD.[RFC 1208]. (1997-05-07)

Administration Management Domain "networking" (ADMD) An {X.400} {Message Handling System} {public service carrier}. The ADMDs in all countries worldwide together provide the X.400 {backbone}. Examples: {MCImail} and {ATTmail} in the U.S., {British Telecom} {Gold400mail} in the U.K. See also {PRMD}. [RFC 1208]. (1997-05-07)

Administrative Domain "networking" (AD) A collection of {hosts} and {routers}, and the interconnecting network(s), managed by a single {administrative authority}. (1994-11-24)

Administrative Domain ::: (networking) (AD) A collection of hosts and routers, and the interconnecting network(s), managed by a single administrative authority. (1994-11-24)

Advanced Communication Function/Network Control Program "networking" (ACF/NCP, usually called just "NCP") The primary {SNA} {network control program}, one of the {ACF} products. ACF/NCP resides in the {communications controller} and interfaces with {ACF/VTAM} in the {host processor} to control network communications. NCP can also communicate with multiple {hosts} using {local channel} or remote links ({PU} type 5 or PU type 4) thus enabling cross {domain} application communication. In a multiple {mainframe} SNA environment, any terminal or application can access any other application on any host using cross domain logon. See also {Emulator program}. [Communication or Communications?] (1999-01-29)

Advanced Communication Function/Network Control Program ::: (networking) (ACF/NCP, usually called just NCP) The primary SNA network control program, one of the ACF products. ACF/NCP resides in the communications controller and interfaces with ACF/VTAM in the host processor to control network communications.NCP can also communicate with multiple hosts using local channel or remote links (PU type 5 or PU type 4) thus enabling cross domain application communication. In a multiple mainframe SNA environment, any terminal or application can access any other application on any host using cross domain logon.See also Emulator program.[Communication or Communications?] (1999-01-29)

Aether, Ether (Greek) [from aitho shining, fire] The upper or purer air as opposed to aer, the lower air; the clear sky; the abode of the gods. In Classical antiquity it denoted primordial substance, Proteus or protyle, the unitary source both of all substances and energies, the mask of all kosmic phenomena. Often used loosely to embrace a domain which extends from the All-Father himself down to the atmosphere of our earth. Vergil speaks of “Jupiter omnipotens aether,” and Cicero describes aether as the ultimate zone of heaven encircling, embracing, and permeating all things. At one time a member of the pantheon and object of veneration, at another the quest of the alchemist in search of the “absolute element” which would give him power over nature, and finally a hypothetical medium of science for conveying light waves.

A formula of the pure functional calculus of first order which contains no free individual variables is said to be satisfiable if it is possible to determine the underlying non-empty domain of individuals and to give meanings to the propositional and functional variables contained -- namely to each propositional variable a meaning as a particular proposition and to each n-adic functional variable a meaning as an n-adic propositional function of individuals (of the domain in question) -- in such a way that (under the accepted meanings of the sentential connectives, the quantifiers, and application of function to argument) the formula becomes true. The meaning of the last word, even for abstract, not excluding infinite, domains, must be presupposed -- a respect in which this definition differs sharply from most others made in this article.

(a) In metaphysics: Theory which admits in any given domain, two independent and mutually irreducible substances e.g. the Platonic dualism of the sensible and intelligible worlds, the Cartesian dinlism of thinking and extended substances, the Leibnizian dualism of the actual and possible worlds, the Kantian dualism of the noumenal and the phenomenal. The term dualism first appeared in Thomas Hyde, Historia religionis veterum Persarum (1700) ch. IX, p. 164, where it applied to religious dualism of good and evil and is similarly employed by Bayle m his Dictionary article "Zoroaster" and by Leibniz in Theodicee. C. Wolff is responsible for its use in the psycho-physical sense, (cf. A. Lalande, Vocabulaire de la Philosophie. Vol. I, p. 180, note by R. Eucken.)

algebraic "theory" In {domain theory}, a {complete partial order} is algebraic if every element is the {least upper bound} of some {chain} of {compact} elements. If the set of compact elements is {countable} it is called {omega-algebraic}. [Significance?] (1995-04-25)

algebraic ::: (theory) In domain theory, a complete partial order is algebraic if every element is the least upper bound of some chain of compact elements. If the set of compact elements is countable it is called omega-algebraic.[Significance?] (1995-04-25)

Amal: “‘The garden of the Spouse’ is the psychic domain of love.

Amal: “‘The garden of the Spouse’ is the psychic domain of love.”

amateur packet radio ::: (communications) (PR) The use of packet radio by amateurs to communicate between computers. PR is a complete amateur radio computer network with digipeaters (relays), mailboxes (BBS) and other special nodes.In Germany, it is on HF, say, 2m (300 and 1200 BPS), 70cm (1200 to 9600 BPS), 23cm (normally 9600 BPS and up, currently most links between digipeaters) and higher frequencies. There is a KW (short wave) Packet Radio at 300 BPS, too.Satellites with OSCAR (Orbiting Sattelite Carring Amateur Radio) transponders (mostly attached to commercial satellites by the AMateur SATellite (AMSAT) group) carry Packet Radio mailboxes or digipeaters.There are both on-line and off-line services on the packet radio network: You can send electronic mail, read bulletins, chat, transfer files, connect to about the hottest international KW connections currently coming up (so you can pile up).PR uses AX.25 (an X.25 derivative) as its transport layer and sometimes even TCP/IP is transmitted over AX.25. AX.25 is like X.25 but the adressing uses HAM calls like DG8MGV.There are special wormholes all over the world which tunnel amateur radio traffic through the Internet to forward mail. Sometimes mails travels over allow HAMs to bridge from Internet to AMPR-NET, e.g. db0fho.ampr.org or db0fho.et-inf.fho-emden.de, but only if you are registered HAM.Because amateur radio is not for profit, it must not be interconnected to the Internet but it may be connected through the Internet. All people on the (completely free) amateur radio net must be licensed radio amateurs and must have a call which is unique all over the world.There is a special domain AMPR.ORG (44.*.*.*) for amateur radio reserved in the IP space. This domain is split between countries, which can further subdivide it. For example 44.130.*.* is Germany, 44.130.58.* is Augsburg (in Bavaria), and 44.130.58.20 is dg8mgv.ampr.org (you may verify this with nslookup).Mail transport is only one aspect of packet radio. You can talk interactively (as in chat), read files, or play silly games built in the Packet Radio 1000 km are unlikely to be useable for real-time communication and long paths can introduce significant delay times (answer latency).Other uses of amateur radio for computer communication include RTTY (baudot), AMTOR, PACTOR, and CLOVER. .Usenet newsgroup: rec.radio.amateur.packet.(2001-05-12)

amateur packet radio "communications" (PR) The use of {packet radio} by amateurs to communicate between computers. PR is a complete amateur radio computer network with "digipeaters" (relays), mailboxes (BBS) and other special nodes. In Germany, it is on HF, say, 2m (300 and 1200 BPS), 70cm (1200 to 9600 BPS), 23cm (normally 9600 BPS and up, currently most links between digipeaters) and higher frequencies. There is a KW (short wave) Packet Radio at 300 BPS, too. Satellites with OSCAR (Orbiting Sattelite Carring Amateur Radio) transponders (mostly attached to commercial satellites by the AMateur SATellite (AMSAT) group) carry Packet Radio mailboxes or {digipeaters}. There are both on-line and off-line services on the packet radio network: You can send {electronic mail}, read bulletins, chat, transfer files, connect to on-line DX-Clusters (DX=far distance) to catch notes typed in by other HAMs about the hottest international KW connections currently coming up (so you can pile up). PR uses {AX.25} (an {X.25} derivative) as its {transport layer} and sometimes even {TCP/IP} is transmitted over AX.25. AX.25 is like X.25 but the adressing uses HAM "calls" like "DG8MGV". There are special "wormholes" all over the world which "tunnel" amateur radio traffic through the {Internet} to forward mail. Sometimes mails travels over satelites. Normally amateur satellites have strange orbits, however the mail forwarding or mailbox satellites have very predictable orbits. Some wormholes allow HAMs to bridge from Internet to {AMPR-NET}, e.g. db0fho.ampr.org or db0fho.et-inf.fho-emden.de, but only if you are registered HAM. Because amateur radio is not for profit, it must not be interconnected to the {Internet} but it may be connected through the Internet. All people on the (completely free) amateur radio net must be licensed radio amateurs and must have a "call" which is unique all over the world. There is a special {domain} AMPR.ORG (44.*.*.*) for amateur radio reserved in the IP space. This domain is split between countries, which can further subdivide it. For example 44.130.*.* is Germany, 44.130.58.* is Augsburg (in Bavaria), and 44.130.58.20 is dg8mgv.ampr.org (you may verify this with {nslookup}). Mail transport is only one aspect of packet radio. You can talk interactively (as in {chat}), read files, or play silly games built in the Packet Radio software. Usually you can use the autorouter to let the digipeater network find a path to the station you want. However there are many (sometimes software incompatible) digipeaters out there, which the router cannot use. Paths over 1000 km are unlikely to be useable for {real-time} communication and long paths can introduce significant delay times (answer latency). Other uses of amateur radio for computer communication include {RTTY} ({baudot}), {AMTOR}, {PACTOR}, and {CLOVER}. {A huge hamradio archive (ftp://ftp.ucsd.edu/hamradio/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:rec.radio.amateur.packet}. (2001-05-12)

am "networking" The {country code} for Armenia. Used for the {vanity domain} "i.am". (1999-01-27)

anglo-saxondom ::: n. --> The Anglo-Saxon domain (i. e., Great Britain and the United States, etc.); the Anglo-Saxon race.

Anthony Hoare "person" (C. Anthony R. Hoare, Tony) A computer scientist working on programming languages, especially {parallel} ones. Hoare was responsible for {Communicating Sequential Processes} (CSP). See also: {pointer}, {Simone}. [Did he invent the Hoare {powerdomain}? Other details?] (1999-07-22)

Anthony Hoare ::: (person) (C. Anthony R. Hoare, Tony) A computer scientist working on programming languages, especially parallel ones. Hoare was responsible for Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP).See also: pointer, Simone.[Did he invent the Hoare powerdomain? Other details?] (1999-07-22)

Ariadne (Greek) In Greek mythology, the daughter of King Minos of Crete, who fell in love with Theseus when he came to kill the Minotaur confined in the labyrinth. She gave Theseus a clue of yarn or thread by means of which he found his way out of the labyrinth again. Ariadne fled with him, but he abandoned her on the Isle of Naxos at the request of Dionysos, who then married her and raised her to immortality. Ariadne was identified in Italy with Libera, goddess of wine. “Analogy is the guiding law in Nature, the only true Ariadne’s thread that can lead us, through the inextricable paths of her domain, toward her primal and final mysteries.” (SD 2:153)

Astrology Universal analogy provides a key to occult mysteries by studying the nature and motions of the celestial orbs. The heavenly bodies are in essence gods, and the influence they shed is the aura which likewise emanates from all living beings. Ancient astrology taught the absolute solidarity of the universe and of everything within it as an organic entity so that the operations and motions of the celestial bodies and influences flowing forth from them governed or regulated all subordinate beings over which their sway fell. The seven sacred planets are correlated with the cosmic and human septenates; learning the natures of these planets provides one key to an understanding of the natures of their correspondences. By their motions they measure cycles and determine epochs. Every being, if we reckon its life cycle, is an event; its nature, its destiny, is shown if we know and can define the epoch of its birth. Thus the adept, in proportion to his skill, can interpret the past and estimate what is to come; he can define the interrelations of things and arrive at an understanding of the structure of macrocosms and microcosms, which are spread out alike in time and space. “Astrology is a science as infallible as astronomy itself, with the condition, however, that its interpreters must be equally infallible; and it is this condition, sine qua non, so very difficult of realization, that has always proved a stumbling-block to both. Astrology is to exact astronomy what psychology is to exact physiology. In astrology and psychology one has to step beyond the visible world of matter, and enter into the domain of transcendent spirit” (IU 1:259).

atomic "jargon" (From Greek "atomos", indivisible) Indivisible; cannot be split up. For example, an instruction may be said to do several things "atomically", i.e. all the things are done immediately, and there is no chance of the instruction being half-completed or of another being interspersed. Used especially to convey that an operation cannot be interrupted. An atomic {data type} has no internal structure visible to the program. It can be represented by a flat {domain} (all elements are equally defined). Machine {integers} and {Booleans} are two examples. An atomic {database transaction} is one which is guaranteed to complete successfully or not at all. If an error prevents a partially-performed transaction from proceeding to completion, it must be "backed out" to prevent the database being left in an inconsistent state. [{Jargon File}] (2000-04-03)

atomic ::: (jargon) (From Greek atomos, indivisible) Indivisible; cannot be split up.For example, an instruction may be said to do several things atomically, i.e. all the things are done immediately, and there is no chance of the instruction being half-completed or of another being interspersed. Used especially to convey that an operation cannot be interrupted.An atomic data type has no internal structure visible to the program. It can be represented by a flat domain (all elements are equally defined). Machine integers and Booleans are two examples.An atomic database transaction is one which is guaranteed to complete successfully or not at all. If an error prevents a partially-performed transaction from proceeding to completion, it must be backed out to prevent the database being left in an inconsistent state.[Jargon File](2000-04-03)

:::   ". . . a true occultism means no more than a research into supraphysical realities and an unveiling of the hidden laws of being and Nature, of all that is not obvious on the surface. It attempts the discovery of the secret laws of mind and mental energy, the secret laws of life and life-energy, the secret laws of the subtle-physical and its energies, — all that Nature has not put into visible operation on the surface; it pursues also the application of these hidden truths and powers of Nature so as to extend the mastery of the human spirit beyond the ordinary operations of mind, the ordinary operations of life, the ordinary operations of our physical existence. In the spiritual domain which is occult to the surface mind in so far as it passes beyond normal and enters into supernormal experience, there is possible not only the discovery of the self and spirit, but the discovery of the uplifting, informing and guiding light of spiritual consciousness and the power of the spirit, the spiritual way of knowledge, the spiritual way of action. To know these things and to bring their truths and forces into the life of humanity is a necessary part of its evolution. Science itself is in its own way an occultism; for it brings to light the formulas which Nature has hidden and it uses its knowledge to set free operations of her energies which she has not included in her ordinary operations and to organise and place at the service of man her occult powers and processes, a vast system of physical magic, — for there is and can be no other magic than the utilisation of secret truths of being, secret powers and processes of Nature. It may even be found that a supraphysical knowledge is necessary for the completion of physical knowledge, because the processes of physical Nature have behind them a supraphysical factor, a power and action mental, vital or spiritual which is not tangible to any outer means of knowledge.” The Life Divine

“… a true occultism means no more than a research into supraphysical realities and an unveiling of the hidden laws of being and Nature, of all that is not obvious on the surface. It attempts the discovery of the secret laws of mind and mental energy, the secret laws of life and life-energy, the secret laws of the subtle-physical and its energies,—all that Nature has not put into visible operation on the surface; it pursues also the application of these hidden truths and powers of Nature so as to extend the mastery of the human spirit beyond the ordinary operations of mind, the ordinary operations of life, the ordinary operations of our physical existence. In the spiritual domain which is occult to the surface mind in so far as it passes beyond normal and enters into supernormal experience, there is possible not only the discovery of the self and spirit, but the discovery of the uplifting, informing and guiding light of spiritual consciousness and the power of the spirit, the spiritual way of knowledge, the spiritual way of action. To know these things and to bring their truths and forces into the life of humanity is a necessary part of its evolution. Science itself is in its own way an occultism; for it brings to light the formulas which Nature has hidden and it uses its knowledge to set free operations of her energies which she has not included in her ordinary operations and to organise and place at the service of man her occult powers and processes, a vast system of physical magic,—for there is and can be no other magic than the utilisation of secret truths of being, secret powers and processes of Nature. It may even be found that a supraphysical knowledge is necessary for the completion of physical knowledge, because the processes of physical Nature have behind them a supraphysical factor, a power and action mental, vital or spiritual which is not tangible to any outer means of knowledge.” The Life Divine

A true occultism means no more than a research into supraphysical realities and an unveiling of the hidden laws of being and Nature, of all that is not obvious on the surface. It attempts the discovery of the secret laws of mind and mental energy, the secret laws of life and life-energy, the secret laws of the subtle-physical and its energies,—all that Nature has not put into visible operation on the surface; it pursues also the application of these hidden truths and powers of Nature so as to extend the mastery of the human spirit beyond the ordinary operations of mind, the ordinary operations of life, the ordinary operations of our physical existence. In the spiritual domain, which is occult to the surface mind in so far as it passes beyond normal and enters into supernormal experience, there is possible not only the discovery of the self and spirit, but the discovery of the uplifting, informing and guiding light of spiritual consciousness and the power of the spirit, the spiritual way of knowledge, the spiritual way of action. To know these things and to bring their truths and forces into the life of humanity is a necessary part of its evolution. Science itself is in its own way an occultism; for it brings to light the formulas which Nature has hidden and it uses its knowledge to set free operations of her energies which she has not included in her ordinary operations and to organise and place at the service of man her occult powers and processes, a vast system of physical magic,—for there is and can be no other magic than the utilisation of secret truths of being, secret powers and processes of Nature.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 678


at Swarajya, self-rule or sul>jcctive empire, the entire control by the subjective consciousness of all the states and activities proper to its own domain, but included Samrajya as well, outward empire, the control by the subjective consciousness of its outer activities and environment.

au ::: 1. (networking) The two character country code for Australia used in Internet domain names.2. (filename extension) audio. (1995-02-15)

au 1. "networking" The two character {country code} for Australia used in {Internet} {domain names}. 2. "filename extension" {audio}. (1995-02-15)

Aum ::: OM is the mantra, the expressive sound-symbol of the Brahman Consciousness in its four domains from the Turiya to the external or material plane. The function of a mantra is to create vibrations in the inner consciousness that will prepare it for the realisation of what the mantra symbolises and is supposed indeed to carry within itself. The mantra OM should th
   refore lead towards the opening of the consciousness to the sight and feeling of the One Consciousness in all material things, in the inner being and in the supraphysical worlds, in the causal plane above now superconscient to us and, finally, the supreme liberated transcendence above all cosmic existence OM if rightly used (not mechanically) might very well help the opening upwards and outwards (cosmic consciousness) as well as the descent.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 825-826


Backup Domain Controller "networking" (BDC) A server in a {network} of {Microsoft Windows} computers that maintains a copy of the {SAM} database and handles access requests that the {Primary Domain Controller} (PDC) doesn't respond to. There may be zero or more BDCs in a network. They increase reliability and reduce load on the PDC. (2006-09-18)

Backup Domain Controller ::: (networking) (BDC) A server in a network of Microsoft Windows computers that maintains a copy of the SAM database and handles access requests that the Primary Domain Controller (PDC) doesn't respond to. There may be zero or more BDCs in a network. They increase reliability and reduce load on the PDC.(2006-09-18)

barony ::: n. --> The fee or domain of a baron; the lordship, dignity, or rank of a baron.
In Ireland, a territorial division, corresponding nearly to the English hundred, and supposed to have been originally the district of a native chief. There are 252 of these baronies. In Scotland, an extensive freehold. It may be held by a commoner.


BASIC ::: (language) Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. A simple language originally designed for ease of programming by students and beginners. Many dialects exist, and BASIC is popular on microcomputers with sound and graphics support. Most micro versions are interactive and interpreted.BASIC has become the leading cause of brain-damage in proto-hackers. This is another case (like Pascal) of the cascading lossage that happens when a language accidents hadn't made BASIC so common on low-end micros. As it is, it ruins thousands of potential wizards a year.Originally, all references to code, both GOTO and GOSUB (subroutine call) referred to the destination by its line number. This allowed for very simple programming with named procedures and functions, IF-THEN-ELSE
IF constructs and WHILE loops etc.Early BASICs had no graphic operations except with graphic characters. In the 1970s BASIC interpreters became standard features in mainframes and minicomputers. Some versions included matrix operations as language primitives.A public domain interpreter for a mixture of DEC's MU-Basic and Microsoft Basic is . A yacc parser and interpreter were in the comp.sources.unix archives volume 2.See also ANSI Minimal BASIC, bournebasic, bwBASIC, ubasic, Visual Basic.[Jargon File] (1995-03-15)


BASIC "language" Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. A simple language originally designed for ease of programming by students and beginners. Many dialects exist, and BASIC is popular on {microcomputers} with sound and graphics support. Most micro versions are {interactive} and {interpreted}. BASIC has become the leading cause of brain-damage in proto-hackers. This is another case (like {Pascal}) of the cascading lossage that happens when a language deliberately designed as an educational toy gets taken too seriously. A novice can write short BASIC programs (on the order of 10-20 lines) very easily; writing anything longer is painful and encourages bad habits that will make it harder to use more powerful languages. This wouldn't be so bad if historical accidents hadn't made BASIC so common on low-end micros. As it is, it ruins thousands of potential wizards a year. Originally, all references to code, both {GOTO} and GOSUB (subroutine call) referred to the destination by its line number. This allowed for very simple editing in the days before {text editors} were considered essential. Just typing the line number deleted the line and to edit a line you just typed the new line with the same number. Programs were typically numbered in steps of ten to allow for insertions. Later versions, such as {BASIC V}, allow {GOTO}-less {structured programming} with named {procedures} and {functions}, IF-THEN-ELSE
IF constructs and {WHILE} loops etc. Early BASICs had no graphic operations except with graphic characters. In the 1970s BASIC {interpreters} became standard features in {mainframes} and {minicomputers}. Some versions included {matrix} operations as language {primitives}. A {public domain} {interpreter} for a mixture of {DEC}'s {MU-Basic} and {Microsoft Basic} is {here (ftp://oak.oakland.edu/pub/Unix-c/languages/basic/basic.tar-z)}. A {yacc} {parser} and {interpreter} were in the comp.sources.unix archives volume 2. See also {ANSI Minimal BASIC}, {bournebasic}, {bwBASIC}, {ubasic}, {Visual Basic}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-03-15)


BDC {Backup Domain Controller}

domain ::: 1. A sphere of activity, concern, or function; a field. 2. A region characterized by a specific feature, type of growth or wildlife, etc. domains.

domain ::: 1. (mathematics) In the theory of functions, the set of argument values for which a function is defined.See domain theory.2. (networking) A group of computers whose hostnames share a common suffix, the domain name. The last component of this is the top-level domain.See administrative domain, Domain Name System, fully qualified domain name.3. Distributed Operating Multi Access Interactive Network.4. (programming) A specific phase of the software life cycle in which a developer works. Domains define developers' and users' areas of responsibility and the scope of possible relationships between products.5. The subject or market in which a piece of software is designed to work. (1997-12-26)

domain 1. "networking" A group of computers whose {fully qualified domain names} (FQDN) share a common suffix, the "domain name". The {Domain Name System} maps {hostnames} to {Internet address} using a hierarchical {namespace} where each level in the hierarchy contributes one component to the FQDN. For example, the computer foldoc.doc.ic.ac.uk is in the doc.ic.ac.uk domain, which is in the ic.ac.uk domain, which is in the ac.uk domain, which is in the uk {top-level domain}. A domain name can contain up to 67 characters including the dots that separate components. These can be letters, numbers and hyphens. 2. An {administrative domain} is something to do with {routing}. 3. {Distributed Operating Multi Access Interactive Network}. 4. "mathematics" In the theory of functions, the set of argument values for which a {function} is defined. See {domain theory}. 5. "programming" A specific phase of the {software life cycle} in which a developer works. Domains define developers' and users' areas of responsibility and the scope of possible relationships between products. 6. The subject or market in which a piece of software is designed to work. (2007-10-01)

domain address "networking" The name of a {host} on the {Internet} belonging to the {hierarchy} of Internet {domains}. (1994-10-27)

domain address ::: (networking) The name of a host on the Internet belonging to the hierarchy of Internet domains. (1994-10-27)

domain architecture "systems analysis" A generic, organisational structure or design for software systems in a {domain}. The domain architecture contains the designs that are intended to satisfy requirements specified in the {domain model}. A domain architecture can be adapted to create designs for software systems within a domain and also provides a framework for configuring {assets} within individual software systems. (1997-12-26)

domain architecture ::: (systems analysis) A generic, organisational structure or design for software systems in a domain. The domain architecture contains the designs that domain and also provides a framework for configuring assets within individual software systems. (1997-12-26)

domain calculus "database" A form of {relational calculus} in which {scalar} variables take values drawn from a given {domain}. Examples of the domain calculus are {ILL}, {FQL}, {DEDUCE} and the well known {Query By Example} (QBE). {INGRES} is a {relational DBMS} whose {DML} is based on the relational calculus.

domain calculus ::: (database) A form of relational calculus in which scalar variables take values drawn from a given domain.Examples of the domain calculus are ILL, FQL, DEDUCE and the well known Query By Example (QBE). INGRES is a relational DBMS whose DML is based on the relational calculus.

domain engineering ::: (systems analysis) 1. The development and evolution of domain specific knowledge and artifacts to support the development and evolution of systems in the domain. Domain engineering includes engineering of domain models, components, methods and tools and may also include asset management.2. The engineering process of analysing and modelling a domain, designing and modelling a generic solution architecture for a product line within that domain, implementing and using reusable components of that architecture and maintaining and evolving the domain, architecture and implementation models.3. A reuse-based approach to defining the scope (domain definition), specifying the structure (domain architecture) and building the Assets (requirements, applications. Domain engineering can include domain definition, domain analysis, developing the domain architecture domain implementation.

domain engineering "systems analysis" 1. The development and evolution of {domain} specific knowledge and artifacts to support the development and evolution of systems in the domain. Domain engineering includes engineering of {domain models}, components, methods and tools and may also include {asset management}. 2. The engineering process of analysing and modelling a domain, designing and modelling a generic solution architecture for a product line within that domain, implementing and using reusable components of that architecture and maintaining and evolving the domain, architecture and implementation models. 3. A reuse-based approach to defining the scope ({domain definition}), specifying the structure ({domain architecture}) and building the Assets (requirements, designs, software code, documentation) for a class of systems, subsystems or applications. Domain engineering can include domain definition, domain analysis, developing the domain architecture domain implementation.

domain handle "networking" Information held by a {domain name} registrar about a registrant (the person or organisation that owns the name). Typically the registrar stores one copy of this information and refers to that copy for each additional domain registered by the same person. The information would include basic contact details: name, e-mail address, etc. and billing information. Some of this information would be used to populate the {whois} database entry for a domain. {(http://www.easyname.eu/support/domains/20-what-is-a-domain-handle)}. (2009-09-17)

domainist "jargon" /doh-mayn'ist/ 1. Said of a domain address (as opposed to a {bang path}) because the part to the right of the "@" specifies a nested series of "domains"; for example, esr@snark.thyrsus.com specifies the machine called snark in the subdomain called thyrsus within the top-level domain called com. See also {big-endian}. 2. Said of a site, mailer or routing program which knows how to handle domainist addresses. 3. Said of a person (especially a site admin) who prefers domain addressing, supports a domainist mailer, or proselytises for domainist addressing and disdains {bang paths}. This term is now (1993) semi-obsolete, as most sites have converted. [{Jargon File}] (1995-04-21)

domainist ::: (jargon) /doh-mayn'ist/ 1. Said of a domain address (as opposed to a bang path) because the part to the right of the @ specifies a nested series of in the subdomain called thyrsus within the top-level domain called com. See also big-endian.2. Said of a site, mailer or routing program which knows how to handle domainist addresses.3. Said of a person (especially a site admin) who prefers domain addressing, supports a domainist mailer, or proselytises for domainist addressing and disdains bang paths. This term is now (1993) semi-obsolete, as most sites have converted.[Jargon File] (1995-04-21)

domain maturity "systems analysis" The level of stability and depth of understanding that has been achieved in an area for which {applications} are developed. (1997-12-26)

domain maturity ::: (systems analysis) The level of stability and depth of understanding that has been achieved in an area for which applications are developed. (1997-12-26)

domain model ::: (systems analysis) 1. A definition of the functions, objects, data, requirements, relationships and variations in a particular domain.2. A product of domain analysis which provides a representation of the requirements of the domain. The domain model identifies and describes the Domain Model describes commonalities and variabilities among requirements for software systems in the domain. (1997-12-26)

domain model "systems analysis" 1. A definition of the functions, objects, data, requirements, relationships and variations in a particular {domain}. 2. A product of {domain analysis} which provides a representation of the requirements of the domain. The domain model identifies and describes the structure of data, flow of information, functions, constraints and controls within the Domain that are included in software systems in the domain. The Domain Model describes commonalities and variabilities among requirements for software systems in the domain. (1997-12-26)

domain name {fully qualified domain name}

domain ::: n. --> Dominion; empire; authority.
The territory over which dominion or authority is exerted; the possessions of a sovereign or commonwealth, or the like. Also used figuratively.
Landed property; estate; especially, the land about the mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne.
Ownership of land; an estate or patrimony which one has in his own right; absolute proprietorship; paramount or sovereign


domain selection "systems analysis" The prioritisation and selection of one or more {domains} for which specific {software reuse} engineering projects are to be initiated. (1997-12-26)

domain selection ::: (systems analysis) The prioritisation and selection of one or more domains for which specific software reuse engineering projects are to be initiated. (1997-12-26)

domains (Heaven and Hell). [Rf. Ambelain, La

domain-specific language "language" A machine-processable language whose terms are derived from a {domain model} and that is used for the definition of components or software architectures supporting that domain. A domain-specific language is often used as input to an application generator. (1997-12-26)

domain-specific language ::: (language) A machine-processable language whose terms are derived from a domain model and that is used for the definition of components or software architectures supporting that domain. A domain-specific language is often used as input to an application generator. (1997-12-26)

domain squatter "web" An unscrupulous person who registers a {domain name} in the hope of selling it to the rightful, expected owner at a profit. E.g. {(http://foldoc.com/)}. (2007-07-15)

domain theory ::: (theory) A branch of mathematics introduced by Dana Scott in 1970 as a mathematical theory of programming languages, and for nearly a quarter of a century developed almost exclusively in connection with denotational semantics in computer science.In denotational semantics of programming languages, the meaning of a program is taken to be an element of a domain. A domain is a mathematical structure consisting of a set of values (or points) and an ordering relation, = on those values. Domain theory is the study of such structures.(= is written in LaTeX as \subseteq)Different domains correspond to the different types of object with which a program deals. In a language containing functions, we might have a domain X -> Y functions or applications of functions to other functions. To represent the meaning of such programs, we must solve the recursive equation over domains, D = D -> D equivalent equation has no non-trivial solution in set theory.There are many definitions of domains, with different properties and suitable for different purposes. One commonly used definition is that of Scott domains, often simply called domains, which are omega-algebraic, consistently complete CPOs.There are domain-theoretic computational models in other branches of mathematics including dynamical systems, fractals, measure theory, integration theory, probability theory, and stochastic processes.See also abstract interpretation, bottom, pointed domain. (1999-12-09)

domain theory "theory" A branch of mathematics introduced by Dana Scott in 1970 as a mathematical theory of programming languages, and for nearly a quarter of a century developed almost exclusively in connection with {denotational semantics} in computer science. In {denotational semantics} of programming languages, the meaning of a program is taken to be an element of a domain. A domain is a mathematical structure consisting of a set of values (or "points") and an ordering relation, "= on those values. Domain theory is the study of such structures. (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\subseteq}) Different domains correspond to the different types of object with which a program deals. In a language containing functions, we might have a domain X -" Y which is the set of functions from domain X to domain Y with the ordering f "= g iff for all x in X, f x "= g x. In the {pure lambda-calculus} all objects are functions or {applications} of functions to other functions. To represent the meaning of such programs, we must solve the {recursive} equation over domains, D = D -" D which states that domain D is ({isomorphic} to) some {function space} from D to itself. I.e. it is a {fixed point} D = F(D) for some operator F that takes a domain D to D -" D. The equivalent equation has no non-trivial solution in {set theory}. There are many definitions of domains, with different properties and suitable for different purposes. One commonly used definition is that of Scott domains, often simply called domains, which are {omega-algebraic}, {consistently complete} {CPOs}. There are domain-theoretic computational models in other branches of mathematics including {dynamical systems}, {fractals}, {measure theory}, {integration theory}, {probability theory}, and {stochastic processes}. See also {abstract interpretation}, {bottom}, {pointed domain}. (1999-12-09)

Being or a Presence — sometimes one of these, sometimes several of them or all together. The movement of ascension has diffe- rent results ; it may liberate the consciousness so that one feels no longer in he body, but above it or else spread in wideness with the body whether almost non-existent or only a point in one’s free expanse. It may enable the being or some part of the being to go out from the body and move elsewhere, and this action is usually accompanied by some kind of partial Samadhi or else a complete trance. Or, it may result in empowering the cons- ciousness, no longer limited by the body and the habits of the external nature, to go within, to enter the inner mental depths, the inner vital, the inner (subtle) physical, the psychic, to become aware of its inmost psychic self or its inner mental, vital, and subtle physical being, and it may be, to move and live in the domains, the planes, the worlds that correspond to these parts of the nature. It is the repeated and constant ascent of the lower consciousness that enables the mind, the vital, the physical to come into touch with the higher planes up to the Supramental and get impregnated with their light and power and influence.

Berkeley Internet Name Domain "networking" (BIND) An implementation of a {DNS} {server} developed and distributed by the {University of California at Berkeley}. Many {Internet} {hosts} run BIND, and it is the ancestor of many commercial implementations. (1997-12-15)

Berkeley Internet Name Domain ::: (networking) (BIND) An implementation of a DNS server developed and distributed by the University of California at Berkeley.Many Internet hosts run BIND, and it is the ancestor of many commercial implementations. (1997-12-15)

Bibliography: Karl Pearson, Grammar of Science, 1892. Henri Poincare, Science and Hypothesis, 1905. W. S. Jevons, Principles of Science, 1907. J. A. Thomson, An Introduction to Science, 1911. N. Campbell, What is Science?, 1921. C. D. Broad, Scientific Thought, 1923. A. D. Ritchie, Scientific Method, 1923. E. W. Hobson, Domain of Natural Science, 1923. A. S. Eddington, Nature of the Physical World, 1929. M. R. Cohen, Reason and Nature, 1931. A. C. Benjamin, An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science, 1937. W. H. Werkmeister, A Philosophy of Science, 1940.

big-endian 1. "data, architecture" A computer {architecture} in which, within a given multi-{byte} numeric representation, the most significant byte has the lowest address (the word is stored "big-end-first"). Most processors, including the {IBM 370} family, the {PDP-10}, the {Motorola} {microprocessor} families, and most of the various {RISC} designs current in mid-1993, are big-endian. See {-endian}. 2. "networking, standard" A backward {electronic mail address}. The world now follows the {Internet} {hostname} {standard} (see {FQDN}) and writes e-mail addresses starting with the name of the computer and ending up with the {country code} (e.g. fred@doc.acme.ac.uk). In the United Kingdom the {Joint Networking Team} decided to do it the other way round (e.g. me@uk.ac.wigan.cs) before the {Internet} {domain} standard was established. Most {gateway sites} required {ad-hockery} in their {mailers} to handle this. By July 1994 this parochial idiosyncracy was on the way out and mailers started to reject big-endian addresses. By about 1996, people would look at you strangely if you suggested such a bizarre thing might ever have existed. [{Jargon File}] (1998-08-09)

big-endian ::: 1. (data, architecture) A computer architecture in which, within a given multi-byte numeric representation, the most significant byte has the lowest address (the word is stored big-end-first).Most processors, including the IBM 370 family, the PDP-10, the Motorola microprocessor families, and most of the various RISC designs current in mid-1993, are big-endian.See -endian.2. (networking, standard) A backward electronic mail address. The world now follows the Internet hostname standard (see FQDN) and writes e-mail Internet domain standard was established. Most gateway sites required ad-hockery in their mailers to handle this.By July 1994 this parochial idiosyncracy was on the way out and mailers started to reject big-endian addresses. By about 1996, people would look at you strangely if you suggested such a bizarre thing might ever have existed.[Jargon File] (1998-08-09)

bijection ::: (mathematics) A function is bijective or a bijection or a one-to-one correspondence if it is both injective (no two values map to the same value) and domain which maps to it). I.e. there is exactly one element of the domain which maps to each element of the codomain.For a general bijection f from the set A to the set B:f'(f(a)) = a where a is in A and f(f'(b)) = b where b is in B.A and B could be disjoint sets.See also injection, surjection, isomorphism, permutation.(2001-05-10)

bijection "mathematics" A {function} is bijective or a bijection or a one-to-one correspondence if it is both {injective} (no two values map to the same value) and {surjective} (for every element of the {codomain} there is some element of the {domain} which maps to it). I.e. there is exactly one element of the domain which maps to each element of the codomain. For a general bijection f from the set A to the set B: f'(f(a)) = a where a is in A and f(f'(b)) = b where b is in B. A and B could be disjoint sets. See also {injection}, {surjection}, {isomorphism}, {permutation}. (2001-05-10)

BIND {Berkeley Internet Name Domain}

bogon ::: /boh'gon/ [by analogy with proton/electron/neutron, but doubtless reinforced after 1980 by the similarity to Douglas Adams's Vogons] 1. The elementary emitting bogons again means that it is broken or acting in an erratic or bogus fashion.2. A query packet sent from a TCP/IP domain resolver to a root server, having the reply bit set instead of the query bit.3. Any bogus or incorrectly formed packet sent on a network.4. A person who is bogus or who says bogus things. This was historically the original usage, but has been overtaken by its derivative senses. See also bogosity; compare psyton, fat electrons, magic smoke.The bogon has become the type case for a whole bestiary of nonce particle names, including the clutron or cluon (indivisible particle of cluefulness, explanatory myths. Of course, playing on an existing word (as in the futon) yields additional flavour.[Jargon File]

bogon /boh'gon/ (By analogy with proton/electron/neutron, but doubtless reinforced after 1980 by the similarity to Douglas Adams's "Vogons") 1. The elementary particle of bogosity (see {quantum bogodynamics}). For instance, "the Ethernet is emitting bogons again" means that it is broken or acting in an erratic or bogus fashion. 2. A query {packet} sent from a {TCP/IP} {domain resolver} to a root server, having the reply bit set instead of the query bit. 3. Any bogus or incorrectly formed packet sent on a network. 4. A person who is bogus or who says bogus things. This was historically the original usage, but has been overtaken by its derivative senses. See also {bogosity}; compare {psyton}, {fat electrons}, {magic smoke}. The bogon has become the type case for a whole bestiary of nonce particle names, including the "clutron" or "cluon" (indivisible particle of cluefulness, obviously the antiparticle of the bogon) and the futon (elementary particle of {randomness}, or sometimes of lameness). These are not so much live usages in themselves as examples of a live meta-usage: that is, it has become a standard joke or linguistic maneuver to "explain" otherwise mysterious circumstances by inventing nonce particle names. And these imply nonce particle theories, with all their dignity or lack thereof (we might note parenthetically that this is a generalisation from "(bogus particle) theories" to "bogus (particle theories)"!). Perhaps such particles are the modern-day equivalents of trolls and wood-nymphs as standard starting-points around which to construct explanatory myths. Of course, playing on an existing word (as in the "futon") yields additional flavour. [{Jargon File}]

Book of the Dead, Egyptian The name given to certain ancient papyri of the Egyptian, more correctly called Pert em hru (coming forth into day or light). They have been discovered in many of the tombs, interred with the mummies. Although by no means the only text of importance coming down from the ancient Egyptians, it is a work of extreme antiquity, containing the system expounded by the priests, and is far older than the two other extant works known as the Book of the Pylons and the Book of the Tuat. The work depicts in symbolic form the afterdeath state, as presented by the priests to the populace of Egypt. The soul is depicted in the guise of a pilgrim, journeying through various halls, at the portals of each of which he was obliged to give a correct answer — an account of the life he had lived upon earth. The pilgrim eventually reached the judgment hall, within which he was tried by the company of gods and goddesses. Before Osiris his heart was placed in a balance to testify for or against him. If he passed the test satisfactorily, he was permitted by Osiris to enter his domain and become as one of the deities.

bottom "theory" The least defined element in a given {domain}. Often used to represent a non-terminating computation. (In {LaTeX}, bottom is written as {\perp}, sometimes with the domain as a subscript). (1997-01-07)

bottom ::: (theory) The least defined element in a given domain.Often used to represent a non-terminating computation.(In LaTeX, bottom is written as \perp, sometimes with the domain as a subscript). (1997-01-07)

bottom-unique ::: In domain theory, a function f is bottom-unique if f x = bottom => x = bottom A bottom-unique function is also strict.

bottom-unique In {domain theory}, a function f is bottom-unique if f x = bottom "=" x = bottom A bottom-unique function is also {strict}.

boundedly complete ::: In domain theory, a complete partial order is boundedly complete if every bounded subset has a least upper bound. Also called consistently complete.

boundedly complete "theory" (Or "consistently complete") In {domain theory}, a {complete partial order} is boundedly complete if every {bounded} {subset} has a {least upper bound}. (2014-07-01)

bounded "theory" In {domain theory}, a subset S of a {cpo} X is bounded if there exists x in X such that for all s in S, s "= x. In other words, there is some element above all of S. If every bounded subset of X has a least upper bound then X is boundedly {complete}. (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\subseteq}). (1995-02-03)

bounded ::: (theory) In domain theory, a subset S of a cpo X is bounded if there exists x in X such that for all s in S, s = x. In other words, there is some element above all of S. If every bounded subset of X has a least upper bound then X is boundedly complete.(= is written in LaTeX as \subseteq). (1995-02-03)

boxology "graphics" /bok-sol'*-jee/ {ASCII art}. This term implies a more restricted domain, that of box-and-arrow drawings. "His report has a lot of boxology in it." Compare {macrology}. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-02)

boxology ::: (graphics) /bok-sol'*-jee/ ASCII art.This term implies a more restricted domain, that of box-and-arrow drawings. His report has a lot of boxology in it.Compare macrology.[Jargon File] (1994-12-02)

Brahman Consciousness in its four domains from the Turiya to the external or material plane.

Buddhakshetra (Sanskrit) Buddhakṣetra [from buddha awakened + kṣetra field, sphere of action] The sphere of action of an enlightened one. According to theosophy, there are four (or seven) buddhakshetras or fields in which the buddhas manifest and do their sublime work of benevolence which, counting from above, are: 1) the realms in which the dhyani-buddhas live and work; 2) the realms in which the dhyani-bodhisttvas live and work, called by Blavatsky “the domain of ideation”; 3) the realms of the manushya-buddhas, in which these work as nirmanakayas; and 4) the field of action in which the human buddhas work, the ordinary human world — our physical globe.

bulletin board system "communications, application" (BBS, bboard /bee'bord/, message board, forum; plural: BBSes) A computer and associated software which typically provides an electronic message database where people can log in and leave messages. Messages are typically split into {topic groups} similar to the {newsgroups} on {Usenet} (which is like a distributed BBS). Any user may submit or read any message in these public areas. The term comes from physical pieces of board on which people can pin messages written on paper for general consumption - a "physical bulletin board". {Ward Christensen}, the programmer and operator of the first BBS (on-line 1978-02-16) called it a CBBS for "computer bulletin board system". Since the rise of the {World-Wide Web}, the term has become antiquated, though the concept is more popular than ever, with many {websites} featuring discussion areas where users can post messages for public consumption. Apart from public message areas, some BBSes provided archives of files, personal {electronic mail} and other services of interest to the system operator ({sysop}). Thousands of BBSes around the world were run from amateurs' homes on {MS-DOS} boxes with a single {modem} line each. Although BBSes were traditionally the domain of hobbyists, many connected directly to the {Internet} (accessed via {telnet}), others were operated by government, educational, and research institutions. Fans of {Usenet} or the big commercial {time-sharing} bboards such as {CompuServe}, {CIX} and {GEnie} tended to consider local BBSes the low-rent district of the hacker culture, but they helped connect hackers and users in the personal-{micro} and let them exchange code. Use of this term for a {Usenet} newsgroup generally marks one either as a {newbie} fresh in from the BBS world or as a real old-timer predating {Usenet}. (2005-09-20)

burggrave ::: n. --> Originally, one appointed to the command of a burg (fortress or castle); but the title afterward became hereditary, with a domain attached.

Canada ::: Country with domain ca. (1995-04-06)

Canada Country with {domain} "ca". (1995-04-06)

case sensitivity "text" Whether a text matching operation distinguishes upper-{case} (capital) letters from lower case (is "case sensitive") or not ("case insensitive"). Case in file names should be preserved (for readability) but ignored when matching (so the user doesn't have to get it right). {MS-DOS} does not preserve case in file names, {Unix} preserves case and matches are case sensitive. Any decent {text editor} will allow the user to specify whether or not text searches should be {case sensitive}. Case sensitivity is also relevant in programming (most programming languages distiguish between case in the names of {identifiers}), and addressing ({Internet} {domain names} are case insensitive but {RFC 822} local {mailbox} names are case sensitive). Case insensitive operations are sometimes said to "fold case", from the idea of folding the character code table so that upper and lower case letters coincide. The alternative "smash case" is more likely to be used by someone who considers this behaviour a {misfeature} or in cases where one case is actually permanently converted to the other. "{MS-DOS} will automatically smash case in the names of all the files you create". (1997-07-09)

case sensitivity ::: (text) Whether a text matching operation distinguishes upper-case (capital) letters from lower case (is case sensitive) or not (case insensitive).Case in file names should be preserved (for readability) but ignored when matching (so the user doesn't have to get it right). MS-DOS does not preserve case in file names, Unix preserves case and matches are case sensitive.Any decent text editor will allow the user to specify whether or not text searches should be case sensitive.Case sensitivity is also relevant in programming (most programming languages distiguish between case in the names of identifiers), and addressing (Internet domain names are case insensitive but RFC 822 local mailbox names are case sensitive).Case insensitive operations are sometimes said to fold case, from the idea of folding the character code table so that upper and lower case letters coincide. this behaviour a misfeature or in cases where one case is actually permanently converted to the other.MS-DOS will automatically smash case in the names of all the files you create. (1997-07-09)

category "theory" A category K is a collection of objects, obj(K), and a collection of {morphisms} (or "{arrows}"), mor(K) such that 1. Each morphism f has a "typing" on a pair of objects A, B written f:A-"B. This is read 'f is a morphism from A to B'. A is the "source" or "{domain}" of f and B is its "target" or "{co-domain}". 2. There is a {partial function} on morphisms called {composition} and denoted by an {infix} ring symbol, o. We may form the "composite" g o f : A -" C if we have g:B-"C and f:A-"B. 3. This composition is associative: h o (g o f) = (h o g) o f. 4. Each object A has an identity morphism id_A:A-"A associated with it. This is the identity under composition, shown by the equations id__B o f = f = f o id__A. In general, the morphisms between two objects need not form a {set} (to avoid problems with {Russell's paradox}). An example of a category is the collection of sets where the objects are sets and the morphisms are functions. Sometimes the composition ring is omitted. The use of capitals for objects and lower case letters for morphisms is widespread but not universal. Variables which refer to categories themselves are usually written in a script font. (1997-10-06)

category ::: (theory) A category K is a collection of objects, obj(K), and a collection of morphisms (or arrows), mor(K) such that1. Each morphism f has a typing on a pair of objects A, B written f:A->B. This is read 'f is a morphism from A to B'. A is the source or domain of f and B is its target or co-domain.2. There is a partial function on morphisms called composition and denoted by an infix ring symbol, o. We may form the composite g o f : A -> C if we have g:B->C and f:A->B.3. This composition is associative: h o (g o f) = (h o g) o f.4. Each object A has an identity morphism id_A:A->A associated with it. This is the identity under composition, shown by the equations id_B o f = f = f o id_A.In general, the morphisms between two objects need not form a set (to avoid problems with Russell's paradox). An example of a category is the collection of sets where the objects are sets and the morphisms are functions.Sometimes the composition ring is omitted. The use of capitals for objects and lower case letters for morphisms is widespread but not universal. Variables which refer to categories themselves are usually written in a script font. (1997-10-06)

ciated with visions in a shadowy (chayamaya) dimness; "the subconscient below the Earth ::: the Earth being the conscious physical plane", a domain where what has been rejected from the surface nature often takes refuge.

CIDR {Classless Inter-Domain Routing}

C* "language, parallel" An {object-oriented}, {data-parallel} superset of {ANSI C} with synchronous {semantics}, for the {Connection Machine}, designed by {Thinking Machines}, 1987. C* adds a "domain" data type and a selection statement for parallel execution in domains. An unimplemented language called "{Parallel C}" [which one?] influenced the design of {C*}. {Dataparallel-C} was based on {C*}. ["C*: An Extended C Language for Data Parallel Programming", J.R. Rose et al, Proc Second Intl Conf on Supercomputing, L.P. Kartashev et al eds, May 1987, pp 2-16]. ["C* Programming Manual", Thinking Machines Corp, 1986]. [{Jargon File}] (2000-11-14)

C* ::: (language, parallel) An object-oriented, data-parallel superset of ANSI C with synchronous semantics, for the Connection Machine, designed by Thinking Machines, 1987. C* adds a domain data type and a selection statement for parallel execution in domains.An unimplemented language called Parallel C [which one?] influenced the design of C*. Dataparallel-C was based on C*.Current version: 6.x, as of 1993-07-27.[C*: An Extended C Language for Data Parallel Programming, J.R. Rose et al, Proc Second Intl Conf on Supercomputing, L.P. Kartashev et al eds, May 1987, pp 2-16].[C* Programming Manual, Thinking Machines Corp, 1986].[Jargon File](2000-11-14)

Classless Inter-Domain Routing "networking" (CIDR) /sid*r/ A technique that summarises a block of {Internet addresses} in a {routing table} as an address in {dotted decimal notation} followed by a {forward slash} and a two-digit decimal number giving the number of leading one bits in the subnet mask. For example, 123.123.123.0/24 specifies a subnet mask of 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 (binary), implying the block of addresses 123.123.123.0 through 123.123.123.255. CIDR is "classless" because it is not limited to the subnet masks specified by {Internet address} classes A, B and C. According to {RFC 1519}, CIDR was implemented to distribute Internet address space more efficiently and to provide a mechanism for {IP route aggregation}. This in turn reduces the number of entries in IP routing tables, enabling faster, more efficient routing, e.g. using {routing} {protocols} such as {OSPF}. CIDR is supported by {BGP4}. See also {RFC 1467}, {RFC 1518}, {RFC 1520}. (2006-01-26)

Classless Inter-Domain Routing ::: (networking) (CIDR) /sid*r/ A technique that summarises a block of Internet addresses in a routing table as an address in dotted decimal notation subnet mask of 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 (binary), implying the block of addresses 123.123.123.0 through 123.123.123.255.CIDR is classless because it is not limited to the subnet masks specified by Internet address classes A, B and C.According to RFC 1519, CIDR was implemented to distribute Internet address space more efficiently and to provide a mechanism for IP route aggregation. This in efficient routing, e.g. using routing protocols such as OSPF. CIDR is supported by BGP4.See also RFC 1467, RFC 1518, RFC 1520.(2006-01-26)

closure 1. "programming" In a {reduction system}, a closure is a data structure that holds an expression and an environment of variable bindings in which that expression is to be evaluated. The variables may be local or global. Closures are used to represent unevaluated expressions when implementing {functional programming languages} with {lazy evaluation}. In a real implementation, both expression and environment are represented by pointers. A {suspension} is a closure which includes a flag to say whether or not it has been evaluated. The term "{thunk}" has come to be synonymous with "closure" but originated outside {functional programming}. 2. "theory" In {domain theory}, given a {partially ordered set}, D and a subset, X of D, the upward closure of X in D is the union over all x in X of the sets of all d in D such that x "= d. Thus the upward closure of X in D contains the elements of X and any greater element of D. A set is "upward closed" if it is the same as its upward closure, i.e. any d greater than an element is also an element. The downward closure (or "left closure") is similar but with d "= x. A downward closed set is one for which any d less than an element is also an element. (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\subseteq} and the upward closure of X in D is written \uparrow_\{D} X). (1994-12-16)

closure ::: 1. (programming) In a reduction system, a closure is a data structure that holds an expression and an environment of variable bindings in which that programming languages with lazy evaluation. In a real implementation, both expression and environment are represented by pointers.A suspension is a closure which includes a flag to say whether or not it has been evaluated. The term thunk has come to be synonymous with closure but originated outside functional programming.2. (theory) In domain theory, given a partially ordered set, D and a subset, X of D, the upward closure of X in D is the union over all x in X of the downward closed set is one for which any d less than an element is also an element.(= is written in LaTeX as \subseteq and the upward closure of X in D is written \uparrow_{D} X). (1994-12-16)

CMU Common Lisp ::: (CMU CL) A public domain industrial strength Common Lisp programming environment. Many of the X3J13 changes have been incorporated into CMU CL. CLtL1 or proposed ANSI CL. Probably the new features most interesting to users are SETF functions, LOOP and the WITH-COMPILATION-UNIT macro.The new CMU CL compiler is called Python.Version 17c includes an incremental compiler, profiler, run-time support, documentation, an editor and a debugger. It runs under Mach on SPARC, MIPS and IBM PC RT and under SunOS on SPARC. .E-mail: . (1993-11-18)

CMU Common Lisp "language" (CMU CL) A {public domain} "industrial strength" {Common Lisp} programming environment. Many of the {X3J13} changes have been incorporated into CMU CL. Wherever possible, this has been done so as to transparently allow use of either {CLtL1} or proposed {ANSI CL}. Probably the new features most interesting to users are {SETF} functions, {LOOP} and the {WITH-COMPILATION-UNIT} {macro}. The new CMU CL compiler is called {Python}. Version 17c includes an {incremental compiler}, profiler, run-time support, documentation, an editor and a debugger. It runs under {Mach} on {SPARC}, {MIPS} and {IBM PC RT} and under {SunOS} on {SPARC}. {(ftp://lisp-sun1.slisp.cs.cmu.edu/pub/)}. E-mail: "slisp@cs.cmu.edu". (1993-11-18)

CNAME "networking" The {canonical name} query type for {Domain Name System}. This query asks a DNS {server} for a {host}'s official {hostname}. (1994-12-22)

CNAME ::: (networking) The canonical name query type for Domain Name System. This query asks a DNS server for a host's official hostname. (1994-12-22)

coalesced sum ::: (theory) (Or smash sum) In domain theory, the coalesced sum of domains A and B, A (+) B, contains all the non-bottom elements of both domains, tagged to show which part of the sum they come from, and a new bottom element. D (+) E = { bottom(D(+)E) }U { (0,d) | d in D, d /= bottom(D) } in the sum. This may be generalised to any number of domains.The ordering is bottom(D(+)E) = v For all v in D(+)E = is usually written as LaTeX \sqsubseteq and (+) as LaTeX \oplus - a + in a circle. (1994-12-22)

coalesced sum "theory" (Or "smash sum") In {domain theory}, the coalesced sum of {domains} A and B, A (+) B, contains all the non-{bottom} elements of both domains, tagged to show which part of the sum they come from, and a new {bottom} element. D (+) E = { bottom(D(+)E) }   U { (0,d) | d in D, d /= bottom(D) }   U { (1,e) | e in E, e /= bottom(E) } The bottoms of the constituent domains are coalesced into a single bottom in the sum. This may be generalised to any number of domains. The ordering is bottom(D(+)E) "= v For all v in D(+)E (i,v1) "= (j,v2)  iff i = j & v1 "= v2 ""=" is usually written as {LaTeX} \sqsubseteq and "(+)" as {LaTeX} \oplus - a "+" in a circle. (1994-12-22)

codomain "theory" The set of values or {type} containing all possible results of a {function}. The codomain of a function f of type D -" C is C. A function's {image} is a subset of its codomain. (1994-12-23)

codomain ::: The set of values or type containing all possible results of a function. The codomain of a function f of type D -> C is C. A function's image is a subset of its codomain. (1994-12-23)

Common Internet File System "protocol" (CIFS) An {Internet} {file system} {protocol}, based on {Microsoft}'s {SMB}. Microsoft has given CIFS to the {Internet Engineering Task Force} (IETF) as an Internet Draft. CIFS is intended to complement existing protocols such as {HTTP}, {FTP}, and {NFS}. CIFS runs on top of {TCP/IP} and uses the Internet's {Domain Name Service} (DNS). It is optimised to support the slower speed {dial-up} connections common on the Internet. CIFS is more flexible than FTP. FTP operations are carried out on entire files whereas CIFS is aimed at routine data access and incorporates high-performance multi-user read and write operations, {locking}, and file-sharing semantics. CIFS is probably closest in functionality to NFS. NFS gives random access to files and directories, but is {stateless}. With CIFS, once a file is open, state about the current access to that file is stored on both the client and the server. This allows changes on the server side to be notified to the clients that are interested. {Microsoft Overview (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/fileio/base/cifs_smb_protocol_overview.asp)}. {SNIA page (http://snia.org/tech_activities/CIFS/)}. {CIFS: A Common Internet File System, Paul Leach and Dan Perry (http://microsoft.com/Mind/1196/CIFS.htm)}. {IETF Specification. CIFS version 1 (ftp://ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-leach-cifs-v1-spec-01.txt)}. (2003-03-12)

Common Internet File System ::: (protocol) (CIFS) An Internet file system protocol, based on Microsoft's SMB. Microsoft has given CIFS to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as an Internet Draft. CIFS is intended to complement existing protocols such as HTTP, FTP, and NFS.CIFS runs on top of TCP/IP and uses the Internet's Domain Name Service (DNS). It is optimised to support the slower speed dial-up connections common on the Internet.CIFS is more flexible than FTP. FTP operations are carried out on entire files whereas CIFS is aimed at routine data access and incorporates high-performance multi-user read and write operations, locking, and file-sharing semantics.CIFS is probably closest in functionality to NFS. NFS gives random access to files and directories, but is stateless. With CIFS, once a file is open, state server. This allows changes on the server side to be notified to the clients that are interested. . . . .(2003-03-12)

Communications Decency Act ::: (legal) (CDA) An amendment to the U.S. 1996 Telecommunications Bill that went into effect on 08 February 1996, outraging thousands of Internet users who it punishable by fines of up to $250,000 to post indecent language on the Internet anywhere that a minor could read it.The Electronic Frontier Foundation created public domain blue ribbon icons that many web authors downloaded and displayed on their web pages.On 12 June 1996, a three-judge panel in Philadelphia ruled the CDA unconstitutional and issued an injunction against the United States Justice to their web pages, courtesy of the Voters Telecommunications Watch. The Justice Department has appealed the decision to the U.S. Supreme Court. (1996-11-03)

com "networking" (.com, "commercial") The {top-level domain} originally for American companies but, since the explosion of the {web}, used by most companies and for {vanity domains} of all types, whether in the US or not, often in addition to {country code} domains like amazon.co.uk. The term "dot com" is now widely used to refer to any Internet business as in "My dot com turned into a dot bomb". (2007-02-18)

compact ::: 1. (Or finite, isolated) In domain theory, an element d of a cpo D is compact if and only if, for any chain S, a subset of D, d = lub S => there exists s in S such that d = s. I.e. you always reach d (or better) after a finite number of steps up the chain.(= is written in LaTeX as \sqsubseteq).[Jargon File] (1995-01-13)2. Of a design, describes the valuable property that it can all be apprehended at once in one's head. This generally means the thing created from the design cleanly into the overall design scheme (thus, some fans of Classic C maintain that ANSI C is no longer compact). (1995-01-13)

compact 1. "theory" (Or "finite", "isolated") In {domain theory}, an element d of a {cpo} D is compact if and only if, for any {chain} S, a subset of D, d "= lub S =" there exists s in S such that d "= s. I.e. you always reach d (or better) after a finite number of steps up the chain. (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\sqsubseteq}). [{Jargon File}] (1995-01-13) 2. "jargon" Of a design, describes the valuable property that it can all be apprehended at once in one's head. This generally means the thing created from the design can be used with greater facility and fewer errors than an equivalent tool that is not compact. Compactness does not imply triviality or lack of power; for example, {C} is compact and {Fortran} is not, but C is more powerful than Fortran. Designs become non-compact through accreting {features} and {cruft} that don't merge cleanly into the overall design scheme (thus, some fans of {Classic C} maintain that {ANSI C} is no longer compact). (2008-10-13)

compactness preserving ::: In domain theory, a function f is compactness preserving if f c is compact whenever c is. (1995-01-13)

compactness preserving "theory" In {domain theory}, a {function} f is compactness preserving if f c is {compact} whenever c is. (1995-01-13)

complete partial ordering "theory" (cpo) A {partial ordering} of a {set} under a {relation}, where all {directed} {subsets} have a {least upper bound}. A cpo is usually defined to include a least element, {bottom} (David Schmidt calls this a {pointed cpo}). A cpo which is {algebraic} and {boundedly complete} is a (Scott) {domain}. (1994-11-30)

complete partial ordering ::: (theory) (cpo) A partial ordering of a set under a relation, where all directed subsets have a least upper bound. A cpo is usually defined to include a least element, bottom (David Schmidt calls this a pointed cpo). A cpo which is algebraic and boundedly complete is a (Scott) domain. (1994-11-30)

Consciousness: A designation applied to conscious mind as opposed to a supposedly unconscious or subconscious mind, and to the whole domain of the physical and non-mental. (See: Field of consciousness.)

Consciousness: (Lat. conscire, to know, to be cognizant of) A designation applied to conscious mind as opposed to a supposedly unconscious or subconscious mind (See Subconscious Mind; Unconscious Mind), and to the whole domain of the physical and non-mental. Consciousness is generally considered an indefinable term or rather a term definable only by direct introspective appeal to conscious experiences. The indefinability of consciousness is expressed by Sir William Hamilton: "Consciousness cannot be defined: we may be ourselves fully aware what consciousness is, but we cannot without confusion convey to others a definition of what we ourselves clearly apprehend. The reason is plain: consciousness lies at the root of all knowledge." (Lectures on Metaphysics, I, 191.) Ladd's frequently quoted definition of consciousness succeeds only in indicating the circumstances under which it is directly observable: "Whatever we are when we are awake, as contrasted with what we are when we sink into a profound and dreamless sleep, that is to be conscious."

consistently complete ::: [domain theory] boundedly complete.

Constraint Handling In Prolog "language" (CHIP) A {constraint logic programming} language developed by M. Dincbas at {ECRC}, Munich, Germany in 1985 which includes {Boolean unification} and a symbolic {simplex}-like {algorithm}. CHIP introduced the {domain-variable model}. ["The Constraint Logic Programming Language CHIP", M. Dincbas et al, Proc 2nd Intl Conf on Fifth Generation Computer Sys, Tokyo (Nov 1988), pp.249-264]. ["Constraint Satisfaction in Logic Programming", Van Hentenryck. Available from COSYTEC, 4 rue Jean Rostand, F91893 Orsay, France]. (1994-11-15)

Constraint Handling In Prolog ::: (language) (CHIP) A constraint logic programming language developed by M. Dincbas at ECRC, Munich, Germany in 1985 which includes Boolean unification and a symbolic simplex-like algorithm. CHIP introduced the domain-variable model.[The Constraint Logic Programming Language CHIP, M. Dincbas et al, Proc 2nd Intl Conf on Fifth Generation Computer Sys, Tokyo (Nov 1988), pp.249-264].[Constraint Satisfaction in Logic Programming, Van Hentenryck. Available from COSYTEC, 4 rue Jean Rostand, F91893 Orsay, France]. (1994-11-15)

continuous function ::: A function f : D -> E, where D and E are cpos, is continuous if it is monotonic and f (lub Z) = lub { f z | z in Z } for all directed sets Z in D. In other words, the image of the lub is the lub of any directed image.All additive functions (functions which preserve all lubs) are continuous. A continuous function has a least fixed point if its domain has a least element, bottom (i.e. it is a cpo or a pointed cpo depending on your definition of a cpo). The least fixed point is fix f = lub {f^n bottom | n = 0..infinity} (1994-11-30)

continuous function "mathematics" A {function} f : D -" E, where D and E are {cpos}, is continuous if it is {monotonic} and f (lub Z) = lub { f z | z in Z } for all {directed} sets Z in D. In other words, the image of the lub is the lub of any directed image. All {additive} functions (functions which preserve all lubs) are continuous. A continuous function has a {least fixed point} if its {domain} has a least element, {bottom} (i.e. it is a cpo or a "pointed cpo" depending on your definition of a cpo). The {least fixed point} is fix f = lub {f^n bottom | n = 0..infinity} (1994-11-30)

copyright "legal" The exclusive rights of the owner of the copyright on a work to make and distribute copies, prepare derivative works, and perform and display the work in public (these last two mainly apply to plays, films, dances and the like, but could also apply to software). A work, including a piece of software, is under copyright by default in most coutries, whether of not it displays a copyright notice. However, a copyright notice may make it easier to assert ownership. The copyright owner is the person or company whose name appears in the copyright notice on the box, or the disk or the screen or wherever. Most countries have agreed to uphold each others' copyrights. A copyright notice has three parts. The first can be either the {copyright symbol} (a letter C in a circle), the word "Copyright" or the abbreviation "Copr". Only the first of these is recognised internationally and the common {ASCII} rendering "(C)" is not valid anywhere. This is followed by the name of the copyright holder and the year of publication. The year should be the year of _first_ publication, it is not necessary as some believe to update this every year to the current year. Copyright protection in most countries extends for 50 years after the author's death. Originally, most of the computer industry assumed that only the program's underlying instructions were protected under copyright law but, beginning in the early 1980s, a series of lawsuits involving the video screens of game programs extended protections to the appearance of programs. Use of copyright to restrict redistribution is immoral, unethical and illegitimate. It is a result of brainwashing by monopolists and corporate interests and it violates everyone's rights. Such use of copyrights and patents hamper technological progress by making a naturally abundant resource scarce. Many, from communists to right wing libertarians, are trying to abolish intellectual property myths. See also {public domain}, {copyleft}, {software law}. {Universal Copyright Convention (http://www.unesco.org/new/en/culture/themes/creativity/creative-industries/copyright/)}. {US Copyright Office (http://copyright.gov/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:misc.legal.computing}. [Is this definition correct in the UK? In the US? Anywhere?] (2014-01-08)

copyright ::: (legal) The exclusive rights of the owner of the copyright on a work to make and distribute copies, prepare derivative works, and perform and display the work in public (these last two mainly apply to plays, films, dances and the like, but could also apply to software).A work, including a piece of software, is under copyright by default in most coutries, whether of not it displays a copyright notice. However, a copyright or company whose name appears in the copyright notice on the box, or the disk or the screen or wherever.A copyright notice has three parts. The first can be either a c with a circle around it (LaTeX \copyright), or the word Copyright or the abbreviation Copr. A c in parentheses: (c) has no legal meaning. This is followed by the name of the copyright holder and the year of first publication.Countries around the world have agreed to recognise and uphold each others' copyrights, but this world-wide protection requires the use of the c in a circle.Originally, most of the computer industry assumed that only the program's underlying instructions were protected under copyright law but, beginning in the early 1980s, a series of lawsuits involving the video screens of game programs extended protections to the appearance of programs.Use of copyright to restrict redistribution is actually immoral, unethical, and illegitimate. It is a result of brainwashing by monopolists and corporate from communists to right wing libertarians, are trying to abolish intellectual property myths.See also public domain, copyleft, software law. US Copyright Office Circular 61 - Copyright Registration for Computer Programs . The US Department of Education's How Does Copyright Law Apply to Computer Software .Usenet newsgroup: misc.legal.computing.[Is this definition correct in the UK? In the US? Elsewhere?](2000-03-23)

country code ::: (networking, standard) Originally, a two-letter abbreviation for a particular country, generally used as a top-level domain.Originally, as the name implies, country codes were meant just for countries; but over time, country codes were allocated for many areas (mostly islands) that aren't countries -- such as Antarctica (aq), Christmas Island (cx) and Saint Pierre et Miquelon (pm).Country codes are based on ISO 3166 and are used as the top level domain for Internet hostnames in most countries but hardly ever in the USA (code us). .(2003-05-02)

country code "networking, standard" Originally, a two-letter abbreviation for a particular country (or geographical region), generally used as a {top-level domain}. Originally country codes were just for countries; but country codes have been allocated for many areas (mostly islands) that aren't countries, such as Antarctica (aq), Christmas Island (cx) and Saint Pierre et Miquelon (pm). Country codes are defined in {ISO 3166} and are used as the top level domain for {Internet} {hostnames} in most countries but hardly ever in the USA (code "us"). ISO 3166 defines short and full english and french names, two- and three-letter codes and a three-digit code for each country. There are also {language codes}. {Latest list (http://www.iso.org/iso/en/prods-services/iso3166ma/02iso-3166-code-lists/list-en1.html)}. (2006-12-11)

county ::: n. --> An earldom; the domain of a count or earl.
A circuit or particular portion of a state or kingdom, separated from the rest of the territory, for certain purposes in the administration of justice and public affairs; -- called also a shire. See Shire.
A count; an earl or lord.


C-Prolog ::: (language, Prolog) An implementation of Prolog in C, developed by F. Pereira et al in July 1982. It had no garbage collection.It is not in the public domain. (1994-10-13)

C-Prolog "language, Prolog" An implementation of {Prolog} in {C}, developed by F. Pereira "pereira@research.att.com" et al in July 1982. It had no {garbage collection}. It is not in the {public domain}. (1994-10-13)

cyber-squatting "jargon, networking" The practice of registering famous brand names as {Internet} {domain names}, e.g. harrods.com, ibm.firm or sears.shop, in the hope of later selling them to the appropriate owner at a profit. (1998-01-22)

cyber-squatting ::: (jargon, networking) The practice of registering famous brand names as Internet domain names, e.g. harrods.com, ibm.firm or sears.shop, in the hope of later selling them to the appropriate owner at a profit. (1998-01-22)

Decus cpp ::: An almost-ANSI C preprocessor by Martin Minow. It is shipped with X11R5 (contrib/util/cpp) because some systems don't have a working cpp.It runs on VMS (Vax C, Decus C), RSX-11M, RSTS/E, P/OS, RT11, A/UX and Apollo Domain/IX 9.6 and is highly portable. (1994-11-03)

Decus cpp An almost-{ANSI C} {preprocessor} by Martin Minow. It is shipped with {X11R5} (contrib/util/cpp) because some systems don't have a working {cpp}. It runs on {VMS} ({Vax C}, {Decus C}), {RSX-11M}, {RSTS/E}, {P/OS}, {RT11}, {A/UX} and {Apollo Domain}/IX 9.6 and is highly portable. (1994-11-03)

Defense Data Network Network Information Center (DDN NIC or just "The NIC") The {DDN} {NIC}'s primary responsibility is the assignment of {Internet address}es and {Autonomous System numbers}, the administration of the root domain, and providing information and support services to the {DDN}. It is also a primary repository for {RFCs}. See also {Internet Registry}. (1994-12-07)

Defense Data Network Network Information Center ::: (DDN NIC or just The NIC) The DDN NIC's primary responsibility is the assignment of Internet addresses and Autonomous System numbers, the administration of the root domain, and providing information and support services to the DDN. It is also a primary repository for RFCs.See also Internet Registry. (1994-12-07)

Demon Internet Ltd. "company" One of the first company to provide public {Internet} access in the UK. The staff of Demon Systems Ltd., an established software house, started Demon Internet on 1992-06-01 and it was the first system in the United Kingdom to offer low cost full {Internet} access. It was started with the support of about 100 founder members who discussed the idea on {Compulink Information Exchange}, and were brave enough to pay a year's subscription in advance. They aimed to have 200 members in the first year to cover costs, ignoring any time spent. After about two weeks they realised they needed nearer 400. By November 1993 they had over 2000 subscribers and by August 1994 they had about 11000 with 20% per month growth. All revenues have been reinvested in resources and expansion of service. Demon link to {Sprintlink} in the United States making them totally independent. They peer with {EUNet} and {PIPEX} to ensure good connectivity in Great Britain as well as having links to the {JANET}/{JIPS} UK academic network. A direct line into the {Department of Computing, Imperial College, London (http://sunsite.doc.ic.ac.uk)} from their Central London {Point of Presence} (PoP) (styx.demon.co.uk) gives access to the biggest {FTP} and {Archie} site in Europe. Demon provide local call access to a large proportion of the UK. The central London {PoP} provides {leased line} connections at a cheaper rate for those customers in the central 0171 area. Further lines and {PoPs} are being added continuously. Subscribers get allocated an {Internet Address} and can choose a {hostname} within the demon.co.uk {domain}. They can have any number of e-mail address at that host. In October 1994 Demon confirmed a large contract with the major telecommunications provider {Energis}. They will supply guaranteed bandwidth to Demon's 10Mb/s {backbone} from several cities and towns. Several {PoPs} will be phased out and replaced with others during 1995. E-mail: "internet@demon.net". {(ftp://ftp.demon.co.uk/)}. {(http://demon.co.uk/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:demon.announce}. Telephone: +44 (181) 349 0063. Address: Demon Internet Ltd., 42 Hendon Lane, Finchley, London N3 1TT, UK. (1994-11-08)

Demon Internet Ltd. ::: (company) One of the first company to provide public Internet access in the UK.The staff of Demon Systems Ltd., an established software house, started Demon Internet on 1992-06-01 and it was the first system in the United Kingdom to per month growth. All revenues have been reinvested in resources and expansion of service.Demon link to Sprintlink in the United States making them totally independent. They peer with EUNet and PIPEX to ensure good connectivity in Great Britain as Central London Point of Presence (PoP) (styx.demon.co.uk) gives access to the biggest FTP and Archie site in Europe.Demon provide local call access to a large proportion of the UK. The central London PoP provides leased line connections at a cheaper rate for those customers in the central 0171 area. Further lines and PoPs are being added continuously.Subscribers get allocated an Internet Address and can choose a hostname within the demon.co.uk domain. They can have any number of e-mail address at that host.In October 1994 Demon confirmed a large contract with the major telecommunications provider Energis. They will supply guaranteed bandwidth to Demon's 10Mb/s backbone from several cities and towns. Several PoPs will be phased out and replaced with others during 1995.E-mail: . . .Usenet newsgroup: demon.announce.Telephone: +44 (181) 349 0063.Address: Demon Internet Ltd., 42 Hendon Lane, Finchley, London N3 1TT, UK. (1994-11-08)

denotational semantics "theory" A technique for describing the meaning of programs in terms of mathematical {functions} on programs and program components. Programs are translated into functions about which properties can be proved using the standard mathematical theory of functions, and especially {domain theory}. Compare {axiomatic semantics}, {operational semantics}, {standard semantics}. (1996-08-21)

denotational semantics ::: (theory) A technique for describing the meaning of programs in terms of mathematical functions on programs and program components. Programs are translated into functions about which properties can be proved using the standard mathematical theory of functions, and especially domain theory.Compare axiomatic semantics, operational semantics, standard semantics. (1996-08-21)

design recovery "process" A subtask of {reverse engineering} in which domain knowledge, external information, and deduction of fuzzy reasoning are added to the observations of the subject system to identify meaningful higher level abstractions beyond those obtained directly by examining the system itself. In other words, design recovery aims to work out what a system or component was designed to do rather than just examining its subcomponents and their interrelationships. (1996-12-08)

design recovery ::: (process) A subtask of reverse engineering in which domain knowledge, external information, and deduction of fuzzy reasoning are added to the observations of the subject system to identify meaningful higher level abstractions beyond those obtained directly by examining the system itself.In other words, design recovery aims to work out what a system or component was designed to do rather than just examining its subcomponents and their interrelationships. (1996-12-08)

despotat ::: n. --> The station or government of a despot; also, the domain of a despot.

dhama ::: seat, domain.

disjoint union ::: In domain theory, a union (or sum) which results in a domain without a least element.

disjoint union In {domain theory}, a union (or sum) which results in a domain without a least element.

distributed database ::: A collection of several different databases that looks like a single database to the user. An example is the Internet Domain Name System (DNS). (1994-12-07)

distributed database A collection of several different {databases} that looks like a single {database} to the user. An example is the {Internet} {Domain Name System} (DNS). (1994-12-07)

Distributed Operating Multi Access Interactive Network (DOMAIN) The proprietary network {protocol} used by {Apollo} {workstations}. (1995-02-16)

Distributed Operating Multi Access Interactive Network ::: (DOMAIN) The proprietary network protocol used by Apollo workstations. (1995-02-16)

distribution ::: 1. (software) A software source tree packaged for distribution; but see kit.2. (messaging) A vague term encompassing mailing lists and Usenet newsgroups (but not BBS fora); any topic-oriented message channel with multiple recipients.3. (messaging) An information-space domain (usually loosely correlated with geography) to which propagation of a Usenet message is restricted; a much-underused feature.[Jargon File]

distribution 1. "software" A software source tree packaged for distribution; but see {kit}. 2. "messaging" A vague term encompassing {mailing lists} and {Usenet} {newsgroups} (but not {BBS} {fora}); any topic-oriented message channel with multiple recipients. 3. "messaging" An information-space domain (usually loosely correlated with geography) to which propagation of a {Usenet} message is restricted; a much-underused feature. [{Jargon File}]

DNS ::: 1. Domain Name System.2. Distributed Name Service. See DECdns.

DNS 1. {Domain Name System}. 2. Distributed Name Service. See {DECdns}.

Domain Analysis "systems analysis" 1. Determining the operations, data objects, properties and {abstractions} appropriate for designing solutions to problems in a given {domain}. 2. The {domain engineering} activity in which domain knowledge is studied and formalised as a domain definition and a domain specification. A {software reuse} approach that involves combining software components, subsystems, etc., into a single application system. 3. The process of identifying, collecting organising, analysing and representing a {domain model} and software architecture from the study of existing systems, underlying theory, emerging technology and development histories within the domain of interest. 4. The analysis of systems within a domain to discover commonalities and differences among them. (1997-12-26)

Domain Analysis ::: (systems analysis) 1. Determining the operations, data objects, properties and abstractions appropriate for designing solutions to problems in a given domain.2. The domain engineering activity in which domain knowledge is studied and formalised as a domain definition and a domain specification. A software reuse approach that involves combining software components, subsystems, etc., into a single application system.3. The process of identifying, collecting organising, analysing and representing a domain model and software architecture from the study of existing systems, underlying theory, emerging technology and development histories within the domain of interest.4. The analysis of systems within a domain to discover commonalities and differences among them. (1997-12-26)

Domain Architecture Model "systems analysis" A set of software architectures generic to a {domain} that define organising frameworks for constructing new application designs and implementations within the domain, consistent with the domain requirements model. (1997-12-26)

Domain Architecture Model ::: (systems analysis) A set of software architectures generic to a domain that define organising frameworks for constructing new application designs and implementations within the domain, consistent with the domain requirements model. (1997-12-26)

Domain Name Server "spelling" {Domain Name System}. (1997-12-15)

Domain Name Server ::: (spelling) Domain Name System. (1997-12-15)

Domain Name System "networking" (DNS) A general-purpose distributed, replicated, data query service chiefly used on {Internet} for translating {hostnames} into {Internet addresses}. Also, the style of {hostname} used on the Internet, though such a name is properly called a {fully qualified domain name}. DNS can be configured to use a sequence of name servers, based on the domains in the name being looked for, until a match is found. The name resolution client (e.g. Unix's gethostbyname() library function) can be configured to search for host information in the following order: first in the local {hosts file}, second in {NIS} and third in DNS. This sequencing of Naming Services is sometimes called "name service switching". Under {Solaris} is configured in the file /etc/nsswitch.conf. DNS can be queried interactively using the command {nslookup}. It is defined in {STD 13}, {RFC 1034}, {RFC 1035}, {RFC 1591}. {BIND} is a common DNS server. {Info from Virtual Office, Inc. (http://virtual.office.com/domains.html)}. (2001-05-14)

Domain Name System ::: (networking) (DNS) A general-purpose distributed, replicated, data query service chiefly used on Internet for translating hostnames into Internet sequence of name servers, based on the domains in the name being looked for, until a match is found.The name resolution client (e.g. Unix's gethostbyname() library function) can be configured to search for host information in the following order: first in the Services is sometimes called name service switching. Under Solaris is configured in the file /etc/nsswitch.conf.DNS can be queried interactively using the command nslookup. It is defined in STD 13, RFC 1034, RFC 1035, RFC 1591.BIND is a common DNS server. .(2001-05-14)

Domain Software Engineering Environment "programming" (DSEE) A proprietary {CASE} framework and {configuration management} system from {Apollo}. (1996-05-29)

Domain Software Engineering Environment ::: (programming) (DSEE) A proprietary CASE framework and configuration management system from Apollo. (1996-05-29)

domanial ::: a. --> Of or relating to a domain or to domains.

DOOM "games" A simulated 3D moster-hunting action game for {IBM PCs}, created and published by {id Software}. The original press release was dated January 1993. A cut-down shareware version v1.0 was released on 10 December 1993 and again with some bug-fixes, as v1.4 in June 1994. DOOM is similar to Wolfenstein 3d (id Software, Apogee) but has better {texture mapping}; walls can be at any angle, of any thickness and have windows; lighting can fade into the distance or come from point sources; floors and ceilings can be of any height; many surfaces are animated; up to four players can play over a network or two by serial link; it has a high {frame rate} (comparable to TV on a {486}/33); DOOM isn't just a collection of connected closed rooms like Wolfenstein but sounds can travel anywhere and alert monsters of your approach. The shareware version is available from these sites: {Cactus (ftp://cactus.org/pub/IHHD/multi-player/)}, {Manitoba (ftp://ftp.cc.umanitoba.ca/pub/doom/)}, {UK (ftp://ftp.demon.co.uk/pub/ibmpc/games/id/)}, {South Africa (ftp://ftp.sun.ac.za/pub/msdos/games/id/)}, {UWP ftp (ftp://archive.uwp.edu/pub/msdos/games/id/)}, {UWP http (http://archive.uwp.edu/pub/msdos/games/id/)}, {Finland (ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/msdos/games/id)}, {Washington (ftp://wuarchive.wustl.edu/pub/MSDOS_UPLOADS/games/doom)}. A {FAQ} by Hank Leukart: {UWP (ftp://ftp.uwp.edu/pub/msdos/games/id/home-brew/doom)}, {Washington (ftp://wuarchive.wustl.edu/pub/MSDOS_UPLOADS/games/doomstuff)}. {FAQ on WWW (http://venom.st.hmc.edu/~tkelly/doomfaq/intro.html)}. {Other links (http://gamesdomain.co.uk/descript/doom.html)}. {Usenet} newsgroups: {news:rec.games.computer.doom.announce}, {news:rec.games.computer.doom.editing}, {news:rec.games.computer.doom.help}, {news:rec.games.computer.doom.misc}, {news:rec.games.computer.doom.playing}, {news:alt.games.doom}, {news:comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action}, {news:comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.announce}, {news:comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.misc}. Mailing List: "listserv@cedar.univie.ac.at" ("sub DOOML" in the message body, no subject). Telephone: +44 (1222) 362 361 - the UK's first multi-player DOOM and games server. (1994-12-14)

Do What the Fuck You Want to Public License "legal" (WTFPL) An obscenely permissive {license} for {software} and other scientific or artistic works. As the name suggests, the WTFPL does not restrict what you can do with the licenced work at all. The only restriction on the use of the license itself is that if you change it you also change the name. The WTFPL aims to expose and remove the problems of the popular but competing {GPL} and {BSD} licences. Since, according to its own terms, the license can be completely ignored, it can be little more than an amusing paradox. {Unlicense} is a more serious template for dedicating {software} to the {public domain}. {WTFPL Home (http://www.wtfpl.net/)}. (2013-11-05)

D‘R, the domain of R.

DSEE {Domain Software Engineering Environment}

duncedom ::: n. --> The realm or domain of dunces.

Dweller on the Threshold (Dweller of the Threshold) Coined by Bulwer-Lytton in his romance Zanoni, where it represents a malevolent entity of awful and terrifying aspect awaiting to menace and tempt the aspirant to occultism. The author, by means of this vivid portrayal, has expressed the mystical fact that when one has taken a stand to overcome a certain weakness in one’s nature, or even a habit, such resolution seems to array all the opposing forces against the aspirant. Thus it may readily be understood that when one seeks to enter the domain of the occult, a similar experience awaits the candidate; but the forces or energies thus aroused are of one’s own making, and they must be met and conquered by their originator before progress may be successfully made. “The real Dweller on the Threshold is formed of the despair and despondency of the neophyte, who is called upon to give up all his old affections for kindred, parents and children, as well as his aspirations for objects of worldly ambition, which have perhaps been his associates for many incarnations. When called upon to give up these things, the neophyte feels a kind of blank, before he realizes his higher possibilities.” (Subba Row, Theos 7:284).

edu "networking" ("education") The {top-level domain} for educational establishments in the USA (and some other countries). E.g. "mit.edu". The UK equivalent is "ac.uk". (1999-01-26)

edu ::: (networking) (education) The top-level domain for educational establishments in the USA (and some other countries). E.g. mit.edu. The UK equivalent is ac.uk. (1999-01-26)

electronic mail address "messaging" (Usually "e-mail address") The string used to specify the source or destination of an {electronic mail} message. E.g. "john@doc.acme.ac.uk". The {RFC 822} standard is probably the most widely used on the {Internet}. {X.400} was once used in Europe and Canada. {UUCP}-style ({bang path}) addresses or other kinds of {source route} became virtually extinct in the 1990s. In the example above, "john" is the {local part} which is the name of a {mailbox} on the destination computer. If the sender and recipient use the same computer, or the same {LAN}, for electronic mail then the local part is usually all that is required. If they use different computers, e.g. they work at different companies or use different {Internet service providers}, then the "host part", e.g. "sales.acme.com" must be appended after an "@". This usually takes the form of a {fully qualified domain name} or, within a large organisation, it may be just the {hostname} part, e.g. "sales". The destination computer named by the host part is usually a {server} of some kind rather than an individual's {workstation} or {PC}. The user's mail is stored on the server and read later via {client} mail software running on the user's computer. Large organisations, such as universities will often set up a global {alias} directory which maps a simple user name such as "jsmith" to an address which contains more information such as "jsmith@london.bigcomp.co.uk". This hides the detailed knowledge of where the message will be delivered from the sender, making it much easier to redirect mail if a user leaves or moves to a different department for example. (2014-10-07)

embedding ::: 1. (mathematics) One instance of some mathematical object contained with in another instance, e.g. a group which is a subgroup.2. (theory) (domain theory) A complete partial order F in [X -> Y] is an embedding if (1) For all x1, x2 in X, x1 = x2 => F x1 = F x2 and(2) For all y in Y, x | F x = y is directed.(= is written in LaTeX as \sqsubseteq). (1995-03-27)

embedding 1. "mathematics" One instance of some mathematical object contained with in another instance, e.g. a {group} which is a subgroup. 2. "theory" ({domain theory}) A {complete partial order} F in [X -" Y] is an embedding if (1) For all x1, x2 in X, x1 "= x2 "=" F x1 "= F x2 and (2) For all y in Y, {x | F x "= y} is {directed}. (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\sqsubseteq}). (1995-03-27)

ESLPDPRO {ESL} public domain version of Edinburgh {Prolog} for {MS-DOS}. The code is totally compatible with C-Prolog. {(ftp://aisun1.ai.uga.edu/ai.prolog/eslpdpro.zip)}.

ESLPDPRO ::: ESL public domain version of Edinburgh Prolog for MS-DOS. The code is totally compatible with C-Prolog. .

extralogical ::: a. --> Lying outside of the domain of logic.

federation "security" The establishment of some or all of business agreements, {cryptographic} trust and user identifiers or attributes across security and policy domains to enable more seamless business interaction. As {web services} promise to enable integration between business partners through {loose coupling} at the application and messaging layer, federation does so at the identity management layer, insulating each domain from the details of the others' authentication and authorization. Key to this loose coupling at the identity management layer are standardized mechanisms and formats for the communication of identity information between the domains. {SAML} is one such standard. (2011-05-12)

FIDIL ::: Based on maps, generalised arrays whose index sets (domains) are arbitrary D-dimensional sets. Domains are first-class objects and may be constructed by union, intersection, etc.[Fidil: A Language for Scientific Programming, P.N. Hilfinger et al, TR UCRL-98057, LLNL Jan 1988].

FIDIL Based on "maps", generalised arrays whose index sets ("domains") are arbitrary D-dimensional sets. Domains are first-class objects and may be constructed by union, intersection, etc. ["Fidil: A Language for Scientific Programming", P.N. Hilfinger et al, TR UCRL-98057, LLNL Jan 1988].

FIDO ::: FInite DOmains. A constraint language implemented on top of Prolog. .

FIDO "language" (FInite DOmains) A {constraint language} implemented on top of {Prolog}. {(ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub1/Unix/languages/fido/)}. (2014-11-08)

fief ::: territory, domain or estate (esp. of a feudal lord).

Firmament Combines the meanings of support, expanse, and boundary; a translation of the Latin firmamentum (a support), which again renders the Greek stereoma (a foundation). The Hebrew is raqia‘ (an unfolding or expanse). The ordinary European meaning is the vault of heaven or sky. It is often identified with air, called the breath of the supporters of the heavenly dome in Islamic mysticism; in India the ethery expanse is the domain of Indra, and one reads of the 1008 divisions of the devaloka (god-worlds) and firmaments. It also relates to the supporters, pillars, or cosmocratores in so many ancient cosmogonies, said to uphold or support the world.

first-order logic ::: (language, logic) The language describing the truth of mathematical formulas. Formulas describe properties of terms and have a truth value. The following are atomic formulas: TrueFalse If F1, F2 and F3 are formulas and v is a variable then the following are compound formulas: F1 ^ F2 conjunction - true if both F1 and F2 are true, a mathematical expression involving numbers, operators, functions and variables.The order of a logic specifies what entities For all and Exists may quantify over. First-order logic can only quantify over sets of atomic entity. The sets over which quantifiers operate are usually implicit but can be deduced from well-formedness constraints.In first-order logic quantifiers always range over ALL the elements of the domain of discourse. By contrast, second-order logic allows one to quantify over subsets.[The Realm of First-Order Logic, Jon Barwise, Handbook of Mathematical Logic (Barwise, ed., North Holland, NYC, 1977)].(2005-12-27)

first-order logic "language, logic" The language describing the truth of mathematical {formulas}. Formulas describe properties of terms and have a truth value. The following are atomic formulas: True False p(t1,..tn) where t1,..,tn are terms and p is a predicate. If F1, F2 and F3 are formulas and v is a variable then the following are compound formulas: F1 ^ F2 conjunction - true if both F1 and F2 are true, F1 V F2 disjunction - true if either or both are true, F1 =" F2 implication - true if F1 is false or F2 is true, F1 is the antecedent, F2 is the consequent (sometimes written with a thin arrow), F1 "= F2 true if F1 is true or F2 is false, F1 == F2 true if F1 and F2 are both true or both false (normally written with a three line equivalence symbol) ~F1 negation - true if f1 is false (normally written as a dash '-' with a shorter vertical line hanging from its right hand end). For all v . F universal quantification - true if F is true for all values of v (normally written with an inverted A). Exists v . F existential quantification - true if there exists some value of v for which F is true. (Normally written with a reversed E). The operators ^ V =" "= == ~ are called connectives. "For all" and "Exists" are {quantifiers} whose {scope} is F. A term is a mathematical expression involving numbers, operators, functions and variables. The "order" of a logic specifies what entities "For all" and "Exists" may quantify over. First-order logic can only quantify over sets of {atomic} {propositions}. (E.g. For all p . p =" p). Second-order logic can quantify over functions on propositions, and higher-order logic can quantify over any type of entity. The sets over which quantifiers operate are usually implicit but can be deduced from well-formedness constraints. In first-order logic quantifiers always range over ALL the elements of the domain of discourse. By contrast, second-order logic allows one to quantify over subsets. ["The Realm of First-Order Logic", Jon Barwise, Handbook of Mathematical Logic (Barwise, ed., North Holland, NYC, 1977)]. (2005-12-27)

flat ::: 1. Lacking any complex internal structure. That bitty box has only a flat file system, not a hierarchical one. The verb form is flatten. Usually used pejoratively (at least with respect to file systems).2. Said of a memory architecture like that of the VAX or Motorola 680x0 that is one big linear address space (typically with each possible value of a processor are composed from a base-register/offset pair. Segmented designs are generally considered cretinous.3. A flat domain is one where all elements except bottom are incomparable (equally well defined). E.g. the integers.[Jargon File]

flat 1. Lacking any complex internal structure. "That {bitty box} has only a flat file system, not a hierarchical one." The verb form is {flatten}. Usually used pejoratively (at least with respect to file systems). 2. Said of a memory architecture like that of the {VAX} or {Motorola} {680x0} that is one big linear address space (typically with each possible value of a processor register corresponding to a unique address). This is a {Good Thing}. The opposite is a "{segmented}" architecture like that of the {Intel 80x86} in which addresses are composed from a base-register/offset pair. Segmented designs are generally considered cretinous. 3. A flat {domain} is one where all elements except {bottom} are incomparable (equally well defined). E.g. the integers. [{Jargon File}]

fm "networking" The {country code} for the Federated States of Micronesia. Heavily used for {vanity domains} by FM radio stations. (1999-01-27)

For many purposes, however, it is necessary to add to the functional calculus of order omega the axiom of infinity, requiring the domain of individuals to be infinite. -- This is most conveniently done by adding a single additional primitive formula, which may be described by referring to § 3 above, taking the formula, which is there given as an example of a formula satisfiable in an infinite domain of individuals but not in any finite domain, and prefixing the quantifier (EF) with scope extending to the end of the formula. This form of the axiom of infinity, however, is considerably stronger (in the absence of the axiom of choice) than the "Infin ax" of Whitehead and Russell.

For the interpretation of the calculus we must presuppose a certain domain of individuals. This may be any well-defined non-empty domain, within very wide limits. Different posslhle choices of the domain of individuals lead to different interpretations of the calculus.

fourth generation language "language" (4GL, or "report generator language") An "application specific" language, one with built-in knowledge of an {application domain}, in the way that {SQL} has built-in knowledge of the {relational} database domain. The term was invented by Jim Martin to refer to {non-procedural} {high level languages} built around {database} systems. Fourth generation languages are close to {natural language} and were built with the concept that certain applications could be generalised by adding limited programming ability to them. When given a description of the data format and the report to generate, a 4GL system produces {COBOL} (or other 3GL) code, that actually reads and processes the data and formats the results. Some examples of 4GL are: {database query language} e.g.{SQL}; {Focus}, {Metafont}, {PostScript}, {S}, {IDL-PV}, {WAVE}, {Gauss}, {Mathematica}, and {data-stream languages} such as {AVS}, {APE}, {Iris Explorer}. (2004-04-01)

fourth generation language ::: (language) (4GL, or report generator language) An application specific language, one with built-in knowledge of an application domain, in the way that SQL has built-in knowledge of the relational database domain.The term was invented by Jim Martin to refer to non-procedural high level languages built around database systems.Fourth generation languages are close to natural language and were built with the concept that certain applications could be generalised by adding limited programming ability to them.When given a description of the data format and the report to generate, a 4GL system produces COBOL (or other 3GL) code, that actually reads and processes the data and formats the results.Some examples of 4GL are: database query language e.g.SQL; Focus, Metafont, PostScript, S, IDL-PV, WAVE, Gauss, Mathematica, and data-stream languages such as AVS, APE, Iris Explorer.(2004-04-01)

FQDN {fully qualified domain name}

Fravashi (Avestan) Fravahr (Pahlavi), Fravati (old Persian) [from fra before + var to grow upright, incline upward, be true] Sometimes Farvarshi. Primeval truth; the alter ego or spiritual counterpart of every entity. “The Fravashi is the inner power in every being that maintains it and makes it grow and subsist. Originally the Fravashis were the same as the Pitris of the Hindus or the Manes of the Latins, that is to say, the everlasting and deified souls of the dead; but in course of time they gained a wider domain, and not only men, but gods and even physical objects, like the sky and the earth, etc., had each a Fravashi” (Darmesteter, Farvardin Yasht 179).

fully qualified domain name ::: (networking) (FQDN) The full name of a system, consisting of its local hostname and its domain name, including a top-level domain (tld). For example, sufficient to determine a unique Internet address for any host on the Internet. This process, called name resolution, uses the Domain Name System (DNS).With the explosion of interest in the Internet following the advent of the World-Wide Web, domain names (especially the most significant two components, therefore become highly political and is performed by a number of different registrars. There are different registries for the different tlds.A final dot on the end of a FQDN can be used to tell the DNS that the name is fully qualified and so needs no extra suffixes added, but it is not required.See also network, the, network address.(2005-06-09)

fully qualified domain name "networking" (FQDN) The full name of a system, consisting of its local {hostname} and its {domain} name, including a {top-level domain} (tld). For example, "venera" is a hostname and "venera.isi.edu" is an FQDN. An FQDN should be sufficient to determine a unique {Internet address} for any host on the {Internet}. This process, called "name resolution", uses the {Domain Name System} (DNS). With the explosion of interest in the {Internet} following the advent of the {web}, domain names (especially the most significant two components, e.g. "sun.com", and especially in the ".com" tld) have become a valuable part of many companies' "brand". The allocation of these, overseen by {ICANN}, has therefore become highly political and is performed by a number of different registrars. There are different registries for the different tlds. A final dot on the end of a FQDN can be used to tell the DNS that the name is fully qualified and so needs no extra suffixes added, but it is not required. See also {network, the}, {network address}. (2005-06-09)

function 1. "mathematics" (Or "map", "mapping") If D and C are sets (the domain and codomain) then a function f from D to C, normally written "f : D -" C" is a subset of D x C such that: 1. For each d in D there exists some c in C such that (d,c) is an element of f. I.e. the function is defined for every element of D. 2. For each d in D, c1 and c2 in C, if both (d,c1) and (d,c2) are elements of f then c1 = c2. I.e. the function is uniquely defined for every element of D. See also {image}, {inverse}, {partial function}. 2. "programming" Computing usage derives from the mathematical term but is much less strict. In programming (except in {functional programming}), a function may return different values each time it is called with the same argument values and may have {side effects}. A {procedure} is a function which returns no value but has only {side-effects}. The {C} language, for example, has no procedures, only functions. {ANSI C} even defines a {type}, {void}, for the result of a function that has no result. (1996-09-01)

function ::: 1. (mathematics) (Or map, mapping) If D and C are sets (the domain and codomain) then a function f from D to C, normally written f : D -> C is a subset of D x C such that:1. For each d in D there exists some c in C such that (d,c) is an element of f. I.e. the function is defined for every element of D.2. For each d in D, c1 and c2 in C, if both (d,c1) and (d,c2) are elements of f then c1 = c2. I.e. the function is uniquely defined for every element of D.See also image, inverse, partial function.2. (programming) Computing usage derives from the mathematical term but is much less strict. In programming (except in functional programming), a function may return different values each time it is called with the same argument values and may have side effects.A procedure is a function which returns no value but has only side-effects. The C language, for example, has no procedures, only functions. ANSI C even defines a type, void, for the result of a function that has no result. (1996-09-01)

Function: In mathematics and logic, an n-adic function is a law of correspondence between an ordered set of n things (called arguments of the function, or values of the independent variables) and another thing (the value of the function, or value of the dependent variable), of such a sort that, given any ordered set of n arguments which belongs to a certain domain (the range of the function), the value of the function is uniquely determined. The value ot the function is spoken of as obtained by applying the function to the arguments. The domain of all possible values of the function is called the range of the dependent variable. If F denotes a function and X1, X2, . . . , Xn denote the first argument, second argument, etc., respectively, the notation F(X1, X2, . . . , Xn) is used to denote the corresponding value of the function; or the notation may be [F](X1, X2 . . . , Xn), to provide against ambiguities which might otherwisc arise if F were a long expression rather than a single letter.

games "games" "The time you enjoy wasting is not time wasted." -- {Bertrand Russell}. Here are some games-related pages on the {Web}: {Imperial Nomic (http://mit.edu:8001/people/achmed/fascist/)}, {Thoth's games and recreations page (http://cis.ufl.edu/~thoth/library/recreation.html)}, {Games Domain (http://wcl-rs.bham.ac.uk/GamesDomain)}, {Zarf's List of Games on the Web (http://leftfoot.com/games.html)}, {Dave's list of pointers to games resources (http://wcl-rs.bham.ac.uk/~djh/index.html)}, {Collaborative Fiction (http://asylum.cid.com/fiction/fiction.html)}. See also {3DO}, {ADL}, {ADVENT}, {ADVSYS}, {alpha/beta pruning}, {Amiga}, {CHIP-8}, {Core Wars}, {DROOL}, {empire}, {I see no X here.}, {Infocom}, {Inglish}, {initgame}, {life}, {minimax}, {moria}, {mudhead}, {multi-user Dimension}, {nethack}, {ogg}, {plugh}, {rogue}, {SPACEWAR}, {virtual reality}, {wizard mode}, {wumpus}, {xyzzy}, {ZIL}, {zorkmid}. See also {game theory}. (1996-03-03)

GAPLog ::: General Amalgamated Programming with Logic. LOGPRO group, Linkoping Sweden. A restricted version of constraint logic programming, using S-unification but not restricted to a single domain.[Chapter in forthcoming Springer book on ESPRIT]

GAPLog General Amalgamated Programming with Logic. {LOGPRO} group, Linkoping Sweden. A restricted version of {constraint logic programming}, using {S-unification} but not restricted to a single domain. [Chapter in forthcoming Springer book on ESPRIT]

genetic programming ::: (programming) (GP) A programming technique which extends the genetic algorithm to the domain of whole computer programs. In GP, populations of problems of system identification, classification, control, robotics, optimisation, game playing, and pattern recognition.Starting with a primordial ooze of hundreds or thousands of randomly created programs composed of functions and terminals appropriate to the problem, the operations of Darwinian fitness proportionate reproduction and crossover (sexual recombination). (1995-03-31)

genetic programming "programming" (GP) A programming technique which extends the {genetic algorithm} to the domain of whole computer programs. In GP, populations of programs are genetically bred to solve problems. Genetic programming can solve problems of system identification, classification, control, robotics, optimisation, game playing, and {pattern recognition}. Starting with a primordial ooze of hundreds or thousands of randomly created programs composed of functions and terminals appropriate to the problem, the population is progressively evolved over a series of generations by applying the operations of Darwinian fitness proportionate reproduction and crossover (sexual recombination). (1995-03-31)

Goedel "language" (After the mathematician {Kurt Gödel}) A {declarative}, general-purpose language for {artificial intelligence} based on {logic programming}. It can be regarded as a successor to {Prolog}. The {type system} is based on {many-sorted logic} with {parametric polymorphism}. Modularity is supported, as well as {infinite precision arithmetic} and {finite sets}. Goedel has a rich collection of system {modules} and provides {constraint} solving in several domains. It also offers {metalogical} facilities that provide significant support for {metaprograms} that do analysis, transformation, compilation, verification, and debugging. A significant subset of Goedel has been implemented on top of {SISCtus Prolog} by Jiwei Wang "jiwei@lapu.bristol.ac.uk". {FTP Bristol, UK (ftp://ftp.cs.bris.ac.uk/goedel)}, {FTP K U Leuven (ftp://ftp.cs.kuleuven.ac.be/pub/logic-prgm/goedel)}. E-mail: "goedel@compsci.bristol.ac.uk". (1995-05-02)

Goedel ::: (language) (After the mathematician Kurt G�del) A declarative, general-purpose language for artificial intelligence based on logic programming. many-sorted logic with parametric polymorphism. Modularity is supported, as well as infinite precision arithmetic and finite sets.Goedel has a rich collection of system modules and provides constraint solving in several domains. It also offers metalogical facilities that provide significant support for metaprograms that do analysis, transformation, compilation, verification, and debugging.A significant subset of Goedel has been implemented on top of SISCtus Prolog by Jiwei Wang . .E-mail: . (1995-05-02)

gov "networking" The {top-level domain} for US government bodies. (1999-01-26)

gov ::: (networking) The top-level domain for US government bodies. (1999-01-26)

GRAS ::: A public domain graph-oriented database system for software engineering applications from RWTH Aachen.

GRAS A {public domain} {graph-oriented database} system for {software engineering} applications from {RWTH Aachen}.

handle 1. "programming, operating system" A simple item of data that identifies a resource. For example, a {Unix} file handle identifies an open file and associated data such as whether it was opened for read or write and the current read/write position. On the {Macintosh}, a handle is a pointer to a pointer to some dynamically-allocated memory. The extra level of indirection allows on-the-fly {memory compaction} or {garbage collection} without invalidating application program references to the allocated memory. 2. "jargon" An alias used intended to conceal a user's true identity in an electronic message. The term is common on Citizen's Band and other amateur radio but, in that context usually means the user's real name as {FCC} rules forbid concealing one's identity. Use of grandiose handles is characteristic of {crackers}, {weenies}, {spods}, and other lower forms of network life; true hackers travel on their own reputations. Compare {nick}. [{Jargon File}] 3. "networking" {domain handle}. (2004-07-20)

heaven ::: 1. Any of the places in or beyond the sky conceived of as domains of divine beings in various religions. 2. The sky or universe as seen from the earth; the firmament. 3.* Fig. A condition or place of great happiness, delight, or pleasure. *Heaven, heaven"s, Heaven"s, heavens, heaven-air, heaven-bare, heaven-bliss, heaven-born, heaven-bound, heaven-fire, heaven-hints, heaven-leap, Heaven-light, heaven-lights, Heaven-nature"s, heaven-nymphs, heaven-pillaring, heaven-pleased, heaven-rapture"s, heaven-sent, heaven-sentience, heaven-surrounded, heaven-truth, heaven-use, heaven-worlds.

Helheim, Helhem (Icelandic, Swedish) Hel’s home; in the Norse Eddas the domain of Hel, ruler of the realm of death. Hel or Hela, daughter of Loki, governs the lands where souls spend the time intervening between lives in the “victory worlds.” The realms of death vary from beautiful, peaceful meadows of delight to cages woven of venomous serpents where the occupants undergo acute suffering. The lowest of these hells contain rivers of venom in which oath-brakers and adulterers must wade.

heuristic ::: 1. (programming) A rule of thumb, simplification, or educated guess that reduces or limits the search for solutions in domains that are difficult and poorly understood. Unlike algorithms, heuristics do not guarantee optimal, or even feasible, solutions and are often used with no theoretical guarantee.2. (algorithm) approximation algorithm.(2001-04-12)

heuristic 1. "programming" A rule of thumb, simplification, or educated guess that reduces or limits the search for solutions in domains that are difficult and poorly understood. Unlike {algorithms}, heuristics do not guarantee optimal, or even {feasible}, solutions and are often used with no theoretical guarantee. 2. "algorithm" {approximation algorithm}. (2001-04-12)

Hlidskjalf (Icelandic) [from hlid side, gate; or from hlifd protection + skjalf shelf, bench, plane] The word may mean either that the gods are arrayed by our side in the struggle of life; or deriving it from the Scandinavian lida (to suffer), it could be by extension of meaning the “shelf of compassion,” whence their protection extends over the human race. In the Norse Edda, it is on Hlidskjalf that Odin is enthroned with his consort Frigga and whence he is able to survey all worlds. Frey, the deity of our terrestrial world, also oversees his domain from this vantage point.

Hoare powerdomain {powerdomain}

hostname ::: 1. (Or sitename). The unique name by which a computer is known on a network, used to identify it in electronic mail, Usenet news, or other forms of electronic information interchange.On Internet the hostname is an ASCII string, e.g. foldoc.doc.ic.ac.uk which, consists of a local part (foldoc) and a domain name (doc.ic.ac.uk). The hostname the Domain Name System (DNS) or resolver. It is possible for one computer to have several hostnames (aliases) though one is designated as its canonical name.It is often possible to guess a hostname for a particular institution. This is useful if you want to know if they operate network services like anonymous FTP, this fails, prepend ftp. or www. as appropriate, e.g. www.data-io.com. You can use the ping command as a quick way to test whether a hostname is valid.The folklore interest of hostnames stems from the creativity and humour they often display. Interpreting a sitename is not unlike interpreting a vanity roughly descending order). The obligatory comment is Harris's Lament: All the good ones are taken!See also network address.2. Berkeley Unix command to set and get the application level name used by the host.Unix manual page: hostname(1). (1995-02-16)

hostname 1. (Or "sitename"). The unique name by which a computer is known on a {network}, used to identify it in {electronic mail}, {Usenet} {news}, or other forms of electronic information interchange. On the {Internet} the hostname is an {ASCII} string, e.g. "foldoc.doc.ic.ac.uk" which, consists of a local part (foldoc) and a {domain} name (doc.ic.ac.uk). The hostname is translated into an {Internet address} either via the {hosts file}, {NIS} or by the {Domain Name System} (DNS) or {resolver}. It is possible for one computer to have several hostnames (aliases) though one is designated as its {canonical} name. It is often possible to guess a hostname for a particular institution. This is useful if you want to know if they operate network services like {anonymous FTP}, {World-Wide Web} or {finger}. First try the institution's name or obvious abbreviations thereof, with the appropriate {domain} appended, e.g. "mit.edu". If this fails, prepend "ftp." or "www." as appropriate, e.g. "www.data-io.com". You can use the {ping} command as a quick way to test whether a hostname is valid. The folklore interest of hostnames stems from the creativity and humour they often display. Interpreting a sitename is not unlike interpreting a vanity licence plate; one has to mentally unpack it, allowing for mono-case and length restrictions and the lack of whitespace. Hacker tradition deprecates dull, institutional-sounding names in favour of punchy, humorous, and clever coinages (except that it is considered appropriate for the official public gateway machine of an organisation to bear the organisation's name or acronym). Mythological references, cartoon characters, animal names, and allusions to SF or fantasy literature are probably the most popular sources for sitenames (in roughly descending order). The obligatory comment is Harris's Lament: "All the good ones are taken!" See also {network address}. 2. {Berkeley} {Unix} command to set and get the application level name used by the host. {Unix manual page}: hostname(1). (1995-02-16)

“ ‘I am the three-wicked Flame and my wicks are immortal,’ says the defunct. ‘I enter into the domain of Sekhem (the God whose arm sows the seed of action produced by the disembodied soul) and I enter the region of the Flames who have destroyed their adversaries,’ i.e., got rid of the sin-creating ‘four wicks’ ” (SD 1:237).

ideal "theory" In {domain theory}, a non-empty, {downward closed} subset which is also closed under binary {least upper bounds}. I.e. anything less than an element is also an element and the least upper bound of any two elements is also an element. (1997-09-26)

If R denotes a (binary) relation, and X and Y denote arguments, the notation XRY may be used, instead of R(X, Y), to mean that the two arguments stand in the relation denoted by R The domain of a relation R is the class of things x for which there exists at least one y such that xRy holds. The converse domain of a relation R is the class of things y for which there exists at least one x such that xRy. The field of a relation is the logical sum of the domain and the converse domain.

If the Peano postulates are formulated on the basis of an interpretation according to which the domain of individuals coincides with that of the non-negative integers, the undefined term N may be dropped and the postulates reduced to the three following: (x)(y)[[S(x) = S(y)] ⊃[x = y]]. (x) ∼[S(x) = 0]. F(0)[F(x) ⊃x F(S(x))] ⊃F (x)F(y). It is possible further to drop the undefined term 0 and to replace the successor function S by a dyadic propositional function S (the contemplated interpretation being that S(x,y) is the proposition y = x+l). The Peano postulates may then be given the following form: (x)(Ey)S(x, y). (x)[S(x,y) ⊃y [S(x,z) ⊃x [y = z]]]. (x)[S(y,x) ⊃y [S(z,x) ⊃x [y = z]]]. (Ex)[[(x) ∼S(x,y)] ≡y [y = z]]. [(x) ∼S(x,z)] ⊃x [F(z)[F(x) ⊃x [S(x, y) ⊃y F(y)]] ⊃F (x)F(x)]. For this form of the Peano postulates the underlying logic may be taken to be simply the functional calculus of second order without additions. In this formulation, numerical functions can be introduced only by contextual definition as incomplete symbols.

image 1. "data, graphics" Data representing a two-dimensional scene. A digital image is composed of {pixels} arranged in a rectangular array with a certain height and width. Each pixel may consist of one or more {bits} of information, representing the brightness of the image at that point and possibly including colour information encoded as {RGB} triples. {Images} are usually taken from the real world via a {digital camera}, {frame grabber}, or {scanner}; or they may be generated by computer, e.g. by {ray tracing} software. See also {image formats}, {image processing}. (1994-10-21) 2. "mathematics" The image (or range) of a {function} is the set of values obtained by applying the function to all elements of its {domain}. So, if f : D -" C then the set f(D) = \{ f(d) | d in D \} is the image of D under f. The image is a subset of C, the {codomain}. (2000-01-19)

image ::: 1. (data, graphics) Data representing a two-dimensional scene. A digital image is composed of pixels arranged in a rectangular array with a certain representing the brightness of the image at that point and possibly including colour information encoded as RGB triples.Images are usually taken from the real world via a digital camera, frame grabber, or scanner; or they may be generated by computer, e.g. by ray tracing software.See also image formats, image processing. (1994-10-21)2. (mathematics) The image (or range) of a function is the set of values obtained by applying the function to all elements of its domain. So, if f : D -> C then the set f(D) = { f(d) | d in D } is the image of D under f. The image is a subset of C, the codomain.(2000-01-19)

In another sense, kingdom is sometimes used in theosophy to signify the life-waves circling around a planetary chain, or the various individualized hierarchies in universal nature, each one comprising the kingdom or domain of its own characteristic species, topped by its hierarch.

incameration ::: n. --> The act or process of uniting lands, rights, or revenues, to the ecclesiastical chamber, i. e., to the pope&

inclusive "theory" In {domain theory}, a {predicate} P : D -" Bool is inclusive iff For any {chain} C, a subset of D, and for all c in C, P(c) =" P(lub C) In other words, if the predicate holds for all elements of an increasing sequence then it holds for their {least upper bound}. ("lub is written in {LaTeX} as {\sqcup}). (1995-02-03)

inclusive ::: (theory) In domain theory, a predicate P : D -> Bool is inclusive iff For any {chain} C, a subset of D, andfor all c in C, In other words, if the predicate holds for all elements of an increasing sequence then it holds for their least upper bound.(lub is written in LaTeX as \sqcup). (1995-02-03)

Individual: In formal logic, the individuals form the first or lowest type of Russell's hierarchy of types. In the Principia Mathematica of Whitehead and Russell, individuals are "defined as whatever is neither a proposition nor a function." It is unnecessary, however, to give the word any such special significance, and for many purposes it is better (as is often done) to take the individuals to be an arbitrary -- or an arbitrary infinite -- domain, or any particular well-defined domain may be taken as the domain of individuals, according to the purpose in hand. When used in this way, the term domain of individuals may be taken as synonymous with the term universe of discourse (in the sense of Boole) which is employed in connection with the algebra of classes. See Logic, formal, §§ 3, 6, 7. -- A.C.

inductive relation ::: A relation R between domains D and E is inductive if for all chains d1 .. dn in D and e1 .. en in E, For all i, di R ei => lub(d) R lub(e)

inductive relation A relation R between {domains} D and E is inductive if for all {chains} {d1 .. dn} in D and {e1 .. en} in E, For all i, di R ei =" lub(d) R lub(e)

In Kant, the domain of things beyond possible experience is completely problematic because of the a priori limitations of human knowledge (cf. J. Loewenberg, Calif. Studies in Philosophy). See Modality.

In particular, a monadic function is a law of correspondence between an argument (or value of the independent variable) and a value of the function (or value of the dependent variable), of such a sort that, given any argument belonging to a certain domain (the range of the function, or range of the independent variable), the value of the function is uniquely determined. If F denotes a monadic function and X denotes an argument, the notation F(X) is used for the corresponding value of the function.

instructional technology "education" Design, development, use, management and evaluation of process and resources for learning. Instructional technology aims to promote the application of validated, practical procedures in the design and delivery of instruction. It is often defined either in terms of media and other technology used (e.g. {audiovisual media} and equipment and computers), or in terms of a systematic process which encompasses instructional design, development, delivery and evaluation. ["Instructional Technology: The Definition and Domains of the Field", 1994, Barbara Seels and Rita Richey, Washington, D.C., Association for Educational Communications and Technology]. (2010-01-29)

int ::: 1. (programming) A common name for the integer data type. In C for example, it means a (signed) integer of the computer's native word length.2. (networking) The top-level domain for international organisations. (1999-01-26)

int 1. "programming" A common name for the {integer} data type. In {C} for example, it means a (signed) integer of the computer's native {word length}. 2. "networking" The {top-level domain} for international organisations. (1999-01-26)

Internet address ::: (networking) (IP address) The 32-bit number uniquely identifying a node on a network using Internet Protocol, as defined in STD 5, RFC 791. An IP address is represented in dotted decimal notation, e.g. 128.121.4.5.The address can be split into a network number (or network address) and a host number unique to each host on the network and sometimes also a subnet address.The way the address is split depends on its class, A, B or C (but see also CIDR). The class is determined by the high address bits:Class A - high bit 0, 7-bit network number, 24-bit host number. n1.a.a.a 0 = n1 = 127Class B - high 2 bits 10, 14-bit network number, 16-bit host number. n1.n2.a.a 128 = n1 = 191Class C - high 3 bits 110, 21-bit network number, 8-bit host number. n1.n2.n3.a 192 = n1 = 223DNS translates a node's fully qualified domain name to an Internet address which ARP (or constant mapping) translates to an Ethernet address.[Jargon File](2006-01-27)

Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers ::: (body, networking) (ICANN) The non-profit corporation that was formed to assume responsibility for IP address allocation, protocol parameter assignment, domain name system management, and root server system management functions now performed under U.S. Government contract by IANA and other entities. .(2002-01-09)

Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers "body, networking" (ICANN) The non-profit corporation that was formed to assume responsibility for {IP address} allocation, protocol parameter assignment, {domain name system} management, and {root server} system management functions now performed under U.S. Government contract by {IANA} and other entities. {ICANN Home (http://icann.org/)}. (2002-01-09)

Internet "networking" 1. With a lower-case "i", any set of {networks} interconnected with {routers}. 2. With an upper-case "I", the world's collection of interconnected networks. The Internet is a three-level {hierarchy} composed of {backbone networks}, {mid-level networks}, and {stub networks}. These include commercial (.com or .co), university (.ac or .edu) and other research networks (.org, .net) and military (.mil) networks and span many different physical networks around the world with various {protocols}, chiefly the {Internet Protocol}. Until the advent of the {web} in 1990, the Internet was almost entirely unknown outside universities and corporate research departments and was accessed mostly via {command line} interfaces such as {telnet} and {FTP}. Since then it has grown to become a ubiquitous aspect of modern information systems, becoming highly commercial and a widely accepted medium for all sort of customer relations such as advertising, brand building and online sales and services. Its original spirit of cooperation and freedom have, to a great extent, survived this explosive transformation with the result that the vast majority of information available on the Internet is free of charge. While the web (primarily in the form of {HTML} and {HTTP}) is the best known aspect of the Internet, there are many other {protocols} in use, supporting applications such as {electronic mail}, {chat}, {remote login} and {file transfer}. There were 20,242 unique commercial domains registered with {InterNIC} in September 1994, 10% more than in August 1994. In 1996 there were over 100 {Internet access providers} in the US and a few in the UK (e.g. the {BBC Networking Club}, {Demon}, {PIPEX}). There are several bodies associated with the running of the Internet, including the {Internet Architecture Board}, the {Internet Assigned Numbers Authority}, the {Internet Engineering and Planning Group}, {Internet Engineering Steering Group}, and the {Internet Society}. See also {NYsernet}, {EUNet}. {The Internet Index (http://openmarket.com/intindex)} - statistics about the Internet. (2015-03-26)

Internet ::: (networking) (Note: capital I). The Internet is the largest internet (with a small i) in the world. It is a three level hierarchy composed of (.org, .net) and military (.mil) networks and span many different physical networks around the world with various protocols, chiefly the Internet Protocol.Until the advent of the World-Wide Web in 1990, the Internet was almost entirely unknown outside universities and corporate research departments and was accessed this explosive transformation with the result that the vast majority of information available on the Internet is free of charge.While the web (primarily in the form of HTML and HTTP) is the best known aspect of the Internet, there are many other protocols in use, supporting applications such as electronic mail, Usenet, chat, remote login, and file transfer.There were 20,242 unique commercial domains registered with InterNIC in September 1994, 10% more than in August 1994. In 1996 there were over 100 Internet access providers in the US and a few in the UK (e.g. the BBC Networking Club, Demon, PIPEX).There are several bodies associated with the running of the Internet, including the Internet Architecture Board, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, the Internet Engineering and Planning Group, Internet Engineering Steering Group, and the Internet Society.See also NYsernet, EUNet. - statistics about the Internet.(2000-02-21)

Internet Service Provider ::: (company, networking) (ISP) A company which provides other companies or individuals with access to, or presence on, the Internet. Most ISPs are also administration of World-Wide Web sites, training and administration of intranets and domain name registration.(2005-06-19)

Internet Service Provider "company, networking" (ISP) A company which provides other companies or individuals with access to, or presence on, the {Internet}. Most ISPs are also {Internet Access Providers}; extra services include help with design, creation and administration of {website}s, training and administration of {intranets} and {domain name} registration. (2005-06-19)

invasion ::: n. --> The act of invading; the act of encroaching upon the rights or possessions of another; encroachment; trespass.
A warlike or hostile entrance into the possessions or domains of another; the incursion of an army for conquest or plunder.
The incoming or first attack of anything hurtful or pernicious; as, the invasion of a disease.


IP address "networking" (Internet address) The 32-bit number uniquely identifying a {node} on a network using {Internet Protocol}, as defined in {STD} 5, {RFC} 791. An IP address is normally displayed in {dotted decimal notation}, e.g. 128.121.4.5. The address can be split into a {network number} (or network address) and a {host number} unique to each host on the network and sometimes also a {subnet address}. The way the address is split depends on its "class", A, B or C (but see also {CIDR}). The class is determined by the high address bits: Class A - high bit 0, 7-bit network number, 24-bit host number. n1.a.a.a 0 "= n1 "= 127 Class B - high 2 bits 10, 14-bit network number, 16-bit host number. n1.n2.a.a 128 "= n1 "= 191 Class C - high 3 bits 110, 21-bit network number, 8-bit host number. n1.n2.n3.a 192 "= n1 "= 223 {DNS} translates a node's {fully qualified domain name} to an Internet address which {ARP} (or {constant mapping}) translates to an {Ethernet address}. [{Jargon File}] (2006-01-27)

It is not difficult to find examples of formulas A, containing no free individual variables, such that both A and ∼A are satisfiaMe. A simple example is the formula (x)F(x). More instructive is the following example, [(x)(y)(z)[[∼F{x,x)][F(x, y)F(y,z) ⊃ F(x,z)]]][(x)(Ey)F(x,y)], which is satisfiable in an infinite domain of individuals but not in any finite domain -- the negation is satisfiable in any non-empty domain.

Kingdom(s) In natural history, a large group, department, or domain, marked off from others by characteristic qualities, three being generally recognized: animal, vegetable, and mineral, with mankind at the summit of the animal kingdom. Ancient thought as a whole, however, took account of vast spheres of cosmic inner space and inner consciousness inhabited by numerous hierarchies of all-various evolving, intelligent, and semi-intelligent beings. Hence it is that mankind was a separate kingdom; and, if we consider human nature as a whole, humanity is more sharply distinguished from the lower kingdoms than they are from each other. To these four in theosophy are added three kingdoms below the mineral called elemental kingdoms, thus making a septenate. Above the human may be enumerated three dhyani-chohanic or god kingdoms, but the word “man” has often been used so as to include these kingdoms. These divisions correspond to the other septenary and denary divisions in the cosmos.

knowledge-based system "artificial intelligence" (KBS) A program for extending and/or querying a {knowledge base}. The related term {expert system} is normally used to refer to a highly domain-specific type of KBS used for a specialised purpose such as medical diagnosis. The {Cyc} project is an example of a large KBS. (1999-09-07)

knowledge-based system ::: (artificial intelligence) (KBS) A program for extending and/or querying a knowledge base.The related term expert system is normally used to refer to a highly domain-specific type of KBS used for a specialised purpose such as medical diagnosis.The Cyc project is an example of a large KBS. (1999-09-07)

kremvax ::: /krem-vaks/ Originally, a fictitious Usenet site at the Kremlin, named like the then large number of Usenet VAXen with names of the form foovax. Kremvax was notion that Usenet might ever penetrate the Iron Curtain seemed so totally absurd at the time.In fact, it was only six years later that the first genuine site in Moscow, demos.su, joined Usenet. Some readers needed convincing that the postings from it frequently in his own postings, and at one point twitted some credulous readers by blandly asserting that he *was* a hoax!Eventually he even arranged to have the domain's gateway site *named* kremvax, thus neatly turning fiction into truth and demonstrating that the hackish sense of humour transcends cultural barriers. Mr. Antonov also contributed some Russian-language material for the Jargon File.In an even more ironic historical footnote, kremvax became an electronic centre of the anti-communist resistance during the bungled hard-line coup of August perestroika made kremvax one of the timeliest means of their outreach to the West.[Jargon File]

kremvax /krem-vaks/ (Or kgbvax) Originally, a fictitious {Usenet} site at the Kremlin, named like the then large number of {Usenet} {VAXen} with names of the form foovax. Kremvax was announced on April 1, 1984 in a posting ostensibly originated there by Soviet leader Konstantin Chernenko. The posting was actually forged by Piet Beertema as an April Fool's joke. Other fictitious sites mentioned in the hoax were moskvax and {kgbvax}. This was probably the funniest of the many April Fool's forgeries perpetrated on {Usenet} (which has negligible security against them), because the notion that {Usenet} might ever penetrate the Iron Curtain seemed so totally absurd at the time. In fact, it was only six years later that the first genuine site in Moscow, demos.su, joined {Usenet}. Some readers needed convincing that the postings from it weren't just another prank. Vadim Antonov, senior programmer at Demos and the major poster from there up to mid-1991, was quite aware of all this, referred to it frequently in his own postings, and at one point twitted some credulous readers by blandly asserting that he *was* a hoax! Eventually he even arranged to have the domain's gateway site *named* kremvax, thus neatly turning fiction into truth and demonstrating that the hackish sense of humour transcends cultural barriers. Mr. Antonov also contributed some Russian-language material for the {Jargon File}. In an even more ironic historical footnote, kremvax became an electronic centre of the anti-communist resistance during the bungled hard-line coup of August 1991. During those three days the Soviet UUCP network centreed on kremvax became the only trustworthy news source for many places within the USSR. Though the sysops were concentrating on internal communications, cross-border postings included immediate transliterations of Boris Yeltsin's decrees condemning the coup and eyewitness reports of the demonstrations in Moscow's streets. In those hours, years of speculation that totalitarianism would prove unable to maintain its grip on politically-loaded information in the age of computer networking were proved devastatingly accurate - and the original kremvax joke became a reality as Yeltsin and the new Russian revolutionaries of "glasnost" and "perestroika" made kremvax one of the timeliest means of their outreach to the West. [{Jargon File}]

label edge router "networking" (LER) A device that sits at the edge of an {MPLS domain}, that uses {routing} information to assign labels to {datagrams} and then forwards them into the MPLS domain. (1999-06-14)

label edge router ::: (networking) (LER) A device that sits at the edge of an MPLS domain, that uses routing information to assign labels to datagrams and then forwards them into the MPLS domain. (1999-06-14)

Laboratory INstrument Computer "computer" (LINC) A computer which was originally designed in 1962 by {Wesley Clark}, {Charles Molnar}, Severo Ornstein and others at the {Lincoln Laboratory Group}, to facilitate scientific research. With its {digital logic} and {stored programs}, the LINC is accepted by the {IEEE Computer Society} to be the World's first {interactive} {personal computer}. The machine was developed to fulfil a need for better laboratory tools by doctors and medical researchers. It would supplant the 1958 {Average Response Computer}, and was designed for individual use. Led by William N. Papian and mainly funded by the {National Institute of Health}, Wesley Clark designed the logic while Charles Molnar did the engineering. The first LINC was finished in March 1962. In January 1963, the project moved to {MIT}, and then to {Washington University} (in St. Louis) in 1964. The LINC had a simple {operating system}, four "knobs" (which was used like a {mouse}), a {Soroban keyboard} (for alpha-numeric data entry), two {LINCtape} drives and a small {CRT} display. It originally had one {kilobit} of {core memory}, but this was expanded to 2 Kb later. The computer was made out of {Digital Equipment Corporation} (DEC) hardware modules. Over 24 LINC systems had been built before late 1964 when DEC began to sell the LINC commercially. After the introduction of the {PDP-8}, {Dick Clayton} at DEC produced a rather frightening hybrid of the LINC and PDP-8 called a LINC-8. This really was not a very satisfactory machine, but it used the new PDP-8 style DEC cards and was cheaper and easier to produce. It still didn't sell that well. In the late 1960s, Clayton brought the design to its pinnacle with the PDP-12, an amazing tour de force of the LINC concept; along with about as seamless a merger as could be done with the PDP-8. This attempted to incorporate {TTL logic} into the machine. The end of the LINC line had been reached. Due to the success of the LINC-8, {Spear, Inc.} produced a LINC clone (since the design was in the {public domain}). The interesting thing about the Spear {micro-LINC 300} was that it used {MECL} II logic. MECL logic was known for its blazing speed (at the time!), but the Spear computer ran at very modest rates. In 1995 the last of the classic LINCs was turned off for the final time after 28 years of service. This LINC had been in use in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory of Auditory Physiology (EPL) of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. On 15 August 1995, it was transferred to the MIT {Computer Museum} where it was put on display. {LINC/8, PDP-12 (http://faqs.org/faqs/dec-faq/pdp8/section-7.html)}. {Lights out for last LINC (http://rleweb.mit.edu/publications/currents/6-1linc.HTM)}. ["Computers and Automation", Nov. 1964, page 43]. (1999-05-20)

Laboratory INstrument Computer ::: (computer) (LINC) A computer which was originally designed in 1962 by Wesley Clark, Charles Molnar, Severo Ornstein and others at the Lincoln stored programs, the LINC is accepted by the IEEE Computer Society to be the World's first interactive personal computer.The machine was developed to fulfil a need for better laboratory tools by doctors and medical researchers. It would supplant the 1958 Average Response Computer, and was designed for individual use.Led by William N. Papian and mainly funded by the National Institute of Health, Wesley Clark designed the logic while Charles Molnar did the engineering. The first LINC was finished in March 1962.In January 1963, the project moved to MIT, and then to Washington University (in St. Louis) in 1964.The LINC had a simple operating system, four knobs (which was used like a mouse), a Soroban keyboard (for alpha-numeric data entry), two LINCtape drives was expanded to 2 Kb later. The computer was made out of Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) hardware modules.Over 24 LINC systems had been built before late 1964 when DEC began to sell the LINC commercially.After the introduction of the PDP-8, Dick Clayton at DEC produced a rather frightening hybrid of the LINC and PDP-8 called a LINC-8. This really was not a very satisfactory machine, but it used the new PDP-8 style DEC cards and was cheaper and easier to produce. It still didn't sell that well.In the late 1960s, Clayton brought the design to its pinnacle with the PDP-12, an amazing tour de force of the LINC concept; along with about as seamless a merger as could be done with the PDP-8. This attempted to incorporate TTL logic into the machine. The end of the LINC line had been reached.Due to the success of the LINC-8, Spear, Inc. produced a LINC clone (since the design was in the public domain). The interesting thing about the Spear micro-LINC 300 was that it used MECL II logic. MECL logic was known for its blazing speed (at the time!), but the Spear computer ran at very modest rates.In 1995 the last of the classic LINCs was turned off for the final time after 28 years of service. This LINC had been in use in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory of Auditory Physiology (EPL) of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.On 15 August 1995, it was transferred to the MIT Computer Museum where it was put on display. . .[Computers and Automation, Nov. 1964, page 43]. (1999-05-20)

LAMBDA ::: A version of typed lambda-calculus, used to describe semantic domains.[Outline of a Mathematical Theory of Computation, D.S. Scott, TM PRG-2, PRG, Oxford U, 1971].

LAMBDA A version of {typed lambda-calculus}, used to describe semantic {domains}. ["Outline of a Mathematical Theory of Computation", D.S. Scott, TM PRG-2, PRG, Oxford U, 1971].

lattice "theory" A {partially ordered set} in which all finite subsets have a {least upper bound} and {greatest lower bound}. This definition has been standard at least since the 1930s and probably since Dedekind worked on lattice theory in the 19th century; though he may not have used that name. See also {complete lattice}, {domain theory}. (1999-12-09)

lattice ::: (theory) A partially ordered set in which all finite subsets have a least upper bound and greatest lower bound.This definition has been standard at least since the 1930s and probably since Dedekind worked on lattice theory in the 19th century; though he may not have used that name.See also complete lattice, domain theory. (1999-12-09)

lifted domain "theory" In {domain theory}, a {domain} with a new {bottom} element added. Given a domain D, the lifted domain, lift D contains an element lift d corresponding to each element d in D with the same ordering as in D and a new element bottom which is less than every other element in lift D. In {functional languages}, a lifted domain can be used to model a {constructed type}, e.g. the type data LiftedInt = K Int contains the values K minint .. K maxint and K bottom, corresponding to the values in Int, and a new value bottom. This denotes the fact that when computing a value v = (K n) the computation of either n or v may fail to terminate yielding the values (K bottom) or bottom respectively. (In LaTeX, a lifted domain or element is indicated by a subscript {\perp}). See also {tuple}.

lifted domain ::: (theory) In domain theory, a domain with a new bottom element added. Given a domain D, the lifted domain, lift D contains an element lift d corresponding to each element d in D with the same ordering as in D and a new element bottom which is less than every other element in lift D.In functional languages, a lifted domain can be used to model a constructed type, e.g. the type data LiftedInt = K Int terminate yielding the values (K bottom) or bottom respectively.(In LaTeX, a lifted domain or element is indicated by a subscript \perp).See also tuple.

like nailing jelly to a tree "jargon, humour" Used to describe a task thought to be impossible, especially one in which the difficulty arises from poor specification or inherent slipperiness in the problem domain. "Trying to display the "prettiest" arrangement of nodes and arcs that diagrams a given graph is like nailing jelly to a tree, because nobody's sure what "prettiest" means algorithmically." [{Jargon File}] (1997-12-23)

Linux ::: (operating system) (Linus Unix) /li'nuks/ (but see below) An implementation of the Unix kernel originally written from scratch with no proprietary code.The kernel runs on Intel and Alpha hardware in the general release, with SPARC, PowerPC, MIPS, ARM, Amiga, Atari, and SGI in active development. The SPARC, networking. The Intel and SPARC versions have reliable symmetric multiprocessing.Work on the kernel is coordinated by Linus Torvalds, who holds the copyright on a large part of it. The rest of the copyright is held by a large number of other project supports Linux as its kernel until the research Hurd kernel is completed.This kernel would be no use without application programs. The GNU project has provided large numbers of quality tools, and together with other public domain these tools is known as a Linux distribution. Compatibility modules and/or emulators exist for dozens of other computing environments.The kernel version numbers are significant: the odd numbered series (e.g. 1.3.xx) is the development (or beta) kernel which evolves very quickly. Stable (or release) kernels have even major version numbers (e.g. 1.2.xx).There is a lot of commercial support for and use of Linux, both by hardware companies such as Digital, IBM, and Apple and numerous smaller network and Providers, and there are ports to both parallel supercomputers and embedded microcontrollers. Debian is one popular open source distribution.The pronunciation of Linux has been a matter of much debate. Many, including Torvalds, insist on the short I pronunciation /li'nuks/ because Linus has an english pronunciation of Linus and minus. Others say /li'niks/ following Minix, which Torvalds was working on before Linux. . . . UK Mirror .(2000-06-09)

Linux "operating system" ("Linus Unix") /li'nuks/ (but see below) An implementation of the {Unix} {kernel} originally written from scratch with no proprietary code. The kernel runs on {Intel} and {Alpha} hardware in the general release, with {SPARC}, {PowerPC}, {MIPS}, {ARM}, {Amiga}, {Atari}, and {SGI} in active development. The SPARC, PowerPC, ARM, {PowerMAC} - {OSF}, and 68k ports all support {shells}, {X} and {networking}. The Intel and SPARC versions have reliable {symmetric multiprocessing}. Work on the kernel is coordinated by Linus Torvalds, who holds the copyright on a large part of it. The rest of the copyright is held by a large number of other contributors (or their employers). Regardless of the copyright ownerships, the kernel as a whole is available under the {GNU} {General Public License}. The GNU project supports Linux as its kernel until the research {Hurd} kernel is completed. This kernel would be no use without {application programs}. The GNU project has provided large numbers of quality tools, and together with other {public domain} software it is a rich Unix environment. A compilation of the Linux kernel and these tools is known as a Linux distribution. Compatibility modules and/or {emulators} exist for dozens of other computing environments. The kernel version numbers are significant: the odd numbered series (e.g. 1.3.xx) is the development (or beta) kernel which evolves very quickly. Stable (or release) kernels have even major version numbers (e.g. 1.2.xx). There is a lot of commercial support for and use of Linux, both by hardware companies such as {Digital}, {IBM}, and {Apple} and numerous smaller network and integration specialists. There are many commercially supported distributions which are generally entirely under the GPL. At least one distribution vendor guarantees {Posix} compliance. Linux is particularly popular for {Internet Service Providers}, and there are ports to both parallel supercomputers and {embedded} {microcontrollers}. {Debian} is one popular {open source} distribution. The pronunciation of "Linux" has been a matter of much debate. Many, including Torvalds, insist on the short I pronunciation /li'nuks/ because "Linus" has an /ee/ sound in Swedish (Linus's family is part of Finland's 6% ethnic-Swedish minority) and Linus considers English short /i/ to be closer to /ee/ than English long /i:/ dipthong. This is consistent with the short I in words like "linen". This doesn't stop others demanding a long I /li:'nuks/ following the english pronunciation of "Linus" and "minus". Others say /li'niks/ following {Minix}, which Torvalds was working on before Linux. {More on pronunciation (/pub/misc/linux-pronunciation)}. {LinuxHQ (http://linuxhq.com/)}. {slashdot (http://slashdot.org/)}. {freshmeat (http://freshmeat.net/)}. {Woven Goods (http://fokus.gmd.de/linux/)}. {Linux Gazette (http://ssc.com/lg)}. {funet Linux Archive (ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/Linux)}, {US mirror (ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/)}, {UK Mirror (ftp://sunsite.doc.ic.ac.uk/packages/Linux/)}. (2000-06-09)

lordship ::: n. --> The state or condition of being a lord; hence (with his or your), a title applied to a lord (except an archbishop or duke, who is called Grace) or a judge (in Great Britain), etc.
Seigniory; domain; the territory over which a lord holds jurisdiction; a manor.
Dominion; power; authority.


Löwenheim's theorem: The theorem, first proved by Löwenheim, that if a formula of the pure functional calculus of first order (see Logic, formal § 3), containing no free individual variables, is satisfiable (see ibid.) at all, it is satisfiable in a domain of individuals which is at most enumerable. Other, simpler, proofs of the theorem were afterwards given by Skolem, who also obtained the generalization that, if an enumerable set of such formulas are simultaneously satisfiable, they are simultaneously satisfiable in a domain of individuals at most enumerable.

m4 A {macro} processor for {Unix} and {GCOS} which is more flexible than {cpp}. m4 copies its input to the output, expanding macros which can be either built-in or user-defined. m4 has built-in functions for including files, running {Unix} commands, doing integer arithmetic, manipulating text in various ways and recursing. m4 can be used either as a {front-end} to a compiler or as a stand-alone tool. {sendmail}'s configuration file (/etc/sendmail.cf) is writen in m4 macros. There is a {GNU m4 v1.1 (ftp://gnu.org/pub/gnu/m4-1.0.tar.Z)} by Francois Pinard "pinard@iro.umontreal.ca" and a {public domain} version by Ozan Yigit "oz@sis.yorku.ca" and Richard A. O'Keefe "ok@goanna.cs.rmit.OZ.AU" (FTP from any {386BSD}, {NetBSD} or {FreeBSD} archive). A {Macintosh} version is {here (ftp://nic.switch.ch/pub/software/mac/src/mpw-c/)}. See also {m3}, {m5}. ["The M4 Macro Processor", Kernighan & Ritchie, Jul 1977].

Madhav: “The wheel of determinism in material Nature turns mechanically without any saving sensation, it moves under the pressure of a gathered momentum without questioning; it is immaterial in its operations without the slightest breath of the warmth of life. All circumstances are cogs in this wheel of Fate that revolves relentlessly. It is only a force of will from an existence beyond the domain of this mechanism that can hold the movement, change its direction and displace the instrumental condition.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

Madhav: “This creation is an ordered manifestation of the Divine. There is a central Will, expressing the originating Truth-vision, impelling the whole movement. But also there are special emanations from the Divine charged with specific tasks in the organisation and maintenance of the emerging creation. These are the gods and goddesses, deities, Powers and Personalities that are in charge of their respective domains, on different levels of existence. Each world has its own guardians entrusted by the Supreme Creative Spirit with the work of building and furthering the manifestation of the particular Truth-principle that pushes for expression in that world-formula.” Readings in Savitri Vol. I.

Madhav: “When Aswapathy lifts the curtain of the flesh i.e. when he gets through the barrier of his physical existence, he comes to the threshold of another domain, subtle and occult. He sees a serpent watching, guarding the entrance. In all traditions, especially the ancient, at the doors of every subtle kingdom there is a sentinel and that sentinel is imaged as a serpent. In spiritual symbolism the serpent stands for Energy. Depending on the colour of the serpent, it is physical energy or vital energy, mental energy, spiritual energy. Unless this serpent allows one to pass one cannot enter. The serpent, in this context, is the guard whose consent is necessary before one can pass. The Book of the Divine Mother

Mail Exchange Record ::: (messaging) (MX Record) A DNS resource record type indicating which host can handle electronic mail for a particular domain. (1996-02-26)

Mail Exchange Record "messaging" (MX Record) A {DNS} resource record type that says which {SMTP} server handles {electronic mail} for a particular {domain}. E.g. the MX record foo.co.uk. 1054 IN MX 10 mail.foo.co.uk. means that mail for an address like "denis@foo.co.uk" should be sent to "mail.foo.co.uk". There can be several servers for a domain. The "10" is a priority - the server with the lowest number will be tried first. (2007-01-29)

mail exchanger "messaging" A {server} running {SMTP} {Message Transfer Agent} {software} that accepts incoming {electronic mail} and either delivers it locally or forwards it to another server. The mail exchanger to use for a given domain can be discovered by querying {DNS} for {Mail Exchange Records}. (2007-01-29)

Margaret Hamilton "person" (born 1936-08-17) A {computer scientist}, {systems engineer} and business owner, credited with coining the term {software engineering}. Margaret Hamilton published over 130 papers, proceedings and reports about the 60 projects and six major programs in which she has been involved. In 1965 she became Director of Software Programming at MIT's {Charles Stark Draper Laboratory} and Director of the Software Engineering Division of the {MIT Instrumentation Laboratory}, which developed on-board {flight software} for the Apollo space program. At {NASA}, Hamilton pioneered the Apollo on-board guidance software that navigated to and landed on the Moon and formed the basis for software used in later missions. At the time, programming was a hands-on, engineering descipline; computer science and software engineering barely existed. Hamilton produced innovations in {system design} and software development, enterprise and {process modelling}, development paradigms, {formal systems modelling languages}, system-oriented objects for systems modelling and development, {automated life-cycle environments}, {software reliability}, {software reuse}, {domain analysis}, correctness by built-in language properties, open architecture techniques for robust systems, full {life-cycle automation}, {quality assurance}, {seamless integration}, {error detection and recovery}, {man-machine interface} systems, {operating systems}, {end-to-end testing} and {life-cycle management}. She developed concepts of {asynchronous software}, {priority scheduling} and {Human-in-the-loop} decision capability, which became the foundation for modern, ultra-reliable software design. The Apollo 11 moon landing would have aborted when spurious data threatened to overload the computer, but thanks to the innovative asynchronous, priority based scheduling, it eliminated the unnecessary processing and completed the landing successfully. In 1986, she founded {Hamilton Technologies, Inc.}, developed around the {Universal Systems Language} and her systems and software design {paradigm} of {Development Before the Fact} (DBTF). (2015-03-08)

Martian {Packets} that turn up unexpectedly on the wrong {network} because of bogus {routing} entries. Also a packet which has an altogether bogus (non-registered or ill-formed) {internet address}, such as the test loopback interface [127.0.0.1]. Such a packet will come back labelled with a source address that is clearly not of this earth. "The domain server is getting lots of packets from Mars. Does that gateway have a martian filter?" [{Jargon File}]

Martian ::: Packets that turn up unexpectedly on the wrong network because of bogus routing entries. Also a packet which has an altogether bogus (non-registered or of this earth. The domain server is getting lots of packets from Mars. Does that gateway have a martian filter?[Jargon File]

mcvax ::: mcvax.cwi.nl used to be the international backbone node of EUnet, the European Unix network. It was located in Amsterdam, Netherlands and belonged to Centrum simply not feasible to rename the machine to europa as was suggested at one stage.Mcsun (or relay.eu.net or net.eu.relay in some parts of Europe) replaced the international backbone host of EUnet around 1990. This machine was donated by Sun Microsystems owned by the European Unix Systems User Group (EUUG). It was located about 5m from where mcvax used to be and operated by the same people.Mcvax has finally ceased to exist in the domain and uucp namespaces. It still exists in the EARN/BITNET namespace.[Posting by Daniel Karrenberg (1990-03-02)

mcvax mcvax.cwi.nl used to be the international {backbone} node of {EUnet}, the European Unix network. It was located in Amsterdam, Netherlands and belonged to "Centrum voor Wiskunde en Informatica" (Centre for Mathematics and Computer Science) which is an institute belonging to a foundation called "Mathematisch Centrum". Since the first mcvax was on of the first {VAXen} in Europe and one of it's first {uucp} connections was to a machine called decvax it was quickly christened mcvax. Some also say this was done to give Jim McKie a nice mail address: mcvax!mckie. But this is certainly not true at all. The function of EUnet international backbone moved to another VAX later but the name moved with it, because in those days of mainly uucp based mail and before widespread use of {pathalias} it was simply not feasible to rename the machine to "europa" as was suggested at one stage. Mcsun (or relay.eu.net or net.eu.relay in some parts of Europe) replaced the international backbone host of EUnet around 1990. This machine was donated by {Sun Microsystems} owned by the {European Unix Systems User Group} (EUUG). It was located about 5m from where mcvax used to be and operated by the same people. Mcvax has finally ceased to exist in the {domain} and {uucp} {namespaces}. It still exists in the {EARN}/{BITNET} namespace. [Posting by Daniel Karrenberg "dfk@eu.net" to eunet.general]. (1990-03-02)

MDL (Originally "Muddle"). C. Reeve, {Carl Hewitt} and {Gerald Sussman}, Dynamic Modeling Group, MIT ca. 1971. Intended as a successor to Lisp, and a possible base for Planner-70. Basically LISP 1.5 with data types and arrays. Many of its features were advanced at the time (I/O, interrupt handling and coroutining), and were incorporated into later LISP dialects ("optional", "rest" and "aux" markers). In the mid 80's there was an effort to use bytecoding to make the language portable. CLU was first implemented in MDL. Infocom wrote Zork in MDL, and used it as the basis for the ZIL interpreter. Implementations exist for ITS, {TOPS-20}, BSD 4.3, Apollo Domain, SunOS and A/UX. ["The MDL Programming Language", S.W. Galley et al, Doc SYS.11.01, Project MAC, MIT (Nov 1975)].

MDL ::: (Originally Muddle). C. Reeve, Carl Hewitt and Gerald Sussman, Dynamic Modeling Group, MIT ca. 1971. Intended as a successor to Lisp, and a possible language portable. CLU was first implemented in MDL. Infocom wrote Zork in MDL, and used it as the basis for the ZIL interpreter.Implementations exist for ITS, TOPS-20, BSD 4.3, Apollo Domain, SunOS and A/UX.[The MDL Programming Language, S.W. Galley et al, Doc SYS.11.01, Project MAC, MIT (Nov 1975)].

Mental transformation ::: All the works of the mind and intellect must first be heightened and widened, then illumined, lifted into the domains of a higher Intelligence, afterwards translated into workings of a greater non-mental Intuition, then again trans- formed into the dynamic outpourings of the Overmind radiance, and these transfigured into the full light and sovereignty of the supramental Gnosis.

metaheuristic "algorithm, complexity, computability" A top-level general strategy which guides other {heuristics} to search for feasible solutions in domains where the task is hard. Metaheuristics have been most generally applied to problems classified as {NP-Hard} or {NP-Complete} by the theory of {computational complexity}. However, metaheuristics would also be applied to other {combinatorial} {optimisation} problems for which it is known that a {polynomial-time} solution exists but is not practical. Examples of metaheuristics are {Tabu Search}, {simulated annealing}, {genetic algorithms} and {memetic algorithms}. (1997-10-30)

metaheuristic ::: (algorithm, complexity, computability) A top-level general strategy which guides other heuristics to search for feasible solutions in domains where the task is hard.Metaheuristics have been most generally applied to problems classified as NP-Hard or NP-Complete by the theory of computational complexity. However, problems for which it is known that a polynomial-time solution exists but is not practical.Examples of metaheuristics are Tabu Search, simulated annealing, genetic algorithms and memetic algorithms. (1997-10-30)

metaphone ::: (algorithm, text) An algorithm for encoding a word so that similar sounding words encode the same. It's similar to soundex in purpose, but as it as well as more storage capacity, but neither of these requirements are usually prohibitive. It is in the public domain so it can be freely implemented.Metaphone was developed by Lawrence Philips . It is described in [Practical Algorithms for Programmers, Binstock & Rex, Addison Wesley, 1995]. (1998-12-22)

metaphone "algorithm, text" An {algorithm} for encoding a word so that similar sounding words encode the same. It's similar to {soundex} in purpose, but as it knows the basic rules of English pronunciation it's more accurate. The higher accuracy doesn't come free, though, metaphone requires more computational power as well as more storage capacity, but neither of these requirements are usually prohibitive. It is in the public domain so it can be freely implemented. Metaphone was developed by Lawrence Philips "lphilips@verity.com". It is described in ["Practical Algorithms for Programmers", Binstock & Rex, Addison Wesley, 1995]. (1998-12-22)

MicroGnuEmacs ::: (MG) A Public Domain Emacs-style editor modified from MicroEmacs to be more compatible with GNU Emacs. MicroGnuEmacs is essentially free, it is not features that were incompatible with GNU Emacs and adds missing features that seemed essential.MG version 1a of 1986-11-16 is known to work with 4.2BSD and 4.3BSD Unix, Ultrix-32, OS9/68k, VMS, Amiga, System V, Eunice. It should also support MS-DOS, PC-DOS and the Rainbow.MicroGnuEmacs is derived from, and aims to replace, v30 of MicroEmacs, the latest version from the original MicroEmacs author Dave Conroy. The chief , Bob Larson, and Dave Brower . .(2000-04-03)

MicroGnuEmacs "text, tool" (mg) A {Public Domain} {Emacs}-style editor modified from {MicroEmacs} to be more compatible with {GNU} Emacs. mg is essentially free, it is not associated with the GNU project, and does not have the GNU copyright restrictions. It is a small, fast, portable editor for people who can't run real Emacs thing for one reason or another. It has few if any of the MicroEmacs features that were incompatible with GNU Emacs and adds missing features that seemed essential. MicroGnuEmacs is derived from, and aims to replace, v30 of MicroEmacs, the latest version from the original MicroEmacs author Dave Conroy. The chief contributors were Mike Meyer "mwm@ucbopal.berkeley.edu", Mic Kaczmarczik "mic@ngp.utexas.edu", Bob Larson, and Dave Brower "rtech!daveb@sun.com". mg version 1a of 1986-11-16 works with {4.2BSD}, {4.3BSD}, {Ultrix-32}, {OS9/68k}, {VMS}, {Amiga}, {System V}, {Eunice}. It is included in base {OpenBSD}. It should also support {MS-DOS}, {PC-DOS} and the {Rainbow}. {(http://www.isc.org/index.pl?/sources/editors)}. (2007-05-25)

mil "networking" The {top-level domain} for entities affiliated with US armed forces. (1999-01-26)

mil ::: (networking) The top-level domain for entities affiliated with US armed forces. (1999-01-26)

monotonic In {domain theory}, a function f : D -" C is monotonic (or monotone) if for all x,y in D, x "= y =" f(x) "= f(y). (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\sqsubseteq}). (1994-11-24)

monotonic ::: In domain theory, a function f : D -> C is monotonic (or monotone) if for all x,y in D, x = y => f(x) = f(y). (1994-11-24)

MORTRAN ::: A public domain Fortran preprocessor for structured programming. (1995-09-20)

MORTRAN A {public domain} {Fortran} {preprocessor} for {structured programming}. (1995-09-20)

Mosaic "web, tool" {NCSA}'s {browser} ({client}) for the {web}. Mosaic has been described as "the killer application of the 1990s" because it was the first program to provide a slick {multimedia} {graphical user interface} to the {Internet}'s burgeoning wealth of distributed information services (formerly mostly limited to {FTP} and {Gopher}) at a time when access to the {Internet} was expanding rapidly outside its previous domain of academia and large industrial research institutions. NCSA Mosaic was originally designed and programmed for the {X Window System} by Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina at NCSA. Version 1.0 was released in April 1993, followed by two maintenance releases during summer 1993. Version 2.0 was released in December 1993, along with version 1.0 releases for both the {Apple Macintosh} and {Microsoft Windows}. An {Acorn Archimedes} port is underway (May 1994). Marc Andreessen, who created the NCSA Mosaic research prototype as an undergraduate student at the {University of Illinois} left to start {Mosaic Communications Corporation} along with five other former students and staff of the university who were instrumental in NCSA Mosaic's design and development. {(http://ncsa.uiuc.edu/SDG/Software/Mosaic/Docs/help-about.html)}. {(ftp://ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu/)}. E-mail: "mosaic-x@ncsa.uiuc.edu" (X version), "mosaic-mac@ncsa.uiuc.edu" (Macintosh), "mosaic-win@ncsa.uiuc.edu" (Windows version), "mosaic@ncsa.uiuc.edu" (general help). (1995-04-06)

Mosaic ::: (World-Wide Web, tool) NCSA's browser (client) for the World-Wide Web.Mosaic has been described as the killer application of the 1990s because it was the first program to provide a slick multimedia graphical user interface to expanding rapidly outside its previous domain of academia and large industrial research institutions.NCSA Mosaic was originally designed and programmed for the X Window System by Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina at NCSA. Version 1.0 was released in April 1993, Macintosh and Microsoft Windows. An Acorn Archimedes port is underway (May 1994).Marc Andreessen, who created the NCSA Mosaic research prototype as an undergraduate student at the University of Illinois left to start Mosaic Communications Corporation along with five other former students and staff of the university who were instrumental in NCSA Mosaic's design and development. . .E-mail: (X version), (Windows version), (1995-04-06)

MPLS domain "networking" A portion of a {network} that contains devices that understand {MPLS}. (1999-06-14)

MPLS domain ::: (networking) A portion of a network that contains devices that understand MPLS. (1999-06-14)

MUD "games" {Multi-User Dimension} or "Multi-User Domain". Originally "Multi-User Dungeon". [{Jargon File}] (1995-04-16)

MUD ::: (games) Multi-User Dimension or Multi-User Domain. Originally Multi-User Dungeon.[Jargon File] (1995-04-16)

mulk :::   sovereignty; domain; realm

Multi-channel Memorandum Distribution Facility ::: (messaging) (MMDF) An electronic mail system for Unix(?) which is much easier to configure than sendmail. The source is available.MMDF is a versatile and configurable mail routing system (MTA) which also includes user interface programs (MUA). It can be set up to route mail to defines the machine and domain names, various other configuration tables (alias, domain, channel) and other configuration information.[Home?] (1997-01-14)

Multi-channel Memorandum Distribution Facility "messaging" (MMDF) An {electronic mail} system for Unix(?) which is much easier to configure than {sendmail}. The source is available. MMDF is a versatile and configurable mail routing system ({MTA}) which also includes user interface programs ({MUA}). It can be set up to route mail to different {domains} and {hosts} over different channels (e.g. {SMTP}, {UUCP}). On {UNIX} systems, its configuration begins with the /usr/mmdf/mmdftailor file, which defines the machine and domain names, various other configuration tables (alias, domain, channel) and other configuration information. [Home?] (1997-01-14)

Multimedia and Hypermedia information coding Expert Group ::: (multimedia, standard) (MHEG) is an ISO standard encoding for multimedia and hypermedia information, designed to facilitate use and interchange of such information in varied domains such as games, electronic publishing and medical applications. .(2002-12-30)

Multimedia and Hypermedia information coding Expert Group "multimedia, standard" (MHEG) is an {ISO} {standard} encoding for {multimedia} and {hypermedia} information, designed to facilitate use and interchange of such information in varied domains such as games, electronic publishing and medical applications. {MHEG Home (http://mheg.org/)}. (2002-12-30)

Multi-User Dimension "games" (MUD) (Or Multi-User Domain, originally "Multi-User Dungeon") A class of multi-player interactive game, accessible via the {Internet} or a {modem}. A MUD is like a real-time {chat} forum with structure; it has multiple "locations" like an {adventure} game and may include combat, traps, puzzles, magic and a simple economic system. A MUD where characters can build more structure onto the database that represents the existing world is sometimes known as a "{MUSH}". Most MUDs allow you to log in as a guest to look around before you create your own character. Historically, MUDs (and their more recent progeny with names of MU- form) derive from a hack by Richard Bartle and Roy Trubshaw on the University of Essex's {DEC-10} in 1979. It was a game similar to the classic {Colossal Cave} adventure, except that it allowed multiple people to play at the same time and interact with each other. Descendants of that game still exist today and are sometimes generically called BartleMUDs. There is a widespread myth that the name MUD was trademarked to the commercial MUD run by Bartle on {British Telecom} (the motto: "You haven't *lived* 'til you've *died* on MUD!"); however, this is false - Richard Bartle explicitly placed "MUD" in the {PD} in 1985. BT was upset at this, as they had already printed trademark claims on some maps and posters, which were released and created the myth. Students on the European academic networks quickly improved on the MUD concept, spawning several new MUDs ({VAXMUD}, {AberMUD}, {LPMUD}). Many of these had associated {bulletin-board systems} for social interaction. Because these had an image as "research" they often survived administrative hostility to {BBSs} in general. This, together with the fact that {Usenet} feeds have been spotty and difficult to get in the UK, made the MUDs major foci of hackish social interaction there. AberMUD and other variants crossed the Atlantic around 1988 and quickly gained popularity in the US; they became nuclei for large hacker communities with only loose ties to traditional hackerdom (some observers see parallels with the growth of {Usenet} in the early 1980s). The second wave of MUDs (TinyMUD and variants) tended to emphasise social interaction, puzzles, and cooperative world-building as opposed to combat and competition. In 1991, over 50% of MUD sites are of a third major variety, LPMUD, which synthesises the combat/puzzle aspects of AberMUD and older systems with the extensibility of TinyMud. The trend toward greater programmability and flexibility will doubtless continue. The state of the art in MUD design is still moving very rapidly, with new simulation designs appearing (seemingly) every month. There is now a move afoot to deprecate the term {MUD} itself, as newer designs exhibit an exploding variety of names corresponding to the different simulation styles being explored. {UMN MUD Gopher page (gopher://spinaltap.micro.umn.edu/11/fun/Games/MUDs/Links)}. {U Pennsylvania MUD Web page (http://cis.upenn.edu/~lwl/mudinfo.html)}. See also {bonk/oif}, {FOD}, {link-dead}, {mudhead}, {MOO}, {MUCK}, {MUG}, {MUSE}, {chat}. {Usenet} newsgroups: {news:rec.games.mud.announce}, {news:rec.games.mud.admin}, {news:rec.games.mud.diku}, {news:rec.games.mud.lp}, {news:rec.games.mud.misc}, {news:rec.games.mud.tiny}. (1994-08-10)

Multi-User Dimension ::: (games) (MUD) (Or Multi-User Domain, originally Multi-User Dungeon) A class of multi-player interactive game, accessible via the Internet or a modem. MUDs allow you to log in as a guest to look around before you create your own character.Historically, MUDs (and their more recent progeny with names of MU- form) derive from a hack by Richard Bartle and Roy Trubshaw on the University of Essex's as they had already printed trademark claims on some maps and posters, which were released and created the myth.Students on the European academic networks quickly improved on the MUD concept, spawning several new MUDs (VAXMUD, AberMUD, LPMUD). Many of these had associated This, together with the fact that Usenet feeds have been spotty and difficult to get in the UK, made the MUDs major foci of hackish social interaction there.AberMUD and other variants crossed the Atlantic around 1988 and quickly gained popularity in the US; they became nuclei for large hacker communities with only aspects of AberMUD and older systems with the extensibility of TinyMud. The trend toward greater programmability and flexibility will doubtless continue.The state of the art in MUD design is still moving very rapidly, with new simulation designs appearing (seemingly) every month. There is now a move afoot to deprecate the term MUD itself, as newer designs exhibit an exploding variety of names corresponding to the different simulation styles being explored. . .See also bonk/oif, FOD, link-dead, mudhead, MOO, MUCK, MUG, MUSE, chat.Usenet newsgroups: rec.games.mud.announce, rec.games.mud.admin, rec.games.mud.diku, rec.games.mud.lp, rec.games.mud.misc, rec.games.mud.tiny. (1994-08-10)

name resolution "networking" The process of mapping a name into its corresponding address. The {Domain Name System} is the system which does name resolution on the {Internet}. (1997-12-15)

name resolution ::: (networking) The process of mapping a name into its corresponding address.The Domain Name System is the system which does name resolution on the Internet. (1997-12-15)

name service switching {Domain Name System}

namespace "systems" The {set} of all possible identifiers for some kind of object. From the definition of a set, all names in a namespace are unique and there is some rule to determine whether a potential name is an element of the set. For example, the {Domain Name System} includes rules for determining what constitutes a valid host name. (2008-12-09)

Nature, of all that is not obvious on the surface. An integral knowledge demands an exploration, an unveiling of all the possible domains of consciousness and experience. For there are subjective domains of our being which lie behind the obvious surface; these have to be fathomed and whatever is ascertained must be admitted within the scope of the total reality. An inner range of spiritual experience is one very great domain of human consciousness ; it has to be entered into up to its deepest depths and its vastest reaches. The supraphysical is as real as the physical ; to know it is part of a complete knowledge. The knowledge of the supraph>'sical has been associated with mysti- efsm and occultism, and occultism has been banned as a super- stition and fantastic error. But the occult Is a part of existence ; a true occultism means no more than a research into supraphysical realities and an unveiling of the hidden Jaws of being and

Nergal (Chaldean) The Chaldean deity presiding over the realms of the dead. The entrance to his domain was through a large subterranean cavern named Aralu or Irkalla, which was under the special surveillance of the goddess Allatu (though his consort was Laz). His symbol was the lion, thus the colossal lions engraved upon edifices represented Nergal’s guardianship. He was regarded as regent of the planet Mars.

net ::: 1. (networking) network.2. (networking) network, the.3. (architecture) neural network.4. (networking) The top-level domain originally for networks, although it sees heavy use for vanity domains of all types.[Jargon File] (1999-01-26)

net 1. "networking" {network}. 2. "networking" {network, the}. 3. "architecture" {neural network}. 4. "networking" The {top-level domain} originally for networks, although it sees heavy use for {vanity domains} of all types. [{Jargon File}] (1999-01-26)

network address ::: (networking) 1. The network portion of an IP address. For a class A network, the network address is the first byte of the IP address. For a class B In each case, the remainder is the host address. In the Internet, assigned network addresses are globally unique.See also subnet address, Internet Registry.2. (Or net address) An electronic mail address on the network. In the 1980s this might have been a bang path but now (1997) it is nearly always a domain work with, sell to, or recruit from among hackers but *don't* display net addresses are quietly presumed to be clueless poseurs and mentally flushed.Hackers often put their net addresses on their business cards and wear them prominently in contexts where they expect to meet other hackers face-to-face know each other quite well by network names without ever learning each others' real monikers.See also sitename, domainist.[Jargon File] (1997-05-10)

network address "networking" 1. The network portion of an {IP address}. For a {class A} network, the network address is the first {byte} of the IP address. For a {class B network}, the network address is the first two bytes of the IP address. For a {class C network}, the network address is the first three bytes of the IP address. In each case, the remainder is the {host address}. In the {Internet}, assigned network addresses are globally unique. See also {subnet address}, {Internet Registry}. 2. (Or "net address") An {electronic mail} address on {the network}. In the 1980s this might have been a {bang path} but now (1997) it is nearly always a {domain address}. Such an address is essential if one wants to be to be taken seriously by {hackers}; in particular, persons or organisations that claim to understand, work with, sell to, or recruit from among hackers but *don't* display net addresses are quietly presumed to be clueless poseurs and mentally {flush}ed. Hackers often put their net addresses on their business cards and wear them prominently in contexts where they expect to meet other hackers face-to-face (e.g. {science-fiction fandom}). This is mostly functional, but is also a signal that one identifies with hackerdom (like lodge pins among Masons or tie-dyed T-shirts among Grateful Dead fans). Net addresses are often used in e-mail text as a more concise substitute for personal names; indeed, hackers may come to know each other quite well by network names without ever learning each others' real monikers. See also {sitename}, {domainist}. [{Jargon File}] (1997-05-10)

noise shaping "communications" {Spectral noise} transformation in a quantisation processes. Noise is "colourised" in the {time domain} an/or {frequency domain} by adding parts of the previous sample. The {SNR bandwidth} and {SNR time integral} stay the same, so some noise decreases, some increases, but overall noise always increases. An example of noise shaping in the frequency domain is quantisation of samples on a {Compact Disc} to reduce noise below -98 dB. The are different algorithms with slightly different filters, e.g. {Super Bitmapping}, {4D Recording}. A time domain example is {MPEG-4 AAC TNS}, which is a method to enhance quality by temporal forming of the noise in a transform block. (2003-07-19)

noise shaping ::: (communications) Spectral noise transformation in a quantisation processes. Noise is colourised in the time domain an/or frequency domain by stay the same, so some noise decreases, some increases, but overall noise always increases.An example of noise shaping in the frequency domain is quantisation of samples on a Compact Disc to reduce noise below -98 dB. The are different algorithms with slightly different filters, e.g. Super Bitmapping, 4D Recording.A time domain example is MPEG-4 AAC TNS, which is a method to enhance quality by temporal forming of the noise in a transform block.(2003-07-19)

"Nothing can be more remarkable and suggestive than the extent to which modern Science confirms in the domain of Matter the conceptions and even the very formulae of language which were arrived at, by a very different method, in the Vedanta, — the original Vedanta, not of the schools of metaphysical philosophy, but of the Upanishads. And these, on the other hand, often reveal their full significance, their richer contents only when they are viewed in the new light shed by the discoveries of modern Science, — for instance, that Vedantic expression which describes things in the Cosmos as one seed arranged by the universal Energy in multitudinous forms.(1) Significant, especially, is the drive of Science towards a Monism which is consistent with multiplicity, towards the Vedic idea of the one essence with its many becomings.” The Life Divine

“Nothing can be more remarkable and suggestive than the extent to which modern Science confirms in the domain of Matter the conceptions and even the very formulae of language which were arrived at, by a very different method, in the Vedanta,—the original Vedanta, not of the schools of metaphysical philosophy, but of the Upanishads. And these, on the other hand, often reveal their full significance, their richer contents only when they are viewed in the new light shed by the discoveries of modern Science,—for instance, that Vedantic expression which describes things in the Cosmos as one seed arranged by the universal Energy in multitudinous forms.(1) Significant, especially, is the drive of Science towards a Monism which is consistent with multiplicity, towards the Vedic idea of the one essence with its many becomings.” The Life Divine

nslookup ::: A Unix utility by Andrew Cherenson for querying Internet domain name servers. The basic use is to find the Internet address corresponding to a given hostname well-known services. Other types (ANY, AXFR, MB, MD, MF, NULL) are described in RFC 1035. . (1994-10-27)

nslookup "networking" A {Unix} {utility program}, originally by Andrew Cherenson, for querying {Internet} {domain name servers}. The basic use is to find the {IP address} corresponding to a given {hostname} (or vice versa). By changing the query type (e.g. "set type=CNAME") other types of information can be obtained including CNAME - the {canonical name} for an alias; HINFO - the host {CPU} and {operating system} type; MINFO - mailbox or mail list information; {MX} - {mail exchanger} information; NS - the {name server} for the named zone; PTR - the hostname if the query is an IP address, otherwise the pointer to other information; SOA the domain's start-of-authority information; TXT - text information; UINFO - user information; WKS - supported {well-known services}. Other types (ANY, AXFR, MB, MD, MF, NULL) are described in {RFC 1035}. {(ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/computing/operating-systems/unix/bsd-sources/usr.sbin/named/tools/nslookup/)}. (1994-10-27)

nu ::: (networking) The country code for Niue. (1999-01-27)Because it sounds like new, nu is heavily used for vanity domains. (1999-01-27)

nu "networking" The {country code} for Niue. (1999-01-27) Because it sounds like "new", nu is heavily used for {vanity domains}. (1999-01-27)

Om (Aum) ::: OM is the mantra, the expressive sound-symbol of the Brahman Consciousness in its four domains from the Turiya to the external or material plane. The function of a mantra is to create vibrations in the inner consciousness that will prepare it for the realisation of what the mantra symbolises and is supposed indeed to carry within itself. The mantra OM should th
   refore lead towards the opening of the consciousness to the sight and feeling of the One Consciousness in all material things, in the inner being and in the supraphysical worlds, in the causal plane above now superconscient to us and, finally, the supreme liberated transcendence above all cosmic existence. The last is usually the main preoccupation with those who use the mantra.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 825-26


Omega-algebraic ::: In domain theory, a complete partial order is algebraic if every element is the lub of some chain of compact elements. If the set of compact elements is countable it is omega-algebraic. Usually written with a Greek letter omega (LaTeX \omega). (1995-02-03)

Omega-algebraic In domain theory, a complete partial order is algebraic if every element is the lub of some chain of compact elements. If the set of compact elements is countable it is omega-algebraic. Usually written with a Greek letter omega ({LaTeX} \omega). (1995-02-03)

.OM ::: in the Vedic tradition, the sacred "initiating syllable", regarded as "the one universal formulation of the energy of sound and speech" and "the foundation of all the potent creative sounds of the revealed word"; the "Word of Manifestation", the mantra or "expressive sound-symbol of the Brahman Consciousness in its four domains" (see AUM).

:::   "OM is the mantra, the expressive sound-symbol of the Brahman Consciousness in its four domains from the Turiya to the external or material plane. The function of a mantra is to create vibrations in the inner consciousness that will prepare it for the realisation of what the mantra symbolises and is supposed indeed to carry within itself. The mantra OM should therefore lead towards the opening of the consciousness to the sight and feeling of the One Consciousness in all material things, in the inner being and in the supraphysical worlds, in the causal plane above now superconscient to us and, finally, the supreme liberated transcendence above all cosmic existence.” *Letters on Yoga

“OM is the mantra, the expressive sound-symbol of the Brahman Consciousness in its four domains from the Turiya to the external or material plane. The function of a mantra is to create vibrations in the inner consciousness that will prepare it for the realisation of what the mantra symbolises and is supposed indeed to carry within itself. The mantra OM should therefore lead towards the opening of the consciousness to the sight and feeling of the One Consciousness in all material things, in the inner being and in the supraphysical worlds, in the causal plane above now superconscient to us and, finally, the supreme liberated transcendence above all cosmic existence.” Letters on Yoga

“OM is the mantra, the expressive sound-symbol of the Brahman Consciousness in itsfour domains from the Turiya to the external or material plane. The function of a mantra is to create vibrations in the inner consciousness that will prepare it for the realisation of what the mantra symbolises and is supposed indeed to carry within itself. The mantra OM should therefore lead towards the opening of the consciousness to the sight and feeling of the One Consciousness in all material things, in the inner being and in the supraphysical worlds, in the causal plane above now superconscient to us and, finally, the supreme liberated transcendence above all cosmic existence.” Letters on Yoga

om ::: the mantra or expressive sound symbol of the brahman in its four domains from the turiya to the external or material plane (i.e. the outward looking, the inward or subtle, and the superconscient causal - each letter A, U, M indicating one of these three in ascending order and the whole bringing out the fourth state, turiya); used as an initiating syllable pronounced as a benedictory prelude and sanction.

On the cosmic scale Ragnarok brings to a close a universal cycle of activity. When a world dies the god Heimdal, guardian of the rainbow bridge between the realms of the gods and Midgard, domain of humanity, blows the Gjallarhorn, summoning the gods of life to the final battle against the forces of destruction. Lesser judgments take place when single world systems reach their term, as recorded in the “Lay of Odin’s Corpse” (Odins Korpgalder), which deals with a death of one planet, and relates the deities’ efforts to elicit from the planetary soul an accounting of its past cycle of activity.

ontology ::: 1. (philosophy) A systematic account of Existence.2. (artificial intelligence) (From philosophy) An explicit formal specification of how to represent the objects, concepts and other entities that are assumed to exist in some area of interest and the relationships that hold among them.For AI systems, what exists is that which can be represented. When the knowledge about a domain is represented in a declarative language, the set of interpretation and well-formed use of these terms. Formally, an ontology is the statement of a logical theory.A set of agents that share the same ontology will be able to communicate about a domain of discourse without necessarily operating on a globally shared theory. consistent with the definitions in the ontology. The idea of ontological commitment is based on the Knowledge-Level perspective.3. (information science) The hierarchical structuring of knowledge about things by subcategorising them according to their essential (or at least the previous senses of ontology (above) which has become common in discussions about the difficulty of maintaining subject indices. (1997-04-09)

ontology 1. "philosophy" A systematic account of Existence. 2. "artificial intelligence" (From philosophy) An explicit formal specification of how to represent the objects, concepts and other entities that are assumed to exist in some area of interest and the relationships that hold among them. For {AI} systems, what "exists" is that which can be represented. When the {knowledge} about a {domain} is represented in a {declarative language}, the set of objects that can be represented is called the {universe of discourse}. We can describe the ontology of a program by defining a set of representational terms. Definitions associate the names of entities in the {universe of discourse} (e.g. classes, relations, functions or other objects) with human-readable text describing what the names mean, and formal {axioms} that constrain the interpretation and well-formed use of these terms. Formally, an ontology is the statement of a {logical theory}. A set of {agents} that share the same ontology will be able to communicate about a domain of discourse without necessarily operating on a globally shared theory. We say that an agent commits to an ontology if its observable actions are consistent with the definitions in the ontology. The idea of ontological commitment is based on the {Knowledge-Level} perspective. 3. "information science" The hierarchical structuring of knowledge about things by subcategorising them according to their essential (or at least relevant and/or cognitive) qualities. See {subject index}. This is an extension of the previous senses of "ontology" (above) which has become common in discussions about the difficulty of maintaining {subject indices}. (1997-04-09)

Open source license "legal" Any document that attempts to specify {open source} usage and distribution of software. These licenses are usually drafted by experts and are likely to be more legally sound than one a programmer could write. However, loopholes do exist. Here is a non-exhaustive list of open source licenses: 1. {Public Domain} - No license. 2. {BSD} License - An early open source license 3. {General Public License} (GPL) - The {copyleft} license of the {Free Software Foundation}. Used for {GNU} software and much of {Linux}. 4. {Artistic License (http://my-opensource.org/Artistic.txt)} Less restrictive than the GPL, permitted by {Perl} in addition to the GPL. 5. {Mozilla Public Licenses (http://mozilla.org/MPL/)}. (MPL, MozPL) and Netscape Public License (NPL). ["Open Sources", pub. O'Reilly, {full text (http://oreilly.com/catalog/opensources/book/perens.html)}]. (1999-11-28)

Open source license ::: (legal) Any document that attempts to specify open source usage and distribution of software. These licenses are usually drafted by experts and are likely to be more legally sound than one a programmer could write. However, loopholes do exist.Here is a non-exhaustive list of open source licenses:1. Public Domain - No license.2. BSD License - An early open source license3. General Public License (GPL) - The copyleft license of the Free Software Foundation. Used for GNU software and much of Linux.4. Less restrictive than the GPL, permitted by Perl in addition to the GPL.5. . (MPL, MozPL) and Netscape Public License (NPL).[Open Sources, pub. O'Reilly, (1999-11-28)

OPS5 "language" A programming language for rule-based {production systems}. A rule consists of pre-condition(s) and a resulting action. The system checks its {working memory} to see if there are rules whose pre-conditions are satisfied, if so, the action in one selected satisfied rule is executed. There is a {public domain} implementation of an OPS5 {interpreter} written by Charles L. Forgy "forgy@cs.cmu.edu" in 1977. It was first implemented in {Lisp} and later in {BLISS}. It was also ported to {Common Lisp} by George Wood and Jim Kowalski. {CLIPS} is a language for writing {expert systems}, with some of the capabilities of OPS5. See also {C5}, {OPS83}, {OPS4}, {OPS5+}, {OPS83}. Inference Engine Tech, Cambridge MA. {An OPS5 interpreter in Common LISP (ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/mirrors/Unix-c/languages/ops5)}. {A version by Mark Kantrowitz (ftp://ftp.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs.cmu.edu/user/mkant/Public/Lisp/)}. "mkant+@cs.cmu.edu". ["Programming Expert Systems in OPS5", L. Brownston et al, A-W 1985]. ["An OPS5 Primer", Sherman et al, comes with OPS5 for DOS]. ["Rule-Based Programming in the Unix System", G.T. Vesonder, AT&T Tech J 67(1), 1988]. (1995-08-18)

OPS5 ::: (language) A programming language for rule-based production systems. A rule consists of pre-condition(s) and a resulting action.The system checks its working memory to see if there are rules whose pre-conditions are satisfied, if so, the action in one selected satisfied rule is executed.There is a public domain implementation of an OPS5 interpreter written by Charles L. Forgy in 1977. It was first implemented in Lisp and later in BLISS. It was also ported to Common Lisp by George Wood and Jim Kowalski.CLIPS is a language for writing expert systems, with some of the capabilities of OPS5.See also C5, OPS83, OPS4, OPS5+, OPS83.Inference Engine Tech, Cambridge MA. . . .[Programming Expert Systems in OPS5, L. Brownston et al, A-W 1985].[An OPS5 Primer, Sherman et al, comes with OPS5 for DOS].[Rule-Based Programming in the Unix System, G.T. Vesonder, AT&T Tech J 67(1), 1988]. (1995-08-18)

Optical Time Domain Reflectometer "hardware" A device used to perform {Optical Time Domain Reflectometry}. (1995-02-01)

Optical Time Domain Reflectometer ::: (hardware) A device used to perform Optical Time Domain Reflectometry. (1995-02-01)

Optical Time Domain Reflectometry ::: Measurement of the elapsed time and intensity of light reflected on optical fibre using an optical time domain reflectometer. The reflectometer can compute the distance to problems on the fibre such as attenuation and breaks, making it a useful tool in optical network trouble-shooting. (1995-02-01)

Optical Time Domain Reflectometry Measurement of the elapsed time and intensity of light reflected on {optical fibre} using an optical time domain reflectometer. The reflectometer can compute the distance to problems on the fibre such as attenuation and breaks, making it a useful tool in optical network trouble-shooting. (1995-02-01)

org "networking" The {top-level domain} for organisations or individuals that don't fit any other top-level domain (national, com, edu, or gov). Though many have .org domains, it was never intended to be limited to non-profit organisations. {RFC 1591}. (2001-05-14)

org ::: (networking) The top-level domain for organisations or individuals that don't fit any other top-level domain (national, com, edu, or gov). Though many have .org domains, it was never intended to be limited to non-profit organisations.RFC 1591.(2001-05-14)

(or yetzirah) is the chief domain of the angels.

OTDR {Optical Time-Domain Reflectometry}

Overmind ::: Above the mind there are several levels of conscious of the Truth. But in between is what he has distinguished as the Overmind, the world of the cosmic Gods. Now it is this Overmind that has up to the present governed our world: it is the highest that man has been able to attain in illumined consciousness. It has been taken for the Supreme Divine and all those who have reached it have never for a moment doubted that they have touched the true Spirit. For, its splendours are so great to the ordinary human consciousness that it is absolutely dazzled into believing that here at last is the crowning reality. And yet the fact is that the Overmind is far below the true Divine. It is not the authentic home of the Truth. It is only the domain of the formateurs , all those creative powers and deities to whom men have bowed down since the beginning of history. And the reason why the true Divine has not manifested and transformed the earth-nature is precisely that the Overmind has been mistaken for the Supermind.being, among which the really divine world is what Sri Aurobindo has called the Supermind, the world. The cosmic Gods do not wholly live in the Truth-Consciousness: they are only in touch with it and represent, each of them, an aspect of its glories.

oz An old Australian {top-level domain} and network which got incorporated into the current one. The former Australian {domains} .oz, .edu and .com are now .oz.au, .edu.au and .com.au. (1994-10-04)

palatine ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to a palace, or to a high officer of a palace; hence, possessing royal privileges.
Of or pertaining to the palate. ::: n. --> One invested with royal privileges and rights within his domains; a count palatine. See Count palatine, under 4th Count.


Paradise [from Greek paradeisos from Old Persian pairidaeza from Sanskrit paradesa region beyond] Applied in Persian and Greek to a pleasure park or royal domain. A Hebrew version (pardes) is found in the Bible, translated “orchard” (Eccl 2:5, Cant 4:3) and “forest” (Neh 2:8). An equivalent is the Hebrew eden (delight). Stories of a Paradise or Eden are universal; and while the general idea is simple, its applications are complex. It is the state of innocence and bliss from which there is departure, and to which there is eventual return. This may apply to the human race as a whole, to particular races, to the lands they inhabit, or to the pilgrimage of the individual human soul.

partial ordering ::: A relation R is a partial ordering if it is a pre-order (i.e. it is reflexive (x R x) and transitive (x R y R z => x R z)) and it is also antisymmetric (x R y R x => x = y). The ordering is partial, rather than total, because there may exist elements x and y for which neither x R y nor y R x.In domain theory, if D is a set of values including the undefined value (bottom) then we can define a partial ordering relation = on D by x = y if x = bottom or x = y. bottom) and (bottom, x). The partial ordering on D x D is then (x1,y1) = (x2,y2) if x1 = x2 and y1 = y2. The partial ordering on D -> D is defined by f = g if f(x) = g(x) for all x in D. (No f x is more defined than g x.)A lattice is a partial ordering where all finite subsets have a least upper bound and a greatest lower bound.(= is written in LaTeX as \sqsubseteq). (1995-02-03)

partial order "mathematics" (Informally, "order", "ordering") A {binary relation} R that is a {pre-order} (i.e. it is {reflexive} (x R x) and {transitive} (x R y R z =" x R z)) and {antisymmetric} (x R y R x =" x = y). The order is partial, rather than total, because there may exist elements x and y for which neither x R y nor y R x. In {domain theory}, if D is a set of values including the undefined value ({bottom}) then we can define a partial ordering relation "= on D by x "= y if x = bottom or x = y. The constructed set D x D contains the very undefined element, (bottom, bottom) and the not so undefined elements, (x, bottom) and (bottom, x). The partial ordering on D x D is then (x1,y1) "= (x2,y2) if x1 "= x2 and y1 "= y2. The partial ordering on D -" D is defined by f "= g if f(x) "= g(x) for all x in D. (No f x is more defined than g x.) A {lattice} is a partial ordering where all finite subsets have a {least upper bound} and a {greatest lower bound}. (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\sqsubseteq}). (1995-02-03)

PDC {Primary Domain Controller}

PD {public domain}

permutation "mathematics" 1. An ordering of a certain number of elements of a given set. For instance, the permutations of (1,2,3) are (1,2,3) (2,3,1) (3,1,2) (3,2,1) (1,3,2) (2,1,3). Permutations form one of the canonical examples of a "{group}" - they can be composed and you can find an inverse permutation that reverses the action of any given permutation. The number of permutations of r things taken from a set of n is n P r = n! / (n-r)! where "n P r" is usually written with n and r as subscripts and n! is the {factorial} of n. What the football pools call a "permutation" is not a permutation but a {combination} - the order does not matter. 2. A {bijection} for which the {domain} and {range} are the same set and so f(f'(x)) = f'(f(x)) = x. (2001-05-10)

permutation ::: (mathematics) 1. An ordering of a certain number of elements of a given set.For instance, the permutations of (1,2,3) are (1,2,3) (2,3,1) (3,1,2) (3,2,1) (1,3,2) (2,1,3).Permutations form one of the canonical examples of a group - they can be composed and you can find an inverse permutation that reverses the action of any given permutation.The number of permutations of r things taken from a set of n is n P r = n! / (n-r)! where n P r is usually written with n and r as subscripts and n! is the factorial of n.What the football pools call a permutation is not a permutation but a combination - the order does not matter.2. A bijection for which the domain and range are the same set and sof(f'(x)) = f'(f(x)) = x.(2001-05-10)

physical and its energies, — all that Nature has not put into visi- ble operation on the surface ; It pursues also the application of these hidden truths and powers of Nature so as to extend the mastery of the human spirit beyond the ordinary operations of mind, the ordinary operations of life, the ordinary operations of our physical existence. In the spiritual domain, which is occult to the surface mind in so far as it passes beyond normal and enters into supernormal experience, there is possible not only the discovery of the self and spirit, but the discovery of the uplift- ing, informing and guiding light of spiritual consciousness and the power of the spirit, the spiritual way of knowledge, the spiri- tual way of action. To know these things and to bring their truths and forces into the life of humanity is a necessary part of its evolution. Science itself is in Its own way an occultism ; for it brings to light the formulas which Nature has hidden and it uses its knowledge to set free operations of her energies which she has not included in her ordinary operations and to organise and place at the service of man her occult powers and processes, a vast system of physical magic, — for there is and can be no other magic than the utilisation of secret truths of being, secret powers and processes of Nature. It may even be found that a supra- physical knowledge Is necessary for the completion of physical knowledge, because the processes of physical Nature have behind them a supraphysical factor, a power and action mental, vital or spiritual which is not tangible to any outer means of knowledge.

physical ::: The Mother: “The physical is the concrete domain that crystallises and defines the thoughts, the movements of the vital, etc. It is a solid foundation for action.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.

physical ::: the Mother: "The physical is the concrete domain that crystallises and defines the thoughts, the movements of the vital, etc. It is a solid foundation for action.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.

pit ::: 1. A natural or artificial hole or cavity in the ground. 2. Hell; the domain of fallen souls. Pit, pits.

PLANES. ::: If we regard the gmdatton of worlds or planes as a whole, we see them as a great connected complex move- ment ; the higher precipitate their influences on the lower, the lotver react to the higher and develop or manifest in themselves within their own formula something that corresponds to the superior power and its action. The material world has evolved life in obedience to a pressure from the vital plane, mind in obedience to a pressure from the mental plane. It is now trying to evolve supermind in obedica^ to a pressure from the supra- mental plane. In more detail, particular forces, movements, powers, beings of a higher world can throw themselves on the lower to establish appropriate and corresponding forms which will connect them with the material domain and, as it were, reproduce or project their action here. And each thing created here has, supporting it, subtler envelopes or forms of itself which make it subsist and connect it with forces acting from above. Man, for instance, has, besides his gross physical body, subtler sheaths or bodies by which he lives behind the s’eil in direct connection with suprapbysical planes of consciousness and can be influenced by their powers, movements and beings. What takes place in life has always behind it pie-existeni movements and forms in the occult vital planes ; what takes place in mind presupposes prc-cxistcnt movements and forms in the occult mental planes. That is an aspect of things which becomes more and more evident, insistent and important, the more we progress in a dynamic yoga.

pointed domain "theory" In most formulations of {domain theory}, a {domain} is defined to have a {bottom} element and {algebraic} {CPOs} without bottoms are called "{predomains}". David Schmidt's domains do not have this requirement and he calls a domain with a bottom "pointed". (1999-07-07)

pointed domain ::: (theory) In most formulations of domain theory, a domain is defined to have a bottom element and algebraic CPOs without bottoms are called predomains. David Schmidt's domains do not have this requirement and he calls a domain with a bottom pointed. (1999-07-07)

Point Of Contact "networking" (POC) An individual associated with a particular {Internet} entity ({IP network}, {domain}, {ASN}). (1998-09-07)

powerdomain "theory" The powerdomain of a {domain} D is a domain containing some of the {subsets} of D. Due to the asymmetry condition in the definition of a {partial order} (and therefore of a domain) the powerdomain cannot contain all the subsets of D. This is because there may be different sets X and Y such that X "= Y and Y "= X which, by the asymmetry condition would have to be considered equal. There are at least three possible orderings of the subsets of a powerdomain: Egli-Milner: X "= Y iff for all x in X, exists y in Y: x "= y     and for all y in Y, exists x in X: x "= y ("The other domain always contains a related element"). Hoare or Partial Correctness or Safety: X "= Y iff for all x in X, exists y in Y: x "= y ("The bigger domain always contains a bigger element"). Smyth or Total Correctness or Liveness: X "= Y iff for all y in Y, exists x in X: x "= y ("The smaller domain always contains a smaller element"). If a powerdomain represents the result of an {abstract interpretation} in which a bigger value is a safe approximation to a smaller value then the Hoare powerdomain is appropriate because the safe approximation Y to the powerdomain X contains a safe approximation to each point in X. (""=" is written in {LaTeX} as {\sqsubseteq}). (1995-02-03)

PowerFuL "language" A language combining {functional programming} and {logic programming}, using "angelic Powerdomains". (1998-06-30)

predomain "theory" A {domain} with no {bottom} element. (1995-05-04)

Primary Domain Controller "networking" (PDC) Each {Windows NT} {domain} has a Primary Domain Controller and zero or more {Backup Domain Controllers}. The PDC holds the {SAM} database and authenticates access requests from {workstations} and {servers} in the domain. (2003-07-16)

primary management domain "messaging" (PRMD) The component of an {X.400} {electronic mail address} that gives the organisation name, usually abbreviated to p= in written addresses. See also {ADMD}. (2003-05-15)

PRMD {primary management domain}

projection "theory" In domain theory, a {function}, f, which is (a) {idempotent}, i.e. f(f(x))=f(x) and (b) whose result is no more defined than its argument. E.g. F(x)=bottom or F(x)=x. In {reduction} systems, a function which returns some {component} of its argument. E.g. head, tail, \ (x,y) . x. In a {graph reduction} system the function can just return a pointer to part of its argument and does not need to build any new graph. (1997-01-29)

public domain (PD) The total absence of {copyright} protection. If something is "in the public domain" then anyone can copy it or use it in any way they wish. The author has none of the exclusive rights which apply to a copyright work. The phrase "public domain" is often used incorrectly to refer to {freeware} or {shareware} (software which is copyrighted but is distributed without (advance) payment). Public domain means no copyright -- no exclusive rights. In fact the phrase "public domain" has no legal status at all in the UK. See also {archive site}, {careware}, {charityware}, {copyleft}, {crippleware}, {guiltware}, {postcardware} and {-ware}. Compare {payware}.

public domain software {public domain}

puzzledom ::: n. --> The domain of puzzles; puzzles, collectively.

Quantifier: Universal quantifier is the name given to the notation (x) prefixed to a logical formula A (containing the free varible x) to express that A holds for all values of x -- usually, for all values of x within a certain range or domain of values, which either is implicit in the context, or is indicated by the notation through some convention. The same name is also given to variant or alternative notations employed for the same purpose. And of course the same name is given when the particular variable appearing is some other letter than x.

Raja yoga ::: This is the first step only. Afterwards, the ordinary activities of the mind and sense must be entirely quieted in order that the soul may be free to ascend to higher states of consciousness and acquire the foundation for a perfect freedom and self-mastery. But Rajayoga does not forget that the disabilities of the ordinary mind proceed largely from its subjection to the reactions of the nervous system and the body. It adopts th
   refore from the Hathayogic system its devices of asana and pranayama, but reduces their multiple and elaborate forms in each case to one simplest and most directly effective process sufficient for its own immediate object. Thus it gets rid of the Hathayogic complexity and cumbrousness while it utilises the swift and powerful efficacy of its methods for the control of the body and the vital functions and for the awakening of that internal dynamism, full of a latent supernormal faculty, typified in Yogic terminology by the kundalinı, the coiled and sleeping serpent of Energy within. This done, the system proceeds to the perfect quieting of the restless mind and its elevation to a higher plane through concentration of mental force by the successive stages which lead to the utmost inner concentration or ingathered state of the consciousness which is called Samadhi. By Samadhi, in which the mind acquires the capacity of withdrawing from its limited waking activities into freer and higher states of consciousness, Rajayoga serves a double purpose. It compasses a pure mental action liberated from the confusions of the outer consciousness and passes thence to the higher supra-mental planes on which the individual soul enters into its true spiritual existence. But also it acquires the capacity of that free and concentrated energising of consciousness on its object which our philosophy asserts as the primary cosmic energy and the method of divine action upon the world. By this capacity the Yogin, already possessed of the highest supracosmic knowledge and experience in the state of trance, is able in the waking state to acquire directly whatever knowledge and exercise whatever mastery may be useful or necessary to his activities in the objective world. For the ancient system of Rajayoga aimed not only at Swarajya, self-rule or subjective empire, the entire control by the subjective consciousness of all the states and activities proper to its own domain, but included Samrajya as well, outward empire, the control by the subjective consciousness of its outer activities and environment.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 36-37


rascaldom ::: n. --> State of being a rascal; rascality; domain of rascals; rascals, collectively.

realm ::: 1. A kingdom. 2. The region, sphere, or domain within which anything occurs, prevails, or dominates. 3. The special province or field of someone or something. **realms.

realm ::: n. --> A royal jurisdiction or domain; a region which is under the dominion of a king; a kingdom.
Hence, in general, province; region; country; domain; department; division; as, the realm of fancy.


reflexive domain A domain satisfying a recursive domain equation. E.g. D = D -" D.

Reflexivity: A dyadic relation R is called reflexive if xRx holds for all x within a certain previously fixed domain which must include the field of R (cf. logic, formal, § 8). In the propositional calculus, the laws of reflexivity of material implication and material equivalence (the conditional and biconditional) are the theorems, p ⊃ p, p ≡ p, expressing the reflexivity of these relations. Other examples of reflexive relations are equality, class inclusion, ⊂ (see logic, formal, § 7); formal implication and formal equivalence (see logic, formal, § 3); the relation not greater than among whole numbers, or among rational numbers, or among real numbers; the relation not later than among instants of time; the relation less than one hour apart among instants of time.

relational calculus "database" An operational methodolgy, founded on {predicate calculus}, dealing with descripitive expressions that are equivalent to the operations of {relational algebra}. {Codd's reduction algorithm} can convert from {relational calculus} to {relational algebra}. Two forms of the relational calculus exist: the {tuple calculus} and the {domain calculus}. ["An Introduction To Database Systems" (6th ed), C. J. Date, Addison Wesley]. (1998-10-05)

Relation-number: Dyadic relations R and R' are said to be similar (or ordinally similar) if there exists a one-one relation S whose domain is the field of R, and whose converse domain is the field of R', such that, if aSa' and bSb' then aRb if and only if a'Rb' . The relation-number of a dyadic relation may then be defined as the class of relations similar to it -- cf. cardinal number.

rent regard for the other members of the great series. Thus, if we regard the vital or the subtle physical plane, we see great ranges of it, (most of it), existing in themselves, without any relation with the material world and with no movement to affect or influence it, still less to precipitate a corresponding manifes- tation in the physical formula. At most we can say that the existence of anything in the vital, subtle physical or any other plane creates a possibility for a corresponding movement of manifestation in the physical world. But something more is needed to turn that static or latent possibility into a dynamic potentiality or an actual urge towards a material creation. That something may be a call from the material plane, e.g., some force or some one on the physical existence entering into touch with a supraphysical power or world or part of it and moved to bring it down into the earth-life. Or it may be an impulse in the vital or other plane itself, e.g., a vital being moved to extend his action towards the earth and establish there a kingdom for himself or the play of the forces for which he stands in his own domain.

resolver "networking" The {TCP/IP} {protocol} library software that formats requests to be sent to the {Domain Name Server} for {hostname} to {IP address} conversion. (1995-03-28)

RFC 1034 "networking, standard" One of the {RFCs} defining the {Domain Name System}. {(rfc:1034)}. (1997-12-15)

RFC 1035 "networking, standard" One of the {RFCs} defining the {Domain Name System}. {(rfc:1035)}. (1997-12-15)

RFC 1520 "networking, standard" The {RFC} defining {Classless Inter-Domain Routing}. {(rfc:1520)}. (1996-10-01)

RFC 1591 "networking, standard" The {RFC} defining the {Domain Name System}. Written by J. Postel in March 1994. (2001-05-14)

Riordan's Internet Privacy Enhanced Mail "messaging" (RIPEM) A (not yet complete, but useful) implementation of {Privacy Enhanced Mail} (PEM). RIPEM allows your {electronic mail} to have the four security facilities provided by PEM: {disclosure protection} (optional), originator authenticity, message {integrity} measures and {non-repudiation} of origin (always). RIPEM was written primarily by Mark Riordan "mrr@scss3.cl.msu.edu". Most of the code is in the {public domain}, except for the {RSA} routines, which are a library called RSAREF licensed from {RSA Data Security, Inc}. The current (November 1993) version of RIPEM is 1.1a; the current version of the {Macintosh} {port} of RIPEM is 0.8b1. (1998-07-03)

routeing domain "networking" (US "routing") A set of {routers} that exchange routeing information within an {administrative domain}. (1994-12-14)

royal ::: a. --> Kingly; pertaining to the crown or the sovereign; suitable for a king or queen; regal; as, royal power or prerogative; royal domains; the royal family; royal state.
Noble; generous; magnificent; princely.
Under the patronage of royality; holding a charter granted by the sovereign; as, the Royal Academy of Arts; the Royal Society. ::: n.


royalty ::: n. --> The state of being royal; the condition or quality of a royal person; kingship; kingly office; sovereignty.
The person of a king or sovereign; majesty; as, in the presence of royalty.
An emblem of royalty; -- usually in the plural, meaning regalia.
Kingliness; spirit of regal authority.
Domain; province; sphere.


(|‘R, the converse domain of R.

SB-Prolog Stony Brook Prolog. A {public domain} {Prolog} {interpreter} for {Unix}. Version 3.1. Distributed under the {GNU} {General Public License}. {(ftp://sbcs.sunysb.edu/pub/sbprolog/)}. {Amiga version 2.3.2 (ftp://ftp.cso.uiuc.edu/amiga/fish/f1/ff140)} and {(ftp://ftp.cso.uiuc.edu/amiga/fish/f1/ff141)}. E-mail: "warren@sbcs.sunysb.edu". (1995-01-16)

Scott domain An {algebraic}, {boundedly complete}, {complete partial order}. Often simply called a {domain}. (1994-11-01)

scoundreldom ::: n. --> The domain or sphere of scoundrels; scoundrels, collectively; the state, ideas, or practices of scoundrels.

security through obscurity "security" Or "security by obscurity". A term applied by hackers to most {operating system} vendors' favourite way of coping with security holes - namely, ignoring them, documenting neither any known holes nor the underlying security {algorithms}, trusting that nobody will find out about them and that people who do find out about them won't exploit them. This never works for long and occasionally sets the world up for debacles like the {RTM} worm of 1988 (see {Great Worm}), but once the brief moments of panic created by such events subside most vendors are all too willing to turn over and go back to sleep. After all, actually fixing the bugs would siphon off the resources needed to implement the next user-interface frill on marketing's wish list - and besides, if they started fixing security bugs customers might begin to *expect* it and imagine that their warranties of merchantability gave them some sort of rights. Historical note: There are conflicting stories about the origin of this term. It has been claimed that it was first used in the {Usenet} newsgroup in {news:comp.sys.apollo} during a campaign to get {HP}/{Apollo} to fix security problems in its {Unix}-{clone} {Aegis}/{DomainOS} (they didn't change a thing). {ITS} fans, on the other hand, say it was coined years earlier in opposition to the incredibly paranoid {Multics} people down the hall, for whom security was everything. In the ITS culture it referred to (1) the fact that by the time a {tourist} figured out how to make trouble he'd generally got over the urge to make it, because he felt part of the community; and (2) (self-mockingly) the poor coverage of the documentation and obscurity of many commands. One instance of *deliberate* security through obscurity is recorded; the command to allow patching the running ITS system ({altmode} altmode control-R) echoed as $$^D. If you actually typed alt alt ^D, that set a flag that would prevent patching the system even if you later got it right. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-15)

server 1. A program which provides some service to other ({client}) programs. The connection between client and server is normally by means of {message passing}, often over a {network}, and uses some {protocol} to encode the client's requests and the server's responses. The server may run continuously (as a {daemon}), waiting for requests to arrive or it may be invoked by some higher level daemon which controls a number of specific servers ({inetd} on {Unix}). There are many servers associated with the {Internet}, such as those for {HTTP}, {Network File System}, {Network Information Service} (NIS), {Domain Name System} (DNS), {FTP}, {news}, {finger}, {Network Time Protocol}. On Unix, a long list can be found in /etc/services or in the {NIS} database "services". See {client-server}. 2. A computer which provides some service for other computers connected to it via a network. The most common example is a {file server} which has a local disk and services requests from remote clients to read and write files on that disk, often using {Sun}'s {Network File System} (NFS) {protocol} or {Novell Netware} on {PCs}. Another common example is a {web server}. [{Jargon File}] (2003-12-29)

Similarly, existential quantifier is the name given to the notation (Ex) prefixed to a logical formula A (containing the free variable x) to express that A holds for some (i.e., at least one) value of x -- usually, for some value of x within a certain range or domain. The E which forms part of the notation is often inverted, and various alternative notitions also occur.

sphere ::: 1. The sky considered as a vaulted roof; firmament. 2. The place or environment within which a person or thing exists; a field of activity or operation; orbit, province, realm, domain. 3. A celestial abode. 4. A field of something specified. 5. The orbit of a celestial body, such as that of a planet. Also fig. **spheres.**

SRC Modula-3 Version 2.11 compiler(-"C), run-time, library, documentation The goal of Modula-3 is to be as simple and safe as it can be while meeting the needs of modern systems programmers. Instead of exploring new features, we studied the features of the Modula family of languages that have proven themselves in practice and tried to simplify them into a harmonious language. We found that most of the successful features were aimed at one of two main goals: greater robustness, and a simpler, more systematic type system. Modula-3 retains one of Modula-2's most successful features, the provision for explicit interfaces between modules. It adds objects and classes, exception handling, garbage collection, lightweight processes (or threads), and the isolation of unsafe features. conformance: implements the language defined in SPwM3. ports: i386/AIX 68020/DomainOS Acorn/RISCiX MIPS/Ultrix 68020/HP-UX RS/6000/AIX IBMRT/4.3 68000/NEXTSTEP i860/SVR4 SPARC/SunOS 68020/SunOS sun386/SunOS Multimax/4.3 VAX/Ultrix Mailing list: comp.lang.modula3 E-mail: Bill Kalsow "kalsow@src.dec.com" From DEC/SRC, Palo Alto, CA. "Modula-3 Report (revised)" Luca Cardelli et al. {(ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/DEC/Modula-3/)}. (1992-02-09)

standard semantics The standard interpretation of a term in some language yields the term's standard denotational semantics, i.e. its "meaning". This is usually given by a semantic function which maps a term in the abstract syntax to a point in some domain. The domain is the interpretation of the term's type. The semantic function also takes an environment - a function which maps the free variables of the term to their meaning. We say that a domain point "denotes", or "is the denotation of", a term. A non-standard semantics results from some other interpretation, e.g. an abstract interpretation.

starosty ::: n. --> A castle and domain conferred on a nobleman for life.

start of authority "networking" (SOA) A type of {resource record} used by the {Domain Name System} (DNS) to give metadata about a set of domain name data (the contents of a "zone file"). An SOA record has the following parameters: Serial: the zone serial number - a version number for the zone file. Refresh: the number of seconds between update requests from secondary and slave name servers. Retry: the number of seconds the secondary or slave will wait before retrying when an attempt fails. Expire: (time to live - TTL) the number of seconds a master or slave will wait before considering cached data out-of-date. Minimum: previously used to determine the minimum TTL, this offers negative caching. (2007-05-11)

STD 13 "networking, standard" One of the {STDs} defining the {Domain Name System}. (1997-12-15)

subject "programming" In {subject-oriented programming}, a subject is a collection of {classes} or class fragments whose {class hierarchy} models its domain in its own, subjective way. A subject may be a complete application in itself, or it may be an incomplete fragment that must be composed with other subjects to produce a complete application. Subject composition combines class hierarchies to produce new subjects that incorporate functionality from existing subjects. (1999-08-31)

Suite Synthetique des Benchmarks de l'AFUU "benchmark" (SSBA, AFUU Synthetic Benchmark Suite) A {public domain} {benchmark} suite produced by the {AFUU}. Version: 2.3 (1995-07-14). (1996-06-11)

sum 1. "theory" In {domain theory}, the sum A + B of two {domains} contains all elements of both domains, modified to indicate which part of the union they come from, plus a new {bottom} element. There are two constructor functions associated with the sum: inA : A -" A+B   inB : B -" A+B inA(a) = (0,a)    inB(b) = (1,b) and a disassembly operation: case d of {isA(x) -" E1; isB(x) -" E2} This can be generalised to arbitrary numbers of domains. See also {smash sum}, {disjoint union}. 2. "tool" A {Unix} utility to calculate a 16-bit {checksum} of the data in a file. It also displays the size of the file, either in {kilobytes} or in 512-byte blocks. The checksum may differ on machines with 16-bit and 32-bit ints. {Unix manual page}: sum(1). (1995-03-16)

surjection "mathematics" A function f : A -" B is surjective or onto or a surjection if f A = B. I.e. f can return any value in B. This means that its {image} is its {codomain}. Only surjections have {right inverses}, f' : B -" A where f (f' x) = x since if f were not a surjection there would be elements of B for which f' was not defined. See also {bijection}, {injection}. (1995-05-27)

svarajya (swarajya) ::: self-rule, subjective empire; "the entire control svarajya by the subjective consciousness of all the states and activities proper to its own domain".

sve dame (swe dame) ::: in its own domain.

Syntax/Semantic Language "language" (S/SL) A high level {specification language} for {recursive descent parsers} developed by J.R. Cordy "cordy@cs.queensu.ca" and R.C. Holt "holt@uwaterloo.ca" at the University of Toronto in 1980. S/SL is a small language that supports cheap recursion and defines input, output, and error token names (& values), semantic mechanisms (class interfaces whose methods are really escapes to routines in a host programming language but allow good abstraction in the pseudo-code) and a pseudo-code program that defines the syntax of the input language by the token stream the program accepts. Alternation, control flow and one-symbol look-ahead constructs are part of the language. The S/SL processor compiles this pseudo-code into a table (byte-codes) that is interpreted by the S/SL table-walker (interpreter). The pseudo-code language processes the input language in recursive descent LL1 style but extensions allow it to process any LRk language relatively easily. S/SL is designed to provide excellent syntax error recovery and repair. It is more powerful and transparent than yacc but slower. S/SL has been used to implement production commercial compilers for languages such as {PL/I}, {Euclid}, {Turing}, {Ada}, and {COBOL}, as well as {interpreters}, {command processors}, and domain specific languages of many kinds. {(ftp://ftp.cs.queensu.ca/pub/cordy/ssl)}. ["Specification of S/SL: Syntax/Semantic Language", J.R. Cordy and R.C. Holt, Computer Systems Research Institute, University of Toronto, 1980]. ["An Introduction to S/SL: Syntax/Semantic Language", R.C. Holt, J.R. Cordy, and D.B. Wortman; ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems (TOPLAS), Vol 4, No. 2, April 1982, pp 149-178]. ["Hierarchic Syntax Error Repair", D.T. Barnard and R.C. Holt, International Journal of Computing and Information Sciences, Vol. 11, No. 4, August 1982, Pages 231-258.] (2003-10-30)

TDR {time domain reflectometer}

The axiom of extensionality as above stated has (incidentally to its principal purpose) the effect of excluding non-classes entirely and assuming that everything is a class. This assumption can be avoided if desired, at the cost of complicating the axioms somewhat -- one method would be to introduce an additional functional constant, expressing the property to be a class (or set), and to modify the axioms accordingly, the domain of individuals being thought of as possibly containing other things besides sets.

The deceased, entering the domain as a khu, performs the same activities that he did on earth: plowing, reaping, sailing his boat, and making love. On entering Amenti, Anubis conducts the soul to the hall of Osiris where it is judged by the 42 judges and its heart is weighed against the feather of truth. If the soul passes the test, it goes to the fields of Aalu. If the names of the 15 Aats, the 7 Arrets (circles), the 21 Pylons, as well as the gods and guardians of these domains are all known, the deceased is enabled to pass from one mansion to the other, and finally to enter the Night Boat of the Sun, which passes through the Tuat on its way to arise in the heavens. The shades who miss this boat, the unprogressed egos, must remain in the afterworld or kama-loka, while those who enter the boat are carried to the heaven world or devachan where they wander about until they return to earth for rebirth. This refers to the passing from world to world by the ego proficient in knowledge of the “names,” and thereafter entering the secret or invisible pathways to the sun. The knowledge of the names indicates spiritual, intellectual, and psychic development, by which the ego of the defunct is no longer attracted to the lower spheres, but having knowledge of them correctly answers the challenges and thereafter follows the attraction upwards and onwards.

The fixity of this theoretical structure is not to be interpreted as incompatible with the continuous movement of discovery. The function of philosophy as such, in any age, is that of attempting to effect the theoretical ordering of the available fund of knowledge. There is implicit in Spinoza's conception of this function the recognition of the two-fold character of the task of philosophy. The task, on the one hand is reflection upon the available fund of insight and ideas, upon all the fruits of reflection and inquiry, with the purpose of coherent ordering and expression of the fund. In this sense, 'philosophy' is that which can be displayed in the geometrical fashion. It is equally the task of philosophy, however, to prepare for this display and ordering. Paradoxically, philosophy must prepare for itself. Philosophy, in this function, is reflection upon the conditions of all inquiry, the discovery of the grounds of method, of the proper and indispensable assumptions of inquiry as such, and of the basic ideas within whose domain inquiry will move. If inquiry is to be undertaken at all, then mind must discover within itself, and disclose to itself, whatever authoritative guidance can be assured for the enterprise. The competence of the mind to know, the determination of the range of that competence, the rational criteria of truth, the necessities levelled to mind by the very reflections of mind -- these and related questions define the task of philosophy as propaedeutic both to philosophy itself and to science. In this recognition of the two-fold character of philosophy, and of its relation to science, Spinoza is re-stating the spirit of Descartes.

The left half of an upward arrow placed between (e.g.) a and R denotes the relation which holds between x and y if and only if x∈a and xRy, in other words, the relation R with its domain limited to the class a.

There follows the existence of an interpretation of the Zermelo set theory (see Logic, formal, § 9) -- consistency of the theory assumed -- according to which the domain of sets is only enumerable; although there are theorems of the Zermelo set theory which, under the usual interpretation, assert the existence of the non-enumerable infinite.

There intervenes, third, uplifting our knowledge and effort into the domain of spiritual experience, the direct suggestion, example and influence of the Teacher — guru. Last comes the instru- mentality of Time — kala ; for in all things there is a cycle of thtit action and a period of the dWine movement.

There is yet a third kind of epohe that allegedly enables one to discriminate subjectivity qua transcendental -- by effecting yet another kind of reduction, which Husserl eventually called "transcendental-phenomenological." (In his Ideen he called it simply "phenomenological.") By refraining from participition in one's inveterate (and justifiable) natural attitude of presupposing the world and the status of one's subjectivity in the world, one can see the world (and whatever else one may intend) as fundamentally a noematic-intentional object for transcendental subjectivity -- for one's individual self, the subject whose life is one's own transcendental stream of consciousness, and for other transcendental subjects. As one can describe one's actual psychic subjectivity, so one can describe one's actual transcendental subjectivity and thus produce an empirical transcendental phenomenology. Again, as in the case of the purely psychic, so in the case of the purely transcendental, an eidetic reduction enables one to produce a purely eidetic science -- here an eidetic transcendental phenomenology, the theme of which is the absolutely universal domain of transcendental subjectivity in general, including the latter's noematic-objective sense: the entire world and all its possible variants. This eidetic transcendental phenomenology is what Husserl ordinarily meant when, in the Ideen or subsequent works, he spoke simply of "phenomenology. "

The right half of an upward arrow placed between (e.g.) R and b denotes the relation which holds between x and y if and only if xRy and y∈b; in other words the relation R with its converse domain limited to b.

The states of matter give clues by means of correspondence to the understanding of the primary elements. Gases are indefinitely expansible and their particles have great freedom and range of movement and are always in rapid motion. It would seem by analogy that the solid state corresponds to the physical planes, the liquid state to the astral or psychic plane, air to mind, and fire to spirit. Air may be called the vehicle of fire, as mind is the vehicle of spirit. Fire is analogous to points or foci of energy; air, being number two, suggests lines of force or radiation, motion. The air which, according to the teaching of the medieval Fire-philosophers, is the domain of sylphs is certainly not our familiar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen, which is merely a correspondence of the element on our plane; it is when on our own astral air plane that these beings may be encountered.

"The sun in the yoga is the symbol of the supermind and the supermind is the first power of the Supreme which one meets across the border where the experience of spiritualised mind ceases and the unmodified divine Consciousness begins the domain of the supreme Nature, para prakrti . It is that Light of which the Vedic mystics got a glimpse and it is the opposite of the intervening darkness of the Christian mystics, for the supermind is all light and no darkness.” Letters on Yoga

“The sun in the yoga is the symbol of the supermind and the supermind is the first power of the Supreme which one meets across the border where the experience of spiritualised mind ceases and the unmodified divine Consciousness begins the domain of the supreme Nature, para prakrti . It is that Light of which the Vedic mystics got a glimpse and it is the opposite of the intervening darkness of the Christian mystics, for the supermind is all light and no darkness.” Letters on Yoga

The tales concerning Valhalla have been sadly misunderstood in popular mythologies. Far from being an account of gross debauchery, there is mystical meaning hidden in every detail of the description of Odin’s domain and of the feasting of his warriors. For example, Valhalla is said to have 540 doors, through each of which 800 warriors issue abreast. This makes the number of One-harriers total 432,000, an oft-recurring number in Hindu and Babylonian time tables dealing with mystic and mythic history. Their message is in fact one of the noblest and most inspiring of mythic tales, when read between the lines of allegory, for here the warriors of emerge willingly to be “slain” daily in the cause of humanity’s evolutionary progress.

The Zermelo set theory may be formulated as a simple applied functional calculus of first order (in the sense of § 3), for which the domain of individuals is composed of classes, and the only functional constant is ε, primitive formulas (additional to those given in § 3) being added as follows:

Three senses of "Ockhamism" may be distinguished: Logical, indicating usage of the terminology and technique of logical analysis developed by Ockham in his Summa totius logicae; in particular, use of the concept of supposition (suppositio) in the significative analysis of terms. Epistemological, indicating the thesis that universality is attributable only to terms and propositions, and not to things as existing apart from discourse. Theological, indicating the thesis that no tneological doctrines, such as those of God's existence or of the immortality of the soul, are evident or demonstrable philosophically, so that religious doctrine rests solely on faith, without metaphysical or scientific support. It is in this sense that Luther is often called an Ockhamist.   Bibliography:   B. Geyer,   Ueberwegs Grundriss d. Gesch. d. Phil., Bd. II (11th ed., Berlin 1928), pp. 571-612 and 781-786; N. Abbagnano,   Guglielmo di Ockham (Lanciano, Italy, 1931); E. A. Moody,   The Logic of William of Ockham (N. Y. & London, 1935); F. Ehrle,   Peter von Candia (Muenster, 1925); G. Ritter,   Studien zur Spaetscholastik, I-II (Heidelberg, 1921-1922).     --E.A.M. Om, aum: (Skr.) Mystic, holy syllable as a symbol for the indefinable Absolute. See Aksara, Vac, Sabda. --K.F.L. Omniscience: In philosophy and theology it means the complete and perfect knowledge of God, of Himself and of all other beings, past, present, and future, or merely possible, as well as all their activities, real or possible, including the future free actions of human beings. --J.J.R. One: Philosophically, not a number but equivalent to unit, unity, individuality, in contradistinction from multiplicity and the mani-foldness of sensory experience. In metaphysics, the Supreme Idea (Plato), the absolute first principle (Neo-platonism), the universe (Parmenides), Being as such and divine in nature (Plotinus), God (Nicolaus Cusanus), the soul (Lotze). Religious philosophy and mysticism, beginning with Indian philosophy (s.v.), has favored the designation of the One for the metaphysical world-ground, the ultimate icility, the world-soul, the principle of the world conceived as reason, nous, or more personally. The One may be conceived as an independent whole or as a sum, as analytic or synthetic, as principle or ontologically. Except by mysticism, it is rarely declared a fact of sensory experience, while its transcendent or transcendental, abstract nature is stressed, e.g., in epistemology where the "I" or self is considered the unitary background of personal experience, the identity of self-consciousness, or the unity of consciousness in the synthesis of the manifoldness of ideas (Kant). --K.F.L. One-one: A relation R is one-many if for every y in the converse domain there is a unique x such that xRy. A relation R is many-one if for every x in the domain there is a unique y such that xRy. (See the article relation.) A relation is one-one, or one-to-one, if it is at the same time one-many and many-one. A one-one relation is said to be, or to determine, a one-to-one correspondence between its domain and its converse domain. --A.C. On-handedness: (Ger. Vorhandenheit) Things exist in the mode of thereness, lying- passively in a neutral space. A "deficient" form of a more basic relationship, termed at-handedness (Zuhandenheit). (Heidegger.) --H.H. Ontological argument: Name by which later authors, especially Kant, designate the alleged proof for God's existence devised by Anselm of Canterbury. Under the name of God, so the argument runs, everyone understands that greater than which nothing can be thought. Since anything being the greatest and lacking existence is less then the greatest having also existence, the former is not really the greater. The greatest, therefore, has to exist. Anselm has been reproached, already by his contemporary Gaunilo, for unduly passing from the field of logical to the field of ontological or existential reasoning. This criticism has been repeated by many authors, among them Aquinas. The argument has, however, been used, if in a somewhat modified form, by Duns Scotus, Descartes, and Leibniz. --R.A. Ontological Object: (Gr. onta, existing things + logos, science) The real or existing object of an act of knowledge as distinguished from the epistemological object. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ontologism: (Gr. on, being) In contrast to psychologism, is called any speculative system which starts philosophizing by positing absolute being, or deriving the existence of entities independently of experience merely on the basis of their being thought, or assuming that we have immediate and certain knowledge of the ground of being or God. Generally speaking any rationalistic, a priori metaphysical doctrine, specifically the philosophies of Rosmini-Serbati and Vincenzo Gioberti. As a philosophic method censored by skeptics and criticists alike, as a scholastic doctrine formerly strongly supported, revived in Italy and Belgium in the 19th century, but no longer countenanced. --K.F.L. Ontology: (Gr. on, being + logos, logic) The theory of being qua being. For Aristotle, the First Philosophy, the science of the essence of things. Introduced as a term into philosophy by Wolff. The science of fundamental principles, the doctrine of the categories. Ultimate philosophy; rational cosmology. Syn. with metaphysics. See Cosmology, First Principles, Metaphysics, Theology. --J.K.F. Operation: "(Lit. operari, to work) Any act, mental or physical, constituting a phase of the reflective process, and performed with a view to acquiring1 knowledge or information about a certain subject-nntter. --A.C.B.   In logic, see Operationism.   In philosophy of science, see Pragmatism, Scientific Empiricism. Operationism: The doctrine that the meaning of a concept is given by a set of operations.   1. The operational meaning of a term (word or symbol) is given by a semantical rule relating the term to some concrete process, object or event, or to a class of such processes, objectj or events.   2. Sentences formed by combining operationally defined terms into propositions are operationally meaningful when the assertions are testable by means of performable operations. Thus, under operational rules, terms have semantical significance, propositions have empirical significance.   Operationism makes explicit the distinction between formal (q.v.) and empirical sentences. Formal propositions are signs arranged according to syntactical rules but lacking operational reference. Such propositions, common in mathematics, logic and syntax, derive their sanction from convention, whereas an empirical proposition is acceptable (1) when its structure obeys syntactical rules and (2) when there exists a concrete procedure (a set of operations) for determining its truth or falsity (cf. Verification). Propositions purporting to be empirical are sometimes amenable to no operational test because they contain terms obeying no definite semantical rules. These sentences are sometimes called pseudo-propositions and are said to be operationally meaningless. They may, however, be 'meaningful" in other ways, e.g. emotionally or aesthetically (cf. Meaning).   Unlike a formal statement, the "truth" of an empirical sentence is never absolute and its operational confirmation serves only to increase the degree of its validity. Similarly, the semantical rule comprising the operational definition of a term has never absolute precision. Ordinarily a term denotes a class of operations and the precision of its definition depends upon how definite are the rules governing inclusion in the class.   The difference between Operationism and Logical Positivism (q.v.) is one of emphasis. Operationism's stress of empirical matters derives from the fact that it was first employed to purge physics of such concepts as absolute space and absolute time, when the theory of relativity had forced upon physicists the view that space and time are most profitably defined in terms of the operations by which they are measured. Although different methods of measuring length at first give rise to different concepts of length, wherever the equivalence of certain of these measures can be established by other operations, the concepts may legitimately be combined.   In psychology the operational criterion of meaningfulness is commonly associated with a behavioristic point of view. See Behaviorism. Since only those propositions which are testable by public and repeatable operations are admissible in science, the definition of such concepti as mind and sensation must rest upon observable aspects of the organism or its behavior. Operational psychology deals with experience only as it is indicated by the operation of differential behavior, including verbal report. Discriminations, or the concrete differential reactions of organisms to internal or external environmental states, are by some authors regarded as the most basic of all operations.   For a discussion of the role of operational definition in phvsics. see P. W. Bridgman, The Logic of Modern Physics, (New York, 1928) and The Nature of Physical Theory (Princeton, 1936). "The extension of operationism to psychology is discussed by C. C. Pratt in The Logic of Modem Psychology (New York. 1939.)   For a discussion and annotated bibliography relating to Operationism and Logical Positivism, see S. S. Stevens, Psychology and the Science of Science, Psychol. Bull., 36, 1939, 221-263. --S.S.S. Ophelimity: Noun derived from the Greek, ophelimos useful, employed by Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) in economics as the equivalent of utility, or the capacity to provide satisfaction. --J.J.R. Opinion: (Lat. opinio, from opinor, to think) An hypothesis or proposition entertained on rational grounds but concerning which doubt can reasonably exist. A belief. See Hypothesis, Certainty, Knowledge. --J.K.F- Opposition: (Lat. oppositus, pp. of oppono, to oppose) Positive actual contradiction. One of Aristotle's Post-predicaments. In logic any contrariety or contradiction, illustrated by the "Square of Opposition". Syn. with: conflict. See Logic, formal, § 4. --J.K.F. Optimism: (Lat. optimus, the best) The view inspired by wishful thinking, success, faith, or philosophic reflection, that the world as it exists is not so bad or even the best possible, life is good, and man's destiny is bright. Philosophically most persuasively propounded by Leibniz in his Theodicee, according to which God in his wisdom would have created a better world had he known or willed such a one to exist. Not even he could remove moral wrong and evil unless he destroyed the power of self-determination and hence the basis of morality. All systems of ethics that recognize a supreme good (Plato and many idealists), subscribe to the doctrines of progressivism (Turgot, Herder, Comte, and others), regard evil as a fragmentary view (Josiah Royce et al.) or illusory, or believe in indemnification (Henry David Thoreau) or melioration (Emerson), are inclined optimistically. Practically all theologies advocating a plan of creation and salvation, are optimistic though they make the good or the better dependent on moral effort, right thinking, or belief, promising it in a future existence. Metaphysical speculation is optimistic if it provides for perfection, evolution to something higher, more valuable, or makes room for harmonies or a teleology. See Pessimism. --K.F.L. Order: A class is said to be partially ordered by a dyadic relation R if it coincides with the field of R, and R is transitive and reflexive, and xRy and yRx never both hold when x and y are different. If in addition R is connected, the class is said to be ordered (or simply ordered) by R, and R is called an ordering relation.   Whitehcid and Russell apply the term serial relation to relations which are transitive, irreflexive, and connected (and, in consequence, also asymmetric). However, the use of serial relations in this sense, instead ordering relations as just defined, is awkward in connection with the notion of order for unit classes.   Examples: The relation not greater than among leal numbers is an ordering relation. The relation less than among real numbers is a serial relation. The real numbers are simply ordered by the former relation. In the algebra of classes (logic formal, § 7), the classes are partially ordered by the relation of class inclusion.   For explanation of the terminology used in making the above definitions, see the articles connexity, reflexivity, relation, symmetry, transitivity. --A.C. Order type: See relation-number. Ordinal number: A class b is well-ordered by a dyadic relation R if it is ordered by R (see order) and, for every class a such that a ⊂ b, there is a member x of a, such that xRy holds for every member y of a; and R is then called a well-ordering relation. The ordinal number of a class b well-ordered by a relation R, or of a well-ordering relation R, is defined to be the relation-number (q. v.) of R.   The ordinal numbers of finite classes (well-ordered by appropriate relations) are called finite ordinal numbers. These are 0, 1, 2, ... (to be distinguished, of course, from the finite cardinal numbers 0, 1, 2, . . .).   The first non-finite (transfinite or infinite) ordinal number is the ordinal number of the class of finite ordinal numbers, well-ordered in their natural order, 0, 1, 2, . . .; it is usually denoted by the small Greek letter omega. --A.C.   G. Cantor, Contributions to the Founding of the Theory of Transfinite Numbers, translated and with an introduction by P. E. B. Jourdain, Chicago and London, 1915. (new ed. 1941); Whitehead and Russell, Princtpia Mathematica. vol. 3. Orexis: (Gr. orexis) Striving; desire; the conative aspect of mind, as distinguished from the cognitive and emotional (Aristotle). --G.R.M.. Organicism: A theory of biology that life consists in the organization or dynamic system of the organism. Opposed to mechanism and vitalism. --J.K.F. Organism: An individual animal or plant, biologically interpreted. A. N. Whitehead uses the term to include also physical bodies and to signify anything material spreading through space and enduring in time. --R.B.W. Organismic Psychology: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, an instrument) A system of theoretical psychology which construes the structure of the mind in organic rather than atomistic terms. See Gestalt Psychology; Psychological Atomism. --L.W. Organization: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, work) A structured whole. The systematic unity of parts in a purposive whole. A dynamic system. Order in something actual. --J.K.F. Organon: (Gr. organon) The title traditionally given to the body of Aristotle's logical treatises. The designation appears to have originated among the Peripatetics after Aristotle's time, and expresses their view that logic is not a part of philosophy (as the Stoics maintained) but rather the instrument (organon) of philosophical inquiry. See Aristotelianism. --G.R.M.   In Kant. A system of principles by which pure knowledge may be acquired and established.   Cf. Fr. Bacon's Novum Organum. --O.F.K. Oriental Philosophy: A general designation used loosely to cover philosophic tradition exclusive of that grown on Greek soil and including the beginnings of philosophical speculation in Egypt, Arabia, Iran, India, and China, the elaborate systems of India, Greater India, China, and Japan, and sometimes also the religion-bound thought of all these countries with that of the complex cultures of Asia Minor, extending far into antiquity. Oriental philosophy, though by no means presenting a homogeneous picture, nevertheless shares one characteristic, i.e., the practical outlook on life (ethics linked with metaphysics) and the absence of clear-cut distinctions between pure speculation and religious motivation, and on lower levels between folklore, folk-etymology, practical wisdom, pre-scientiiic speculation, even magic, and flashes of philosophic insight. Bonds with Western, particularly Greek philosophy have no doubt existed even in ancient times. Mutual influences have often been conjectured on the basis of striking similarities, but their scientific establishment is often difficult or even impossible. Comparative philosophy (see especially the work of Masson-Oursel) provides a useful method. Yet a thorough treatment of Oriental Philosophy is possible only when the many languages in which it is deposited have been more thoroughly studied, the psychological and historical elements involved in the various cultures better investigated, and translations of the relevant documents prepared not merely from a philological point of view or out of missionary zeal, but by competent philosophers who also have some linguistic training. Much has been accomplished in this direction in Indian and Chinese Philosophy (q.v.). A great deal remains to be done however before a definitive history of Oriental Philosophy may be written. See also Arabian, and Persian Philosophy. --K.F.L. Origen: (185-254) The principal founder of Christian theology who tried to enrich the ecclesiastic thought of his day by reconciling it with the treasures of Greek philosophy. Cf. Migne PL. --R.B.W. Ormazd: (New Persian) Same as Ahura Mazdah (q.v.), the good principle in Zoroastrianism, and opposed to Ahriman (q.v.). --K.F.L. Orphic Literature: The mystic writings, extant only in fragments, of a Greek religious-philosophical movement of the 6th century B.C., allegedly started by the mythical Orpheus. In their mysteries, in which mythology and rational thinking mingled, the Orphics concerned themselves with cosmogony, theogony, man's original creation and his destiny after death which they sought to influence to the better by pure living and austerity. They taught a symbolism in which, e.g., the relationship of the One to the many was clearly enunciated, and believed in the soul as involved in reincarnation. Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Plato were influenced by them. --K.F.L. Ortega y Gasset, Jose: Born in Madrid, May 9, 1883. At present in Buenos Aires, Argentine. Son of Ortega y Munillo, the famous Spanish journalist. Studied at the College of Jesuits in Miraflores and at the Central University of Madrid. In the latter he presented his Doctor's dissertation, El Milenario, in 1904, thereby obtaining his Ph.D. degree. After studies in Leipzig, Berlin, Marburg, under the special influence of Hermann Cohen, the great exponent of Kant, who taught him the love for the scientific method and awoke in him the interest in educational philosophy, Ortega came to Spain where, after the death of Nicolas Salmeron, he occupied the professorship of metaphysics at the Central University of Madrid. The following may be considered the most important works of Ortega y Gasset:     Meditaciones del Quijote, 1914;   El Espectador, I-VIII, 1916-1935;   El Tema de Nuestro Tiempo, 1921;   España Invertebrada, 1922;   Kant, 1924;   La Deshumanizacion del Arte, 1925;   Espiritu de la Letra, 1927;   La Rebelion de las Masas, 1929;   Goethe desde Adentio, 1934;   Estudios sobre el Amor, 1939;   Ensimismamiento y Alteracion, 1939;   El Libro de las Misiones, 1940;   Ideas y Creencias, 1940;     and others.   Although brought up in the Marburg school of thought, Ortega is not exactly a neo-Kantian. At the basis of his Weltanschauung one finds a denial of the fundamental presuppositions which characterized European Rationalism. It is life and not thought which is primary. Things have a sense and a value which must be affirmed independently. Things, however, are to be conceived as the totality of situations which constitute the circumstances of a man's life. Hence, Ortega's first philosophical principle: "I am myself plus my circumstances". Life as a problem, however, is but one of the poles of his formula. Reason is the other. The two together function, not by dialectical opposition, but by necessary coexistence. Life, according to Ortega, does not consist in being, but rather, in coming to be, and as such it is of the nature of direction, program building, purpose to be achieved, value to be realized. In this sense the future as a time dimension acquires new dignity, and even the present and the past become articulate and meaning-full only in relation to the future. Even History demands a new point of departure and becomes militant with new visions. --J.A.F. Orthodoxy: Beliefs which are declared by a group to be true and normative. Heresy is a departure from and relative to a given orthodoxy. --V.S. Orthos Logos: See Right Reason. Ostensible Object: (Lat. ostendere, to show) The object envisaged by cognitive act irrespective of its actual existence. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ostensive: (Lat. ostendere, to show) Property of a concept or predicate by virtue of which it refers to and is clarified by reference to its instances. --A.C.B. Ostwald, Wilhelm: (1853-1932) German chemist. Winner of the Nobel prize for chemistry in 1909. In Die Uberwindung des wissenschaftlichen Materialistmus and in Naturphilosophie, his two best known works in the field of philosophy, he advocates a dynamic theory in opposition to materialism and mechanism. All properties of matter, and the psychic as well, are special forms of energy. --L.E.D. Oupnekhat: Anquetil Duperron's Latin translation of the Persian translation of 50 Upanishads (q.v.), a work praised by Schopenhauer as giving him complete consolation. --K.F.L. Outness: A term employed by Berkeley to express the experience of externality, that is the ideas of space and things placed at a distance. Hume used it in the sense of distance Hamilton understood it as the state of being outside of consciousness in a really existing world of material things. --J.J.R. Overindividual: Term used by H. Münsterberg to translate the German überindividuell. The term is applied to any cognitive or value object which transcends the individual subject. --L.W. P

Time Domain Reflectometer "hardware, networking" (TDR) An electronic device for detecting and locating short- or open-circuits in an {Ethernet} cable. TDRs can also measure how the {characteristic impedance} of a line varies along its length. (1995-12-28)

TLD {top-level domain}

tm "networking" The {country code} for Turkmenistan. Heavily used for {vanity domains} because it looks like the abbreviation for "trademark". (1999-01-27)

to "networking" The {country code} for Tonga. Heavily used for {vanity domains} because it looks like the English word "to". (1999-01-27)

top-level domain "networking" The last and most significant component of an {Internet} {fully qualified domain name}, the part after the last ".". For example, {host} wombat.doc.ic.ac.uk is in top-level domain "uk" (for United Kingdom). Every other country has its own top-level domain, including ".us" for the U.S.A. Within the .us domain, there are subdomains for the fifty states, each generally with a name identical to the state's postal abbreviation. These are rarely used however. Within the .uk domain, there is a .ac.uk subdomain for academic sites and a .co.uk domain for commercial ones. Other top-level domains may be divided up in similar ways. In the US and some other countries, the following top-level domains are used much more widely than the country code: .com - commercial bodies .edu - educational institutions .gov - U. S. government .mil - U. S. armed services .net - network operators .org - other organisations Since the rapid commercialisation of the Internet in the 1990s the ".com" domain has become particularly heavily populated with every company trying to register its company name as a subdomain of .com, e.g. "netscape.com" so as to make it easy for customers to guess or remember the {URL} of the comany's {home page}. United Nations entities use the domain names of the countries where they are located. The UN headquarters facility in New York City, for example, is un.org. Several new top-level domains are about to be added (Oct 1997): .nom - individual people .rec - recreational organisations .firm - businesses such as law, accounting, engineering .store - commercial retail companies .ent - entertainment facilities and organisations (1997-10-08)

town ::: adv. & prep. --> Formerly: (a) An inclosure which surrounded the mere homestead or dwelling of the lord of the manor. [Obs.] (b) The whole of the land which constituted the domain. [Obs.] (c) A collection of houses inclosed by fences or walls.
Any number or collection of houses to which belongs a regular market, and which is not a city or the see of a bishop.
Any collection of houses larger than a village, and not incorporated as a city; also, loosely, any large, closely populated


transparent 1. "jargon" Not visible, hidden; said of a system which functions in a manner not evident to the user. For example, the {Domain Name System} transparently resolves a {fully qualified domain name} into an {IP address} without the user being aware of it. Compare this to what {Donald Norman (http://atg.apple.com/Norman/)} calls "invisibility", which he illustrates from the user's point of view: "You use computers when you use many modern automobiles, microwave ovens, games, CD players and calculators. You don't notice the computer because you think of yourself as doing the task, not as using the computer." ["The Design of Everyday Things", New York, Doubleday, 1989, p. 185]. 2. "theory" Fully defined, known, predictable; said of a sub-system in which matters generally subject to volition or stochastic state change have been chosen, measured, or determined by the environment. Thus for transparent systems, output is a known function of the inputs, and users can both predict the behaviour and depend upon it. (1996-06-04)

trespass ::: n. 1. A passing beyond (limits or boundaries). v. 2. To enter wrongfully, infringe upon a domain, right, etc.

tunnelling "networking" (US: "tunneling") A networking technique used to carry data encoded in one protocol, A, over a channel using another protocol, B. Protocol A is said to be "encapsulated" in protocol B and treats B as though it were a {data link layer}. Tunnelling is used to get data between {administrative domains} which use a protocol that is not supported by the {internet} connecting those domains. A historical example would be transmitting written text via {Morse code} - instead of having someone carry the text on paper, it is converted to (or encapsulated as) Morse code at one end and converted back to written text at the other. A more recent example would be tunnelling {IPv6} over an {IPv4} network that does not support IPv6 natively. Tunnelling techniques such as {6to4} or {6rd} are used to encapsulate {IPv6} in the absence of native {dual-stack} support. (2013-10-07)

Turbo Prolog A {strongly typed} Prolog-like {logic programming} language. 1986. It has user-defined domains. Programs are arranged in sections: DOMAINS, CLAUSES, PREDICATES, DATABASE and GOAL. It is currently known as {PDC Prolog} and is distributed by {Prolog Development Center}, Atlanta +1 404 873 1366. E-mail: "pdc@mcimail.com".

tv "networking" The {country code} for Tuvalu. Heavily used for {vanity domains} by TV stations. (1999-01-27)

twenty tenets ::: Twenty of the most fundamental patterns of evolution across all domains. Applicable only to individual and social holons, not artifacts or heaps.

Twin Vector Quantization "audio, compression" (VQF) Part of the {MPEG-4} {standard} dealing with time domain weighted interleaved {vector quantization}. [Why "VQF"?] (2001-12-17)

typo squatter "web" A {domain squatter} who registers a {domain name} that is a common {typographical error} for a popular {website} so that people will visit their site accidentally, e.g. {(http://goggle.com/)} for {(http://google.com/)}. (2007-07-13)

Unlicense "legal" A template for dedicating {software} to the {public domain}. It combines a {copyright} waiver like that of the {SQLite} project with the no-warranty statement from the {MIT}/{X11} license. {(http://unlicense.org/)}. (2014-07-31)

unsensualize ::: v. t. --> To elevate from the domain of the senses; to purify.

us "networking" The {country code} for the United States. Usually used only by schools, libraries, and some state and local governments. Other US sites, and many international ones, use the non-national {top-level domains} .com, .edu etc. (1999-01-27)

vanity domain "networking" A {domain} you register for the sole purpose of having your own domain so you can have an easily remembered {URL} and {e-mail} address. The domain is usually served (often {vhost}ed) off someone else's machines. This is as opposed to a domain you register because you have machines of your own which are already on the Internet and which you want to make addressable via something other than {dot address}es. Whereas vanity domains were almost unheard-of in 1980s, since the invention and popularisation of the {Web} in the mid-1990s and the desire for {URLs} which consist only of memorable domain names (e.g., "http://pbs.org") for everything from movies to car wax, vanity domains have come to be the rule instead of the exception. (1997-09-11)

Virtual LAN "networking" Software defined groups of {host} on a {local area network} (LAN) that communicate as if they were on the same wire, even though they are physically on different {LAN segments} throughout a site. To define a virtual LAN, the {network administrator} uses a virtual LAN management utility to establish membersip rules that determine which hostss are in a specific virtual LAN. Many models may exist but two seem to dominate: (1) Vitual Segment (or Port-Group) Virtual LAN. These are switched at the {data link layer} ({OSI} layer 2). Virtual segments turn an arbitrary number of physical segments into a single virtual segment that funtions as a self-contained traffic domain. (2) Virtual Subnet Virtual LAN: These are switched at the {Network Layer} ({OSI} layer 3). Subnet-oriented virtual LANs are based on {subnet address}es used by {IP}, {IPX}, and other {network layer} {protocols} to normally identify physical networks. Administrators assign one subnet address to a number of switch {ports} (which may be on different switches and over a backbone). Once identified as a virtual subnet, the selected LANs function as a {bridge group} - traffic is bridged at Layer 2 within the virtual subnet and routed at Layer 3 between virtual subnets. ["The many faces of virtual LANs", Steven King, Network World, 1994/5?]. (1995-04-03)

vishaya. ::: sense object; object of perception or enjoyment; subject matter; content; areas; range; field-object domain; sphere; realm, scope; matters of enjoyment or experience; doubt

web hosting "web, business" Running {web servers} for other businesses or individuals, usually as a commercial venture. Basic web hosting would allow customers to upload own {web site} content - {HTML} pages, {images}, {video} - typically via {FTP}, to a shared web server which other people can access via the {Internet}. A {web hosting (http://webhostingsearch.com/)} businesses may provide any or all of the functions required by a website including: networking, HTTP server software, content storage, {content management}, running customer or off-the-shelf {CGI} programs, {ASP} scripts or other server extentions, {load balancing}, {streaming content}, {domain name} registration, {DNS} serving, {electronic mail} storage and forwarding, {database}, {shell account}, content design and creation, {search engine optimisation}, {web log} analysis and web applications such as on-line shopping with financial transaction processing. (2011-12-24)

Were we living in the realms of spirit rather than in the realms of material manifestation, we should probably be driven by the logic of circumstance to invert our usage of these terms, and declare the spiritual realms of our domain to be the positive ones, and the material realms to be the negative.

whois An {Internet} directory service for looking up names of people on a remote server. Many servers respond to {TCP} queries on {port} 43, in a manner roughly analogous to the {DDN} {NIC} whois service described in {RFC} 954. Other sites provide this directory service via the {finger} {protocol} or accept queries by {electronic mail} for directory information. On {Unix} the client command is whois -h server_name person_name You can also type "telnet server_name 43" and then type the person's name on a separate line. For a list of whois servers, FTP/Gopher: sipb.mit.edu. Or whois -h sipb.mit.edu whois-servers As the above command demonstrates, whois can find information about things other than users, e.g. domains, networks and hosts. See also {finger}, {X.500}, {white pages}.

Wide Area Information Servers "networking, information science" (WAIS) A distributed information retrieval system. WAIS is supported by {Apple Computer}, {Thinking Machines} and Dow Jones. {Clients} are able to retrieve documents using keywords. The search returns a list of documents, ranked according to the frequency of occurrence of the keyword(s) used in the search. The client can retrieve text or {multimedia} documents stored on the {server}. WAIS offers simple {natural language} input, indexed searching for fast retrieval, and a "relevance feedback" mechanism which allows the results of initial searches to influence future searches. It uses the {ANSI Z39.50} service. {Public domain} implementations are available. Other information retrieval systems include {archie}, {Gopher}, {Prospero}, and {web}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.infosystems.wais}. {Telnet (telnet://sunsite.unc.edu)}. (1995-03-13)

wireless "networking" A term describing a computer {network} where there is no physical connection (either copper cable or {fibre optics}) between sender and receiver, but instead they are connected by radio. Applications for wireless networks include multi-party {teleconferencing}, distributed work sessions, {personal digital assistants}, and electronic newspapers. They include the transmission of voice, video, {images}, and data, each traffic type with possibly differing {bandwidth} and quality-of-service requirements. The wireless network components of a complete source-destination path requires consideration of mobility, {hand-off}, and varying transmission and {bandwidth} conditions. The wired/wireless network combination provides a severe bandwidth mismatch, as well as vastly different error conditions. The processing capability of fixed vs. mobile terminals may be expected to differ significantly. This then leads to such issues to be addressed in this environment as {admission control}, {capacity assignment} and {hand-off} control in the wireless domain, flow and error control over the complete end-to-end path, dynamic bandwidth control to accommodate bandwidth mismatch and/or varying processing capability. {Usenet} newsgroup {news:comp.std.wireless}. (1995-02-27)

woman "tool" A replacement for the {Unix} {man} {documentation} browsing command. Version 1.157 of woman runs under/on {386BSD}, {OSF}, {Apollo} {Domain/OS}, {BSD}, {HP-UX}, {IBM} {RS-6000}, {Irix}, {Linux}, {Solaris}, {Sony} {NEWS}, {SunOS}, {Ultrix}, {Unicos}. Posted to comp.sources.reviewed Volume 3, Issue 50 on 05 Jul 1993 by Arne Henrik Juul "arnej@pvv.unit.no", archive-name woman-1.157. {FTP USC, USA (ftp://usc.edu/archive/usenet/sources/comp.sources.reviewed/volume3/woman-1.157/)}. {FTP Imperial, UK (ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/usenet/comp.sources.reviewed/volume3/woman-1.157/)}. (1995-03-21)

world ::: 1. Everything that exists; the universe; the macrocosm. 2. The earth with its inhabitants. 3. Any sphere, realm, or domain, with all pertaining to it. 4. Any period, state, or sphere of existence. world"s, worlds, wonder-world, wonder-worlds, world-adventure, world-adventure"s, world-being"s, World-Bliss, world-cloak, world-conjecture"s, world-creating, world-creators, world-delight, World-Delight, world-destiny, world-destroying, world-disillusion"s, world-dream, world-drowse, world-egos, world-energies, world-energy, World-Energy, world-force, world-experience, world-fact, world-failure"s, world-fate, World-Force, world-forces, World-free, World-Geometer"s, world-heart, world-idea, world-ignorance, World-Ignorance, World-maker"s, world-indifference, world-interpreting, world-kindergarten, world-knowledge, world-law, world-laws, world-libido"s, world-making"s, World-Matter"s, World-naked, world-need, world-ocean"s, world-outline, world-pain, world-passion, World-personality, world-pile, world-plan, world-power, World-Power, World-Power"s, World-Puissance, world-rapture, world-redeemer"s, world-rhyme, world-rhythms, world-scene, world-scheme, world-sea, World-Self, world-shape, world-shapes, world-space, world-stuff, world-symbol, World-symbols, World-task, world-time, World-Time‘s, world-tree, world-ways, world-whim, dream-world, heaven-world, mid-world.

worldspace ::: The AQAL configuration at any given moment for a group of holons. Often used to emphasize the importance of intersubjectivity in bringing forth domains of distinctions. A clearing or opening tetra-enacted by the agency of a holon, where holons of similar depth can manifest to each other: agency-in-communion.

X.400 "messaging" The set of {ITU-T} communications standards covering {electronic mail} services provided by data networks. X.400 was widely used in Europe and Canada. X.400 addresses tend to be much longer than {RFC 822} ones. They consist of a set of bindings for country (c), {administrative domain} (a), {primary management domain} (p), surname (s), given name (g). For example, the X.400 address, c=gb;a=attmail;p=Universal Export;s=Bond;g=James; might be equivalent to RFC 822 James.Bond@UniversalExport.co.uk [Reference?] (2003-06-24)



QUOTES [29 / 29 - 1053 / 1053]


KEYS (10k)

   11 The Mother
   4 Sri Aurobindo
   3 Ken Wilber
   3 Howard Gardner
   1 William Irwin Thompson
   1 Slavoj Žižek
   1 Jordan Peterson
   1 Ibn Ata 'illah al- Iskandari
   1 Frank Lloyd Wright
   1 Baha-ullah
   1 Asoka
   1 ?

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   44 Anonymous
   16 Noam Chomsky
   16 Deepak Chopra
   13 Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
   12 Terence McKenna
   12 Jordan Peterson
   12 Ibrahim Ibrahim
   12 Eric Evans
   11 Jordan B Peterson
   9 Ursula K Le Guin
   8 Albert Einstein
   7 Howard Gardner
   7 Daniel Kahneman
   6 Ren Gu non
   6 Nassim Nicholas Taleb
   6 Michel Foucault
   6 Ken Wilber
   6 Katherine Applegate
   6 Friedrich Nietzsche
   5 Slavoj i ek

1:the domain ... of true reflection. " ~ Ibn Ata 'illah al- Iskandari, @Sufi_Path
2:One must exploit the asynchronies that have befallen one, link them to a promising issue or domain, reframe frustrations as opportunities, and, above all, persevere. ~ Howard Gardner,
3:Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" ~ Frank Lloyd Wright,
4:Catastrophes are often stimulated by the failure to feel the emergence of a domain, and so what cannot be felt in the imagination is experienced as embodied sensation in the catastrophe.
   ~ William Irwin Thompson,
5:The intellect moves naturally between two limits, the abstractions or solving analyses of the reason and the domain of positive and practical reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
6:The seeker will discover himself with new eyes, a new understanding, a new heart and a new soul, and with them he shall see the evident signs of the world and the obscure secrets of the soul, and he will understand that in the least object there is found a door by which one enters into the domain of self-evidence, certitude and conviction. ~ Baha-ullah, the Eternal Wisdom
7:Flatland accepts no interior domain whatsoever, and reintroducing Spirit is the least of our worries. 'Thus our task is not specifically to reintroduce spirituality and somehow attempt to show that modern science is becoming compatible with God. That approach, which is taken by most of the integrative attempts, does not go nearly deep enough in diagnosing the disease, and thus, in my opinion, never really addresses the crucial issues. 'Rather, it is the rehabilitation of the interior in general that opens the possibility of reconciling science and religion.' ~ Ken Wilber, Marriage of Sense and Soul, p. 142.,
8:Whenever we moderns pause for a moment, and enter the silence, and listen very carefully, the glimmer of our deepest nature begins to shine forth, and we are introduced to the mysteries of the deep, the call of the within, the infinite radiance of a splendor that time and space forgot - we are introduced to the all-pervading Spiritual domain that the growing tip of our honored ancestors were the first to discover. And they were good enough to leave us a general map to that infinite domain, a map called the Great Nest of Being, a map of our own interiors, an archeology of our own Spirit. ~ Ken Wilber, Integral Psychology, p. 190,
9:Theres another class of people and I would say this is one of the pathologies of being creative so if your a high open person and you have all those things its not going to be enough. you are going to have to pick another domain where you are working on something positive and revolutiony because like the creative impulse for someone who is open we know it is a fundamental personallity dimension, ... and if the ones who are high in openness arent doing something creative they are like dead sticks adn cant live properly. And I think those are the people who benefit particularly from depth psychological approaches, especially Jungian approaches. ~ Jordan Peterson, 015 Maps of Meaning 4: Narrative, Neuropsychology & Mythology II / Part 1,
10:... All the works of mind and intllect must be first heightened and widened, then illumined, lifted into the domain of a higher Intelligence, afterwards translated into workings of a greater non-mental Intuition, these again transformed into the dynamic outpourings of the Overmind radiance, and those transfigured into the full light and sovereignty of the supramental Gnosis. It is this that the evolution of consciousness in the world carries prefigured but latent in its seed and in the straining tense intention of its process; nor can that process, that evolution cease till it has evolved the instruments of a perfect in place of its now imperfect manifestation of the Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1, 149,
11:[the four aids ::: YOGA-SIDDHI, the perfection that comes from the practice of Yoga, can be best attained by the combined working of four great instruments. There is, first, the knowledge of the truths, principles, powers and processes that govern the realisation - sastra. Next comes a patient and persistent action on the lines laid down by this knowledge, the force of our personal effort - utsaha. There intervenes, third, uplifting our knowledge and effort into the domain of spiritual experience, the direct suggestion, example and influence of the Teacher - guru. Last comes the instrumentality of Time - kala; for in all things there is a cycle of their action and a period of the divine movement.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Works, The Four Aids, 53 [T0],
12:But if in passing from one domain to another we renounce what has already been given us from eagerness for our new attainment, if in reaching the mental life we cast away or belittle the physical life which is our basis, or if we reject the mental and physical in our attraction to the spiritual, we do not fulfil God integrally, nor satisfy the conditions of His selfmanifestation. We do not become perfect, but only shift the field of our imperfection or atmost attain a limited altitude. However high we may climb, even though it be to the Non-Being itself, we climb ill if we forget our base. Not to abandon the lower to itself, but to transfigure it in the light of the higher to which we have attained, is true divinity of nature. Brahman is integral and unifies many states of consciousness at a time; we also, manifesting the nature of Brahman, should become integral and all-embracing. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine,
13:During an individual's immersion in a domain, the locus of flow experiences shifts: what was once too challenging becomes attainable and even pleasurable, while what has long since become attainable no longer proves engaging. Thus, the journeyman musical performer gains flow from the accurate performance of familiar pieces in the repertoire; the youthful master wishes to tackle the most challenging pieces, ones most difficult to execute in a technical sense; the seasoned master may develop highly personal interpretations of familiar pieces, or, alternatively, return to those deceptively simple pieces that may actually prove difficult to execute convincingly and powerfully. Such an analysis helps explain why creative individuals continue to engage in the area of their expertise despite its frustrations, and why so many of them continue to raise the ante, posing ever-greater challenges for themselves, even at the risk of sacrificing the customary rewards. ~ Howard Gardner,
14:Embracing a different vocabulary, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi has described a highly sought-after affective state called the flow state or flow experience. In such intrinsically motivating experiences, which can occur in any domain of activity, people report themselves as fully engaged with and absorbed by the object of their attention. In one sense, those "in flow" are not conscious of the experience at the moment; on reflection, however, such people feel that they have been fully alive, totally realized, and involved in a "peak experience." Individuals who regularly engage in creative activities often report that they seek such states; the prospect of such "periods of flow" can be so intense that individuals will exert considerable practice and effort, and even tolerate physical or psychological pain, in pursuit thereof. Committed writers may claim that they hate the time spent chained to their desks, but the thought that they would not have the opportunity to attain occasional periods of flow while writing proves devastating. ~ Howard Gardner,
15:Art is the human language of the nervous plane, intended to express and communicate the Divine, who in the domain of sensation manifests as beauty.

   The purpose of art is therefore to give those for whom it is meant a freer and more perfect communion with the Supreme Reality. The first contact with this Supreme Reality expresses itself in our consciousness by a flowering of the being in a plenitude of vast and peaceful delight. Each time that art can give the spectator this contact with the infinite, however fleetingly, it fulfils its aim; it has shown itself worthy of its mission. Thus no art which has for many centuries moved and delighted a people can be dismissed, since it has at least partially fulfilled its mission - to be the powerful and more or less perfect utterance of that which is to be expressed. What makes it difficult for the sensibility of a nation to enjoy the delight that another nation finds in one art or another is the habitual limitation of the nervous being which, even more than the mental being, is naturally exclusive in its ability to perceive the Divine and which, when it has entered into relation with Him through certain forms, feels an almost irresistible reluctance to recognise Him through other forms of sensation. ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago, 122,
16:In a traditional German toilet, the hole into which shit disappears after we flush is right at the front, so that shit is first laid out for us to sniff and inspect for traces of illness. In the typical French toilet, on the contrary, the hole is at the back, i.e. shit is supposed to disappear as quickly as possible. Finally, the American (Anglo-Saxon) toilet presents a synthesis, a mediation between these opposites: the toilet basin is full of water, so that the shit floats in it, visible, but not to be inspected.

It is clear that none of these versions can be accounted for in purely utilitarian terms: each involves a certain ideological perception of how the subject should relate to excrement. Hegel was among the first to see in the geographical triad of Germany, France and England an expression of three different existential attitudes: reflective thoroughness (German), revolutionary hastiness (French), utilitarian pragmatism (English). In political terms, this triad can be read as German conservatism, French revolutionary radicalism and English liberalism.

The point about toilets is that they enable us not only to discern this triad in the most intimate domain, but also to identify its underlying mechanism in the three different attitudes towards excremental excess: an ambiguous contemplative fascination; a wish to get rid of it as fast as possible; a pragmatic decision to treat it as ordinary and dispose of it in an appropriate way. It is easy for an academic at a round table to claim that we live in a post-ideological universe, but the moment he visits the lavatory after the heated discussion, he is again knee-deep in ideology.
~ Slavoj Žižek,
17:What is "the heavenly archetype of the lotus"?
  
It means the primal idea of the lotus.
   Each thing that is expressed physically was conceived somewhere before being realised materially.
   There is an entire world which is the world of the fashioners, where all conceptions are made. And this world is very high, much higher than all the worlds of the mind; and from there these formations, these creations, these types which have been conceived by the fashioners come down and are expressed in physical realisations. And there is always a great distance between the perfection of the idea and what is materialised. Very often the materialised things are like caricatures in comparison with the primal idea. This is what he calls the archetype. This takes place in worlds... not always the same ones, it depends on the things; but for many things in the physical, the primal ideas, these archetypes, were in what Sri Aurobindo calls the Overmind.
   But there is a still higher domain than this where the origins are still purer, and if one reaches this, attains this, one finds the absolutely pure types of what is manifested upon earth. And then it is very interesting to compare, to see to what an extent earthly creation is a frightful distortion. And moreover, it is only when one can reach these regions and see the reality of things in their essence that one can work with knowledge to transform them here; otherwise on what can we take our stand to conceive a better world, more perfect, more beautiful than the existing one? It can't be on our imagination which is itself something very poor and very material. But if one can enter that consciousness, rise right up to these higher worlds of creation, then with this in one's consciousness one can work at making material things take their real form. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, 121,
18:The capacity for visions, when it is sincere and spontaneous, can put you in touch with events which you are not capable of knowing in your outer consciousness.... There is a very interesting fact, it is that somewhere in the terrestrial mind, somewhere in the terrestrial vital, somewhere in the subtle physical, one can find an exact, perfect, automatic recording of everything that happens. It is the most formidable memory one could imagine, which misses nothing, forgets nothing, records all. And if you are able to enter into it, you can go backward, you can go forward, and in all directions, and you will have the "memory" of all things - not only of things of the past, but of things to come. For everything is recorded there.

   In the mental world, for instance, there is a domain of the physical mind which is related to physical things and keeps the memory of physical happenings upon earth. It is as though you were entering into innumerable vaults, one following another indefinitely, and these vaults are filled with small pigeon-holes, one above another, one above another, with tiny doors. Then if you want to know something and if you are conscious, you look, and you see something like a small point - a shining point; you find that this is what you wish to know and you have only to concentrate there and it opens; and when it opens, there is a sort of an unrolling of something like extremely subtle manuscripts, but if your concentration is sufficiently strong you begin to read as though from a book. And you have the whole story in all its details. There are thousands of these little holes, you know; when you go for a walk there, it is as though you were walking in infinity. And in this way you can find the exact facts about whatever you want to know. But I must tell you that what you find is never what has been reported in history - histories are always planned out; I have never come across a single "historical" fact which is like history.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951, 109 [T7],
19:Are there no false visions?
There are what in appearance are false visions. There are, for instance, hundreds or thousands of people who say that they have seen the Christ. Of that number those who have actually seen Him are perhaps less than a dozen, and even with them there is much to say about what they have seen. What the others saw may be an emanation; or it may be a thought or even an image remembered by the mind. There are, too, those who are strong believers in the Christ and have had a vision of some Force or Being or some remembered image that is very luminous and makes upon them a strong impression. They have seen something which they feel belongs to another world, to a supernatural order, and it has created in them an emotion of fear, awe or joy; and as they believe in the Christ, they can think of nothing else and say it is He. But the same vision or experience if it comes to one who believes in the Hindu, the Mohammedan or some other religion, will take a different name and form. The thing seen or experienced may be fundamentally the same, but it is formulated differently according to the different make-up of the apprehending mind. It is only those that can go beyond beliefs and faiths and myths and traditions who are able to say what it really is; but these are few, very few. You must be free from every mental construction, you must divest yourself of all that is merely local or temporal, before you can know what you have seen.

   Spiritual experience means the contact with the Divine in oneself (or without, which comes to the same thing in that domain). And it is an experience identical everywhere in all countries, among all peoples and even in all ages. If you meet the Divine, you meet it always and everywhere in the same way. Difference comes in because between the experience and its formulation there is almost an abyss. Directly you have spiritual experience, which takes place always in the inner consciousness, it is translated into your external consciousness and defined there in one way or another according to your education, your faith, your mental predisposition. There is only one truth, one reality; but the forms through which it may be expressed are many. 21 April 1929 ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
20:"Will it take long for the Supermind which is involved in material Nature to emerge into the outer consciousness and bring visible results?"
   That depends on the state of consciousness from which one answers, for... For the human consciousness, obviously, I think it will take quite a long time. For another consciousness it will be relatively very fast, and for yet another consciousness, it is already accomplished. It is an accomplished fact. But in order to become aware of this, one must be able to enter into another state of consciousness than the ordinary physical consciousness.
   Sri Aurobindo has spoken - I believe I have read it to you, I think it's in The Synthesis of Yoga - of the true mind, the true vital and the true physical or subtle physical, and he has said that they co-exist with the ordinary mind, vital and physical, and that in certain conditions one may enter into contact with them, and then one becomes aware of the difference between what really is and the appearances of things.
   Well, for a developed consciousness, the Supermind is already realised somewhere in a domain of the subtle physical, it already exists there visible, concrete, and expresses itself in forms and activities. And when one is in tune with this domain, when one lives there, one has a very strong feeling that this world would only have to be condensed, so to say, for it to become visible to all. What would then be interesting would be to develop this inner perception which would put you into contact with the supramental truth which is already manifested, and is veiled for you only for want of appropriate organs to enter into relation with it.
   It is possible that those who are conscious of their dreams may have dreams of a new kind which put them into contact with that world, for it is accessible to the subtle physical of all those who have the corresponding organs in themselves. And there is necessarily a subtle influence of this physical on outer matter, if one is ready to receive impressions from it and admit them into one's consciousness. That's all.
   Now, if nobody has any questions to ask, well, we shall remain silent.
   Something to say, over there? (Mother looks at a disciple.) Oh! he is burning to speak! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956,
21:What do we understand by the term "chance"? Chance can only be the opposite of order and harmony. There is only one true harmony and that is the supramental - the reign of Truth, the expression of the Divine Law. In the Supermind, therefore, chance has no place. But in the lower Nature the supreme Truth is obscured: hence there is an absence of that divine unity of purpose and action which alone can constitute order. Lacking this unity, the domain of lower Nature is governed by what we may call chance - that is to say, it is a field in which various conflicting forces intermix, having no single definite aim. Whatever arises out of such a rushing together of forces is a result of confusion, dissonance and falsehood - a product of chance. Chance is not merely a conception to cover our ignorance of the causes at work; it is a description of the uncertain mele ́e of the lower Nature which lacks the calm one-pointedness of the divine Truth. The world has forgotten its divine origin and become an arena of egoistic energies; but it is still possible for it to open to the Truth, call it down by its aspiration and bring about a change in the whirl of chance. What men regard as a mechanical sequence of events, owing to their own mental associations, experiences and generalisations, is really manipulated by subtle agencies each of which tries to get its own will done. The world has got so subjected to these undivine agencies that the victory of the Truth cannot be won except by fighting for it. It has no right to it: it has to gain it by disowning the falsehood and the perversion, an important part of which is the facile notion that, since all things owe their final origin to the Divine, all their immediate activities also proceed directly from it. The fact is that here in the lower Nature the Divine is veiled by a cosmic Ignorance and what takes place does not proceed directly from the divine knowledge. That everything is equally the will of God is a very convenient suggestion of the hostile influences which would have the creation stick as tightly as possible to the disorder and ugliness to which it has been reduced. So what is to be done, you ask? Well, call down the Light, open yourselves to the power of Transformation. Innumerable times the divine peace has been given to you and as often you have lost it - because something in you refuses to surrender its petty egoistic routine. If you are not always vigilant, your nature will return to its old unregenerate habits even after it has been filled with the descending Truth. It is the struggle between the old and the new that forms the crux of the Yoga; but if you are bent on being faithful to the supreme Law and Order revealed to you, the parts of your being belonging to the domain of chance will, however slowly, be converted and divinised. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
22:Sweet Mother, there's a flower you have named "The Creative Word".

Yes.

What does that mean?

It is the word which creates.

There are all kinds of old traditions, old Hindu traditions, old Chaldean traditions in which the Divine, in the form of the Creator, that is, in His aspect as Creator, pronounces a word which has the power to create. So it is this... And it is the origin of the mantra. The mantra is the spoken word which has a creative power. An invocation is made and there is an answer to the invocation; or one makes a prayer and the prayer is granted. This is the Word, the Word which, in its sound... it is not only the idea, it is in the sound that there's a power of creation. It is the origin, you see, of the mantra.

In Indian mythology the creator God is Brahma, and I think that it was precisely his power which has been symbolised by this flower, "The Creative Word". And when one is in contact with it, the words spoken have a power of evocation or creation or formation or transformation; the words... sound always has a power; it has much more power than men think. It may be a good power and it may be a bad power. It creates vibrations which have an undeniable effect. It is not so much the idea as the sound; the idea too has its own power, but in its own domain - whereas the sound has a power in the material world.

I think I have explained this to you once; I told you, for example, that words spoken casually, usually without any re- flection and without attaching any importance to them, can be used to do something very good. I think I spoke to you about "Bonjour", "Good Day", didn't I? When people meet and say "Bonjour", they do so mechanically and without thinking. But if you put a will into it, an aspiration to indeed wish someone a good day, well, there is a way of saying "Good Day" which is very effective, much more effective than if simply meeting someone you thought: "Ah! I hope he has a good day", without saying anything. If with this hope in your thought you say to him in a certain way, "Good Day", you make it more concrete and more effective.

It's the same thing, by the way, with curses, or when one gets angry and says bad things to people. This can do them as much harm - more harm sometimes - than if you were to give them a slap. With very sensitive people it can put their stomach out of order or give them palpitation, because you put into it an evil force which has a power of destruction.

It is not at all ineffective to speak. Naturally it depends a great deal on each one's inner power. People who have no strength and no consciousness can't do very much - unless they employ material means. But to the extent that you are strong, especially when you have a powerful vital, you must have a great control on what you say, otherwise you can do much harm. Without wanting to, without knowing it; through ignorance.

Anything? No? Nothing?

Another question?... Everything's over? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, 347-349,
23:
   Sweet Mother, how can one feel the divine Presence constantly?


Why not?

   But how can one do it?

But I am asking why one should not feel it. Instead of asking the question how to feel it, I ask the question: "What do you do that you don't feel it?" There is no reason not to feel the divine Presence. Once you have felt it, even once, you should be capable of feeling it always, for it is there. It is a fact. It is only our ignorance which makes us unaware of it. But if we become conscious, why should we not always be conscious? Why forget something one has learnt? When one has had the experience, why forget it? It is simply a bad habit, that's all.
   You see, there is something which is a fact, that's to say, it is. But we are unaware of it and do not know it. But after we become conscious and know it, why should we still forget it? Does it make sense? It's quite simply because we are not convinced that once one has met the Divine one can't forget Him any more. We are, on the contrary, full of stupid ideas which say, "Oh! Yes, it's very well once like that, but the rest of the time it will be as usual." So there is no reason why it may not begin again.
   But if we know that... we did not know something, we were ignorant, then the moment we have the knowledge... I am sincerely asking how one can manage to forget. One might not know something, that is a fact; there are countless things one doesn't know. But the moment one knows them, the minute one has the experience, how can one manage to forget? Within yourself you have the divine Presence, you know nothing about it - for all kinds of reasons, but still the chief reason is that you are in a state of ignorance. Yet suddenly, by a clicking of circumstances, you become conscious of this divine Presence, that is, you are before a fact - it is not imagination, it is a fact, it's something which exists. Then how do you manage to forget it once you have known it?
   ...
   It is because something in us, through cowardice or defeatism, accepts this. If one did not accept it, it wouldn't happen.
   Even when everything seems to be suddenly darkened, the flame and the Light are always there. And if one doesn't forget them, one has only to put in front of them the part which is dark; there will perhaps be a battle, there will perhaps be a little difficulty, but it will be something quite transitory; never will you lose your footing. That is why it is said - and it is something true - that to sin through ignorance may have fatal consequences, because when one makes mistakes, well, these mistakes have results, that's obvious, and usually external and material results; but that's no great harm, I have already told you this several times. But when one knows what is true, when one has seen and had the experience of the Truth, to accept the sin again, that is, fall back again into ignorance and obscurity - this is indeed an infinitely more serious mistake. It begins to belong to the domain of ill-will. In any case, it is a sign of slackness and weakness. It means that the will is weak.
   So your question is put the other way round. Instead of asking yourself how to keep it, you must ask yourself: how does one not keep it? Not having it, is a state which everybody is in before the moment of knowing; not knowing - one is in that state before knowing. But once one knows one cannot forget. And if one forgets, it means that there is something which consents to the forgetting, it means there is an assent somewhere; otherwise one would not forget.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, 403,405,406,
24:
   Sometimes while reading a text one has ideas, then Sweet Mother, how can one distinguish between the other person's idea and one's own?


Oh! This, this doesn't exist, the other person's idea and one's own idea.
   Nobody has ideas of his own: it is an immensity from which one draws according to his personal affinity; ideas are a collective possession, a collective wealth.
   Only, there are different stages. So there is the most common level, the one where all our brains bathe; this indeed swarms here, it is the level of "Mr. Everybody". And then there is a level that's slightly higher for people who are called thinkers. And then there are higher levels still - many - some of them are beyond words but they are still domains of ideas. And then there are those capable of shooting right up, catching something which is like a light and making it come down with all its stock of ideas, all its stock of thoughts. An idea from a higher domain if pulled down organises itself and is crystallised in a large number of thoughts which can express that idea differently; and then if you are a writer or a poet or an artist, when you make it come lower down still, you can have all kinds of expressions, extremely varied and choice around a single little idea but one coming from very high above. And when you know how to do this, it teaches you to distinguish between the pure idea and the way of expressing it.
   Some people cannot do it in their own head because they have no imagination or faculty for writing, but they can do it through study by reading what others have written. There are, you know, lots of poets, for instance, who have expressed the same idea - the same idea but with such different forms that when one reads many of them it becomes quite interesting to see (for people who love to read and read much). Ah, this idea, that one has said it like this, that other has expressed it like that, another has formulated it in this way, and so on. And so you have a whole stock of expressions which are expressions by different poets of the same single idea up there, above, high above. And you notice that there is an almost essential difference between the pure idea, the typal idea and its formulation in the mental world, even the speculative or artistic mental world. This is a very good thing to do when one loves gymnastics. It is mental gymnastics.
   Well, if you want to be truly intelligent, you must know how to do mental gymnastics; as, you see, if you want really to have a fairly strong body you must know how to do physical gymnastics. It is the same thing. People who have never done mental gymnastics have a poor little brain, quite over-simple, and all their life they think like children. One must know how to do this - not take it seriously, in the sense that one shouldn't have convictions, saying, "This idea is true and that is false; this formulation is correct and that one is not and this religion is the true one and that religion is false", and so on and so forth... this, if you enter into it, you become absolutely stupid.
   But if you can see all that and, for example, take all the religions, one after another and see how they have expressed the same aspiration of the human being for some Absolute, it becomes very interesting; and then you begin... yes, you begin to be able to juggle with all that. And then when you have mastered it all, you can rise above it and look at all the eternal human discussions with a smile. So there you are master of the thought and can no longer fly into a rage because someone else does not think as you, something that's unfortunately a very common malady here.
   Now, there we are. Nobody has any questions, no?
   That's enough? Finished! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955,
25:
   In the lower planes can't one say what will happen at a particular moment?

That depends. On certain planes there are consciousnesses that form, that make formations and try to send them down to earth and manifest them. These are planes where the great forces are at play, forces struggling with each other to organise things in one way or another. On these planes all the possibilities are there, all the possibilities that present themselves but have not yet come to a decision as to which will come down.... Suppose a plane full of the imaginations of people who want certain things to be realised upon earth - they invent a novel, narrate stories, produce all kinds of phenomena; it amuses them very much. It is a plane of form-makers and they are there imagining all kinds of circumstances and events; they play with the forces; they are like the authors of a drama and they prepare everything there and see what is going to happen. All these formations are facing each other; and it is those which are the strongest, the most successful or the most persistent or those that have the advantage of a favourable set of circumstances which dominate. They meet and out of the conflict yet another thing results: you lose one thing and take up another, you make a new combination; and then all of a sudden, you find, pluff! it is coming down. Now, if it comes down with a sufficient force, it sets moving the earth atmosphere and things combine; as for instance, when with your fist you thump the saw-dust, you know surely what happens, don't you? You lift your hand, give a formidable blow: all the dust gets organised around your fist. Well, it is like that. These formations come down into matter with that force, and everything organises itself automatically, mechanically as around the striking fist. And there's your wished object about to be realised, sometimes with small deformations because of the resistance, but it will be realised finally, even as the person narrating the story up above wanted it more or less to be realised. If then you are for some reason or other in the secret of the person who has constructed the story and if you follow the way in which he creates his path to reach down to the earth and if you see how a blow with the fist acts on earthly matter, then you are able to tell what is going to happen, because you have seen it in the world above, and as it takes some time to make the whole journey, you see in advance. And the higher you rise, the more you foresee in advance what is going to happen. And if you pass far beyond, go still farther, then everything is possible.
   It is an unfolding that follows a wide road which is for you unknowable; for all will be unfolded in the universe, but in what order and in what way? There are decisions that are taken up there which escape our ordinary consciousness, and so it is very difficult to foresee. But there also, if you enter consciously and if you can be present up there... How shall I explain that to you? All is there, absolute, static, eternal: but all that will be unfolded in the material world, naturally more or less one thing after another; for in the static existence all can be there, but in the becoming all becomes in time, that is, one thing after another. Well, what path will the unfolding follow? Up there is the domain of absolute freedom.... Who says that a sufficiently sincere aspiration, a sufficiently intense prayer is not capable of changing the path of the unfolding?
   This means that all is possible.
   Now, one must have a sufficient aspiration and a prayer that's sufficiently intense. But that has been given to human nature. It is one of the marvellous gifts of grace given to human nature; only, one does not know how to make use of it. This comes to saying that in spite of the most absolute determinisms in the horizontal line, if one knows how to cross all these horizontal lines and reach the highest Point of consciousness, one is able to make things change, things apparently absolutely determined. So you may call it by any name you like, but it is a kind of combination of an absolute determinism with an absolute freedom. You may pull yourself out of it in any way you like, but it is like that.
   I forgot to say in that book (perhaps I did not forget but just felt that it was useless to say it) that all these theories are only theories, that is, mental conceptions which are merely more or less imaged representations of the reality; but it is not the reality at all. When you say "determinism" and when you say "freedom", you say only words and all that is only a very incomplete, very approximate and very weak description of what is in reality within you, around you and everywhere; and to be able to begin to understand what the universe is, you must come out of your mental formulas, otherwise you will never understand anything.
   To tell the truth, if you live only a moment, just a tiny moment, of this absolutely sincere aspiration or this sufficiently intense prayer, you will know more things than by meditating for hours.

~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953,
26:
   Mother, when one imagines something, does it not exist?

When you imagine something, it means that you make a mental formation which may be close to the truth or far from the truth - it also depends upon the quality of your formation. You make a mental formation and there are people who have such a power of formation that they succeed in making what they imagine real. There are not many of these but there are some. They imagine something and their formation is so well made and so powerful that it succeeds in being realised. These are creators; there are not many of them but there are some.

   If one thinks of someone who doesn't exist or who is dead?

Ah! What do you mean? What have you just said? Someone who doesn't exist or someone who is dead? These are two absolutely different things.

   I mean someone who is dead.

Someone who is dead!

   If this person has remained in the mental domain, you can find him immediately. Naturally if he is no longer in the mental domain, if he is in the psychic domain, to think of him is not enough. You must know how to go into the psychic domain to find him. But if he has remained in the mental domain and you think of him, you can find him immediately, and not only that, but you can have a mental contact with him and a kind of mental vision of his existence.

   The mind has a capacity of vision of its own and it is not the same vision as with these eyes, but it is a vision, it is a perception in forms. But this is not imagination. It has nothing to do with imagination.

   Imagination, for instance, is when you begin to picture to yourself an ideal being to whom you apply all your conceptions, and when you tell yourself, "Why, it should be like this, like that, its form should be like this, its thought like that, its character like that," when you see all the details and build up the being. Now, writers do this all the time because when they write a novel, they imagine. There are those who take things from life but there are those who are imaginative, creators; they create a character, a personage and then put him in their book later. This is to imagine. To imagine, for example, a whole concurrence of circumstances, a set of events, this is what I call telling a story to oneself. But it can be put down on paper, and then one becomes a novelist. There are very different kinds of writers. Some imagine everything, some gather all sorts of observations from life and construct their book with them. There are a hundred ways of writing a book. But indeed some writers imagine everything from beginning to end. It all comes out of their head and they construct even their whole story without any support in things physically observed. This truly is imagination. But as I say, if they are very powerful and have a considerable capacity for creation, it is possible that one day or other there will be a physical human being who realises their creation. This too is true.

   What do you suppose imagination is, eh? Have you never imagined anything, you?

   And what happens?

   All that one imagines.


You mean that you imagine something and it happens like that, eh? Or it is in a dream...

   What is the function, the use of the imagination?

If one knows how to use it, as I said, one can create for oneself his own inner and outer life; one can build his own existence with his imagination, if one knows how to use it and has a power. In fact it is an elementary way of creating, of forming things in the world. I have always felt that if one didn't have the capacity of imagination he would not make any progress. Your imagination always goes ahead of your life. When you think of yourself, usually you imagine what you want to be, don't you, and this goes ahead, then you follow, then it continues to go ahead and you follow. Imagination opens for you the path of realisation. People who are not imaginative - it is very difficult to make them move; they see just what is there before their nose, they feel just what they are moment by moment and they cannot go forward because they are clamped by the immediate thing. It depends a good deal on what one calls imagination. However...

   Men of science must be having imagination!


A lot. Otherwise they would never discover anything. In fact, what is called imagination is a capacity to project oneself outside realised things and towards things realisable, and then to draw them by the projection. One can obviously have progressive and regressive imaginations. There are people who always imagine all the catastrophes possible, and unfortunately they also have the power of making them come. It's like the antennae going into a world that's not yet realised, catching something there and drawing it here. Then naturally it is an addition to the earth atmosphere and these things tend towards manifestation. It is an instrument which can be disciplined, can be used at will; one can discipline it, direct it, orientate it. It is one of the faculties one can develop in himself and render serviceable, that is, use it for definite purposes.

   Sweet Mother, can one imagine the Divine and have the contact?

Certainly if you succeed in imagining the Divine you have the contact, and you can have the contact with what you imagine, in any case. In fact it is absolutely impossible to imagine something which doesn't exist somewhere. You cannot imagine anything at all which doesn't exist somewhere. It is possible that it doesn't exist on the earth, it is possible that it's elsewhere, but it is impossible for you to imagine something which is not already contained in principle in the universe; otherwise it could not occur.

   Then, Sweet Mother, this means that in the created universe nothing new is added?

In the created universe? Yes. The universe is progressive; we said that constantly things manifest, more and more. But for your imagination to be able to go and seek beyond the manifestation something which will be manifested, well, it may happen, in fact it does - I was going to tell you that it is in this way that some beings can cause considerable progress to be made in the world, because they have the capacity of imagining something that's not yet manifested. But there are not many. One must first be capable of going beyond the manifested universe to be able to imagine something which is not there. There are already many things which can be imagined.

   What is our terrestrial world in the universe? A very small thing. Simply to have the capacity of imagining something which does not exist in the terrestrial manifestation is already very difficult, very difficult. For how many billions of years hasn't it existed, this little earth? And there have been no two identical things. That's much. It is very difficult to go out from the earth atmosphere with one's mind; one can, but it is very difficult. And then if one wants to go out, not only from the earth atmosphere but from the universal life!

   To be able simply to enter into contact with the life of the earth in its totality from the formation of the earth until now, what can this mean? And then to go beyond this and enter into contact with universal life from its beginnings up to now... and then again to be able to bring something new into the universe, one must go still farther beyond.

   Not easy!
   That's all?
   (To the child) Convinced?
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, [T1],
27:
   Can a Yogi attain to a state of consciousness in which he can know all things, answer all questions, relating even to abstruse scientific problems, such as, for example, the theory of relativity?


Theoretically and in principle it is not impossible for a Yogi to know everything; all depends upon the Yogi.

   But there is knowledge and knowledge. The Yogi does not know in the way of the mind. He does not know everything in the sense that he has access to all possible information or because he contains all the facts of the universe in his mind or because his consciousness is a sort of miraculous encyclopaedia. He knows by his capacity for a containing or dynamic identity with things and persons and forces. Or he knows because he lives in a plane of consciousness or is in contact with a consciousness in which there is the truth and the knowledge.

   If you are in the true consciousness, the knowledge you have will also be of the truth. Then, too, you can know directly, by being one with what you know. If a problem is put before you, if you are asked what is to be done in a particular matter, you can then, by looking with enough attention and concentration, receive spontaneously the required knowledge and the true answer. It is not by any careful application of theory that you reach the knowledge or by working it out through a mental process. The scientific mind needs these methods to come to its conclusions. But the Yogi's knowledge is direct and immediate; it is not deductive. If an engineer has to find out the exact position for the building of an arch, the line of its curve and the size of its opening, he does it by calculation, collating and deducing from his information and data. But a Yogi needs none of these things; he looks, has the vision of the thing, sees that it is to be done in this way and not in another, and this seeing is his knowledge.

   Although it may be true in a general way and in a certain sense that a Yogi can know all things and can answer all questions from his own field of vision and consciousness, yet it does not follow that there are no questions whatever of any kind to which he would not or could not answer. A Yogi who has the direct knowledge, the knowledge of the true truth of things, would not care or perhaps would find it difficult to answer questions that belong entirely to the domain of human mental constructions. It may be, he could not or would not wish to solve problems and difficulties you might put to him which touch only the illusion of things and their appearances. The working of his knowledge is not in the mind. If you put him some silly mental query of that character, he probably would not answer. The very common conception that you can put any ignorant question to him as to some super-schoolmaster or demand from him any kind of information past, present or future and that he is bound to answer, is a foolish idea. It is as inept as the expectation from the spiritual man of feats and miracles that would satisfy the vulgar external mind and leave it gaping with wonder.

   Moreover, the term "Yogi" is very vague and wide. There are many types of Yogis, many lines or ranges of spiritual or occult endeavour and different heights of achievement, there are some whose powers do not extend beyond the mental level; there are others who have gone beyond it. Everything depends on the field or nature of their effort, the height to which they have arrived, the consciousness with which they have contact or into which they enter.

   Do not scientists go sometimes beyond the mental plane? It is said that Einstein found his theory of relativity not through any process of reasoning, but through some kind of sudden inspiration. Has that inspiration anything to do with the Supermind?

The scientist who gets an inspiration revealing to him a new truth, receives it from the intuitive mind. The knowledge comes as a direct perception in the higher mental plane illumined by some other light still farther above. But all that has nothing to do with the action of Supermind and this higher mental level is far removed from the supramental plane. Men are too easily inclined to believe that they have climbed into regions quite divine when they have only gone above the average level. There are many stages between the ordinary human mind and the Supermind, many grades and many intervening planes. If an ordinary man were to get into direct contact even with one of these intermediate planes, he would be dazzled and blinded, would be crushed under the weight of the sense of immensity or would lose his balance; and yet it is not the Supermind.

   Behind the common idea that a Yogi can know all things and answer all questions is the actual fact that there is a plane in the mind where the memory of everything is stored and remains always in existence. All mental movements that belong to the life of the earth are memorised and registered in this plane. Those who are capable of going there and care to take the trouble, can read in it and learn anything they choose. But this region must not be mistaken for the supramental levels. And yet to reach even there you must be able to silence the movements of the material or physical mind; you must be able to leave aside all your sensations and put a stop to your ordinary mental movements, whatever they are; you must get out of the vital; you must become free from the slavery of the body. Then only you can enter into that region and see. But if you are sufficiently interested to make this effort, you can arrive there and read what is written in the earth's memory.

   Thus, if you go deep into silence, you can reach a level of consciousness on which it is not impossible for you to receive answers to all your questions. And if there is one who is consciously open to the plenary truth of the supermind, in constant contact with it, he can certainly answer any question that is worth an answer from the supramental Light. The queries put must come from some sense of the truth and reality behind things. There are many questions and much debated problems that are cobwebs woven of mere mental abstractions or move on the illusory surface of things. These do not pertain to real knowledge; they are a deformation of knowledge, their very substance is of the ignorance. Certainly the supramental knowledge may give an answer, its own answer, to the problems set by the mind's ignorance; but it is likely that it would not be at all satisfactory or perhaps even intelligible to those who ask from the mental level. You must not expect the supramental to work in the way of the mind or demand that the knowledge in truth should be capable of being pieced together with the half-knowledge in ignorance. The scheme of the mind is one thing, but Supermind is quite another and it would no longer be supramental if it adapted itself to the exigencies of the mental scheme. The two are incommensurable and cannot be put together.

   When the consciousness has attained to supramental joys, does it no longer take interest in the things of the mind?

The supramental does not take interest in mental things in the same way as the mind. It takes its own interest in all the movements of the universe, but it is from a different point of view and with a different vision. The world presents to it an entirely different appearance; there is a reversal of outlook and everything is seen from there as other than what it seems to the mind and often even the opposite. Things have another meaning; their aspect, their motion and process, everything about them, are watched with other eyes. Everything here is followed by the supermind; the mind movements and not less the vital, the material movements, all the play of the universe have for it a very deep interest, but of another kind. It is about the same difference as that between the interest taken in a puppet-play by one who holds the strings and knows what the puppets are to do and the will that moves them and that they can do only what it moves them to do, and the interest taken by another who observes the play but sees only what is happening from moment to moment and knows nothing else. The one who follows the play and is outside its secret has a stronger, an eager and passionate interest in what will happen and he gives an excited attention to its unforeseen or dramatic events; the other, who holds the strings and moves the show, is unmoved and tranquil. There is a certain intensity of interest which comes from ignorance and is bound up with illusion, and that must disappear when you are out of the ignorance. The interest that human beings take in things founds itself on the illusion; if that were removed, they would have no interest at all in the play; they would find it dry and dull. That is why all this ignorance, all this illusion has lasted so long; it is because men like it, because they cling to it and its peculiar kind of appeal that it endures.

   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, 93?
,
28:[The Gods and Their Worlds]

   [...] According to traditions and occult schools, all these zones of realities, these planes of realities have got different names; they have been classified in a different way, but there is an essential analogy, and if you go back far enough into the traditions, you see only the words changing according to the country and the language. Even now, the experiences of Western occultists and those of Eastern occultists offer great similarities. All who set out on the discovery of these invisible worlds and make a report of what they saw, give a very similar description, whether they be from here or there; they use different words, but the experience is very similar and the handling of forces is the same.

   This knowledge of the occult worlds is based on the existence of subtle bodies and of subtle worlds corresponding to those bodies. They are what the psychological method calls "states of consciousness", but these states of consciousness really correspond to worlds. The occult procedure consists then in being aware of these various inner states of being or subtle bodies and in becoming sufficiently a master of them so as to be able to go out of them successively, one after another. There is indeed a whole scale of subtleties, increasing or decreasing according to the direction in which you go, and the occult procedure consists in going out of a denser body into a subtler body and so on again, up to the most ethereal regions. You go, by successive exteriorisations, into bodies or worlds more and more subtle. It is somewhat as if every time you passed into another dimension. The fourth dimension of the physicists is nothing but the scientific transcription of an occult knowledge. To give another image, one can say that the physical body is at the centre - it is the most material, the densest and also the smallest - and the inner bodies, more subtle, overflow more and more the central physical body; they pass through it, extending themselves farther and farther, like water evaporating from a porous vase and forming a kind of steam all around. And the greater the subtlety, the more the extension tends to unite with that of the universe: one ends by universalising oneself. And it is altogether a concrete process which gives an objective experience of invisible worlds and even enables one to act in these worlds.

   There are, then, only a very small number of people in the West who know that these gods are not merely subjective and imaginary - more or less wildly imaginary - but that they correspond to a universal truth.

   All these regions, all these domains are filled with beings who exist, each in its own domain, and if you are awake and conscious on a particular plane - for instance, if on going out of a more material body you awake on some higher plane, you have the same relation with the things and people of that plane as you had with the things and people of the material world. That is to say, there exists an entirely objective relation that has nothing to do with the idea you may have of these things. Naturally, the resemblance is greater and greater as you approach the physical world, the material world, and there even comes a time when the one region has a direct action upon the other. In any case, in what Sri Aurobindo calls the overmental worlds, you will find a concrete reality absolutely independent of your personal experience; you go back there and again find the same things, with the differences that have occurred during your absence. And you have relations with those beings that are identical with the relations you have with physical beings, with this difference that the relation is more plastic, supple and direct - for example, there is the capacity to change the external form, the visible form, according to the inner state you are in. But you can make an appointment with someone and be at the appointed place and find the same being again, with certain differences that have come about during your absence; it is entirely concrete with results entirely concrete.

   One must have at least a little of this experience in order to understand these things. Otherwise, those who are convinced that all this is mere human imagination and mental formation, who believe that these gods have such and such a form because men have thought them to be like that, and that they have certain defects and certain qualities because men have thought them to be like that - all those who say that God is made in the image of man and that he exists only in human thought, all these will not understand; to them this will appear absolutely ridiculous, madness. One must have lived a little, touched the subject a little, to know how very concrete the thing is.

   Naturally, children know a good deal if they have not been spoilt. There are so many children who return every night to the same place and continue to live the life they have begun there. When these faculties are not spoilt with age, you can keep them with you. At a time when I was especially interested in dreams, I could return exactly to a place and continue a work that I had begun: supervise something, for example, set something in order, a work of organisation or of discovery, of exploration. You go until you reach a certain spot, as you would go in life, then you take a rest, then you return and begin again - you begin the work at the place where you left off and you continue it. And you perceive that there are things which are quite independent of you, in the sense that changes of which you are not at all the author, have taken place automatically during your absence.

   But for this, you must live these experiences yourself, you must see them yourself, live them with sufficient sincerity and spontaneity in order to see that they are independent of any mental formation. For you can do the opposite also, and deepen the study of the action of mental formation upon events. This is very interesting, but it is another domain. And this study makes you very careful, very prudent, because you become aware of how far you can delude yourself. So you must study both, the dream and the occult reality, in order to see what is the essential difference between the two. The one depends upon us; the other exists in itself; entirely independent of the thought that we have of it.

   When you have worked in that domain, you recognise in fact that once a subject has been studied and something has been learnt mentally, it gives a special colour to the experience; the experience may be quite spontaneous and sincere, but the simple fact that the subject was known and studied lends a particular quality. Whereas if you had learnt nothing about the question, if you knew nothing at all, the transcription would be completely spontaneous and sincere when the experience came; it would be more or less adequate, but it would not be the outcome of a previous mental formation.

   Naturally, this occult knowledge or this experience is not very frequent in the world, because in those who do not have a developed inner life, there are veritable gaps between the external consciousness and the inmost consciousness; the linking states of being are missing and they have to be constructed. So when people enter there for the first time, they are bewildered, they have the impression they have fallen into the night, into nothingness, into non-being!

   I had a Danish friend, a painter, who was like that. He wanted me to teach him how to go out of the body; he used to have interesting dreams and thought that it would be worth the trouble to go there consciously. So I made him "go out" - but it was a frightful thing! When he was dreaming, a part of his mind still remained conscious, active, and a kind of link existed between this active part and his external being; then he remembered some of his dreams, but it was a very partial phenomenon. And to go out of one's body means to pass gradually through all the states of being, if one does the thing systematically. Well, already in the subtle physical, one is almost de-individualised, and when one goes farther, there remains nothing, for nothing is formed or individualised.

   Thus, when people are asked to meditate or told to go within, to enter into themselves, they are in agony - naturally! They have the impression that they are vanishing. And with reason: there is nothing, no consciousness!

   These things that appear to us quite natural and evident, are, for people who know nothing, wild imagination. If, for example, you transplant these experiences or this knowledge to the West, well, unless you have been frequenting the circles of occultists, they stare at you with open eyes. And when you have turned your back, they hasten to say, "These people are cranks!" Now to come back to the gods and conclude. It must be said that all those beings who have never had an earthly existence - gods or demons, invisible beings and powers - do not possess what the Divine has put into man: the psychic being. And this psychic being gives to man true love, charity, compassion, a deep kindness, which compensate for all his external defects.

   In the gods there is no fault because they live according to their own nature, spontaneously and without constraint: as gods, it is their manner of being. But if you take a higher point of view, if you have a higher vision, a vision of the whole, you see that they lack certain qualities that are exclusively human. By his capacity of love and self-giving, man can have as much power as the gods and even more, when he is not egoistic, when he has surmounted his egoism.

   If he fulfils the required condition, man is nearer to the Supreme than the gods are. He can be nearer. He is not so automatically, but he has the power to be so, the potentiality.

   If human love manifested itself without mixture, it would be all-powerful. Unfortunately, in human love there is as much love of oneself as of the one loved; it is not a love that makes you forget yourself. - 4 November 1958

   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III, 355
,
29:The Science of Living

To know oneself and to control oneself

AN AIMLESS life is always a miserable life.

Every one of you should have an aim. But do not forget that on the quality of your aim will depend the quality of your life.

   Your aim should be high and wide, generous and disinterested; this will make your life precious to yourself and to others.

   But whatever your ideal, it cannot be perfectly realised unless you have realised perfection in yourself.

   To work for your perfection, the first step is to become conscious of yourself, of the different parts of your being and their respective activities. You must learn to distinguish these different parts one from another, so that you may become clearly aware of the origin of the movements that occur in you, the many impulses, reactions and conflicting wills that drive you to action. It is an assiduous study which demands much perseverance and sincerity. For man's nature, especially his mental nature, has a spontaneous tendency to give a favourable explanation for everything he thinks, feels, says and does. It is only by observing these movements with great care, by bringing them, as it were, before the tribunal of our highest ideal, with a sincere will to submit to its judgment, that we can hope to form in ourselves a discernment that never errs. For if we truly want to progress and acquire the capacity of knowing the truth of our being, that is to say, what we are truly created for, what we can call our mission upon earth, then we must, in a very regular and constant manner, reject from us or eliminate in us whatever contradicts the truth of our existence, whatever is opposed to it. In this way, little by little, all the parts, all the elements of our being can be organised into a homogeneous whole around our psychic centre. This work of unification requires much time to be brought to some degree of perfection. Therefore, in order to accomplish it, we must arm ourselves with patience and endurance, with a determination to prolong our life as long as necessary for the success of our endeavour.

   As you pursue this labour of purification and unification, you must at the same time take great care to perfect the external and instrumental part of your being. When the higher truth manifests, it must find in you a mind that is supple and rich enough to be able to give the idea that seeks to express itself a form of thought which preserves its force and clarity. This thought, again, when it seeks to clothe itself in words, must find in you a sufficient power of expression so that the words reveal the thought and do not deform it. And the formula in which you embody the truth should be manifested in all your feelings, all your acts of will, all your actions, in all the movements of your being. Finally, these movements themselves should, by constant effort, attain their highest perfection.

   All this can be realised by means of a fourfold discipline, the general outline of which is given here. The four aspects of the discipline do not exclude each other, and can be followed at the same time; indeed, this is preferable. The starting-point is what can be called the psychic discipline. We give the name "psychic" to the psychological centre of our being, the seat within us of the highest truth of our existence, that which can know this truth and set it in movement. It is therefore of capital importance to become conscious of its presence in us, to concentrate on this presence until it becomes a living fact for us and we can identify ourselves with it.

   In various times and places many methods have been prescribed for attaining this perception and ultimately achieving this identification. Some methods are psychological, some religious, some even mechanical. In reality, everyone has to find the one which suits him best, and if one has an ardent and steadfast aspiration, a persistent and dynamic will, one is sure to meet, in one way or another - outwardly through reading and study, inwardly through concentration, meditation, revelation and experience - the help one needs to reach the goal. Only one thing is absolutely indispensable: the will to discover and to realise. This discovery and realisation should be the primary preoccupation of our being, the pearl of great price which we must acquire at any cost. Whatever you do, whatever your occupations and activities, the will to find the truth of your being and to unite with it must be always living and present behind all that you do, all that you feel, all that you think.

   To complement this movement of inner discovery, it would be good not to neglect the development of the mind. For the mental instrument can equally be a great help or a great hindrance. In its natural state the human mind is always limited in its vision, narrow in its understanding, rigid in its conceptions, and a constant effort is therefore needed to widen it, to make it more supple and profound. So it is very necessary to consider everything from as many points of view as possible. Towards this end, there is an exercise which gives great suppleness and elevation to the thought. It is as follows: a clearly formulated thesis is set; against it is opposed its antithesis, formulated with the same precision. Then by careful reflection the problem must be widened or transcended until a synthesis is found which unites the two contraries in a larger, higher and more comprehensive idea.

   Many other exercises of the same kind can be undertaken; some have a beneficial effect on the character and so possess a double advantage: that of educating the mind and that of establishing control over the feelings and their consequences. For example, you must never allow your mind to judge things and people, for the mind is not an instrument of knowledge; it is incapable of finding knowledge, but it must be moved by knowledge. Knowledge belongs to a much higher domain than that of the human mind, far above the region of pure ideas. The mind has to be silent and attentive to receive knowledge from above and manifest it. For it is an instrument of formation, of organisation and action, and it is in these functions that it attains its full value and real usefulness.

   There is another practice which can be very helpful to the progress of the consciousness. Whenever there is a disagreement on any matter, such as a decision to be taken, or an action to be carried out, one must never remain closed up in one's own conception or point of view. On the contrary, one must make an effort to understand the other's point of view, to put oneself in his place and, instead of quarrelling or even fighting, find the solution which can reasonably satisfy both parties; there always is one for men of goodwill.

   Here we must mention the discipline of the vital. The vital being in us is the seat of impulses and desires, of enthusiasm and violence, of dynamic energy and desperate depressions, of passions and revolts. It can set everything in motion, build and realise; but it can also destroy and mar everything. Thus it may be the most difficult part to discipline in the human being. It is a long and exacting labour requiring great patience and perfect sincerity, for without sincerity you will deceive yourself from the very outset, and all endeavour for progress will be in vain. With the collaboration of the vital no realisation seems impossible, no transformation impracticable. But the difficulty lies in securing this constant collaboration. The vital is a good worker, but most often it seeks its own satisfaction. If that is refused, totally or even partially, the vital gets vexed, sulks and goes on strike. Its energy disappears more or less completely and in its place leaves disgust for people and things, discouragement or revolt, depression and dissatisfaction. At such moments it is good to remain quiet and refuse to act; for these are the times when one does stupid things and in a few moments one can destroy or spoil the progress that has been made during months of regular effort. These crises are shorter and less dangerous for those who have established a contact with their psychic being which is sufficient to keep alive in them the flame of aspiration and the consciousness of the ideal to be realised. They can, with the help of this consciousness, deal with their vital as one deals with a rebellious child, with patience and perseverance, showing it the truth and light, endeavouring to convince it and awaken in it the goodwill which has been veiled for a time. By means of such patient intervention each crisis can be turned into a new progress, into one more step towards the goal. Progress may be slow, relapses may be frequent, but if a courageous will is maintained, one is sure to triumph one day and see all difficulties melt and vanish before the radiance of the truth-consciousness.

   Lastly, by means of a rational and discerning physical education, we must make our body strong and supple enough to become a fit instrument in the material world for the truth-force which wants to manifest through us.

   In fact, the body must not rule, it must obey. By its very nature it is a docile and faithful servant. Unfortunately, it rarely has the capacity of discernment it ought to have with regard to its masters, the mind and the vital. It obeys them blindly, at the cost of its own well-being. The mind with its dogmas, its rigid and arbitrary principles, the vital with its passions, its excesses and dissipations soon destroy the natural balance of the body and create in it fatigue, exhaustion and disease. It must be freed from this tyranny and this can be done only through a constant union with the psychic centre of the being. The body has a wonderful capacity of adaptation and endurance. It is able to do so many more things than one usually imagines. If, instead of the ignorant and despotic masters that now govern it, it is ruled by the central truth of the being, you will be amazed at what it is capable of doing. Calm and quiet, strong and poised, at every minute it will be able to put forth the effort that is demanded of it, for it will have learnt to find rest in action and to recuperate, through contact with the universal forces, the energies it expends consciously and usefully. In this sound and balanced life a new harmony will manifest in the body, reflecting the harmony of the higher regions, which will give it perfect proportions and ideal beauty of form. And this harmony will be progressive, for the truth of the being is never static; it is a perpetual unfolding of a growing perfection that is more and more total and comprehensive. As soon as the body has learnt to follow this movement of progressive harmony, it will be possible for it to escape, through a continuous process of transformation, from the necessity of disintegration and destruction. Thus the irrevocable law of death will no longer have any reason to exist.

   When we reach this degree of perfection which is our goal, we shall perceive that the truth we seek is made up of four major aspects: Love, Knowledge, Power and Beauty. These four attributes of the Truth will express themselves spontaneously in our being. The psychic will be the vehicle of true and pure love, the mind will be the vehicle of infallible knowledge, the vital will manifest an invincible power and strength and the body will be the expression of a perfect beauty and harmony.

   Bulletin, November 1950

   ~ The Mother, On Education,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Action is my domain.  ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
2:In the domain of art there is no light without heat. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
3:Science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgements of all kinds remain necessary. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
4:The Holocaust is a sacred subject. One should take off one's shoes when entering its domain, one should tremble each time one pronounces the word. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
5:The science of mathematics presents the most brilliant example of how pure reason may successfully enlarge its domain without the aid of experience. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
6:I'm struck by the insidious, computer-driven tendency to take things out of the domain of muscular activity and put them into the domain of mental activity. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
7:Life is a pilgrimage. The wise man does not rest by the roadside inns. He marches direct to the illimitable domain of eternal bliss, his ultimate destination. ~ sivananda, @wisdomtrove
8:I want the public as well as libraries and schools to enjoy unlimited access to public-domain books. This means no charges for these kind of texts themselves. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
9:All that is observable in a man-that is to say his actions and such of his spiritual existence as can be deduced from his actions-falls into the domain of history. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
10:A vibrant, rich, growing corpus of public-domain books is a vital public good - similar to parks, the infrastructure of basic services, and other hallmarks of any advanced society. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
11:Forget the past, for it is gone from your domain! forget the future, for it is beyond your reach! control the present! Live supremely well now! This is the way of the wise. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
12:Step back from action to consciousness, leave action to the body and the mind; it is their domain. Remain as pure witness, till even witnessing dissolves in the Supreme. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
13:Present, n. That part of eternity dividing the domain of disappointment from the realm of hope. Ambrose Bierce ~ ambrose-bierce, @wisdomtrove
14:So when we make contact with the domain of being in the meditation practice, we are already, in a profound sense, beyond the scarring, beyond the isolation and fragmentation and suffering we may be experiencing. ~ jon-kabat-zinn, @wisdomtrove
15:It is also true that the less competent a person is in a given domain, the more he will tend to overestimate his abilities. This often produces an ugly marriage of confidence and ignorance that is very difficult to correct for. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
16:It is this mythical, or rather symbolic, content of the religious traditions which is likely to come into conflict with science. This occurs whenever this religious stock of ideas contains dogmatically fixed statements on subjects which belong in the domain of science. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
17:Factual truth is always related to other people: it concerns events and circumstances in which many are involved; it is established by witnesses and depends upon testimony; it exists only to the extent that it is spoken about, even if it occurs in the domain of privacy. It is political by nature. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
18:Each solstice is a domain of experience unto itself. At the Summer Solstice, all is green and growing, potential coming into being, the miracle of manifestation painted large on the canvas of awareness. At the Winter Solstice, the wind is cold, trees are bare and all lies in stillness beneath blankets of snow. ~ gary-zukav, @wisdomtrove
19:Hope is easy; knowledge is hard. Science is the one domain in which we human beings make a truly heroic effort to counter our innate biases and wishful thinking. Science is the one endeavor in which we have developed a refined methodology for separating what a person hopes is true from what he has good reason to believe. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
20:Religion has traditionally been the domain of such fundamental inquiries within a spiritual framework, but mindfulness has little to do with religion, except in the most fundamental meaning of the word, as an attempt to appreciate the deep mystery of being alive and to acknowledge being vitally connected to all that exists. ~ jon-kabat-zinn, @wisdomtrove
21:Every one of the world's "great" religions utterly trivializes the immensity and beauty of the cosmos. Books like the Bible and the Koran get almost every significant fact about us and our world wrong. Every scientific domain - from cosmology to psychology to economics - has superseded and surpassed the wisdom of Scripture. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
22:If spiritual science is to do the same for spirit that natural science has done for nature, it must investigate quite differently from the latter. It must find ways and means of penetrating into the sphere of the spiritual, a domain which cannot be perceived with outer physical senses nor apprehended with the intellect which is bound to the brain. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
23:Of Life only is there no end; and though of its million starry mansions many are empty and many still unbuilt, and though its vast domain is as yet unbearably desert, my seed shall one day fill it and master its matter to its uttermost confines. And for what may be beyond, the eyesight of Lilith is too short. It is enough that there is a beyond. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
24:The soul is that part of us that is immortal. It existed before the personality was born and it will exist after the personality is gone. The personality is an energy tool of the soul that is temporary. Through it we learn in this domain of the five senses. We learn through what we create and the impact that it has on us. This process is becoming conscious. ~ gary-zukav, @wisdomtrove
25:Each soul has it's own path. Children are young personalities but they are not always young souls. Incarnation into the domain of the five senses is a dramatic act of spiritual responsibility. Neonates are great souls and so I honor their paths. I do the best that I can, but the best that I can do is to change myself. To make myself a citizen like I want others to be. ~ gary-zukav, @wisdomtrove
26:Human existence is girt round with mystery: the narrow region of our experience is a small island in the midst of a boundless sea. To add to the mystery, the domain of our earthly existence is not only an island of infinite space, but also in infinite time. The past and the future are alike shrouded from us: we neither know the origin of anything which is, nor its final destination. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
27:Does anyone pray before they cut a tree? I haven't seen anyone do that yet in the timber industry. But my vision is that that day is coming. I have a vision of a world in which we relate to each other as souls - not as personalities - not as bodies and minds and capabilities to accomplish things in this domain of the five sense, but as immortal spirits learning together how to co-create this world. ~ gary-zukav, @wisdomtrove
28:This world is not the same to all people. Each one lives in his little domain... .Peace and harmony may reign in one person's world; where strife and restlessness in anothers. But whatever the circumstances of one's environment, it consists of both an inner and an outer world. The outside world is the one in which your life engages in action and interaction. The world inside of you determines your happiness or unhappiness. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
29:Life is about movement, expansion, growth, and actualizing potential. If you stay in a home, relationship, or job beyond the time it is healthy for you, the universe will prod you with thorns as if to say, “It’s time to move to a broader domain.” If you do not heed the message, the thorns will get sharper and at some point you will have no choice but to fly. When you do, you will understand why a once comfortable situation became uncomfortable. ~ alan-cohen, @wisdomtrove
30:I am old, and death inevitably approaches. But both birth and death are beyond the will of a human being. They are not my domain. I do not think about it. Yoga has taught me to think of only working to live a useful life... I will never stop learning, and it have tried to share some lessons with you. I do pray that my ending will be your beginning. The great rewards and the countless blessings of a life spent following the Inward Journey await you. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
31:Every one of the world's "great" religions utterly trivializes the immensity and beauty of the cosmos. Books like the Bible and the Koran get almost every significant fact about us and our world wrong. Every scientific domain - from cosmology to psychology to economics - has superseded and surpassed the wisdom of Scripture. Everything of value that people get from religion can be had more honestly, without presuming anything on insufficient evidence. The rest is self-deception, set to music. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
32:When a seeker merges in the beatitude of samadbi, he does not perceive time and space or name and form, the offspring of maya. Whatever -is within the domain of maya is unreal. Give it up. Destroy the prison house of name and form arid rush out of it with the strength of a lion. Dive deep in search of the Self and realize It through samadhi, You will find the world of name and form vanishing into void, and the puny ego dissolving in Brahman-Consciousness. You will realize your identity with Brahman, Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute. ~ sri-ramakrishna, @wisdomtrove
33:We have all been hypnotized into thinking that we are smaller than we are. Just as an undersized flowerpot keeps a mighty tree root-bound or a little fishbowl keeps goldfish tiny, we have adapted, adjusted, and accommodated to a Lilliputian life. But place the same tree in an open field or the fish in a lake, and they will grow to hundreds of times their size. Unlike the tree or goldfish, you are not dependent on someone else to move you. You have the power to move yourself. You can step into a broader domain and grow to your full potential. ~ alan-cohen, @wisdomtrove
34:We have a right to expect that the best trained, the best educated men on the Pacific slope, the Rocky Mountains, and great plains States will take the lead in the preservation and right use of forests, in securing the right use of waters, and in seeing that our land policy is not twisted from its original purpose, but is perpetuated by amendment, by change when such change is necessary in the life of that purpose, the purpose being to turn the public domain into farms each to be the property of the man who actually tills it and makes his home in it. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
35:Are you really surprised by the endurance of religion? What ideology is likely to be more durable than one that conforms, at every turn, to our powers of wishful thinking? Hope is easy; knowledge is hard. Science is the one domain in which we human beings make a truly heroic effort to counter our innate biases and wishful thinking. Science is the one endeavor in which we have developed a refined methodology for separating what a person hopes is true from what he has good reason to believe. The methodology isn't perfect, and the history of science is riddled with abject failures of scientific objectivity. But that is just the point-these have been failures of science, discovered and corrected by-what, religion? No, by good science. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
36:The habit of ignoring our present moments in favor of others yet to come leads directly to a pervasive lack of awareness of the web of life in which we are embedded. This includes a lack of awareness and understanding of our own mind and how it influences our perceptions and our actions. It severely limits our perspective on what it means to be a person and how we are connected to each other and the world around us. Religion has traditionally been the domain of such fundamental inquiries within a spiritual framework, but mindfulness has little to do with religion, except in the most fundamental meaning of the word, as an attempt to appreciate the deep mystery of being alive and to acknowledge being vitally connected to all that exists. ~ jon-kabat-zinn, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Wisdom is not the domain of the Wiz. ~ Frank Zappa,
2:entering his domain. She strode in and ~ Kristen Britain,
3:Chaos is the domain of ignorance itself. ~ Jordan Peterson,
4:Chaos is the domain of ignorance itself. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
5:In the domain of art there is no light without heat. ~ Victor Hugo,
6:My favorite: Spirituality is a domain of awareness. ~ Deepak Chopra,
7:Politics is traditionally a male domain in Russia. ~ Alexei Navalny,
8:Uncertainty and doubt are the domain of System 2. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
9:Religion is increasingly a woman's domain in America. ~ Bruce Feiler,
10:the Kingdom of Heaven is the domain of those who repent, ~ A G Riddle,
11:The mind is a far bigger domain than we ever imagined. ~ Terence McKenna,
12:I am not built for academic writings. Action is my domain. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
13:War is the domain of physical exertion and suffering. ~ Carl von Clausewitz,
14:Mozart encompasses the entire domain of musical creation, ~ Frederic Chopin,
15:there should be some learning when a domain model is discussed. ~ Eric Evans,
16:Music is the sole domain in which man realizes the present. ~ Igor Stravinsky,
17:The domain of rhythm extends from the spiritual to the carnal. ~ Bruno Walter,
18:No domain of nature is quite closed to man at all times. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
19:No single theory ever agrees with all the facts in its domain ~ Paul Feyerabend,
20:And that is why You do not trifle with the Master of the Domain. ~ Sherry Thomas,
21:If [domain seizure] isn't direct censorship, I don't know what is. ~ Dan Gillmor,
22:God is all about life, not death. Death is his enemy’s domain. ~ Lisa Tawn Bergren,
23:If you hack the Vatican server, have you tampered in God's domain? ~ Aaron Allston,
24:No one wants a domain with their name on it owned by somebody else. ~ Jack Abramoff,
25:To enter a mosque is to enter an angelic domain. It is not a men's Club. ~ Anonymous,
26:I don't think I have committed a crime outside the domain of the US. ~ Edward Snowden,
27:Opportunity will only meet you in the domain of your chosen attitude. ~ Bryant McGill,
28:Please remove your watch,' he said. 'In my domain time isn't a factor. ~ Hanif Kureishi,
29:This is his real domain,” muttered Hunter. “Things lost. Things forgotten. ~ Neil Gaiman,
30:Hasty action is the domain of the fool; especially in the area of vengeance. ~ Robert J Crane,
31:I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain. ~ Frank Lloyd Wright,
32:A domain exits where concepts can't go; so leave them on the doorstep to enter. ~ Chris Murphy,
33:The domain experts had learned more and had clarified the goal of the application. ~ Eric Evans,
34:The most knowledgeable person in one domain may be the most ignorant in another. ~ Albert Camus,
35:The heart of software is its ability to solve domain-related problems for its user. ~ Eric Evans,
36:Cross-domain innovation tends to produce strong, defensible competitive advantage. ~ Sramana Mitra,
37:Sometimes fields that are not competent in the domain take control over it. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
38:I expect Europe's top-level domain, .eu, to become similarly as important as dot-com. ~ Viviane Reding,
39:What does eminent domain mean?” Stewart asked. “It means you’re shit out of luck,” Ross said. ~ Ron Rash,
40:Almost without exception, blue refers to the domain of abstraction and immateriality. ~ Wassily Kandinsky,
41:I don't know if you're in my range, but I'd sure like to take you back to my domain. ~ Brittainy C Cherry,
42:I believe the term is ‘eminent domain.’
Ah, yes. That means ‘theft by the government, ~ Terry Pratchett,
43:After recent events, one might wonder if the macroeconomy is the domain of any economist. ~ Steven D Levitt,
44:All of the great Disney works took works that were in the public domain and remixed them. ~ Lawrence Lessig,
45:Real genius is nothing else but the supernatural virtue of humility in the domain of thought. ~ Simone Weil,
46:Life wants you to thrive in the domain of your own unique creative vision for your yourself. ~ Bryant McGill,
47:It is the powerful who know how to honour, it is their art, their domain for invention. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
48:She vowed to be watchful. She vowed to be ready. For the night was her domain and hers alone. ~ Robert Beatty,
49:Sometimes we become so expert in our own domain, we forget that customers may be less familiar. ~ Ron Kaufman,
50:That lack of programmability is probably what ultimately will doom vi. It can't extend its domain. ~ Bill Joy,
51:The shortest path between two truths in the real domain passes through the complex domain. ~ Jacques Hadamard,
52:I have been in my domain for nine thousand eight hundred and fifty-five days. Alone. For ~ Katherine Applegate,
53:The only domain where the divine is visible is that of art, whatever name we choose to call it. ~ Andre Malraux,
54:PRESENT, n. That part of eternity dividing the domain of disappointment from the realm of hope. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
55:To achieve creativity in an existing domain, there must be surplus attention available. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
56:If you want to stay relevant, you’re going to have to dive into the domain of the business you’re in ~ Chad Fowler,
57:Everyone operates within their own domain and obviously those domains overlap to a great extent. ~ Aleksandar Hemon,
58:Measures of self-precept must be tailored to the domain of psychological functioning being explored. ~ Albert Bandura,
59:Present – That part of eternity dividing the domain of disappointment from the realm of hope. Ambrose Bierce ~ Anonymous,
60:The shadow moves across the darkened streets, surveying its domain. The fog is like a living thing. ~ Alexandra Sokoloff,
61:When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain he wept, for there were no more worlds to conquer". - Milton. ~ John Milton,
62:and illustrations are in the public domain and are free to use, reproduce, or alter as desired. Cover and ~ Lewis Carroll,
63:The work that is truly productive is the domain of a steadily smaller and more elite fraction of humanity. ~ Vernor Vinge,
64:In a wicked world, relying upon experience from a single domain is not only limiting, it can be disastrous. ~ David Epstein,
65:Present—that part of eternity dividing the domain of disappointment from the realm of hope. AMBROSE BIERCE ~ Jonas Jonasson,
66:Art extracted from the most familiar reality does indeed exist and its domain is perhaps the largest of any. ~ Marcel Proust,
67:Human thought is thought that opens up into the future, and the future is inescapably the domain of the gods. ~ Daniel Quinn,
68:It is the lord’s duty to his domain to provide adequate defense for his folk during a time of war or crisis. ~ Terry Mancour,
69:The pregnant body is not solely its owner's domain. In gestating another person you become public property. ~ Sin ad Gleeson,
70:Spirituality is meant to take us beyond our tribal identity into a domain of awareness that is more universal. ~ Deepak Chopra,
71:There are goods that are outside trade and in the public domain and that should be reserved and protected. ~ Christine Lagarde,
72:The temptations are great to simply retreat to the domain of private life and give up on our public problems. ~ Lee H Hamilton,
73:Generally, crises were Mom's domain. Dad's job was to listen, nod, act curmudgeonly, and offer to pay for things. ~ Lisa Wingate,
74:Economics has gained the title Queen of the Social Sciences by choosing solved political problems as its domain. ~ Daron Acemo lu,
75:You need someone that behaves like James Bond more than you need someone that is an expert in some particular domain. ~ Sam Altman,
76:He has rescued us from the domain of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of the Son He loves. Colossians 1:13 ~ Beth Moore,
77:I will despise whatever lies in the domain of Fortune, but if a choice is offered, I will choose the better half. ~ Alain de Botton,
78:Now they are lovers. The first, wild courses are ended. They have founded their domain. A satanic happiness follows. ~ James Salter,
79:Everyone who works in the domain of fiction is a bit crazy. The problem is to render this craziness interesting. ~ Francois Truffaut,
80:In the domain of cops and robbers, an interdiction serves to structure a black market and a shadow economy. ~ William Irwin Thompson,
81:The Domain Name Server (DNS) is the Achilles heel of the Web. The important thing is that it's managed responsibly. ~ Tim Berners Lee,
82:Bandwidth is broadening as we speak. The whole world is being brought into the domain of electricity. ~ Terence McKenna, Evolving Times,
83:People often say 'I live for my art.' Bullshit! If you are given a talent it's to be used. It's not in the private domain. ~ Rod McKuen,
84:Even better, once you’re sure you have the domain, ask your social media followers what the name means in their language. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
85:In our domain we neither allow any Muslim to change his religion nor allow any other religion to propagate its faith. ~ Abul A la Maududi,
86:There are no physical divisions in the subtle domain and therefore no barriers between heaven and hell, light and shadow. ~ Deepak Chopra,
87:Outsider means "I will accept the possibility that I don't have responsibility for what is happening inside my domain." ~ Aleksandar Hemon,
88:Virtual domain = the field of spirit Quantum domain = the field of mind Material reality = the field of physical existence ~ Deepak Chopra,
89:All generous minds have a horror of what are commonly called 'Facts'. They are the brute beasts of the intellectual domain. ~ Thomas Hobbes,
90:Each poet creates an expatriate space, a slightly skewed domain where things are freshly felt because they are freshly said. ~ Alice Fulton,
91:Simplicity and beauty are the signs not of truth but of a well-constructed approximate model of a limited domain of phenomena. ~ Lee Smolin,
92:The wind and the sea and the storm were his domain and I wanted nothing to do with them any longer. I just wanted Cain. ~ Jennifer Silverwood,
93:Do not expect God always to give you His thrilling minutes, but learn to live in the domain of drudgery by the power of God. ~ Oswald Chambers,
94:protective of his gleaming domain, beavering away in it alone like an obsessed scientist in a humid and luridly lit laboratory. ~ Michel Faber,
95:Yea for we are the conquerors And all that is lies before us A black domain of stars And we the brightest lights within it ~ Arwen Elys Dayton,
96:The sweet spot for smart decisions, then, comes not just from being a domain expert, but also from having high self-awareness. ~ Daniel Goleman,
97:With one curious look flung in my direction, the Empress of Vegetables turned on her heel and marched back into her domain. ~ Alexandra Bracken,
98:Sir Arthur Eddington as he contemplated the peculiarities of the quantum domain: “Something unknown is doing we don’t know what. ~ Deepak Chopra,
99:the domain of quantum world is so astonishingly strange that it even makes tales of alien abductions sound perfectly reasonable ~ Jim Al Khalili,
100:This is her world. Her domain. Politics and intricate back-alley deals, trade alliances formed over champagne and shrimp cocktail. ~ Ally Carter,
101:[Psi waves travel far and wide
Faster than the speed of light
Limitless is their domain
Time does not their rate detain.] ~ Marcha A Fox,
102:The ear disapproves but tolerates certain musical pieces; transfer them into the domain of our nose, and we will be forced to flee. ~ Jean Cocteau,
103:The emperor would prefer the poet to keep away from politics, the emperor's domain, so that he can manage things the way he likes. ~ Chinua Achebe,
104:The Internet is the global brain, the cyberspacially connected, telepathic, collective domain that we've all been hungering for. ~ Terence McKenna,
105:We have to be able to reject disproportionate and unjustified responses in the cyber domain just as we do in the physical domain. ~ Edward Snowden,
106:When you are a rock star in front of 20,000 people, you receive instant gratification. A rock star on tour is a king in his domain. ~ Gene Simmons,
107:Patriotism, when it wants to make itself felt in the domain of learning, is a dirty fellow who should be thrown out of doors. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
108:I'm not one for walking the beaches humming a melody. I love the discipline of sitting in the studio, writing and listening. That is my domain. ~ Enya,
109:That shallowness of knowledge produces software that does a basic job but lacks a deep connection to the domain expert’s way of thinking. ~ Eric Evans,
110:The work of art leaves the domain of representation in order to become 'experience', transcendental empiricism or science of the sensible. ~ Anonymous,
111:Cuba has not accepted the domain and imposition of an empire that has wanted to dominate us for over half a century [America]. ~ Alejandro Castro Espin,
112:I also like the whole idea of fairy tales and folk tales being a woman's domain, considered a lesser domain at the time they were told. ~ Alice Hoffman,
113:Science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgements of all kinds remain necessary. ~ Albert Einstein,
114:An innovation, or cluster of innovations, in one field ends up triggering changes that seem to belong to a different domain altogether. ~ Steven Johnson,
115:Business activities and rules are as central to a domain as are the entities involved; any domain will have various categories of concepts. ~ Eric Evans,
116:Mickey Mouse should be in the public domain by now. What a better world it would be if other people were doing things with Mickey Mouse! ~ Lloyd Kaufman,
117:There is not a square inch in the whole domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry, Mine! ~ Abraham Kuyper,
118:In his day, liking someone like David Bowie would have been the domain of degenerate officers in black and white movies about nazis. ~ Jonathan Goldstein,
119:He would measure the world against the rigid grid of his heart and put each man in charge of a domain no more and no less than his just deserts. ~ Ken Liu,
120:One of my notes says: “Correct Anaïs’ English.” Do you want me to do that, or would Hugo consider that I am encroaching on his private domain? ~ Ana s Nin,
121:The 'how's' are the domain of the universe. It always knows the shortest, quickest, fastest, most harmonious way between you and your dream. ~ Mike Dooley,
122:Judaism is the Aryan religion that keeps resurrecting itself throughout history in different modes and based on the domain that hosts it. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
123:Married! Not to retreat, but to be the mistress of a lord's domain; not to be safe in a convent, but to live as some lord's breeding sow. ~ Katherine Arden,
124:Science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value, elly judgments of all kinds remain necessary. ~ Albert Einstein,
125:But there is a higher law than the Constitution, which regulates our authority over the domain, and devotes it to the same noble purposes. ~ William H Seward,
126:The domain of mythic images lives in us; it's good to be acquainted with it. When a mythology does not operate on us, we lose this contact. ~ Joseph Campbell,
127:You might be “just a programmer,” but being able to speak to your business clients in the language of their business domain is a critical skill. ~ Chad Fowler,
128:Any argument where one supposes an arbitrary choice to be made an uncountably infinite number of times ...[is] outside the domain of mathematics. ~ Emile Borel,
129:But let a man know that there are things to be known, of which he is ignorant, and it is so much carved out of his domain of universal knowledge. ~ Horace Mann,
130:The absolute truth cannot be realized within the domain of the ordinary mind, and the path beyond the ordinary mind is the path of the heart. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche,
131:French mathematician Jacques Hadamard (1865–1963): “The shortest path between two truths in the real domain passes through the complex domain.” I ~ Paul J Nahin,
132:If the Domain is destroyed, I have condemned my husband to an eternity of darkness, silence, with only his own rage and madness to keep him company. ~ Greg Bear,
133:The Holocaust is a sacred subject. One should take off one's shoes when entering its domain, one should tremble each time one pronounces the word. ~ Elie Wiesel,
134:differences between expert performers and normal adults reflect a life-long period of deliberate effort to improve performance in a specific domain. ~ Cal Newport,
135:free market required public regulation to keep predatory finance and rent seeking in check, and to keep basic infastructure in the public domain. ~ Michael Hudson,
136:I am not at all for a feminism which is entirely separatist, which would say, "this domain is purely for women." I don't believe that at all. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
137:One Domain Vocabulary A class that uses terms from multiple domains might be violating context independence, unless it’s part of a bridging layer. ~ Steve Freeman,
138:The science of mathematics presents the most brilliant example of how pure reason may successfully enlarge its domain without the aid of experience ~ Immanuel Kant,
139:When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer. (Technically a misquote, but I like the misquote better) ~ Plutarch,
140:a domain name that seemed to indicate the e-mail was sent from somewhere in Eastern Europe, from one of those former Soviet countries that ended in -ia. ~ Anonymous,
141:domain-specific I mean that our reactions, our mode of thinking, our intuitions, depend on the context in which the matter is presented, what ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
142:the differences between expert performers and normal adults reflect a life-long period of deliberate effort to improve performance in a specific domain. ~ Cal Newport,
143:This almost never happens, outside of the realm of scientific terminology (which is obviously a domain populated by sadists with no regard for language). ~ Ammon Shea,
144:We aim in the domain of politics at republicanism; in the domain of economics at socialism; in the domain of what is today called religion, at atheism. ~ August Bebel,
145:An individual understands a concept, skill, theory, or domain of knowledge to the extent that he or she can apply it appropriately in a new situation. ~ Howard Gardner,
146:Art’s role (like philosophy’s) is not to criticize reality but to change it; and little change can be effected if art remains a cloistered domain. ~ Richard Shusterman,
147:Can the dead hear our prayers? When the words come floating up, do they go straight to God's sacred domain, or does all of heaven know our desperation? ~ Eishes Chayil,
148:Everything is bilateral in the domain of thought. Ideas are binary. Janus is the myth of criticism and the symbol of genius. Only God is triangular! ~ Honore de Balzac,
149:Recall, now, that the kingdom of God is the range of his effective will: that is, it is the domain where what he prefers is actually what happens. And ~ Dallas Willard,
150:Science's domain is the natural. If you want to understand the natural world and be sure you're not misleading yourself, science is the way to do it. ~ Francis Collins,
151:Very few institutions thrive when they are left solely to “professionals,” people who have made it their life’s work to master a given domain of culture. ~ Andy Crouch,
152:But cheating has always been the purview of fairies, and as we are about to enter their domain, we ought to act in accordance with local customs. ~ Catherynne M Valente,
153:If the design, or some central part of it, does not map to the domain model, that model is of little value, and the correctness of the software is suspect. ~ Eric Evans,
154:I'm struck by the insidious, computer-driven tendency to take things out of the domain of muscular activity and put them into the domain of mental activity. ~ Brian Eno,
155:And so a ghost of him had been created by her hatred and her rage. It was fading, yet it still stalked her, even here in the safe hallways of her own domain. ~ Anne Rice,
156:With nonlocal connection, we are forced to conceptualize a domain of reality outside space-time because a nonlocal connection cannot happen in space-time. ~ Amit Goswami,
157:13He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, 14in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins. ~ Anonymous,
158:Again, what works well in the spiritual domain can become destructive and even immoral if interpreted literally and practically in the mundane world. It ~ Karen Armstrong,
159:Life is a pilgrimage. The wise man does not rest by the roadside inns. He marches direct to the illimitable domain of eternal bliss, his ultimate destination. ~ Sivananda,
160:specified a two-tiered family of five criteria of excellence (expertise) in the domain, fundamental pragmatics of life. At the first level, expertise consists ~ Anonymous,
161:If the entire divinity and domain of God sits in the heart of a person, and his longing becomes timeless, then man can develop the capacity to love. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
162:I want the public as well as libraries and schools to enjoy unlimited access to public-domain books. This means no charges for these kind of texts themselves. ~ Tom Peters,
163:economist Abba Lerner noted in the 1970s, “Economics has gained the title Queen of the Social Sciences by choosing solved political problems as its domain. ~ Daron Acemo lu,
164:Facts need testimony to be remembered and trustworthy witnesses to be established in order to find a secure dwelling place in the domain of human affairs. ~ Michiko Kakutani,
165:The Northwest is essentially a national domain; it is fitting that it should be, as it is, not only by position but by feeling, the heart of the nation. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
166:Culture is more and more consciously becoming a project carried out in the domain of language by, for instance, propaganda both governmental and commercial. ~ Terence McKenna,
167:A lot of people, quite frankly, think intense attachments to animals are weird and suspect, the domain of people who can't quite handle attachments to humans. ~ Caroline Knapp,
168:Between knowledge of what really exists and ignorance of what does not exist lies the domain of opinion. It is more obscure than knowledge, but clearer than ignorance. ~ Plato,
169:There are so many items that are not in the copyright domain. And people might not realize the Library of Congress manages the copyright process for the nation. ~ Carla Hayden,
170:In general, don’t fight your frameworks. Seek ways to keep the fundamentals of domain-driven design and let go of the specifics when the framework is antagonistic. ~ Eric Evans,
171:the differences between expert performers and normal adults reflect a life-long period of deliberate effort to improve performance in a specific domain.” American ~ Cal Newport,
172:Without a commitment to science and rationality in its proper domain, there can be no solution to the problems that engulf us. Still, the Yahoos never rest. ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
173:All that is observable in a man-that is to say his actions and such of his spiritual existence as can be deduced from his actions-falls into the domain of history. ~ E M Forster,
174:Cancel me not - for what then shall remain? Abscissas, some mantissas, modules, modes, A root or two, a torus and a node: The inverse of my verse, a null domain. ~ Stanislaw Lem,
175:If I thought even for one moment that a single molecule were running loose in the universe outside the control and domain of almighty God, I wouldn't sleep tonight. ~ R C Sproul,
176:Occurrences in this domain are beyond the reach of exact prediction because of the variety of factors in operation, not because of any lack of order in nature. ~ Albert Einstein,
177:What if eternity is a sterile, impotent, lifeless domain of pure potentialities, which, in order fully to actualize itself, has to pass through temporal existence? ~ Slavoj i ek,
178:The historical development of the work of anthropologists seems to single out clearly a domain of knowledge that heretofore has not been treated by any other science ~ Franz Boas,
179:the “hummingbird effect.” An innovation, or cluster of innovations, in one field ends up triggering changes that seem to belong to a different domain altogether. ~ Steven Johnson,
180:Create different desktop patterns on them so that the visual cues help to remind you, and put you in the proper place-memory context, of each computer’s domain. ~ Daniel J Levitin,
181:In pure literature, the writers of the eighteenth century achieved, indeed, many triumphs; but their great, their peculiar, triumphs were in the domain of thought. ~ Lytton Strachey,
182:My biggest thing is banana pudding, but it's the devil! So no one is allowed to bring it into my house. Because I can't control myself. So why put it in my domain? ~ Jennifer Hudson,
183:One must exploit the asynchronies that have befallen one, link them to a promising issue or domain, reframe frustrations as opportunities, and, above all, persevere. ~ Howard Gardner,
184:I do not actually see how art, literature can be anything other that being in that domain of trying to tell us, trying to get us to see what is important in our lives. ~ Chinua Achebe,
185:One must exploit the asynchronies that have befallen one, link them to a promising issue or domain, reframe frustrations as opportunities, and, above all, persevere. ~ Howard Gardner,
186:if anyone comes into my domain without explicit permission, I’m going to impale you in a way that will give you the very best idea of what it feels like to be a corn dog. ~ Dannika Dark,
187:Time' is the illusional domain occupied by the state of boredom. 'Space' is the infinite - reality - experienced by the state of higher creative consciousness. Choose wisely. ~ T F Hodge,
188:After all, the internet originated around 1960 and wasn't privatized until 1995. That's thirty five years in the public domain during the hard, creative development period. ~ Noam Chomsky,
189:English translations of most of the texts are found in the Sacred Books of the East series (1879–1910), which is now in the public domain and easily accessible online. ~ Stephen E Flowers,
190:Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain. ~ Frank Lloyd Wright,
191:Cliché activates the comfortable mental laziness, we sort of revert to the domain of the already-familiar, what we have already imagined so that it doesn't seem that bad. ~ Aleksandar Hemon,
192:Skeptics often treat size, regulation, perceived complexity, legacy technology, or some other special characteristic of the domain in which they operate as a barrier to change. ~ Jez Humble,
193:When I let go of the identification with the body, then I open myself to the unbounded awareness of pure Self. This is the domain of bliss, of real fulfillment in life. ~ Janet Bray Attwood,
194:One very important domain of our lives and experience that we tend to miss, ignore, abuse, or lose control of as a result of being in the automatic pilot mode is our own body. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
195:A vibrant, rich, growing corpus of public-domain books is a vital public good - similar to parks, the infrastructure of basic services, and other hallmarks of any advanced society. ~ Tom Peters,
196:Every system is built from a domain-specific language designed by the programmers to describe that system. Functions are the verbs of that language, and classes are the nouns. ~ Robert C Martin,
197:the real revolution for this century “would be to stop seeing the home as a gendered space” but rather as both a male and female domain, just as we now see the workplace. ~ Anne Marie Slaughter,
198:These disturbances are the product of our human propensity to explore in teams, to develop new tools to expand our domain to places that are not part of our “natural” habitat. ~ David Grinspoon,
199:Yet while Vidal writes best about power, politics, and history White’s strengths are sex, art and – sometimes – love. Each tends to stumble when he enters the other’s domain. ~ Christopher Bram,
200:Common sense invents and constructs no less than its own field than science does in its domain. It is, however, in the nature of common sense not to be aware of this situation. ~ Albert Einstein,
201:Forget the past, for it is gone from your domain! forget the future, for it is beyond your reach! control the present! Live supremely well now! This is the way of the wise. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
202:Love has traditionally been the domain of poets, artists, and philosophers, but in the last 50 years the terrain of relationships has increasingly been mapped by psychologists. ~ Tom Butler Bowdon,
203:unmarried women make good academics because they’ve been neutered by too much knowledge and bookish pleasure. The world hands them a tiny domain it never cared about to begin with. ~ Dominic Smith,
204:Expertise is not a single skill; it is a collection of skills, and the same professional may be highly expert in some of the tasks in her domain while remaining a novice in others. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
205:forget the past, for it is gone from your domain! forget the future, for it is beyond your reach! control the present! Live supremely well now! This is the way of the wise... ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
206:The poet is a bird of strange moods. He descends from his lofty domain to tarry among us, singing; if we do not honor him he will unfold his wings and fly back to his dwelling place. ~ Khalil Gibran,
207:There are some issues that are not in control of the government. Two of those issues are human rights and personal freedoms are in the domain of Iran's conservative judicial system. ~ Hassan Rouhani,
208:Humour is the only domain of creative activity where a stimulus on a high level of complexity produces a massive and sharply defined response on the level of physiological reflexes. ~ Arthur Koestler,
209:The righteous will claim sole domain on judgement. The righteous are the first to make hands into fists, the first to shout down dissenters, the first to bully others into compliance. ~ Steven Erikson,
210:To communicate effectively, the code must be based on the same language used to write the requirements—the same language that the developers speak with each other and with domain experts. ~ Eric Evans,
211:To the scientist, the universality of physical laws makes the cosmos a marvelously simple place. By comparison, human nature-the psychologist's domain-is infinitely more daunting. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
212:Women's bodies are public domain, as evidenced clearly at the present time by the furor over abortion. Everyone has an opinion about what a woman should or should not do with her body. ~ Maureen Murdock,
213:I am amused to see from my window here how busily a man has divided and staked off his domain. God must smile at his puny fences running hither and thither everywhere over the land. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
214:International law in its counter-hegemonic uses is very important in any domain where issues of legitimacy are significant, but is rarely able to have a corresponding behavioural impact. ~ Richard A Falk,
215:As a politician who cherishes religious conviction in his personal sphere, but regards politics as a domain belonging outside religion, I believe that this view is seriously flawed. ~ Recep Tayyip Erdogan,
216:The child is a realist in every domain of thought, and it is therefore natural that in the moral sphere he should lay more stress on the external, tangible element than on the hidden motive. ~ Jean Piaget,
217:What 'eminent domain' laws mean in practice is that politicians have a right to seize your property and turn it over to someone else, in order to gain campaign contributions and win votes. ~ Thomas Sowell,
218:There's a very good reason that governments aren't supposed to compete with private-enterprise companies. Governments have monopolies on certain things, like eminent domain and deadly force. ~ P J O Rourke,
219:In science, dubious forecasts are more likely to be exposed—and the truth is more likely to prevail. In politics, a domain in which the truth enjoys no privileged status, it’s anybody’s guess. ~ Nate Silver,
220:Our humanist attitude should therefore throughout be to stress what we all have in common with each other and relegate quarrelsome religion to the private domain where it can do [less] harm. ~ Hermann Bondi,
221:Passion in this context refers to a sustained and deep commitment to achieving our full potential and greater capacity for self-expression in a domain that engages us on a personal level. ~ John Seely Brown,
222:The movie stars and matinee idols are put into the public domain by photography. They become dreams that money can buy. They can be bought and thumbed more easily than public prostitutes. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
223:Love is frightened at the intervals of insensibility and callousness that encroach by little and little on the domain of grief, and it makes efforts to recall the keenness of the first anguish. ~ George Eliot,
224:other incursions of new intellectual property laws into the public domain. Tim's long-term vision for his company is to change the world by spreading the knowledge of innovators. For everything ~ Tim O Reilly,
225:It should go without saying that even the most narrowly construed eminent-domain power would violate individual rights. Either a person owns his legitimately acquired property or he does not. ~ Sheldon Richman,
226:There was a time, in the nineteenth century, for example, when women spoke mostly about the house, children, birth, and so forth, because it was their domain. That's changing a little, now. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
227:At Google, operations are not just an afterthought: they are critical to the company's success, and we want to have just as much effort and creativity in this domain as in new product development. ~ Eric Schmidt,
228:Catastrophes are often stimulated by the failure to feel the emergence of a domain, and so what cannot be felt in the imagination is experienced as embodied sensation in the catastrophe. ~ William Irwin Thompson,
229:In every domain of art, a work that corresponds to the need of its day carries a message of social and cultural value. It is the artist who crystallizes his age ... who fixes his time in history. ~ Edgard Varese,
230:The intellect moves naturally between two limits, the abstractions or solving analyses of the reason and the domain of positive and practical reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
231:In the day-to-day, farm work is stress relief for me. At the end of the day, I love having this other career - my anti-job - that keeps me in shape and gives me control over a vegetal domain. ~ Barbara Kingsolver,
232:It's in the public domain. That's one of the reasons I do it so much. But luckily, it's a brilliant film [ Night Of The Living Dead]. Every horror aficionado must see that film at least once. ~ Cassandra Peterson,
233:Two things which are the peculiar domain of the heart, not the mind—politics and religion. He doesn’t want to know the other side. He wants arguments and statistics for his own side, and nothing more. ~ Mark Twain,
234:Catastrophes are often stimulated by the failure to feel the emergence of a domain, and so what cannot be felt in the imagination is experienced as embodied sensation in the catastrophe.
   ~ William Irwin Thompson,
235:Stop preventing philosophers from possessing money; no one has condemned wisdom to poverty. I will despise whatever lies in the domain of Fortune, but if a choice is offered, I will choose the better half. ~ Seneca,
236:The domain of mental testing, including the whole concept of the IQ test and its uses, owes much of its success to the U.S. Army’s need to have a way of selecting recruits for World War I. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
237:The Eurozone die is cast. Countries must withdraw from the euro so that governments can create their own money once again, and resist creditor demands to carve up and privatize their public domain. ~ Michael Hudson,
238:This universe is formed out of both consciousness forces and matter. While the study of matter has been the domain of traditional science, the study of consciousness is the science of spirituality. ~ Shriram Sharma,
239:No matter how far we go into the future, there will always be new things happening, new information coming in, new worlds to explore, a constantly expanding domain of life, consciousness, and memory. ~ Freeman Dyson,
240:What is new is that environmentalism intensely illuminates the need to confront the corporate domain at its most powerful and guarded point - the exclusive right to govern the systems of production. ~ Barry Commoner,
241:By the time Apple's Macintosh operating system finally falls into the public domain, there will be no machine that could possibly run it. The term of copyright for software is effectively unlimited. ~ Lawrence Lessig,
242:Real science studies and makes accessible that knowledge which people at that period of history think important, and real art transfers this truth from the domain of knowledge to the domain of feelings. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
243:Theoretical physicists live in a classical world, looking out into a quantum-mechanical world. The latter we describe only subjectively, in terms of procedures and results in our classical domain. ~ John Stewart Bell,
244:A movement that we will to execute is never more than a represented movement, and appears in a different domain from that of the executed movement, which always takes place when the image is vivid enough. ~ Ernst Mach,
245:as a society emphasizes and values some aspects of the total range of human potentials more than others, the valued aspects are associated closely with, and limited to, the dominant group's domain. ~ Jean Baker Miller,
246:Simultaneously with the establishment of the Constitution, Virginia ceded to the United States her domain, which then extended to the Mississippi, and was even claimed to extend to the Pacific Ocean. ~ William H Seward,
247:What happens to the spiritual life of a young girl who is made to understand, consciously or subconsciously, that she has no place in the spiritual domain except as a consumer of someone else’s God? ~ Joan D Chittister,
248:What I have told you is not legend; it is the truth. The sword is real; it rests today at Paranor. But most important of all, the Warlock Lord is real. He lives today and the Skull Kingdom is his domain! ~ Terry Brooks,
249:Formerly they had dwelt in the Belgian Congo until the cruelties of their heartless oppressors had driven them to seek the safety of unexplored solitudes beyond the boundaries of Leopold's domain. ~ Edgar Rice Burroughs,
250:It is one of the aims of linguistics to define itself, to recognise what belongs within its domain. In those cases where it relies upon psychology, it will do so indirectly, remaining independent. ~ Ferdinand de Saussure,
251:Sleep this night is not a dark haunted domain the mind must consciously set itself to invade, but a cave inside himself, into which he shrinks while the claws of the bear rattle like rain outside. Sunshine, ~ John Updike,
252:This is an accessible work of philosophy in the best sense, sharply focused on matters of vital human concern and free of the domain tics that mar even allegedly popular works by Anglo-American philosophers. ~ Mark Lilla,
253:We hope to see a Europe where men of every country will think of being a European as of belonging to their native land, and...wherever they go in this wide domain...will truly feel, ‘Here I am at home. ~ Winston Churchill,
254:A good zoo," Stella said, "is a large domain. A wild cage. A safe place to be. It has room to roam and humans who don't hurt." She pauses, considering her words. "A good zoo is how humans make amends. ~ Katherine Applegate,
255:A good zoo,” Stella says, “is a large domain. A wild cage. A safe place to be. It has room to roam and humans who don’t hurt.” She pauses, considering her words. “A good zoo is how humans make amends. ~ Katherine Applegate,
256:Effective negotiation is applied people smarts, a psychological edge in every domain of life: how to size someone up, how to influence their sizing up of you, and how to use that knowledge to get what you want. ~ Chris Voss,
257:Machines will never be able to give the thinking process a model of thought itself, since machines are not mortal. What gives humans access to the symbolic domain of value and meaning is the fact that we die. ~ Regis Debray,
258:What exactly is moral focus? It is giving moral priority to one particular domain of interest over others. The result is that one domain is seen as having primary moral significance over other domains. Thus, ~ George Lakoff,
259:Jesus and Shakespeare are fragments of the soul, and by love I conquer and incorporate them in my own conscious domain. His virtue,--is not that mine? His wit,--if it cannot be made mine, it is not wit. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
260:The science of mathematics presents the most brilliant example of how pure reason may successfully enlarge its domain without the aid of experience. ~ Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason (1781) Tr. Max Müller (1881) p. 610.,
261:If Baudelaire, in hieroglyphics of the soul, had deciphered the return of the age of the sentiment and ideas, Poe, in the field of morbid psychology had more especially investigated the domain of the soul. ~ Joris Karl Huysmans,
262:If you were unfamiliar with the political situation in our country, you might think you were witnessing not the machinations of a democracy but the final surrender of personal consciousness into the public domain. ~ Rachel Cusk,
263:If gender is eradicated, so too is an important domain of pleasure for many people. And others have a strong sense of self bound up with their genders, so to get rid of gender would be to shatter their self-hood. ~ Judith Butler,
264:Indeed, King Louis XIV of France, confronted with a revised map of his domain based on accurate longitude measurements, reportedly complained that he was losing more territory to his astronomers than to his enemies. ~ Dava Sobel,
265:So when we make contact with the domain of being in the meditation practice, we are already, in a profound sense, beyond the scarring, beyond the isolation and fragmentation and suffering we may be experiencing. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
266:Conscious doubt is not in the repertoire of System 1; it requires maintaining incompatible interpretations in mind at the same time, which demands mental effort. Uncertainty and doubt are the domain of System 2. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
267:Free yourself from all anxiety by entrusting your future to me. And remember this always, that there is one behind you who will come to you at the right moment and lead you to the everlasting domain. ~ Holy Mother Sri Sarada Devi,
268:The internet is shared critical infrastructure for everyone on earth. It's not supposed to be a domain of warfare. We're not supposed to be putting the Unied States' economy on the frontlines in the battleground. ~ Edward Snowden,
269:For old age is respected only if it defends itself, maintains its rights, submits to no one, and rules over its domain until its last breath.
-- How to grow old: ancient wisdom for the second half of life. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
270:History of the Great American Fortunes uncovered how many family fortunes were taken from the public domain by colonial land grants, bribery and insider dealing – and how such fortunes quickly take a financial form. ~ Michael Hudson,
271:[Experts’] knowledge is not simply a list of facts and formulas that are relevant to their domain; instead, their knowledge is organized around core concepts or ‘big ideas’ that guide their thinking about their domains, ~ John Medina,
272:Most good novelists have been women or homosexuals. The novel is the triumphant evolved creation, one increasingly has to think, of these two groups, who have cooperated more closely in this domain than in any other. ~ Nicholson Baker,
273:Once we accept quantum nonlocality as an established physical aspect of the world in which we live, it becomes easier within science to conceive of a transcendent domain outside the manifest physical domain of space-time. ~ Amit Goswami,
274:And now having a child has been taken out of the sphere of biological determinism and placed instead in the domain of intentional action. Another option to consider and decide upon. And ... not to choose is to choose. ~ Rebecca Goldstein,
275:Morons often like to claim that their truth has been suppressed: that they are like Galileo, a noble outsider fighting the rigid and political domain of the scientific literature, which resists every challenge to orthodoxy. ~ Ben Goldacre,
276:The fundamentalists, by 'knowing' the answers before they start, and then forcing nature into the straitjacket of their discredited preconceptions, lie outside the domain of science - or any honest intellectual inquiry. ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
277:It is also true that the less competent a person is in a given domain, the more he will tend to overestimate his abilities. This often produces an ugly marriage of confidence and ignorance that is very difficult to correct for. ~ Sam Harris,
278:The wind stilled a bit and he blinked the sand out of his eyes. Before him stood nothing less than the god of the Scrape. It had to be a god. He was huge, muscled, hung like an elephant, and sandy gold, just like his domain. ~ Erin Kellison,
279:Secretary Hillary Clinton used several different servers and administrators of those servers during her four years at the State Department. She also used numerous mobile devices to send and to read email on that personal domain. ~ James Comey,
280:Finally, therefore, remember your retreat into this little domain which is yourself, and above all be not disturbed nor on the rack, but be free and look at things as a man, a human being, a citizen, a creature that must die. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
281:A ghost is someone who hasn't made it - in other words, who died, and they don't know they're dead. So they keep walking around and thinking that you're inhabiting their - let's say, their domain. So they're aggravated with you. ~ Sylvia Browne,
282:Find x if (x)=2sin3x,over the domain -2piX=Beth

'Stop goofing around!',I said.
'I'm not! I'm stating the truth.You're my solution to everything',Xavier replied. 'The end result is always you.X always equals Beth. ~ Alexandra Adornetto,
283:the Son of God was coming to earth—a King entering His domain! In heaven, angels do God’s bidding and offer ceaseless worship. How appropriate that heavenly servants be given a part in preparing the way for the Savior’s birth! ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
284:Creativity is any act, idea, or product that changes an existing domain, or that transforms an existing domain into a new one What counts is whether the novelty he or she produces is accepted for inclusion in the domain. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
285:Rather than requiring the domain model to specifically support the necessary view properties, it is the responsibility of the Presentation Model to derive the view-specific indicators and properties from the state of the domain model. ~ Anonymous,
286:The corollary of the possibility of conceiving other worlds - this one being, de facto, only a domain - is the impossibility of moving beyond the world we inhabit and the imperious necessity of accepting its frontiers as limits. ~ Michel Foucault,
287:The lamentable expression: 'But it was only a dream", the increasing use of which - among others in the domain of the cinema - has contributed not a little to encourage such hypocrisy, has for a long while ceased to merit discussion. ~ Andr Breton,
288:The room you are about to enter,” the Eagle said, setting up Nicole’s wheelchair, “is the largest single room in this domain. It is half a kilometer across at its widest point. Inside currently is a model of the Milky Way Galaxy. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
289:despite their seemingly greater sphere of use, we still can’t use them to have any thoughts whatsoever beyond the domain of experience, because their only role is to fix the logical forms of judgments that we make about given intuitions ~ Anonymous,
290:How much I wanted to move into these rooms and live forever in this domain of medieval autumns and mute winters, serving out my sentence of life among all the visible and invisible wonders I had only dreamed about from so far away. ~ Thomas Ligotti,
291:The kingdom of God is not a geographic domain with set boundaries and settled decrees, but a set of relationships in which Christ is sovereign. At the table, Jesus moves us from ideas about life and love to actual living and loving. ~ Leonard Sweet,
292:The lamentable expression: 'But it was only a dream", the increasing use of which - among others in the domain of the cinema - has contributed not a little to encourage such hypocrisy, has for a long while ceased to merit discussion. ~ Andre Breton,
293:The quality and success of Disney was actually bad for us animators because everyone on the planet thought that animation was only for kids and only in a certain domain. The big film festivals never thought much about animated films. ~ Michel Ocelot,
294:The theory of relativity worked out by Mr. Einstein, which is in the domain of natural science, I believe can also be applied to the political field. Both democracy and human rights are relative concepts - and not absolute and general. ~ Jiang Zemin,
295:Attention deficit is no longer the supposed domain of Generation Y's who were brought up on a diet of social media and new technology. A recent study revealed 65 percent of 55-64 year olds surf, text and watch television simultaneously. ~ Kevin Kelly,
296:Those who violate the rules of a language do not enter new territory; they leave the domain of meaningful discourse. Even facts in these circumstances dissolve, because they are shaped by the language and subjected to its limitations. ~ Paul Feyerabend,
297:I think fiction allows you to inhabit new domains and it's you, the reader living in that domain for a few days that results in a deeper understanding as opposed to the novel proclaiming this is what it is right and this is what is wrong. ~ Mohsin Hamid,
298:Leadership is about creating a domain in which human beings continually deepen their understanding of reality and become more capable of participating in the unfolding of the world. Ultimately leadership is about creating new realities. ~ Joseph Jaworski,
299:The only Socialism that God has institutionalized and even ordered man to fully comply with, is that of faith and religion; because this is the only domain where He is the claimant and no other entity is allowed to capitalize thereupon. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
300:Love isn't quite desire... Love is probably a little bit in The Sandman's domain. Love is partly a dream, it's partly to do with desire, and sometimes it's partly to do with death, as well. It's also very often something to do with delirium. ~ Neil Gaiman,
301:Politics is traditionally a male domain in Russia. Until now, women have only been accessories. Now, female protest groups are emerging - not because men came up with the idea, but through their own efforts. That's something new for Russia. ~ Alexei Navalny,
302:There is something about nature out of control that touches a primal terror. We are used to believing that we're the masters of our domain, and that God has given us this earth to rule over. We need this illusion like a good night-light. ~ Robert R McCammon,
303:And for me anyway, consciousness is three components: a personal component which for lack of a better word we can call the soul. A collective component which is more archetypal and a deeper level, and then a universal domain of consciousness. ~ Deepak Chopra,
304:I think the time has come for us to embrace spirituality as a domain of awareness where we all experience our universal nature, where we all experience our inseparability, where we all know love as the ultimate truth at the heart of creation. ~ Deepak Chopra,
305:People are the only mirror we have to see ourselves in. The domain of all meaning. All virtue, all evil, are contained only in people. There is none in the universe at large. Solitary confinement is a punishment in every human culture. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
306:It's totally outrageous, ... for someone to take these domain names and then solicit funds, run them through what looks like a legitimate charity using pictures and other hurricane victims, when in reality that money was running to his hate sites. ~ Jay Nixon,
307:There is no well defined boundary line between honesty and dishonesty. The frontiers of one blend with the outside limits of the other, and he who attempts to tread this dangerous ground may be sometimes in the one domain and sometimes in the other. ~ O Henry,
308:The force of inertia acts in the domain of psychics as well as physics; any idea pushed into the popular mind with considerable force will keep on going until some opposing force--or the slow resistance of friction--stops it at last. ~ Charlotte Perkins Gilman,
309:The Spanish silver mines, for example, once part of Hannibal’s domain, were soon producing so much more ore that the environmental pollution from its processing can still be detected in datable samples extracted from deep in the Greenland ice cap. ~ Mary Beard,
310:If the distinction provided by Jesus' words: Give unto god, what is god's, and unto Caesar what is Caesar's! is carried through, then other necessary intrusions by the national state into the domain of church creeds can be completely avoided. ~ Alfred Rosenberg,
311:I often get questioned about how we came up with the name Weebly. We all know that all of the good domain names are already taken, and we had neither the desire nor budget to try and fit our business into a pre-existing word - so we made one up. ~ David Rusenko,
312:Librarians and other information specialists have developed user’s guides to evaluating websites. These include questions we should ask, such as “Is the page current?” or “What is the domain?” (A guide prepared by NASA is particularly helpful.) ~ Daniel J Levitin,
313:H.M.," said the Woggle-Bug, pompously, "means Highly Magnified; and T.E. means Thoroughly Educated. I am, in reality, a very big bug, and doubtless the most intelligent being in all this broad domain."
"How well you disguise it," said the Wizard. ~ L Frank Baum,
314:Nothing is beautiful, only man: on this piece of naivete rests all aesthetics, it is the first truth of aesthetics. Let us immediately add its second: nothing is ugly but degenerate man - the domain of aesthetic judgment is therewith defined. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
315:Inline object definitions and declarations for C++11. This library embeds in C++11 a fast type-safe json-like domain specific language. It allows, in one C++ statement, to define, declare and instantiate a C++ object, without any overhead execution time. ~ Anonymous,
316:In the past, people could use their music because there are these bootlegs floating around that were supposedly public domain but they weren't, and now they've locked everything up and it's become really near impossible to use their music in movies. ~ George Ratliff,
317:We feel more emotion... before an amateur photograph linked to our own life history than before the work of a Great Photographer, because his domain partakes of art, and the intent of the souvenir-object remains at the lower level of personal history. ~ Chris Marker,
318:Even granting that the genius subjected to the test of critical inspection emerges free from all error, we should consider that everything he has discovered in a given domain is almost nothing in comparison with what is left to be discovered. ~ Santiago Ramon y Cajal,
319:Yau proposed another round, then asked: 'Is it true that to the west of the Khalif's domain there live white-skinned people, with blue eyes and yellow hair?'

'There can't be men like that!' Chiao Tai protested. 'Must be ghosts or devils!'(49) ~ Robert van Gulik,
320:One way to explain the complexity and unpredictability of historical systems, despite their ultimate determinacy, is to note that long chains of causation may separate final effects from ultimate causes lying outside the domain of that field of science. ~ Jared Diamond,
321:Assimilating the style of predecessors is necessary before one can develop one's own. Only by immersing oneself in the domain can one find out whether there is room left for contributing creatively to it, and whether one is capable of doing so. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
322:Christians need the Spirit of God to reveal more of himself and his ways to us, if we are to know God better, for it is the Spirit's task to take things that belong to the domain of God, the domain of glory, and bring them to us so that we can receive them. ~ D A Carson,
323:It's a fact that within the space of a few decades, women have achieved a massive shift in the role they play - in the way they act in public, and in the way they have conquered areas of the working world that were until recently considered a man's domain. ~ Hanna Rosin,
324:The domain of leaders is the future. The work of leaders is change. The most significant contribution leaders make is not to today's bottom line; it is to the long-term development of people and institutions so they can adapt, change, prosper, and grow. ~ James M Kouzes,
325:The next library is a place, still. A place where people come together to do co-working and coordinate and invent projects worth working on together. Aided by a librarian who can bring domain knowledge and people knowledge and access to information to bear. ~ Alan Bennett,
326:Our future shall not consist of networks, but of blocs whose very essence shall be of an ethnic nature. We are heading towards a simplification of the domain of ideas that govern our world. Over-ornate intellectual analyses are always a source of disorder. ~ Guillaume Faye,
327:There is another domain that we consider relevant and having good prospects - marine biology. For many years this region [Russian Far East] has been home for one of the leading institutes of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Marine Biology. ~ Vladimir Putin,
328:Day after day I postponed living in you, but I never put off the death which I died each day in myself. I longed for a life of happiness but I was frightened to approach it in its own domain; and yet, while I fled from it, I still searched for it. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
329:In addition to shaming sexual-assault victims, positioning abstinence as women's domain further promotes the notion that it's women's morality that's on the line when it comes to sex, men just can't help themselves, so their ethics are safe from criticism. ~ Jessica Valenti,
330:It was the kind of weather when bad things happened, Timmy thought, the kind when monsters stepped out of the shadows to bask in the fluorescent light of the storm, drinking the rain and snatching those foolish enough to venture into their domain. And ~ Kealan Patrick Burke,
331:Spirituality promotes passivity when the domain of spirit is defined as outside the world. When this world is the terrain of spirit, we ourselves become actors in the story, and this world becomes the realm in which the sacred must be honored and freedom created. ~ Starhawk,
332:You don't do that while you're being paid by taxpayers to do a very difficult and full-time job, and you also do not bring Clinton Foundation interests into the domain of the secretary of state, and you do not give preferred access to your own personal clients. ~ Jill Stein,
333:Hence, even in the domain of natural science the aid of the experimental method becomes indispensable whenever the problem set is the analysis of transient and impermanent phenomena, and not merely the observation of persistent and relatively constant objects. ~ Wilhelm Wundt,
334:The myth is the public domain and the dream is the private myth. If your private myth, your dream, happens to coincide with that of the society, you are in good accord with your group. If it isn't, you've got a long adventure in the dark forest ahead of you. ~ Joseph Campbell,
335:We must move away from domain control to domain denial, since our only motive to be on the ground in the Greater Middle East and Central Asia is for smackdown or disruption purposes. (In retrospect, that is how we should have handled Afghanistan after 9/11.) ~ Robert D Kaplan,
336:1. Providing a unique interface between members of the organization 2. Delivering unique creativity 3. Managing a situation or organization of great complexity 4. Leading customers 5. Inspiring staff 6. Providing deep domain knowledge 7. Possessing a unique talent ~ Seth Godin,
337:Children and scientists share an outlook on life. If I do this, what will happen? is both the motto of the child at play and the defining refrain of the physical scientist. ... The unfamiliar and the strange - these are the domain of all children and scientists. ~ James Gleick,
338:Before the war, the domain of culture seemed to offer a haven from the increasingly hateful world of politics. Now, when I hear the word culture, I pull out the quote commonly attributed to Hermann Goring: "When I hear the word culture, I reach for my revolver. ~ Aleksandar Hemon,
339:My visitors are often surprised when they see the TV Mack put in my domain. They seem to find it odd, the sight of a gorilla staring at tiny humans in a box. Sometimes I wonder, though: Isn't the way they stare at me, sitting in my tiny box, just as strange? ~ Katherine Applegate,
340:A public domain work is an orphan. No one is responsible for its life. But everyone exploits its use, until that time certain when it becomes soiled and haggard, barren of its previous virtues. How does the consumer benefit from the steady decline of a film's quality? ~ Jack Valenti,
341:Geniuses are those who have the intelligence, enthusiasm, and endurance to acquire the needed expertise in a broadly valued domain of achievement and who then make contributions to that field that are considered by peers to be both original and highly exemplary. ~ Dean Keith Simonton,
342:If we are to make progress, we must not repeat history but make new history. We must add to the inheritance left by our ancestors. If we may make new discoveries and inventions in the phenomenal world, must we declare our bankruptcy in the spiritual domain? Is ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
343:There was a time when academia was society’s refuge for the eccentric, brilliant, and impractical. No longer. It is now the domain of professional self-marketers. As for the eccentric, brilliant, and impractical: it would seem society now has no place for them at all. ~ David Graeber,
344:I could take a cow and implant a camera in it and let it amble around the city or in its own domain (I say a cow because a human being I would not trust). If the camera was programmed to go off at an indeterminate series of moments, the samplings would be fantastic. ~ Frederick Sommer,
345:This is a tricky domain because, unlike simple arithmetic, to solve a calculus problem - and in particular to perform integration - you have to be smart about which integration technique should be used: integration by partial fractions, integration by parts, and so on. ~ Marvin Minsky,
346:Eroticism differs from animal sexuality in that human sexuality is limited by taboos and the domain of eroticism is that of the transgression of these taboos. Desire in eroticism is the desire that triumphs over the taboo. It presupposes man in conflict with himself. ~ Georges Bataille,
347:The whole-system approach isn’t just a bright shiny new model to replace the old ones—it comes closer to reality. Nature doesn’t recognize human-made categories. Body and mind are one domain, and every organ, tissue, and cell works toward the same goal: sustaining life. ~ Deepak Chopra,
348:when you inhabit the domain of alert and affectionate attention, the domain of non-judgmental spaciousness, and simply rest in awareness with no agenda other than to be awake. We adopt this perspective of open presence and acceptance throughout the meditation practice. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
349:It is this mythical, or rather symbolic, content of the religious traditions which is likely to come into conflict with science. This occurs whenever this religious stock of ideas contains dogmatically fixed statements on subjects which belong in the domain of science. ~ Albert Einstein,
350:Most talented developers do not have much interest in learning about the specific domain in which they are working, much less making a major commitment to expand their domain-modeling skills. Technical people enjoy quantifiable problems that exercise their technical skills. ~ Eric Evans,
351:I am as sex-positive as the next perverted bisexual liberal, but I don't think sex-positivity should be solely the domain of any political party or that it means policing others' sexuality or judging it. There's no "better than" or "less than," if that makes sense. ~ Rachel Kramer Bussel,
352:My heart goes out to the Lindsay Lohans and Britneys who have really had childhood taken from them and probably missed important developmental steps. They have become sort of "public domain" and something to be made money on. There's no sense of self there, I'm sure of it. ~ Genie Francis,
353:Some kind of settlement in Kashmir is crucial for both India and Pakistan. It's also tearing India apart with horrible atrocities in the region which is controlled by Indian armed forces. This is feeding right back into society even in the domain of elementary civil rights. ~ Noam Chomsky,
354:The things which the child loves remain in the domain of the heart until old age. The most beautiful thing in life is that our souls remain hovering over the places where we once enjoyed ourselves. I am one of those who remembers those places regardless of distance or time. ~ Khalil Gibran,
355:One theme of what I've been writing has been to get people to understand that "apolitical" means "you lose." It doesn't mean you live a utopian life free of politicians' influence. The destruction of the public domain is the clearest example, but it will only be the first. ~ Lawrence Lessig,
356:these pure concepts have no meaning outside that domain; and all these noumena, together with the intelligible 4 world that they compose, are nothing but the representation of a problem, ·namely the problem or question: What are noumena like? What is the intelligible world like? ~ Anonymous,
357:I didn't say wonderful, I say eminent domain is something you need Chris. Eminent domain - if I build a highway - go ahead. I know exactly what you're saying. But if I build a highway, and if something's in the way of the highway, you're going to have to do something with that. ~ Donald Trump,
358:The United States is more reliant on the technical systems. We're more reliant on the critical infrastructure of the internet than any other nation out there. And when there's such a low barrier to entering the domain of cyber-attacks we're starting a fight that we can't win. ~ Edward Snowden,
359:what we call expertise is really just “vast amounts of knowledge, pattern-based retrieval, and planning mechanisms acquired over many years of experience in the associated domain.” In other words, a great memory isn’t just a by-product of expertise; it is the essence of expertise. ~ Joshua Foer,
360:Please take good care of it all, OK? Be an enlightened monarch who treats your domain with reverent responsibility. And make sure you also enjoy the full measure of fun that comes with such mastery. Glide through life as if all of creation is yearning to honor and entertain you. ~ Rob Brezsny,
361:In the domain of painting and statuary, the present-day credo of the worldly wise, especially in France, is this: ... I believe that art is, and can only be, the exact reproduction of nature... An avenging God has heard the prayers of this multitude; Daguerre was his messiah. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
362:Many scientists think that philosophy has no place, so for me it's a sad time because the role of reflection, contemplation, meditation, self-inquiry, insight, intuition, imagination, creativity, free will, is in a way not given any importance, which is the domain of philosophers. ~ Deepak Chopra,
363:Meditation is the progressive quieting of our mind, until we reach the source of thought, which in wisdom traditions are the realm of our soul and spirit. In this domain of awareness there is infinite creativity, synchronicity, the power of intention, and freedom from limitations. ~ Deepak Chopra,
364:The best-trained part of us, though, is the mouth, it is always obediently and devoutly shut. And it's only too true: an open mouth is a yawning fact, the fact that its owner is dwelling with his few thoughts in some other place than the domain and pleasure-garden of attentiveness. ~ Robert Walser,
365:By extending the idea of natural law to the economic sphere - an inevitable but fundamental error - they (18th century philosophes) both secularized the economy and converted it into a domain external to man: a system of inflexible laws whose constraints permitted no modification. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
366:Enlightened leadership is spiritual if we understand spirituality not as some kind of religious dogma or ideology but as the domain of awareness where we experience values like truth, goodness, beauty, love and compassion, and also intuition, creativity, insight and focused attention. ~ Deepak Chopra,
367:I don't see why ogling same-sex kissing should be the exclusive domain of frat boys whacking off to lesbian action, that's so sexist. Feminism should be all inclusive- it should be about sexual liberation, equal pay for equal work, and the fundamental girl right of boy2boy appreciation. ~ Rachel Cohn,
368:It's my view that gender is culturally formed, but it's also a domain of agency or freedom and that it is most important to resist the violence that is imposed by ideal gender norms, especially against those who are gender different, who are nonconforming in their gender presentation. ~ Judith Butler,
369:Your social value is fluid and changes with the environment you are in—or the environment you create. If you wish to elevate your social value in any given situation, you can do so by redirecting people into a domain where you are in charge. This is easier to do than you might think. Our ~ Oren Klaff,
370:In ancient Egypt the domain of the mysteries of death was attributed to Osiris, and that of life—including language, writing, law and the arts—was attributed to Isis. Thus, Isis was the soul of the civilisation of ancient Egypt, which we are still admiring after more than twenty centuries. ~ Anonymous,
371:We did not find direct evidence that Secretary Clinton’s personal e-mail domain, in its various configurations since 2009, was successfully hacked. But, given the nature of the system and of the actors potentially involved, we assess that we would be unlikely to see such direct evidence. ~ James Comey,
372:On April 1, 1998, I launched Webmaster-Resources.com, and I remember that date specifically because it was the date that the price of a two-year domain name registration dropped from $100 to $70, and considering I was funding this out of my allowance, that $30 made all the difference. ~ Matt Mickiewicz,
373:If this is preparation for life, where in the world, where in the relationship with our colleagues, where in the industrial domain, where ever again, anywhere in life, is a person given this curious sequence of prepared talks and prepared questions, questions to which the answers are known? ~ Edwin Land,
374:Miss N. had taught her nurses to watch carefully in order to understand what the ill required and provide it. Not medicine—that was the doctors’ domain—but the things she argued were equally crucial to recovery: light, air, warmth, cleanliness, rest, comfort, nourishment, and conversation. ~ Emma Donoghue,
375:The more progress physical sciences make, the more they tend to enter the domain of mathematics, which is a kind of centre to which they all converge. We may even judge the degree of perfection to which a science has arrived by the facility with which it may be submitted to calculation. ~ Adolphe Quetelet,
376:The only one that I think I could beat, if my life depended on it, would be the Predator. If it was in my territory, in my domain, with the guns that I've got, I think I could hurt him pretty bad. That's the only one, though. When you get into metaphysical creatures, they don't play fair. ~ Lance Henriksen,
377:As Razam so aptly demonstrates, a new kind of traveler is emerging-one that embarks into the mysterious and uncharted domain within, where they aim to conquer their own hearts. Written in the tradition of a great adventure narrative, Aya Awakenings is a timely story for a new emerging era. ~ Yossi Ghinsberg,
378:I read what I'd written and thought once again: from what violent chasms is my most intimate intimacy nourished, why does it deny itself so much and flee to the domain of ideas? I feel within me a subterranean violence, a violence that only comes to the surface during the act of writing. ~ Clarice Lispector,
379:Midgard, realm of the humans; the elf kingdom of Alfheim; Vanaheim, the Vanir gods’ domain; Jotunheim, land of the giants; Niflheim, the world of ice, fog and mist; Helheim, realm of the dishonourable dead; Nidavellir, the gloomy world of the dwarves; and Muspellheim, home of the fire giants. ~ Rick Riordan,
380:To want a job that exercises a man's capacities in an enterprise useful to society, is utopian anarcho-syndicalism; it is labor invading the domain of management. No labor leader has entertained such a thought in our generation. Management has the "sole prerogative" to determine the products. ~ Paul Goodman,
381:For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary. Religion, on the other hand, deals only with evaluations of human thought and action: it cannot justifiably speak of facts and relationships between facts. ~ Albert Einstein,
382:Thank you to the friends I laughed with and leaned on at various times while writing this book, and whose domain expertise I occasionally abused for story “research,” including Joy Somberg, Misha Wright, Ammie Hwang, Maya Rock, Jonathan Tze, Nina Hein, Ana Martínez, David Petersen, and Pia Wilson. ~ Mia Alvar,
383:Often misunderstood, Dionysus is far more than a wine deity. He is the Breaker of Chains, who rescues not only the flesh but the heart and spirit from too much of worldly regulations and duties. He is a god of joy and freedom. Any uncultivated, tangled, and primal woodland is very much his domain. ~ Tanith Lee,
384:Wilson, like his contemporary Max Weber, distinguished between politics and administration. Politics, he argued, was a domain of final ends, subject to democratic contestation, but administration was a realm of implementation, which could be studied empirically and subjected to scientific analysis. ~ Anonymous,
385:Like an inspired and prolific poet, who never refuses to spread beauty to the humblest places, which until now did not seem to share the domain of art, the sun still warmed the bountiful energy of the dung heap, of the unevenly paved yard, and of the pear tree worn down like an old serving maid. ~ Marcel Proust,
386:State interference in social relations becomes, in one domain after another, superfluous, and then dies out of itself; the government of persons is replaced by the administration of things, and by the conduct of processes of production.

Quoted in The Situationists and the City, pg. 194 ~ Friedrich Engels,
387:Does the human being reason? No; he thinks, muses, reflects, but does not reason...that is, in the two things which are the peculiar domain of the heart, not the mind, politics and religion. He doesn't want to know the other side. He wants arguments and statistics for his own side, and nothing more. ~ Mark Twain,
388:Factual truth is always related to other people: it concerns events and circumstances in which many are involved; it is established by witnesses and depends upon testimony; it exists only to the extent that it is spoken about, even if it occurs in the domain of privacy. It is political by nature. ~ Hannah Arendt,
389:Scientists have power by virtue of the respect commanded by the discipline... We live with poets and politicians, preachers and philosophers. All have their ways of knowing, and all are valid in their proper domain. The world is too complex and interesting for one way to hold all the answers. ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
390:Anger is precious. A silverback uses his anger to maintain order and warn his troop of danger. When my father beat his chest, it was to say, Beware, listen, I am in charge. I am angry to protect you, because that is what I was born to do.

Here in my domain, there is no one to protect. ~ Katherine Applegate,
391:Your memories are eroding away. The futures you anticipate, will mostly not come to pass, and the real richness is in the moment. And it's not necessarily some kind of 'Be Here Now' feel-good thing because it doesn't always feel good. But it always feels. It is a domain of feeling. It's primary. ~ Terence McKenna,
392:Whether or not experience inevitably led to expertise, they agreed, depended entirely on the domain in question. Narrow experience made for better chess and poker players and firefighters, but not for better predictors of financial or political trends, or of how employees or patients would perform. ~ David Epstein,
393:Hitherto, no rival hypothesis has been proposed as a substitute for the doctrine of transmutation; for 'independent creation,' as it is often termed, or the direct intervention of the Supreme Cause, must simply be considered as an avowal that we deem the question to lie beyond the domain of science. ~ Charles Lyell,
394:In the laboratory there are no fustian ranks, no brummagem aristocracies; the domain of Science is a republic, and all its citizens are brothers and equals, its princes of Monaco and its stonemasons of Cromarty meeting, barren of man-made gauds and meretricious decorations, upon the one majestic level! ~ Mark Twain,
395:It is said that scattered through Despair's domain are a multitude of tiny windows, hanging in the void. Each window looks out onto a different scene, being, in our world, a mirror. Sometimes you will look into a mirror and feel the eyes of Despair upon you, feel her hook catch and snag on your heart. ~ Neil Gaiman,
396:LSD burst over the dreary domain of the constipated bourgeoisie like the angelic herald of a new psychedelic millennium. We have never been the same since, nor will we ever be, for LSD demonstrated, even to skeptics, that the mansions of heaven and gardens of paradise lie within each and all of us. ~ Terence McKenna,
397:According to Ericsson, what we call expertise is really just “vast amounts of knowledge, pattern-based retrieval, and planning mechanisms acquired over many years of experience in the associated domain.” In other words, a great memory isn’t just a by-product of expertise; it is the essence of expertise. ~ Joshua Foer,
398:finance was to become a public utility, situated in the public domain or at least alongside a public banking option. Instead, the past century’s expansion of predatory credit has been reinforced by de-taxing interest, land rent, financial speculation, debt leveraging and “capital” (asset-price) gains. ~ Michael Hudson,
399:The interrelationship of the self-organization dynamics of material and energetic processes from chemistry through biology to sociobiology and beyond seems to point to the existence of a general dynamic system theory which is valid in a very wide domain of natural systems. ~ Erich Jantsch, The Self-Organizing Universe,
400:Listen to the language the domain experts use. Are there terms that succinctly state something complicated? Are they correcting your word choice (perhaps diplomatically)? Do the puzzled looks on their faces go away when you use a particular phrase? These are hints of a concept that might benefit the model. ~ Eric Evans,
401:In the domain of Political Economy, free scientific inquiry meets not merely the same enemies as in all other domains. The peculiar nature of the material it deals with, summons as foes into the field of battle the most violent, mean and malignant passions of the human breast, the Furies of private interest. ~ Karl Marx,
402:By keenly confronting the enigmas that surround us, and by considering and analyzing the observations that I had made, I ended up in the domain of mathematics. Although I am absolutely without training in the exact sciences, I often seem to have more in common with mathematicians than with my fellow artists. ~ M C Escher,
403:The majority of parents are poor psychologists and give their children the most questionable moral trainings. It is perhaps in this domain that one realized most how keenly how immoral it can be to believe too much in morality, and how much more precious is a little humanity than all the rules in the world. ~ Jean Piaget,
404:Any phrase that suggests play is this domain that's the opposite of work, or the thing that you do when you're done working, should trouble us. Because it means that play is always relegated to the exhaust of life. It's the thing that you do after you do the important stuff, it's what you do on your own time. ~ Ian Bogost,
405:In sum, no matter the domain, the highly successful had a kind of ferocious determination that played out in two ways. First, these exemplars were unusually resilient and hardworking. Second, they knew in a very, very deep way what it was they wanted. They not only had determination, they had direction. ~ Angela Duckworth,
406:I will stress once again that we do not know the source from which the UFOs or the alien beings come whether or not, for example, they originate in the physical universe as modern astrophysics has described it). But they manifest in the physical world and bring about definable consequences in that domain. ~ Jacques Vallee,
407:Norman Mailer described the desire to be cool as a "decision to encourage the psychopath in oneself, to explore that domain of experience where security is boredom and therefore sickness and one exists in the present, in that enormous present which is without past or future, memory or planned intention. ~ Anthony Bourdain,
408:Norman Mailer described the desire to be cool as a “decision to encourage the psychopath in oneself, to explore that domain of experience where security is boredom and therefore sickness and one exists in the present, in that enormous present which is without past or future, memory or planned intention. ~ Anthony Bourdain,
409:The felt presence of immediate experience is the defining phenomenon of being. If you can’t reach it, you are in trouble. You need some kind of help—psychedelics, therapy, loving kindness. Something. And if you can reach it, then you have contacted the authentic domain of being. ~ Terence McKenna, Appreciating Imagination,
410:Each solstice is a domain of experience unto itself. At the Summer Solstice, all is green and growing, potential coming into being, the miracle of manifestation painted large on the canvas of awareness. At the Winter Solstice, the wind is cold, trees are bare and all lies in stillness beneath blankets of snow. ~ Gary Zukav,
411:It is our view,” said Slant, turning his chair slightly so that he did not have to look at Vimes, “that the new land is ours by Eminent Domain, Extra-Territoriality and, most importantly, Acquiris Quodcumque Rapis. I am given to understand that it was one of our fishermen who first set foot on it this time. ~ Terry Pratchett,
412:According to legend, Path Kethona was first visited by Forerunners during our greatest period of exploration, over ten million years ago. Yet there was substantial doubt that voyage had ever happened. Records had long ago vanished. Not even Haruspis, entrusted with studying the Domain, could access those memories. ~ Greg Bear,
413:Just let the Pope tell us that our Western middle-class need for uninhibited sexual self-expression is less important to him and the church than the poor of Latin America, and some of our brightest academic ethicists shall attempt to relegate him to the domain of those who are out of it, behind the times. ~ William H Willimon,
414:There are now, to the delight of parasitical writers like me, what I might almost call “public domain” plot items. There are dragons, and magic users, and far horizons, and quests, and items of power, and weird cities. There’s the kind of scenery that we would have had on earth if only God had had the money. ~ Terry Pratchett,
415:Scientists actively approach the door to knowledge—the boundary of the domain of what we know. We question and explore and we change our views when facts and logic force us to do so. We are confident only in what we can verify through experiments or in what we can deduce from experimentally confirmed hypotheses. ~ Lisa Randall,
416:'Freeing' a literary work into the public domain is less a public benefit than a transfer of wealth from the families of American writers to the executives and stockholders of various businesses who will continue to profit from, for example, 'The Garden Party,' while the descendants of Katherine Mansfield will not. ~ Mark Helprin,
417:It is the dissenter, the theorist, the aspirant, who is quitting this ancient domain to embark on seas of adventure, who engages our interest. Omitting then for the present all notice of the stationary class, we shall find that the movement party divides itself into two classes, the actors, and the students. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
418:A living being is tender and flexible;
a corpse is hard and stiff.
It is the same with everything—
leaves and grasses are tender and delicate,
but when they die they become rigid and dry. Those who are hard and inflexible
belong to death’s domain;
but the gentle and flexible
belong to life. ~ Lao Tzu,
419:The great soul of power extends far beyond states, to every domain of life, from families to international affairs. And throughout, every form of authority and domination bears a severe burden of proof. It is not self-legitimizing. And when it cannot bear the burden, as is commonly the case, it should be dismantled. ~ Noam Chomsky,
420:Colossians 1:10–14 and “walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God. . . . He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins. ~ Mark Driscoll,
421:In the West, when all of these reactors, nuclear reactors, are matters...part of the public domain, there are all kinds of supervision over them. We see that the ecological movement, environmentalist movement, organizes all kinds of demonstrations against these. They lie on railroads, they tie themselves to the gates. ~ Akbar Ganji,
422:The only way to get these fruitless efforts to be completely abandoned is to •show clearly that they are impossible, and to allow reason’s knowledge of itself to become a true science in ·terms of· which the domain of reason’s right use is distinguished with mathematical certainty from that of its worthless and idle use ~ Anonymous,
423:Without metaphor the handling of general concepts such as culture and civilization becomes impossible, and that of disease and disorder is the obvious one for the case in point. Is not crisis itself a concept we owe to Hippocrates? In the social and cultural domain no metaphor is more apt than the pathological one. ~ Johan Huizinga,
424:A hallmark of petty tyrants—including many Rule Nazis—is that their power over a narrow domain is coupled with low prestige; they simmer and sulk about the lack of respect they get. This mix of power and low social status creates a deadly brew—it provokes them to take out their frustration and resentment on others. ~ Robert I Sutton,
425:He smiled and scrawled something at the bottom of the answer sheet. The solution now read:
Find X if (X)=2sin3X, over the domain -2πX= Beth
Stop goofing around! I said.

I'm not I'm stating a truth your my solution to everything. Xavier replied. The end result is always you. X always equals Beth. ~ Alexandra Adornetto,
426:Hope is easy; knowledge is hard. Science is the one domain in which we human beings make a truly heroic effort to counter our innate biases and wishful thinking. Science is the one endeavor in which we have developed a refined methodology for separating what a person hopes is true from what he has good reason to believe. ~ Sam Harris,
427:It’s important that someone celebrate our existence," she objected amiably. "People are the only mirror we have to see ourselves in. The domain of all meaning. All virtue, all evil, are contained only in people. There is none in the universe at large. Solitary confinement is a punishment in every human culture. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
428:Where is the peace in more is better? This idea keeps us exclusively in the physical domain. You can replace the more is better belief with an inner serenity that doesn't need more to be acceptable. There is no peace in more is better, and if it doesn't being peace to your life, then it's something you want to discard. ~ Wayne Dyer,
429:No theory ever agrees with all the facts in its domain, yet it is not always the theory that is to blame. Facts are constituted by older ideologies, and a clash between facts and theories may be proof of progress. It is also a first step in our attempt to find the principles implicit in familiar observational notions. ~ Paul Feyerabend,
430:Our public officials have forgotten that they are ultimately accountable to the people who put them in office, that the information they keep in secrecy belongs to all of us. Julian Assange took a courageous step by rightfully returning what belongs to the public domain. For that reason, I believe we need to stand behind him. ~ Yoko Ono,
431:the “law” of the struggle for existence that Darwin observed in the domain of biology will one day cede its place to the law of cooperation for existence which exists already in the cooperation of flowering plants and bees, in the cooperation of different cells in an organism, and in cooperation in the human social organism. ~ Anonymous,
432:What is called for is not an integration of thought, or a kind of imposed unity, for any such imposed point of view would itself be merely another fragment. Rather, all our different ways of thinking are to be considered as different ways of looking at the one reality, each with some domain in which it is clear and adequate. ~ David Bohm,
433:If I could, I'd deliver you from old age and death, from aches and pains, from the blandishments of ghosts, from the torment of your familiar, Goblin. I'd deliver you from heat and cold and from the arid dullness of the noonday sub. I'd deliver you into the placid light of the moon and into the domain of the Milky Way forever. ~ Anne Rice,
434:The reading occupied the attention that she had formerly given to gossip about sweethearts and the experimental retreats that she would go through with her girl friends, not because it was imposed as discipline but because she had lost all interest by then in talking about mysteries that were in the public domain. ~ Gabriel Garc a M rquez,
435:The world is very complicated and it is clearly impossible for the human mind to understand it completely. Man has therefore devised an artifice which permits the complicated nature of the world to be blamed on something which is called accidental and thus permits him to abstract a domain in which simple laws can be found. ~ Eugene Wigner,
436:The full impact of the Lobachevskian method of challenging axioms has probably yet to be felt. It is no exaggeration to call Lobachevsky the Copernicus of Geometry [as did Clifford], for geometry is only a part of the vaster domain which he renovated; it might even be just to designate him as a Copernicus of all thought. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
437:UPS are replacing fixed daily routes with dynamic ones adjusted in real time for weather and traffic—again with machine learning. Only cognitive technologies can handle all the necessary data. And at some point supply chains may be powered by autonomously driven trucks, which will bring enormous changes to that domain. ~ Thomas H Davenport,
438:For scholars, these three domains; lived-experiences, creative depictions of life situations, and individual or audience responses to these works, have a dynamic quality that involves an element of “interanimation.” In other words, understanding the processes associated with one domain facilitates an understanding of the others. ~ Anonymous,
439:person also needs access to a domain. This depends to a great extent on luck. Being born to an affluent family, or close to good schools, mentors, and coaches obviously is a great advantage. It does no good to be extremely intelligent and curious if I cannot learn what it takes to operate in a given symbolic system. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
440:It seemed to me that transhumanism was an expression of the profound human longing to transcend the confusion and desire and impotence and sickness of the body, cowering in the darkening shadow of its own decay. This longing had historically been the domain of religion, and was now the increasingly fertile terrain of technology. ~ Mark O Connell,
441:The theory of the transference of the collective will of the people to historic persons may perhaps explain much in the domain of jurisprudence and be essential for its purposes, but in its application to history, as soon as revolutions, conquests, or civil wars occur—that is, as soon as history begins—that theory explains nothing. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
442:In the last chapter, I discussed how other animals might have domain-specific forms of consciousness, and in the case of nonhuman primates, domain-independent forms of nonverbal consciousness, but how only humans have verbal working memory, and thus language-based consciousness and the mental frills that language makes possible. ~ Joseph E LeDoux,
443:Elsa's mother no longer spoke to her of men and love, but of duty and fate and accepting one’s burden. As far as Elsa could tell, if love really was the inherited female domain, then women were saddled with the biggest burden of all. It was pressing down upon them, the way the sea pressed down upon the creatures of the deep. ~ Kathy Diane Leveille,
444:For reasons that are both fair and foul - but mostly for fair reasons - we have come under the domain of a scientific-management system whose ambitions are endless. They want to manage every second of our lives, every expenditure that we make. And the schools are the training ground to create a population that's easy to manage. ~ John Taylor Gatto,
445:A trader who expects to be given a million-dollar bonus, and who further expects everyone else on his trading desk to be given million-dollar bonuses, will not maintain the same reference point if he learns that everyone else just received two million dollars. If he is then paid a million dollars, he is back in the domain of losses. ~ Michael Lewis,
446:In popular culture love is always the stuff of fantasy. Maybe this is why men have done most of the theorizing about love. Fantasy has primarily been their domain, both in the sphere of cultural production and in everyday life. Male fantasy is seen as something that can create reality, whereas female fantasy is regarded as pure escape. ~ bell hooks,
447:I think that the design process—whatever that means—must become conscious, global, integrated. The entire human domain (which means the entire planet and its surrounding near space) should be enclosed and included in a coherent plan driven by human values and a thirst for transformational beauty. ~ Terence McKenna, Dreaming Awake at the End of Time,
448:To say it again: it is the greatest temptation of the rational faculty to glorify its own capacity and its own productions and to claim that in the face of its theories nothing transcendent or outside its domain need exist. This means that all important facts have been discovered. This means that nothing important remains unknown. ~ Jordan Peterson,
449:Only when he has published his ideas and findings has the scientist made his contribution, and only when he has thus made it part of the public domain of scholarship can he truly lay claim to it as his own. For his claim resides only in the recognition accorded by peers in the social system of science through reference to his work. ~ Robert K Merton,
450:In mathematical quarters, the regular division of the plane has been considered theoretically. ... [Mathematicians] have opened the gate leading to an extensive domain, but they have not entered this domain themselves. By their very nature they are more interested in the way in which the gate is opened than in the garden lying behind it. ~ M C Escher,
451:Photography has arrived at the point where it is capable of liberating painting from all literature, from the anecdote, and even from the subject. In any case, a certain aspect of the subject now belongs to the domain of photography. So shouldn't painters profit from their newly acquired liberty, and make use of it to do other things? ~ Pablo Picasso,
452:To say it again: it is the greatest temptation of the rational faculty to glorify its own capacity and its own productions and to claim that in the face of its theories nothing transcendent or outside its domain need exist. This means that all important facts have been discovered. This means that nothing important remains unknown. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
453:A government, to afford the needful protection and exercise proper care for the welfare of a people, must have homogeneity in its constituents. It is this necessity which has divided the human race into separate nations, and finally has defeated the grandest efforts which conquerors have made to give unlimited extent to their domain. ~ Jefferson Davis,
454:It is said that scattered through Despair's domain are a multitude of tiny windows, hanging in the void. Each window looks out onto a different scene, being, in our world, a mirror. Sometimes you will look into a mirror and feel the eyes of Despair upon you, feel her hook catch and snag on your heart. Despair says little, and is patient. ~ Neil Gaiman,
455:One does not avoid incompetence if one makes an attempt whose likelihood of success is too low. This seems little more than analytic: when the performance is in a domain that imposes standards of risk, attempts may or may not meet such standards. And the relevant competence of agents then includes reliably enough meeting those standards. ~ Ernest Sosa,
456:The French have such an attractive civilization, dedicated to calm pleasures and general tolerance, and their taste in every domain is so sharp, so sure, that the foreigner (especially someone from chaotic, confused America) is quickly seduced into believing that if he can only become a Parisian he will at last master the art of living. ~ Edmund White,
457:The goddess Artemis had a twin brother, Apollo, the many-faceted god of the Sun. He was her male counterpart: his domain was the city, hers the wilderness; his was the sun, hers the moon; his the domesticated flocks, hers the wild, untamed animals; he was the god of music, she was the inspiration for round dances on the mountains. ~ Jean Shinoda Bolen,
458:I felt more and more ill at ease: people had often spoken to me about show business, media projects, and micro-sociology; but art, never, and I was filled with the presentiment of something novel, dangerous, and probably fatal, from a domain where there was — a bit like in love — almost nothing to win and almost everything to lose. ~ Michel Houellebecq,
459:One of the great challenges in reconstructing a mass extinction is making sense of what happened when. In the same way we have divided living things into a hierarchy of divisions—domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species—geologists have broken apart the long history of our planet into eon, era, period, epoch, and age. ~ Bill Nye,
460:Should one in boldness say, Lo, I am God!
Besides the One--Eternal--Infinite,
Then let him from the throne he has usurped
Put forth his power and form another globe,
Such as we dwell in, saying, This is mine.
Nor only so, but in this new domain
For ever let him dwell. if this he can,
Then verily he is a god proclaimed. ~ Pythagoras,
461:The seeker will discover himself with new eyes, a new understanding, a new heart and a new soul, and with them he shall see the evident signs of the world and the obscure secrets of the soul, and he will understand that in the least object there is found a door by which one enters into the domain of self-evidence, certitude and conviction. ~ Baha-ullah,
462:Why can’t I take you? Why is it so hard? You have the other half of my soul; with you I will be complete! So. Then. Why?” Crispin murmured clenching his fists.
Oh, he pitied the fool who would be in his way once he returned to his domain.
“Oh, what suffering will befall them in her place,” he smiled wickedly.

~Crispin~ ~ J L Clayton,
463:While the DFT is limited to computing points in the frequency domain over the full unit circle, the FRFT evaluates a set of equispaced points on the frequency domain over a fraction of this range, determined by , as shown in Fig.2ab. The FRFT can be centered about ! = 0 by pre-multiplying the input vector by a phase ramp, which we denote as C ~ Anonymous,
464:Poetry and code - and mathematics - make us read differently from other forms of writing. Written poetry makes the silent reader read three kinds of pattern at once; code moves the reader from a static to an active, interactive and looped domain; while algebraic topology allows us to read qualitative forms and their transformations. ~ Stephanie Strickland,
465:She swayed all the way around the kitchen, touring what had been her domain as clods fell from the skirt of her dress (there was no sign of the quilt or the counterpane) and her head bobbed and rolled on her cut throat. Once it tilted back all the way to her shoulder blades before snapping forward again with a low and fleshy smacking sound. ~ Stephen King,
466:Thus there is not a grievance in the nation for which the government does not voluntarily make itself responsible. Is it surprising, then, that every failure increases the threat of another revolution in France? And what remedy is proposed for this? To extend indefinitely the domain of the law; that is, the responsibility of government. ~ Fr d ric Bastiat,
467:The secular” must not be thought of as the space in which real human life gradually emancipates itself from the controlling power of “religion” and thus achieves the latter’s relocation. It is this assumption that allows us to think of religion as “infecting” the secular domain or as replicating within it the structure of theological concepts. ~ Talal Asad,
468:Bob Rubin Trade: payoff in a skewed domain where the benefits are visible (and rewarded with some compensation) and the detriment is rare (and unpunished owing to absence of skin in the game). Can be generalized to politics, anything where the penalty is weak and the victims are abstract and distributed (say taxpayers or shareholders). ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
469:Without being aware of it and without being rigorously systematic about it, we exclude the Subject of Cognizance from the domain of nature that we endeavour to understand. We step with our own person back into the part of an onlooker who does not belong to the world, which by this very procedure becomes an objective world. ~ Erwin Schrödinger, Mind and Matter,
470:My companions could make observations. Sloane could generate relevant statistics. If there'd been witness testimony, Michael could have told us who was exhibiting signs of guilt. But here, now, looking at the pictures, this was my domain. I would have to backtrack to explain how I knew, to figure out how I knew -- but I was certain. ~ Jennifer Lynn Barnes,
471:Therefore internal debates and bickering continue and inevitably flow into the public domain, confounding the existing confusion. Rajiv Gandhi had once said that intelligence organisations could not be treated like the rest of the bureaucracy. It is time the government settled these issues once and for all—who better to do it than Prime Minister Modi. ~ A S Dulat,
472:Labor, with its coarse raiment and its bare right arm, has gone forth in the earth, achieving the truest conquests and rearing the most durable monuments. It has opened the domain of matter and the empire of the mind. The wild beast has fled before it, and the wilderness has fallen back.... its triumphal march is the progress of civilization. ~ Edwin Hubbel Chapin,
473:Thus is order ensured: some have to play the game because they cannot otherwise live, and those who could live otherwise are kept out because they do not want to play the game. It is as if the class from which independent intellectuals have defected takes its revenge, by pressing its demands home in the very domain where the deserter seeks refuge. ~ Theodor Adorno,
474:Under the notion that unregulated market-driven values and relations should shape every domain of human life, the business model of governance has eviscerated any viable notion of social responsibility while furthering the criminalization of social problems and cutbacks in basic social services, especially for the poor, young people and the elderly. ~ Henry Giroux,
475:Leadership exists when people are no longer victims of circumstances but participate in creating new circumstances. Leadership is about creating a domain in which human beings continually deepen their understanding of reality and become more capable of participating in the unfolding of the world. Ultimately, leadership is about creating new realities. ~ Peter Senge,
476:In the spiritual domain, criticism is love turned sour. In a wholesome spiritual life there is no room for criticism. The critical faculty is an intellectual one, not a moral one. If criticism becomes a habit it will destroy the moral energy of the life and paralyse spiritual force. The only person who can criticise human beings is the Holy Spirit. ~ Oswald Chambers,
477:Psychiatry is NOT Science, it is just a game like Gematria. It is induced and applied by man and only exists in his domain while he remains alive. Since man is NO god, he possesses NOT the power over his mechanics – including Psychology, and hence, his Biology is subjugated to the Laws of Science as an exterior influence whether he likes it or not. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
478:Thus is order ensured: some have to play the game because they cannot otherwise live, and those who could live otherwise are kept out because they do not want to play the game. It is as if the class from which independent intellectuals have defected takes its revenge, by pressing its demands home in the very domain where the deserter seeks refuge. ~ Theodor W Adorno,
479:Subjection, even when it is happy, consists fundamentally in locking employees in a restricted domain of enjoyment. The whole purpose of epithumogenic work is to orient the conatus of enlistees, by reconfiguring their imaginary and inducing joyful affects, towards narrowly defined objects that trace for it a new, well-determined perimeter of the desirable. ~ Anonymous,
480:When a significant process or transformation in the domain is not a natural responsibility of an ENTITY or VALUE OBJECT, add an operation to the model as a standalone interface declared as a SERVICE. Define the interface in terms of the language of the model and make sure the operation name is part of the UBIQUITOUS LAN- GUAGE. Make the SERVICE stateless. ~ Eric Evans,
481:The soul is that part of us that is immortal. It existed before the personality was born and it will exist after the personality is gone. The personality is an energy tool of the soul that is temporary. Through it we learn in this domain of the five senses. We learn through what we create and the impact that it has on us. This process is becoming conscious. ~ Gary Zukav,
482:It seems counterintuitive that more choice leads to more depression. However, when we increase people's opportunities for control, we increase their expectations of control and their sense of responsibility for failure. When we have more choices in every domain, we must spend more time researching choices and negotiating these decisions with family members. ~ Mary Pipher,
483:When you want to get good at something, how you spend your time practicing is far more important than the amount of time you spend. In fact, in every domain of expertise that’s been rigorously examined, from chess to violin to basketball, studies have found that the number of years one has been doing something correlates only weakly with level of performance ~ Joshua Foer,
484:The vice named surrealism is the immoderate and impassioned use of the stupefacient image or rather of the uncontrolled provocation of the image for its own sake and for the element of unpredictable perturbation and of metamorphosis which it introduces into the domain of representation; for each image on each occasion forces you to revise the entire Universe. ~ Louis Aragon,
485:What is absolutely true is that any good [Television] series has a specific voice. And I think that voice is almost exclusively the domain of the executive producer. . . . As a staff writer you're not being called upon to be the great creative person. You're sort of called upon to understand the characters and their voices and put them through certain paces. ~ Howard Gordon,
486:Since it is sure of its ability to control the entire domain of the visible and the audible via the laws governing commercial circulation and democratic communication, Empire no longer censures anything. All art, and all thought, is ruined when we accept this permission to consume, to communicate and to enjoy. We should become the pitiless censors of ourselves. ~ Alain Badiou,
487:And my Black bird, still not quitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On that pallid bust -- still flitting through my dolorous domain;
But it cannot stop from gazing for it truly finds amazing
That, by artful paraphrasing, I such rhyming can sustain--
Notwithstanding my lost symbol I such rhyming still sustain--
Though I shan't try it again! ~ Gilbert Adair,
488:...beyond observing that some law of logic should fix the number of coincidences, in a given domain, after which they cease to be coincidences, and form, instead, the living organism of a new truth (“Tell me,” says Osberg’s little glitana to the Moors, El Motela and Ramera, “what is the precise minimum of hairs on a body that allows one to call it ‘hairy’?”) ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
489:Why can’t I take you? Why is it so hard? You have the other half of my soul; with you I will be complete! So. Then. Why?” Crispin murmured clenching his fists.
Oh, he pitied the fool who would be in his way once he returned to his domain.
“Oh, what suffering will befall them in her place,” he smiled wickedly.

~ J L ClaytonCrispin~ J L Clayton ~ J L Clayton,
490:We know that modern art tends to realise these conditions: in this sense it becomes a veritable theatre of metamorphoses and permutations. A theatre where nothing is fixed, a labyrinth without a thread (Ariadne has hung herself). The work of art leaves the domain of representation in order to become 'experience', transcendental empiricism or science of the sensible. ~ Anonymous,
491:the demands of the scientific method. Before his colleagues would allow him to put a scientific paper into the public domain, they tore into his ideas, challenging his premises, doubting his methods and questioning his ability. It never occurred to Singh that he could sue a critic of his work, even if the criticism was damaging to his reputation or wholly misguided. ~ Nick Cohen,
492:Jude 6-7 And angels who did not keep their own domain, but abandoned their proper abode, he has kept in eternal chains under gloomy darkness until the judgment of the great day— just as Sodom and Gomorrah and the surrounding cities, which likewise indulged in gross immorality and pursued strange flesh, serve as an example by undergoing a punishment of eternal fire. ~ Brian Godawa,
493:Moreover it is becoming the Britons, whether scientific or unscientific, who boast at all fitting occasions of their aptitude to rule the waves, should know something of the population of their saline empire, especially of those parts of it immediately in contact with their terrestrial domain, and the coasts of the Continent to which our United Kingdom appertains. ~ Edward Forbes,
494:Each soul has it's own path. Children are young personalities but they are not always young souls. Incarnation into the domain of the five senses is a dramatic act of spiritual responsibility. Neonates are great souls and so I honor their paths. I do the best that I can, but the best that I can do is to change myself. To make myself a citizen like I want others to be. ~ Gary Zukav,
495:I like filmmakers that try to touch upon the metaphysical, the things that are behind all this, that you can't actually physically interact with, but are somehow intuitively there. Maybe you can see the ashes of that fire or the echoes of something happening on a domain not-here, whether that be coincidence, whether that be familiarity with somebody who's a stranger. ~ Mike Cahill,
496:With me throwing in the name of Ishmael into the alternative domain, I expect each of the contributors in this field to put his/her house in order as a reaction to my assertions rather than dismissing my observation as impulsive. If my work sounds preposterous, then there would be no need to give it any consideration since the truth will sooner or later erase it. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
497:In April 2013, a few weeks before DSM-V was formally released, NIMH director Thomas Insel announced that his agency could no longer support DSM’s “symptom-based diagnosis.”32 Instead the institute would focus its funding on what are called Research Domain Criteria (RDoC)33 to create a framework for studies that would cut across current diagnostic categories. ~ Bessel A van der Kolk,
498:The attempt to apply rational arithmetic to a problem in geometry resulted in the first crisis in the history of mathematics. The two relatively simple problems -- the determination of the diagonal of a square and that of the circumference of a circle -- revealed the existence of new mathematical beings for which no place could be found within the rational domain. ~ David van Dantzig,
499:Even thought this is a remarkable story [The danish Girl] and these are two fascinating people in their own right, Lili's story had been in the public domain but this had somehow slipped out of sight. It seemed bizarre then but I couldn't have imagined releasing the film in a climate like today around trans issues and the comfort people have about it in the public eye. ~ Lucinda Coxon,
500:The early parent-child environment, the balance between being and doing, lives on in the mind. Mindfulness offers an opportunity to see these patterns clearly. In seeing them, in bringing them into the domain of reflective self-awareness, there is a possibility of emerging from their constraints. Choice emerges where before there was only blind and conditioned behavior. ~ Mark Epstein,
501:For in me there have always been two fools, among others, one asking nothing better than to stay where he is and the other imagining that life might be slightly less horrible a little further on. So that I was never disappointed, so to speak, whatever I did, in this domain. And these inseparable fools I indulged turn about, that they might understand their foolishness. ~ Samuel Beckett,
502:I'm saying that the domain of poetry includes both oral & written forms, that poetry goes back to a pre-literate situation & would survive a post-literate situation, that human speech is a near-endless source of poetic forms, that there has always been more oral than written poetry, & that we can no longer pretend to a knowledge of poetry if we deny its oral dimension. ~ Jerome Rothenberg,
503:Ooo, ooo, ooo, the Simi finally knows an answer! It in that scary, scary room, in that scary temple in the lowest level of Hades’s domain. Least it used to be and I doubts anybody’s moved it ’cause that ugly, snarly dogs thing with all them heads gets really nasty whenever someone goes down there. And them dragons and snake-headed people not real happy ’bout it neither. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
504:Evolution, or order of process, is more than just a paradigm for the biological domain; it is a view of how a totality that hangs together in all of its interactive processes moves. This dynamic totality spans a vast spectrum from subatomic processes to social and further on to noetic (mental and psychic) processes. ~ Erich Jantsch, Evolution and Consciousness - Human Systems in Transition,
505:When you type an address in your web browser, a group of servers called domain name servers (DNS) match the address to an IP in their database, and send you to the right place. If you typed the IP into your browser’s address bar instead, you’d actually end up in the exact same place without the routing: 74.125.139.100 opens Google.com, 17.149.160.49 opens Apple.com, and so on. ~ A G Riddle,
506:The great mathematician fully, almost ruthlessly, exploits the domain of permissible reasoning and skirts the impermissible. That his recklessness does not lead him into a morass of contradictions is a miracle in itself: certainly it is hard to believe that our reasoning power was brought, by Darwin's process of natural selection, to the perfection which it seems to possess. ~ Eugene Wigner,
507:Librarians are hot. They have knowledge and power over their domain...It is no coincidence how many librarians are portrayed as having a passionate interior, hidden by a cool layer of reserve. Aren't books like that? On the shelf, their calm covers belie the intense experience of reading one. Reading inflames the soul. Now, what sort of person would be the keeper of such books? ~ Holly Black,
508:When I write what publishers call 'fantasy' I am writing in what I think is the most important tradition of fiction: starting with Homer and up through Shakespeare and Milton, the most important themes to tackle are those of the mythopoeic domain, tales of the body and mind seen through a temperament and a cosmos divorced from current reality so what is said can be more clear. ~ Janet Morris,
509:I have a piano in my living room that I mess around on a little bit and when I asked Len if I could find a piece of music, I went through a **** load of classical music to find something that I felt had a certain urgency to it, but also with a hint of melancholia and maybe a sense of longing. I found that which is public domain and I had a piano teacher to go through it with me. ~ Colin Farrell,
510:In the seventy years since von Neumann effectively placed his “Draft Report” on the EDVAC into the public domain, the trend for computers has been, with a few notable exceptions, toward a more proprietary approach. In 2011 a milestone was reached: Apple and Google spent more on lawsuits and payments involving patents than they did on research and development of new products.64 ~ Walter Isaacson,
511:One other specific piece of guidance we've offered is that low-quality content on some parts of a website can impact the whole site’s rankings, and thus removing low quality pages, merging or improving the content of individual shallow pages into more useful pages, or moving low quality pages to a different domain could eventually help the rankings of your higher-quality content. ~ Amit Singhal,
512:when he has to risk everything on his leap, and in the spiritual domain Jesus Christ demands that you risk everything you hold by common sense and leap into what He says. . . . Trust entirely in God, and when He brings you to the venture, see that you take it. We act like pagans in a crisis, only one out of a crowd is daring enough to bank his faith in the character of God.2 ~ Charles R Swindoll,
513:I was struck by the absence, even among very young boys and girls, of any interior motivation; they were incapable of thinking, of inventing, of imagining, of choosing, of deciding for themselves; this incapacity was expressed by their conformism; in every domain of life they employed only the abstract measure of money, because they were unable to trust to their own judgment. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
514:Comparing the three domains, I found that for jobs of all kinds, emotional competencies were twice as prevalent among distinguishing competencies as were technical skills and purely cognitive abilities combined. In general the higher a position in an organization, the more EI mattered: for individuals in leadership positions, 85 percent of their competencies were in the EI domain. ~ Daniel Goleman,
515:May you be strengthened with all power, according to his glorious might, for all endurance and patience with joy, 12† giving thanks[4] to the Father, who has qualified you[5] to share in the inheritance of the saints in light. 13†He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, 14† in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins. ~ Anonymous,
516:The review and clean-up effort, if successful, will bring welcome relief to millions of frustrated users in search of current information. But the job will be a big one. One place to start would be the website of the agency in charge of managing government domain-names. It lists the chairman of its parent organisation as “Premier Wen Jiabao”. Mr Wen left office more than two years ago. ~ Anonymous,
517:Human existence is girt round with mystery: the narrow region of our experience is a small island in the midst of a boundless sea. To add to the mystery, the domain of our earthly existence is not only an island in infinite space, but also in infinite time. The past and the future are alike shrouded from us: we neither know the origin of anything which is, nor its final destination. ~ Jack McDevitt,
518:The Doctor: The Fourth Great and Bountiful Human Empire. And there it is: planet Earth at its height. Covered with megacities, five moons, population 96 billion. The hub of a galactic domain, stretching across a million planets, a million species. With mankind right in the middle. [Adam faints] The Doctor: [leans towards Rose, still looking out over the Earth] He's your boyfriend. ~ Russell T Davies,
519:Ignorance is not about the amount of knowledge. It is about the mechanism of choosing actions. If one chooses actions based upon that which is known to be true - and tries hard to make that domain grow, the domain of knowledge, then he will be rational. Meanwhile, someone else who has much more knowledge might make decisions without paying any attention to truth. That person is ignorant. ~ Jesse Ball,
520:Synchronicities, epiphanies, peak, and mystical experiences are all cases in which creativity breaks through the barriers of the self and allows awareness to flood through the whole domain of consciousness. It is the human mind operating, for a moment, in its true order and moving through orders of increasing subtlety, reaching past the source of mind and matter into creativity itself. ~ F David Peat,
521:Human existence is girt round with mystery: the narrow region of our experience is a small island in the midst of a boundless sea. To add to the mystery, the domain of our earthly existence is not only an island of infinite space, but also in infinite time. The past and the future are alike shrouded from us: we neither know the origin of anything which is, nor its final destination. ~ John Stuart Mill,
522:I do consider it my responsibility to know everything there is to know about anything that could be considered my domain. I believe I am quite adept at the management of people and events.” His green eyes twinkled. “You’ve certainly managed me since the day I was born.” “I was but three years old when you were born,” she protested. “I didn’t start managing you for at least another year. ~ Erica Ridley,
523:We are created for precisely this sort of suffering. In the end, it is all we are, these limpid tide pools of self-consciousness between crashing waves of pain. We are destined and designed to bear our pain with us, hugging it tight to our bellies like the young Spartan thief hiding a wolf cub so it can eat away our insides. What other creature in God’s wide domain would carry the memory ~ Dan Simmons,
524:A metaphor is not merely a linguistic expression (a form of words) used for artistic or rhetorical purposes; instead, it is a process of human understanding by which we achieve meaningful experience that we can make sense of. A metaphor, in this "experiential" sense, is a process by which we understand and structure one domain of experience in terms of another domain of a different kind. ~ Mark Johnson,
525:Moreover, it is not entirely without significance that true love was, in Platonic philosophy -- but also, as you know, in a whole sector, a whole domain of Christian spirituality and mysticism -- the form par excellence of the true life. Since Platonism, true love and the true life have traditionally belonged together, and to a large extend Christian Platonism will take up this theme. ~ Michel Foucault,
526:We're not in the physical world. The physical world is in us. We create the physical world when we perceive it, when we observe it. And also we create this experience in our imagination. And when I say "we," I don't mean the physical body or the brain, but a deeper domain of consciousness which conceives, governs, constructs and actually becomes everything that we call physical reality. ~ Deepak Chopra,
527:A new device or method is put together from the available components—the available vocabulary—of a domain. In this sense a domain forms a language; and a new technological artifact constructed from components of the domain is an utterance in the domain’s language. This makes technology as a whole a collection of several languages, because each new artifact may draw from several domains. ~ W Brian Arthur,
528:Nevertheless, many of these models encoded human prejudice, misunderstanding, and bias into the software systems that increasingly managed our lives. Like gods, these mathematical models were opaque, their workings invisible to all but the highest priests in their domain: mathematicians and computer scientists. Their verdicts, even when wrong or harmful, were beyond dispute or appeal. And ~ Cathy O Neil,
529:Only rarely do we see beyond the needs of humanity, and he linked this blindness to our Christian and humanist infrastructure. It arose 2,000 years ago and was then benign, and we were no significant threat to Gaia. Now that we are over six billion hungry and greedy individuals, all aspiring to a first-world lifestyle, our urban way of life encroaches upon the domain of the living Earth. ~ James Lovelock,
530:A Coffin—is A Small Domain
A Coffin—is a small Domain,
Yet able to contain
A Citizen of Paradise
In it diminished Plane.
A Grave—is a restricted Breadth—
Yet ampler than the Sun—
And all the Seas He populates
And Lands He looks upon
To Him who on its small Repose
Bestows a single Friend—
Circumference without Relief—
Or Estimate—or End—
~ Emily Dickinson,
531:The Doctor: The Fourth Great and Bountiful Human Empire. And there it is: planet Earth at its height. Covered with megacities, five moons, population 96 billion. The hub of a galactic domain, stretching across a million planets, a million species. With mankind right in the middle.
[Adam faints]
The Doctor: [leans towards Rose, still looking out over the Earth] He's your boyfriend. ~ Russell T Davies,
532:only rarely do we see beyond the needs of humanity, and he linked this blindness to our Christian and humanist infrastructure. It arose 2,000 years ago and was then benign, and we were no significant threat to Gaia. Now that we are over six billion hungry and greedy individuals, all aspiring to a first-world lifestyle, our urban way of life encroaches upon the domain of the living Earth. ~ James E Lovelock,
533:Above all, Alzheimer wanted the medical world to recognize that mental illnesses have an undeniable material component. There was an obvious political reason for taking such a position because it could then be established that dementia-like conditions are not part of the spiritual/theological domain, but undeniably biological in origin and therefore not attributable with moral implications. ~ Margaret M Lock,
534:Does anyone pray before they cut a tree? I haven't seen anyone do that yet in the timber industry. But my vision is that that day is coming. I have a vision of a world in which we relate to each other as souls - not as personalities - not as bodies and minds and capabilities to accomplish things in this domain of the five sense, but as immortal spirits learning together how to co-create this world. ~ Gary Zukav,
535:I take facts about reasons to be fundamental in two ways. First, I believe that facts about reasons are not reducible to or analyzable in terms of facts of other kind, such as facts about the natural world. Second, I believe that reasons are the fundamental elements of the normative domain, and other normative notions, such as goodness and moral right and wrong can be explained in terms of reasons. ~ T M Scanlon,
536:Human life is an extension of the principles of nature, and human civilization is a venture extrapolated out of human natures: man and his natural potential are the root of the entire human domain. The great task of all philosophizing is to become competent to interpret and steer the potential developmental forces in human natures and in the human condition, both of which are prodigiously fatalistic. ~ Kenny Smith,
537:the two of them are pursuing a new trajectory begun only a few hours before, that they are no longer living in the same world as Cordélia and the planet’s other inhabitants but are moving away from it, absenting themselves, drifting toward another domain, the place where, perhaps, for a time, all those people would survive, together and inconsolable, all those people who had lost a child. Cord ~ Maylis de Kerangal,
538:When food is considered in a psychological light, numberless theories may follow as to its meaning. Edible products cease to inhabit the domain of common sense; a fondness for radishes is no longer just a fondness for the root of a conciferous plant, it accedes to the symbolic level where, depending on one's analytical inclinations, it may become a sign of cold-bloodedness, paranoia or liberality. ~ Alain de Botton,
539:A lot of abstract painters seem to be doing everything all at once now. And so these different styles are jibing and not so jibing, and they're clashing. But they all seem to be working in their own domain. Whereas back in the '60s, man, it was kind of a dull world. It was a vital world. But it was kind of contained and not too recognized by the public. Now art is absolutely recognized by the public. ~ Edward Ruscha,
540:Each of the five tribes of machine learning has its own master algorithm, a general-purpose learner that you can in principle use to discover knowledge from data in any domain. The symbolists’ master algorithm is inverse deduction, the connectionists’ is backpropagation, the evolutionaries’ is genetic programming, the Bayesians’ is Bayesian inference, and the analogizers’ is the support vector machine. ~ Pedro Domingos,
541:Kisan Call Centres provide valuable and timely knowledge support to farmers and fishermen. Similar domain service provider call centres are required in the field of commerce and industry, entrepreneurial skill development and employment generation, travel and tourism, banking and insurance, meteorological forecasting, disaster warning systems, education and human resource development and healthcare. ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
542:The economic basis of the State did not correspond with the administrative character which Charlemagne had endeavoured to preserve. The economy of the State was based upon the great domain without commercial outlets. The landowners had no need of security, since they did not engage in commerce. Such a form of property is perfectly consistent with anarchy. Those who owned the soil had no need of the king. ~ Henri Pirenne,
543:Earlier maps had underestimated the distances to other continents and exaggerated the outlines of individual nations. Now global dimensions could be set, with authority, by the celestial spheres. Indeed, King Louis XIV of France, confronted with a revised map of his domain based on accurate longitude measurements, reportedly complained that he was losing more territory to his astronomers than to his enemies. ~ Dava Sobel,
544:An academic discipline, or any other semiotic domain, for that matter, is not primarily content, in the sense of facts and principles. It is rather primarily a lived and historically changing set of distinctive social practices. It is in these practices that 'content' is generated, debated, and transformed via certain distinctive ways of thinking, talking, valuing, acting, and, often, writing and reading. ~ James Paul Gee,
545:The ambivalent nature of light points if anything to a continuous underlying substance, what traditional cosmology calls the ether, which also exhibits a discontinuous aspect by virtue of its being indistinct. The debate in this domain today, if one glances at the principles involved, is not very much different from that of the followers of hylomorphism and atomism in the Middle Ages and in Antiquity. ~ Seyyed Hossein Nasr,
546:A leading philosopher in our study maintains that if a young person wants to learn philosophy these days, he or she would be better advised to become immersed in the domain directly and avoid the field altogether: “I’d tell him to read the great books of philosophy. And I would tell him not to do graduate study at any university. I think all philosophy departments are no good. They are all terrible. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
547:Each thing has its word, but the word has become a thing by itself. Why shouldn't I find it? Why can't a tree be called Pluplusch, and Pluplubasch when it has been raining? The word, the word, the word outside your domain, your stuffiness, this laughable impotence, your stupendous smugness, outside all the parrotry of your self-evident limitedness. The word, gentlemen, is a public concern of the first importance. ~ Hugo Ball,
548:Instant enlightenment. A quintessential modernism, culture and religion accommodated to the age of fast food and bumper stickers. But psyche and spirit are not so exempt from the natural domain that they can simply produce self-change instantaneously, on demand. Wisdom precipitates through a notoriously slow apparatus of retorts and flasks, and it has to find receptive ground only in a properly seasoned mind. ~ Kenny Smith,
549:She was able to draw no conclusions because her husband's patients, except for mutual friends, were part of his private domain; they were people without identity, known not by their faces but by their pains, not by the colour of their eyes or the evasions of their hearts but by the size of their livers, the coating on their tongues, the blood in their urine, the hallucinations of their feverish nights. ~ Gabriel Garc a M rquez,
550:Ghosts, we hope, may be always with us - that is, never too far out of the reach of fancy. On the whole, it would seem they adapt themselves well, perhaps better than we do, to changing world conditions - they enlarge their domain, shift their hold on our nerves, and, dispossessed of one habitat, set up house in another. The universal battiness of our century looks like providing them with a propitious climate. ~ Elizabeth Bowen,
551:In our young minds houses belonged to women were their special domain, not as property, but as places where all that truly mattered in life took place - the warmth and comfort of shelter, the feeding of our bodies, the nurturing of our souls. There we learned dignity, integrity of being; there we learned to have faith. The folks who made this life possible, who were our primary guides and teachers, were black women. ~ Bell Hooks,
552:For memetics to be a reasonable research programme, it should be the case that copying, and differential success in causing the multiplication of copies, overwhelmingly plays the major role in shaping all or at least most of the contents of culture. Evolved domain-specific psychological dispositions, if there are any, should be at most a relatively minor factor that could be considered part of background conditions. ~ Dan Sperber,
553:The multiverse as a real physical construct within physics overlapping with a more mystical understanding of many possible worlds - the notion of there being a root down at the quantum level between intention and reality, between consciousness and existence - it's not a matter of trying to explain the mystery of magic away with a pat mechanism of a pseudoscience, it's just a matter of trying to ground it in a domain. ~ Jon Spaihts,
554:Two mutually exclusive readings of IoT impose themselves: IoT as the domain of radical emancipation, a unique chance to combine freedom and collaboration in which, to paraphrase Juliet’s definition of love from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, ‘The more I give to thee, the more I have, for both are infinite,’ versus IoT as a complete submersion into the divine digital Other, where I am deprived of my freedom of agency. ~ Slavoj i ek,
555:When people are suicidal, their thinking is paralyzed, their options appear spare or nonexistent, their mood is despairing, and hopelessness permeates their entire mental domain. The future cannot be separated from the present, and the present is painful beyond solace. ‘This is my last experiment,’ wrote a young chemist in his suicide note. ‘If there is any eternal torment worse than mine I’ll have to be shown. ~ Kay Redfield Jamison,
556:The consequence of such mingling is that an individual who enters the communications system pursuing one interest soon becomes aware of stigmatized material on a broad range of subjects. As a result, those who come across one form of stigmatized knowledge will learn of others, in connections that imply that stigmatized knowledge is a unified domain, an alternative worldview, rather than a collection of unrelated ideas. ~ Kurt Andersen,
557:Cartesian dualism served science well, at first: by ceding matters of the spirit to men of the cloth, it got the Church off the back of science, which for centuries afterward was perceived as less of a threat to religion’s domain than it would otherwise have been (pace, Galileo). But Cartesian dualism was a disaster for moral philosophy, setting in motion a process that ultimately reduced human beings to automatons. ~ Jeffrey M Schwartz,
558:Science is the century-old endeavour to bring together by means of systematic thought the perceptible phenomena of this world into as thorough-going an association as possible. To put it boldly, it is the attempt at a posterior reconstruction of existence by the process of conceptualization. Science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgements of all kinds remain necessary. ~ Karl Popper,
559:Gangsta rap often reaches higher than its ugliest, lowest common denominator, misogyny, violence, materialism and sexual transgression are not its exclusive domain. At its best, this music draws attention to complex dimensions of ghetto life ignored by most Americans. Indeed, gangsta rap's in-your-face style may do more to force America to confront crucial social problems than a million sermons or political speeches. ~ Michael Eric Dyson,
560:Gruber speaks of an "evolving systems" approach to the study of creativity: that is, one monitors simultaneously the organization of knowledge in a domain, the purpose(s) pursued by the creator, and the affective experiences he or she undergoes. While these systems are only "loosely coupled," their interaction over time helps one understand the ebb and flow of creative activity over the course of a productive human life. ~ Howard Gardner,
561:Humans are not biological robots. We live for meaning, for the personal value of every experience. The body metabolizes our experiences and sends the message to every cell, while the mind, in its own domain, processes experience in terms of sensations, images, thoughts, and feelings. Nothing fuses the whole-system effects of love and non-love like the human heart, which needs to be understood as more than a physical organ. ~ Deepak Chopra,
562:Most writers I know have switched to word processors. I haven't but I'm very curious about why people like it so much. I think it has something to do with the fact that at last writing, which has been such an old-fashioned, artisanal activity, even on a typewriter, has now entered the central domain of modern experience which is that of making copies, being involved in the world of duplicates and machine-mediated activities. ~ Susan Sontag,
563:One can delineate the domain of philosophy however one likes, but in its search for truth, philosophy is always concerned with human existence. Authentic philosophizing refuses to remain at the stage of knowledge […]. Care for human existence and its truth makes philosophy a 'practical science' in the deepest sense, and it also leads philosophy—and this is the crucial point—into the concrete distress of human existence. ~ Herbert Marcuse,
564:All manners of freedom, including freedom of expression, freedom of conscious, freedom of thought...it accepts tolerance. But it is not an atheist society. Religion is the private affair of an individual...be present in the public domain, but state has to be clearly separated from religion. When I'm speaking, I'm speaking only for myself. At the same time, I know that these ideas have wide support among the Iranian population. ~ Akbar Ganji,
565:The weaknesses and biases of the international mechanisms of accountability make it seem desirable to extend the domain of accountability by empowering domestic courts to act as agents of the world legal system. Even if there is no consistent application of Universal Jurisdiction, it still leads those who might be prosecuted to alter their travel plans to avoid even the complication of waiting for a complaint to be dismissed. ~ Richard A Falk,
566:I just might kill someone in my next job, and I'll be honest here, I couldn't do the time. Really. No way. I couldn't share a room with four other people, let alone poop in front of them. I hate sharing a room and a bathroom with my husband, and I even have eminent domain over him. Prison would never work out: I'd get picked last for all of the gangs, I'd never get included in the escape plans, it would be just like high school ~ Laurie Notaro,
567:I have always believed that scientific research is another domain where a form of optimism is essential to success: I have yet to meet a successful scientist who lacks the ability to exaggerate the importance of what he or she is doing, and I believe that someone who lacks a delusional sense of significance will wilt in the face of repeated experiences of multiple small failures and rare successes, the fate of most researchers. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
568:In particular, the State has arrogated to itself a compulsory monopoly over police and military services, the provision of law, judicial decision-making, the mint and the power to create money, unused land ("the public domain"), streets and highways, rivers and coastal waters, and the means of delivering mail...the State relies on control of the levers of propaganda to persuade its subjects to obey or even exalt their rulers. ~ Murray N Rothbard,
569:This world is not the same to all people. Each one lives in his little domain....Peace and harmony may reign in one person's world; where strife and restlessness in anothers. But whatever the circumstances of one's environment, it consists of both an inner and an outer world. The outside world is the one in which your life engages in action and interaction. The world inside of you determines your happiness or unhappiness. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
570:You speak like a future nation-builder, Master Shevki. Dede has no relationship with the nation. His domain is the soul of the individual … a soul that has curiosities, enigmas, hunger, thirst particular to itself. Whether or not men are composed of small pieces of an apparent nation like some type of world-womb, they return naked to the congregation. Dede has no relation with the future Turkish regime that you have imagined. ~ Halide Edib Ad var,
571:Instead of a narrative form constructed around enigmas, the popular cinema is governed by forms of speech and narrative mechnisms deriving from the domain of the already-known. The spectator of this cinema is then addressed through the presentation of a pre-interpreted Symbolic order in contrast to the spectator of classical realist cinema who is complicit in the conversion of the raw material of re-presentation into narrative meaning. ~ Anonymous,
572:Creativity builds upon the public domain. The battle that we're fighting now is about whether the public domain will continue to be fed by creative works after their copyright expires. That has been our tradition but that tradition has been perverted in the last generation. We're trying to use the Constitution to reestablish what has always been taken for granted--that the public domain would grow each year with new creative work. ~ Lawrence Lessig,
573:In mathematics, if you are of quick mind, you can get to the "frontline" of cutting-edge research very quickly. In some other domains you may have to read entire thick volumes first. Moreover, if you have been for too long in a certain domain, you get conditioned to think like everybody else. When you are new, you are not compelled to the ideas of the people around you. The younger you are, the more likely you are to be truly original. ~ Mario Livio,
574:The discussion of the sexual problem is only a somewhat crude prelude to a far deeper question, and that is the question of the psychological relationship between the sexes. In comparison with this the other pales into insignificance, and with it we enter the real domain of woman. Woman's psychology is founded on the principle of Eros, the great binder and loosener, whereas from ancient times the ruling principle ascribed to man is Logos. ~ Carl Jung,
575:One thing that you and I know is language. Another thing that you and I know is how objects behave in perceptual space. We have a whole mass of complex ways of understanding what is the nature of visual space. A proper part of psychology ought to be, and in recent years has been, an effort to try to discover the principles of how we organize visual space. I would say that the same is true of every domain of psychology, of human studies. ~ Noam Chomsky,
576:They are. But in Special Circumstances we deal in the moral equivalent of black holes, where the normal laws — the rules of right and wrong that people imagine apply everywhere else in the universe — break down; beyond those metaphysical event horizons, there exist . . . special circumstances.” She smiled. “That’s us. That’s our territory; our domain.” “To some people,” he said, “that might sound like just a good excuse for bad behavior. ~ Iain M Banks,
577:To say it again: it is the greatest temptation of the rational faculty to glorify its own capacity and its own productions and to claim that in the face of its theories nothing transcendent or outside its domain need exist. This means that all important facts have been discovered. This means that nothing important remains unknown. But most importantly, it means denial of the necessity for courageous individual confrontation with Being. ~ Jordan Peterson,
578:To say it again: it is the greatest temptation of the rational faculty to glorify its own capacity and its own productions and to claim that in the face of its theories nothing transcendent or outside its domain need exist. This means that all important facts have been discovered. This means that nothing important remains unknown. But most importantly, it means denial of the necessity for courageous individual confrontation with Being. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
579:Love has been taken away from the poets, and has been brought within the domain of true science. It may prove to be one of the great cosmic elementary forces. When the atom of hydrogen draws the atom of chlorine towards it to form the perfected molecule of hydrochloric acid, the force which it exerts may be intrinsically similar to that which draws me to you. Attraction and repulsion appear to be the primary forces. This is attraction. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
580:Authors, artists, and even philosophers are much better off having a very small number of fanatics behind them than a large number of people who appreciate their work. The number of persons who dislike the work don’t count—there is no such thing as the opposite of buying your book, or the equivalent of losing points in a soccer game, and this absence of negative domain for book sales provides the author with a measure of optionality. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
581:Your body, which is very physical, is under the influence of your thoughts, your feelings, your emotions, your dreams, your fantasies, your desires, your instincts, your drives, your imagination. All these things orchestrate themselves - all these internal activities that are in the invisible domain that we call consciousness actually have very precise physical effects both in our biology, but they also influence our perception of the world. ~ Deepak Chopra,
582:I do my best work in the bedroom. This is completely my domain. So it should be no big deal that she asked me to wait here. But something about being in Charlotte’s bedroom is wigging me out. Mostly because there’s nudity transpiring mere feet away. She’s taking a shower, and no matter how you slice them, New York apartments are thimble size. Let me spell this out—There is a wet, naked, hot woman in a ten-foot radius. Got it? Okay. Moving on. ~ Lauren Blakely,
583:Children and scientists share an outlook on life. If I do this, what will happen? is both the motto of the child at play and the defining refrain of the physical scientist. Every child is observer, analyst, and taxonomist, building a mental life through a sequence of intellectual revolutions, constructing theories and promptly shedding them when they no longer fit. The unfamiliar and the strange—these are the domain of all children and scientists. ~ James Gleick,
584:is the enslavement of a pervasive lie; it imposes upon men a falsified vision not only of God but also of everything else. And that is indeed why it is a closed kingdom. Escaping from violence is escaping from this kingdom into another kingdom, whose existence the majority of people do not even suspect. This is the Kingdom of love, which is also the domain of the true God, the Father of Jesus, of whom the prisoners of violence cannot even conceive. ~ Brian Zahnd,
585:I am old, and death inevitably approaches. But both birth and death are beyond the will of a human being. They are not my domain. I do not think about it. Yoga has taught me to think of only working to live a useful life...I will never stop learning, and it have tried to share some lessons with you. I do pray that my ending will be your beginning. The great rewards and the countless blessings of a life spent following the Inward Journey await you. ~ B K S Iyengar,
586:This issue of expanding the reach of international criminal law by reliance on the use of Universal Jurisdiction by domestic courts needs to be balanced against the injustice of according impunity to those with strong geopolitical backing. It is notable that several western European countries backtracked on UJ after threats of retaliatory moves by the United States and Israel. There is no doubt that the domain of UJ is a geopolitical battleground. ~ Richard A Falk,
587:In the domain of pharmaceuticals, we need a metric for health impact, and with this metric we can then assess the value of the introduction of a new product and pay its innovator accordingly, say on the basis of the product's measured health impact during its first ten years on the market. In exchange, innovators must of course renounce the usual rewards they are otherwise entitled to, namely the patent-protected markup on the price of their product. ~ Thomas Pogge,
588:Another example of motivation in advertising relates to the old saying “Sex sells.” Long an advertising standard, images of buff, scantily clad (and usually female) bodies are used to hawk everything from the latest Victoria’s Secret lingerie to domain names through GoDaddy .com and fast food chains such as Carl’s Jr. and Burger King (figure 4). These and countless other ads use the voyeuristic promise of pleasure to capture attention and motivate action. ~ Nir Eyal,
589:technique of reproduction detaches the reproduced object from the domain of tradition. By making many reproductions it substitutes a plurality of copies for a unique existence. And in permitting the reproduction to meet the beholder or listener in his own particular situation, it reactivates the object reproduced. These two processes lead to a tremendous shattering of tradition which is the obverse of the contemporary crisis and renewal of mankind. ~ Walter Benjamin,
590:A large majority of our respondents were inspired by a tension in their domain that became obvious when looked at from the perspective of another domain. Even though they do not think of themselves as interdisciplinary, their best work bridges realms of ideas. Their histories tend to cast doubt on the wisdom of overspecialization, where bright young people are trained to become exclusive experts in one field and shun breadth like the plague. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
591:In a sense it has been my way to transcendental experience: to the discovery that matter metaphorically speaking, is the creation of the spirit (the mode of existence of the observer in a domain of discourse), and that the spirit is the creation of the matter it creates. This is not a paradox, but it is the expression of our existence in a domain of cognition in which the content of cognition is cognition itself. Beyond that nothing can be said. ~ Humberto R Maturana,
592:The building was certainly innocuous in appearance, with its clean cream-colored wood and small-paned windows, its balconies and widow’s walk.  It looked a perfectly peaceful habitation from the outside, and it wasn’t until one walked into the house that its sinister aspects became discernible.  One passed the threshold and walked into a dark domain, a place that breathed of the past with its antique furnishings, its old oak paneling, its dead silence.  ~ W H Pugmire,
593:John Bransford, a gifted education researcher, has spent many years studying what separates novice teachers from expert teachers. One of many things he noticed is the way the experts organize information. “[Experts’] knowledge is not simply a list of facts and formulas that are relevant to their domain; instead, their knowledge is organized around core concepts or ‘big ideas’ that guide their thinking about their domains,” he cowrote in How People Learn. ~ John Medina,
594:Both Bacon and Descartes, while discarding the teleology of the ancients, maintained faith in the Bible and in God. But they also laid the groundwork for the rise of Deism—and in time, for the fall of religion itself. By cutting final causes from science, by separating God from the natural world, the modern scientific project would eventually remove religion and purpose from the domain of reason—a project that both Bacon and Descartes would have abhorred. ~ Ben Shapiro,
595:And they talked and talked, repeating the same things, going over them, then going over them again, from one side then from the other, kneading and kneading them, continually rolling between their fingers this unsatisfactory, mean substance that they had extracted from their lives (what they called “life,” their domain), kneading it, pulling it, rolling it until it ceased to form anything between their fingers but a little pile, a little gray pellet. ~ Nathalie Sarraute,
596:What is software architecture? The answer is multitiered. At the highest level, there are the architecture patterns that define the overall shape and structure of software applications 1 . Down a level is the architecture that is specifically related to the purpose of the software application. Yet another level down resides the architecture of the modules and their interconnections. This is the domain of design patterns 2 , packakges, components, and classes ~ Anonymous,
597:The more advanced the sciences have become, the more they have tended to enter the domain of mathematics, which is a sort of center towards which they converge. We can judge of the perfection to which a science has come by the facility, more or less great, with which it may be approached by calculation. ~ Adolphe Quetelet (ca. 1825-1826) as quoted by Frank H. Hankins, "Adolphe Quetelet as Statistician" in Studies in History Economics and Public Law (1908) Vol. 31 p. 443.,
598:The unforeseen is the most beautiful gift life can give us. That is what we must think of multiplying in our domain. That is what should have been talked about in this assembly, and no one has said a word about it ...Art is inconceivable without risk, without inner sacrifice; freedom and boldness of imagination can be won only in the process of work, and it is there the unforeseen I spoke of a moment ago must intervene, and there no directives can help. ~ Boris Pasternak,
599:Violence is the enslavement of a pervasive lie; it imposes upon men a falsified vision not only of God but also of everything else. And that is indeed why it is a closed kingdom. Escaping from violence is escaping from this kingdom into another kingdom, whose existence the majority of people do not even suspect. This is the Kingdom of love, which is also the domain of the true God, the Father of Jesus, of whom the prisoners of violence cannot even conceive. ~ Brian Zahnd,
600:He argued that expertise in “the field of shoemaking, painting, building, [or] confectionary” is the result of the same accumulation of “experiential linkings.” According to Ericsson, what we call expertise is really just “vast amounts of knowledge, pattern-based retrieval, and planning mechanisms acquired over many years of experience in the associated domain.” In other words, a great memory isn’t just a by-product of expertise; it is the essence of expertise ~ Joshua Foer,
601:Any succession of events in which we take part with sensations, perceptions and possibly with actions gradually drops out of the domain of consciousness when the same string of events repeats itself in the same way very often. But it is immediately shot up into the conscious region, if at such a repetition either the occasion or the environmental conditions met with on its pursuit differ from what they were on all the previous incidences. ~ Erwin Schrödinger, Mind and Matter,
602:Not only does the State do the work badly on a domain not its own, bunglingly, at greater cost, and with less fruit than spontaneous organizations, but, again, through the legal monopoly which it deems its prerogative, or through the overwhelming competition which it exercises, it kills or paralyzes these natural organizations or prevents their birth; and hence so many precious organs, which, absorbed, atropic or abortive, are lost to the great social body. ~ Hippolyte Taine,
603:When I was in architecture school, rather than giving us drafting boards and t-squares and lead pencils and stuff they gave us all the same tools that places like Digital Domain and ILM used to make features films or special effects. They gave us all these digital tools like Alias and Mya and Soft Image and all these kind of high-end computers, so I came out of architecture school knowing how to use all that stuff. And I started making short films at night. ~ Joseph Kosinski,
604:Folding his arms, Mg. Thane leaned against the table and asked, “What is the story written on?”
“What sort of question is that?”
“The kind you should answer.”
Ceony’s eyes narrowed. His tone carried an air of chastisement, but his expression seemed lax enough. “It’s obviously written on paper.”
Mg. Thane snapped his fingers. “There we are! And paper is your domain now. So make it mean something. And calm down,” he said, almost as an afterthought. ~ Charlie N Holmberg,
605:Photography today is accomplishing a lofty mission in which every German should collaborate by buying a camera. The German people is ahead of every other in the technical domain and, thanks to its exceptional qualities, the small camera has conquered the whole world... Much is at stake here from the point of view of popular consumer goods and, furthermore, photography has a particularly important political role to play. (Addressing the Berlin Photography Fair, 1933) ~ Joseph Goebbels,
606:The kingdom of God is not a geographic domain with set boundaries and settled decrees, but a set of relationships in which Christ is sovereign. At the table, Jesus moves us from ideas about life and love to actual living and loving. Martin Luther was right. Theology is table talk.[38] Jesus didn’t sell the food of his Father. He issued invitations to the table. In fact, Jesus’ favorite image for the kingdom of God is a banquet where everyone is sitting around a table. ~ Leonard Sweet,
607:It is a complicated word: home. It carries varied definitions to nearly every person. To me, home is not just a place, but a feeling; a warm and comfortable sensation of control. Home is where I need make no excuses for my actions or the color of my skin; where I must be accepted because this is my place. It is both a personal and a shared domain; for it is the place a person most truly belongs, and yet it is so only because of those friends around him.
-Drizzt Do'Urden ~ R A Salvatore,
608:Since emotional regulation is the critical issue in managing the effects of trauma and neglect, it would make an enormous difference if teachers, army sergeants, foster parents, and mental health professionals were thoroughly schooled in emotional-regulation techniques. Right now this still is mainly the domain of preschool and kindergarten teachers, who deal with immature brains and impulsive behavior on a daily basis and who are often very adept at managing them. ~ Bessel A van der Kolk,
609:If our value system doesn't allow us to enjoy anything without putting a price on it, we miss a great part of the beauty of life. When we bring this value system into the domain of prayer, we can never enjoy God. As soon as we start enjoying Him, we have to reflect, "Oh boy, I'm enjoying God!" And as soon as we do that, we are taking a photograph of the experience. Every reflection is like a photograph of reality. It isn't our original experience; it is a commentary on it. ~ Thomas Keating,
610:In the spiritual domain, criticism is love turned sour... If criticism becomes a habit, it will destroy the moral energy of the life and paralyze the spiritual force... Whenever you are in a critical temper, it is impossible to enter into communion with God. Criticism makes you hard and vindictive and cruel, and leaves you with the flattering unction that you are a superior person. It is impossible to develop the characteristics of a saint and maintain a critical attitude. ~ Oswald Chambers,
611:A business leader who exemplified good work would be somebody who understood himself or herself, understood the corporation or company that they were in very well, knew something about their history, understood the domain—the sector in which they’re working, which could be anything from transportation to widgets—and had some sense of the mega-trends going on in the world. You cannot be an excellent leader unless you’ve thought about this kind of knowledge, so that’s excellence. ~ Daniel Goleman,
612:This is the idea of personality; that is to say, the reunion of presentations, the remembrance of all past impressions, the imagination of future phenomena. It is the notion of my body, of my capacities, of my name, of my social position, of the part I play in the world ; it is an ensemble of moral, political, religious thoughts, etc.; it is a world of ideas, the most considerable, perhaps, that we can ever know, for we are far from having made the tour of the domain of personality. ~ Anonymous,
613:It is an understatement to say that the time has arrived for a serious and open international dialogue regarding the possibility of future interplanetary relations. In no other area of human experience has so much evidence existed for so long, and yet been attended by such a paucity of serious research and analysis - at least in the civilian domain. While the subject matter of UFOs itself is extraordinary, it is the absence of a serious human response to it that is most extraordinary. ~ Steven M Greer,
614:Art and the triumph of the human spirit - the two combined thrill me. It's the "Braveheart" moment, the stuff Joseph Campbell talks about, "the heroes journey," a beautiful documentary on a poignant topic, the fireman saving a kitten from a burning building. It's the combo of heroism and kindness against the odds or even good reason. It implies immortality because it is the domain of the soul. That evidence of the spirit of life is what makes me get out of bed in the morning. ~ Kristin Bauer van Straten,
615:If you like your soccer cerebral, and the triumph ultimately to be wrung out of staying power, Milan was the place to be. If you love the uncertainty of teams that cannot defend yet have the courage to attack, attack, attack, then Seville was heaven... The common denominator between the victories of Arsenal and Fenerbache? The strength of mind, the courage to dare in another team's domain, the inner belief that is as much a part of sporting success as the skill a fellow may be born with. ~ Robert Hughes,
616:Since most of our moral understanding comes, via metaphor, from a broad range of other domains of experience, and since we apply those metaphors to a number of different experiential domains, we should be wary of trying to compartmentalize ethics. The cross-domain mappings of the metaphors suggest the intricate web of connections that impose our moral ideas on other aspects of our lives, including considerations that are technical, scientific, political, aesthetic, religious, and social. ~ George Lakoff,
617:The mind is programmable by the heart and the heart is also programmable by the mind; if we to shut down one of them, we would literally be incarcerated with the good alongside the evil that we have generated so far within ourselves. Our only choice is to claim both domains so that we guarantee the perpetuation of the resonance between them; because if there were no induction from one domain into the other, degradation will follow and will inevitably lead to infection and then disease. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
618:My Prime Minister regards the economy as our highest priority and forgets that economics and ecology are derived from the same Greek word, oikos, meaning household or domain. Ecology is the study of home, while economics is its management. Ecologists try to define the conditions and principles that enable a species to survive and flourish. Yet in elevating the economy above those principles, we seem to think we are immune to the laws of nature. We have to put the ‘eco’ back into economics. ~ David Suzuki,
619:The cowardly belief that a person must stay in one place is too reminiscent of the unquestioning resignation of animals, beasts of burden stupefied by servitude and yet always willing to accept the slipping on of the harness. There are limits to every domain, and laws to govern every organized power. But the vagrant owns the whole vast earth that ends only at the non-existent horizon, and her empire is an intangible one, for her domination and enjoyment of it are things of the spirit. ~ Isabelle Eberhardt,
620:The gargoyles were worth the climb: Some seemed so real they could easily have been demons turned to stone. One appeared to be biting the head off of some much smaller creature—a tiny man?—clutched in his claws. Another was contemplative, his monkeylike face resting in the palms of his oversized hands, as he observed his domain. Others stuck out their tongues, bared their teeth, made faces. Their expressions were so elastic and whimsical it was hard to believe they were carved of stone. ~ Juliet Blackwell,
621:Every one of the world's "great" religions utterly trivializes the immensity and beauty of the cosmos. Books like the Bible and the Koran get almost every significant fact about us and our world wrong. Every scientific domain -- from cosmology to psychology to economics -- has superseded and surpassed the wisdom of Scripture. Everything of value that people get from religion can be had more honestly, without presuming anything on insufficient evidence. The rest is self-deception, set to music. ~ Sam Harris,
622:Any technical person contributing to the model must spend some time touching the code, whatever primary role he or she plays
on the project. Anyone responsible for changing code must learn to express a model through the code. Every developer must be involved in some level of discussion about the model and have contact with domain experts. Those who contribute in different ways must consciously engage those who touch the code in a dynamic exchange of model ideas through the UBIQUITOUS LANGUAGE ~ Eric Evans,
623:He recalled those brief years when his song had fallen silent, his refusal to heed it leaving him bereft, without guidance. It had been hard to be so rudderless in a sea of chaos and war. This, however, was much worse, because now there was the chill, the bone-deep cold that had seeped into him in the Ally’s domain and lingered on here in this world of myriad paths, all seemingly so dark. And the words, of course, those words that hounded him from the Beyond. We will make an ending, you and I. ~ Anthony Ryan,
624:Katsa couldn’t say where the notion had come from, but once it pushed its way into her mind, it would not leave. What might she be capable of—if she acted of her own volition and outside Randa’s domain? It was something she thought about, something to distract herself as she broke fingers for Randa and twisted men’s arms from their sockets. And the more she considered the question, the more urgent it became, until she thought she would blaze up and burn from the frustration of not doing it. ~ Kristin Cashore,
625:American parents, teachers, and children were far more likely than their Japanese and Chinese counterparts to believe that mathematical ability is innate; if you have it, you don’t have to work hard, and if you don’t have it, there’s no point in trying. In contrast, most Asians regard math success, like achievement in any other domain, as a matter of persistence and plain hard work. Of course you will make mistakes as you go along; that’s how you learn and improve. It doesn’t mean you are stupid. ~ Carol Tavris,
626:Carrying body and soul and embracing the one, can you avoid separation? Can you let your body become as supple as a newborn child’s? In the opening and shutting of heaven’s gate, can you play the feminine part? Can you love your people and govern your domain without self-importance? Giving birth and nourishing; having, yet not possessing; working, yet not taking credit; leading without controlling or dominating. One who heeds this power brings the Tao to this very earth. This is the primal virtue. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
627:Even as he turned the little handle round and round, the room remained under the tenuous authority of sleep. As yet unchallenged, somnolence continued to cast its shadow over sights and sensations, over forms and formulations, over what has been said and what must be done, lending each the insubstantiality of its domain. But when the Count opened the small wooden drawer of the grinder, the world and all it contained were transformed by that envy of the alchemists—the aroma of freshly ground coffee. ~ Amor Towles,
628:Every one of the world's "great" religions utterly trivializes the immensity and beauty of the cosmos. Books like the Bible and the Koran get almost every significant fact about us and our world wrong. Every scientific domain -- from cosmology to psychology to economics -- has superseded and surpassed the wisdom of Scripture.

Everything of value that people get from religion can be had more honestly, without presuming anything on insufficient evidence. The rest is self-deception, set to music. ~ Sam Harris,
629:I think that because of YouTube, because of MySpace, because of the digital domain that we have on the Internet, the younger generation is much more open to information. I think it's so much easier for them to gain information and trade information, and they have become more aware. In some cases, more aware than their own parents and adults, as to what's going on in the world. I find that really intriguing and interesting, and I think there is a brewing of a whole new generation of activists coming. ~ Serj Tankian,
630:As I became a creature of the empty tunnels, survival became easier and more difficult all at once. I gained in the physical skills and experience necessary to live on. I could defeat almost anything that wandered into my chosen domain. It did not take me long, however, to discover one nemesis that I could neither defeat nor flee. It followed me wherever I went - indeed, the farther I ran, the more it closed in around me. My enemy was solitude, the interminable, incessant silence of hushed corridors. ~ R A Salvatore,
631:Especially for the younger generation, the Internet is not some standalone, separate domain where a few of life’s functions are carried out. It is not merely our post office and our telephone. Rather, it is the epicenter of our world, the place where virtually everything is done. It is where friends are made, where books and films are chosen, where political activism is organized, where the most private data is created and stored. It is where we develop and express our very personality and sense of self. ~ Anonymous,
632:The domain namespace is chaotic—every top-level domain and registry seems to have its own rules for things like minimum character lengths for domains, whether or not you can register at the top level (foo.nr vs. foo.com.nr for example)—and I didn’t want to go compile all these nuances by hand. So I used Mechanical Turk to gather things like the min-char lengths for each top-level domain, top-level registration possibilities, and all the second-level domains they may or may not use (Brazil is the craziest). ~ Anonymous,
633:Complete knowledge of the nature of an analytic function must also include insight into its behavior for imaginary values of the arguments. Often the latter is indispensable even for a proper appreciation of the behavior of the function for real arguments. It is therefore essential that the original determination of the function concept be broadened to a domain of magnitudes which includes both the real and the imaginary quantities, on an equal footing, under the single designation complex numbers. ~ Carl Friedrich Gauss,
634:I had a vivid illustration of domain dependence in the driveway of a hotel in the pseudocity of Dubai. A fellow who looked like a banker had a uniformed porter carry his luggage (I can instantly tell if someone is a certain type of banker with minimal cues as I have physical allergies to them, even affecting my breathing). About fifteen minutes later I saw the banker lifting free weights at the gym, trying to replicate natural exercises using kettlebells as if he were swinging a suitcase. Domain dependence is ~ Anonymous,
635:This is my domain. You've got your own hopeless humans in New York."
"One of those hopeless humans is the father of my child," Magnus pointed out.
Magnus had not ever been pregnant, though that would have been interesting, Emma thought. He and Alec Lightwood had an adopted warlock child, named Max, who was a scintillating shade of navy blue.
"And," Magnus added, "the rest of them have all saved the world, at least once."
Malcolm gestured toward Julian and Emma. "I have high hopes for these. ~ Cassandra Clare,
636:We are so busy and obsessed with our restless thinking about everything and everyone that we have mistaken our thinking about everything and everyone for everything and everyone. This tendency to take our thoughts to be real is what keeps the dream state intact and keeps us trapped within its domain of unconsciousness and strife. To many people the very idea that what is is more real than all of their beliefs and opinions about what is is hard to believe. But that’s how it is when you are caught up in a dream. ~ Adyashanti,
637:Fool brother Filip led blind brother Daret
deep into the black cave.
He knew that inside it, the Queen Crab resided
but that didn’t scare him away.

Said blind brother Daret to fool brother Filip,
does Queen Crab no longer reign?
I have heard she is vicious, and likes to eat fishes.
It’s best we avoid her domain.

Answered fool Filip to his brother small,
have I not always kept you safe?
I know what I’m doing, for I’m older than you,
and I’ll never lead you astray.
~ Susan Dennard,
638:As I write, we now consider nature to have given rise to three or four foundational types of living things, or domains of life. I’m going with four. We have Bacteria, Archaea (microbes that are fundamentally different from bacteria), Eukarya (that’s us, animals and plants together), and Vira. You could also call that last one Viruses. (I took some Latin in school, and I prefer this style of pluralization for this particular second declension noun, describing this particular domain of living or nearly living things.) ~ Bill Nye,
639:In a 2006 article in Management Science, Alan MacCormack and Carliss Baldwin document an example of a product that successfully evolved from an integral to a modular architecture.21 When the software was put into the public domain as open source, the commercial firm that owned the copyright invested significant resources to make the transition. This was critical because the software could not have been maintained by distributed teams of volunteer developers if it had not been broken into smaller subsystems. ~ Geoffrey G Parker,
640:Western science sees the universe as "naturalistic." While other cultures see the world as consisting of both matter and spirit, Western thought understands it as consisting of material forces only, all of which operate devoid of anything that could be called "purpose." It is not the result of sin, or any cosmic battle, or any high forces determining our destinies. Western societies, therefore, see suffering as simply an accident. In this view while suffering is real it is outside the domain of good and evil. ~ Timothy J Keller,
641:When the number of factors coming into play in a phenomenological complex is too large scientific method in most cases fails. One need only think of the weather, in which case the prediction even for a few days ahead is impossible. Nevertheless, no one doubts that we are confronted with a causal connection whose causal components are in the main known to us. Occurrences in this domain are beyond the reach of exact prediction because of the variety of factors in operation, not because of any lack of order in nature. ~ Albert Einstein,
642:The Pāli term for "feeling" is vedanā, derived from the verb vedeti, which means both "to feel" and "to know". In its usage in the discourses, vedanā comprises both bodily and mental feelings. Vedanā does not include "emotion" in its range of meaning. Although emotions arise depending on the initial input provided by feeling, they are more complex mental phenomena than bare feeling itself and are therefore rather the domain of the next [third] satipaṭṭhāna, contemplation of states of mind. ~ An layo,
643:Any domain knowledge is not a plain set of relations, it is whole hierarchy of relations. And not surprisingly only a minority of relations are leaves of this hierarchy, typically a majority of relations adopt other relations as domains. We have a representation: relation → table; domain → attribute. But a table can not adopt another table as an attribute! Therefore, we can not represent our domain knowledge in terms of tables. There simply is no room for relations between relations. Though, we can represent SOME relations ~ Anonymous,
644:The first act by virtue of which the State really constitutes itself the representative of the whole of societythe taking possession of the means of production in the name of societythis is, at the same time, its last independent act as a State. State interference in social relations becomes, in one domain after another, superfluous, and then dies out of itself; the government of persons is replaced by the administration of things, and by the conduct of processes of production. The State is not abolished. It dies out. ~ Friedrich Engels,
645:The result of the revolution in Germany has been to establish a democracy in the best sense of the word. We are steering towards an order of things guaranteeing a process of a natural and reasonable selection in the domain of political leadership, thanks to which that leadership will be entrusted to the most competent, irrespective of their descent, name or fortune. The memorable words of the great Corsican that every soldier carries a Field Marshal's baton in his knapsack, will find its political complement in Germany. ~ Adolf Hitler,
646:Much of the early engineering development of digital computers was done in universities. A few years ago, the view was commonly expressed that universities had played their part in computer design, and that the matter could now safely be left to industry. [...] Apart from the obvious functions of keeping in the public domain material that might otherwise be hidden, universities can make a special contribution by reason of their freedom from commercial considerations, including freedom from the need to follow the fashion. ~ Maurice Wilkes,
647:Social (Pragmatic) Communication Disorder DSM-5 describes a new disorder that has elements of ASD but is actually conceptualized as outside the autism spectrum. The intention is to provide diagnostic coverage for children with symptoms in the social-communication domain but who have never displayed repetitive, restricted behaviours or interests. However, it is unclear how Social Communication Disorder (SCD) will be different from ASD, which support or therapy services will be available, and what the child will qualify for. ~ Tony Attwood,
648:The two most capable nation state adversaries in the cyber domain are clearly Russia and, of course, China. And I do think Russia poses a huge threat in the way they have used the cyber domain. That, to me, by the way, is the big issue here, is Russian interference in our political process, in our election process. And that is an egregious act by them. And they will continue to do that and I think more aggressively than they have in the past. And I think it's something Americans, all American citizens need to be aware of. ~ James R Clapper,
649:The idea is that of the earth not only becoming covered with myriad grains of thought, but becoming enclosed in a single thinking envelope so as to form, functionally, no more than a single vast grain of thought on the sidereal scale, the plurality of individual reflections grouping themselves together and reinforcing one another in the act of a single unanimous reflection...A new domain of psychical expansion- that is what we lack. And it is staring us in the face if we would only raise our heads to look at it. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
650:What’s different here is the focus on the proxy when far more relevant data is available. I cannot imagine a more meaningful piece of data for auto insurers than a drunk driving record. It is evidence of risk in precisely the domain they’re attempting to predict. It’s far better than other proxies they consider, such as a high school student’s grade point average. Yet it can count far less in their formula than a score drawn from financial data thrown together on a credit report (which, as we’ve seen, is sometimes erroneous). ~ Cathy O Neil,
651:In the civilization of our times, it is normal, and almost obligatory, for cookery and fashion to take up most of the culture sections, for chefs and fashion designers now enjoy the prominence that before was given to scientists, composers and philosophers. Gas burners, stoves and catwalks meld, in the cultural coordinates of our time, with books, laboratories and operas, while TV stars and great footballers exert the sort of influence over habits, taste and fashion that was previously the domain of teachers and thinkers ~ Mario Vargas Llosa,
652:We thus begin to see that the institutionalized practice of citations and references in the sphere of learning is not a trivial matter. While many a general reader-that is, the lay reader located outside the domain of science and scholarship-may regard the lowly footnote or the remote endnote or the bibliographic parenthesis as a dispensable nuisance, it can be argued that these are in truth central to the incentive system and an underlying sense of distributive justice that do much to energize the advancement of knowledge. ~ Robert K Merton,
653:As for Christianity's alleged concern with truth, Christian faith is to free inquiry what the Mafia is to free enterprise. Christianity may be represented as a competitor in the realm of ideas to be considered on the basis of its merits, but this is mere disguise. Like the Mafia, if Christianity fails to defeat its competition by legitimate means (which is a forgone conclusion), it resorts to strong-arm tactics. Have faith or be damned - this biblical doctrine alone is enough to exclude Christianity from the domain of reason. ~ George H Smith,
654:Especially for the younger generation, the Internet is not some standalone, separate domain where a few of life’s functions are carried out. It is not merely our post office and our telephone. Rather, it is the epicenter of our world, the place where virtually everything is done. It is where friends are made, where books and films are chosen, where political activism is organized, where the most private data is created and stored. It is where we develop and express our very personality and sense of self. To turn that network ~ Glenn Greenwald,
655:You Bastard was thinking: there seems to be some growing dimensional instability here, swinging from zero to nearly forty-five degrees by the look of it. How interesting. I wonder what’s causing it? Let V equal 3. Let Tau equal Chi/4. cudcudcud Let Kappa/y be an Evil-Smelling-Bugger* (* Renowned as the greatest camel mathematician of all time, who invented a math of eight-dimensional space while lying down with his nostrils closed in a violent sandstorm.) differential tensor domain with four imaginary spin co-efficients. . . ~ Terry Pratchett,
656:I had a vivid illustration of domain dependence in the driveway of a hotel in the pseudocity of Dubai. A fellow who looked like a banker had a uniformed porter carry his luggage (I can instantly tell if someone is a certain type of banker with minimal cues as I have physical allergies to them, even affecting my breathing). About fifteen minutes later I saw the banker lifting free weights at the gym, trying to replicate natural exercises using kettlebells as if he were swinging a suitcase. Domain dependence is pervasive. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
657:The constitution regulates our stewardship; the constitution devotes the domain to union, to justice, to defense, to welfare, and to liberty. But there is a higher law than the constitution, which regulates our authority over the domain, and devotes it to the same noble purposes. The territory is a part, no inconsiderable part, of the common heritage of mankind, bestowed upon them by the Creator of the universe. We are his stewards, and must so discharge our trust as to secure in the highest attainable degree their happiness. ~ William H Seward,
658:there is one neuroanatomical anomaly that turns up again and again in savants, including Kim: damage in the brain’s left hemisphere. Interestingly, the exaggerated abilities of savants are almost always in right-brain sorts of activities, like visual and spatial skills, and savants almost always have trouble with tasks that are supposed to be primarily the left-brain’s domain, such as language. Speech defects are extremely common among savants, which is part of the reason that loquacious, well-spoken Daniel seems so extraordinary. ~ Joshua Foer,
659:there was a time when this home was her domain. Sometimes she felt proud of it, sometimes she felt tied to it, but whether it was a burden or a blessing, it was hers to keep. She’d known better than anyone what this house needed; lately it’d become one of the few aspects of her life she could control. there is no corner, no ridge along the steps or crack along the wall, that she doesn’t know like her own body. the house may never have been the sanctuary she’d always dreamed of, but at least it carried no surprises. It was comfortable. ~ Anonymous,
660:(The terms douloi, banausoi and aristoi) are in a way more precise, but what is more vital and valuable, they are more comprehensive: they project a concept of psychic order that embraces entire fields that we have no other way of seeing all together as the working of a single principle. If we think of the human domain as the collaboration and the conflict of these three diverse character-types, we can understand the weave and the stress and polemics of their very different basal teleologies or ultimate governing purposes of life. ~ Kenny Smith,
661:These chunks represent patterns (such as faces) as well as specific knowledge. For example, a world-class chess master is estimated to have mastered about 100,000 board positions. Shakespeare used 29,000 words but close to 100,000 meanings of those words. Development of expert systems in medicine indicate that humans can master about 100,000 concepts in a domain. If we estimate that this “professional” knowledge represents as little as 1 percent of the overall pattern and knowledge store of a human, we arrive at an estimate of 107 chunks. ~ Ray Kurzweil,
662:there was a time when this home was her domain. Sometimes she felt proud of it, sometimes she felt tied to it, but whether it was a burden or a blessing, it was hers to keep. She’d known better than anyone what this house needed; lately it’d become one of the few aspects of her life she could control. there is no corner, no ridge along the steps or crack along the wall, that she doesn’t know like her own body. the house may never have been the sanctuary she’d always dreamed of, but at least it carried no surprises. It was comfortable. ~ Natalia Sylvester,
663:Today’s milestone is human madness. Politics is a part of it, particularly in its lethal outbursts. Politics is not, as it was for Hannah Arendt, the field where human freedom is unfurled. The modern world, the world of world war, the Third World, the underground world of death that acts upon us, do not have the civilized splendor of the Greek city state. The modern political domain is massively, in totalitarian fashion, social, leveling, exhausting. Hence madness is a space of antisocial, apolitical, and paradoxically free individuation ~ Julia Kristeva,
664:If you have a thankful heart and are using that domain to reflect God's beauty as a Creator, then you are worshiping. Listening to Hillsound United isn't worship; it's and aid for worship. I found a deeper level of joy and connection with Jesus when I realized that eating a good meal with thankfulness was just as holy as my prayer time. The truth is, Go doesn't just want your "Christian" things. He wats it all. When we realize the beauty of God's grace in the mundane, not just the religious, that's when we will begin to see him correctly. ~ Jefferson Bethke,
665:It may happen that the enemies of Islam may consider it expedient not to take any action against Islam, if Islam leaves them alone in their geographical boundaries to continue the lordship of some men over others and does not extend its message and its declaration of universal freedom within their domain. But Islam cannot agree to this unless they submit to its authority by paying Jizyah, which will be a guarantee that they have opened their doors for the preaching of Islam and will not put any obstacle in its way through the power of the state. ~ Sayyid Qutb,
666:Sociological method as we practice it rests wholly on the basic principle that social facts must be studied as things, that is, as realities external to the individual. There is no principle for which we have received more criticism; but none is more fundamental. Indubitably for sociology to be possible, it must above all have an object all its own. It must take cognizance of a reality which is not in the domain of other sciences... there can be no sociology unless societies exist, and that societies cannot exist if there are only individuals. ~ Emile Durkheim,
667:The physical domain of the country had its counterpart in me. The trails I made led outward into the hills and swamps, but they led inward also. And from the study of things underfoot, and from reading and thinking, came a kind of exploration, myself and the land. In time the two became one in my mind. With the gathering force of an essential thing realizing itself out of early ground, I faced in myself a passionate and tenacious longing--- to put away thought forever, and all the trouble it brings, all but the nearest desire, direct and searching. ~ John Haines,
668:It’s all about control. Control is illusory. No matter what university you go to, no matter what degree you hold, if your goal is to become master of your own destiny, you have more to learn. Parkinson’s is a perfect metaphor for lack of control. Every unwanted movement in my hand or arm, every twitch that I cannot anticipate or arrest, is a reminder that even in the domain of my own being, I am not calling the shots. I tried to exert control by drinking myself to a place of indifference, which just exacerbated the sense of miserable hopelessness. ~ Michael J Fox,
669:you know when i was a little kid in oregon i didn't feel that i was and american at all, with all that suburban ideal and sex repression and general dreary newspaper gray censorship of all our real human values but and when i discovered buddhism and all i suddenly felt that i had lived in a previous lifetime innumerable ages ago and now because of the faults and sins in that lifetime i was being degraded to a more grievous domain of existence and my karma was to be born in america where nobody has any fun or believes in anything, especially freedom. ~ Jack Kerouac,
670:Many more details confirm my work: For example, Sokar (who is located in the 5th hour domain) is a chthonic deity of canals and underground tombs. He is the god of the Mysterious Region which could be identified as the Grand Gallery. This passageway could possibly be recognized as the oval island of Sokar which were guarded by large granite blocks from Afu-Ra's path. The granite slabs were probably securing the pathway to the Grand Gallery from the King's Chamber rather than from the pyramid's entrance against tomb robbers as Mark Lehner's hypothesized. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
671:We have a right to expect that the best trained, the best educated men on the Pacific slope, the Rocky Mountains, and great plains States will take the lead in the preservation and right use of forests, in securing the right use of waters, and in seeing that our land policy is not twisted from its original purpose, but is perpetuated by amendment, by change when such change is necessary in the life of that purpose, the purpose being to turn the public domain into farms each to be the property of the man who actually tills it and makes his home in it. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
672:Never can a new idea move within the law. It matters not whether that idea pertains to political and social changes or to any other domain of human thought and expression - to science, literature, music; in fact, everything that makes for freedom and joy and beauty must refuse to move within the law. How can it be otherwise? The law is stationary, fixed, mechanical, 'a chariot wheel' which grinds all alike without regard to time, place and condition, without ever taking into account cause and effect, without ever going into the complexity of the human soul. ~ Emma Goldman,
673:You cannot transform a domain unless you first thoroughly understand how it works. Which means that one has to acquire the tools of mathematics, learn the basic principles of physics, and become aware of the current state of knowledge. But the old Italian saying seems to apply: Impara l’arte, e mettila da parte (learn the craft, and then set it aside). One cannot be creative without learning what others know, but then one cannot be creative without becoming dissatisfied with that knowledge and rejecting it (or some of it) for a better way. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
674:We have shriveled down the notion of what constitutes "a family unit" to such a tiny scale that it would probably be unrecognizable as a family to anybody in one of those big, loose, enveloping Hmong clans. You almost need an electron microscope to study the modern Western family these days. What you've got are two, possibly three, or maybe sometimes four people rattling around together in a giant space, each person with her own private physical and psychological domain, each person spending large amounts of the day completely separated from the others. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
675:As the coffee slid down my throat and the caffeine penetrated my haze, I wondered why he had returned so soon. I pulled my scraggly housecoat tightly around me. His gray eyes looked far too awake for this time of the day. He must be one of those morning people. After sitting contentedly for five minutes his left knee began to fidget. I enjoyed his discomfort. Call me mean, but anyone who dares enter my domain before my first cup of coffee deserves no less. I kept drinking, closing my eyes to express my bliss and taking a wee bit of pleasure in his discomfort. ~ Jo Ann Carson,
676:Bullies learn nothing when bullied in turn; there are no lessons, no about-face in their squalid natures. The principle of righteous justice is a peculiar domain where propriety and vengeance become confused, almost indistinguishable. The bullied bully is shown but the other side of the same fear he or she has lived with all his or her life. The about-face happens there, on the outside, not the inside. Inside, the bully and everything that haunts the bully's soul remains unchanged.

It is an abject truth, but conscience cannot be shoved down the throat. ~ Steven Erikson,
677:Come, let us hasten to a higher plane
Where dyads tread the fairy fields of Venn,
Their indices bedecked from one to n
Commingled in an endless Markov chain!

I'll grant thee random access to my heart,
Thou'lt tell me all the constants of thy love;
And so we two shall all love's lemmas prove,
And in our bound partition never part.

Cancel me not — for what then shall remain?
Abscissas some mantissas, modules, modes,
A root or two, a torus and a node:
The inverse of my verse, a null domain.

- Love and Tensor Algebra ~ Stanis aw Lem,
678:Yet his feeling of distance, the need he felt to stay silent and to keep his views on what he had read, seen, or thought about to himself without immediately firing them off into the public domain in exchange for a fee, increased with every year that passed. He preferred to express this wish in an off-hand and matter-of-fact way (after all, being an author was a way of life!) rather than load it with pathos, but even so what lay at the heart of this was a concern for the nature of the word and a desire to protect it from devaluation through inflationary overuse. ~ Hermann Hesse,
679:And last of all we have the secondary forms of crystals bursting in upon us, and sparkling in the rigidity of mathematical necessity and telling us, neither of harmony of design, usefulness or moral significance, nothing but spherical trigonometry and Napier's analogies. It is because we have blindly excluded the lessons of these angular bodies from the domain of human knowledge that we are still in doubt about the great doctrine that the only laws of matter are those which our minds must fabricate, and the only laws of mind are fabricated for it by matter. ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
680:Every writer owes something to a particular tradition he/she grew up in. But no serious writer - other than the militantly nationalist ones - would reduce his/her domain of influence to a single tradition. Furthermore, historical breaks are so common and large in Europe that there are ruptures in every tradition which then connect the same generations across national borders. Younger Eastern European writers, for instance, have more in common with other writers of the same age in Europe, than with the previous, communist-era generations in their own countries. ~ Aleksandar Hemon,
681:Even older and deeper than ethics, however, is religion. Religion concerns itself not with (mere) right and wrong, but with good and evil themselves - with the archetypes of right and wrong. Relgion concerns itself with the domain of value, ultimate value. That is not the scientific domain. It is not the domain of emperical description. The people who wrote the Bible, for example, weren't scientists. They couldn't have been scientists, even if they had wanted to be. The viewpoints, methods and practices of science hadn't been formulated when the Bible was written. ~ Jordan Peterson,
682:The fairest state of them all, this tranquil and beloved domain—what has it now become? A nursery for Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas. A monstrous breeding farm to supply the sinew to gratify the maw of Eli Whitney’s infernal machine, cursed be that blackguard’s name! In such a way is our human decency brought down, when we pander all that is in us noble and just to the false god which goes by the vile name of Capital! Oh, Virginia, woe betide thee! Woe, thrice woe, and ever damned in memory be the day when poor black men in chains first trod upon thy sacred strand! ~ William Styron,
683:Even older and deeper than ethics, however, is religion. Religion concerns itself not with (mere) right and wrong, but with good and evil themselves - with the archetypes of right and wrong. Relgion concerns itself with the domain of value, ultimate value. That is not the scientific domain. It is not the domain of emperical description. The people who wrote the Bible, for example, weren't scientists. They couldn't have been scientists, even if they had wanted to be. The viewpoints, methods and practices of science hadn't been formulated when the Bible was written. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
684:I was angry that Trujillo had shot down my idea, but impressed that his own idea made so much sense, and then angry again that he would dare to be so good at something I considered my own personal domain. And then I was embarrassed for feeling so petty about it, and I was worried if I was right, and I was frustrated we hadn’t found anything solid yet, and I was mad at Nathan, and scared for Brooke, and fascinated by this new killer—and all I wanted to do was get out, and away, and be by myself, even if it was just for a minute. Even just half a minute. Maybe just forever. ~ Dan Wells,
685:Even today a good many distinguished minds seem unable to accept or even to understand that from a source of noise natural selection alone and unaided could have drawn all the music of the biosphere. In effect natural selection operates upon the products of chance and can feed nowhere else; but it operates in a domain of very demanding conditions, and from this domain chance is barred. It is not to chance but to these conditions that eveloution owes its generally progressive cource, its successive conquests, and the impresssion it gives of a smooth and steady unfolding. ~ Jacques Monod,
686:When the internal critic puts you down using such comparisons, here's how it operates:
First, it selects a single, arbitrary domain of comparison ( fame, maybe, or power).
Then it acts as if that domain is the only one that is relevant. Then it contrasts you unfavorably with someone truly stellar, within that domain.

It can take that final step even further, using the unbridgeable gap between you and its target of comparison as evidence for the fundamental injustice of life. That way your motivation to do anything at all can be most effectively undermined. ~ Jordan Peterson,
687:My brain was spinning. Demons, missing students...
Why had my life suddenly become a Nancy Drew mystery from hell?
"Okay, but that would mean..." I could hardly say the next words. They seemed unbelievable to me. "That would mean Mrs. Casnoff is in on it, and if that is the case,my dad would know something about it."
"Not necessarily," Archer said. "Hecate Hall and Graymalkin Island are completely Mrs. Casnoff's domain. Your dad signs off on all the kids who're sentenced here, but past that, he leaves it all to her."
Way to be screwed over by delegating, Dad. ~ Rachel Hawkins,
688:I’m not starry-eyed about science. Scientists are human, and so we are prone to corruption and groupthink and all sorts of forces that veer us away from the truth. But it does work stunningly well, and this is largely because science provides an excellent example of a community that establishes conditions where rational argument is able to flourish. I think the same holds, to varying extents, in other domains, such as philosophy, the humanities, and even certain sorts of political discourse. We are capable of reason and can exercise this capacity in the domain of morality. To ~ Paul Bloom,
689:When the internal critic puts you down using such comparisons, here's how it operates:
First, it selects a single, arbitrary domain of comparison ( fame, maybe, or power).
Then it acts as if that domain is the only one that is relevant. Then it contrasts you unfavorably with someone truly stellar, within that domain.

It can take that final step even further, using the unbridgeable gap between you and its target of comparison as evidence for the fundamental injustice of life. That way your motivation to do anything at all can be most effectively undermined. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
690:Inwardness is the characteristic feature of the vegetable rather than the animal approach to existence. The animals move, migrate and swarm, while plants hold fast. Plants live in a dimension characterised by solid state, the fixed and the enduring. If there is movement in the consciousness of plants then it must be the movement of spirit and attention in the domain of vegetal imagination. (...) This is the truth that the shamans have always known and practiced. Awareness of the green side of mind was called Veriditas by the twelfth century visionary Hildegard Von Bingen. ~ Terence McKenna,
691:CHAPTER II SPACE MISSION AREAS “Weather, intelligence, communications, precision [sic]-navigation-and timing... are all capabilities we have brought to the fight from the space domain and are relied upon in virtually any and every military operation. ” Mr. Michael B. Donley Secretary of the Air Force November 2010 1. Introduction US military space operations are composed of the following mission areas: space situational awareness, space force enhancement, space support, space control, and space force application. This chapter summarizes the role of each mission area and how they ~ Anonymous,
692:The strategy of semantic ascent is that it carries the discussion into a domain where both parties are better agreed on the objects (viz., words) and on the main terms connecting them. Words, or their inscriptions, unlike points, miles, classes and the rest, are tangible objects of the size so popular in the marketplace, where men of unlike conceptual schemes communicate at their best. The strategy is one of ascending to a common part of two fundamentally disparate conceptual schemes, the better to discuss the disparate foundations. No wonder it helps in philosophy. ~ Willard Van Orman Quine,
693:To the extent that we hyper-separate ourselves from nature and reduce it conceptually in order to justify domination, we not only lose the ability to empathise and to see the non-human sphere in ethical terms, but also get a false sense of our own character and location that includes an illusory sense of autonomy. The failure to see the non-human domain in the richer terms appropriate to ethics licences supposedly ‘purely instrumental’ relationships that distort our perceptions and enframings, impoverish our relations and make us insensitive to dependencies and interconnections ~ Val Plumwood,
694:3 Tap an account type:  Microsoft Exchange  MobileMe  Google email  Yahoo! Mail  AOL  Other 4 Enter your account information and tap Save. Your service provider or system administrator can provide the account settings you need. Exchange accounts: Enter your complete email address, domain (optional), user name, password, and a description. The description can be whatever you like. iPhone supports Microsoft’s Autodiscovery service, which uses your user name and password to determine the address of the Exchange server. If the server’s address can’t be determined, you’re asked to ~ Anonymous,
695:faith is never meant to exist apart from knowledge, where knowledge is possible. What is possible through the Scriptures and the actions of God in history is knowledge—knowledge of God, knowledge of human life—and that dignity has to be restored. So our focus is on knowledge for living and the disastrous effects of forcing the teachings of Jesus Christ and his people from the domain of human knowledge. Now we have an odd thing called secular knowledge. What is that? Is reality secular? If reality is not secular, secular knowledge falls miserably short of what human beings need. ~ Dallas Willard,
696:Big Sister Shen tells me this used to be a sleepy fishing village. But with the economic reforms and the opening up of China, urbanization brought construction everywhere. To get more compensation when the government exercised its eminent domain powers, villagers raced to build tall towers on their land so as to maximize the square footage of the residential space. But before they could cash in, real estate prices had risen to the point where even the government could no longer afford to pay compensation. These hastily erected buildings remain like historical ruins, witnesses to history. ~ Ken Liu,
697:For an instant he thought he grasped the truth of a terrifying world in which one could not escape horror, in which violence was eternal, the great and only verity, greater than the civilisations it created, greater than any god man worshipped, for it was the only true god. It was as if man existed only to transmit violence to ensure its domain is eternal. For the world did not change, this violence had always existed and would never be eradicated, men would die under the boot and fists and horror of other men until the end of time, and all human history was a history of violence. ~ Richard Flanagan,
698:For no exact scientific reason, but simply as a result of impression and routine, we have formed the habit of separating the psychic from the material, as if they belonged to two different worlds, the arrangement of individuals and the arrangement of cells; only the latter being regarded as organic and natural, in contrast to the former, which is relegated to the domain of the moral or artificial. Society (human society especially) is a matter for historians and jurists rather than biologists. Is not that what we too often think? ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Phyletic Structure of the Human Group,
699:I often went to Catholic mass or Eucharist at the Episcopal church, nourished by the symbol and power of this profound feeding ritual. It never occurred to me how odd it was that women, who have presided over the domain of food and feeding for thousands of years, were historically and routinely barred from presiding over it in a spiritual context. And when the priest held out the host and said, "This is my body, given for you," not once did I recognize that it is women in the act of breastfeeding who most truly embody those words and who are also most excluded from ritually saying them. ~ Sue Monk Kidd,
700:Communication does not include any transfer of products or knowledge from one system to another, but is based on the reorientation of the indigenous processes—in other words, the cognitive domain, or the mind—of a system by the self-presentation of another system and the processes which are indigenous to it. The verbal description of a colorful sunset transmits nothing of the real experience, if not by way of remembering a comparable experience of one’s own. In other words, cognition falls here together with re-cognition, presentation becomes re-presentation. ~ Erich Jantsch, The Self-Organizing Universe,
701:Flatland accepts no interior domain whatsoever, and reintroducing Spirit is the least of our worries. 'Thus our task is not specifically to reintroduce spirituality and somehow attempt to show that modern science is becoming compatible with God. That approach, which is taken by most of the integrative attempts, does not go nearly deep enough in diagnosing the disease, and thus, in my opinion, never really addresses the crucial issues. 'Rather, it is the rehabilitation of the interior in general that opens the possibility of reconciling science and religion.' ~ Ken Wilber, Marriage of Sense and Soul, p. 142.,
702:The vast body of literature, in every domain, is composed of hand-me-down ideas. The question — never resolved, alas! — is to what extent it would be efficacious to curtail the overwhelming supply of cheap fodder. One thing is certain today — the illiterate are definitely not the least intelligent among us. If it be knowledge or wisdom one is seeking, then one had better go direct to the source. And the source is not the scholar or philosopher, not the master, saint, or teacher, but life itself — direct experience of life. The same is true for art. Here, too, we can dispense with ‘the masters. ~ Henry Miller,
703:It seems to me that the novel is very much alive as a form. Without any question, every epoch has its own forms, and the novel nowadays cannot resemble that of the nineteenth century. In this domain all experiments are justified, and it is better to write something new clumsily than to repeat the old brilliantly. In the nineteenth century, novels dealt with the fate of a person or of a family; this was linked to life in that period. In our time the destinies of people are interwoven. Whether man recognizes it or not, his fate is much more linked to that of many other people than it used to be. ~ Ilya Ehrenburg,
704:Pribram realized that if the holographic brain model was taken to its logical conclusions, it opened the door on the possibility that objective reality—the world of coffee cups, mountain vistas, elm trees, and table lamps—might not even exist, or at least not exist in the way we believe it exists. Was it possible, he wondered, that what the mystics had been saying for centuries was true, reality was maya, an illusion, and what was out there was really a vast, resonating symphony of wave forms, a "frequency domain" that was transformed into the world as we know it only after it entered our senses? ~ Michael Talbot,
705:So far, the items on that list of brain differences that are thought to explain the gender status quo have always, in the end been crossed off. But before this happens, speculation becomes elevated to the status of fact, especially in the hands of some popular writers. Once in the public domain these supposed facts about male and female brains become part of the culture, often lingering on well past their best-by dates. Here they reinforce and legitimate the gender stereotypes that interact with our minds, helping to create the very gender inequalities that the neuroscientific claims seek to explain. ~ Cordelia Fine,
706:The European soul manifested in Merkel herself said (after the murder-attack in Berlin) that she was "shocked, shaken and deeply saddened" by the attack and told reporters it would be "particularly sickening" if it turns out the attacker was an asylum-seeker who sought refuge in Germany; however this same socialist domain of influence ignores its own transgressions through its illegal immigrant Jew constituency that got shipped off to the Middle East to seek refuge decades ago. This European illegitimate mutant entity of the Jew has been slaughtering people and stealing Land & Property ever since. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
707:It is really a sorry tale. I almost feel pity for them. When I quite recently realized this, I was shocked. No, I was disappointed. Until then I had lived my life respecting the world of men. I had always thought that they lived in this domain of lofty, agonizing ideals. Unable to compare to them, all I hoped to be able to do was stay in the background and assist them in the duties in their life, and help them in what little way I could. But how foolish I was. It is almost humorous to think that the woman who is helping out in the background is in fact the only purpose for which these men live their lives. ~ Osamu Dazai,
708:The case for the humanities is not hard to make, though it can be difficult--to such an extent have we been marginalized, so long have we acceded to that marginalization--not to sound either defensive or naive. The humanities, done right, are the crucible in which our evolving notions of what it means to be fully human are put to the test; they teach us, incrementally, endlessly, not what to do, but how to be. Their method is confrontational, their domain unlimited, their "product" not truth but the reasoned search for truth, their "success" something very much like Frost's momentary stay against confusion. ~ Mark Slouka,
709:It is as if we are doomed to be deceived by the most superficial part of things, the packaging, the gift wrapping. This is why we don’t see antifragility in places that are obvious, too obvious. It is not part of the accepted way of thinking about success, economic growth, or innovation that these may result only from overcompensation against stressors. Nor do we see this overcompensation at work elsewhere. (And domain dependence is also why it has been difficult for many researchers to realize that uncertainty, incomplete understanding, disorder, and volatility are members of the same close family.) ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
710:But everywhere, managerial feudalism ensures that thousands of hours of creative effort will literally come to nothing. Take the domain of scientific research, or higher education once again. If a grant agency funds only 10 percent of all applications, that means that 90 percent of the work that went into preparing applications was just as pointless as the work that went into making the promo video for Apollonia’s doomed reality TV show Too Fat to Fuck. (Even more so, really, since one can rarely make such an amusing anecdote out of it afterward.) This is an extraordinary squandering of human creative energy. ~ David Graeber,
711:Certainly truths are to be found in all the philosophers, and above all half-truths, but these truths are flanked with errors and inconsistencies, and there is moreover no need for them; hence it is pointless to dwell on them. Partial truths are only to be accepted in the domain of traditional orthodoxy, because they are only acceptable in the context of the total Truth, which alone guarantees their exactitude and their efficacy. To think while denying the total Truth, which is both objective and subjective, is completely inconsistent; it is not really thinking.
[Letter on Existentialism to Huston Smith] ~ Frithjof Schuon,
712:When we come under the spell of the deeper domain of technology, its economic character and even its power aspect fascinate us less than its playful side. Then we realize we that we are involved in a play, a dance of the spirit, which cannot be grasped by calculation. What is ultimately left for science is intuition alone - a call of destiny.

This playful feature manifests itself more clearly in small things than in the gigantic works of our world. The crude observer can only be impressed by large quantities - chiefly when they are in motion - and yet there are as many organs in a fly as in a leviathan. ~ Ernst J nger,
713:Whenever we moderns pause for a moment, and enter the silence, and listen very carefully, the glimmer of our deepest nature begins to shine forth, and we are introduced to the mysteries of the deep, the call of the within, the infinite radiance of a splendor that time and space forgot - we are introduced to the all-pervading Spiritual domain that the growing tip of our honored ancestors were the first to discover. And they were good enough to leave us a general map to that infinite domain, a map called the Great Nest of Being, a map of our own interiors, an archeology of our own Spirit. ~ Ken Wilber, Integral Psychology, p. 190,
714:In this modern era of cosmology, evolution, and the human genome, is there still the possibility of a richly satisfying harmony between the scientific and spiritual worldviews? I answer with a resounding yes! In my view, there is no conflict in being a rigorous scientist and a person who believes in a God who takes a personal interest in each one of us. Science’s domain is to explore nature. God’s domain is in the spiritual world, a realm not possible to explore with the tools and language of science. It must be examined with the heart, the mind, and the soul—and the mind must find a way to embrace both realms. ~ Francis S Collins,
715:The holding of the Feis of Tara was the occasion also for holding a great Aonach or fair. Almost all the great periodic assemblages of ancient Ireland had fairs in their train. After that of Tara the most famous of these periodic assemblies were those held at Tlachtga, Uisnech, Cruachan and Tallite — the three royal residences in those three portions of the royal domain of Meath, which had been annexed from Leinster, Munster, Connaught and Ulster, respectively. Also the Fair of Emain Macha (in the present county of Armagh), the Fair of Colmain on the Curragh of Kildare, and the famous Fair of Carman (Wexford). As ~ Seumas MacManus,
716:YES! a ten!
...eight...nine...ten!"

"Landing you in the Enchanted Forest, which is MY domain.
600 gold, please."

"My Scottie dog will not pay your tyrannical toll!"

"Nimona... "

"He rallied the oppressed woodland creatures and organized a revolt!"

"It just so happens I am a just ruler and am greatly admired by all my subjects."

"Squirrels scale the walls of the castle and bears batter down the gates!
Bloody chaos ensues!
The Enchanted Forest is ours!"

"I'm taking the 600 gold anyway."

"HIGHWAY ROBBERY! "

"Plus another 600 for damages. ~ Noelle Stevenson,
717:The happiness of my existence, its unique character perhaps can be found in its fatefulness: to speak in a riddle, as my father I have already died, as my mother I still live and grow old. This double origin taken as it were from the highest and lowest rungs of the ladder of life at once decadent and beginning — this if anything explains that neutrality, that freedom from bias in regard to the general problem of existence which perhaps distinguishes me. My nose is more sensitive than any man that has yet lived as to signs of ascent or decline. In this domain I am a true master — I know both sides for I am both sides. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
718:One thing is certain, however. The metaphysical 'rule', which is held as an ironclad conviction by those whom I have debated the issue of creation, namely that "out of nothing nothing comes," has no foundation in science. Arguing that it is self-evident, unwavering, and unassailable is like arguing, as Darwin falsely did, when he made the suggestion that the origin of life was beyond the domain of science by building an analogy with the incorrect claim that matter cannot be created or destroyed. All it represents is an unwillingness to recognize the simple fact that nature may be cleverer than philosophers or theologians. ~ Lawrence M Krauss,
719:Many Are Called
The Lord Apollo, who has never died,
Still holds alone his immemorial reign,
Supreme in an impregnable domain
That with his magic he has fortified;
And though melodious multitudes have tried
In ecstasy, in anguish, and in vain,
With invocation sacred and profane
To lure him, even the loudest are outside.
Only at unconjectured intervals,
By will of him on whom no man may gaze,
By word of him whose law no man has read,
A questing light may rift the sullen walls,
To cling where mostly its infrequent rays
Fall golden on the patience of the dead.
~ Edwin Arlington Robinson,
720:Being satisfied: this is the general model of being and living whose promoters and supporters do not appreciate the fact that it generates discontent. For the quest for satisfaction and the fact of being satisfied presuppose the fragmentation of 'being' into activities, intentions, needs, all of them well-defined, isolated, separable and separated from the Whole. Is this an art of living? A style? No. It is merely the result and the application to daily life of a management technique and a positive knowledge directed by market research. The economic prevails even in a domain that seemed to elude it: it governs lived experience. ~ Henri Lefebvre,
721:In other words, while they would in general admit that some kinds of statistical laws are consistent with the assumption of further individual laws operating in a broader context, they believe that quantum mechanics could never satisfactorily be regarded as a law of this kind. The statistical features of the quantum theory are thus regarded as representing a kind of irreducible lawlessness of individual phenomena in the quantum domain. All individual laws (e.g. classical mechanics) are then regarded as limiting cases of the probability laws of the quantum theory, approximately valid for systems involving large numbers of molecules. ~ David Bohm,
722:A Classroom Assignment
On Freedom
By Thomas S. Sidney, aged 12 Years
October 21st, 1828
Freedom will break the tyrant's chains,
And shatter all his whole domain;
From slavery she will always free
And all her aim is liberty.
On Slavery
By George E. Allen, aged 12 Years
October 21st, 1828
Slavery, oh, thou cruel stain,
Thou does fill my heart with pain;
See my brother, here he stands
Chained by slavery's cruel hands.
Could we not feel a brother's woes,
Relieve the wants he undergoes?
Snatch him from slavery's cruel smart,
And to him freedom's joy impart?
~ Anonymous Americas,
723:In technology, as in writing or speech-or haute cuisine-there are varying degrees of fluency, of articulateness, of self-expression. A beginning practitioner in architecture, like a beginner at a foreign language, will use the same base combinations-the same phrases-over and over, even if not quite appropriate. A practiced architect, steeped in the art of the domain, will have discarded any notion of the grammar as pure rules, and will use instead an intuitive knowledge of what fits together. And a true master will push the envelope, will write poetry in the domain, will leave his or her "signature" in the habit-combinations used. ~ W Brian Arthur,
724:That afternoon, with a sense of infinite relief, Pollock watched the flat swampy foreshore of Sulyma grow small in the distance. The gap in the long line of white surge became narrower and narrower. It seemed to be closing in and cutting him off from his trouble. The feeling of dread and worry began to slip from him bit by bit. At Sulyma belief in Porroh malignity and Porroh magic had been in the air, his sense of Porroh had been vast, pervading, threatening, dreadful. Now manifestly the domain of Porroh was only a little place, a little black band between the lea and the blue cloudy Mendi uplands.

("Pollock And The Porroh Man") ~ H G Wells,
725:Wilson’s weakness was to be over-literal, or to assume that his opponents were. One treatise, The Uttermost Pit, demonstrated with considerable geological learning that there could not be space within the mineral bowels of the Earth for any chambers big enough to contain all the damned souls of the ages. A third, Going to Gehenna, purported to show that the biblical references to the infernal domain were in point of fact to real places of sinister repute, and not to anywhere metaphysical. Wilson lost no opportunity to argue, with any evidence he found to hand, that there could not be any hell or Hades, and so none should fear them. ~ Mark Valentine,
726:When you run a large organization, you tend to become very good at tasks such as complex decision-making, prioritization, organizational design, process improvement, and organizational communication. When you are building an organization, there is no organization to design, there are no processes to improve, and communicating with the organization is simple. On the other hand, you have to be very adept at running a high-quality hiring process, have terrific domain expertise (you are personally responsible for quality control), know how to create process from scratch, and be extremely creative about initiating new directions and tasks. ~ Ben Horowitz,
727:She had not been his and now she was his. Or she had always been his and just now knew it. Cora's attention detached itself. It floated someplace past the burning slave and the great house and the lines that defined the Randall domain. She tried to fill in its details from stories, sifting through the accounts of slaves who had seen it. Each time she caught hold of something - buildings of polished white stone, an ocean so vast that there wasn't a tree in sight, the shop of a colored blacksmith who served no master but himself - it wriggled free like a fish and raced away. She would have to see it for herself if she were to keep it. ~ Colson Whitehead,
728:Those who are close to us, when they die, divide our world. There is the world of the living, which we finally, in one way or another, succumb to, and then there is the domain of the dead that, like an imaginary friend (or foe) or a secret concubine, constantly beckons, reminding us of our loss. What is memory but a ghost that lurks at the corners of the mind, interrupting our normal course of life, disrupting our sleep in order to remind us of some acute pain or pleasure, something silenced or ignored? We miss not only their presence, or how they felt about us, but ultimately how they allowed us to feel about ourselves or them. (prologue) ~ Azar Nafisi,
729:The facts of the case were straightforward: Hillary Clinton had used her personal email system, on a server and with an email address that was entirely of her own creation, to conduct her work as secretary of state. She set the server up several months after taking office. For the first few months of her tenure, she had used a personal AT&T BlackBerry email address before switching to a Clintonemail.com domain. In the course of doing her work, she emailed with other State employees. In the course of emailing those people, the inspector general discovered, she and they talked about classified topics in the body of dozens of their emails. ~ James Comey,
730:So the experience I have of my everyday work environment is of a conformist, claustrophobic and repressive verbal universe, a penitential domain of reason-mongering in which hyperactivity in detail—the endlessly repeated shouts of “why,” the rebuttals, calls for “evidence,” qualifications and quibbles—stands in stark contrast to the immobility and self-referentiality of the structure as a whole. I suffer from recurrent bouts of nausea in the face of this densely woven tissue of “arguments,” most of which are nothing but blinds for something else altogether, generally something unsavory; and I feel an urgent need to exit from it altogether. ~ Raymond Geuss,
731:In separate meetings, Army, Air Force, and Navy commanders each insisted that outer space was their service’s domain. To the Army, the moon was simply “the high ground,” and therefore part of its domain. Air Force generals, claiming that space was “just a little higher up” than the area they already controlled, tried to get Secretary McElroy interested in their plans for “creating a new Aerospace Force.” The admirals and vice admirals of the U.S. Navy argued that “outer space over the oceans” was a natural extension of the “underwater, surface and air regime in which [the Navy] operated” and should therefore be considered the Navy’s domain. ~ Annie Jacobsen,
732:Wisdom and integrity cannot be found in any single domain. A broader viewpoint that breaks across disciplinary boundaries is needed, a way of understanding that combines knowing and sensing, feeling and judging. In facing this task one cannot expect to succeed in the public eye, as one can when a field of culture recognizes one’s contributions to art, business, or science. But by this time a person aspiring to wisdom knows that the bottom line of a well-lived life is not so much success but the certainty we reach, in the most private fibers of our being, that our existence is linked in a meaningful way with the rest of the universe. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
733:Imagine that the whole world belongs to you. The birch trees in New Hampshire's White Mountains are yours, and so are the cirrus clouds in the western sky at dusk and the black sand on the beaches of Hawaii's big island.

You own everything, my dear sovereign - the paintings in all the museums of the world, as well as the internet and the wild horses and the roads. Please take good care of it all, OK? Be an enlightened monarch who treats your domain with reverent responsibility. And make sure you also enjoy the full measure of fun that comes with such mastery. Glide through life as if all of creation is yearning to honor and entertain you. ~ Rob Brezsny,
734:The math-powered applications powering the data economy were based on choices made by fallible human beings. Some of these choices were no doubt made with the best intentions. Nevertheless, many of these models encoded human prejudice, misunderstanding, and bias into the software systems that increasingly managed our lives. Like gods, these mathematical models were opaque, their workings invisible to all but the highest priests in their domain: mathematicians and computer scientists. Their verdicts, even when wrong or harmful, were beyond dispute or appeal. And they tended to punish the poor and the oppressed in our society, while making the rich richer. ~ Cathy O Neil,
735:Life is some kind of opportunity. It’s an opening between unbridgeable chasms of the unknown. And yet, out of chaos—for 20, 40, 70 years—we come into a domain of immense opportunity. It is a conundrum, it is a puzzle, it is something to be figured out. And I have the faith that, if we can figure this out, we can somehow not only make a better world for our children, but in some other profound way we can even undo what has been done. This would be the ultimate dream: that somehow we can discover an elegant escape that will leave us with the clear understanding that the problem was an illusion. It was an illusion. It was the last illusion. ~ Terence McKenna, Ecology of Souls,
736:This present summer evening, as the sun goes down, the preparations are complete. Dreary and solemn the old house looks, with so many appliances of habitation and with no inhabitants except the pictured forms upon the walls. So did these come and go, a Dedlock in possession might have ruminated passing along; so did they see this gallery hushed and quiet, as I see it now; so think, as I think, of the gap that they would make in this domain when they were gone; so find it, as I find it, difficult to believe that it could be without them; so pass from my world, as I pass from theirs, now closing the reverberating door; so leave no blank to miss them, and so die. ~ Charles Dickens,
737:From the dim regions beyond the mountains at the upper end of our encircled domain, there crept out a narrow and deep river, brighter than all save the eyes of Eleonora; and, winding stealthily about in mazy courses, it passed away, at length, through a shadowy gorge, among hills still dimmer than those whence it had issued. We called it the "River of Silence"; for there seemed to be a hushing influence in its flow. No murmur arose from its bed, and so gently it wandered along, that the pearly pebbles upon which we loved to gaze, far down within its bosom, stirred not at all, but lay in a motionless content, each in its own old station, shining on gloriously forever. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
738:In fact, just as articulate expression within a spoken language depends on more than mere grammar (it depends upon deep knowledge of the words in the language and their cultural associations), so too articulate expression in technology depends on more than grammar alone. Articulate utterance in technology requires deep knowledge of the domain in question: a fluency in the vocabulary of components used; a familiarity with standard modules, previous designs, standard materials, fastening technologies; a "knowingness" of what is natural and accepted in the culture of that domain. Intuitive knowledge, cross communication, feeling, past use, imagination, taste-all these count. ~ W Brian Arthur,
739:Refering to the domain of knowledge, adab means an intellectual discipline (ketertiban budi) which recognizes and acknowledges the hierarchy of knowledge based on the criteria of degrees of perfection (keluhuran) and priority (keutamaan) such that the ones that are based on revelation are recognized and acknowledged as more perfect and of a higher priority than those based on the intellect; those that are fard 'ayn are above fard kifayah; those that provide guidance (hidayah) to life are more superior to those that are practically useful (kegunaan amali). Adab towards knowledge would result in the proper and correct ways of learning and applying different sciences. ~ Wan Mohd Nor Wan Daud,
740:With all the chatter about eventual consistency, it might surprise you that at least two mechanisms in a messaging solution must always be consistent with each other: the persistence store used by the domain model, and the persistence store backing the messaging infrastructure used to forward the Events published by the model. This is required to ensure that when the model’s changes are persisted, Event delivery is also guaranteed, and that if an Event is delivered through messaging, it indicates a true situation reflected by the model that published it. If either of these is out of lockstep with the other, it will lead to incorrect states in one or more interdependent models. ~ Anonymous,
741:We are created for precisely this sort of suffering. In the end, it is all we are, these limpid tide pools of self-consciousness between crashing waves of pain. We are destined and designed to bear our pain with us, hugging it tight to our bellies like the young Spartan thief hiding a wolf cub so it can eat away our insides. What other creature in God's wide domain would carry the memory of you, Fanny, dust these nine hundred years, and allow it to eat away at him even as consumption does the same work with its effortless efficiency?

Words assail me. The thought of books makes me ache. Poetry echoes in my mind, and if I had the ability to banish it, I would do so at once. ~ Dan Simmons,
742:Chaplin gave us a genuine reverse image of modern times: its image seen through a living man, through his sufferings, his tribulations, his victories. We are now entering the vast domain of the illusory reverse image. What we find is a false world: firstly because it is not a world, and because it presents itself as true, and because it mimics real life closely in order to replace the real by its opposite; by replacing real unhappiness by fictions of happiness, for example—by offering a fiction in response to the real need for happiness—and so on. This is the 'world' of most films, most of the press, the theatre, the music hall: of a large sector of leisure activities. (57) ~ Henri Lefebvre,
743:Physical science, then, cannot formulate laws outside of maya, the very texture and structure of creation. Nature herself is maya; natural science must perforce deal with her ineluctable quiddity. In her own domain, she is eternal and inexhaustible; future scientists can do no more than probe one aspect after another of her varied infinitude. Science thus remains in a perpetual flux, unable to reach finality; fit indeed to formulate the laws of an already existing and functioning cosmos, but powerless to detect the Law Framer and Sole Operator. The majestic manifestations of gravitation and electricity have become known, but what gravitation and electricity are, no mortal knoweth. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
744:I was born in Nature's wide domain! The trees were all that sheltered my infant limbs, the blue heavens all that covered me. I am one of Nature's children. I have always admired her. She shall be my glory: her features, her robes, and the wreath about her brow, the seasons, her stately oaks, and the evergreen — her hair, ringlets over the earth — all contribute to my enduring love of her. And wherever I see her, emotions of pleasure roll in my breast, and swell and burst like waves on the shores of the ocean, in prayer and praise to Him who has placed me in her hand. It is thought great to be born in palaces, surrounded with wealth — but to be born in Nature's wide domain is greater still! I ~ Kent Nerburn,
745:A causal domain is just a collection of things linked by mutual cause-and-effect relationships.” “But isn’t everything in the universe so linked?” “Depends on how their light cones are arranged. We can’t affect things in our past. Some things are too far away to affect us in any way that matters.” “But still, you can’t really draw hard and fast boundaries between causal domains.” “In general, no. But you are much more strongly webbed together with me by cause and effect than you are with an alien in a faraway galaxy. So, depending on what level of approximation you’re willing to put up with, you could say that you and I belong together in one causal domain, and the alien belongs in another. ~ Neal Stephenson,
746:But is Christian faith the place to turn for logic? Is not logic the domain of scholars and philosophers? The British philosopher John Locke condemns this common misconception: “God has not been so sparing to men to make them barely two-legged creatures, and left it to Aristotle to make them rational.”[2] In other words, Locke recognized that logic existed and people reasoned and used the critical faculties of their minds before any philosopher came along to teach about it. God created logic and reasoning as he created man, and he created it for man, and therefore, we should find it reasonable that God’s Word has something to say—if not a lot to say—about logic, rationality, and good judgment. ~ Joel McDurmon,
747:It is noteworthy that the Muslim League had campaigned for Pakistan for seven years without deciding what its capital might be. The Bengalis proposed Dhaka while others suggested Lahore and even Multan, a historic city in the south of Punjab. But the subject was never seriously discussed while rallying Muslims to the cause of Pakistan. After belatedly deciding on Karachi as the capital, Muslim League leaders expected the British Indian Army to resolve the problems they might encounter in accommodating the government of their new country. This was one of the earliest manifestations of Pakistan’s tendency to rely on the military as the solution to problems normally falling in the civilian domain. ~ Husain Haqqani,
748:Every conquest over Nature increases her domain. The stars do not become Nature till we can weigh and measure them: the soul does not become Nature till we can psychoanalyse her. The wresting of powers from Nature is also the surrendering of things to Nature. As long as this process stops short of the final stage we may well hold that the gain outweighs the loss. But as soon as we take the final step of reducing our own species to the level of mere Nature, the whole process is stultified, for this time the being who stood to gain and the being who has been sacrificed are one and the same. This is one of the many instances where to carry a principle to what seems its logical conclusion produces absurdity. ~ C S Lewis,
749:Why have I been a fool so long? Why, seeing that fate has appointed me to be ruler of an earthly paradise, did I prefer to bind myself in servitude as a scribe of lifeless documents? To think that, after I had been nurtured and schooled and stored with all the knowledge necessary for the diffusion of good among those under me, and for the improvement of my domain, and for the fulfillment of the manifold duties of a landowner who is at once judge, administrator, and constable of his people, I should have entrusted my estate to an ignorant bailiff, and sought to maintain an absentee guardianship over the affairs of serfs whom I have never met, and of whose capabilities and characters I am yet ignorant! ~ Nikolai Gogol,
750:I am so happy,’ observed Jack, after a moment; and indeed he could be seen swelling with it. ‘But what was that about beer?’ ‘I asked whether we were still in the beer region, or domain, that part of the ocean in which the beer we bring from home and which we serve out daily at the absurd and criminal rate of a gallon – a gallon: eight pints! – a head, is still available. Has the beer not yet given way to the even more pernicious grog?’ ‘I believe we are still on beer. We do not usually run out before we raise the Peak of Tenerife. Should you like some?’ ‘If you please. I particularly need a light, gentle sleep tonight; and beer, a respectable ship’s beer, is the most virtuous hypnotic known to man. ~ Patrick O Brian,
751:To achieve historical creativity many other conditions must be met. For instance, you must be lucky, for to excel in some domains you might need the right genes, you might have to be born in the right family, at the right historical moment. Without access to the domain, potential is fruitless: How many Congolese would make great skiers? Are there really no Papuans who could contribute to nuclear physics? And finally, without the support of a field, even the most promising talent will not be recognized. But if creativity with a capital C is largely beyond our control, living a creative personal life is not. And in terms of ultimate fulfillment, the latter may be the most important accomplishment ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
752:Yeats—himself, we should note, deeply involved with the struggle for Irish independence—once said, “We make out of the quarrel with others, rhetoric, but of the quarrel with ourselves, poetry.” On the other side of the question, many feel that the abrasions of history upon, within, and against individual lives have been part of poetry’s domain from the start, and that whatever affects a person belongs in poems, and can be joined there to all the rest—the emotional with the intellectual; the personal with the social; the public and the private; the natural world and the humanly made; the coldness of stone and the humanly felt; the knowledge of violent injustice and the longing for lyrical transcendence. ~ Jane Hirshfield,
753:Tain Shir walks the deck of RNS Sulane between the bombs and incendiaries and steel-tipped barbs. A weapon among weapons but she alone is free. The tragedy of the knife is the hilt. The tragedy of the crossbow is the trigger. Shir has neither. She cannot be gripped nor fired.
She is unmastered.
The sailors are rude with her. So be it. Etiquitte is the domain of those whose power is conditional upon the respect of others, and Shir is unconditional. If she drifted alone in the void beyond the moon or if she walked among the monarchs of the ancient Cheetah Palaces she would not be altered in her capabilities or her intentions, for not one truth of her resides within a relationship to any other thing. ~ Seth Dickinson,
754:The Roman non Semitic domain on the world's stage allegedly -and yet of course more innocently than maliciously- strives for learning to be like Jesus in everyday life, becoming, thinking and acting like him; however, they formally ban his name from being given to babies! In the eyes of a Semite (i.e., pure Arab), either these people are mentally challenged, or they are cursed to the point where one observes the emergence of this testimonial outcry in their own domain against and in opposition to their own convictions. These are the nations who war Islam under the pretense of having a god with a name (i.e., JHWH) while failing miserably to follow the call to his son starting with the mere essence of his name. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
755:The power of creation – whatever it turns out to be – lies even beyond energy, a force with the ability to turn gaseous clouds of dust into stars and eventually into DNA. In the terminology of physics, we refer to this pre-quantum level as virtual. When you go beyond all energy, there is nothing, a void. Visible light becomes virtual light; real space becomes virtual space; real time becomes virtual time. In the process, all properties vanish. Light no longer shines, space covers no distance, time is eternal. This is the womb of creation, infinitely dynamic and alive. Words like empty, dark, and cold do not apply to it. The virtual domain is so inconceivable that only religious language seems to touch it at all. ~ Deepak Chopra,
756:Yahweh Elohim retreated with his divine council to deliberate the verdict. When he returned, he announced to the lawyers at the bar, “I declare the defense righteous in standing. The Accuser has failed to provide proof of his charges against Yahweh’s right to eminent domain, and his use of Israel as his instruments of justice.” “Your honor,” spouted the Accuser, “I demand a court order for a stay of execution. This is a capital trial and I think we need to reexamine the evidence in light of the extreme sentence.” “Motion denied,” said Yahweh Elohim. “The iniquity of the Amorites is complete. Canaan has filled up the measure of its guilt. Israel shall commence its possession of the land immediately. Court is dismissed. ~ Brian Godawa,
757:Francis Ii, King Of Naples
Written after reading Trevelyan's "Garibaldi and the making of Italy"
Poor foolish monarch, vacillating, vain,
Decaying victim of a race of kings,
Swift Destiny shook out her purple wings
And caught him in their shadow; not again
Could furtive plotting smear another stain
Across his tarnished honour. Smoulderings
Of sacrificial fires burst their rings
And blotted out in smoke his lost domain.
Bereft of courtiers, only with his queen,
From empty palace down to empty quay.
No challenge screamed from hostile carabine.
A single vessel waited, shadowy;
All night she ploughed her solitary way
Beneath the stars, and through a tranquil sea.
~ Amy Lowell,
758:Theres another class of people and I would say this is one of the pathologies of being creative so if your a high open person and you have all those things its not going to be enough. you are going to have to pick another domain where you are working on something positive and revolutiony because like the creative impulse for someone who is open we know it is a fundamental personallity dimension, ... and if the ones who are high in openness arent doing something creative they are like dead sticks adn cant live properly. And I think those are the people who benefit particularly from depth psychological approaches, especially Jungian approaches. ~ Jordan Peterson, 015 Maps of Meaning 4: Narrative, Neuropsychology & Mythology II / Part 1,
759:How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain plowland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one's country; is it hate of one's uncountry? Then it's not a good thing. Is it simply self-love? That's a good thing, but one mustn't make a virtue of it, or a profession… Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
760:Opponents of abortion use the word baby to refer to the cluster of cells, the embryo, and the fetus alike. The very choice of the word baby imposes the idea of an independently existing human being. Whereas cluster of cells, embryo, and fetus keep discussion in the medical domain, baby moves the discussion to the moral domain. The issue of the morality of abortion is settled once the words are chosen. The purposeful removal of a cell group from the mother that does not constitute an independently existing, viable, or even a recognizable human being cannot be “murder.” The word “murder” is not defined as such a medical procedure. The purposeful killing of a “baby”—an independently existing human being—can be “murder.” Is ~ George Lakoff,
761:How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain plowland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one's country; is it hate of one's uncountry? Then it's not a good thing. Is it simply self-love? That's a good thing, but one mustn't make a virtue of it, or a profession...Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
762:How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain plowland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one's country; is it hate of one's uncountry? Then it's not a good thing. Is it simply self-love? That's a good thing, but one mustn't make a virtue of it, or a profession... Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
763:How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain ploughland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one’s country; is it hate of one’s uncountry? Then it’s not a good thing. It is simply self-love? That’s a good thing, but one mustn’t make a virtue of it, or a profession … Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
764:How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain plowland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one’s country; is it hate of one’s uncountry? Then it’s not a good thing. Is it simply self-love? That’s a good thing, but one mustn’t make a virtue of it, or a profession. . . . Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
765:Are you really surprised by the endurance of religion? What ideology is likely to be more durable than one that conforms, at every turn, to our powers of wishful thinking? Hope is easy; knowledge is hard. Science is the one domain in which we human beings make a truly heroic effort to counter our innate biases and wishful thinking. Science is the one endeavor in which we have developed a refined methodology for separating what a person hopes is true from what he has good reason to believe. The methodology isn't perfect, and the history of science is riddled with abject failures of scientific objectivity. But that is just the point-these have been failures of science, discovered and corrected by-what, religion? No, by good science. ~ Sam Harris,
766:Sadly, it is within the religious domain that the phenomenon of rhetorical hysteria takes its most devastating form. I am aware that, in some minds, this tends to be regarded as a delicate subject. Let me declare very simply that I do not share such a sentiment. There is nothing in the least delicate about the slaughter of innocents. We all subscribe to the lofty notions contained in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights but, for some reason, become suddenly coy and selective when it comes to defending what is obviously the most elementary of these rights, which is the right to life. One of my all-time favourite lines comes from the black American poet Langston Hughes. It reads, simply, 'There is no lavender word for lynch'. ~ Wole Soyinka,
767:The same trend is noticeable in the scientific realm: research here is for its own sake far more than for the partial and fragmentary results it achieves; here we see an ever more rapid succession of unfounded theories and hypotheses, no sooner set up than crumbling to give way to others that will have an even shorter life - a veritable chaos amid which one would search in vain for anything definitive, unless it be a monstrous accumulation of facts and details incapable of proving or signifying anything. We refer here of course to speculative science, insofar as this still exists; in applied science there are on the contrary undeniable results, and this is easily understandable since these results bear directly on the domain of matter. ~ Ren Gu non,
768:There are three sisters, the norns, who are wise maidens. They tend the well, and make sure that the roots of Yggdrasil are covered with mud and cared for. The well belongs to Urd; she is fate, and destiny. She is your past. With her are Verdandi—her name means “becoming”—and hers is the present, and Skuld, whose name means “that which is intended,” and her domain is the future. The norns will decide what happens in your life. There are other norns, not just those three. Giant norns and elf norns, dwarf norns and Vanir norns, good norns and bad, and what your fate will be is decided by them. Some norns give people good lives, and others give us hard lives, or short lives, or twisted lives. They will shape your fate, there at Urd’s well. ~ Neil Gaiman,
769:... All the works of mind and intllect must be first heightened and widened, then illumined, lifted into the domain of a higher Intelligence, afterwards translated into workings of a greater non-mental Intuition, these again transformed into the dynamic outpourings of the Overmind radiance, and those transfigured into the full light and sovereignty of the supramental Gnosis. It is this that the evolution of consciousness in the world carries prefigured but latent in its seed and in the straining tense intention of its process; nor can that process, that evolution cease till it has evolved the instruments of a perfect in place of its now imperfect manifestation of the Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1, 149,
770:Césaires (Aimé and Suzanne) were creative innovators of surrealism—that they actually introduced fresh surrealist ideas to Breton and his colleagues. I don’t think it is too much to argue that the Césaires not only embraced surrealism—independently of the Paris Group, I might add—but also expanded it, enlarged its perspectives, and contributed enormously to theorizing the “domain of the Marvelous.” Aimé Césaire, after all, has never denied his surrealist leanings. As he explains: “Surrealism provided me with what I had been confusedly searching for. I have accepted it joyfully because in it I have found more of a confirmation than a revelation.” Surrealism, he explained, helped him to summon up powerful unconscious forces. “This, for ~ Robin D G Kelley,
771:In a completely different era and domain, Charles Darwin hypothesized that the emergence of each new species was a gradual process, taking place through the slow transformation of existing species into their somewhat-modified offspring. Yet evidence for such continuous change was not only lacking back then but is scarce even today, having prompted Darwin to label it "the gravest objection [that] can be urged against my theory." Instead, over millions of years species in the fossil record show little or no evolutionary change. New species tend to appear over periods spanning tens of thousands of years, a split second in terms of all evolutionary time. Evolution proceeds in bursts, which are in turn preserved in the fossil record. ~ Albert L szl Barab si,
772:The Sun has ever been a socialist symbol that obtrudes daily on man and infringes his domain. From her name he has devised shyness and yet she holds that notion in total disdain. She dances on the ecliptic right and left while looking down and smiling at man's endeavor that was all in vain. The Moon was sent to guide her towards modesty and yet she refuses but to appease him with her inflaming rain. Evil looked up at her and said let us make you masculine for that you own all the powers that is for us to gain. Then The Lord ordered man to remain pure while staying in harmony with His two servants and claim only that what is deemed sane. Adam's progeny bowed down before The Almighty in obedience and counted illuminations instead of faces of burn. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
773:Hate Orgoreyn? No, how should I? How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain plowland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one’s country; is it hate of one’s uncountry? Then it’s not a good thing. Is it simply self-love? That’s a good thing, but one mustn’t make a virtue of it, or a profession… Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
774:The least step forward in the domain of free thought and individual life has been achieved in all ages to the accompaniment of physical and intellectual tortures: and not only the mere step forward, no! but every form of movement and change has rendered necessary innumerable martyrs, throughout the entire course of thousands of years which sought their paths and laid down their foundation-stones, years, however, which we do not think of when we speak about “world-history,” that ridiculously small division of mankind's existence. And even in this so-called world-history, which in the main is merely a great deal of noise about the latest novelties, there is no more important theme than the old, old tragedy of the martyrs who tried to move the mire. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
775:One of the more extreme claims of the Gaia camp, at present neither proven nor refuted, is that the influence of life over the eons has helped Earth hold on to her life-giving water, while Venus and Mars, lifeless through most of their existence, lost theirs. If so, then life may indeed be responsible for Earth’s plate tectonics. One of the original architects of plate tectonic theory, Norm Sleep from Stanford, has become thoroughly convinced that life is deeply implicated in the overall physical dynamics of Earth, including the “nonliving” interior domain. In describing the cumulative, long-term influence of life on geology, continent building, and plate tectonics, he wrote, “The net effect is Gaian. That is, life has modified Earth to its advantage.”6 ~ David Grinspoon,
776:Chanukah In this Sicha, the Rebbe explains the Mitzvah of the Chanukah lights, and concentrates on two of their features, that they are to be placed by the door of one’s house that is adjacent to the street, or the public domain, and that they must be placed on the left-hand side of the door. These features have a deep symbolism: The “left-hand side” and the “public domain” both stand for the realm of the profane, and by placing the lights there, we are, as it were, bringing the Divine light into the area of existence which is normally most resistant to it. The Sicha goes on to explain the difference between the positive and negative commandments in their effect on the world, and concludes with a comparison between the Chanukah lights and tefillin. ~ Menachem M Schneerson,
777:Hate Orgoreyn? No, how should I? How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain plowland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one’s country; is it hate of one’s uncountry? Then it’s not a good thing. Is it simply self-love? That’s a good thing, but one mustn’t make a virtue of it, or a profession. . . . Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
778:Something broke in me and left me with a nerve split in two. In the beginning the extremities linked to the cut hurt me so badly that I paled in pain and perplexity. However the split places gradually scarred over. Until coldly, I no longer hurt. I changed, without planning to. I used to look at you from my inside outward and from the inside of you, which because of love, I could guess. After the scarring I started to look at you from the outside in. And also to see myself from the outside in: I had transformed myself into a heap of facts and actions whose only root was in the domain of logic. At first I couldn't associate me with myself. Where am I? I wondered. And the one who answered was a stranger who told me coldly and categorically: you are yourself. ~ Clarice Lispector,
779:Buicks and fresh petticoats marked a clear cultural change. Victory over the world of scarcity was a historical accomplishment of the first order, but they also realised that the domain of plenty would bring new problems, of a nature and extent at which they could only guess. It’s a classic tale of generational change. The first generation struggles up out of poverty, the second generation acquires wealth, the third generation becomes spoilt and goes off the rails. Yet something else was going on here as well, something that concerned the very foundations of society. In a culture of survival, people have little choice, whereas now there were alternatives, more and more of them. Almost all the traditional norms and values, which had their roots in a ‘world of necessity’, ~ Geert Mak,
780:The widening gap between technology and human needs can only be filled by ethics. We have seen in the last thirty years many examples of the power of ethics. The worldwide environmental movement, basing its power on ethical persuasion, has scored many victories over industrial wealth and technological arrogance. The most spectacular victory of the environmentalists was the downfall of the nuclear industry in the United States and many other countries, first in the domain of nuclear power and more recently in the domain of weapons. It was the environmental movement that closed down factories for making nuclear weapons in the United States, from plutonium-producing Hanford to warhead-producing Rocky Flats. Ethics can be a force more powerful than politics and economics. ~ Freeman Dyson,
781:all true art is in fact nothing but an attempt to
transmit the sensation of ecstasy...evil always consists in the transforming of something great into something small...a living cell contains something that is lacking in a dead one...life and thought, are in the domain of the unmeasurable...the very great majority of our ideas are not the products of evolution but the product of the degeneration of ideas...Man is pre-eminently a transitional form...truth includes all in itself...Civilisation never starts by natural growth but only through artificial cultivation...People who think that something can be attained by their own efforts are as blind as those who are utterly ignorant of the possibilities of the new knowledge...Most people can except truth only in the form of a lie. ~ P D Ouspensky,
782:The concept of progress, i.e., an improvement or completion (in modern jargon, a rationalization) became dominant in the eighteenth century, in an age of humanitarian-moral belief. Accordingly, progress meant above all progress in culture, self-determination, and education: moral perfection. In an age of economic or technical thinking, it is self-evident that progress is economic or technical progress. To the extent that anyone is still interested in humanitarian-moral progress, it appears as a byproduct of economic progress. If a domain of thought becomes central, then the problems of other domains are solved in terms of the central domain - they are considered secondary problems, whose solution follows as a matter of course only if the problems of the central domain are solved. ~ Carl Schmitt,
783:From Descartes’s skepticism came the radical belief that the individual seeking certainty trumped a God or king bestowing truth. The resulting Enlightenment, of course, led to the concept of human rights and freed many from oppression. But as Dreyfus and Kelly emphasize, for all its good in the political arena, in the domain of the metaphysical this thinking stripped the world of the order and sacredness essential to creating meaning. In a post-Enlightenment world we have tasked ourselves to identify what’s meaningful and what’s not, an exercise that can seem arbitrary and induce a creeping nihilism. “The Enlightenment’s metaphysical embrace of the autonomous individual leads not just to a boring life,” Dreyfus and Kelly worry; “it leads almost inevitably to a nearly unlivable one. ~ Cal Newport,
784:In man a working level of narcissism is inseparable from self-esteem, from a basic sense of self-worth. We have learned, mostly from Alfred Adler, that what man needs most is to feel secure in his self-esteem. But man is not just a blind glob of idling protoplasm, but a creature with a name who lives in a world of symbols, on an abstract idea of his own worth, an idea composed of sounds, words, and images, in the air, in the mind, on paper. And this means that man's natural yearning for organismic activity, the pleasures of incorporation and expansion, can be fed limitlessly in the domain of symbols and so into immortality. The single organism can expand into dimensions of worlds and times without moving a physical limb; it can take eternity into itself even as it gaspingly dies. ~ Ernest Becker,
785:In the United States all Christian denominations and sects are placed on a basis of equality before the law, and alike protected by the government in their property and right of public worship, yet self-supporting and self-governing; and, in turn, they strengthen the moral foundations of society by training loyal and virtuous citizens. Freedom of religion must be recognized as one of the inalienable rights of man, which lies in the sacred domain of conscience, beyond the restraint and control of politics, and which the government is bound to protect as much as any other fundamental right. Freedom is liable to abuse, and abuse may be punished. But Christianity is itself the parent of true freedom from the bondage of sin and error, and is the best protector and regulator of freedom. ~ Philip Schaff,
786:To reflect upon the present as history is to understand that history may now be made by default. Understanding that, we no longer need accept as “necessary” the lesser evil. We no longer need to accept historical fate, for fate is a feature of specific kinds of social structure, of irresponsible systems of power.

These systems can be changed. Fate can be transcended We must come to understand that while the domain of fate is diminishing, the exercise of responsibility is also diminishing and in fact becoming organized as irresponsibility. We must hold men of power variously responsible for pivotal events, we mush unmask their pretentions- and often their own mistaken convictions- that they are not responsible. Our politics, in short, must be the politics of responsibility. ~ C Wright Mills,
787:no one should be allowed to stop in one place any longer than necessary. A man isn’t a tree, and being settled in one place is his misfortune. It saps his courage, breaks his confidence. When a man settles down somewhere, he agrees to any and all of its conditions, even the disagreeable ones, and frightens himself with the uncertainty that awaits him. Change to him seems like abandonment, like a loss of an investment: someone else will occupy his domain, and he’ll have to begin again. Digging oneself in marks the real beginning of old age, because a man is young as long as he isn’t afraid to make new beginnings. If he stays in the same place, he has to put up with things, or take action. If he moves on, he keeps his freedom; he’s ready to change places and the conditions imposed on him. ~ Me a Selimovi,
788:a young person wants to learn philosophy these days, he or she would be better advised to become immersed in the domain directly and avoid the field altogether: “I’d tell him to read the great books of philosophy. And I would tell him not to do graduate study at any university. I think all philosophy departments are no good. They are all terrible.” By and large, however, jurisdiction over a given domain is officially left in the hands of a field of experts. These may range from grade school teachers to university professors and include anyone who has a right to decide whether a new idea or product is “good” or “bad.” It is impossible to understand creativity without understanding how fields operate, how they decide whether something new should or should not be added to the domain. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
789:Even as he turned the little handle round and round, the room remained under the tenuous authority of sleep. As yet unchallenged, somnolence continued to cast its shadow over sights and sensations, over forms and formulations, over what has been said and what must be done, lending each the insubstantiality of its domain. But when the Count opened the small wooden drawer of the grinder, the world and all it contained were transformed by that envy of the alchemists—the aroma of freshly ground coffee. In that instant, darkness was separated from light, the waters from the lands, and the heavens from the earth. The trees bore fruit and the woods rustled with the movement of birds and beasts and all manner of creeping things. While closer at hand, a patient pigeon scuffed its feet on the flashing. ~ Amor Towles,
790:The proprietor, the robber, the hero, the sovereign—for all these titles are synonymous—imposes his will as law, and suffers neither contradiction nor control; that is, he pretends to be the legislative and the executive power at once ... [and so] property engenders despotism ... That is so clearly the essence of property that, to be convinced of it, one need but remember what it is, and observe what happens around him. Property is the right to use and abuse ... if goods are property, why should not the proprietors be kings, and despotic kings—kings in proportion to their facultes bonitaires? And if each proprietor is sovereign lord within the sphere of his property, absolute king throughout his own domain, how could a government of proprietors be any thing but chaos and confusion? ~ Pierre Joseph Proudhon,
791:You may think that tax policy sounds like the most boring topic in the world. That is precisely what most governments, corporations, and special interests would like you to think, because tax policy is where much of society and the economy gets shaped. It is also where well-informed citizens can achieve socioeconomic revolutions with astonishing speed and effectiveness—but only if they realize how much power they might wield in this domain. If citizens don’t understand taxes, they don’t understand how, when, and where their government expropriates money, time, and freedom from their lives. They also don’t understand how most governments bias consumption over savings, and bias some forms of consumption over other forms, thereby distorting the trait-display systems that people might otherwise favor. ~ Geoffrey Miller,
792:[the four aids ::: YOGA-SIDDHI, the perfection that comes from the practice of Yoga, can be best attained by the combined working of four great instruments. There is, first, the knowledge of the truths, principles, powers and processes that govern the realisation - sastra. Next comes a patient and persistent action on the lines laid down by this knowledge, the force of our personal effort - utsaha. There intervenes, third, uplifting our knowledge and effort into the domain of spiritual experience, the direct suggestion, example and influence of the Teacher - guru. Last comes the instrumentality of Time - kala; for in all things there is a cycle of their action and a period of the divine movement.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Works, The Four Aids, 53 [T0],
793:Dark eyes are dearer far
Than those that mock the hyacinthine bell.

Blue! 'Tis the life of heaven,the domain
Of Cynthia,the wide palace of the sun,
The tent of Hesperus, and all his train,
The bosomer of clouds, gold, gray, and dun.
Blue! 'Tis the life of waters:Ocean
And all its vassal streams, pools numberless,
May rage, and foam, and fret, but never can
Subside, if not to dark-blue nativeness.
Blue! gentle cousin of the forest-green,
Married to green in all the sweetest flowers
Forget-me-not,the blue-bell,and, that queen
Of secrecy, the violet: what strange powers
Hast thou, as a mere shadow! But how great,
When in an Eye thou art alive with fate!
by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

~ John Keats, Answer To A Sonnet By J.H.Reynolds
,
794:Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov stirred at half past eight to the sound of rain on the eaves. With a half-opened eye, he pulled back his covers and climbed from bed. He donned his robe and slipped on his slippers. He took up the tin from the bureau, spooned a spoonful of beans into the Apparatus, and began to crank the crank. Even as he turned the little handle round and round, the room remained under the tenuous authority of sleep. As yet unchallenged, somnolence continued to cast its shadow over sights and sensations, over forms and formulations, over what has been said and what must be done, lending each the insubstantiality of its domain. But when the Count opened the small wooden drawer of the grinder, the world and all it contained were transformed by that envy of the alchemists—the aroma of freshly ground coffee. ~ Amor Towles,
795:It may be that quantum physics can produce a universe from nothing, without cause, but such an accidental and unanalyzable origin for EVERYTHING seems deeply unsatisfying, at least to this pilgrim. In the absence of God, we still want causes and reasons. We still need to make sense of this strange cosmos we find ourselves in. Permanent or impermanent, absolute or relative, we still long for answers, and understanding. Evidently, science can find reasons and causes for everything in the physical universe but not for the universe itself. What caused the universe to come into being? Why is there something rather than nothing? We don’t know and will almost certainly never know. And so this most profound question, although in tightest embrace with the physical world, will likely remain in the domain of philosophy and religion. ~ Alan Lightman,
796:The two-man crew of the patrol boat does not speak English. Rachel exploits this as best she can, while still dumping life jackets in the water. “What? I don’t understand what you’re saying? Do you speak English?”
They confirm in their native tongue that they obviously do not. Rachel must be putting on a theatrical display, because the small boat rocks while she talks. “I don’t need these life jackets anymore,” she says, in her thickest Italian accent. “The colors are all wrong for me. I mean, look at this orange. Ew, right?”
Galen rolls his eyes. I try not to giggle.
“And this green? Hideous!” she continues.
The men get more irate when she doesn’t stop littering their domain. “Hey, what the…Don’t touch me! I have a foot injury, you jerk!”
Galen and I slink below the surface. “We knew that might happen,” he says. ~ Anna Banks,
797:He came from plebeian roots and had failed to distinguish himself in any way, not in war, not in work, not in art, though in this last domain he believed himself to have great talent. He was said to be indolent. He rose late, worked little, and surrounded himself with the lesser lights of the party with whom he felt most comfortable, an entourage of middlebrow souls that Putzi Hanfstaengl derisively nicknamed the “Chauffeureska,” consisting of bodyguards, adjutants, and a chauffeur. He loved movies—King Kong was a favorite—and he adored the music of Richard Wagner. He dressed badly. Apart from his mustache and his eyes, the features of his face were indistinct and unimpressive, as if begun in clay but never fired. Recalling his first impression of Hitler, Hanfstaengl wrote, “Hitler looked like a suburban hairdresser on his day off. ~ Erik Larson,
798:Contrary to what we hear, the great American divide is not a clash between conservatives who advocate liberty versus progressives who oppose liberty. Rather, the two sides each affirm a certain type of liberty. One side, for example, cherishes economic liberty while the other champions liberty in the sexual and social domain. Nor is it a clash between patriots and anti-patriots. Both sides love America, but they love a different type of America. One side loves the America of Columbus and the Fourth of July, of innovation and work and the “animal spirit” of capitalism, of the Boy Scouts and parochial schools, of traditional families and flag-saluting veterans. The other side loves the America of tolerance and social entitlements, of income and wealth redistribution, of affirmative action and abortion, of feminism and gay marriage. ~ Dinesh D Souza,
799:It's a fact...that in societies like ours sex truly represents a second system of differentiation, completely independent of money; and as a system of differentiation it functions just as mercilessly. The effects of these two systems are, furthermore, strictly equivalent. Just like unrestrained economic liberalism, and for similar reasons, sexual liberalism produces phenomena of absolute pauperization . Some men make love every day; others five or six times in their life, or never. Some make love with dozens of women; others with none. It's what's known as 'the law of the market'...Economic liberalism is an extension of the domain of the struggle, its extension to all ages and all classes of society. Sexual liberalism is likewise an extension of the domain of the struggle, its extension to all ages and all classes of society. ~ Michel Houellebecq,
800:That same brutal principle of unequal distribution applies outside the financial domain— indeed, anywhere that creative production is required. The majority of scientific papers are published by a very small group of scientists. A tiny proportion of musicians produces almost all the recorded commercial music. Just a handful of authors sell all the books. A million and a half separately titled books (!) sell each year in the US. However, only five hundred of these sell more than a hundred thousand copies. 12 Similarly, just four classical composers (Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, and Tchaikovsky) wrote almost all the music played by modern orchestras. Bach, for his part, composed so prolifically that it would take decades of work merely to hand- copy his scores, yet only a small fraction of this prodigious output is commonly performed. ~ Jordan Peterson,
801:There is something about nature out of control that touches a primal terror. We are used to believing that we’re the masters of our domain, and that God has given us this earth to rule over. We need this illusion like a good night-light. The truth is more fearsome: we are as frail as young trees in tornadoes, and our beloved homes are one flood away from driftwood. We plant our roots in trembling earth, we live where mountains rose and fell and prehistoric seas burned away in mist. We and the towns we have built are not permanent; the earth itself is a passing train. When you stand in muddy water that is rising toward your waist and you hear people shouting against the darkness and see their figures struggling to hold back the currents that will not be denied, you realize the truth of it: we will not win, but we cannot give up. ~ Robert R McCammon,
802:That same brutal principle of unequal distribution applies outside the financial domain— indeed, anywhere that creative production is required. The majority of scientific papers are published by a very small group of scientists. A tiny proportion of musicians produces almost all the recorded commercial music. Just a handful of authors sell all the books. A million and a half separately titled books (!) sell each year in the US. However, only five hundred of these sell more than a hundred thousand copies. 12 Similarly, just four classical composers (Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, and Tchaikovsky) wrote almost all the music played by modern orchestras. Bach, for his part, composed so prolifically that it would take decades of work merely to hand- copy his scores, yet only a small fraction of this prodigious output is commonly performed. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
803:In the West, the great problem that was created for Christianity from the 17th century onward and even earlier during the Renaissance was that religion began to retreat from one domain after another in order to accommodate the forces of modernism and secularism. One can point to the Galileo trial, after which the Church ‘‘lost the cosmos.’’ In fact, the Church was right in many ways, because what Galileo was saying did not concern astronomy alone, but also theology, which was quite something else. As a consequence of this trial, the Church withdrew from its concern with the sciences of nature and no longer challenged what kind of science was developed, and suf- fered the results of accepting the reductionism and materialistic views of modern science. This process resulted in the complete secularization of nature and the cosmos. ~ Seyyed Hossein Nasr,
804:I had a vision, once, of an immense landscape, spread for miles out to the horizon before me. I was high in the air, granted a bird’s-eye view. Everywhere I could see great stratified multi-storied pyramids of glass, some small, some large, some overlapping, some separate—all akin to modern skyscrapers; all full of people striving to reach each pyramid’s very pinnacle. But there was something above that pinnacle, a domain outside each pyramid, in which all were nested. That was the privileged position of the eye that could or perhaps chose to soar freely above the fray; that chose not to dominate any specific group or cause but instead to somehow simultaneously transcend all. That was attention, itself, pure and untrammeled: detached, alert, watchful attention, waiting to act when the time was right and the place had been established. ~ Jordan Peterson,
805:No, that’s true … You hate Orgoreyn, don’t you?’ ‘Very few Orgota know how to cook. Hate Orgoreyn? No, how should I? How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain ploughland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one’s country; is it hate of one’s uncountry? Then it’s not a good thing. It is simply self-love? That’s a good thing, but one mustn’t make a virtue of it, or a profession … Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
806:Further evidence for the pathogenic role of dissociation has come from a largescale clinical and community study of traumatized people conducted by a task force of the American Psychiatric Association. In this study, people who reported having dissociative symptoms were also quite likely to develop persistent somatic symptoms for which no physical cause could be found. They also frequently engaged in self-destructive attacks on their own bodies. The results of these investigations validate the century-old insight that traumatized people relive in their bodies the moments of terror that they can not describe in words. Dissociation appears to be the mechanism by which intense sensory and emotional experiences are disconnected from the social domain of language and memory, the internal mechanism by which terrorized people are silenced. ~ Judith Lewis Herman,
807:I had a vision, once, of an immense landscape, spread for miles out to the horizon before me. I was high in the air, granted a bird’s-eye view. Everywhere I could see great stratified multi-storied pyramids of glass, some small, some large, some overlapping, some separate—all akin to modern skyscrapers; all full of people striving to reach each pyramid’s very pinnacle. But there was something above that pinnacle, a domain outside each pyramid, in which all were nested. That was the privileged position of the eye that could or perhaps chose to soar freely above the fray; that chose not to dominate any specific group or cause but instead to somehow simultaneously transcend all. That was attention, itself, pure and untrammeled: detached, alert, watchful attention, waiting to act when the time was right and the place had been established. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
808:In the change-over from the village to the city, there is some further confirmation of this reading of communal ways: for the land and all it brought forth became the property of the temple and the god; even the peasants who worked it belonged to the temple, and all the other members of the community belonged to the land, too, and were obliged to give part of their labor to the common tasks of digging and embanking and building. These posessions, with the extension of the secular powers of kingship, would become the royal estate; and identification of the common domain with the sovereign power sank so deep that even in modern states most sharply conscious of the rights of private property, the state itself is the ultimate owner and residuary legatee, with that power to commandeer and to tax which is ultimately the power to possess or destroy. ~ Lewis Mumford,
809:in Likkutei Torah15 of the verse, “He has not seen sin in Jacob nor toil in Israel.”16 At the level of “Jacob” the Jew has no sin, but he still experiences “toil”—his freedom from sin is achieved only by tension and struggle for he has concealments to overcome. This is why he is called “Jacob, my servant”17 for “service” (in Hebrew, avodah) has the implication of strenuous effort to refine his physical nature (his “animal soul”). He does not sin but he still experiences the inclination to sin, which he must overcome. But “Israel” encounters no “toil,” for in his struggle “with Elokim and with men” he broke down the factors which conceal G-dliness and silenced his dissenting inclinations. Israel no longer needs to contend with those forces which oppose the perception of G-dliness. His progress lies entirely within the domain of the holy. ~ Menachem M Schneerson,
810:Part 1: Creating a Niche Website Overview Before we begin in detail, let’s familiarize ourselves with the phases of creating a niche site from start to finish. The timeline on the next page shows the relationship of the phases. Phases Planning - Define and refine the objectives, and plan the course of action to achieve the objectives for your Niche Site. Keyword and Product Research - A critical component of the process that forms the foundation of your niche site project. In this phase you identify candidates for the overall subject matter of your Niche Site. First Page Competition Analysis - Goes hand in hand with keyword research and has the power to dictate the success of your website. This helps narrow down your potential keywords based on the overall competition. Buying a Domain and Hosting - Setting up the online real estate for your new website ~ Anonymous,
811:You too, you took an interest in the world. That was long ago. I want you to cast your mind back to then. The domain of the rules was no longer enough for you; you were unable to love any longer in the domain of the rules; so you had to enter into the domain of the struggle. I ask you to go back to that precise moment. It was long ago, no? Cast your mind back: the water was cold.
You are far from the edge, now. Oh yes! How far from the edge you are! You long believed in the existence of another shore; such is no longer the case. You go on swimming, though, and every movement you make brings you closer to drowning. You are suffocating, your lungs are on fire. The water seems colder and colder to you, more and more galling. You aren't that young anymore. Now you are going to die. Don't worry. I am here. I won't let you sink. Go on with your reading. ~ Michel Houellebecq,
812:Although corporate bosses were starting to embrace BlackBerry, Lazaridis and Balsillie knew they faced a challenge selling bulk orders to big businesses. Technology purchases were the domain of chief information officers (CIOs). These executives were conservative and frowned on technology that exposed internal communications. “The problem with going through IT is they had to approve everything. It would take a year,” says Lazaridis. “You had to test everything, approve it, and most of these [CIOs] didn’t want it anyway. It was just another thing to deal with. But once a CEO tried it, that was it.” The solution, Lazaridis and Balsillie decided, was an unorthodox plan to infiltrate Fortune 1000 companies. RIM made it easy for influential managers and executives to link the addictive BlackBerry system into their corporate e-mail without involving the IT department. ~ Jacquie McNish,
813:The Vampire
You that, like a dagger’s thrust,
Have entered my complaining heart,
You that, stronger than a host
Of demons, came, wild yet prepared;
Within my mind’s humility
You made your bed and your domain;
- Infamous one who’s bound to me
Like any felon by his chain,
Like a gambler by his games,
Like the bottle and the sot,
Like the worms in one’s remains,
- Damm you! Damnation be your lot!
I’ve begged the merciful, swift sword
To overcome my liberty To poison I have said the word:
Save me from poltroonery.
Alas the sword! Alas the poison!
Contemptuous, they spoke to m:
"You never can deserve remission
Of your accursed slavery,
"Imbecile! - If our deadly empire
Freed you from your present fate,
Your kiss would soon resuscitate
The cold cadaver of your vampire!"
~ Charles Baudelaire,
814:The Ministry places great importance and focus on the waste management issue as one of the most pressing priorities in the UAE, given its economic, social, environmental and medical effects. The Ministry addresses this issue through two approaches, the first in limiting the generation of waste form the source, by organizing awareness programs that target families and individuals, or by regulations and developing a national regulatory framework for waste management. The second revolves around the reuse and recycling of waste as a national commitment and one of the major objectives of the national agenda of the UAE Vision 2021. We all hope that we can strengthen the cooperation between the public and private sector in that domain, and encourage private companies to play a more vital role in waste management in a way that exceeds corporate social responsibility initiatives. ~ Anonymous,
815:CHILDHOOD I That idol, black eyes and yellow mop, without parents or court, nobler than Mexican and Flemish fables; his domain, insolent azure and verdure, runs over beaches called by the shipless waves, names ferociously Greek, Slav, Celt. At the border of the forest—dream flowers tinkle, flash, and flare,—the girl with orange lips, knees crossed in the clear flood that gushes from the fields, nakedness shaded, traversed, dressed by rainbow, flora, sea. Ladies who stroll on terraces adjacent to the sea; baby girls and giantesses, superb blacks in the verdigris moss, jewels upright on the rich ground of groves and little thawed gardens,—young mothers and big sisters with eyes full of pilgrimages, sultanas, princesses tyrannical of costume and carriage, little foreign misses and young ladies gently unhappy. What boredom, the hour of the “dear body” and “dear heart.” II ~ Arthur Rimbaud,
816:"We see the infinite plain of facts, and we impose a moral interpretation upon it. And the moral interpretation is about 'what to do about what is'. That's associated both with security, because we just don't need that much complexity, and aim. So we're mobile creatures, right? We need to know where we're going, because all we're ever concerned about, roughly speaking, is where we're going. That's what we need to know. Where are we going, what are we doing, and why? And that's not the same questions as, 'What is the world made up of?' And so that's the domain of the moral, as far as I'm concerned, which is 'What are you aiming at?' That's the question of the ultimate ideal, in some sense. Even if you have trivial, little, fragmentary ideals, there's something trying to emerge out of that. It's more coherent, and more integrated, and more applicable, and more practical." ~ Jordan Peterson,
817:Chaos is the domain of ignorance itself. It's unexplored territory. Chaos is what extends, eternally and without limit, beyond the boundaries of all states, all ideas, and all disciplines. It's the foreigner, the stranger, the member of another gang, the rustle in the bushes in the night-time, the monster under the bed, the hidden anger of your mother, and the sickness of your child. Chaos is the despair and horror you feel when you have been profoundly betrayed. It's the place you end up when things fall apart; when your dreams die, your career collapses, or your marriage ends. It's the underworld of fairytale and myth, where the dragon and the gold it guards eternally co-exist. Chaos is where we are when we don't know where we are, and what we are doing when we don't know what we are doing. It is, in short, all those things and situations we neither know nor understand. ~ Jordan Peterson,
818:"We see the infinite plain of facts, and we impose a moral interpretation upon it. And the moral interpretation is about 'what to do about what is'. That's associated both with security, because we just don't need that much complexity, and aim. So we're mobile creatures, right? We need to know where we're going, because all we're ever concerned about, roughly speaking, is where we're going. That's what we need to know. Where are we going, what are we doing, and why? And that's not the same questions as, 'What is the world made up of?' And so that's the domain of the moral, as far as I'm concerned, which is 'What are you aiming at?' That's the question of the ultimate ideal, in some sense. Even if you have trivial, little, fragmentary ideals, there's something trying to emerge out of that. It's more coherent, and more integrated, and more applicable, and more practical." ~ Jordan B Peterson,
819:Venice
The clatter of a cloudy pane
Awoke me in the small hours.
It hung in a gondola rank
And vacancy weighed on the oars.
The trident of hushed guitars
Was hanging like Scorpio’s stars
Above a marine horizon
Untouched by the smoking sun.
In the domain of the zodiac
The chord was a lonely sound.
Untroubled below by the trident,
The port moved its mists around.
At some time the earth had split off,
Capsized palaces gone to wrack.
A fortress loomed up like a planet;
Like a planet, houses spun back.
And the secret of life without root
I understood as the day surfaced:
My dreams and my eyes had more room
To grope on their own through the mist.
And like the foam of mad blossom
And like the foam of rabid lips
Among glimmering shadows broke loose
The chord that knew no fingertips.
~ Boris Pasternak,
820:Chaos is the domain of ignorance itself. It's unexplored territory. Chaos is what extends, eternally and without limit, beyond the boundaries of all states, all ideas, and all disciplines. It's the foreigner, the stranger, the member of another gang, the rustle in the bushes in the night-time, the monster under the bed, the hidden anger of your mother, and the sickness of your child. Chaos is the despair and horror you feel when you have been profoundly betrayed. It's the place you end up when things fall apart; when your dreams die, your career collapses, or your marriage ends. It's the underworld of fairytale and myth, where the dragon and the gold it guards eternally co-exist. Chaos is where we are when we don't know where we are, and what we are doing when we don't know what we are doing. It is, in short, all those things and situations we neither know nor understand. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
821:For years, President Obama and his top officials vehemently denounced China for using its surveillance capabilities for economic advantage while insisting that the United States and its allies never do any such thing. The Washington Post quoted an NSA spokesperson saying that the Department of Defense, of which the agency is a part, “ ‘does engage’ in computer network exploitation,” but “does ***not*** engage in economic espionage in any domain, including ‘cyber’ ” [emphatic asterisks in the original]. That the NSA spies for precisely the economic motive it has denied is proven by its own documents. The agency acts for the benefit of what it calls its “customers,” a list that includes not only the White House, the State Department, and the CIA, but also primarily economic agencies, such as the US Trade Representative and the Departments of Agriculture, Treasury, and Commerce: ~ Glenn Greenwald,
822:Universities face a constant struggle to maintain their integrity, and their fundamental social role in a healthy society, in the face of external pressures. The problems are heightened with the expansion of private power in every domain, in the course of the state-corporate social engineering projects of the past several decades. . . . To defend their integrity and proper commitments is an honorable and difficult task in itself, but our sights should be set higher than that. Particularly in the societies that are more privileged, many choices are available, including fundamental institutional change, if that is the right way to proceed, and surely including scholarship that contributes to, and draws from, the never-ending popular struggles for freedom and justice. 5 Higher education is under attack not because it is failing, but because it is a potentially democratic public sphere. ~ Noam Chomsky,
823:A close examination of the instructions in the Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta reveals that the meditator is never instructed to interfere actively with what happens in the mind. If a mental hindrance arises, for example, the task of satipaṭṭhāna contemplation is to know that the hindrance is present, to know what has led to its arising, and to know what will lead to its disappearance. A more active intervention is no longer the domain of satipaṭṭhāna, but belongs rather to the province of right effort (sammā vāyāma).

The need to distinguish clearly between a first stage of observation and a second stage of taking action is, according to the Buddha, an essential feature of his way of teaching. The simple reason for this approach is that only the preliminary step of calmly assessing a situation without immediately reacting enables one to undertake the appropriate action. ~ An layo,
824:Good Heart, that ownest all!
I ask a modest boon and small:
Not of lands and towns the gift,--
Too large a load for me to lift,--
But for one proper creature,
Which geographic eye,
Sweeping the map of Western earth,
Or the Atlantic coast, from Maine
To Powhatan's domain,
Could not descry.
Is't much to ask in all thy huge creation,
So trivial a part,--
A solitary heart?

Yet count me not of spirit mean,
Or mine a mean demand,
For 't is the concentration
And worth of all the land,
The sister of the sea,
The daughter of the strand,
Composed of air and light,
And of the swart earth-might.
So little to thy poet's prayer
Thy large bounty well can spare.
And yet I think, if she were gone,
The world were better left alone.
by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, Lover's Petition
,
825:The Lord's Creation is like Agarwood, when touched by man (i.e., mould) it becomes infected; as the infection progresses, the Creation produces magic in response to the attack, which only the observant attentive believer can pick up the traces thereof. The purity of that Elixir depends on how it is being distilled from the Agarwood (i.e., The Lord's Creation) by the faithful; the more believing she/he is, the more miraculous the testimony becomes. And only by striving can the incense be extracted into the air (i.e., the public domain) for that its release requires the adequate amount of inquisitive energy to be exerted - that's where the scholar's role lies. Disbelief, however, is touched only by the smoke triggering thereby, disease. Therefore, the Agarwood (i.e., The Lord’s Creation) was given to serve man for that without man’s interaction with it, there would be no magic to extract. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
826:The mother gives her child what she deprives herself of—sleep, the best nourishment and, in certain circumstances, her health, her self.—But are all these acts unegoistic? Are these moral deeds miracles because they are, in Schopenhauer's phrase "impossible and yet accomplished"? Is it not evident that in all four cases man loves one part of himself, (a thought, a longing, an experience) more than he loves another part of himself? that he thus analyses his being and sacrifices one part of it to another part? Is this essentially different from the behavior of the obstinate man who says "I would rather be shot than go a step out of my way for this fellow"?—Preference for something (wish, impulse, longing) is present in all four instances: to yield to it, with all its consequences, is not "unegoistic."—In the domain of the ethical man conducts himself not as individuum but as dividuum. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
827:Laissez faire! Let things alone! have said the judges of the camp. Careers are open; and although the field is covered with corpses, although the conqueror stamps on the bodies of the vanquished, although by supply and demand, and the combinations and monopolies in which they result, the greater part of society becomes enslaved to the few, let things along — for thus has decreed fair play. It is by virtue of this beautiful system that a parvenu, without speaking of the great lord who receives counties as his heritage, is able to conquer with ready money thousands of acres, expel those who cultivate his domain, and replace people and their dwellings with wild animals and rare trees. It is thus that a tradesman, more cunning or intelligent, or, perhaps, more favored by luck than his fellows, is enabled to become master of an army of workers, and as often as not to starve them at his pleasure. ~ lis e Reclus,
828:CAST YOUR BURDEN ON ME, AND I WILL SUSTAIN you. No matter what your circumstances may be, I can—and will—carry you through them. Sometimes you are weighed down by a situation that seems too heavy for you. Do not try to cope with this burden alone. Instead, bring it into My Presence and cast it on Me, releasing it into My care and keeping. Although your circumstances may not change right away, you can find real relief through this process. Casting your burden on Me is a spiritual transaction. You acknowledge that I am in charge of your life and that outcomes are ultimately My domain. This lightens your load immensely, relieving you from feeling responsible for things beyond your control. When you come to Me weary and burdened, I have promised that I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you—trusting in My unfailing Love—and let Me carry your heavy load. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light. ~ Sarah Young,
829:And finally, when the celebrated Quranic commentator Fakhr ad-Din ar-Razi (1149–1209) interpreted the verse “[God] created spouses for you of your own kind so that you may have peace of mind through them” (3:21) as “proof that women were created like animals and plants and other useful things [and not for] worship and carrying the Divine commands . . . because the woman is weak, silly, and in one sense like a child,” his commentary became (and still is) one of the most widely respected in the Muslim world.
This last point bears repeating. The fact is that for fifteen centuries, the science of Quranic commentary has been the exclusive domain of Muslim men. And because each one of these exegetes inevitably brings to the Quran his own ideology and his own preconceived notions, it should not be surprising to learn that certain verses have most often been read in their most misogynist interpretation. ~ Reza Aslan,
830:Mastery in a technology in fact is difficult to achieve because a technology grammar, unlike a linguistic one, changes rapidly. Technology grammars are primitive and dimly perceived at first; they deepen as the base knowledge that comprises them grows; and they evolve as new combinations that work well are discovered and as the daily use of working designs reveals difficulties. There is never closure to them. As a result, even adepts can never fully keep up with all the principles of combination in their domain.

One result of this heavy investment in a domain is that a designer rarely puts a technology together from considerations of all domains available. The artist adapts himself, Paul Klee said, to the contents of his paintbox. "The painter...does not fit the paints to the world. He fits himself to the paint." As in art, so in technology. Designers construct from the domains they know. ~ W Brian Arthur,
831:The entire destiny of modern linguistics is in fact determined by Saussure's inaugural act through which he separates the ‘external’ elements of linguistics from the ‘internal’ elements, and, by reserving the title of linguistics for the latter, excludes from it all the investigations which establish a relationship between language and anthropology, the political history of those who speak it, or even the geography of the domain where it is spoken, because all of these things add nothing to a knowledge of language taken in itself. Given that it sprang from the autonomy attributed to language in relation to its social conditions of production, reproduction and use, structural linguistics could not become the dominant social science without exercising an ideological effect, by bestowing the appearance of scientificity on the naturalization of the products of history, that is, on symbolic objects. ~ Pierre Bourdieu,
832:But if in passing from one domain to another we renounce what has already been given us from eagerness for our new attainment, if in reaching the mental life we cast away or belittle the physical life which is our basis, or if we reject the mental and physical in our attraction to the spiritual, we do not fulfil God integrally, nor satisfy the conditions of His selfmanifestation. We do not become perfect, but only shift the field of our imperfection or atmost attain a limited altitude. However high we may climb, even though it be to the Non-Being itself, we climb ill if we forget our base. Not to abandon the lower to itself, but to transfigure it in the light of the higher to which we have attained, is true divinity of nature. Brahman is integral and unifies many states of consciousness at a time; we also, manifesting the nature of Brahman, should become integral and all-embracing. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine,
833:to conceive of the Infinite quantitatively is not only to limit it, but in addition it
is to conceive of it as subject to increase and decrease, which is no less absurd; with similar considerations one quickly finds oneself envisaging not only several infinites that coexist without confounding or excluding one another, but also infinites that are larger or smaller than others; and finally, the infinite having become so relative under these conditions that it no longer suffices, the ‘transfinite’ is invented, that is, the domain of quantities greater than the infinite. Here, indeed, it is properly a matter of ‘invention, for such conceptions correspond to no reality. So many words, so many absurdities, even regarding simple, elementary logic, yet this does not prevent one from finding among those responsible some who even claim to be ‘specialists’ in logic, so great is the intellectual confusion of our times! ~ Ren Gu non,
834:Another proof for Khafre's pyramid resembling the Lower Heavens' authority on the Giza Plateau can be seen in the pharaoh's statue where Horus (contrary to the conventional claim) is not protecting his backside head with his wings nor is serving as another reference to the united Egypt, but rather is showing and pointing to the Pharaoh his domain of authority by directing his head to the same horizon at which the Sphinx is gazing right in front of that same pyramid. Remember that the Book of the Dead, Spell 83, serves as a transformation ritual into a Phoenix. And on the Metternich Stele, Horus is praised as this great Bennu Bird which as I have validly asserted and shown earlier to have the function of a courier of the upper-heavenly proclaimed tidings/news and the carrier thereof. Therefore, it is a straightforward observation now to acknowledge this second role which the Phoenix was fulfilling in ancient Egypt! ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
835:Horace Ii, 3.
Be tranquil, Dellius, I pray;
For though you pine your life away
With dull complaining breath,
Or speed with song and wine each day-Still, still your doom is death.
Where the white poplar and the pine
In glorious arching shade combine
And the brook singing goes,
Bid them bring store of nard and wine
And garlands of the rose.
Let's live while chance and youth obtain-Soon shall you quit this fair domain
Kissed by the Tiber's gold,
And all your earthly pride and gain
Some heedless heir shall hold.
One ghostly boat shall some time bear
From scenes of mirthfulness or care
Each fated human soul!-Shall waft and leave his burden where
The waves of Lethe roll.
_So come, I pri' thee, Dellius, mine-Let's sing our songs and drink our wine
In that sequestered nook
Where the white poplar and the pine
Stand listening to the brook._
~ Eugene Field,
836:Henceforth the Cartesian surgical operation in which spirit and matter become totally separated dominated scientific and philosophic thought The domain of science was matter which was a pure "it" divorced completely from any ontological aspect other than pure quantity. Although there were protests here and there especially among English and German thinkers, this view became the very factor that determined the relationship between man and nature, scientifically and philosophically. Thus seventeenth-century rationalism is the unconscious background of all later scientific thought up to the present day. Whatever discoveries are made in the sciences and whatever changes are brought about in conceptions of time, space, matter and motion, the background of seventeenth-century rationalism remains. For this very reason, other interpretations of nature, especially the symbolic, have never been seriously considered and accepted. ~ Seyyed Hossein Nasr,
837:The general economic growth of the quarter of a century that followed World War II not surprisingly created many illusions. In the West, people thought that they had found in Keynesianism the definitive solution to the problem of crises and unemployment. It was thus thought that the world had entered into an era of perpetual prosperity and definitive mastery of the business cycle. In the socialist world, it was also thought that the model formula for even higher growth had been discovered which enabled Khruschev to announce victoriously that by 1980 the USSR would have overtaken the united States "in every domain." In the third world of Africa and Asia, the national liberation movements which had seized political independence, also had a battery of prescriptions which, in a mix of capitalist and socialist recipes, in doses that varied from case to case, would enable these movements to overcome "underdevelopment" in "interdependence. ~ Samir Amin,
838:The projection of Disbelief among humanity is biological, it is marked by the emergence of Socialists (nationalists and/or Patriots - the latter fancy themselves with the name: Capitalists) who -so in life as in burial- shrine themselves onto and into the Earth; with the Rich among them favoring the gemstones layers thereof. However, and contrary to this entombed mosaic of cadavers, is Belief dislodging to its carriers from Earth's beds - therefore, it is spiritual (i.e., cordial - meaning: 'of the heart') and not biological. The tombs of the Pantheists on the other hand are hallucinatory dreams of spatial transcending, yet bolted in their own domain of consciousness while being numb outside that constrained sphere of infection; it is after all their biological senses that charm them, not their active hearts (contrary to passive mode when it is not linked with the mind and, hence, acts as a mere radiator of a biological system). ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
839:A thief and worse', you say, but slander's cheap, and a woman's tongue worse than any thief. You come up here to make bad blood among the field hands, casting calumny and lies, the dragonseed every witch sows behind her. Did you think I did not know you for a witch? When I saw that foul imp that clings to you, do you think I did not know how it was begotten, and for what purposes? The man did well who tried to destroy that creature, but the job should be completed. You defied me once, across the body of the old wizard, and I forbore to punish you then, for his sake and in the presence of others. But now you've come too far, and I warn you, woman! I will not have you set foot on this domain. And if you cross my will or dare so much as to speak to me again, I will have you driven from Re Albi, and off the Overfell, with the dogs at your heels. Have you understood me?"

"No," Tenar said. "I have never understood men like you. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
840:To Quintus Dellius
Be tranquil, Dellius, I pray;
For though you pine your life away
With dull complaining breath,
Or speed with song and wine each day,
Still, still your doom is death.
Where the white poplar and the pine
In glorious arching shade combine,
And the brook singing goes,
Bid them bring store of nard and wine
And garlands of the rose.
Let's live while chance and youth obtain;
Soon shall you quit this fair domain
Kissed by the Tiber's gold,
And all your earthly pride and gain
Some heedless heir shall hold.
One ghostly boat shall some time bear
From scenes of mirthfulness or care
Each fated human soul,-Shall waft and leave its burden where
The waves of Lethe roll.
_So come, I prithee, Dellius mine;
Let's sing our songs and drink our wine
In that sequestered nook
Where the white poplar and the pine
Stand listening to the brook_.
~ Eugene Field,
841:On the lowest level, this loss of soul turns the man into the hen-pecked husband who lives with his wife as though she were his mother upon whom he is solely dependent in all things having to do with emotions and the inner life. But even the relatively positive case where the woman is the mistress of the inner domain and mother of the home who simultaneously has the responsibility for dealing with all the man's questions and problems having to do with emotions and the inner life, even this leads to a lack of emotional vitality and sterile one-sidedness in the man. He discharges only the "outer" and "rational" affairs of life, profession, politics, etc. Owing to his loss of soul, the world he has shaped becomes a patriarchal world that, in its soullessness, presents an unprecedented danger for humanity. In this context we cannot delve further into the significance of a full development of the archetypal feminine potential for a new, future society. ~ Erich Neumann,
842:Based on these interviews, he compiled a list of ten dimensions of complexity-ten pairs of apparently antithetical characteristics that are often both present in the creative minds. The list includes:

1. Bursts of impulsiveness that punctuate periods of quiet and rest.

2. Being smart yet extremely naive.

3. Large amplitude swings between extreme responsibility and irresponsibility.

4. A rooted sense of reality together with a hefty dose of fantasy and imagination.

5. Alternating periods of introversion and extroversion.

6. Being simultaneously humble and proud.

7. Psychological androgyny-no clear adherence to gender role stereotyping.

8. Being rebellious and iconoclastic yet respectful to the domain of expertise and its history.

9. Being on one had passionate but on the other objective about one's own work.

10. Experiencing suffering and pain mingled with exhilaration and enjoyment. ~ Mario Livio,
843:Given the great human longing for power—our dry-throated thirst for control, our teeth-baring fury to protect even the feeblest charge over the most limited domain—I have always been baffled by the effort people devote to getting out of jury service. For many of those summoned to the courthouse, it is not an exaggeration to say that being impaneled is the greatest authority they will wield in their entire lives. Not only do jurors get to decide guilt or innocence, to command the resources of the state to change the direction of a person’s life, but they also enjoy the seemingly supernatural ability to determine history after it has already occurred. Serving on a jury means getting to decide what happened. Jurors are the authors of the facts. And you, who just last night got in a heated argument with your wife over who got to manage the volume on the television remote, gave it all up by lying to a judge, no less, about your “very serious” back pain. ~ Adam Benforado,
844:During an individual's immersion in a domain, the locus of flow experiences shifts: what was once too challenging becomes attainable and even pleasurable, while what has long since become attainable no longer proves engaging. Thus, the journeyman musical performer gains flow from the accurate performance of familiar pieces in the repertoire; the youthful master wishes to tackle the most challenging pieces, ones most difficult to execute in a technical sense; the seasoned master may develop highly personal interpretations of familiar pieces, or, alternatively, return to those deceptively simple pieces that may actually prove difficult to execute convincingly and powerfully. Such an analysis helps explain why creative individuals continue to engage in the area of their expertise despite its frustrations, and why so many of them continue to raise the ante, posing ever-greater challenges for themselves, even at the risk of sacrificing the customary rewards. ~ Howard Gardner,
845:During an individual's immersion in a domain, the locus of flow experiences shifts: what was once too challenging becomes attainable and even pleasurable, while what has long since become attainable no longer proves engaging. Thus, the journeyman musical performer gains flow from the accurate performance of familiar pieces in the repertoire; the youthful master wishes to tackle the most challenging pieces, ones most difficult to execute in a technical sense; the seasoned master may develop highly personal interpretations of familiar pieces, or, alternatively, return to those deceptively simple pieces that may actually prove difficult to execute convincingly and powerfully. Such an analysis helps explain why creative individuals continue to engage in the area of their expertise despite its frustrations, and why so many of them continue to raise the ante, posing ever-greater challenges for themselves, even at the risk of sacrificing the customary rewards. ~ Howard Gardner,
846:Like chess masters and firefighters, premodern villagers relied on things being the same tomorrow as they were yesterday. They were extremely well prepared for what they had experienced before, and extremely poorly equipped for everything else. Their very thinking was highly specialized in a manner that the modern world has been telling us is increasingly obsolete. They were perfectly capable of learning from experience, but failed at learning without experience. And that is what a rapidly changing, wicked world demands—conceptual reasoning skills that can connect new ideas and work across contexts. Faced with any problem they had not directly experienced before, the remote villagers were completely lost. That is not an option for us. The more constrained and repetitive a challenge, the more likely it will be automated, while great rewards will accrue to those who can take conceptual knowledge from one problem or domain and apply it in an entirely new one. ~ David Epstein,
847:Do not underestimate the significance of Arabia to Egypt, for that the Hyksos were invading Semites who ruled Lower Egypt and some parts of Upper Egypt before getting expelled gradually from these lands since [the revolt which drove them out from Upper Egypt began in the closing years of the Seventeenth Dynasty at Thebes]. The main god of those Semites were Seth, who was distinguished by the ancient Egyptians as the 'desert god' as if they were pointing to us at his Arab origin. The Hyksos after all, ruled the Kingdom that embraced the Upper Heavens' authority instead of that of the Sun which had broken away into the domain of Upper Egypt.The name Hyksos literally means, 'rulers of foreign lands'. If this is to tell us anything, it certainly does point to us at the Aqsa location (falsely known as, the Temple Mount) which is one of the three Islamic holy sites; its name (Aqsa) from which the name of the Hyksos was derived, literally means: the foreign land. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
848:Hunter set up his easel outside across the road and began to try to paint the place, though microscopic droplets of salt fog inevitably got folded though not mixed in with the Payne’s gray and Naples yellow, and in years to come, as the small canvases from this period traveled the world increasing in value, this introduced modelings, shadows, redefinitions of space, which, though they were physically there, Hunter had not seen at the time—would have to wait for his later “Venice” and “London” phases even to recognize. All night, out in the great fjord, they heard the ice, they woke, they dozed again, the voices of the ice entered their dreams, dictated what they would see, what would happen to each dreaming eye as, helpless, it gazed. Just to the north loomed a far-spreading glacier, the only one in this entire domain of ice that had never been named, as if in fearful acknowledgment of its ancient nobility, its seemingly conscious pursuit of a project. . . . ~ Thomas Pynchon,
849:A case could be made that the great historical difference between what we call the Left and the Right largely turns on the relation between “value” and “values.” The Left has always been about trying to collapse the gulf between the domain dominated by pure self-interest and the domain traditionally dominated by high-minded principles; the Right has always been about prising them even farther apart, and then claiming ownership of both. They stand for both greed and charity. Hence, the otherwise inexplicable alliance in the Republican Party between the free market libertarians and the “values voters” of the Christian Right. What this comes down to in practice has usually been the political equivalent of a strategy of good-cop-bad-cop: first unleash the chaos of the market to destabilize lives and all existing verities alike; then, offer yourself up as the last bastion of the authority of church and fatherhood against the barbarians they have themselves unleashed. ~ David Graeber,
850:Under the notion that unregulated market-driven values and relations should shape every domain of human life, the business model of governance has eviscerated any viable notion of social responsibility while furthering the criminalization of social problems and cutbacks in basic social services, especially for young people, the elderly, people of color, and the impoverished.36 At this historical juncture there is a merging of violence and governance along with the systemic disinvestment in and breakdown of institutions and public spheres that have provided the minimal conditions for democracy. This becomes obvious in the emergence of a surveillance state in which social media not only become new platforms for the invasion of privacy but further legitimate a culture in which monitoring functions are viewed as both necessary and benign. Meanwhile, the state-sponsored society of hyper-fear increasingly regards each and every person as a potential terrorist suspect. ~ Henry A Giroux,
851:Blue Bottle wanted to help customers find coffee they’d love. But coffee beans all look alike, so photos wouldn’t be helpful. To find useful solutions, the team did Lightning Demos of websites selling everything from clothes to wine, looking for ways to describe sensory details such as flavor, aroma, and texture. In the end, it was a chocolate-bar wrapper that provided the most useful idea. Tcho is a chocolate manufacturer in Berkeley, California. Printed on the wrapper of every Tcho bar is a simple flavor wheel with just six words: Bright, Fruity, Floral, Earthy, Nutty, and Chocolatey. When Blue Bottle looked at that wheel, they got inspired, and when we sketched, someone repurposed the idea as a simple flavor vocabulary for describing Blue Bottle’s coffee beans: In Friday’s test, and later, at the new online store, customers loved the simple descriptions. It’s a prime example of finding inspiration outside your domain (and yet another reason to be grateful for chocolate). ~ Jake Knapp,
852:In the loudest voice I could muster, I shouted, "As of this moment, you are no longer the armies of China, Macedonia, Myanmar, Tibet or India. You are now warriors of Durga! We have already fought and overcome many fierce creatures. Now we give you the symbol of their power."
I borrowed the Scarf and touched it to my Pearl Necklace. The silken material sped down each and every soldier to cloak them in the most brilliant red, blue, green, gold and white. Even the flag bearers were not left out and now held banners depicting Durga riding her tiger into battle.
"Red for the heart of a Phoenix that sees through falsehood!" I cheered and raided the trident. "Blue for the Monsters of the Deep that rip apart those who dare to cross their domain! Gold for Metal Birds that cut their enemies with razor beaks! Green for the Horde of Hanuman that comes alive to protect that which is most precious! And white for the Dragons of the Five Oceans, whose cunning and power has no equal! ~ Colleen Houck,
853:be rich?” As Cailliau recalled, his initial reaction was “Well, it helps, no?”27 That was the incorrect response. “He apparently didn’t care about that,” Cailliau realized. “Tim’s not in it for the money. He accepts a much wider range of hotel-room facilities than a CEO would.”28 Instead Berners-Lee insisted that the Web protocols should be made available freely, shared openly, and put forever in the public domain. After all, the whole point of the Web, and the essence of its design, was to promote sharing and collaboration. CERN issued a document declaring that it “relinquishes all intellectual property rights to this code, both source and binary form, and permission is granted for anyone to use, duplicate, modify, and redistribute it.”29 Eventually CERN joined forces with Richard Stallman and adopted his GNU General Public License. The result was one of the grandest free and open-source projects in history. That approach reflected Berners-Lee’s self-effacing style. He was averse to ~ Walter Isaacson,
854:—Father says! ...her voice cut him through. —Lucifer was the archangel who refused to serve Our Lord. To sin is to falsify something in the Divine Order, and that is what Lucifer did. His name means Bringer of Light but he was not satisfied to bring the light of Our Lord to man, he tried to steal the power of Our Lord and to bring his own light to man. He tried to become original, she pronounced malignantly, shaping that word round the whole structure of damnation, repeating it, crumpling the drawing of the robin in her hand, —original, to steal Our Lord’s authority, to command his own destiny, to bear his own light! That is why Satan is the Fallen Angel, for he rebelled when he tried to emulate Our Lord Jesus. And he won his own domain, didn’t he. Didn’t he! And his own light is the light of the fires of Hell! Is that what you want? Is that what you want? Is that what you wanted?
There may have been, by now, many things that Wyatt wanted to do to Jesus: emulate was not one of them. ~ William Gaddis,
855:After the Aryan illegal immigrants (i.e., Jews) were symbolically defeated by the Semites, they resorted to the symbolism of their Zoroastrian & Persian brethren by utilizing the fire on their Menorah; but even that triggered hostility against them. The Jews tried various ways to adapt Judaism to the Semitic domain -into which they infiltrated- but failed miserably on each occasion; and the latest testimony we witness nowadays thereof, is the development of the Menorah from being seven-branched into nine-branched to correspond to the new culture in which they have chosen to lodge, i.e., the Arabic. In the Roman ancient times (which was also another Aryan culture setting foot on Semitic lands) the Menorah was seven-branched and corresponded thereby with the Latin alphabet, but nowadays it is nine-branched corresponding with the Arabic alphabet in an attempt to penetrate (using its reversed-symbolism apparatus) the new host and repeat its ancient game to annex yet again the Semitic tongue. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
856:Oh!” This was said brightly, as if she was happy he had noticed. “I decided I needed my own workspace, instead of constantly infringing upon yours. So I had a few of the boys move a desk in here.”

He stared at the petite, feminine, desk that was pushed against his. And wondered how the bloody hell she had managed to convince men who were terrified of him to move the desk inside his domain.

“Absolutely not.”

***

Two hours later, he was still scowling as she happily worked on . . . whatever the hell it was she was working on. Across from him. At her desk. How the hell . . .

He remembered saying no. He remembered cursing. Threatening her unborn children. Then there was a sort of hazy period of smiles and calm words. Then she had touched the back of his hand with her naked fingers.

And now, here he was with . . . her desk . . . pressed to his—surreptitiously watching her scratch her paper, the tip of her tongue poking from the side of her mouth as she worked. ~ Anne Mallory,
857:I rarely suffer lengthy emotional distress from contact with other people. A person may anger or annoy me, but not for long. I can distinguish between myself and another as beings of two different realms. It's a kind of talent (by which I do not mean to boast: it's not an easy thing to do, so if you can do it, it is a kind of a talent - a special power). When someone gets on my nerves, the first thing I do is transfer the object of my unpleasant feelings to another domain, one having no connection with me. Then I tell myself, Fine, I'm feeling bad, but I've put the source of these fellings into another zone, away from here, where I can examine it and deal with it later in my own good time. In other words, I put a freeze on my emotions. Later, when I thaw them out to perform the examination, I do occasionally find my emotions in a distressed state, but that is rare. The passage of time will usuallly extract the venom from most things and render them harmless. Then sooner or later, I forget about them. ~ Haruki Murakami,
858:Of the spirit of women. - The spiritual power of a woman is best demonstrated by her sacrificing her own spirit to that of a man out of love of him and of his spirit but then, despite this sacrifice, immediately evolving a new spirit within the new domain, originally alien to her nature, to which the man's disposition impels her. (from Assorted Opinions & Maxims 272)

-- This is the first time among years of reading Nietzsche that i agree with his words on women: this aphorism captures a few quintessences of true and gallant womanhood, namely the will(ingness) to sacrifice (not only to others but also to the necessity that arises in a context), the balance between creative and reactive, the free-spiritedness out of such balance without conceit and swagger, and the malleability/fluidity without blind submission. (It is momentous to note that the man-woman dynamic is not binary, and that man/womanhood is not a given in one's biology - it's more something that evolves in a person over time.) ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
859:The God of the Christians is indeed the God of the heathens, but with a wide difference … The Christians know God personally, face to face. The heathens know only … 'what,' and not 'who,' God is; … Christians … are distinguished from the heathens; … they are Christians in virtue of their special knowledge of God; … their mark of distinction is God. … [T]his God is unknown to the heathens, and to unbelievers in general; he does not exist for them. He is, indeed, said to exist for the heathens; but mediately, on condition that they cease to be heathens and become Christians. … Faith is imprisoned within itself. It is true that the philosophical, or … any scientific theorist, also limits himself by a definite system. But theoretic limitation, however fettered, short-sighted and narrow-hearted it may be, has still a freer character than faith, because the domain of theory is itself a free one … [F]aith refers … to … a special, personal Being, urging himself on recognition, and making salvation dependent on that recognition. ~ Ludwig Feuerbach,
860:We do not get to vote on who owns what, or on relations in factory and so on, for all this is deemed beyond the sphere of the political, and it is illusory to expect that one can actually change things by "extending" democracy to ple's control. Radical changes in this domain should be made outside the sphere of legal "rights", etcetera: no matter how radical our anti-capitalism, unless this is understood, the solution sought will involve applying democratic mechanisms (which, of course, can have a positive role to play)- mechanisms, one should never forget, which are themselves part of the apparatus of the "bourgeois" state that guarantees the undisturbed functioning of capitalist reproduction. In this precise sense, Badiou hit the mark with his apparently wired claim that "Today, the enemy is not called Empire or Capital. It's called Democracy." it is the "democratic illusion" the acceptance of democratic procedures as the sole framework for any possible change, that blocks any radical transformation of capitalist relations. ~ Slavoj i ek,
861:because of the huge number of pages and links involved, Page and Brin named their search engine Google, playing off googol, the term for the number 1 followed by a hundred zeros. It was a suggestion made by one of their Stanford officemates, Sean Anderson, and when they typed in Google to see if the domain name was available, it was. So Page snapped it up. “I’m not sure that we realized that we had made a spelling error,” Brin later said. “But googol was taken, anyway. There was this guy who’d already registered Googol.com, and I tried to buy it from him, but he was fond of it. So we went with Google.”157 It was a playful word, easy to remember, type, and turn into a verb.IX Page and Brin pushed to make Google better in two ways. First, they deployed far more bandwidth, processing power, and storage capacity to the task than any rival, revving up their Web crawler so that it was indexing a hundred pages per second. In addition, they were fanatic in studying user behavior so that they could constantly tweak their algorithms. ~ Walter Isaacson,
862:Embracing a different vocabulary, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi has described a highly sought-after affective state called the flow state or flow experience. In such intrinsically motivating experiences, which can occur in any domain of activity, people report themselves as fully engaged with and absorbed by the object of their attention. In one sense, those "in flow" are not conscious of the experience at the moment; on reflection, however, such people feel that they have been fully alive, totally realized, and involved in a "peak experience." Individuals who regularly engage in creative activities often report that they seek such states; the prospect of such "periods of flow" can be so intense that individuals will exert considerable practice and effort, and even tolerate physical or psychological pain, in pursuit thereof. Committed writers may claim that they hate the time spent chained to their desks, but the thought that they would not have the opportunity to attain occasional periods of flow while writing proves devastating. ~ Howard Gardner,
863:Embracing a different vocabulary, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi has described a highly sought-after affective state called the flow state or flow experience. In such intrinsically motivating experiences, which can occur in any domain of activity, people report themselves as fully engaged with and absorbed by the object of their attention. In one sense, those "in flow" are not conscious of the experience at the moment; on reflection, however, such people feel that they have been fully alive, totally realized, and involved in a "peak experience." Individuals who regularly engage in creative activities often report that they seek such states; the prospect of such "periods of flow" can be so intense that individuals will exert considerable practice and effort, and even tolerate physical or psychological pain, in pursuit thereof. Committed writers may claim that they hate the time spent chained to their desks, but the thought that they would not have the opportunity to attain occasional periods of flow while writing proves devastating. ~ Howard Gardner,
864:In the thirty years leading up to the Civil War, the law was increasingly interpreted in the courts to suit the capitalist development of the country. Studying this, Morton Horwitz (The Transformation of American Law) points out that the English commonlaw was no longer holy when it stood in the way of business growth. Mill owners were given the legal right to destroy other people’s property by flood to carry on their business. The law of “eminent domain” was used to take farmers’ land and give it to canal companies or railroad companies as subsidies. Judgments for damages against businessmen were taken out of the hands of juries, which were unpredictable, and given to judges. Private settlement of disputes by arbitration was replaced by court settlements, creating more dependence on lawyers, and the legal profession gained in importance. The ancient idea of a fair price for goods gave way in the courts to the idea of caveat emptor (let the buyer beware), thus throwing generations of consumers from that time on to the mercy of businessmen. ~ Howard Zinn,
865:Seizing Situational Status Here are the steps involved in elevating your status in any situation. You will recognize some of these actions from framing, and for good reason. Frame control and status are closely related, as are the pitch techniques you will learn in Chapter 4.        1. Politely ignore power rituals and avoid beta traps.        2. Be unaffected by your customer’s global status (meaning the customer’s status inside and outside the business environment).        3. Look for opportunities to perpetrate small denials and defiances that strengthen your frame and elevate your status.        4. As soon as you take power, quickly move the discussion into an area where you are the domain expert, where your knowledge and information are unassailable by your audience.        5. Apply a prize frame by positioning yourself as the reward for making the decision to do business with you.        6. Confirm your alpha status by making your customer, who now temporarily occupies a beta position, make a statement that qualifies your higher status. ~ Oren Klaff,
866:Another class of universal truths is the conservation laws, where the amount of some measured quantity remains unchanged no matter what. The three most important are the conservation of mass and energy, the conservation of linear and angular momentum, and the conservation of electric charge. These laws are in evidence on Earth, and everywhere we have thought to look—from the domain of particle physics to the large-scale structure of the universe. In spite of this boasting, all is not perfect in paradise. It happens that we cannot see, touch, or taste the source of eighty-five percent of the gravity we measure in the universe. This mysterious dark matter, which remains undetected except for its gravitational pull on matter we see, may be composed of exotic particles that we have yet to discover or identify. A small minority of astrophysicists, however, are unconvinced and have suggested that there is no dark matter—you just need to modify Newton’s law of gravity. Simply add a few components to the equations and all will be well. Perhaps ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
867:Good Idea?
<i>For Justin Clemens
Fin-de-Siècle</i> France
much more congenial
to the glum exuberance
of your thoughts. Exile
in the land of mediocrity
and gum-trees, no doubt
unjust as Ovid’s. Our Caesar
a banal bureaucrat who
jogs around a lake
in Canberra. “Intellectuals”
debate base quackery
in our desert island’s
bored media. Nearly
buried by the sandstorm’s
insignificance, I asked
for a good idea. My thesis
a pauper’s grave,
withered formulae; since
the thirst for life
often kills. I was, frankly,
serious. You: “Then again
there are no good ideas”
and discoursed
with obstinate, burning
exactitude the belief
31
of doubt. Abelard lost
his balls for this. You
may be the last cynic
in the barren domain
of odious and senseless
pastoral optimism;
the strained and resilient
rope flung toward
my hands sinking in
the sand of the island’s
so-called culture, or lack
thereof. Amen.
~ Ali Alizadeh,
868:The history of ideas, then, is the discipline of beginnings and ends, the description of obscure continuities and returns, the reconstitution of developments in the linear form of history. But it can also, by that very fact, describe, from one domain to another, the whole interplay of exchanges and intermediaries: it shows how scientific knowledge is diffused, gives rise to philosophical concepts, and takes form perhaps in literary works; it shows how problems, notions, themes may emigrate from the philosophical field where they were formulated to scientific or political discourses; it relates work with institutions, social customs or behaviour, techniques, and unrecorded needs and practices; it tries to revive the most elaborate forms of discourse in the concrete landscape, in the midst of the growth and development that witnessed their birth. It becomes therefore the discipline of interferences, the description of the concentric circles that surround works, underline them, relate them to one another, and insert them into whatever they are not. ~ Michel Foucault,
869:If this is so, then the placement of the Mishkan at the heart of the camp suggests that societies need, in the public domain, a constant reminder of the presence of God. That, after all, is why the Mishkan appears in Exodus, not Genesis. Genesis is about individuals, Exodus about societies. Significant thinkers believed likewise. John Locke, the pioneer of toleration, thought so. He considered that atheists were ineligible for English citizenship since membership was gained by swearing an oath of allegiance, and an oath, being a vow to God, could not be sworn by an atheist.[10] In his farewell address, George Washington said: Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports…let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.[11 ~ Jonathan Sacks,
870:The only justification for our concepts and system of concepts is that they serve to represent the complex of our experiences; beyond this they have no legitimacy. I am convinced that the philosophers have had a harmful effect upon the progress of scientific thinking in removing certain fundamental concepts from the domain of empiricism, where they are under our control, to the intangible heights of the a priori. For even if it should appear that the universe of ideas cannot be deduced from experience by logical means, but is, in a sense, a creation of the human mind, without which no science is possible, nevertheless this universe of ideas is just as little independent of the nature of our experiences as clothes are of the form of the human body. This is particularly true of our concepts of time and space, which physicists have been obliged by the facts to bring down from the Olympus of the a priori in order to adjust them and put them in a servicable condition. ~ Albert Einstein, The Meaning of Relativity (1921) Lecture I, Space and Time in Pre-Relativity Physics,
871:There's something above even the pinnacle of the highest of dominance hierarchies, access to which should not be sacrificed for mere proximal success. It's a real place, too, although not to be conceptualized in the standard geographical sense of place we typically use to orient ourselves. I had a vision, once, of an immense landscape, spread for miles out to the horizon before me. I was high in the air, granted a bird's-eye view. Everywhere I could see great stratified multi-storied pyramids of glass, some small, some large, some overlapping, some separate—all akin to modern skyscrapers; all full of people striving to reach each pyramid's very pinnacle. But there was something above that pinnacle, a domain outside each pyramid, in which all were nested. That was the privileged position of the eye that could or perhaps chose to soar freely above the fray; that chose not to dominate any specific group or cause but instead to somehow simultaneously transcend all watchful attention, waiting to act when the time was right and the place had been established. ~ Jordan Peterson,
872:May you be strengthened with all power, according to his glorious might, for all endurance and patience with joy, 12† giving thanks[4] to the Father, who has qualified you[5] to share in the inheritance of the saints in light. 13†He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, 14† in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins. The Preeminence of Christ 15‡‡† He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16†For by[1] him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17†And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18†And he is the head of the body, the church. He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19†For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20†and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross. ~ Anonymous,
873:There's something above even the pinnacle of the highest of dominance hierarchies, access to which should not be sacrificed for mere proximal success. It's a real place, too, although not to be conceptualized in the standard geographical sense of place we typically use to orient ourselves. I had a vision, once, of an immense landscape, spread for miles out to the horizon before me. I was high in the air, granted a bird's-eye view. Everywhere I could see great stratified multi-storied pyramids of glass, some small, some large, some overlapping, some separate—all akin to modern skyscrapers; all full of people striving to reach each pyramid's very pinnacle. But there was something above that pinnacle, a domain outside each pyramid, in which all were nested. That was the privileged position of the eye that could or perhaps chose to soar freely above the fray; that chose not to dominate any specific group or cause but instead to somehow simultaneously transcend all watchful attention, waiting to act when the time was right and the place had been established. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
874:We grossly overestimate the length of the effect of misfortune on our lives. You think that the loss of your fortune or current position will be devastating, but you are probably wrong. More likely, you will adapt to anything, as you probably did after past misfortunes. You may feel a sting, but it will not be as bad as you expect. This kind of misprediction may have a purpose: to motivate us to perform important acts (like buying new cars or getting rich) and to prevent us from taking certain unnecessary risks. And it is part of a more general problem: we humans are supposed to fool ourselves a little bit here and there. According to Trivers’s theory of self-deception, this is supposed to orient us favorably toward the future. But self-deception is not a desirable feature outside of its natural domain. It prevents us from taking some unnecessary risks—but we saw in Chapter 6 how it does not as readily cover a spate of modern risks that we do not fear because they are not vivid, such as investment risks, environmental dangers, or long-term security. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
875:It is possible to construct a history which is logically consistent. It cannot be said to be true; simply that it can be sustained without contradiction. Under a given set of experimental conditions, a finite number of possible histories can be recreated using Griffiths’s method; these are called Griffiths’s Consistent Histories. In these, the world behaves as though composed of separate objects, each having fixed, intrinsic properties. However, the number of consistent histories that can be created from a single set of data is generally greater than one. As a being you are self-aware, and this consciousness allows you to hypothesize that the story you’ve created from a given set of memories is a consistent history, justified by a single narrative voice. As a unique individual, having existed for a particular period and been subjected to an ontology of objects and properties, you can assert this with absolute certainty, and so automatically assume that it is a Griffiths’s history. You make this hypothesis about real life, rather than about the domain of dreams. ~ Michel Houellebecq,
876:Trump is an unintentional master of the art of rectal ventriloquism. No, I don’t mean he’s a champion farter. I mean he talks out of his ass, and the words magically start coming out of other peoples’ mouths. He says eminent domain is wonderful and suddenly conservatives start saying, “Yeah, it’s wonderful!” He floats a new entitlement for child care and almost instantaneously people once opposed to it start bragging about how sensitive they are to the plight of working moms. He says Social Security needs to be more generous and days later once proud tea partiers are saying the same thing, and the rest of us are left to marvel how we didn’t even see Trump’s lips, or cheeks, move.
This is a perfect example of the corrupting effect of populism and personality cults. I keep mentioning my favorite line from William Jennings Bryan: “The people of Nebraska are for free silver and I am for free silver. I will look up the arguments later.” For many Trump supporters, the rule of the day is, “Donald Trump is for X and I am for X. I will look up the arguments later (if ever). ~ Jonah Goldberg,
877:There's this thing that writers talk about--where the characters take on a life of their own and they run away with the story, taking it off to places the author never intended to go. That's what happened here.

Except, that's not what really happens. That's one of the stories that writers tell about storytelling.

What really happened was that I sat and wrote and had a conversation with myself--a conversation that wasn't possible, unless I let part of myself pretend it was someone else--a disembodied voice in the typewriter. And so I typed. I typed everything I felt and feared and worried about, everything I thought I knew, and everything else as well, the much larger domain of what I didn't know and didn't know how to figure out.

Because this, at last, was a place where I could talk to somebody about it all--and if that somebody was really me, that was okay too, because I was the guy who had to figure it out anyway. So I had all these conversations with myself--and these different parts of me talked into the keyboard. And talked and talked and talked. ~ David Gerrold,
878:Children need practice dealing with other people. With people, practice never leads to perfect. But perfect isn’t the goal. Perfect is the goal only in a simulation. Children become fearful of not being in control in a domain where control is not the point. Beyond this, children use conversations with one another to learn how to have conversations with themselves. For children growing up, the capacity for self-reflection is the bedrock of development. I worry that the holding power of the screen does not encourage this. It jams that inner voice by offering continual interactivity or continual connection. Unlike time with a book, where one’s mind can wander and there is no constraint on time out for self-reflection, “apps” bring children back to the task at hand just when a child’s mind should be allowed to wander. So in addition to taking children away from conversation with other children, too much time with screens can take children away from themselves. It is one thing for adults to choose distraction over self-reflection. But children need to learn to hear their own voices. ~ John Brockman,
879:That's precisely what's so extraordinary about you, you enjoy giving pleasure. Offering your body as an object of pleasure, giving pleasure unselfishly: that's what Westerners don't know how to do any more. They've completely lost the sense of giving. Try as they might, they no longer feel sex as something natural. Not only are they ashamed of their own bodies, which aren't up to porn standards, but for the same reasons they no longer feel truly attracted to the body of the other. It's impossible to make love without a certain abandon, without accepting, at least temporarily, the state of being in a state of dependency, of weakness. Sentimental adulation and sexual obsession have the same roots, both proceed from some degree of selflessness; it's not a domain in which you can find fulfilment without losing yourself. We have become cold, rational, acutely conscious of our individual existence and our rights; more than anything, we want to avoid alienation and dependence; on top of that we're obsessed with health and hygiene: these are hardly ideal conditions in which to make love. ~ Michel Houellebecq,
880:Here’s a game I sometimes play in my class: I ask a few students to think about a song, not to tell anyone what song they picked, and tap the beat of that song on a table. Next I ask the students to predict how many of the students in the room will correctly guess the song’s name. They usually think that about half will get it. Then I ask the students who were listening to the beat to name the song that they think was being played, and almost no one gets it right. The point is that when we know something and know it well (for example, the song that we have picked), it is hard for us to appreciate the gaps in other people’s understanding—a bias that is called “the curse of knowledge.” We all suffer from this affliction, but it’s particularly severe for academics. Why? Because academics study the same topic for years in all its details and intricacies, and by the time we become one of the world’s experts on that particular topic, the whole domain seems simpler and more intuitive. And with this curse of knowledge it is easy to assume that everyone else also finds the topic simple and easy to understand. ~ Dan Ariely,
881:We have polluted for years, causing much damage to the environment, while the scientists currently making these complicated forecasting models were not sticking their necks out and trying to stop us from building these risks (they resemble those “risk experts” in the economic domain who fight the previous war)—these are the scientists now trying to impose the solutions on us. But the skepticism about models that I propose does not lead to the conclusions endorsed by anti-environmentalists and pro-market fundamentalists. Quite the contrary: we need to be hyper-conservationists ecologically, since we do not know what we are harming with now. That’s the sound policy under conditions of ignorance and epistemic opacity. To those who say “We have no proof that we are harming nature,” a sound response is “We have no proof that we are not harming nature, either;” the burden of the proof is not on the ecological conservationist, but on someone disrupting an old system. Furthermore we should not “try to correct” the harm done, as we may be creating another problem we do not know much about currently. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
882:outside the boundaries of its own skin—these things had driven the species to the edge of destruction. Worse, this one organism threatened the survival of all life on Earth. The Silencer’s makers did not have to look far for a solution. The answer lay in another species that had conquered the entirety of its domain, ruling it with unquestioned authority for millions of years. Beyond their immaculate design, the reason sharks rule the ocean is their complete indifference to everything except feeding, procreation, and defending their territory. The shark does not love. It feels no empathy. It trusts nothing. It lives in perfect harmony with its environment because it has no aspirations or desires. And no pity. A shark feels no sorrow, no remorse, hopes for nothing, dreams of nothing, has no illusions about itself or anything beyond itself. Once a human named Evan Walker had a dream—a dream it can no longer remember—and in that dream there was a tent in the woods and in that tent there was a girl who called herself humanity, and the girl was worth more to it than its own life. No longer. When it finds her, ~ Rick Yancey,
883:Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov stirred at half past eight to the sound of rain on the eaves. With a half-opened eye, he pulled back his covers and climbed from bed. He donned his robe and slipped on his slippers. He took up the tin from the bureau, spooned a spoonful of beans into the Apparatus, and began to crank the crank. Even as he turned the little handle round and round, the room remained under the tenuous authority of sleep. As yet unchallenged, somnolence continued to cast its shadow over sights and sensations, over forms and formulations, over what has been said and what must be done, lending each the insubstantiality of its domain. But when the Count opened the small wooden drawer of the grinder, the world and all it contained were transformed by that envy of the alchemists—the aroma of freshly ground coffee. In that instant, darkness was separated from light, the waters from the lands, and the heavens from the earth. The trees bore fruit and the woods rustled with the movement of birds and beasts and all manner of creeping things. While closer at hand, a patient pigeon scuffed its feet on the flashing. ~ Amor Towles,
884:That kiss was a revelation- Patience had never imagined a simple kiss could be so bold, so heavily invested with meaning. His lips were hard; they moved over hers, parting them further, confidently managing her, ruthlessly teaching her all she was so eager to learn.
His tongue invaded her mouth with the arrogance of a conquerer claiming victory's spoils. Unhurriedly, he visited every corner of his domain, claiming every inch, branding it as his- knowing it. After a lengthy, devastatingly thorough inspection, he settled to sample her in a different way. The slow, languid thrusting seduced her willing senses.
She'd yielded, yet her passive surrender satisfied neither of them. Patience found herself drawn into the game- the slide of lips against lips, the sensual glide of hot tongue against tongue. She was more than willing. The promise in the heat rising, steadily building between them, and even more the tension- excitement and something more- that surged like a slow tide behind the warm glow, drew her on. The kiss stretched and time slowed- the drugging effect of shared breaths sent her wits to a slow spin. ~ Stephanie Laurens,
885:Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov stirred at half past eight to the sound of rain on the eaves. With a half-opened eye, he pulled back his covers and climbed from bed. He donned his robe and slipped on his slippers. He took up the tin from the bureau, spooned a spoonful of beans into the Apparatus, and began to crank the crank. Even as he turned the little handle round and round, the room remained under the tenuous authority of sleep. As yet unchallenged, somnolence continued to cast its shadow over sights and sensations, over forms and formulations, over what has been said and what must be done, lending each the insubstantiality of its domain. But when the Count opened the small wooden drawer of the grinder, the world and all it contained were transformed by that envy of the alchemists—the aroma of freshly ground coffee. In that instant, darkness was separated from light, the waters from the lands, and the heavens from the earth. The trees bore fruit and the woods rustled with the movement of birds and beasts and all manner of creeping things. While closer at hand, a patient pigeon scuffed its feet on the flashing. Easing ~ Amor Towles,
886:God and the individual communicate within the framework of God’s purposes for us, as explained earlier, and that because of the interchange God does what he had not previously intended, or refrains from something he previously had intended to do, is nothing against God’s dignity if it is an arrangement he himself has chosen. It is not inherently “greater” to be inflexible. That is an unfortunate human idea of greatness, derived from behavior patterns all too common in a fallen world. It turns God into a cosmic stuffed shirt. This unfortunate idea is reinforced from “the highest intellectual sources” by classical ideas of “perfection,” which stressed the necessity of absolute inalterability in God. But in a domain of persons, such as The Kingdom Among Us, it is far greater to be flexible and yet able to achieve the good goals one has set. And that is an essential part of the Divine Personality shown in the Bible and incarnated in the person of Jesus and presented in his message. So far from fitting the classical pattern of God as “the Unmoved Mover,” the God shown in the historical record is “the Most Moved Mover.” This ~ Dallas Willard,
887:MAY 6 I HAVE BROKEN LEVIATHAN’S POWER FROM YOUR LIFE MY CHILD, I have broken the demonic power of the sea serpent from your life. I have caused all his demonic little demon fish to stick to his scales as I brought him up out of the midst of the sea and cast him into the wilderness to lie on the open field as food for all the beasts of the field and the birds of the heavens. The rivers and seas belong to Me, and I will make utterly waste and desolate the places where his evil power has dwelt. I am the one who commands the sea and its streams to run dry, and I have broken the power of the evils of the sea from bringing destruction to your life. EZEKIEL 29:3–5; ISAIAH 44:27 Prayer Declaration Father, in the name of Jesus I bind every sea monster that would attack my life or region. You have raised a watch against Leviathan, and You will not let the demonic powers of the sea oppress me. You have stripped him of his power and have taken away his armor. You have caused the places of his domain to become utterly waste and desolate and have thrown him and his demonic spirits into the wilderness to be food for the beasts and birds who dwell there. ~ John Eckhardt,
888:The heart of software is its ability to solve domain-related problems for its user. All other features, vital though they may be, support this basic purpose. When the domain is complex, this is a difficult task, calling for the concentrated effort of talented and skilled people. Developers have to steep themselves in the domain to build up knowledge of the business. They must hone their modeling skills and master domain design. Yet these are not the priorities on most software projects. Most talented developers do not have much interest in learning about the specific domain in which they are working, much less making a major commitment to expand their domain-modeling skills. Technical people enjoy quantifiable problems that exercise their technical skills. Domain work is messy and demands a lot of complicated new knowledge that doesn’t seem to add to a computer scientist’s capabilities. Instead, the technical talent goes to work on elaborate frameworks, trying to solve domain problems with technology. Learning about and modeling the domain is left to others. Complexity in the heart of software has to be tackled head-on. To do otherwise is to risk irrelevance. ~ Eric Evans,
889:Hate Orgoreyn? No, how should I? How does one hate a country, or love one? Tibe talks about it; I lack the trick of it. I know people, I know towns, farms, hills and rivers and rocks, I know how the sun at sunset in autumn falls on the side of a certain plowland in the hills; but what is the sense of giving a boundary to all that, of giving it a name and ceasing to love where the name ceases to apply? What is love of one’s country; is it hate of one’s uncountry? Then it’s not a good thing. Is it simply self-love? That’s a good thing, but one mustn’t make a virtue of it, or a profession. . . . Insofar as I love life, I love the hills of the Domain of Estre, but that sort of love does not have a boundary-line of hate. And beyond that, I am ignorant, I hope.” Ignorant, in the Handdara sense: to ignore the abstraction, to hold fast to the thing. There was in this attitude something feminine, a refusal of the abstract, the ideal, a submissiveness to the given, which rather displeased me. Yet he added, scrupulous, “A man who doesn’t detest a bad government is a fool. And if there were such a thing as a good government on earth, it would be a great joy to serve it. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
890:Metaphysical or esoteric dialectic moves between the simplicity of symbolism and complexity of reflection; now this latter—though modern man has difficulty in understanding the point - can become more and more subtle without for all that getting one inch near to truth; in other words, a thought may be subdivided into a thousand ramifications and hedge itself with all possible precautions and yet remain outward and "profane", for no virtuosity of the potter will transform clay into gold. It is possible to conceive of a language a hundred times more elaborated than that which is used today, for there is in principle no limit to how far one can go in this domain; every formulation is necessarily "naive" in its way and it is always possible to try to enhance it by a luxuriance of logical or imaginative wordplay. Now, this proves on the one hand that elaboration as such adds no essential quality to an enunciation ,and on the other hand, retrospectively, that the relatively simple enunciations of sages of former times were charged with a fullness of meaning which is precisely what people no longer know how to discern a priori and the existence of which they readily deny. ~ Frithjof Schuon,
891:The communities were in fierce competition with each other. They had their rich and their poor; they had orators and conquerors; they made war either for a domain or an idea. Though the various states acknowledged various forms of government, free institutions were beginning to preponderate; popular assemblies increased in power; republics soon became general; the democracy to which the most enlightened European politicians look forward as the extreme goal of political advancement, and which still prevailed among other subterranean races, whom they despised as barbarians, the loftier family of Ana, to which belonged the tribe I was visiting, looked back to as one of the crude and ignorant experiments which belong to the infancy of political science. It was the age of envy and hate, of fierce passions, of constant social changes more or less violent, of strife between classes, of war between state and state. This phase of society lasted, however, for some ages, and was finally brought to a close, at least among the nobler and more intellectual populations, by the gradual discovery of the latent powers stored in the all-permeating fluid which they denominate Vril. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton,
892:Our world is filled with competition, frenzied ambition in every domain. Each of us is acquainted with the spirit of competition. This spirit is not a bad thing in and of itself. Its influence has long been felt in personal relations within the dominant classes. Subsequently it spread throughout the whole of society, to the point that today it has more or less openly triumphed in every part of the world. In Western nations, and above all in the United States, it animates not only economic and financial life, but scientific research and intellectual life as well. Despite the tension and the unrest it brings, these nations are inclined on the whole to congratulate themselves for having embraced the spirit of competition, for its positive effects are considerable. Not the least of these is the impressive wealth it has brought a large part of the population. No one, or almost no one, any longer thinks of forgoing rivalry, since it allows us to go on dreaming of a still more glittering and prosperous future than the recent past. Our world seems to us the most desirable one there ever was, especially when we compare it to life in nations that have not enjoyed the same prosperity. ~ Ren Girard,
893:WE WILL ARGUE that to understand world inequality we have to understand why some societies are organized in very inefficient and socially undesirable ways. Nations sometimes do manage to adopt efficient institutions and achieve prosperity, but alas, these are the rare cases. Most economists and policymakers have focused on “getting it right,” while what is really needed is an explanation for why poor nations “get it wrong.” Getting it wrong is mostly not about ignorance or culture. As we will show, poor countries are poor because those who have power make choices that create poverty. They get it wrong not by mistake or ignorance but on purpose. To understand this, you have to go beyond economics and expert advice on the best thing to do and, instead, study how decisions actually get made, who gets to make them, and why those people decide to do what they do. This is the study of politics and political processes. Traditionally economics has ignored politics, but understanding politics is crucial for explaining world inequality. As the economist Abba Lerner noted in the 1970s, “Economics has gained the title Queen of the Social Sciences by choosing solved political problems as its domain.” We ~ Daron Acemo lu,
894:We desire some pleasure, and the material means of obtaining it are lacking. “It is a mistake,” Labruyère tells us, “to be in love without an ample fortune.” There is nothing for it but to attempt a gradual elimination of our desire for that pleasure. [...] But the pleasure can never be realised. If we succeed in overcoming the force of circumstances, nature at once shifts the battle-ground, placing it within ourselves, and effects a gradual change in our heart until it desires something other than what it is going to obtain. And if this transposition has been so rapid that our heart has not had time to change, nature does not, on that account, despair of conquering us, in a manner more gradual, it is true, more subtle, but no less efficacious. It is then, at the last moment, that the possession of our happiness is wrested from us, or rather it is that very possession which nature, with diabolical cleverness, uses to destroy our happiness. After failure in every quarter of the domain of life and action, it is a final incapacity, the mental incapacity for happiness, that nature creates in us. The phenomenon, of happiness either fails to appear, or at once gives way to the bitterest of reactions. ~ Marcel Proust,
895:In A Township Of Asia Minor
The news about the outcome of the sea-battle at Actium
was of course unexpected.
But there's no need for us to draft a new proclamation.
The name's the only thing that has to be changed.
There, in the concluding lines, instead of: "Having freed the Romans
from Octavius, that disaster,
that parody of a Caesar,"
we'll substitute: "Having freed the Romans
from Antony, that disaster,..."
The whole text fits very nicely.
"To the most glorious victor,
matchless in his military ventures,
prodigious in his political operations,
on whose behalf the township ardently wished
for Antony's triumph,..."
here, as we said, the substitution: "for Octavius Caesar's triumph,
regarding it as Zeus' finest gift—
to this mighty protector of the Greeks,
who graciously honors Greek customs,
who is beloved in every Greek domain,
who clearly deserves exalted praise,
and whose exploits should be recorded at length
in the Greek language, in both verse and prose,
in the Greek language, the vehicle of fame,"
et cetera, et cetera. It all fits brilliantly.
~ Constantine P. Cavafy,
896:The idea that democracy was the most, or indeed the only, legitimate form of government spread to every corner of the world. Democratic constitutions were rewritten, or written for the first time, in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the former Communist world. But stable liberal democracy was consolidated only in a subset of those countries undergoing democratic transitions, because the material balance of power in each society did not force the different actors to accept constitutional compromise. One or another actor—usually the one that had inherited executive authority—emerged as much more powerful than the others and expanded its domain at the expense of the others. The Enlightenment ideas that underpinned modern democracy were broadly disseminated across Europe, all the way to Russia. Their reception, however, differed markedly from country to country depending on how different political actors saw those ideas impinging on their own interests. Understanding the emergence of accountable government requires, then, understanding the particular political forces that existed in the different parts of Europe and why some constellations of power promoted accountability while others proved no bar to the growth of absolutism. ~ Francis Fukuyama,
897:The Rules of Misquotation: Axiom 1. Any quotation that can be altered will be.   Corollary 1A: Vivid words hook misquotes in the mind. ~   Corollary 1B: Numbers are hard to keep straight. ~   Corollary 1C: Small changes can have a big impact (or: what a difference an a makes). ~   Corollary 1D: If noted figures don't say what needs to be said, we'll say it for them. ~   Corollary 1E: Journalists are a less than dependable source of accurate quotes.   Corollary 1F: Famous dead people make excellent commentators on current events.   Axiom 2. Famous quotes need famous mouths. ~   Corollary 2A: Well-known messengers get credit for clever comments they report from less celebrated mouths. ~   Corollary 2B: Particularly quotable figures receive more than their share of quotable quotes. ~   Corollary 2C: Comments made about someone might as well have been said by that person. ~   Corollary 2D: Who you think said something may depend on where you live. ~   Corollary 2E: Vintage quotes are considered to be in the public domain.   Corollary 2F: In a pinch, any orphan quote can be called a Chinese proverb. ~ Ralph Keyes, "Nice Guys Finish Seventh": False Phrases, Spurious Sayings, and Familiar Misquotations (1992) ISBN 0062700200.,
898:Since the earliest days the church as an organization has thrown itself violently against every effort to liberate the body and mind of man. It has been, at all times and everywhere, the habitual and incorrigible defender of bad governments, bad laws, bad social theories, bad institutions. It was, for centuries, an apologist for slavery, as it was apologist for the divine right of kings.... In the domain of pure ideas one branch of the church clings to the archaic speculations of Thomas Aquinas and the other labors under the preposterous nonsense of John Calvin....
The only real way to reconcile science and religion is to set up something that is not science and something that is not religion.... To argue that the gaps in knowledge which still confront the seeker must be filled, not by patient inquiry, but by intuition or revelation, is simply to give ignorance a gratuitous and preposterous dignity. When a man so indulges himself it is only to confess that, to that extent at least, he is not a scientist at all, but a theologian, for he attempts to reconcile science and religion by the sorry device of admitting that the latter is somehow superior to the former, and is thus entitled to all territories that remain unoccupied. (TG 260-61) ~ S T Joshi,
899:There is a principle to be learned by studying the biological origins of moral reasoning. It is that outside the clearest ethical precepts, such as the condemnation of slavery, child abuse, and genocide, which all will agree should be opposed everywhere without exception, there is a larger gray domain inherently difficult to navigate. The declaration of ethical precepts and judgments made from them requires a full understanding of why we care about the matter one way or the other, and that includes the biological history of the emotions engaged. This inquiry has not been done. In fact, it is seldom even imagined. With deepened self-understanding, how will we feel about morality and honor? I have no doubt that in many cases, perhaps the great majority, the precepts shared by most societies today will stand the test of biology-based realism. Others, such as the ban on artificial conception, condemnation of homosexual preference and forced marriages of adolescent girls, will not. Whatever the outcome, it seems clear that ethical philosophy will benefit from a reconstruction of its precepts based on both science and culture. If such greater understanding amounts to the “moral relativism” so fervently despised by the doctrinally righteous, so be it. ~ Edward O Wilson,
900:During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was--but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasureable, because poetic, sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural images of the desolate or terrible. I looked upon the scene before me--upon the mere house, and the simple landscape features of the domain--upon the bleak walls--upon the vacant eye-like windows--upon a few rank sedges--and upon a few white trunks of decayed trees--with an utter depression of soul which I can compare to no earthly sensation more properly than to the after-dream of the reveller upon opium--the bitter lapse into everyday life--the hideous dropping off of the veil. There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart--an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
901:Art is the human language of the nervous plane, intended to express and communicate the Divine, who in the domain of sensation manifests as beauty.

   The purpose of art is therefore to give those for whom it is meant a freer and more perfect communion with the Supreme Reality. The first contact with this Supreme Reality expresses itself in our consciousness by a flowering of the being in a plenitude of vast and peaceful delight. Each time that art can give the spectator this contact with the infinite, however fleetingly, it fulfils its aim; it has shown itself worthy of its mission. Thus no art which has for many centuries moved and delighted a people can be dismissed, since it has at least partially fulfilled its mission - to be the powerful and more or less perfect utterance of that which is to be expressed. What makes it difficult for the sensibility of a nation to enjoy the delight that another nation finds in one art or another is the habitual limitation of the nervous being which, even more than the mental being, is naturally exclusive in its ability to perceive the Divine and which, when it has entered into relation with Him through certain forms, feels an almost irresistible reluctance to recognise Him through other forms of sensation. ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago, 122,
902:Sexual harassment is material. It is a network that stops information from getting out. It is a set of alliances that come alive to stop something; that enable a complaint to be held up or to become confidential, so that it never comes out into the public domain. And notice here: so many complex things are going on at the same time. It is not activity that is coordinated by one person or even necessarily a group of people who are meeting in secret, although secret meetings probably do happen. All of these activities, however complex, sustain a direction; they have a point. Direction does not require something to originate from a single point: in fact a direction is achieved through consistency between points that do not seem to meet. Things combine to achieve something that is solid and tangible; bonds become binds. If one element does not hold, or become binding, another element holds or binds. The process is rather like the cement used to make walls: something is set into a holding pattern. The setting is what hardens. Perhaps when people notice the complexity, or even the inefficiency and disorganization, they don’t notice the cement. When you say there is a pattern, you are heard as paranoid, as if you are imagining that all this complexity derives from a single point. ~ Sara Ahmed,
903:So it began. It ended as it always does, with such things; he had a full pleasure-chamber and flagellary, the Duc de Morhban, and he took me there, in the cool depths of the earth beneath his castle at the outermost edge of Terre d’Ange, setting the torches ablaze until it might as well have been Kushiel’s domain, wringing me limp with blood and sweat, his face distorted behind the lash, and the sound of my own voice, begging, pleading, as he rode me at the end, bestriding me like a colossus. He used flechettes, too. I hadn’t counted on that. A thousand deaths, of agony and pleasure, I died there in Quincel de Morhban’s chamber. He was good, better almost than any patron I had known, when at last he laid civility aside for violent pleasure, the mask of lust obscuring his features. He was a Kusheline, it was in his blood. He wanted—oh, Elua, he wanted!—to hear me give the signale. If he gave up his questions, it was for that, waiting. And if I had given it, I would have answered. But I had given the signale to one patron only, who had sundered me from myself. Quincel de Morhban could command me, shuddering, to give up my very flesh, quivering in abject climax. He could, and he did, snarling with victory. Not my signale. And in the end, his exhaustion defeated us both. ~ Jacqueline Carey,
904:In short, the "Greek miracle ” as it is, called by its enthusiastic admirers, is reduced to something of comparatively small importance, or at least, whenever it implies a fundamentally new departure, this departure is usually in the nature of a degeneration ; it stands for the individualization of conceptions, the substitution of the rational for the truly intellectual, and of the scientific or philosophical for the metaphysical point of view. It matters little, moreover, whether the Greeks were or were not more successful than others in turning certain forms of knowledge to practical use, or whether they deduced consequences of this particular kind, whereas those who preceded them did not do so ; it might even be said that, in this respect, they assigned a less pure, and disinterested ‘purpose to knowledge, because their turn of mind only allowed' them to remain within the domain of principles with some difficulty and as though by exception. This inclination towards the “ practical ” in the most ordinary sense of the word is one of those factors that were fated to become increasingly marked during the course of Western civilization, until in modern times the tendency became frankly predominant. Only the Middle Ages, being much more given to pure speculation, can be said to have escaped it. ~ Ren Gu non,
905:They found that the crowd assembled around Innocentive was able to solve forty-nine of them, for a success rate of nearly 30 percent. They also found that people whose expertise was far away from the apparent domain of the problem were more likely to submit winning solutions. In other words, it seemed to actually help a solver to be ‘marginal’—to have education, training, and experience that were not obviously relevant for the problem. Jeppesen and Lakhani provide vivid examples of this: [There were] different winning solutions to the same scientific challenge of identifying a food-grade polymer delivery system by an aerospace physicist, a small agribusiness owner, a transdermal drug delivery specialist, and an industrial scientist. . . . All four submissions successfully achieved the required challenge objectives with differing scientific mechanisms. . . . [Another case involved] an R&D lab that, even after consulting with internal and external specialists, did not understand the toxicological significance of a particular pathology that had been observed in an ongoing research program. . . . It was eventually solved, using methods common in her field, by a scientist with a Ph.D. in protein crystallography who would not normally be exposed to toxicology problems or solve such problems on a routine basis. ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
906:It has generally been assumed that fairy tales were first created for children and are largely the domain of children. But nothing could be further from the truth.

From the very beginning, thousands of years ago, when tales were told to create communal bonds in face of the inexplicable forces of nature, to the present, when fairy tales are written and told to provide hope in a world seemingly on the brink of catastrophe, mature men and women have been the creators and cultivators of the fairy tale tradition. When introduced to fairy tales, children welcome them mainly because they nurture their great desire for change and independence. On the whole, the literary fairy tale has become an established genre within a process of Western civilization that cuts across all ages. Even though numerous critics and shamans have mystified and misinterpreted the fairy tale because of their spiritual quest for universal archetypes or their need to save the world through therapy, both the oral and the literary forms of the fairy tale are grounded in history: they emanate from specific struggles to humanize bestial and barbaric forces, which have terrorized our minds and communities in concrete ways, threatening to destroy free will and human compassion. The fairy tale sets out to conquer this concrete terror through metaphors. ~ Jack D Zipes,
907:There was a dreadful logic here - so obvious he had overlooked it. The real need was for a different kind of book altogether, a book for the times. Very well then, he would explore that infernal map, transcribe its morbid cartography; record the tale of a realm that was at once a city and Hell and himself.

In this way Owen Maddock turned his back on the light and sought out the oracles that lurk in darkness.

A feverish energy possessed him. He laboured as never before upon his given work. Now he would strive to be obscure, to lead his readers by crooked paths, baffle them with indecipherable mysteries. There would no delicacy of style, only 'thunder at midnight'. Little by little there rose up before his inner eye a new vision to replace that of the White Road that had led him nowhere: a Kingdom of Darkness, a crepuscular domain of monstrous cults that chanted, to the tolling of iron bells and the beating of brazen gongs, unpronounceable demonic litanies. He must familiarise himself with every aspect of this world, its endless roll-calls of Hell, the spells by which the doors of the pit might be opened. He must cast in awful detail the laws by which tortures were administered.

He would write for days in a frenzy, his mind ranging on raven's wings through skies black as pitch.

"The White Road ~ Ron Weighell,
908:The Blonde Maiden
Though
she
depart, a vision flitting,
If I these thoughts in words exhale:
I love you, you blonde maiden, sitting
Within your pure white beauty's veil.
I love you for your blue eyes dreaming,
Like moonlight moving over snow,
And 'mid the far-off forests beaming
On something hid I may not know.
I love this forehead's fair perfection
Because it stands so starry-clear,
In flood of thought sees its reflection
And wonders at the image near.
I love these locks in riot risen
Against the hair-net's busy bands;
To free them from their pretty prison
Their sylphs entice my eyes and hands.
I love this figure's supple swinging
In rhythm of its bridal song,
Of strength and life-joy daily singing
With youthful yearnings deep and long.
I love this foot so lightly bearing
The glory of sure victory
Through youth's domain of merry daring
To meet first-love that hers shall be.
I love these hands, these lips enchanting,
With them the God of love's allied,
With them the apple-prize is granting,
But guards them, too, lest aught betide.
I love you and must say it ever,
Although you heed not what you've heard,
But flee and answer: maidens never
May put their trust in poet's word.
149
~ Bjornstjerne Bjornson,
909:CAST YOUR BURDEN ON ME, AND I WILL SUSTAIN you. No matter what your circumstances may be, I can—and will—carry you through them. Sometimes you are weighed down by a situation that seems too heavy for you. Do not try to cope with this burden alone. Instead, bring it into My Presence and cast it on Me, releasing it into My care and keeping. Although your circumstances may not change right away, you can find real relief through this process. Casting your burden on Me is a spiritual transaction. You acknowledge that I am in charge of your life and that outcomes are ultimately My domain. This lightens your load immensely, relieving you from feeling responsible for things beyond your control. When you come to Me weary and burdened, I have promised that I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you—trusting in My unfailing Love—and let Me carry your heavy load. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light. Cast your burden on the LORD, and He shall sustain you; He shall never permit the righteous to be moved. —Psalm 55:22 NKJV “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” —Matthew 11:28–30 I trust in your unfailing love; my heart rejoices in your salvation. —Psalm 13:5 ~ Sarah Young,
910:Future Of Humanity - Planetary Civilization

In mythology, the gods lived in the divine splendor of heaven, far above the insignificant affairs of mere mortals.

The Greek gods frolicked in the heavenly domain of Mount Olympus, while the Norse gods who fought for honor and eternal glory would feast in the hallowed halls of Valhalla with the spirits of fallen warriors. But if our destiny is to attain the power of the gods by the end of the century, what will our civilization look like in 2100? Where is all this technological innovation taking our civilization?

All the technological revolutions described here are leading to a single point: the creation of a planetary civilization.

This transition is perhaps the greatest in human history. In fact, the people living today are the most important ever to walk the surface of the planet, since they will determine whether we attain this goal or descend into chaos.
Perhaps 5,000 generations of humans have walked the surface of the earth since we first emerged in Africa about 100,000 years ago, and of them, the ones living in this century will ultimately determine our fate.
Unless there is a natural catastrophe or some calamitous act of folly, it is inevitable that we will enter this phase of our collective history. We can see this most clearly by analyzing the history of energy. ~ Michio Kaku,
911:The articles were true,” Myron said. “And you’ve known it all along.” “What we did or did not know is not your concern.” Myron shook his head. “Unbelievable,” he said. “So let me see if I got this straight. You have a serial psycho out there who snatches people out of the blue and torments their families. You want to keep a lid on it because if word got out to the public, you’d have a panic situation. Then the psycho goes directly to Stan Gibbs and suddenly the story is in the public domain …” Myron’s voice died off, seeing that his logic trail had hit a major pothole. He frowned and forged ahead. “I don’t know how that old novel or the plagiarism charges tie in. But either way, you decided to ride it. You let Gibbs get fired and disgraced, probably in part because you were pissed off that he upset your investigation. But mostly”—he spotted what he thought was a clearing—“but mostly you did it so you could watch him. If the psycho contacted him once, you figured, he’d probably do it again—especially if the articles had been discredited.” Kimberly Green said, “Wrong.” “But close.” “No.” “The kidnappings Gibbs wrote about took place, right?” She hesitated, gave Ford an eye check. “We can’t verify all of his facts.” “Jesus, I’m not taking a deposition here,” Myron said. “Was his column true, yes or no?” “We’ve told you enough,” she said. “It’s your turn.” “You haven’t told me squat. ~ Harlan Coben,
912:...Puritanism has made life itself impossible. More than art, more than estheticism, life represents beauty in a thousand variations; it is indeed, a gigantic panorama of eternal change. Puritanism, on the other hand, rests on a fixed and immovable conception of life; it is based on the Calvinistic idea that life is a curse, imposed upon man by the wrath of God. In order to redeem himself man must do constant penance, must repudiate every natural and healthy impulse, and turn his back on joy and beauty.

Puritanism celebrated its reign of terror in England during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, destroying and crushing every manifestation of art and culture. It was the spirit of Puritanism which robbed Shelley of his children, because he would not bow to the dicta of religion. It was the same narrow spirit which alienated Byron from his native land, because that great genius rebelled against the monotony, dullness, and pettiness of his country. It was Puritanism, too, that forced some of England's freest women into the conventional lie of marriage: Mary Wollstonecraft and, later, George Eliot. And recently Puritanism has demanded another toll--the life of Oscar Wilde. In fact, Puritanism has never ceased to be the most pernicious factor in the domain of John Bull, acting as censor of the artistic expression of his people, and stamping its approval only on the dullness of middle-class respectability. ~ Emma Goldman,
913:It's Grand
It's grand to be a squatter
And sit upon a post,
And watch your little ewes and lambs
A-giving up the ghost.
It's grand to be a "cockie"
With wife and kids to keep,
And find an all-wise Providence
Has mustered all your sheep.
It's grand to be a Western man,
With shovel in your hand,
To dig your little homestead out
From underneath the sand.
It's grand to be a shearer
Along the Darling-side,
And pluck the wool from stinking sheep
That some days since have died.
It's grand to be a rabbit
And breed till all is blue,
And then to die in heaps because
There's nothing left to chew.
It's grand to be a Minister
And travel like a swell,
And tell the Central District folk
To go to -- Inverell.
It's grand to be a socialist
And lead the bold array
That marches to prosperity
At seven bob a day.
It's grand to be unemployed
And lie in the Domain,
And wake up every second day -And go to sleep again.
153
It's grand to borrow English tin
To pay for wharves and docks
And then to find it isn't in
The little money-box.
It's grand to be a democrat
And toady to the mob,
For fear that if you told the truth
They'd hunt you from your job.
It's grand to be a lot of things
In this fair Southern land,
But if the Lord would send us rain,
That would, indeed, be grand!
~ Banjo Paterson,
914:Wall Street trading desks at the end of each year offer a flavor of the problem. If a Wall Street trader expects to be paid a bonus of one million dollars and he’s given only half a million, he feels himself to be, and behaves as if he is, in the domain of losses. His reference point is an expectation of what he would receive. That expectation isn’t a stable number; it can be changed in all sorts of ways. A trader who expects to be given a million-dollar bonus, and who further expects everyone else on his trading desk to be given million-dollar bonuses, will not maintain the same reference point if he learns that everyone else just received two million dollars. If he is then paid a million dollars, he is back in the domain of losses. Danny would later use the same point to explain the behavior of apes in experiments researchers had conducted on bonobos. “If both my neighbor in the next cage and I get a cucumber for doing a great job, that’s great. But if he gets a banana and I get a cucumber, I will throw the cucumber at the experimenter’s face.” The moment one ape got a banana, it became the ape next door’s reference point. The reference point was a state of mind. Even in straight gambles you could shift a person’s reference point and make a loss seem like a gain, and vice versa. In so doing, you could manipulate the choices people made, simply by the way they were described. They gave the economists a demonstration of the point: ~ Michael Lewis,
915:TO LIVE IN My Presence consistently, you must expose and expel your rebellious tendencies. When something interferes with your plans or desires, you tend to resent the interference. Try to become aware of each resentment, however petty it may seem. Don’t push those unpleasant feelings down; instead, let them come to the surface where you can deal with them. Ask My Spirit to increase your awareness of resentful feelings. Bring them boldly into the Light of My Presence, so that I can free you from them. The ultimate solution to rebellious tendencies is submission to My authority over you. Intellectually you rejoice in My sovereignty, without which the world would be a terrifying place. But when My sovereign will encroaches on your little domain of control, you often react with telltale resentment. The best response to losses or thwarted hopes is praise: The Lord gives and the Lord takes away. Blessed be the name of the Lord. Remember that all good things—your possessions, your family and friends, your health and abilities, your time—are gifts from Me. Instead of feeling entitled to all these blessings, respond to them with gratitude. Be prepared to let go of anything I take from you, but never let go of My hand! Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting. —PSALM 139:23–24 Humble yourselves, therefore, under God’s mighty hand. —1 PETER 5:6 ~ Sarah Young,
916:"Out of the unconscious you get ritual, dreams, drama, story, art, music, and that sort of buffers us. We have our little domain of competence, and we're buffered by the domain of fantasy and culture. That's really what you learn about when you come to university if you're lucky and the professors are smart enough to actually teach you something about culture instead of constantly telling you that it's completely reprehensible and that it should be destroyed. Why you would prefer chaos to order is beyond me. The only possible reason is that you haven't read enough history to understand exactly what chaos means. And believe me, if you knew what chaos means, you'd be pretty goddamn careful about tearing down the temple that you live in, unless you want to be a denizen of chaos. And some people do. That's when the impulses you harbor can really come out and shine. And so a little gratitude is in order, and that makes you appreciative of the wise king while being smart enough to know that he's also an evil tyrant. That's a total conception of the world. It's balanced. Yah, we should preserve nature, but it IS trying to kill us. YES our culture is tyrannical and oppresses people, but it IS protecting us from dying. And YES we're reasonably good people, but don't take that theory too far until you've tested yourself. That's wisdom, at least in part, and that's what these stories try to teach you."  ~ Jordan Peterson,
917:"Out of the unconscious you get ritual, dreams, drama, story, art, music, and that sort of buffers us. We have our little domain of competence, and we're buffered by the domain of fantasy and culture. That's really what you learn about when you come to university if you're lucky and the professors are smart enough to actually teach you something about culture instead of constantly telling you that it's completely reprehensible and that it should be destroyed. Why you would prefer chaos to order is beyond me. The only possible reason is that you haven't read enough history to understand exactly what chaos means. And believe me, if you knew what chaos means, you'd be pretty goddamn careful about tearing down the temple that you live in, unless you want to be a denizen of chaos. And some people do. That's when the impulses you harbor can really come out and shine. And so a little gratitude is in order, and that makes you appreciative of the wise king while being smart enough to know that he's also an evil tyrant. That's a total conception of the world. It's balanced. Yah, we should preserve nature, but it IS trying to kill us. YES our culture is tyrannical and oppresses people, but it IS protecting us from dying. And YES we're reasonably good people, but don't take that theory too far until you've tested yourself. That's wisdom, at least in part, and that's what these stories try to teach you."  ~ Jordan B Peterson,
918:I see you are fixated on the least of my doings,” he said. “Very well, my abrupt departure from the Domain is easily enough explained: I am not at your beck and call, Madam Inquisitor. You cannot simply say to me, ‘May I call on you this evening, Your Highness, to discuss what you have seen?’”

The Inquisitor thinned her lips.

“Besides, if you had taken the time to inquire from my attendants, you would have learned that I had decided to go back to school at an earlier time, before the lightning came down.

“Now, the hotel suite. I am a young man and have needs that must be met. Since that slum of a school Atlantis so strenuously recommended does not allow for such activities, I keep a place outside of school. As for why I left, I cannot imagine why I should remain once the deed is done.”

“And where was your accomplice in . . . the deed?”

“Left before I did. No need for her presence once she had served her purpose.”

“There was no report of anyone coming or going.”

Of course not, since she left with me.

This time he had to swallow the words as they rose on his tongue.

“Were you watching all the service doors? A large hotel has many.”

“Where did you find her?”

In a certain house in Little-Grind-on-Woe. Very well suited to wielding lightning, that girl.

“In a certain—”

What was the matter with him? He was an accomplished liar. Truth should never approach his lips. ~ Sherry Thomas,
919:At the same time states across the country were rushing to adopt the Common Core, they were also adopting a new tool for evaluating teachers: the Danielson Framework. Like the Common Core, the framework is so laden with technocratic language that one might imagine its sole purpose is to confuse its readers. And as with the Common Core, if a teacher does not meet its demands, she may be out of a job. Taking its name from the education consultant Charlotte Danielson, the framework divides the teaching process into four “domains”: “planning and preparation,” “classroom environment,” “instruction,” and “professional responsibilities.” Each of these domains is then broken into four or five subcategories ranging from “using questioning and discussion techniques” to “showing professionalism.” Subcategories are then separated into a series of components. For example, the components of the subcategory “participating in the professional community” are: “relationships with colleagues,” “involvement in a culture of professional inquiry,” “service to the school,” and “participation in school and district projects.” Danielson describes “proficient” (tolerable) instruction in the “communicating with families” subcategory of the “professional responsibilities” domain as follows: “The teacher provides frequent and appropriate information to families about the instructional program and conveys information about individual student progress in a culturally sensitive manner. ~ Anonymous,
920:Presentism, neglect of the future (along with forgetfulness and contempt for the past) is the paradoxical characteristic of a society and elites who have nothing but the words progress, innovation, modernity on their lips in every domain, including the economic.

As soon as one is no longer ‘in love’ as depicted in television shows, as soon as sexual desire fades, one separates from one’s current partner. Marrying for superficial reasons, one separates for superficial reasons. Moreover, this compulsive and immature sort of behaviour is found not only in relationships but also in eroticism and sex in general, always under the sign of speed, immediacy, and instant gratification. Conjugal love and even sex are no longer savoured but consumed or indeed devoured, as if by fire.

Despite a form of pseudo-maturity demanded in all domains, especially sexual, and an ideology of liberation, Westerners since the 1960s (the baby boom generation to which I belong) have had difficulty proceeding to the psychological stage of adulthood, that of building for the long-term. This is true even in fields very different to those of sex and relationships, and include those of politics and economics. It is the generalised reign of immaturity and improvidence. Marriage is then conceived as a sort of game, and it ends as soon as one blows the final whistle. Unrestrained enjoyment, the slogan of May ‘68,[27] inspired by a cheap, boorish hedonism, has actually passed into our mores. ~ Guillaume Faye,
921:This, then, is the appropriate region of human liberty. It comprises, first, the inward domain of consciousness; demanding liberty of conscience, in the most comprehensive sense; liberty of thought and feeling; absolute freedom of opinion and sentiment on all subjects, practical or speculative, scientific, moral, or theological. The liberty of expressing and publishing opinions may seem to fall under a different principle, since it belongs to that part of the conduct of an individual which concerns other people; but, being almost of as much importance as the liberty of thought itself, and resting in great part on the same reasons, is practically inseparable from it. Secondly, the principle requires liberty of tastes and pursuits; of framing the plan of our life to suit our own character; of doing as we like, subject to such consequences as may follow: without impediment from our fellow-creatures, so long as what we do does not harm them, even though they should think our conduct foolish, perverse, or wrong. Thirdly, from this liberty of each individual, follows the liberty, within the same limits, of combination among individuals; freedom to unite, for any purpose not involving harm to others: the persons combining being supposed to be of full age, and not forced or deceived. No society in which these liberties are not, on the whole, respected, is free, whatever may be its form of government; and none is completely free in which they do not exist absolute and unqualified. ~ John Stuart Mill,
922:This, then, is the appropriate region of human liberty. It comprises, first, the inward domain of consciousness; demanding liberty of conscience, in the most comprehensive sense; liberty of thought and feeling; absolute freedom of opinion and sentiment on all subjects, practical or speculative, scientific, moral, or theological. The liberty of expressing and publishing opinions may seem to fall under a different principle, since it belongs to that part of the conduct of an individual which concerns other people; but, being almost of as much importance as the liberty of thought itself, and resting in great part on the same reasons, is practically inseparable from it. Secondly, the principle requires liberty of tastes and pursuits; of framing the plan of our life to suit our own character; of doing as we like, subject to such consequences as may follow: without impediment from our fellow-creatures, so long as what we do does not harm them, even though they should think our conduct foolish, perverse, or wrong. Thirdly, from this liberty of each individual, follows the liberty, within the same limits, of combination among individuals; freedom to unite, for any purpose not involving harm to others: the persons combining being supposed to be of full age, and not forced or deceived. No society in which these liberties are not, on the whole, respected, is free, whatever may be its form of government; and none is completely free in which they do not exist absolute and unqualified. ~ John Stuart Mill,
923:1. You can create the aura of exclusivity with an invite-only feature (as Mailbox did). 2. You can create hundreds of fake profiles to make your service look more popular and active than it actually is—nothing draws a crowd like a crowd (as reddit did in its early days). 3. You can target a single service or platform and cater to it exclusively—essentially piggybacking off or even stealing someone else’s growth (as PayPal did with eBay). 4. You can launch for just a small group of people, own that market, and then move from host to host until your product spreads like a virus (which is what Facebook did by starting in colleges—first at Harvard—before taking on the rest of the population). 5. You can host cool events and drive your first users through the system manually (as Myspace, Yelp, and Udemy all did). 6. You can absolutely dominate the App Store because your product provides totally new features that everyone is dying for (which is what Instagram did—twenty-five thousand downloads on its first day—and later Snapchat). 7. You can bring on influential advisors and investors for their valuable audience and fame rather than their money (as About.me and Trippy did—a move that many start-ups have emulated). 8. You can set up a special sub-domain on your e-commerce site where a percentage of every purchase users make goes to a charity of their choice (which is what Amazon did with Smile.Amazon.com this year to great success, proving that even a successful company can find little growth hacks). ~ Ryan Holiday,
924:His path was in some ways traditional—Stanford to Stanford Law to judicial clerkship to high-powered law firm—but it was also marked by bouts of rebellion. At Stanford he created and published a radical conservative journal called The Stanford Review, then he wrote a book that railed against multiculturalism and “militant homosexuals” on campus, despite being both gay and foreign born. His friends thought he might become a political pundit. Instead he became a lawyer. Then one day, surprising even himself, he walked out of one of the most prestigious securities law firms in the world, Sullivan & Cromwell, after seven months and three days on the job. Within a few short years, Thiel formed and then sold PayPal, an online payments company, to eBay for $ 1.5 billion in July 2002, the month that Nick Denton registered the domain for his first site, Gizmodo. With proceeds of some $ 55 million, Thiel assembled an empire. He retooled a hedge fund called Clarium into a vehicle to make large, counterintuitive bets on global macro trends, seeding it with $ 10 million of his own money. In 2003, Thiel registered a company called Palantir with the Securities and Exchange Commission. In 2004, he would found it in earnest. The company would take antifraud technology from PayPal and apply it to intelligence gathering—fighting terrorism, predicting crime, providing military insights. It would take money from the venture capital arm of the CIA and soon take on almost every other arm of the government as clients. ~ Ryan Holiday,
925:Martise had remained silent since first entering his domain, offering no hint of her character. If he refused her, it would alarm the priests even more.
“Martise of Asher.” He smiled when she stiffened. “His Grace has spoken for you during this entire meeting. Have you no words? Or did you suffer as my servant and have your tongue cut out?”
He followed her gaze to Gurn. The servant gave her an encouraging nod. Silhara might have considered her easily intimidated, save for that calm demeanor.
“No, sir, I’m no mute. It is rude to speak out of turn, is it not?”
He stilled at her question. Bursin’s wings, what generous god blessed this woman with such a voice? Refined and sensual, it possessed a silky quality, as if she physically caressed him.
The contrast between her dulcet tones and bland appearance startled him. Before she spoke, Martise had faded into her surroundings, forgotten. Now she shone, riveting the attention of anyone within hearing distance. He glanced at Cumbria who treated him to a smug smile.
He didn’t like being caught off guard and lashed out. “Far be it from me that I compromise the deportment of a lady. I wouldn’t tempt a well-trained dog into forgetting the commands of ‘Fetch’ and ‘Sit’.”