classes ::: Title,
children :::
branches ::: integralyogin, Karmayogin, Yogi

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:Yogi
class:Title
see also ::: Sri


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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [6]


Sri_Aurobindo
Sri_Ramana_Maharshi
Swami_Krishnananda
Swami_Nikhilananda
Swami_Sivananda_Saraswati
Vemana

--- PRIMARY CLASS


Title

--- SEE ALSO


Sri

--- SIMILAR TITLES [1]


1.01 - The Ideal of the Karmayogin
1.10 - The Revolutionary Yogi
1.32 - How can a Yogi ever be Worried?
2.03 - Karmayogin A Commentary on the Isha Upanishad
2.04 - Yogic Action
can a Yogi know all things?
integralyogin
Karmayogin
The Life of Shabkar Autobiography of a Tibetan Yogin
Yogi
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


yogi ::: n. --> A follower of the yoga philosophy; an ascetic.

yogi&

yogin ::: [one who practises yoga]; one who is established in realisation [cf. sadhaka]. ::: yogi [nominative]

yogini cakra (Yogini Chakra) ::: [cakra of the female yogin or of the sakti called "Yogini": probably used by Sri Aurobindo as a code word].

Yogic equality ::: The equality of soul, equanimity founded on the sense of the one Self, the one Divine everywhere — seeing the One in spite of all differences, degrees, disparities in the manifestation. The mental principle of equality tries to ignore or else to destroy the differences, degrees and disparities, to act as if all were equal or to try and make all equal,

Yogin fields of consciousness, ranges of experience, abnormal faculties denied to the ordinary human life while it puissantly intensifies such normal powers and faculties as he already pos- sesses. These advantages can be further secured and emphasised by other subsidiary processes open to the Hatha Yogin.

Yogic kriya ::: A special process or discipline in yoga.

Yogin, already possessed of the highest supra-cosmic knowledge and experience in the state of irance. is able in the waling state to acquire directly whatever knowledge and exercise, whatever mastery may be useful or necessary to bis activities in the objec- tive world. For the andent system of Rajajoga aimed not only

Yogins ::: I suppose it could be extendi to ilic Iwdy of others.

Yogic trance cannot be an aim, as In so many yogic systems, but only a means, and a means not of escape from the waking existence, but to enlarge and raise the whole seeing, living and active consciousness.

YOGI AND SADHAKA. ::: The yogi is one who is already established In realisation ; the sadhaka is one who -is getting or still trying to get realisation.

YOGIC ATTITUDE. ::: Not one of forceful suppression, but of detachment and equality with regard to the objects of desire.

YOGIC POWERS. ::: The idea that yogins do not or ought not to use these powers I regard as an ascetic superstition. I believe that all yogins who have these powers do use them whenever they find that that they are called from within to do so. They may refrain if they think the use in a particular case is contrary to the Divine Will or see that prevcofing one evil may-be open- ing the door to worse or for any other veiled reason, but not

yogin — one who practises yoga; one who has attained yogasiddhi. yo . . . śamı̄ samim

Yogi::: The whole difference between the Yogin and the natural man will be this, that the Yogin seeks to substitute in himself for the integral action of the lower Nature working in and by ego and division the integral action of the higher Nature working in and by God and unity.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 45

Yogic Force::: It simply means a higher Consciousness using its power, a spiritual and supraphysical force acting on the physical world directly.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 484

Yogin, Yogini: (Skr.) The man, the woman, practicing Yoga (q.v.). -- K.F.L.

yogi ::: n. --> A follower of the yoga philosophy; an ascetic.

Yogin: A follower of or adept in yoga.

Yogi(Yogin, Sanskrit) ::: A yogi is a devotee, one who practices the Yoga system or one or more of its varioussubordinate branches.In some cases, yogis are those who strive in various ways to conquer the body and physical temptations,for instance by torture of the body. They also study more or less some of the magnificent philosophicalteachings of India coming down from far distant ages of the past; but mere mental study will not make aman a mahatma, nor will any torture of the body bring about the spiritual vision -- the vision sublime.(See also Yoga)

Yogi, Yogini (Sanskrit) Yogin, Yoginī A devotee who practices a full yoga system; the yogi state is that which, “when reached, makes the practitioner thereof absolute master of his six ‘principles,’ he now being merged in the seventh. It gives him full control, owing to his knowledge of Self and Self, over his bodily, intellectual and mental states, which, unable any longer to interfere with, or act upon, his Higher Ego, leave it free to exist in its original, pure, and divine state” (TG 381).

yogi ::: Yogi / Yogin A devotee, in particular one who has mastered the techniques and practices of Yoga and who is capable of teaching and training others in the yogic discipline.

Yogi ::: A male practitioner of yoga.

Yogini ::: A female practitioner of yoga.

yogi&

yogin ::: [one who practises yoga]; one who is established in realisation [cf. sadhaka]. ::: yogi [nominative]

yogini cakra (Yogini Chakra) ::: [cakra of the female yogin or of the sakti called "Yogini": probably used by Sri Aurobindo as a code word].

Yogic equality ::: The equality of soul, equanimity founded on the sense of the one Self, the one Divine everywhere — seeing the One in spite of all differences, degrees, disparities in the manifestation. The mental principle of equality tries to ignore or else to destroy the differences, degrees and disparities, to act as if all were equal or to try and make all equal,

Yogin fields of consciousness, ranges of experience, abnormal faculties denied to the ordinary human life while it puissantly intensifies such normal powers and faculties as he already pos- sesses. These advantages can be further secured and emphasised by other subsidiary processes open to the Hatha Yogin.

Yogic kriya ::: A special process or discipline in yoga.

Yogin, already possessed of the highest supra-cosmic knowledge and experience in the state of irance. is able in the waling state to acquire directly whatever knowledge and exercise, whatever mastery may be useful or necessary to bis activities in the objec- tive world. For the andent system of Rajajoga aimed not only

Yogins ::: I suppose it could be extendi to ilic Iwdy of others.

Yogic trance cannot be an aim, as In so many yogic systems, but only a means, and a means not of escape from the waking existence, but to enlarge and raise the whole seeing, living and active consciousness.

YOGI AND SADHAKA. ::: The yogi is one who is already established In realisation ; the sadhaka is one who -is getting or still trying to get realisation.

YOGIC ATTITUDE. ::: Not one of forceful suppression, but of detachment and equality with regard to the objects of desire.

YOGIC POWERS. ::: The idea that yogins do not or ought not to use these powers I regard as an ascetic superstition. I believe that all yogins who have these powers do use them whenever they find that that they are called from within to do so. They may refrain if they think the use in a particular case is contrary to the Divine Will or see that prevcofing one evil may-be open- ing the door to worse or for any other veiled reason, but not

yogin. (T. rnal ’byor pa; C. xiuxing ren; J. shugyōnin; K. suhaeng in 修行人). A male practitioner of YOGA (generally in the generic sense of meditative practice) who has gained some level of attainment in his practice. The term can be used to refer to any advanced Buddhist practitioner, although it refers especially to advanced practitioners of Buddhist TANTRA.

yoginī. (T. rnal ’byor ma). A female practitioner of YOGA, or contemplative practice, but used especially to refer to female adepts of Buddhist TANTRA, particularly those who engage in tantric rituals (including sexual rituals) with tantric YOGINs. The term is sometimes synonymous with ḌĀKINĪ.

yoginītantra. (T. rnal ’byor ma’i rgyud). Also known as “mother tantras” (MĀTṚTANTRA) and “wisdom tantras” (T. shes rab kyi rgyud), one of the two categories into which the ANUTTARAYOGATANTRAs are divided, the other being “father tantras” (PITṚTANTRA). Developing in India from the SIDDHA tradition, the yoginītantras apparently receive this name because the majority (and in some cases all) of the deities in the tantra’s MAṆḌALA are female. According to a traditional explanation, these tantras emphasize wisdom (PRAJÑĀ), especially the mind of clear light (PRABHĀSVARACITTA), while father tantras emphasize method (UPĀYA), especially the illusory body (MĀYĀDEHA). See CAKRASAṂVARATANTRA.

yogipratyakṣa. (T. rnal ’byor mngon sum; C. dingguan zhi; J. jōkanchi; K. chŏnggwan chi 定觀知). In Sanskrit, “yogic direct perception”; a specific variety of direct perception (PRATYAKṢA) that is typically presumed to derive from meditative practice (BHĀVANĀ; YOGA). A direct intuition of the real obtained through meditative practice, this type of understanding was accepted as a valid means of knowledge by most of the traditional Indian religious schools. In Buddhism, the psychological analysis of the notion of yogipratyakṣa and the related yogijñāna (yogic knowledge or cognition) was undertaken by DHARMAKĪRTI (c. 600–670) in his PRAMĀṆAVĀRTTIKA and NYĀYABINDU, as well as by his commentators. Dharmakīrti’s predecessor DIGNĀGA (c. 480–540) had posited that there were only two reliable sources of knowledge (PRAMĀṆA): direct perception (PRATYAKṢA) and logical inference (ANUMĀNA). Dharmakīrti, however, subdivided direct perception (pratyakṣa) into four subtypes, viz., sensory cognition (indriyajñāna), mental discrimination (MANOVIJÑĀNA), self-awareness (SVASAṂVEDANA), and yogic cognition (yogijñāna). In Dharmakīrti’s analysis, yogic cognition (yogijñāna) is a form of yogic perception (yogipratyakṣa), because it fulfills the two conditions of perception (pratyakṣa): (1) it is devoid of conceptual construction (KALPANĀ); and (2) it is a cognition that is “nonerroneous” (abhrānta), viz., real. The treatment of yogipratyakṣa in the literature thus focuses on how yogipratyakṣa fulfills these two conditions of perception. Yogic knowledge is devoid of conceptual construction (kalpanā), Dharmakīrti maintains, because it is nonconceptual (akalpa; NIRVIKALPA) and thus “vivid” or “distinct” (spaṣṭa). This type of perception is therefore able to perceive reality directly, without the intercession of mental images or concepts. Since yogic cognition is said to be devoid of conceptual construction, this raises the issue of its second condition, its lack of error. Why is meditatively induced perception true and reliable? How does a meditator’s yogic perception differ from the hallucinations of the deranged, since both of them presume they have a vivid cognition of an object? The reason, Dharmakīrti maintains, is that the objects of yogic knowledge are “true” or “real” (bhūta; sadbhūta), whereas hallucinations are “false” or “unreal” objects (abhūta; asadbhūta). The only true objects of yogic knowledge offered by Dharmakīrti are the FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS: that is, the perception of these truths is true and reliable because they enable one to reach the goal of enlightenment, not because they involve a perception of an ultimate substance. In this sense, Dharmakīrti’s understanding of yogijñāna is more focused on the direct realization of the soteriological import of the four noble truths than on extraordinary sensory ability. Therefore, yogic direct perception is qualitatively different from the various forms of clairvoyance that are the byproducts of deep states of concentration that may be achieved by both Buddhist and non-Buddhist practitioners. Yogipratyakṣa is a form of insight (VIPAŚYANĀ) posssessed only by noble persons (ĀRYAPUDGALA); and among the five paths it occurs only on the path of vision (DARŚANAMĀRGA) and above. See also DARŚANA.

yogin

yoginī

yoginītantra

yogipratyakṣa

yogin — one who practises yoga; one who has attained yogasiddhi. yo . . . śamı̄ samim


--- QUOTES [137 / 137 - 500 / 1033] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

  107 Sri Aurobindo
   6 The Mother
   4 Jetsun Milarepa
   2 Yogi Berra
   2 Longchenpa
   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 Swami Vivekananda
   1 Sri Yogi Ramsuratkumar
   1 Sri Guru Granth Sahib
   1 Shiva-Samhita
   1 Satprem
   1 Robert Anton Wilson
   1 Pema Chodron
   1 Paramahansa Yogananda
   1 Nadabindu-Upanishad
   1 23 AM ::: think the theme really needs to be awakening
J- (integralyogin)[12/132]Today at.php">23_AM_:::_very_good_aswell_for_sure
MysticMonistToday_at.php">23_AM_:::_And_exploration_and_smashing_boundaries
J-_(integralyogin)[12/132]Today_at.php">23_AM_:::_oh_nice.php">MysticMonistToday_at.php">23_AM_:::_think_the_theme_really_needs_to_be_awakening
J-_(integralyogin)[12/132]Today_at.php">23_AM_:::_very_good_aswell_for_sure
MysticMonistToday_at.php">23_AM_:::_And_exploration_and_smashing_boundaries
J-_(integralyogin)[12/132]Today_at.php">23_AM_:::_oh_nice

   1 M Alan Kazlev
   1 Judith Simmer-Brown
   1 Chamtrul Rinpoche
   1 Aleister Crowley
   1 Adi Sankara

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  168 Harbhajan Singh Yogi
  146 Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
   76 Yogi Berra
   22 Yogi Bhajan
   6 William Walker Atkinson
   5 Swami Vivekananda
   4 Jaimal Yogis
   3 T J Miller
   3 Sri Aurobindo
   3 Sadhguru
   3 Robin S Sharma
   3 Paramahansa Yogananda
   3 Om Swami
   3 Anonymous
   2 The Mother
   2 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Guru Nanak
   2 Darren Main
   2 B K S Iyengar

1:when you come to a fork in the road, take it ~ Yogi Berra,
2:When spirituality is lost all is lost. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Ourselves,
3:Our plans may fail, God’s purpose cannot. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
4:If there is no creation, there must be disintegration. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Ourselves,
5:In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. But in practice, there is. ~ Yogi Berra,
6:It is the East that must conquer in India’s uprising. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
7:The eye of Faith is not one with the eye of Knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
8:Action solves the difficulties which action creates. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
9:The Yogi eats not out of desire, but to maintain the body. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Food,
10:Aggression is necessary for self-preservation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
11:Spiritual force can always raise up material force to defend it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Ourselves,
12:We must live as a nation before we can live in humanity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
13:The Yogi knows by his capacity for a containing or dynamic identity with things and persons and forces. ~ The Mother,
14:When a force ceases to conquer, it ceases to live. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
15:Faith fights for God, while Knowledge is waiting for fulfilment. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
16:Every man is not only himself, he is that which he represents. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
17:Action solves the difficulties which action creates. Inaction can only paralyse and slay. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin ,
18:Faith divines in the large what Knowledge sees distinctly and clearly. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
19:Nothing can be done by the weak and so nothing is given to the weak. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Bhawanipur Speech,
20:Without indomitable Faith or inspired Wisdom no great cause can conquer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
21:Knowledge will not come without self-communion, without light from within. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
22:The wisdom of the Lover is justified and supported by the wisdom of the Seer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
23:Regard the nation as a necessary unit but no more in a common humanity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Doctrine of Sacrifice,
24:A man must be strong and free in himself before he can live usefully for others. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
25:Life creates institutions; institutions do not create, but express and preserve life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Passing Thoughts,
26:The strength of every particular individual is the strength of God and not his own. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
27:The nation must exist before it can sacrifice its interests for a higher good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Doctrine of Sacrifice,
28:At the top of the head or above it is the right place for yogic concentration in reading or thinking. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
29:Nationalism tempered by expediency is like the French despotism tempered by epigrams. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
30:Nationalism tempered by expediency is like the French despotism tempered by epigrams. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
31:The idea is a mighty force, even when it has no physical power behind it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin: The Right of Association Speech,
32:God prepares, but He does not hasten the ripening of the fruit before its season. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Doctrine of Sacrifice,
33:It is forces that effect great political changes, not moral sentiments or vague generosities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Elections,
34:Action solves the difficulties which action creates. Inaction can only paralyse and slay. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
35:It is the idea which expresses itself in matter and takes to itself bodies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin: The Right of Association Speech,
36:Through all its differences and discords humanity is striving to become one. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin: The Right of Association Speech,
37:From the standpoint of Yoga it is not so much what you do but how you do it that matters most. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II 2.04 - Yogic Action,
38:Born politicians do not care to outpace by too great a stride the speedily accomplishable fact. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
39:God being Supreme Wisdom uses everything for His supreme purposes and out of evil cometh good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
40:Intellectual sympathy can only draw together, the sympathy of the heart can alone unite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin “Swaraj” and the Musulmans,
41:It is to make the yoga the ideal of human life that India rises today. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.01 - The Ideal of the Karmayogin,
42:It is this greater consciousness and higher existence which is the peculiar and appropriate object of Yogic discipline. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
43:God manifests Himself in the individual partially, but He stands behind the progress of the world wholly. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
44:Every man seeks the brotherhood of his fellow and we can only live by fraternity with others. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin: The Right of Association Speech,
45:Death in one’s own dharma brings new birth, success in an alien path means only successful suicide. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
46:Statesmanship is not summed up in the words prudence and caution, it has a place for strength and courage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
47:The wisdom and love of God in turning our evil into His good does not absolve us of our moral responsibility. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
48:When the people are wiser than their leaders and wise men, the democratic future of a country is assured. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Bengal and the Congress,
49:Recover the source of all strength in yourselves and all else will be added to you. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.01 - The Ideal of the Karmayogin,
50:Our lives are useful only in proportion as they help others by example or action or tend to fulfil God in man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
51:Our lives are useful only in proportion as they help others by example or action or tend to fulfil God in man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
52:It is only the Indian who can believe everything, dare everything, sacrifice everything. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.01 - The Ideal of the Karmayogin,
53:Thought could not think in him, flesh could not quiver;    The feet of Time could not adventure here ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Yogi on the Whirlpool,
54:Even a nation of strong men led by the weak, blind or selfish, becomes easily infected with the vices of its leaders. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
55:Sadhana [means] the practice by which perfection, Siddhi, is attained; sadhaka, the Yogin who seeks by that practice the Siddhi. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 45,
56:Ceremonies help the imagination and encourage it to see in the concrete that which cannot be immediately realised. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Boycott Celebration,
57:The errors of life and progress are more exuberant and striking but less fatal than the errors of decay and reaction. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Hughly Conference,
58:In the experience of yogis who do not perceive things dualistically, the fact that things manifest without truly existing is so amazing that they burst into laughter. ~ Longchenpa,
59:It is for ananda that the world exists; for joy that the Self puts Himself into the great and serious game of life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
60:What is being done here is a preparation for a work—a work which will be founded on Yogic consciousness and Yoga-Shakti. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Work and Yoga,
61:The attempt to express in form and limit something of that which is formless and illimitable is the attempt of Indian art. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
62:The Self, the Divine, the Supreme Reality, the All, the Transcendent, - the One in all aspects is then the object of Yogic knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
63:Jnanam is more than philosophy, it is the inspired and direct knowledge which comes of what our ancients called drishti, spiritual sight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
64:Liberty is a goddess who is exacting in her demands on her votaries, but, if they are faithful, she never disappoints them of their reward. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Elections,
65:Even the self-collected existence of the silent Yogin is an act and an act of tremendous effect & profoundest import. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad A Commentary on the Isha Upanishad,
66:I have never heard of a Yogin who got the peace of God and turned away from it as something poor, neutral and pallid, rushing back to cakes and ale. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art ,
67:Every faith is to a certain extent rational, it has its own analysis and synthesis by which it seeks to establish itself intellectually. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
68:In all life there are three elements, the fixed and permanent spirit, the developing yet constant soul and the brittle changeable body. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
69:It may be the final truth that there is nothing but God, but for the purposes of life we have to recognise that there is a dualism in the underlying unity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
70:Yogic knowledge seeks to enter into a secret consciousness beyond mind which is only occultly here, concealed at the basis of all existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge,
71:There is nothing which cannot be a yogic discipline if one does it properly. And if it is not done properly, even tapasya will be of no use and will lead you nowhere. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951 ,
72:In times of difficulty to stop still for a long time is a cardinal error, the best way is to move slowly forward, warily watching each step but never faltering. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
73:The advance of humanity is a steady progress and there is no great gain in rushing positions far ahead, while important points in the rear are uncaptured. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Doctrine of Sacrifice,
74:Always remember God. Each and every event, everywhere, is by His Will alone and is for our own good. Each thing in our lives is always only Blessing, even though it may not appear so, at the time. ~ Sri Yogi Ramsuratkumar,
75:It is quite natural to want to meditate after reading yogic literature - that is not the laziness. The laziness of the mind consists in not meditating, when the consciousness wants to do so. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
76:Yogic or occult powers are no more supernatural or incredible than is supernatural or incredible the power to write a great poem or compose great music. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Himself and the Ashram Education,
77:As the Absolute He stands behind every relative, as the Eternal He supports every transient and assures the permanence of the sum of phenomena; as the Universal He manifests Himself in every particular. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
78:When the will and energy are concentrated and used to control the mind, vital and physical and change them or to bring down the higher consciousness or for any other Yogic purpose or high purpose, that is called Tapasya. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II 102?,
79:If it is the idea that finally expresses itself in all material forms, actions, institutions and consummations, it is the imagination that draws the idea out, suggests the shape and gives the creative impulse. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Boycott Celebration,
80:It is in our inner spiritual experiences that we shall find the proof and source of the world’s Scriptures, the law of knowledge, love and conduct, the basis and inspiration of Karmayoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.01 - The Ideal of the Karmayogin,
81:The rough handling and careless breaking or waste and misuse of physical things is a denial of the Yogic Consciousness and a great hindrance to the bringing down of the Divine Truth to the material plane. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Practical Concerns in Work,
82:the priest and the mage, the man of piety, the just man, the man of wisdom, the saint, the prophet, the Rishi, the Yogi, the seer, the spiritual sage and the mystic ... the saint, the devotee, the spiritual sage, the seer, the prophet, the servant of God, the soldier of the spirit ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
83:So many Siddhas and Buddhas, so many Yogic masters. So many goddesses of various kinds. So many demi-gods and demons, so many silent sages. So many oceans of jewels. So many ways of life, so many languages. So many dynasties of rulers. So many intuitive people, so many selfless servants. O Nanak, His limit has no limit! ~ Sri Guru Granth Sahib,
84:Kriya Yoga is a simple, psychophysiological method by which human blood is decarbonated and recharged with oxygen. The atoms of this extra oxygen are transmuted into life current to rejuvenate the brain and spinal centres. By stopping the accumulation of venous blood, the yogi is able to lessen or prevent the decay of tissues. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
85:There is a meaning in each curve and line.It is an architecture high and grandBy many named and nameless masons builtIn which unseeing hands obey the Unseen, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.01 - The Ideal of the Karmayogin,
86:To be in full union with the Divine is the final aim. When one has some kind of constant union, one can be called a yogi, but the union has to be made complete. There are yogis who have only the union on the spiritual plane, others who are united in mind and heart, others in the vital also. In our yoga our aim is to be united too in the physical consciousness and on the supramental plane. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
87:MysticMonistToday at 12:23 AM ::: think the theme really needs to be awakeningJ- (integralyogin)[12/132]Today at 12:23 AM ::: very good aswell for sureMysticMonistToday at 12:23 AM ::: And exploration and smashing boundariesJ- (integralyogin)[12/132]Today at 12:23 AM ::: oh nice, i loveeeeeee exploration, and smashing boundaries very niceMysticMonistToday at 12:24 AM ::: Yeah I know, that's the themes you would do well with, ~ 23 AM ::: think the theme really needs to be awakening
J- (integralyogin)[12/132]Today at.php">23_AM_:::_very_good_aswell_for_sure
MysticMonistToday_at.php">23_AM_:::_And_exploration_and_smashing_boundaries
J-_(integralyogin)[12/132]Today_at.php">23_AM_:::_oh_nice.php">MysticMonistToday_at.php">23_AM_:::_think_the_theme_really_needs_to_be_awakening
J-_(integralyogin)[12/132]Today_at.php">23_AM_:::_very_good_aswell_for_sure
MysticMonistToday_at.php">23_AM_:::_And_exploration_and_smashing_boundaries
J-_(integralyogin)[12/132]Today_at.php">23_AM_:::_oh_nice
, i loveeeeeee exploration and smashing boundaries very nice
MysticMonistToday at 12:24 AM ::: Yeah I know,
88:But in the Rajayogic Samadhi there are different grades of status, - that in which the mind, though lost to outward objects, still muses, thinks, perceives in the world of thought, that in which the mind is still capable of primary thought-formations and that in which, all out-darting of the mind even within itself having ceased, the soul rises beyond thought into the silence of the Incommunicable and Ineffable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
89:Throughout the past 2500 years, whichever country Buddhism has been taught in, there have always been great yogis. Likewise, sooner or later there will be the great yogis of the West. This is because Buddhism has nothing to do with culture, gender, language, or colour. Buddhism is for all beings throughout time and space. And whoever dedicates their life to putting the teachings into practice will become a great yogi. It is as simple as that. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
90:Let him close the ears with his thumbs .... This is my most beloved Yoga. From practicing this gradually, the Yogi begins to hear mystic sounds (nadas). The first sound is like the hum of the honey-intoxicated bee (matta-bhrnga), next that of a flute (venu), then of a harp (vina); after this, by the gradual practice of Yoga, the destroyer of the darkness of the world, he hears the sounds of ringing bells (ghanta) then sounds like roar of thunder (megha). ~ Shiva-Samhita,
91:For arousing compassion, the nineteenth-century yogi Patrul Rinpoche suggested imagining beings in torment - an animal about to be slaughtered, a person awaiting execution. To make it more immediate, he recommended imagining ourselves in their place. Particularly painful is his image of a mother with no arms watching as a raging river sweeps her child away. To contact the suffering of another being fully and directly is as painful as being in the woman's shoes. ~ Pema Chodron,
92:47. A jnani who is a perfectly Self-realized yogi, sees by the eye of wisdom all objective phenomena to be in and of the Self and thus the Self to be the sole being.1The allusion is to the story of a lady wearing a precious necklace, who suddenly forgot where it was, grew anxious, looked for it everywhere and even asked others to help, until a kind friend pointed out that it was round the seeker's own neck. ~ Adi Sankara, Atma Bodha trans. Sri Ramana Maharshi,
93:The Dzogchen of the basis is to determine the nature of the mind.The Dzogchen of the path is to strike the target of freedom from the extremes.The Dzogchen of the result is to send hopes and doubts into extinction.The Dzogchen of the object is to let appearances go free by not grasping at them.The Dzogchen of the mind is to let thoughts arise as friends.The Dzogchen of the meaning is to let flickering thoughts dissolve naturally.Whoever realizes these points is a great king of yogis. ~ Longchenpa,
94:Those who really want to be yogis must give up, once for all, this nibbling at things. Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life - think of it, dream of it, live on that idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, every part of your body, be full of that idea, and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success and this is the way great spiritual giants are produced. Others are mere talking-machines. If we really want to be blessed and make others blessed, we must go deeper. ~ Swami Vivekananda, Raja-Yoga Pratyahara and Dharana,
95:The miraculous or extraordinary powers acquired by Yogis on the vital plane are not all true in the physical. There are many pit-falls in the vital. These vital powers take up even a man like Hitler and make him do things by suggesting to him - "It shall happen". There are quite a number of cases of Sadhaks who have lost their Sadhana by listening to these voices from the vital-world. And the humour of it all is that they all say that they come either from the Mother or from me! ~ Sri Aurobindo, EVENING TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO RECORDED BY A B PURANI (page no-614),
96:And in a recent unique example, in the life of Ramakrishna Paramhansa, we see a colossal spiritual capacity first driving straight to the divine realisation, taking, as it were, the kingdom of heaven by violence, and then seizing upon one Yogic method after another and extracting the substance out of it with an incredible rapidity, always to return to the heart of the whole matter, the realisation and possession of God by the power of love, by the extension of inborn spirituality into various experience and by the spontaneous play of an intuitive knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
97:way of the Integral Yogin ::: Nor is the seeker of the integral fulfilment permitted to solve too arbitrarily even the conflict of his own inner members. He has to harmonise deliberate knowledge with unquestioning faith; he must conciliate the gentle soul of love with the formidable need of power; the passivity of the soul that lives content in transcendent calm has to be fused with the activity of the divine helper and the divine warrior. ... An all-inclusive concentration is the difficult achievement towards which he must labour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.02 - Self-Consecration,
98:Only, all is directed to the one aim, directed towards God, filled with the idea of the divine, infinite, universal existence so that the outward-going, sensuous, pragmatical preoccupation of the lower knowledge with phenomena and forms is replaced by the one divine preoccupation. After attainment the same character remains. The Yogin continues to know and see God in the finite and be a channel of God-consciousness and God-action in the world; therefore the knowledge of the world and the enlarging and uplifting of all that appertains to life comes within his scope. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 517,
99:The Yogi should always listen to the sound (nada) in the interior of his right ear. This sound, when constantly practiced, will drown every sound (dhvani from outside .... By persisting ... the sound will be heard subtler and subtler. At first, it will be like what is produced by the ocean (jaladhi), the cloud (jimuta), the kettle-drum (bheri), and the water-fall (nirjhara) . ... A little later it will be like the sound produced by a tabor (mardala, or small drum), a big bell (ghanta), and a military drum (kahala); and finally like the sound of the tinkling bell (kinkin), the bamboo-flute (vamsa), the harp (vina) and the bee (bhramara). ~ Nadabindu-Upanishad, (verses 31-41) ,
100:I knew all along what He meant for me, for I heard it again and again, always I listened to the voice within; I am guiding, therefore fear not. Turn to your own work for which I have brought you to jail and when you come out, remember never to fear, never to hesitate. Remember that it is I who am doing this, not you nor any other. Therefore whatever clouds may come, whatever dangers and sufferings, whatever difficulties, whatever impossibilities, there is nothing impossible, nothing difficult. I am in the nation and its uprising and I am Vasudeva, I am Narayana, and what I will, shall be, not what others will. What I choose to bring about, no human power can stay. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin ,
101:Everyone who is turned to the Mother is doing my Yoga. It is a great mistake to suppose that one can 'do' the Purna Yoga - i.e. carry out and fulfil all the sides of the Yoga by one's own effort. No human being can do that. What one has to do is to put oneself in the Mother's hands and open oneself to her by service, by bhakti, by aspiration; then the Mother by her light and force works in him so that the sadhana is done. It is a mistake also to have the ambition to be a big Purna Yogi or a supramental being and ask oneself how far have I got towards that. The right attitude is to be devoted and given to the Mother and to wish to be whatever she wants you to be. The rest is for the Mother to decide and do in you. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother 151,
102:The power to do nothing, which is quite different from indolence, incapacity or aversion to action and attachment to inaction, is a great power and a great mastery; the power to rest absolutely from action is as necessary for the Jnanayogin as the power to cease absolutely from thought, as the power to remain indefinitely in sheer solitude and silence and as the power of immovable calm. Whoever is not willing to embrace these states is not yet fit for the path that leads towards the highest knowledge; whoever is unable to draw towards them, is as yet unfit for its acquisition....Still, periods of absolute calm, solitude and cessation from works are highly desirable and should be secured as often as possible for that recession of the soul into itself which is indispensable to knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Freedom from Subjection to the Being,
103:The Yoga that we seek must also be an integral action of Nature, and the whole difference between the Yogin and the natural man will be this, that the Yogin seeks to substitute in himself for the integral action of the lower Nature working in and by ego and division the integral action of the higher Nature working in and by God and unity. If indeed our aim be only an escape from the world to God, synthesis is unnecessary and a waste of time; for then our sole practical aim must be to find out one path out of the thousand that lead to God, one shortest possible of shortcuts, and not to linger exploring different paths that end in the same goal. But if our aim be a transformation of our integral being into the terms of God-existence, it is then that a synthesis becomes necessary. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Conditions of the Synthesis,
104:potential limitation of Yogic methods ::: But as in physical knowledge the multiplication of scientific processes has its disadvantages, as it tends, for instance, to develop a victorious artificiality which overwhelms our natural human life under a load of machinery and to purchase certain forms of freedom and mastery at the price of an increased servitude, so the preoccupation with Yogic processes and their exceptional results may have its disadvantages and losses. The Yogin tends to draw away from the common existence and lose his hold upon it; he tends to purchase wealth of spirit by an impoverishment of his human activities, the inner freedom by and outer death. If he gains God, he loses life, or if he turns his efforts outward to conquer life, he is in danger of losing God... ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Introduction - The Conditions of the Synthesis,
105:I looked at the jail that secluded me from men and it was no longer by its high walls that I was imprisoned; no, it was Vasudeva who surrounded me. I walked under the branches of the tree in front of my cell but it was not the tree, I knew it was Vasudeva, it was Sri Krishna whom I saw standing there and holding over me his shade. I looked at the bars of my cell, the very grating that did duty for a door and again I saw Vasudeva. It was Narayana who was guarding and standing sentry over me. Or I lay on the coarse blankets that were given me for a couch and felt the arms of Sri Krishna around me, the arms of my Friend and Lover. This was the first use of the deeper vision He gave me. I looked at the prisoners in the jail, the thieves, the murderers, the swindlers, and as I looked at them I saw Vasudeva, it was Narayana whom I found in these darkened souls and misused bodies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin ,
106:Jnanaprakasha:: Jnana includes both the Para and the Apara Vidya, the knowledge of Brahman in Himself and the knowledge of the world; but the Yogin, reversing the order of the worldly mind, seeks to know Brahman first and through Brahman the world. Scientific knowledge, worldly information & instruction are to him secondary objects, not as it is with the ordinary scholar & scientist, his primary aim. Nevertheless these too we must take into our scope and give room to God's full joy in the world. The methods of the Yogin are also different for he tends more and more to the use of direct vision and the faculties of the vijnana and less and less to intellectual means. The ordinary man studies the object from outside and infers its inner nature from the results of his external study. The Yogin seeks to get inside his object, know it from within & use external study only as a means of confirming his view of the outward action resulting from an already known inner nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Record Of Yoga - I ,
107:It is a fact always known to all yogis and occultists since the beginning of time, in Europe and Africa as in India, that wherever yoga or Yajna is done, there the hostile Forces gather together to stop it by any means. It is known that there is a lower nature and a higher spiritual nature - it is known that they pull different ways and the lower is strongest at first and the higher afterwards. It is known that the hostile Forces take advantage of the movements of the lower nature and try to spoil through them, smash or retard the siddhi. It has been said as long ago as the Upanishads (hard is the path to tread, sharp like a razor's edge); it was said later by Christ 'hard is the way and narrow the gate by which one enters into the kingdom of heaven' and also 'many are called, few chosen' - because of these difficulties. But it has also always been known that those who are sincere and faithful in heart and remain so and those who rely on the Divine will arrive in spite of all difficulties, stumbles or falls. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - III Opposition of the Hostile Forces - I,
108:The Self, the Divine, the Supreme Reality, the All, the Transcendent, - the One in all these aspects is then the object of Yogic knowledge. Ordinary objects, the external appearances of life and matter, the psychology of out thoughts and actions, the perception of the forces of the apparent world can be part of this knowledge, but only in so far as it is part of the manifestation of the One. It becomes at once evident that the knowledge for which Yoga strives must be different from what men ordinarily understand by the word. For we mean ordinarily by knowledge an intellectual appreciation of the facts of life, mind and matter and the laws that govern them. This is a knowledge founded upon our sense-perception and upon reasoning from our sense-perceptions and it is undertaken partly for the pure satisfaction of the intellect, partly for practical efficiency and the added power which knowledge gives in managing our lives and the lives of others, in utilising for human ends the overt or secret forces of Nature and in helping or hurting, in saving and ennobling or in oppressing and destroying our fellow-men. Yoga, indeed, is commensurate with all life and can include these subjects and objects. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge,
109:In Rajayoga the chosen instrument is the mind. our ordinary mentality is first disciplined, purified and directed towards the divine Being, then by a summary process of Asana and Pranayama the physical force of our being is stilled and concentrated, the life-force released into a rhythmic movement capable of cessation and concentrated into a higher power of its upward action, the mind, supported and strengthened by this greater action and concentration of the body and life upon which it rests, is itself purified of all its unrest and emotion and its habitual thought-waves, liberated from distraction and dispersion, given its highest force of concentration, gathered up into a trance of absorption. Two objects, the one temporal, the other eternal,are gained by this discipline. Mind-power develops in another concentrated action abnormal capacities of knowledge, effective will, deep light of reception, powerful light of thought-radiation which are altogether beyond the narrow range of our normal mentality; it arrives at the Yogic or occult powers around which there has been woven so much quite dispensable and yet perhaps salutary mystery. But the one final end and the one all-important gain is that the mind, stilled and cast into a concentrated trance, can lose itself in the divine consciousness and the soul be made free to unite with the divine Being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Self-Perfection,
110:challenge for the Integral Yogin ::: Nor is the seeker of the integral fulfilment permitted to solve too arbitrarily even the conflict of his own inner members. He has to harmonise deliberate knowledge with unquestioning faith; he must conciliate the gentle soul of love with the formidable need of power; the passivity of the soul that lives content in transcendent calm has to be fused with the activity of the divine helper and the divine warrior. To him as to all seekers of the spirit there are offered for solution the oppositions of the reason, the clinging hold of the senses, the perturbations of the heart, the ambush of the desires, the clog of the physical body; but he has to deal in another fashion with their mutual and internal conflicts and their hindrance to his aim, for he must arrive at an infinitely more difficult perfection in the handling of all this rebel matter. Accepting them as instruments for the divine realisation and manifestation, he has to convert their jangling discords, to enlighten their thick darknesses, to transfigure them separately and all together, harmonising them in themselves and with each other, -- integrally, omitting no grain or strand or vibration, leaving no iota of imperfection anywhere. All exclusive concentration, or even a succession of concentrations of that kind, can be in his complex work only a temporary convenience; it has to be abandoned as soon as its utility is over. An all-inclusive concentration is the difficult achievement towards which he must labour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 78,
111:The Song Of View, Practice, And Action :::Oh, my Guru! The Exemplar of the View, Practice, and Action, Pray vouchsafe me your grace, and enable me To be absorbed in the realm of Self-nature! For the View, Practice, Action, and Accomplishment There are three Key-points you should know: All the manifestation, the Universe itself, is contained in the mind; The nature of Mind is the realm of illumination Which can neither be conceived nor touched. These are the Key-points of the View. Errant thoughts are liberated in the Dharmakaya; The awareness, the illumination, is always blissful; Meditate in a manner of non-doing and non-effort. These are the Key-points of Practice. In the action of naturalness The Ten Virtues spontaneously grow; All the Ten Vices are thus purified. By corrections or remedies The Illuminating Void is ne'er disturbed. These are the Key-points of Action. There is no Nivana to attain beyond; There is no Samsara here to renounce; Truly to know the Self-mind It is to be the Buddha Himself. These are the Key-points of Accomplishment. Reduce inwardly the Three Key-points to One. This One is the Void Nature of Being, Which only a wondrous Guru Can clearly illustrate. Much activity is of no avail; If one sees the Simultaneously Born Wisdom, He reaches the goal. For all practioners of Dharma The preaching is a precious gem; It is my direct experience from yogic meditation. Think carefully and bear it in your minds, Oh, my children and disciples. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
112:subtle ::: In Vedanta (Mandukya Upanishad and later teachings - e.g. Advaita - based on it) "subtle" is used to designate the "dream state" of consciousness, and in Advaita this also includes the Prana, Manas, and Vijnana koshas (= the vehicles of vital force, mind, and higher consciousness) re-interpreted from of the Taittiriya Upanishad.In Tibetan and Tantric Buddhism it refers to an intermediate grade between the "gross" and "very subtle" "minds" and "winds" (vayu = prana).The Sukshma Sthula or Subtle Body is one of the seven principles of man in Blavatskian Theosophy; it is also called the "astral body" (this has little similarity with the astral body of Out of Body experience, because it cannot move far from the gross physical vehicle, it seems to correspond to what Robert Monroe calls the "second body", and identified with the Double or KaIn Sant Mat / Radhasoami cosmology - the Anda (Cosmic Egg) / Sahans-dal Kanwal (Crown Chakra) is sometimes called the Subtle; hence Subtle = AstralThe term Subtle Physical is used somewhat generically by Sri Aurobindo (in Letters on Yoga) to refer to a wider reality behind the external physical.Ken Wilber uses the term Subtle to indicate the yogic and mystic holonic-evolutionary level intermediate between "Psychic" (in his series = Nature Mysticism) and "Causal" (=Realisation"); it includes many psychic and occult experiences and can be considered as pertaining to the Subtle as defined here (although it also includes other realities and experiences that might also be interpreted as "Inner Gross" - e.g. Kundalini as a classic example). ~ M Alan Kazlev, Kheper planes/subtle,
113:THE PSYCHOLOGY OF YOGA Initial Definitions and Descriptions Yoga has four powers and objects, purity, liberty, beatitude and perfection. Whosoever has consummated these four mightinesses in the being of the transcendental, universal, lilamaya and individual God is the complete and absolute Yogin. All manifestations of God are manifestations of the absolute Parabrahman. The Absolute Parabrahman is unknowable to us, not because It is the nothingness of all that we are, for rather whatever we are in truth or in seeming is nothing but Parabrahman, but because It is pre-existent & supra-existent to even the highest & purest methods and the most potent & illimitable instruments of which soul in the body is capable. In Parabrahman knowledge ceases to be knowledge and becomes an inexpressible identity. Become Parabrahman, if thou wilt and if That will suffer thee, but strive not to know It; for thou shalt not succeed with these instruments and in this body. In reality thou art Parabrahman already and ever wast and ever will be. To become Parabrahman in any other sense, thou must depart utterly out of world manifestation and out even of world transcendence. Why shouldst thou hunger after departure from manifestation as if the world were an evil? Has not That manifested itself in thee & in the world and art thou wiser & purer & better than the Absolute, O mind-deceived soul in the mortal? When That withdraws thee, then thy going hence is inevitable; until Its force is laid on thee, thy going is impossible, cry thy mind never so fiercely & wailingly for departure. Therefore neither desire nor shun the world, but seek the bliss & purity & freedom & greatness of God in whatsoever state or experience or environment. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
114:Response To A Logician :::I bow at the feet of my teacher Marpa. And sing this song in response to you. Listen, pay heed to what I say, forget your critique for a while. The best seeing is the way of "nonseeing" the radiance of the mind itself. The best prize is what cannot be looked for the priceless treasure of the mind itself. The most nourishing food is "noneating" the transcendent food of samadhi. The most thirst-quenching drink is "nondrinking" the nectar of heartfelt compassion. Oh, this self-realizing awareness is beyond words and description! The mind is not the world of children, nor is it that of logicians. Attaining the truth of "nonattainment," you receive the highest initiation. Perceiving the void of high and low, you reach the sublime stage. Approaching the truth of "nonmovement," you follow the supreme path. Knowing the end of birth and death, the ultimate purpose is fulfilled. Seeing the emptiness of reason, supreme logic is perfected. When you know that great and small are groundless, you have entered the highest gateway. Comprehending beyond good and evil opens the way to perfect skill. Experiencing the dissolution of duality, you embrace the highest view. Observing the truth of "nonobservation" opens the way to meditating. Comprehending beyond "ought" and "oughtn't" opens the way to perfect action. When you realize the truth of "noneffort," you are approaching the highest fruition. Ignorant are those who lack this truth: arrogant teachers inflated by learning, scholars bewitched by mere words, and yogis seduced by prejudice. For though they yearn for freedom, they find only enslavement. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
115:principle of Yogic methods ::: Yogic methods have something of the same relation to the customary psychological workings of man as has the scientific handling of the force of electricity or of steam to their normal operations in Nature. And they, too, like the operations of Science, are formed upon a knowledge developed and confirmed by regular experiment, practical analysis and constant result. All Rajayoga, for instance, depends on this perception and experience that our inner elements, combinations, functions, forces can be separated or dissolved, can be new-combined and set to novel and formerly impossible workings or can be transformed and resolved into a new general synthesis by fixed internal processes. Hathayoga similarly depends on this perception and experience that the vital forces and function to which our life is normally subjected and whose ordinary operations seem set and indispensable, can be mastered and the operations changed or suspended with results that would otherwise be impossible and that seem miraculous to those who have not seized the raionale of their process. And if in some other of its forms this character of Yoga is less apparent, because they are more intuitive and less mechanical, nearer, like the Yoga of Devotion, to a supernal ecstasy or, like the Yoga of Knowledge, to a supernal infinity of consciousness and being, yet they too start from the use of some principal faculty in us by ways and for ends not contemplated in its everyday spontaneous workings. All methods grouped under the common name of Yoga are special psychological processes founded on a fixed truth of Nature and developing, out of normal functions, powers and results which were always latent but which her ordinary movements do not easily or do not often manifest. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Introduction - The Conditions of the Synthesis,
116:Song To The Rock Demoness :::River, ripples, and waves, these three, When emerging, arise from the ocean itself. When disappearing, they disappear into the ocean itself. Habitual thinking, love, and possessiveness, these three, When arising, arise from the alaya consciousness itself. When disappearing, they disappear into the alaya consciousness itself. Self-awareness, self-illumination, self-liberation, these three, When arising, arise from the mind itself. When disappearing, they disappear into the mind itself. The unborn, unceasing, and unexpressed, these three, When emerging, arise from the nature of being itself. When disappearing, they disappear into the nature of being itself. The visions of demons, clinging to demons, and thoughts of demons, When arising, arise from the Yogin himself. When disappearing, they disappear into the Yogin himself. Since demons are the phantoms of the mind, If it is not understood by the Yogin that they are empty appearances, And even if he thinks they are real, meditation is confused. But the root of the delusion is in his own mind. By observation of the nature of manifestations, He realizes the identity of manifestation and void, And by understanding, he knows that the two are not different. Meditation and not meditation are not two but one, The cause of all errors is to look upon the two things as different. From the ultimate point of view, there is no view. If you make comparison between the nature of the mind And the nature of the heavens, Then the true nature of being itself is penetrated. See, now, that you look into the true meaning which is beyond thought. Arrange to enter into undisturbed meditation. And be mindful of the Unceasing Intuitive Sensation! ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
117:One can concentrate in any of the three centres which is easiest to the sadhak or gives most result. The power of the concentration in the heart-centre is to open that centre and by the power of aspiration, love, bhakti, surrender remove the veil which covers and conceals the soul and bring forward the soul or psychic being to govern the mind, life and body and turn and open them all-fully-to the Divine, removing all that is opposed to that turning and opening. This is what is called in this Yoga the psychic transformation. The power of concentration above the head is to bring peace, silence, liberation from the body sense, the identification with mind and life and open the way for the lower (mental vital-physical) consciousness to rise up to meet the higher Consciousness above and for the powers of the higher (spiritual or divine) Consciousness to descend into mind, life and body. This is what is called in this Yoga the spiritual transformation. If one begins with this movement, then the Power from above has in its descent to open all the centres (including the lowest centre) and to bring out the psychic being; for until that is done there is likely to be much difficulty and struggle of the lower consciousness obstructing, mixing with or even refusing the Divine Action from above. If the psychic being is once active this struggle and these difficulties can be greatly minimised. The power of concentration in the eyebrows is to open the centre there, liberate the inner mind and vision and the inner or Yogic consciousness and its experiences and powers. From here also one can open upwards and act also in the lower centres; but the danger of this process is that one may get shut up in one's mental spiritual formations and not come out of them into the free and integral spiritual experience and knowledge and integral change of the being and nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II 7.5.56 - Omnipresence,
118:This inner Guide is often veiled at first by the very intensity of our personal effort and by the ego's preoccupation with itself and its aims. As we gain in clarity and the turmoil of egoistic effort gives place to a calmer self-knowledge, we recognise the source of the growing light within us. We recognise it retrospectively as we realise how all our obscure and conflicting movements have been determined towards an end that we only now begin to perceive, how even before our entrance into the path of the Yoga the evolution of our life has been designedly led towards its turning point. For now we begin to understand the sense of our struggles and efforts, successes and failures. At last we are able to seize the meaning of our ordeals and sufferings and can appreciate the help that was given us by all that hurt and resisted and the utility of our very falls and stumblings. We recognise this divine leading afterwards, not retrospectively but immediately, in the moulding of our thoughts by a transcendent Seer, of our will and actions by an all-embracing Power, of our emotional life by an all-attracting and all-assimilating Bliss and Love. We recognise it too in a more personal relation that from the first touched us or at the last seizes us; we feel the eternal presence of a supreme Master, Friend, Lover, Teacher. We recognise it in the essence of our being as that develops into likeness and oneness with a greater and wider existence; for we perceive that this miraculous development is not the result of our own efforts; an eternal Perfection is moulding us into its own image. One who is the Lord or Ishwara of the Yogic philosophies, the Guide in the conscious being ( caitya guru or antaryamin ), the Absolute of the thinker, the Unknowable of the Agnostic, the universal Force of the materialist, the supreme Soul and the supreme Shakti, the One who is differently named and imaged by the religions, is the Master of our Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.01 - The Four Aids,
119:It must also be kept in mind that the supramental change is difficult, distant, an ultimate stage; it must be regarded as the end of a far-off vista; it cannot be and must not be turned into a first aim, a constantly envisaged goal or an immediate objective. For it can only come into the view of possibility after much arduous self-conquest and self-exceeding, at the end of many long and trying stages of a difficult self-evolution of the nature. One must first acquire an inner Yogic consciousness and replace by it our ordinary view of things, natural movements, motives of life; one must revolutionise the whole present build of our being. Next, we have to go still deeper, discover our veiled psychic entity and in its light and under its government psychicise our inner and outer parts, turn mind-nature, life-nature, body-nature and all our mental, vital, physical action and states and movements into a conscious instrumentation of the soul. Afterwards or concurrently we have to spiritualise the being in its entirety by a descent of a divine Light, Force, Purity, Knowledge, freedom and wideness. It is necessary to break down the limits of the personal mind, life and physicality, dissolve the ego, enter into the cosmic consciousness, realise the self, acquire a spiritualised and universalised mind and heart, life-force, physical consciousness. Then only the passage into the supramental consciousness begins to become possible, and even then there is a difficult ascent to make each stage of which is a separate arduous achievement. Yoga is a rapid and concentrated conscious evolution of the being, but however rapid, even though it may effect in a single life what in an instrumental Nature might take centuries and millenniums or many hundreds of lives, still all evolution must move by stages; even the greatest rapidity and concentration of the movement cannot swallow up all the stages or reverse natural process and bring the end near to the beginning. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.13 - The Supermind and the Yoga of Works,
120:WHEN THE GREAT YOGIN Padmasambhava, called by Tibetans Guru Rinpoche, "the precious teacher," embarks on his spiritual journey, he travels from place to place requesting teachings from yogins and yoginls. Guided by visions and dreams, his journey takes him to desolate forests populated with ferocious wild animals, to poison lakes with fortified islands, and to cremation grounds. Wherever he goes he performs miracles, receives empowerments, and ripens his own abilities to benefit others. When he hears of the supreme queen of all dakinls, the greatly accomplished yogini called Secret Wisdom, he travels to the Sandal Grove cremation ground to the gates of her abode, the Palace of Skulls. He attempts to send a request to the queen with her maidservant Kumari. But the girl ignores him and continues to carry huge brass jugs of water suspended from a heavy yoke across her shoulders. When he presses his request, Kumari continues her labors, remaining silent. The great yogin becomes impatient and, through his yogic powers, magically nails the heavy jugs to the floor. No matter how hard Kumari struggles, she cannot lift them. Removing the yoke and ropes from her shoulders, she steps before Padmasambhava, exclaiming, "You have developed great yogic powers. What of my powers, great one?" And so saying, she draws a sparkling crystal knife from the girdle at her waist and slices open her heart center, revealing the vivid and vast interior space of her body. Inside she displays to Guru Rinpoche the mandala of deities from the inner tantras: forty-two peaceful deities manifested in her upper torso and head and fifty-eight wrathful deities resting in her lower torso. Abashed that he did not realize with whom he was dealing, Guru Rinpoche bows before her and humbly renews his request for teachings. In response, she offers him her respect as well, adding, "I am only a maidservant," and ushers him in to meet the queen Secret Wisdom. ~ Judith Simmer-Brown, Dakini's Warm Breath: The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism Introduction: Encountering the Dakini,
121:Nati is the submission of the soul to the will of God; its acceptance of all touches as His touches, of all experience as His play with the soul of man. Nati may be with titiksha, feeling the sorrow but accepting it as God's will, or with udasinata, rising superior to it and regarding joy and sorrow equally as God's working in these lower instruments, or with ananda, receiving everything as the play of Krishna and therefore in itself delightful. The last is the state of the complete Yogin, for by this continual joyous or anandamaya namaskara to God constantly practised we arrive eventually at the entire elimination of grief, pain etc, the entire freedom from the dwandwas, and find the Brahmananda in every smallest, most trivial, most apparently discordant detail of life & experience in this human body. We get rid entirely of fear and suffering; Anandam Brahmano vidvan na bibheti kutaschana. We may have to begin with titiksha and udasinata but it is in this ananda that we must consummate the siddhi of samata. The Yogin receives victory and defeat, success and ill-success, pleasure and pain, honour and disgrace with an equal, a sama ananda, first by buddhi-yoga, separating himself from his habitual mental & nervous reactions & insisting by vichara on the true nature of the experience itself and of his own soul which is secretly anandamaya, full of the sama ananda in all things. He comes to change all the ordinary values of experience; amangala reveals itself to him as mangala, defeat & ill-success as the fulfilment of God's immediate purpose and a step towards ultimate victory, grief and pain as concealed and perverse forms of pleasure. A stage arrives even, when physical pain itself, the hardest thing for material man to bear, changes its nature in experience and becomes physical ananda; but this is only at the end when this human being, imprisoned in matter, subjected to mind, emerges from his subjection, conquers his mind and delivers himself utterly in his body, realising his true anandamaya self in every part of the adhara. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Record Of Yoga ,
122:But usually the representative influence occupies a much larger place in the life of the sadhaka. If the Yoga is guided by a received written Shastra, - some Word from the past which embodies the experience of former Yogins, - it may be practised either by personal effort alone or with the aid of a Guru. The spiritual knowledge is then gained through meditation on the truths that are taught and it is made living and conscious by their realisation in the personal experience; the Yoga proceeds by the results of prescribed methods taught in a Scripture or a tradition and reinforced and illumined by the instructions of the Master. This is a narrower practice, but safe and effective within its limits, because it follows a well-beaten track to a long familiar goal.For the sadhaka of the integral Yoga it is necessary to remember that no written Shastra, however great its authority or however large its spirit, can be more than a partial expression of the eternal Knowledge. He will use, but never bind himself even by the greatest Scripture. Where the Scripture is profound, wide, catholic, it may exercise upon him an influence for the highest good and of incalculable importance. It may be associated in his experience with his awakening to crowning verities and his realisation of the highest experiences. His Yoga may be governed for a long time by one Scripture or by several successively, - if it is in the line of the great Hindu tradition, by the Gita, for example, the Upanishads, the Veda. Or it may be a good part of his development to include in its material a richly varied experience of the truths of many Scriptures and make the future opulent with all that is best in the past. But in the end he must take his station, or better still, if he can, always and from the beginning he must live in his own soul beyond the limitations of the word that he uses. The Gita itself thus declares that the Yogin in his progress must pass beyond the written Truth, - sabdabrahmativartate - beyond all that he has heard and all that he has yet to hear, - srotavyasya srutasya ca. For he is not the sadhaka of a book or of many books; he is a sadhaka of the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.01 - The Four Aids,
123:There I waited day and night for the voice of God within me, to know what He had to say to me, to learn what I had to do. In this seclusion the earliest realisation, the first lesson came to me. I remembered then that a month or more before my arrest, a call had come to me to put aside all activity, to go in seclusion and to look into myself, so that I might enter into closer communion with Him. I was weak and could not accept the call. My work was very dear to me and in the pride of my heart I thought that unless I was there, it would suffer or even fail and cease; therefore I would not leave it. It seemed to me that He spoke to me again and said, The bonds you had not the strength to break, I have broken for you, because it is not my will nor was it ever my intention that that should continue. I have had another thing for you to do and it is for that I have brought you here, to teach you what you could not learn for yourself and to train you for my work. Then He placed the Gita in my hands. His strength entered into me and I was able to do the sadhana of the Gita. I was not only to understand intellectually but to realise what Sri Krishna demanded of Arjuna and what He demands of those who aspire to do His work, to be free from repulsion and desire, to do work for Him without the demand for fruit, to renounce self-will and become a passive and faithful instrument in His hands, to have an equal heart for high and low, friend and opponent, success andfailure, yet not to do His work negligently. I realised what the Hindu religion meant. We speak often of the Hindureligion, of the Sanatan Dharma, but few of us really know what that religion is. Other religions are preponderatingly religions of faith and profession, but the Sanatan Dharma is life itself; it is a thing that has not so much to be believed as lived. This is the Dharma that for the salvation of humanity was cherished in the seclusion of this peninsula from of old. It is to give this religion that India is rising. She does not rise as other countries do, for self or when she is strong, to trample on the weak. She is rising to shed the eternal light entrusted to her over the world. India has always existed for humanity and not for herself and it is for humanity and not for herself that she must be great. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin ,
124:Who could have thought that this tanned young man with gentle, dreamy eyes, long wavy hair parted in the middle and falling to the neck, clad in a common coarse Ahmedabad dhoti, a close-fitting Indian jacket, and old-fashioned slippers with upturned toes, and whose face was slightly marked with smallpox, was no other than Mister Aurobindo Ghose, living treasure of French, Latin and Greek?" Actually, Sri Aurobindo was not yet through with books; the Western momentum was still there; he devoured books ordered from Bombay and Calcutta by the case. "Aurobindo would sit at his desk," his Bengali teacher continues, "and read by the light of an oil lamp till one in the morning, oblivious of the intolerable mosquito bites. I would see him seated there in the same posture for hours on end, his eyes fixed on his book, like a yogi lost in the contemplation of the Divine, unaware of all that went on around him. Even if the house had caught fire, it would not have broken this concentration." He read English, Russian, German, and French novels, but also, in ever larger numbers, the sacred books of India, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Ramayana, although he had never been in a temple except as an observer. "Once, having returned from the College," one of his friends recalls, "Sri Aurobindo sat down, picked up a book at random and started to read, while Z and some friends began a noisy game of chess. After half an hour, he put the book down and took a cup of tea. We had already seen him do this many times and were waiting eagerly for a chance to verify whether he read the books from cover to cover or only scanned a few pages here and there. Soon the test began. Z opened the book, read a line aloud and asked Sri Aurobindo to recite what followed. Sri Aurobindo concentrated for a moment, and then repeated the entire page without a single mistake. If he could read a hundred pages in half an hour, no wonder he could go through a case of books in such an incredibly short time." But Sri Aurobindo did not stop at the translations of the sacred texts; he began to study Sanskrit, which, typically, he learned by himself. When a subject was known to be difficult or impossible, he would refuse to take anyone's word for it, whether he were a grammarian, pandit, or clergyman, and would insist upon trying it himself. The method seemed to have some merit, for not only did he learn Sanskrit, but a few years later he discovered the lost meaning of the Veda. ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure of Consciousness ,
125:The Song Of Food And Dwelling :::I bow down at the feet of the wish-fulfilling Guru. Pray vouchsafe me your grace in bestowing beneficial food, Pray make me realize my own body as the house of Buddha, Pray grant me this knowledge. I built the house through fear, The house of Sunyata, the void nature of being; Now I have no fear of its collapsing. I, the Yogi with the wish-fulfilling gem, Feel happiness and joy where'er I stay. Because of the fear of cold, I sought for clothes; The clothing I found is the Ah Shea Vital Heat. Now I have no fear of coldness. Because of the fear of poverty, I sought for riches; The riches I found are the inexhaustible Seven Holy Jewels. Now I have no fear of poverty. Because of the fear of hunger, I sought for food; The food I found is the Samadhi of Suchness. Now I have no fear of hunger. Because of the fear of thirst, I sought for drink; The heavenly drink I found is the wine of mindfulness. Now I have no fear of thirst. Because of the fear of loneliness, I searched for a friend; The friend I found is the bliss of perpetual Sunyata. Now I have no fear of loneliness. Because of the fear of going astray, I sought for the right path to follow. The wide path I found is the Path of Two-in-One. Now I do not fear to lose my way. I am a yogi with all desirable possessions, A man always happy where'er he stays. Here at Yolmo Tagpu Senge Tson, The tigress howling with a pathetic, trembling cry, Reminds me that her helpless cubs are innocently playing. I cannot help but feel a great compassion for them, I cannot help but practice more diligently, I cannot help but augment thus my Bodhi-Mind. The touching cry of the monkey, So impressive and so moving, Cannot help but raise in me deep pity. The little monkey's chattering is amusing and pathetic; As I hear it, I cannot but think of it with compassion. The voice of the cuckoo is so moving, And so tuneful is the lark's sweet singing, That when I hear them I cannot help but listen When I listen to them, I cannot help but shed tears. The varied cries and cawings of the crow, Are a good and helpful friend unto the yogi. Even without a single friend, To remain here is a pleasure. With joy flowing from my heart, I sing this happy song; May the dark shadow of all men's sorrows Be dispelled by my joyful singing. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
126:reading ::: 50 Spiritual Classics: List of Books Covered: Muhammad Asad - The Road To Mecca (1954) St Augustine - Confessions (400) Richard Bach - Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1970) Black Elk Black - Elk Speaks (1932) Richard Maurice Bucke - Cosmic Consciousness (1901) Fritjof Capra - The Tao of Physics (1976) Carlos Castaneda - Journey to Ixtlan (1972) GK Chesterton - St Francis of Assisi (1922) Pema Chodron - The Places That Scare You (2001) Chuang Tzu - The Book of Chuang Tzu (4th century BCE) Ram Dass - Be Here Now (1971) Epictetus - Enchiridion (1st century) Mohandas Gandhi - An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments With Truth (1927) Al-Ghazzali - The Alchemy of Happiness (1097) Kahlil Gibran - The Prophet (1923) GI Gurdjieff - Meetings With Remarkable Men (1960) Dag Hammarskjold - Markings (1963) Abraham Joshua Heschel - The Sabbath (1951) Hermann Hesse - Siddartha (1922) Aldous Huxley - The Doors of Perception (1954) William James - The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902) Carl Gustav Jung - Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1955) Margery Kempe - The Book of Margery Kempe (1436) J Krishnamurti - Think On These Things (1964) CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters (1942) Malcolm X - The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1964) Daniel C Matt - The Essential Kabbalah (1994) Dan Millman - The Way of the Peaceful Warrior (1989) W Somerset Maugham - The Razor's Edge (1944) Thich Nhat Hanh - The Miracle of Mindfulness (1975) Michael Newton - Journey of Souls (1994) John O'Donohue - Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom (1998) Robert M Pirsig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974) James Redfield - The Celestine Prophecy (1994) Miguel Ruiz - The Four Agreements (1997) Helen Schucman & William Thetford - A Course in Miracles (1976) Idries Shah - The Way of the Sufi (1968) Starhawk - The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess (1979) Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind (1970) Emanuel Swedenborg - Heaven and Hell (1758) Teresa of Avila - Interior Castle (1570) Mother Teresa - A Simple Path (1994) Eckhart Tolle - The Power of Now (1998) Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism (1973) Neale Donald Walsch - Conversations With God (1998) Rick Warren - The Purpose-Driven Life (2002) Simone Weil - Waiting For God (1979) Ken Wilber - A Theory of Everything (2000) Paramahansa Yogananda - Autobiography of a Yogi (1974) Gary Zukav - The Seat of the Soul (1990) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Spirital Classics (2017 Edition) ,
127:How can one become conscious of Divine Love and an instrument of its expression? First, to become conscious of anything whatever, you must will it. And when I say "will it", I don't mean saying one day, "Oh! I would like it very much", then two days later completely forgetting it. To will it is a constant, sustained, concentrated aspiration, an almost exclusive occupation of the consciousness. This is the first step. There are many others: a very attentive observation, a very persistent analysis, a very keen discernment of what is pure in the movement and what is not. If you have an imaginative faculty, you may try to imagine and see if your imagination tallies with reality. There are people who believe that it is enough to wake up one day in a particular mood and say, "Ah! How I wish to be conscious of divine Love, how I wish to manifest divine Love...." Note, I don't know how many millions of times one feels within a little stirring up of human instinct and imagines that if one had at one's disposal divine Love, great things could be accomplished, and one says, "I am going to try and find divine Love and we shall see the result." This is the worst possible way. Because, before having even touched the very beginning of realisation you have spoilt the result. You must take up your search with a purity of aspiration and surrender which in themselves are already difficult to acquire. You must have worked much on yourself only to be ready to aspire to this Love. If you look at yourself very sincerely, very straight, you will see that as soon as you begin to think of Love it is always your little inner tumult which starts whirling. All that aspires in you wants certain vibrations. It is almost impossible, without being far advanced on the yogic path, to separate the vital essence, the vital vibration from your conception of Love. What I say is founded on an assiduous experience of human beings. Well, for you, in the state in which you are, as you are, if you had a contact with pure divine Love, it would seem to you colder than ice, or so far-off, so high that you would not be able to breathe; it would be like the mountain-top where you would feel frozen and find it difficult to breathe, so very far would it be from what you normally feel. Divine Love, if not clothed with a psychic or vital vibration, is difficult for a human being to perceive. One can have an impression of grace, of a grace which is something so far, so high, so pure, so impersonal that... yes, one can have the feeling of grace, but it is with difficulty that one feels Love. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951 ,
128:The preliminary movement of Rajayoga is careful self-discipline by which good habits of mind are substituted for the lawless movements that indulge the lower nervous being. By the practice of truth, by renunciation of all forms of egoistic seeking, by abstention from injury to others, by purity, by constant meditation and inclination to the divine Purusha who is the true lord of the mental kingdom, a pure, clear state of mind and heart is established. This is the first step only. Afterwards, the ordinary activities of the mind and sense must be entirely quieted in order that the soul may be free to ascend to higher states of consciousness and acquire the foundation for a perfect freedom and self-mastery. But Rajayoga does not forget that the disabilities of the ordinary mind proceed largely from its subjection to the reactions of the nervous system and the body. It adopts therefore from the Hathayogic system its devices of asana and pranayama, but reduces their multiple and elaborate forms in each case to one simplest and most directly effective process sufficient for its own immediate object. Thus it gets rid of the Hathayogic complexity and cumbrousness while it utilises the swift and powerful efficacy of its methods for the control of the body and the vital functions and for the awakening of that internal dynamism, full of a latent supernormal faculty, typified in Yogic terminology by the kundalini, the coiled and sleeping serpent of Energy within. This done, the system proceeds to the perfect quieting of the restless mind and its elevation to a higher plane through concentration of mental force by the successive stages which lead to the utmost inner concentration or ingathered state of the consciousness which is called Samadhi. By Samadhi, in which the mind acquires the capacity of withdrawing from its limited waking activities into freer and higher states of consciousness, Rajayoga serves a double purpose. It compasses a pure mental action liberated from the confusions of the outer consciousness and passes thence to the higher supra-mental planes on which the individual soul enters into its true spiritual existence. But also it acquires the capacity of that free and concentrated energising of consciousness on its object which our philosophy asserts as the primary cosmic energy and the method of divine action upon the world. By this capacity the Yogin, already possessed of the highest supracosmic knowledge and experience in the state of trance, is able in the waking state to acquire directly whatever knowledge and exercise whatever mastery may be useful or necessary to his activities in the objective world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Conditions of the Synthesis,
129:Mother of Dreams ::: Goddess supreme, Mother of Dream, by thy ivory doors when thou standest,Who are they then that come down unto men in thy visions that troop, group upon group, down the path of the shadows slanting?Dream after dream, they flash and they gleam with the flame of the stars still around them;Shadows at thy side in a darkness ride where the wild fires dance, stars glow and glance and the random meteor glistens;There are voices that cry to their kin who reply; voices sweet, at the heart they beat and ravish the soul as it listens.What then are these lands and these golden sands and these seas more radiant than earth can imagine?Who are those that pace by the purple waves that race to the cliff-bound floor of thy jasper shore under skies in which mystery muses,Lapped in moonlight not of our night or plunged in sunshine that is not diurnal?Who are they coming thy Oceans roaming with sails whose strands are not made by hands, an unearthly wind advances?Why do they join in a mystic line with those on the sands linking hands in strange and stately dances?Thou in the air, with a flame in thy hair, the whirl of thy wonders watching,Holdest the night in thy ancient right, Mother divine, hyacinthine, with a girdle of beauty defended.Sworded with fire, attracting desire, thy tenebrous kingdom thou keepest,Starry-sweet, with the moon at thy feet, now hidden now seen the clouds between in the gloom and the drift of thy tresses.Only to those whom thy fancy chose, O thou heart-free, is it given to see thy witchcraft and feel thy caresses.Open the gate where thy children wait in their world of a beauty undarkened.High-throned on a cloud, victorious, proud I have espied Maghavan ride when the armies of wind are behind him;Food has been given for my tasting from heaven and fruit of immortal sweetness;I have drunk wine of the kingdoms divine and have healed the change of music strange from a lyre which our hands cannot master,Doors have swung wide in the chambers of pride where the Gods reside and the Apsaras dance in their circles faster and faster.For thou art she whom we first can see when we pass the bounds of the mortal;There at the gates of the heavenly states thou hast planted thy wand enchanted over the head of the Yogin waving.From thee are the dream and the shadows that seem and the fugitive lights that delude us;Thine is the shade in which visions are made; sped by thy hands from celestial lands come the souls that rejoice for ever.Into thy dream-worlds we pass or look in thy magic glass, then beyond thee we climb out of Space and Time to the peak of divine endeavour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems ,
130:- for every well-made and significant poem, picture, statue or building is an act of creative knowledge, a living discovery of the consciousness, a figure of Truth, a dynamic form of mental and vital self-expression or world-expression, - all that seeks, all that finds, all that voices or figures is a realisation of something of the play of the Infinite and to that extent can be made a means of God-realisation or of divine formation. But the Yogin has to see that it is no longer done as part of an ignorant mental life; it can be accepted by him only if by the feeling, the remembrance, the dedication within it, it is turned into a movement of the spiritual consciousness and becomes a part of its vast grasp of comprehensive illuminating knowledge. For all must be done as a sacrifice, all activities must have the One Divine for their object and the heart of their meaning. The Yogin's aim in the sciences that make for knowledge should be to discover and understand the workings of the Divine Consciousness-Puissance in man and creatures and things and forces, her creative significances, her execution of the mysteries, the symbols in which she arranges the manifestation. The Yogin's aim in the practical sciences, whether mental and physical or occult and psychic, should be to enter into the ways of the Divine and his processes, to know the materials and means for the work given to us so that we may use that knowledge for a conscious and faultless expression of the spirit's mastery, joy and self-fulfilment. The Yogin's aim in the Arts should not be a mere aesthetic, mental or vital gratification, but, seeing the Divine everywhere, worshipping it with a revelation of the meaning of its own works, to express that One Divine in ideal forms, the One Divine in principles and forces, the One Divine in gods and men and creatures and objects. The theory that sees an intimate connection between religious aspiration and the truest and greatest Art is in essence right; but we must substitute for the mixed and doubtful religious motive a spiritual aspiration, vision, interpreting experience. For the wider and more comprehensive the seeing, the more it contains in itself the sense of the hidden Divine in humanity and in all things and rises beyond a superficial religiosity into the spiritual life, the more luminous, flexible, deep and powerful will the Art be that springs from that high motive. The Yogin's distinction from other men is this that he lives in a higher and vaster spiritual consciousness; all his work of knowledge or creation must then spring from there: it must not be made in the mind, - for it is a greater truth and vision than mental man's that he has to express or rather that presses to express itself through him and mould his works, not for his personal satisfaction, but for a divine purpose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1,
131:The Teachings of Some Modern Indian YogisRamana MaharshiAccording to Brunton's description of the sadhana he (Brunton) practised under the Maharshi's instructions,1 it is the Overself one has to seek within, but he describes the Overself in a way that is at once the Psychic Being, the Atman and the Ishwara. So it is a little difficult to know what is the exact reading.*The methods described in the account [of Ramana Maharshi's technique of self-realisation] are the well-established methods of Jnanayoga - (1) one-pointed concentration followed by thought-suspension, (2) the method of distinguishing or finding out the true self by separating it from mind, life, body (this I have seen described by him [Brunton] more at length in another book) and coming to the pure I behind; this also can disappear into the Impersonal Self. The usual result is a merging in the Atman or Brahman - which is what one would suppose is meant by the Overself, for it is that which is the real Overself. This Brahman or Atman is everywhere, all is in it, it is in all, but it is in all not as an individual being in each but is the same in all - as the Ether is in all. When the merging into the Overself is complete, there is no ego, no distinguishable I, or any formed separative person or personality. All is ekakara - an indivisible and undistinguishable Oneness either free from all formations or carrying all formations in it without being affected - for one can realise it in either way. There is a realisation in which all beings are moving in the one Self and this Self is there stable in all beings; there is another more complete and thoroughgoing in which not only is it so but all are vividly realised as the Self, the Brahman, the Divine. In the former, it is possible to dismiss all beings as creations of Maya, leaving the one Self alone as true - in the other it is easier to regard them as real manifestations of the Self, not as illusions. But one can also regard all beings as souls, independent realities in an eternal Nature dependent upon the One Divine. These are the characteristic realisations of the Overself familiar to the Vedanta. But on the other hand you say that this Overself is realised by the Maharshi as lodged in the heart-centre, and it is described by Brunton as something concealed which when it manifests appears as the real Thinker, source of all action, but now guiding thought and action in the Truth. Now the first description applies to the Purusha in the heart, described by the Gita as the Ishwara situated in the heart and by the Upanishads as the Purusha Antaratma; the second could apply also to the mental Purusha, manomayah. pran.asarı̄ra neta of the Upanishads, the mental Being or Purusha who leads the life and the body. So your question is one which on the data I cannot easily answer. His Overself may be a combination of all these experiences, without any distinction being made or thought necessary between the various aspects. There are a thousand ways of approaching and realising the Divine and each way has its own experiences which have their own truth and stand really on a basis, one in essence but complex in aspects, common to all, but not expressed in the same way by all. There is not much use in discussing these variations; the important thing is to follow one's own way well and thoroughly. In this Yoga, one can realise the psychic being as a portion of the Divine seated in the heart with the Divine supporting it there - this psychic being takes charge of the sadhana and turns the ......1 The correspondent sent to Sri Aurobindo two paragraphs from Paul Brunton's book A Message from Arunachala (London: Rider & Co., n.d. [1936], pp. 205 - 7). - Ed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
132:The principle of Yoga is the turning of one or of all powers of our human existence into a means of reaching the divine Being. In an ordinary Yoga one main power of being or one group of its powers is made the means, vehicle, path. In a synthetic Yoga all powers will be combined and included in the transmuting instrumentation. In Hathayoga the instrument is the body and life. All the power of the body is stilled, collected, purified, heightened, concentrated to its utmost limits or beyond any limits by Asana and other physical processes; the power of the life too is similarly purified, heightened, concentrated by Asana and Pranayama. This concentration of powers is then directed towards that physical centre in which the divine consciousness sits concealed in the human body. The power of Life, Nature-power, coiled up with all its secret forces asleep in the lowest nervous plexus of the earth-being,-for only so much escapes into waking action in our normal operations as is sufficient for the limited uses of human life,-rises awakened through centre after centre and awakens, too, in its ascent and passage the forces of each successive nodus of our being, the nervous life, the heart of emotion and ordinary mentality, the speech, sight, will, the higher knowledge, till through and above the brain it meets with and it becomes one with the divine consciousness. In Rajayoga the chosen instrument is the mind. our ordinary mentality is first disciplined, purified and directed towards the divine Being, then by a summary process of Asana and Pranayama the physical force of our being is stilled and concentrated, the life-force released into a rhythmic movement capable of cessation and concentrated into a higher power of its upward action, the mind, supported and strengthened by this greater action and concentration of the body and life upon which it rests, is itself purified of all its unrest and emotion and its habitual thought-waves, liberated from distraction and dispersion, given its highest force of concentration, gathered up into a trance of absorption. Two objects, the one temporal, the other eternal,are gained by this discipline. Mind-power develops in another concentrated action abnormal capacities of knowledge, effective will, deep light of reception, powerful light of thought-radiation which are altogether beyond the narrow range of our normal mentality; it arrives at the Yogic or occult powers around which there has been woven so much quite dispensable and yet perhaps salutary mystery. But the one final end and the one all-important gain is that the mind, stilled and cast into a concentrated trance, can lose itself in the divine consciousness and the soul be made free to unite with the divine Being. The triple way takes for its chosen instruments the three main powers of the mental soul-life of the human being. Knowledge selects the reason and the mental vision and it makes them by purification, concentration and a certain discipline of a Goddirected seeking its means for the greatest knowledge and the greatest vision of all, God-knowledge and God-vision. Its aim is to see, know and be the Divine. Works, action selects for its instrument the will of the doer of works; it makes life an offering of sacrifice to the Godhead and by purification, concentration and a certain discipline of subjection to the divine Will a means for contact and increasing unity of the soul of man with the divine Master of the universe. Devotion selects the emotional and aesthetic powers of the soul and by turning them all Godward in a perfect purity, intensity, infinite passion of seeking makes them a means of God-possession in one or many relations of unity with the Divine Being. All aim in their own way at a union or unity of the human soul with the supreme Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Self-Perfection,
133:I have never been able to share your constantly recurring doubts about your capacity or the despair that arises in you so violently when there are these attacks, nor is their persistent recurrence a valid ground for believing that they can never be overcome. Such a persistent recurrence has been a feature in the sadhana of many who have finally emerged and reached the goal; even the sadhana of very great Yogis has not been exempt from such violent and constant recurrences; they have sometimes been special objects of such persistent assaults, as I have indeed indicated in Savitri in more places than one - and that was indeed founded on my own experience. In the nature of these recurrences there is usually a constant return of the same adverse experiences, the same adverse resistance, thoughts destructive of all belief and faith and confidence in the future of the sadhana, frustrating doubts of what one has known as the truth, voices of despondency and despair, urgings to abandonment of the Yoga or to suicide or else other disastrous counsels of déchéance. The course taken by the attacks is not indeed the same for all, but still they have strong family resemblance. One can eventually overcome if one begins to realise the nature and source of these assaults and acquires the faculty of observing them, bearing, without being involved or absorbed into their gulf, finally becoming the witness of their phenomena and understanding them and refusing the mind's sanction even when the vital is still tossed in the whirl or the most outward physical mind still reflects the adverse suggestions. In the end these attacks lose their power and fall away from the nature; the recurrence becomes feeble or has no power to last: even, if the detachment is strong enough, they can be cut out very soon or at once. The strongest attitude to take is to regard these things as what they really are, incursions of dark forces from outside taking advantage of certain openings in the physical mind or the vital part, but not a real part of oneself or spontaneous creation in one's own nature. To create a confusion and darkness in the physical mind and throw into it or awake in it mistaken ideas, dark thoughts, false impressions is a favourite method of these assailants, and if they can get the support of this mind from over-confidence in its own correctness or the natural rightness of its impressions and inferences, then they can have a field day until the true mind reasserts itself and blows the clouds away. Another device of theirs is to awake some hurt or rankling sense of grievance in the lower vital parts and keep them hurt or rankling as long as possible. In that case one has to discover these openings in one's nature and learn to close them permanently to such attacks or else to throw out intruders at once or as soon as possible. The recurrence is no proof of a fundamental incapacity; if one takes the right inner attitude, it can and will be overcome. The idea of suicide ought never to be accepted; there is no real ground for it and in any case it cannot be a remedy or a real escape: at most it can only be postponement of difficulties and the necessity for their solution under no better circumstances in another life. One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time he conceals himself, and then in his own right time he will reveal his Presence. I have tried to dispel all the misconceptions, explain things as they are and meet all the points at issue. It is not that you really cannot make progress or have not made any progress; on the contrary, you yourself have admitted that you have made a good advance in many directions and there is no reason why, if you persevere, the rest should not come. You have always believed in the Guruvada: I would ask you then to put your faith in the Guru and the guidance and rely on the Ishwara for the fulfilment, to have faith in my abiding love and affection, in the affection and divine goodwill and loving kindness of the Mother, stand firm against all attacks and go forward perseveringly towards the spiritual goal and the all-fulfilling and all-satisfying touch of the All-Blissful, the Ishwara. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV ,
134:Chapter LXXXII: Epistola Penultima: The Two Ways to RealityCara Soror,Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.How very sensible of you, though I admit somewhat exacting!You write-Will you tell me exactly why I should devote so much of my valuable time to subjects like Magick and Yoga.That is all very well. But you ask me to put it in syllogistic form. I have no doubt this can be done, though the task seems somewhat complicated. I think I will leave it to you to construct your series of syllogisms yourself from the arguments of this letter.In your main question the operative word is "valuable. Why, I ask, in my turn, should you consider your time valuable? It certainly is not valuable unless the universe has a meaning, and what is more, unless you know what that meaning is-at least roughly-it is millions to one that you will find yourself barking up the wrong tree.First of all let us consider this question of the meaning of the universe. It is its own evidence to design, and that design intelligent design. There is no question of any moral significance-"one man's meat is another man's poison" and so on. But there can be no possible doubt about the existence of some kind of intelligence, and that kind is far superior to anything of which we know as human.How then are we to explore, and finally to interpret this intelligence?It seems to me that there are two ways and only two. Imagine for a moment that you are an orphan in charge of a guardian, inconceivably learned from your point of view.Suppose therefore that you are puzzled by some problem suitable to your childish nature, your obvious and most simple way is to approach your guardian and ask him to enlighten you. It is clearly part of his function as guardian to do his best to help you. Very good, that is the first method, and close parallel with what we understand by the word Magick.We are bothered by some difficulty about one of the elements-say Fire-it is therefore natural to evoke a Salamander to instruct you on the difficult point. But you must remember that your Holy Guardian Angel is not only far more fully instructed than yourself on every point that you can conceive, but you may go so far as to say that it is definitely his work, or part of his work; remembering always that he inhabits a sphere or plane which is entirely different from anything of which you are normally aware.To attain to the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel is consequently without doubt by far the simplest way by which you can yourself approach that higher order of being.That, then, is a clearly intelligible method of procedure. We call it Magick.It is of course possible to strengthen the link between him and yourself so that in course of time you became capable of moving and, generally speaking, operating on that plane which is his natural habitat.There is however one other way, and one only, as far as I can see, of reaching this state.It is at least theoretically possible to exalt the whole of your own consciousness until it becomes as free to move on that exalted plane as it is for him. You should note, by the way, that in this case the postulation of another being is not necessary. There is no way of refuting the solipsism if you feel like that. Personally I cannot accede to its axiom. The evidence for an external universe appears to me perfectly adequate.Still there is no extra charge for thinking on those lines if you so wish.I have paid a great deal of attention in the course of my life to the method of exalting the human consciousness in this way; and it is really quite legitimate to identify my teaching with that of the Yogis.I must however point out that in the course of my instruction I have given continual warnings as to the dangers of this line of research. For one thing there is no means of checking your results in the ordinary scientific sense. It is always perfectly easy to find a subjective explanation of any phenomenon; and when one considers that the greatest of all the dangers in any line of research arise from egocentric vanity, I do not think I have exceeded my duty in anything that I have said to deter students from undertaking so dangerous a course as Yoga.It is, of course, much safer if you are in a position to pursue in the Indian Jungles, provided that your health will stand the climate and also, I must say, unless you have a really sound teacher on whom you can safely rely. But then, if we once introduce a teacher, why not go to the Fountain-head and press towards the Knowledge and conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel?In any case your Indian teacher will ultimately direct you to seek guidance from that source, so it seems to me that you have gone to a great deal of extra trouble and incurred a great deal of unnecessary danger by not leaving yourself in the first place in the hands of the Holy Guardian Angel.In any case there are the two methods which stand as alternatives. I do not know of any third one which can be of any use whatever. Logically, since you have asked me to be logical, there is certainly no third way; there is the external way of Magick, and the internal way of Yoga: there you have your alternatives, and there they cease.Love is the law, love under will.Fraternally,666 ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears ,
135:For instance, a popular game with California occultists-I do not know its inventor-involves a Magic Room, much like the Pleasure Dome discussed earlier except that this Magic Room contains an Omniscient Computer. To play this game, you simply "astrally project" into the Magic Room. Do not ask what "astral projection" means, and do not assume it is metaphysical (and therefore either impossible, if you are a materialist, or very difficult, if you are a mystic). Just assume this is a gedankenexperiment, a "mind game." Project yourself, in imagination, into this Magic Room and visualize vividly the Omniscient Computer, using the details you need to make such a super-information-processor real to your fantasy. You do not need any knowledge of programming to handle this astral computer. It exists early in the next century; you are getting to use it by a species of time-travel, if that metaphor is amusing and helpful to you. It is so built that it responds immediately to human brain-waves, "reading" them and decoding their meaning. (Crude prototypes of such computers already exist.) So, when you are in this magic room, you can ask this Computer anything, just by thinking of what you want to know. It will read your thought, and project into your brain, by a laser ray, the correct answer. There is one slight problem. The computer is very sensitive to all brain-waves. If you have any doubts, it registers them as negative commands, meaning "Do not answer my question." So, the way to use it is to start simply, with "easy" questions. Ask it to dig out of the archives the name of your second-grade teacher. (Almost everybody remembers the name of their first grade teacher-imprint vulnerability again-but that of the second grade teacher tends to get lost.) When the computer has dug out the name of your second grade teacher, try it on a harder question, but not one that is too hard. It is very easy to sabotage this machine, but you don't want to sabotage it during these experiments. You want to see how well it can be made to perform. It is wise to ask only one question at a time, since it requires concentration to keep this magic computer real on the field of your perception. Do not exhaust your capacities for imagination and visualization on your first trial runs. After a few trivial experiments of the second-grade-teacher variety, you can try more interesting programs. Take a person toward whom you have negative feelings, such as anger, disappointment, feeling-of-betrayal, jealousy or whatever interferes with the smooth, tranquil operation of your own bio-computer. Ask the Magic Computer to explain that other person to you; to translate you into their reality-tunnel long enough for you to understand how events seem to them. Especially, ask how you seem to them. This computer will do that job for you; but be prepared for some shocks which might be disagreeable at first. This super-brain can also perform exegesis on ideas that seem obscure, paradoxical or enigmatic to us. For instance, early experiments with this computer can very profitably turn on asking it to explain some of the propositions in this book which may seem inexplicable or perversely wrong-headed to you, such as "We are all greater artists than we realize" or "What the Thinker thinks, the Prover proves" or "mind and its contents are functionally identical." This computer is much more powerful and scientifically advanced than the rapture-machine in the neurosomatic circuit. It has total access to all the earlier, primitive circuits, and overrules any of them. That is, if you put a meta-programming instruction into this computer; it will relay it downward to the old circuits and cancel contradictory programs left over from the past. For instance, try feeding it on such meta-programming instructions as: 1. I am at cause over my body. 2. I am at cause over my imagination. 3.1 am at cause over my future. 4. My mind abounds with beauty and power. 5.1 like people, and people like me. Remember that this computer is only a few decades ahead of present technology, so it cannot "understand" your commands if you harbor any doubts about them. Doubts tell it not to perform. Work always from what you can believe in, extending the area of belief only as results encourage you to try for more dramatic transformations of your past reality-tunnels. This represents cybernetic consciousness; the programmer becoming self-programmer, self-metaprogrammer, meta-metaprogrammer, etc. Just as the emotional compulsions of the second circuit seem primitive, mechanical and, ultimately, silly to the neurosomatic consciousness, so, too, the reality maps of the third circuit become comic, relativistic, game-like to the metaprogrammer. "Whatever you say it is, it isn't, " Korzybski, the semanticist, repeated endlessly in his seminars, trying to make clear that third-circuit semantic maps are not the territories they represent; that we can always make maps of our maps, revisions of our revisions, meta-selves of our selves. "Neti, neti" (not that, not that), Hindu teachers traditionally say when asked what "God" is or what "Reality" is. Yogis, mathematicians and musicians seem more inclined to develop meta-programming consciousness than most of humanity. Korzybski even claimed that the use of mathematical scripts is an aid to developing this circuit, for as soon as you think of your mind as mind 1, and the mind which contemplates that mind as mind2 and the mind which contemplates mind2 contemplating mind 1 as mind3, you are well on your way to meta-programming awareness. Alice in Wonderland is a masterful guide to the metaprogramming circuit (written by one of the founders of mathematical logic) and Aleister Crowley soberly urged its study upon all students of yoga. ~ Robert Anton Wilson, Prometheus Rising ,
136:Depression, unless one has a strong will, suggests, "This is not worth while, one may have to wait a lifetime." As for enthusiasm, it expects to see the vital transformed overnight: "I am not going to have any difficulty henceforth, I am going to advance rapidly on the path of yoga, I am going to gain the divine consciousness without any difficulty." There are some other difficulties.... One needs a little time, much perseverance. So the vital, after a few hours - perhaps a few days, perhaps a few months - says to itself: "We haven't gone very far with our enthusiasm, has anything been really done? Doesn't this movement leave us just where we were, perhaps worse than we were, a little troubled, a little disturbed? Things are no longer what they were, they are not yet what they ought to be. It is very tiresome, what I am doing." And then, if one pushes a little more, here's this gentleman saying, "Ah, no! I have had enough of it, leave me alone. I don't want to move, I shall stay in my corner, I won't trouble you, but don't bother me!" And so one has not gone very much farther than before. This is one of the big obstacles which must be carefully avoided. As soon as there is the least sign of discontentment, of annoyance, the vital must be spoken to in this way, "My friend, you are going to keep calm, you are going to do what you are asked to do, otherwise you will have to deal with me." And to the other, the enthusiast who says, "Everything must be done now, immediately", your reply is, "Calm yourself a little, your energy is excellent, but it must not be spent in five minutes. We shall need it for a long time, keep it carefully and, as it is wanted, I shall call upon your goodwill. You will show that you are full of goodwill, you will obey, you won't grumble, you will not protest, you will not revolt, you will say 'yes, yes', you will make a little sacrifice when asked, you will say 'yes' wholeheartedly." So we get started on the path. But the road is very long. Many things happen on the way. Suddenly one thinks one has overcome an obstacle; I say "thinks", because though one has overcome it, it is not totally overcome. I am going to take a very obvious instance, of a very simple observation. Someone has found that his vital is uncontrollable and uncontrolled, that it gets furious for nothing and about nothing. He starts working to teach it not to get carried away, not to flare up, to remain calm and bear the shocks of life without reacting violently. If one does this cheerfully, it goes quite quickly. (Note this well, it is very important: when you have to deal with your vital take care to remain cheerful, otherwise you will get into trouble.) One remains cheerful, that is, when one sees the fury rise, one begins to laugh. Instead of being depressed and saying, "Ah! In spite of all my effort it is beginning all over again", one begins to laugh and says, "Well, well! One hasn't yet seen the end of it. Look now, aren't you ridiculous, you know quite well that you are being ridiculous! Is it worthwhile getting angry?" One gives it this lesson cheerfully. And really, after a while it doesn't get angry again, it is quiet - and one relaxes one's attention. One thinks the difficulty has been overcome, one thinks a result has at last been reached: "My vital does not trouble me any longer, it does not get angry now, everything is going fine." And the next day, one loses one's temper. It is then one must be careful, it is then one must not say, "Here we are, it's no use, I shall never achieve anything, all my efforts are futile; all this is an illusion, it is impossible." On the contrary, one must say, "I wasn't vigilant enough." One must wait long, very long, before one can say, "Ah! It is done and finished." Sometimes one must wait for years, many years.... I am not saying this to discourage you, but to give you patience and perseverance - for there is a moment when you do arrive. And note that the vital is a small part of your being - a very important part, we have said that it is the dynamism, the realising energy, it is very important; but it is only a small part. And the mind!... which goes wandering, which must be pulled back by all the strings to be kept quiet! You think this can be done overnight? And your body?... You have a weakness, a difficulty, sometimes a small chronic illness, nothing much, but still it is a nuisance, isn't it? You want to get rid of it. You make efforts, you concentrate; you work upon it, establish harmony, and you think it is finished, and then.... Take, for instance, people who have the habit of coughing; they can't control themselves or almost can't. It is not serious but it is bothersome, and there seems to be no reason why it should ever stop. Well, one tells oneself, "I am going to control this." One makes an effort - a yogic effort, not a material one - one brings down consciousness, force, and stops the cough. And one thinks, "The body has forgotten how to cough." And it is a great thing when the body has forgotten, truly one can say, "I am cured." But unfortunately it is not always true, for this goes down into the subconscient and, one day, when the balance of forces is not so well established, when the strength is not the same, it begins again. And one laments, "I believed that it was over! I had succeeded and told myself, 'It is true that spiritual power has an action upon the body, it is true that something can be done', and there! it is not true. And yet it was a small thing, and I who want to conquer immortality! How will I succeed?... For years I have been free from this small thing and here it is beginning anew!" It is then that you must be careful. You must arm yourself with an endless patience and endurance. You do a thing once, ten times, a hundred times, a thousand times if necessary, but you do it till it gets done. And not done only here and there, but everywhere and everywhere at the same time. This is the great problem one sets oneself. That is why, to those who come to tell me very light-heartedly, "I want to do yoga", I reply, "Think it over, one may do the yoga for a number of years without noticing the least result. But if you want to do it, you must persist and persist with such a will that you should be ready to do it for ten lifetimes, a hundred lifetimes if necessary, in order to succeed." I do not say it will be like that, but the attitude must be like that. Nothing must discourage you; for there are all the difficulties of ignorance of the different states of being, to which are added the endless malice and the unbounded cunning of the hostile forces in the world.... They are there, do you know why? They have been.... ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951 ,
137:Can a Yogi attain to a state of consciousness in which he can know all things, answer all questions, relating even to abstruse scientific problems, such as, for example, the theory of relativity?Theoretically and in principle it is not impossible for a Yogi to know everything; all depends upon the Yogi. But there is knowledge and knowledge. The Yogi does not know in the way of the mind. He does not know everything in the sense that he has access to all possible information or because he contains all the facts of the universe in his mind or because his consciousness is a sort of miraculous encyclopaedia. He knows by his capacity for a containing or dynamic identity with things and persons and forces. Or he knows because he lives in a plane of consciousness or is in contact with a consciousness in which there is the truth and the knowledge. If you are in the true consciousness, the knowledge you have will also be of the truth. Then, too, you can know directly, by being one with what you know. If a problem is put before you, if you are asked what is to be done in a particular matter, you can then, by looking with enough attention and concentration, receive spontaneously the required knowledge and the true answer. It is not by any careful application of theory that you reach the knowledge or by working it out through a mental process. The scientific mind needs these methods to come to its conclusions. But the Yogi's knowledge is direct and immediate; it is not deductive. If an engineer has to find out the exact position for the building of an arch, the line of its curve and the size of its opening, he does it by calculation, collating and deducing from his information and data. But a Yogi needs none of these things; he looks, has the vision of the thing, sees that it is to be done in this way and not in another, and this seeing is his knowledge. Although it may be true in a general way and in a certain sense that a Yogi can know all things and can answer all questions from his own field of vision and consciousness, yet it does not follow that there are no questions whatever of any kind to which he would not or could not answer. A Yogi who has the direct knowledge, the knowledge of the true truth of things, would not care or perhaps would find it difficult to answer questions that belong entirely to the domain of human mental constructions. It may be, he could not or would not wish to solve problems and difficulties you might put to him which touch only the illusion of things and their appearances. The working of his knowledge is not in the mind. If you put him some silly mental query of that character, he probably would not answer. The very common conception that you can put any ignorant question to him as to some super-schoolmaster or demand from him any kind of information past, present or future and that he is bound to answer, is a foolish idea. It is as inept as the expectation from the spiritual man of feats and miracles that would satisfy the vulgar external mind and leave it gaping with wonder. Moreover, the term "Yogi" is very vague and wide. There are many types of Yogis, many lines or ranges of spiritual or occult endeavour and different heights of achievement, there are some whose powers do not extend beyond the mental level; there are others who have gone beyond it. Everything depends on the field or nature of their effort, the height to which they have arrived, the consciousness with which they have contact or into which they enter. Do not scientists go sometimes beyond the mental plane? It is said that Einstein found his theory of relativity not through any process of reasoning, but through some kind of sudden inspiration. Has that inspiration anything to do with the Supermind?The scientist who gets an inspiration revealing to him a new truth, receives it from the intuitive mind. The knowledge comes as a direct perception in the higher mental plane illumined by some other light still farther above. But all that has nothing to do with the action of Supermind and this higher mental level is far removed from the supramental plane. Men are too easily inclined to believe that they have climbed into regions quite divine when they have only gone above the average level. There are many stages between the ordinary human mind and the Supermind, many grades and many intervening planes. If an ordinary man were to get into direct contact even with one of these intermediate planes, he would be dazzled and blinded, would be crushed under the weight of the sense of immensity or would lose his balance; and yet it is not the Supermind. Behind the common idea that a Yogi can know all things and answer all questions is the actual fact that there is a plane in the mind where the memory of everything is stored and remains always in existence. All mental movements that belong to the life of the earth are memorised and registered in this plane. Those who are capable of going there and care to take the trouble, can read in it and learn anything they choose. But this region must not be mistaken for the supramental levels. And yet to reach even there you must be able to silence the movements of the material or physical mind; you must be able to leave aside all your sensations and put a stop to your ordinary mental movements, whatever they are; you must get out of the vital; you must become free from the slavery of the body. Then only you can enter into that region and see. But if you are sufficiently interested to make this effort, you can arrive there and read what is written in the earth's memory. Thus, if you go deep into silence, you can reach a level of consciousness on which it is not impossible for you to receive answers to all your questions. And if there is one who is consciously open to the plenary truth of the supermind, in constant contact with it, he can certainly answer any question that is worth an answer from the supramental Light. The queries put must come from some sense of the truth and reality behind things. There are many questions and much debated problems that are cobwebs woven of mere mental abstractions or move on the illusory surface of things. These do not pertain to real knowledge; they are a deformation of knowledge, their very substance is of the ignorance. Certainly the supramental knowledge may give an answer, its own answer, to the problems set by the mind's ignorance; but it is likely that it would not be at all satisfactory or perhaps even intelligible to those who ask from the mental level. You must not expect the supramental to work in the way of the mind or demand that the knowledge in truth should be capable of being pieced together with the half-knowledge in ignorance. The scheme of the mind is one thing, but Supermind is quite another and it would no longer be supramental if it adapted itself to the exigencies of the mental scheme. The two are incommensurable and cannot be put together. When the consciousness has attained to supramental joys, does it no longer take interest in the things of the mind?The supramental does not take interest in mental things in the same way as the mind. It takes its own interest in all the movements of the universe, but it is from a different point of view and with a different vision. The world presents to it an entirely different appearance; there is a reversal of outlook and everything is seen from there as other than what it seems to the mind and often even the opposite. Things have another meaning; their aspect, their motion and process, everything about them, are watched with other eyes. Everything here is followed by the supermind; the mind movements and not less the vital, the material movements, all the play of the universe have for it a very deep interest, but of another kind. It is about the same difference as that between the interest taken in a puppet-play by one who holds the strings and knows what the puppets are to do and the will that moves them and that they can do only what it moves them to do, and the interest taken by another who observes the play but sees only what is happening from moment to moment and knows nothing else. The one who follows the play and is outside its secret has a stronger, an eager and passionate interest in what will happen and he gives an excited attention to its unforeseen or dramatic events; the other, who holds the strings and moves the show, is unmoved and tranquil. There is a certain intensity of interest which comes from ignorance and is bound up with illusion, and that must disappear when you are out of the ignorance. The interest that human beings take in things founds itself on the illusion; if that were removed, they would have no interest at all in the play; they would find it dry and dull. That is why all this ignorance, all this illusion has lasted so long; it is because men like it, because they cling to it and its peculiar kind of appeal that it endures. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 93?
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*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:EntrepreneurYogi.com ~ Darren Main,
2:Deja Vu All Over Again ~ Yogi Berra,
3:Its getting late early ~ Yogi Berra,
4:Love yourself. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
5:Yogis love to be alone. ~ Dharma Mittra,
6:The Autobiography of a Yogi, ~ Anonymous,
7:It's déjà vu all over again. ~ Yogi Berra,
8:It ain't over 'til it's over. ~ Yogi Berra,
9:It ain't over until it's over ~ Yogi Berra,
10:All happiness is in the mind. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
11:It ain`t over until it`s over. ~ Yogi Berra,
12:90% of the game is half mental. ~ Yogi Berra,
13:Truth is everlasting. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
14:Even Napoleon had his Watergate. ~ Yogi Berra,
15:Inner life is Divine. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
16:Life is all business. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
17:We made too many wrong mistakes. ~ Yogi Berra,
18:Feel good, be good, and do good. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
19:Life is a flow of love. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
20:Life is here to Enjoy! ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
21:Okay you guys, pair up in threes! ~ Yogi Berra,
22:It's like deja-vu, all over again. ~ Yogi Berra,
23:We remain where we are. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
24:What you see you become. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
25:A nickel ain't worth a dime anymore. ~ Yogi Berra,
26:A nickle ain't worth a dime anymore! ~ Yogi Berra,
27:The future ain't what it used to be. ~ Yogi Berra,
28:In Thy fullness, my Lord, ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
29:It ain't the heat, it's the humility. ~ Yogi Berra,
30:Sleep in the bliss of God. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
31:The Yogi must always practice. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
32:He must have made that before he died. ~ Yogi Berra,
33:No matter where you go, there you are, ~ Yogi Berra,
34:Self-reliance conquers any difficulty ~ Yogi Bhajan,
35:I never said most of the things I said. ~ Yogi Berra,
36:We're lost, but we're making good time. ~ Yogi Berra,
37:You can observe a lot just by watching. ~ Yogi Berra,
38:I am not what I think I am. I just am. ~ Jaimal Yogis,
39:Nature supports right action. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
40:Be the answer not the question. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
41:Enjoy your life and be happy. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
42:I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous. ~ Yogi Berra,
43:If the world was perfect, it wouldn't be. ~ Yogi Berra,
44:If you can't imitate him, don't copy him. ~ Yogi Berra,
45:Nature works in parallel ways. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
46:Problems are all in your head. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
47:The highest state is laughter. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
48:The nature of life is to grow. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
49:When you see a fork in the road, take it. ~ Yogi Berra,
50:You wouldn't have won if we'd beaten you. ~ Yogi Berra,
51:If the world were perfect, it wouldn't be. ~ Yogi Berra,
52:If you come to a fork in the road, take it ~ Yogi Berra,
53:Keep up and you will be kept up. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
54:Nobody comes here anymore, its too crowded ~ Yogi Berra,
55:Nobody goes there anymore, it's to crowded ~ Yogi Berra,
56:Be the alter not the alternative. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
57:If I didn't wake up, I'd still be sleeping. ~ Yogi Berra,
58:If the world were perfect, it wouldn't be. ~ Yogi Berra,
59:It's 90% mental. The other half is physical ~ Yogi Berra,
60:It's not too far; it just seems like it is. ~ Yogi Berra,
61:Ninety percent of this game is half mental. ~ Yogi Berra,
62:Sacrifice is total nonpresence of the I. N ~ Yogi Bhajan,
63:Share your strengths, not your weaknesses. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
64:We yogied this from day hikers for you. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
65:When you come to a fork in the road take it ~ Yogi Berra,
66:When you see a fork in the road...Take It!! ~ Yogi Berra,
67:Competition is for the competent. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
68:yogi may remain dutifully in the world; there ~ Anonymous,
69:Half the lies they tell about me aren't true. ~ Yogi Berra,
70:Nature knows best how to organise. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
71:That which comes slow comes solid. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
72:Water the root to enjoy the fruit. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
73:We don't do what we know is wrong. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
74:When you come to a fork in the road, take it. ~ Yogi Berra,
75:An attitude of gratitude brings great things. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
76:Pitching always beats batting — and vice-versa. ~ Yogi Berra,
77:Prosperity is the opposite of greedy. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
78:When you come to a fork in the road....Take it. ~ Yogi Berra,
79:You are remembered for your goodness. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
80:Established in Being, perform action. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
81:Happiness is your birthright. Live it! ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
82:Laughter is the language of the heart ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
83:Let your heart speak to others hearts. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
84:Mind is a wave of the ocean of Being. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
85:Self-reliance conquers any difficulty. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
86:There is time in life for everything. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
87:To conquer the unknown you must trust. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
88:You owe it to yourself to be yourself. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
89:Every happening is a lesson, a message. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
90:Ideal relationship is based on giving. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
91:Only a new seed will yield a new crop. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
92:When you come to a fork in the road, just take it ~ Yogi Berra,
93:When you get to the fork in the road.....take it! ~ Yogi Berra,
94:Gratitude is the open door to abundance. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
95:Opposition is dangerous to immortality. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
96:Prayer without heart is a waste to time. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
97:Knowledge is structured in consciousness ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
98:When you don't go within, you go without. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
99:75% of baseball is mental the other half is phisical ~ Yogi Berra,
100:Never make predictions, especially about the future. ~ Yogi Berra,
101:Share your strengths, not your weaknesses. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
102:Success in anything is through happiness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
103:A failure is only a step on the way to your success. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
104:Any act in the name of God returns 10 fold. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
105:Harmony and not strife is the law of yogic living. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
106:Naturalness is the basis of effectiveness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
107:Ninety percent of all mental errors are in your head. ~ Yogi Berra,
108:Have wisdom in your actions and faith in your merits. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
109:If you can't see God in all, you can't see God at all ~ Yogi Bhajan,
110:Love without trust is a river without water. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
111:An attitude of gratitude brings great things. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
112:Consult your spirit, your soul on everything. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
113:I do not believe in miracles, I rely on them. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
114:If your presence doesn't work, neither will your word. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
115:Rest and activity are the steps of progress. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
116:The atma-jnani alone can be a good karma-yogi. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
117:The greatest art is to sit, and wait, and let it come. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
118:Good luck and good timing are the same thing. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
119:In the field of knowledge is all possibility. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
120:Personal love is concentrated universal love. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
121:When you come upon a difficult task ... start. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
122:If you are being judgemental, that is non-yogic. ~ Rajashree Choudhury,
123:Never curse yourself by limiting your students. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
124:Only we should not be influenced by the winds. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
125:There is nothing outside of us. It's all in us. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
126:When you speak, it should be as if Infinity is speaking. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
127:You can observe a lot just by watching. —YOGI BERRA ~ Shaunti Feldhahn,
128:     You can observe a lot by just watching. ~ Yogi Berra ~ Jim Benson,
129:I just want to thank everyone who made this day necessary. ~ Yogi Berra,
130:Meditation is the best means of elongating life ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
131:The story of Love is the story of Love of Self. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
132:Travel light, live light, spread the light, be the light. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
133:Yogi Berra said "If the world was perfect, it wouldn't be. ~ Yogi Berra,
134:Fools live in fear, a wise man lives in strength. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
135:Meditation is nothing but taking a mental shower. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
136:See the job, do the job, stay out of the misery. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
137:Some of the stuff about Yogi energy is really fascinating. ~ Kathy Acker,
138:Surfing is kind of a good metaphor for the rest of life. ~ Jaimal Yogis,
139:The secret of success in business is creativity. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
140:Doubts are death. Doubts are the dry rot of life. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
141:Every individual has the potential to be original. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
142:It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future. ~ Yogi Berra,
143:One must be a saint, Yogi and a hero to be a good teacher. ~ ~ The Mother,
144:Creation is ready to serve you, if you just be you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
145:Cut my pie into four pieces, I don’t think I could eat eight. ~ Yogi Berra,
146:Expansion of happiness is the purpose of creation. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
147:If you ask me anything I don't know, I'm not going to answer. ~ Yogi Berra,
148:Life is a lie if you do not find the eternal truth. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
149:A failure is only a step on the way to your success. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
150:Managers are the most creative people in the world. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
151:You can never get rid of fear, you can only drop it. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
152:By honoring your words you are honored in this world. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
153:Complaints bring misery; compliments brings strength. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
154:The secret of success is conviction and persistence. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
155:The whole purpose of life is to gain enlightenment. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
156:Fake it, you will make it. But you have to believe it. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
157:If you can't see God in All, you can't see God at all. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
158:If your presence doesn't work, neither will your word. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
159:Nobody goes to that restaurant anymore because it's too crowded. ~ Yogi Berra,
160:The basic fundamental of behaviour should be to give. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
161:The greatest art is to sit, and wait, and let it come. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
162:Allow your love to nourish yourself as well as others. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
163:Love is nothing but giving, tolerating and sacrificing. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
164:Ninety percent of baseball is mental, the other half is physical. ~ Yogi Berra,
165:There are three values: Feel good, be good and do good. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
166:A Yogi must avoid the two extremes of luxury and austerity. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
167:Behaviour arises from the level of one's consciousness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
168:If you ask me a question I don't know, I'm not going to answer it. ~ Yogi Berra,
169:If you cannot bless yourself, then nobody can bless you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
170:The mind is given to you, you are not given to the mind. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
171:Through Transcendental Meditation, the human brain can ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
172:Wisdom, character, and consciousness conquer everything. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
173:Blessed is the Yogi who can breathe through his bones. ~ William Walker Atkinson,
174:If you don't know where you're going, you'll end up someplace else. ~ Yogi Berra,
175:If you don't know where you're going, you'll end up somewhere else. ~ Yogi Berra,
176:Responsibility can never be given. It can only be taken. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
177:The purpose of speech is to enliven the bliss in others. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
178:Travel light, live light, spread the light, be the light. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
179:Yogi Berra reportedly said, “It’s not the heat, it’s the humility. ~ Paul Levine,
180:Your heart works for you, but do you work for your heart? ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
181:Autobiography of a Yogi, a book that he would return to several ~ Brent Schlender,
182:I did not come to collect students, but to train teachers. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
183:If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else. ~ Yogi Berra,
184:If you don't know where you are going you will end up somewhere else ~ Yogi Berra,
185:The moment you value yourself, the whole world values you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
186:There is only one thing you should know. Conquer yourself. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
187:What is the purpose of life? To elevate all, big or small. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
188:What you put your attention on grows strong in your life. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
189:You communicate for a better tommorow, not to spoil today. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
190:Art arises from the interaction of the mind and the heart. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
191:Assign Yogi Berra to Cape Canaveral; he could handle any missile. ~ Marianne Moore,
192:Consciousness, fully awake to itself, is the Light of God. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
193:Find friends and not lovers; you will win the game of life. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
194:Never think of failure, for what we think will come about. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
195:If one is not happy, one has lost the very purpose of life. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
196:If the fans don’t wanna come out to the ballpark, no one can stop ‘em. ~ Yogi Berra,
197:When you are far away from reality, your fantasy won't work. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
198:Without realizing who you are, happiness cannot come to you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
199:If you don't know where you are going,
you'll end up someplace else. ~ Yogi Berra,
200:If you don't know where you are going, you will wind up somewhere else. ~ Yogi Berra,
201:Life is a flow of love, only your participation is requested. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
202:When ego is lost, limit is lost. You become infinite, kind, beautiful. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
203:If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. ~ Yogi Berra,
204:If you don't know where you're going, you might wind up some place else. ~ Yogi Berra,
205:The art of happiness is to serve all, and all shall serve you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
206:The first principle of self-love is that you are not for sale. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
207:Time and space cannot play any part between two loving hearts. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
208:When I see a non-yogi [benefit], that's when it really affects my life. ~ Donna Karan,
209:You are very powerful, provided you know how powerful you are. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
210:Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours. ~ Yogi Berra,
211:The greatest education man has to learn is the science of self. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
212:The most effective teachers embody the teaching they give out. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
213:Yogi Berra put it best, "If people don't want to come, we can't stop them." ~ Jay Mohr,
214:Your greatest strength is love. Your greatest weakness is fear. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
215:Be so happy that when others look at you, they become happy too. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
216:I am not a yogi yet, but I aspire to have more balance in my life. ~ Baratunde Thurston,
217:If you want to progress in your life and grow, act not to react. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
218:Outside is the joy of the drop. Inside is the joy of the ocean. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
219:Peace has its price: your head and heart; less than that is war. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
220:Sometimes bringing out your inner best is the secret of success. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
221:The power of light is always bigger than the power of darkness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
222:Every disability is imagined. Every achievement is an experience. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
223:Make yourself so happy, that by looking at you, other people become happy. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
224:Whatever we put our attention on will grow stronger in our life. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
225:A yogi is one who leaves a place a little nicer than when they arrived. ~ David F Swensen,
226:A yogi's brain extends from the bottom of the foot to the top of his head ~ B K S Iyengar,
227:Be happy, healthy, and let all that love flow through your heart. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
228:'God helps those who help themselves.' - it's a very true saying. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
229:If you're too busy to meditate twice a day, you're just too busy. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
230:I wish I had an answer to that because I'm tired of answering that question. ~ Yogi Berra,
231:The United States influences government and life everywhere else. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
232:Your strength is how calmly, quietly and peacefully you face life. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
233:Improve with each breath. Every negative vibration returns 10 fold. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
234:Love is a process in which ego is lost and infinity is experienced. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
235:Make yourself so happy so that when others look at you they become happy too ~ Yogi Bhajan,
236:The flower of life blooms in love and radiates love all around it. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
237:There is nothing in life to take seriously except the joy of life. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
238:To be calm is the highest achievement of the best of what you have. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
239:When we love there are no barriers, no desires, no needs, no wants. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
240:Why is meditation essential? By meditating we take our garbage out. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
241:Adopt the standard of perfection, because it is a perfect universe. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
242:All world conflicts will be resolved if people listen to my advice. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
243:Don't fight darkness. Bring the light, and darkness will disappear. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
244:The whole effect of activity is to enrich the feeling of the other. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
245:The yogis figured a calm mind was infinitely more powerful than a restless mind. ~ Om Swami,
246:Do not get attached to that which is given, be attached to the Giver. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
247:Don't go for what you know you can get. Go for what you really want. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
248:Hope is not a prediction of the future, it's a declaration of what's possible. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
249:To resolve problems through negotiation is a very childish approach. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
250:dwells in the silent chamber of the heart of everyone and everything. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
251:Life finds its purpose and fulfillment in the expansion of happiness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
252:Love is the most important thing in the world, but baseball is pretty good, too. ~ Yogi Berra,
253:Never say things to friends which you don't want to hear from enemies. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
254:No, I don't go to that restaurant anymore. No body goes there. It's too crowded. ~ Yogi Berra,
255:The heart of a yogi should always bear good-will and thoughts that benefit others. ~ Amit Ray,
256:When ego is lost, limit is lost. You become infinite, kind, beautiful. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
257:Human concepts, no matter how grand they may appear, have limitations. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
258:I'm not going to buy my kids an encyclopedia. Let them walk to school like I did. ~ Yogi Berra,
259:In all darkness, there is a light and in all light there is a darkness. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
260:Meditation is a means to discover all the glories of the ocean of mind ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
261:Prayer is talking to God. Meditation is letting God talk to you.” —Yogi Bhajan ~ Maria Shriver,
262:REAL Peace is always unshakable... 'Bliss is unchanged by gain or loss' ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
263:The pair of opposites do not effect a yogi - neither praise nor insult. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
264:You can never hide from your truth. If you do, you will always be lost. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
265:Challenge doesn't come to small people. Challenge comes to great people. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
266:If you give your Self a chance, your Self will give you all the chances. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
267:No action can be performed successfully without a clear result in view. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
268:Our purity lies in our originality. Our intuition lies in our innocence. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
269:Problems will disappear as darkness disappears with the onset of light. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
270:The fundamental law of truth is that it penetrates through all darkness. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
271:You know how to drive a car, but you do not know how to drive your life! ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
272:A pure woman is better than a hundred yogis. Women are more open to love God. ~ Neem Karoli Baba,
273:Divine Love can overcome the evil and the cruel—the tiger does not attack the yogi. ~ The Mother,
274:A comfortable and regulated life is needed for fastest pace of evolution. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
275:Divine Love can overcome the evil and the cruel- the tiger does not attack the yogi. ~ The Mother,
276:Our minds are a lot like the sea...you wake up some days and its rough and stormy. ~ Jaimal Yogis,
277:Passion is like waves; it comes and goes. Compassion is the constant flow. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
278:We are not responding to this instant if we are judging any aspect of it. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
279:Where is the money going to come from? From wherever it is at the moment. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
280:Your truth should be so pure that if lifts a person's soul to the heights. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
281:A spiritual person is vast, like an ocean - but very mighty, very powerful. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
282:If you want to pay off your debts, it pays to increase your earning power. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
283:Master of the universe is every man's potential insight, cosmic potential. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
284:Meditation makes the man Divine and brings the Divine to the world of man. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
285:Remember: the Word is God and God is the Word. You are what your words are. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
286:The Yogi believes in psychic control and the conquest of internal nature. “How ~ Swami Vivekananda,
287:To be blessed is to live in gratitude, so that God can fulfill you forever. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
288:When the heart gets into prayer, every beat of the heart creates a miracle. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
289:Day after day, we culture our minds with the deep silence of our own Being. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
290:If you make your body very strong, really strong, it can fight off anything. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
291:Talking to Yogi Berra about baseball is like talking to Homer about the Gods. ~ A Bartlett Giamatti,
292:Where there's love there's no limit; where there's a limit, there's no love. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
293:A loving heart, a heart full of love, is the precious essence of human life. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
294:Do not fight the darkness, let the light in and the darkness will disappear. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
295:There is no liberation without labor...and there is no freedom which is free. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
296:What is meditation? When you empty yourself and let the universe come in you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
297:Alloted duty means you should live full potentiality with which you are born. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
298:Body is not all. Mind is not all. Spirit is not all. All three make the sense. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
299:If you believe in light, you'll be in light, you don't have to face darkness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
300:Love is the ultimate state of human being where compassion prevails and kindness rules. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
301:The Yogi Philosophy teaches that Man has always lived and always will live. ~ William Walker Atkinson,
302:You can master tantric yogic poly-orgasmic Wonder Sex but you're still gonna die alone. ~ Brad Warner,
303:Bless be the ones who serve others. They are the ones who find heaven on earth. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
304:Hope is not a prediction of the future, it's a declaration of what is possible. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
305:Little League baseball is a very good thing because it keeps the parents off the streets. ~ Yogi Berra,
306:The kingdom of heaven is like electricity. You don't see it. It is within you. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
307:The kingdom of heaven is like electricity. You don’t see it. It is within you. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
308:Through meditation, you can calm the mind and develop what is important to you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
309:I let people make remarks about me, but it doesn't touch me, all those remarks. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
310:Kundalini Yoga will dawn on you the secret of how to be Healthy, Happy and Holy. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
311:The knowledge from an enlightened person breaks on the hard rocks of ignorance. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
312:Yogi Berra, Bill Lee, they were irreverent, poked fun at the stodgy owners and managers. ~ W P Kinsella,
313:Ingrown anger is like an ingrown hair. The pain it creates in life is unbearable. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
314:In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not.” —Yogi Berra In ~ Henrik Kniberg,
315:It was impossible to get a conversation going, everybody was talking too much. —YOGI BERRA ~ Jim Afremow,
316:I want to give you the depth and the strength which is yours... the original you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
317:Of all yogins, only he who rests his unwavering mind and love in me is dear to me. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
318:What you say should not just be truth now, but should be a proven truth tomorrow. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
319:As Yogi Berra said, “If you don’t know where you’re going, you will wind up somewhere else. ~ Sue Johnson,
320:The state of least excitation of consciousness is the field of all possibilities. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
321:Don’t hurt Yogi!” yelled the German father, who still didn’t know who I was supposed to be. ~ Stuart Gibbs,
322:Life is not a struggle, not a tension. Life has not to be suffering. Life is bliss ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
323:Life is simple. Life is not complicated. Life is only one thing: Identify yourself. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
324:TM in the a.m. and the p.m....20 minutes in the bank, all day in the market place. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
325:What is a cozy home? Where you enter and you feel the radiance of your divine self. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
326:Yogi Bear changed my life in ways that I can't explain because it's not a full feature on me. ~ T J Miller,
327:You are the master of all the laws of nature if you know the transcendental field. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
328:America is the most creative country and the most powerful government in the world. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
329:Consciousness in the individual is that area where the totality of life is located. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
330:Speak not through the positive mind or the negative mind, but from the neutral mind. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
331:The first law of social communication is whenever you meet anyone, exalt him or her. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
332:Three mantras you should never say: (1) I don't know. (2) I'm not ready. (3) I can't do it. W ~ Yogi Bhajan,
333:Yogi Raman detected his dismay. “Never overlook the power of simplicity,” Julian was told. ~ Robin S Sharma,
334:Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda, which was Steve Jobs’s favorite book. 9. ~ Vishen Lakhiani,
335:Your mind is your servant, your body is your vehicle and your soul is your residence. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
336:You should make yourself so happy, that by looking at you, other people become happy. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
337:I want to eliminate the basis of problems and basis of crime, and basis of terrorism. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
338:You have to bounce in life with joy. Your strength lies in your smiles and your songs. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
339:Getting to play a yogic healer was awesome. I love yoga, so I've had a lot of teachers. ~ Mary Elizabeth Ellis,
340:Love is the ultimate state of human being where compassion prevails and kindness rules. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
341:Make an attitude to be in gratitude, you will find the whole Universe will come to you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
342:Meditation is the only means to the harmonious development of the body, mind and soul. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
343:What is the power of life? With all the ungraceful dirt, nonsense, you remain graceful. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
344:When the elephant decides to walk through the village, all the dogs come out and bark. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
345:You've got to be careful
If you don't know where you're going,
Because you might get there. ~ Yogi Berra,
346:Don't solve your problems, dissolve your problems - so that they should not recur again. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
347:Einstein used to say, ‘It’s not that I’m smarter, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.’ Yogis ~ Om Swami,
348:Every thought, speech, and action of a person influences everything in the environment. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
349:Fantasy and anger totally destroy the human body. Tolerance is the greatest human asset. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
350:If you give your word, let the entire Universe fall before you, but let your word stand. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
351:The narrow edge between comfort and discomfort is to a yogi what a grain of sand is to an oyster. ~ Darren Main,
352:From tiny, tiny waves of joy, one gets to the ocean of happiness, which is called bliss. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
353:The fact is that there is nothing more beautiful, more worthy or more conscious than you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
354:The Yogic sages say that all the pain of a human life is caused by words, as is all the joy. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
355:We must be guided by faith. If we are guided by fear we lock ourselves and our expansion. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
356:What should the yogi have to fear? Trees, plants, and all that is inside and outside, is He Himself ~ Guru Nanak,
357:When the prayer becomes the vibration of the mind and self, then we can create a miracle. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
358:Develop your Intuition so that the changes in the years to come may be convenient for you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
359:Meditation is the means through which the Soul dictates and guides the mind for all good. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
360:On the platform of reality, on the platform of oneness of life, all differences dissolve. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
361:You've got to be very careful if you don't know where you're going, because you might not get there. ~ Yogi Berra,
362:Happiness radiates like the fragrance from a flower, and draws all good things toward you. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
363:You've got to be very careful if you don't know where you are going, because you might not get there. ~ Yogi Berra,
364:If you do not love yourself to the depth of totality, you will never love love as a reality. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
365:Monks are not expected to speak about themselves; the message is important, not the person. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
366:We must take situations as they are. We must only change our mental attitudes towards them. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
367:Actually, I never liked Dylan's kind of music before; I always thought he sounded just like Yogi Bear. ~ Mick Ronson,
368:Falling out of a posture means you are human; getting back into the posture means you are a yogi. ~ Bikram Choudhury,
369:My coherence-creating groups are going to put out all this mischief-mongership in the world. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
370:God-realization is attained only by great effort on the part of the yogi and by divine grace. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
371:If we take judging ourselves and others out of our life, we will mostly be living in paradise. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
372:If you are happy, happiness will come to you because happiness wants to go where happiness is. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
373:The Age of Aquarius is the age of excellence in which personal purity shall absolutely matter. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
374:When you do not consciously relate to your body, your mind does not relate consciously to you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
375:Who's your soul's mate? Consciousness. Soul is your conscious mate. Guru keeps you conscious. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
376:Books from the ancients, or the yogis and shamans, are your time capsules from yourselves to yourselves… ~ Lee Carroll,
377:Divine is all Love in its essential nature, and Love is all Divine in its truthful expression. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
378:You cannot live by feelings and emotions; you have to live by your intuition and consciousness. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
379:You’ve got to be careful if you don’t know where you’re going, ’cause you might not get there. —Yogi Berra ~ Anonymous,
380:We have an infinite number of reasons to be happy, and a serious responsibility not be serious. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
381:People are influenced by what we are, what we radiate. This has greater appeal than what we say. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
382:there have been only two who were Yogis, possessing the Yogic vision and intuition—Swami Vivekananda and ~ Sri Aurobindo,
383:The yogi learns to forget the past and takes no thought for the morrow. He lives in the eternal present. ~ B K S Iyengar,
384:They think democracy - I used to say "damn the democracy", because it's not a stable government. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
385:Whatever has been discovered has to be put to use - otherwise, what is the use of the discovery? ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
386:You are not a soul, you are not a mind, you are not a body. You are the controller of all three. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
387:About humility we speak with an analogy: When the branches are full of fruit, they just bow down. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
388:As you train your mind, shockingly it brings you prosperity as well as the faculty to maintain it. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
389:If you only know one kriya, then share that. Just be humble, teach it. Every student is a teacher. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
390:Just as a mountain of snow is nothing but water, so also the whole universe is nothing but bliss. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
391:You have to understand the purpose of life, the purpose of life is to do something which will live forever. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
392:Just think of any negativity that comes to you as a raindrop falling into the ocean of your bliss. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
393:The genius of man is hidden in the silent, settled state of mind from where every thought emerges. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
394:The habit of quietly absorbing the shocks will be quite a great help to stabilize pure awareness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
395:If your mind can go along with you it is a blessing. If your mind obeys you, it is a super-blessing. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
396:The idea is to just stop. Just wait. Don't react. Therein lies the whole universe. Just don't react. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
397:Regardless of what we understand or do not understand, we are what we speak. That's how we are known. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
398:See the brotherhood of all mankind as the highest order of Yogis; conquer your own mind, and conquer the world. ~ Guru Nanak,
399:The experience of happiness is a direct means of replenishing life energy and revitalizing the mind. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
400:Yogi Bear was a real moment in my life. Post-Yogi Bear: don't drink as much. Pre-Yogi Bear: like to drink much. ~ T J Miller,
401:You’ve got to be careful if you don’t know where you’re going, ’cause you might not get there. —Yogi Berra ~ Benjamin Graham,
402:Breaking through the cyclical laws of physical nature is the basis of the spiritual process that Adiyogi explored. ~ Sadhguru,
403:I tell the kids, somebody's gotta win, somebody's gotta lose. Just don't fight about it. Just try to get better. ~ Yogi Berra,
404:Meditation is a glorious link to connect and harmonize the two ends of life - material and spiritual. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
405:Never utter a word if it is not from your navel point and it doesn't confirm your regal, highest self. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
406:My University of Management will create managers who will float in happiness, success and fulfillment. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
407:There is one unity, unified wholeness, total natural law, in the transcendental unified consciousness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
408:What is greatness? Greatness is when you have found out that you are not great, but everything else is. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
409:Yogis are not against pleasure. It is just that they are unwilling to settle for little pleasures. They are greedy. ~ Sadhguru,
410:If you cannot put the ego on the side you cannot succeed in love, period. Therefore love must defeat it. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
411:Meditation is the sharp tool to dig out the great treasure hidden within everybody's inner personality. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
412:All that we are is the result of what we have thought. The mind is everything. What we think, we become. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
413:As Yogi Berra said, “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice; in practice there is. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
414:Life is a lie if truth is not found. Truth is just an idea if it is not lived. It is living that matters. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
415:Little mother, thy son will be a yogi. As a spiritual engine, he will carry many souls to God’s kingdom. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
416:Meditation is the straight flight of the mind to the Kingdom of Heaven present in the heart of everyone. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
417:There are two ways to change things: Either you are forced to change or you have the intuition to change. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
418:Working by heart means using your feelings and emotions to lead you to your spiritual sense of existence. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
419:You don't have to learn to be wise. If you just flow you can be successful. Mother Nature will carry you. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
420:As yogis, we are constantly exploring the world of duality, while being acutely aware of the unity of all things. ~ Brenda Strong,
421:first step in Yogi development consists of the mastery of the physical body and its care and attention. ~ William Walker Atkinson,
422:The important thing is this: to be able, at any moment, to sacrifice what we are for what we could become. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
423:You have to understand the purpose of life. The purpose of life is to do something which will live forever. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
424:God grants us the faculty to open ourselves to peace. If we don't then we are responsible if wars continue. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
425:The greatest progress in life is when you know your limitations, and then you have the courage to drop them. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
426:Although Christ, in my mind is an absolute Yogi, I think many Christian teachers today are misrepresenting Christ. ~ George Harrison,
427:One's own karma, one's own actions are responsible to come to bring either happiness or success or whatever. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
428:The path which we believe in is the path of love; it has all the goodness of God in it-calmness and kindness. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
429:It is the focus on the highest ideal day after day that saves life from being wrapped up in small whirlwinds. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
430:Losing is a learning experience. It teaches you humility. It teaches you to work harder. It’s also a powerful motivator. ~ Yogi Berra,
431:The question is, "Are you spiritual or are you not?" The truth is you are. The reality is you don't believe it ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
432:Yogi Raman preached: ‘Every second you spend thinking about someone else’s dreams, you take time away from your own. ~ Robin S Sharma,
433:Meditation is not what you do in the morning, that's practice. Meditation is the daily result of that practice. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
434:¹ "The world waits for the rising of India to receive The divine flood in its fullness." The Ideal of the Karmayogin by ~ Sri Aurobindo,
435:In order to see him it is necessary to meet him in seclusion, far from the main activity of the business scene. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
436:Know what you want, decide when you want it, figure your plan of action, follow through on it, and never doubt. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
437:Conscious communication is called Turiya-when you are totally effective, totally understood and totally truthful. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
438:Cultivate the attitude of gratitude. The attitude of gratitude is when you are grateful for every breath of life. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
439:Stress is the reason for crime and all other kinds of frustration. To relieve it will eliminate everything else. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
440:Nature is favourable to our effort when human awareness is being established more and more in pure consciousness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
441:I did not become great by association of The Beatles! Beatles make Maharishi great? Pah! It is a waste of thought. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
442:There are three things you cannot hide: smell of the garlic, fragrance of the flower and the wisdom of the teacher. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
443:Your mind, emotions and body are instruments and the way you align and tune them determines how well you play life. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
444:Meditation is the direct means of eradicating the very cause of the majority of diseases, both mental and physical. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
445:But Little League can be a great experience for kids, as long as they want to play--and don't play to bring their parents glory. ~ Yogi Berra,
446:living in harmony with nature and adopting some of the yogic principles were the primary reasons why I did not fall sick at all. I ~ Om Swami,
447:Your words should be so strong that they affect every your intuition so that you can recognize what is real and heart. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
448:It may take a little self-discipline - be simple, be kind, stay rested. Attend to your own inner-health and happiness. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
449:Take new values: Leave behind a legend to be followed by those who follow you. Be a yogi - don't be an ordinary person. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
450:There is nothing in the cosmos, either in the material plane or the spiritual plane which cannot be directly cognized. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
451:The Yogi says, religion is practical if you know first why misery exists. All the misery in the world is in the senses. Is ~ Swami Vivekananda,
452:You have to give 100 percent in the first half of the game. If that isn't enough, in the second half, you have to give what's left. ~ Yogi Berra,
453:There is no such thing as an accident. It is all part of a master plan. Play your role as gracefully as you can and relax. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
454:There is nothing difficult, there is nothing complicated, only one has to have a desire to have a better quality of life. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
455:What helps me is yogic breathing, dropping my spiritual level where I am really, really clear that I am playing a character. ~ Giancarlo Esposito,
456:As a healer, the first thing to tell every patient is to breathe deeply. Shallow breathing means no endurance, no patience. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
457:If love could be purchased, everybody would have paid a thousand dollars a pound for it. You know it doesn't work that way. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
458:Lord Krishna pointed out the holy science by which the yogi may master his body and convert it, at will, into pure energy. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
459:To the Yogi everything is bliss, every human face that he sees brings cheerfulness to him. That is the sign of a virtuous man. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
460:If you want to learn a thing, read that. If you want to know a thing, write that; if you want to master a thing, teach that. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
461:When the mind is attuned to the cosmic law, all the laws of nature are in perfect harmony with the aspirations of the mind. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
462:Friendship means only one thing: you don't create fences around you, but try to remove fences from the life of another person. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
463:The philosophy of life is this: Life is not a struggle, not a tension Life is bliss. It is eternal wisdom, eternal existence. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
464:Danger is when you are split three ways: Your soul goes one way, your mind goes another way and your body goes yet another way. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
465:You don't have to explain yourself. Let your weakness be yours. Let your strength be everybody's. You understand the principle? ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
466:In the United States we have the great Harvard Business School, but America is the country with the greatest debt in the world. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
467:Yogi Bear - there's everything before Yogi Bear and there's everything after Yogi Bear. Like a major car accident, or the birth of Christ. ~ T J Miller,
468:Your value is nothing if you cannot honor your word. If you do not mean what you say, you are the most mean person on the Earth. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
469:Appreciation is an art and a lifestyle and a source of happiness and fulfillment. It's called gratitude-an attitude of gratitude. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
470:In the Age of Aquarius, the depression and stress on mankind will tear up people who do not have the technical knowledge of self. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
471:Many things you are already practicing; but you practice them under fear. But if you practice them under love they become Divine. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
472:You have to understand the process of healing in the Age of Aquarius. What will give the healing is the flow of your soul energy. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
473:The Yogi is a most patient and persevering man, and his great attainments are due largely to the possession of these qualities. ~ William Walker Atkinson,
474:Be thou a true yogi. A yogi who understands that everything he's looking for is really inside himself. Learn to live more in the Self. ~ Goswami Kriyananda,
475:Boy, Whitey, I hope I never see my name up there.

To Whitey Ford during scoreboard tribute on opening day to recently deceased Yankees. ~ Yogi Berra,
476:Elevate. Each day, live to elevate yourself, each day elevate one person. Make elevation your religion and you shall reach infinity. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
477:I guess what I'm trying to say is that I'm learning to not want to be someone else, to just be who I am, as is, with nothing extra added on. ~ Jaimal Yogis,
478:Pilgrimages are journeys to places of power. People sometimes make pilgrimages to the caves where Milarepa or other great yogis meditated. ~ Frederick Lenz,
479:The Yogi's ideal is a body strong in all its parts, under the control of a masterful and developed Will, animated by high ideals. ~ William Walker Atkinson,
480:The Yogis’ ideal is a body strong in all its parts, under the control of a masterful and developed Will, animated by high ideals. ~ William Walker Atkinson,
481:You only communicate to pass the time, or to express the emotions. Your tongue has to develop [the capacity] to speak consciousness. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
482:If you want to learn something, read about it. If you want to understand something, write about it. If you want to master something, teach it. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
483:Meditation is the direct means of enjoying the greatest happiness and is the only means to quench the thirst for happiness on earth. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
484:Meditation is a technique to integrate one's personality, to be able to live and enjoy full life of all glories - worldly and divine. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
485:For example, Yogi Raman would never eat after 8:00 p.m. He said that the digestive activity it induced would reduce the quality of his sleep. ~ Robin S Sharma,
486:Talk to everybody with reverence. Listen to everybody with reverence. Say things with reverence. You will always be happy and graceful. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
487:There have been many yogis who have been doing these things, or have been having these experiences for years - and now they are searching for freedom. ~ Mooji,
488:The unit of every country is the family and the strength of the country is based on the smiles of the children and songs of the adults. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
489:In meditation we research the field without time and space and activity, and yet produce a useful effect while conducting the research. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
490:I am a karmayogi-someone who becomes conscious of herself and the Divine through work, not through meditation in some ashram or saying Hail Marys ~ Kelly Cutrone,
491:In fact, every kind of pleasantness that we experience—whether peace or joy or ecstasy—is a kind of chemistry. The yogic system has always known this. ~ Sadhguru,
492:We are not in a position to criticize anyone. The existence of enemies means for us that our friendliness has not been sufficient enough. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
493:Nothing from outside can stop a man from enjoying lasting peace and permanent joy in life, for it is the essential nature of his own soul. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
494:That great, mighty current of evolution which is advancing the life of everything in creation is simply invincible - no one can resist it. ~ Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
495:Peter swept aside Yogi Tea and Harmony Herbal Blend, though he hesitated a second over the chamomile. .... But no. Violent death demanded Earl Grey. ~ Louise Penny,
496:Love fundamentally is the most powerful ecstasy of consciousness, and even if a person goes blind, there is no question when you are in love. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
497:The future is a blank canvas. - not Yogi, Michael Hyatt or Lewis H. Lapham (the correct author is Suzy Kassem according to the U.S. copyright office). ~ Suzy Kassem,
498:When ordinary folk perceive phenomena, They look on them as real, and not illusory. This, then, is the subject of debate Where ordinary and yogis differ. ~ ntideva,
499:Your wealth will increase, your values will increase, your projection will increase, if you simply love to live, just love yourself and live yourself. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
500:Any woman on this planet who values herself as a woman is great. She is a giver of life. And when you are a giver of life, what more is there? ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



50

   40 Yoga
   23 Integral Yoga
   13 Occultism
   12 Hinduism
   4 Buddhism
   3 Philosophy


   37 Sri Aurobindo
   23 Swami Vivekananda
   17 Satprem
   14 Sri Ramakrishna
   12 Aleister Crowley
   11 The Mother
   11 Swami Krishnananda
   6 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   5 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   5 Patanjali
   4 Bokar Rinpoche
   3 Aldous Huxley
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta


   35 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   17 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   17 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   15 Letters On Yoga II
   15 Essays On The Gita
   14 Letters On Yoga I
   12 Raja-Yoga
   12 Letters On Yoga III
   11 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   10 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   9 Magick Without Tears
   8 Talks
   7 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   6 Essays Divine And Human
   6 Bhakti-Yoga
   6 Amrita Gita
   5 Words Of The Mother II
   5 The Secret Doctrine
   5 The Life Divine
   5 The Integral Yoga
   5 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   5 Liber ABA
   4 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   3 The Perennial Philosophy
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Isha Upanishad
   2 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   2 Collected Poems
   2 Agenda Vol 1


0.01_-_Introduction, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  And what if man were not yet invented? What if he were not yet his own species?
  A little white silhouette, twelve thousand miles away, solitary and frail amidst a spiritual horde which had once and for all decided that the meditating and miraculous Yogi was the apogee of the species, was searching for the means, for the reality of this man who for a moment believes himself sovereign of the heavens or sovereign of a machine, but who is quite probably something completely different than his spiritual or material glories. Another, a lighter air was throbbing in that breast, unburdened of its heavens and of its prehistoric machines. Another Epic was beginning.
  
  --
  
  She spoke to deaf ears. She was very alone in this 'ashram.' Little by little, the disciples fill up the place, then they say: it is ours. It is 'the Ashram.' We are 'the disciples.' In Pondicherry as in Rome as in Mecca. 'I do not want a religion! An end to religions!' She exclaimed. She struggled and fought in their midst - was She therefore to leave this Earth like one more saint or Yogi, buried beneath haloes, the 'continuatrice' of a great spiritual lineage? She was seventy-six years old when we landed there, a knife in our belt and a ready curse on our lips.
  

0.01_-_Life_and_Yoga, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Yoga, as Swami Vivekananda has said, may be regarded as a means of compressing one's evolution into a single life or a few years or even a few months of bodily existence. A given system of Yoga, then, can be no more than a selection or a compression, into narrower but more energetic forms of intensity, of the general methods which are already being used loosely, largely, in a leisurely movement, with a profuser apparent waste of material and energy but with a more complete combination by the great
  Mother in her vast upward labour. It is this view of Yoga that can alone form the basis for a sound and rational synthesis of Yogic methods. For then Yoga ceases to appear something mystic and abnormal which has no relation to the ordinary processes of the World-Energy or the purpose she keeps in view in her two great movements of subjective and objective selffulfilment; it reveals itself rather as an intense and exceptional use of powers that she has already manifested or is progressively
  
  --
  
  Yogic methods have something of the same relation to the customary psychological workings of man as has the scientific handling of the force of electricity or of steam to their normal operations in Nature. And they, too, like the operations of Science, are formed upon a knowledge developed and confirmed by regular experiment, practical analysis and constant result. All
  Rajayoga, for instance, depends on this perception and experience that our inner elements, combinations, functions, forces, can be separated or dissolved, can be new-combined and set to novel and formerly impossible workings or can be transformed and resolved into a new general synthesis by fixed internal processes. Hathayoga similarly depends on this perception and experience that the vital forces and functions to which our life is normally subjected and whose ordinary operations seem set and indispensable, can be mastered and the operations changed or suspended with results that would otherwise be impossible and that seem miraculous to those who have not seized the rationale of their process. And if in some other of its forms this character of Yoga is less apparent, because they are more intuitive and less mechanical, nearer, like the Yoga of Devotion, to a supernal ecstasy or, like the Yoga of Knowledge, to a supernal infinity of consciousness and being, yet they too start from the use of some principal faculty in us by ways and for ends not contemplated in its everyday spontaneous workings. All methods grouped under the common name of Yoga are special psychological processes founded on a fixed truth of Nature and developing, out of normal functions, powers and results which were always latent but which her ordinary movements do not easily or do not often manifest.
  
  But as in physical knowledge the multiplication of scientific processes has its disadvantages, as that tends, for instance, to develop a victorious artificiality which overwhelms our natural human life under a load of machinery and to purchase certain forms of freedom and mastery at the price of an increased servitude, so the preoccupation with Yogic processes and their exceptional results may have its disadvantages and losses. The
  
  --
  
  Yogin tends to draw away from the common existence and lose his hold upon it; he tends to purchase wealth of spirit by an impoverishment of his human activities, the inner freedom by an outer death. If he gains God, he loses life, or if he turns his efforts outward to conquer life, he is in danger of losing
  God. Therefore we see in India that a sharp incompatibility has been created between life in the world and spiritual growth and perfection, and although the tradition and ideal of a victorious harmony between the inner attraction and the outer demand remains, it is little or else very imperfectly exemplified. In fact, when a man turns his vision and energy inward and enters on the path of Yoga, he is popularly supposed to be lost inevitably to the great stream of our collective existence and the secular effort of humanity. So strongly has the idea prevailed, so much has it been emphasised by prevalent philosophies and religions that to escape from life is now commonly considered as not only the necessary condition, but the general object of Yoga. No synthesis of Yoga can be satisfying which does not, in its aim, reunite God and Nature in a liberated and perfected human life or, in its method, not only permit but favour the harmony of our inner and outer activities and experiences in the divine consummation of both. For man is precisely that term and symbol of a higher Existence descended into the material world in which it is possible for the lower to transfigure itself and put on the nature of the higher and the higher to reveal itself in the forms of the lower. To avoid the life which is given him for the realisation of that possibility, can never be either the indispensable condition or the whole and ultimate object of his supreme endeavour or of his most powerful means of self-fulfilment. It can only be a temporary necessity under certain conditions or a specialised extreme effort imposed on the individual so as to prepare a greater general possibility for the race. The true and full object and utility of Yoga can only be accomplished when the conscious

0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
   world cannot be doubted. It secured in India a society which lent itself to the preservation and the worship of spirituality, a country apart in which as in a fortress the highest spiritual ideal could maintain itself in its most absolute purity unoverpowered by the siege of the forces around it. But it was a compromise, not an absolute victory. The material life lost the divine impulse to growth, the spiritual preserved by isolation its height and purity, but sacrificed its full power and serviceableness to the world. Therefore, in the divine Providence the country of the
  Yogins and the Sannyasins has been forced into a strict and imperative contact with the very element it had rejected, the element of the progressive Mind, so that it might recover what was now wanting to it.
  

0.04_-_1951-1954, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Before, when there were ... we started with 35 or 36 people - but even when it got up to 150, even with 150 - it was as if ... they were all nestled in a cocoon in my consciousness: they were so near to me that I could constantly guide ALL their inner or outer movements. Day and night, at each moment, everything was totally under my control. And naturally, I think they made a great deal of progress at that time: it is a fact that I was CONSTANTLY doing the sadhana10 for them. But then, with this baby boom ... The sadhana can't be done for little sprouts who are 3 or 4 or 5 years old!
  10Sadhana: Yogic discipline or effort.
  

0.04_-_The_Systems_of_Yoga, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Hathayoga aims at the conquest of the life and the body whose combination in the food sheath and the vital vehicle constitutes, as we have seen, the gross body and whose equilibrium is the foundation of all Nature's workings in the human being. The equilibrium established by Nature is sufficient for the normal egoistic life; it is insufficient for the purpose of the HathaYogin.
  
  --
  By its numerous asanas or fixed postures it first cures the body of that restlessness which is a sign of its inability to contain without working them off in action and movement the vital forces poured into it from the universal Life-Ocean, gives to it an extraordinary health, force and suppleness and seeks to liberate it from the habits by which it is subjected to ordinary physical
  Nature and kept within the narrow bounds of her normal operations. In the ancient tradition of Hathayoga it has always been supposed that this conquest could be pushed so far even as to conquer to a great extent the force of gravitation. By various subsidiary but elaborate processes the HathaYogin next contrives to keep the body free from all impurities and the nervous system unclogged for those exercises of respiration which are his most important instruments. These are called pran.ayama, the control of the breath or vital power; for breathing is the chief physical functioning of the vital forces. Pranayama, for the HathaYogin, serves a double purpose. First, it completes the perfection of the body. The vitality is liberated from many of the ordinary necessities of physical Nature; robust health, prolonged youth, often an extraordinary longevity are attained.
  
  On the other hand, Pranayama awakens the coiled-up serpent of the Pranic dynamism in the vital sheath and opens to the Yogin fields of consciousness, ranges of experience, abnormal faculties denied to the ordinary human life while it puissantly intensifies such normal powers and faculties as he already possesses.
  
  --
  
  These advantages can be farther secured and emphasised by other subsidiary processes open to the HathaYogin.
  
  --
  
  But Rajayoga does not forget that the disabilities of the ordinary mind proceed largely from its subjection to the reactions of the nervous system and the body. It adopts therefore from the HathaYogic system its devices of asana and pran.ayama, but reduces their multiple and elaborate forms in each case to one simplest and most directly effective process sufficient for its own immediate object. Thus it gets rid of the HathaYogic complexity and cumbrousness while it utilises the swift and powerful efficacy of its methods for the control of the body and the vital functions and for the awakening of that internal dynamism, full of a latent supernormal faculty, typified in Yogic terminology by the kun.d.alin, the coiled and sleeping serpent of Energy within. This done, the system proceeds to the perfect quieting of the restless mind and its elevation to a higher plane through concentration of mental force by the successive stages which lead to the utmost inner concentration or ingathered state of the consciousness which is called Samadhi.
  
  --
  37
   its object which our philosophy asserts as the primary cosmic energy and the method of divine action upon the world. By this capacity the Yogin, already possessed of the highest supracosmic knowledge and experience in the state of trance, is able in the waking state to acquire directly whatever knowledge and exercise whatever mastery may be useful or necessary to his activities in the objective world. For the ancient system of
  Rajayoga aimed not only at Swarajya, self-rule or subjective empire, the entire control by the subjective consciousness of all the states and activities proper to its own domain, but included

0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Y THE very nature of the principal Yogic schools, each covering in its operations a part of the complex human integer and attempting to bring out its highest possibilities, it will appear that a synthesis of all of them largely conceived and applied might well result in an integral Yoga. But they are so disparate in their tendencies, so highly specialised and elaborated in their forms, so long confirmed in the mutual opposition of their ideas and methods that we do not easily find how we can arrive at their right union.
  
  An undiscriminating combination in block would not be a synthesis, but a confusion. Nor would a successive practice of each of them in turn be easy in the short span of our human life and with our limited energies, to say nothing of the waste of labour implied in so cumbrous a process. Sometimes, indeed,
  Hathayoga and Rajayoga are thus successively practised. And in a recent unique example, in the life of Ramakrishna Paramhansa, we see a colossal spiritual capacity first driving straight to the divine realisation, taking, as it were, the kingdom of heaven by violence, and then seizing upon one Yogic method after another and extracting the substance out of it with an incredible rapidity, always to return to the heart of the whole matter, the realisation and possession of God by the power of love, by the extension of inborn spirituality into various experience and by the spontaneous play of an intuitive knowledge. Such an example cannot be generalised. Its object also was special and temporal, to exemplify in the great and decisive experience of a master-soul the truth, now most necessary to humanity, towards which a world long divided into jarring sects and schools is with difficulty labouring, that all sects are forms and fragments of a single integral truth and all disciplines labour in their different ways towards one supreme experience. To know, be and possess
  
  --
  The synthesis we propose cannot, then, be arrived at either by combination in mass or by successive practice. It must therefore be effected by neglecting the forms and outsides of the
  Yogic disciplines and seizing rather on some central principle common to all which will include and utilise in the right place and proportion their particular principles, and on some central dynamic force which is the common secret of their divergent methods and capable therefore of organising a natural selection and combination of their varied energies and different utilities.
  
  --
  We observe, first, that there still exists in India a remarkable
  Yogic system which is in its nature synthetical and starts from a great central principle of Nature, a great dynamic force of
  Nature; but it is a Yoga apart, not a synthesis of other schools.
  --
  If, however, we leave aside, here also, the actual methods and practices and seek for the central principle, we find, first, that Tantra expressly differentiates itself from the Vedic methods of Yoga. In a sense, all the schools we have hitherto examined are Vedantic in their principle; their force is in knowledge, their method is knowledge, though it is not always discernment by the intellect, but may be, instead, the knowledge of the heart expressed in love and faith or a knowledge in the will working out through action. In all of them the lord of the Yoga is the Purusha, the Conscious Soul that knows, observes, attracts, governs. But in Tantra it is rather Prakriti, the Nature-Soul, the Energy, the
  Will-in-Power executive in the universe. It was by learning and applying the intimate secrets of this Will-in-Power, its method, its Tantra, that the Tantric Yogin pursued the aims of his discipline, - mastery, perfection, liberation, beatitude. Instead of drawing back from manifested Nature and its difficulties, he confronted them, seized and conquered. But in the end, as is the general tendency of Prakriti, Tantric Yoga largely lost its principle in its machinery and became a thing of formulae and occult mechanism still powerful when rightly used but fallen from the clarity of their original intention.
  
  --
  Prakriti and turn them towards the Divine. But the normal action of Nature in us is an integral movement in which the full complexity of all our elements is affected by and affects all our environments. The whole of life is the Yoga of Nature. The
  Yoga that we seek must also be an integral action of Nature, and the whole difference between the Yogin and the natural man will be this, that the Yogin seeks to substitute in himself for the integral action of the lower Nature working in and by ego and division the integral action of the higher Nature working in and by God and unity. If indeed our aim be only an escape from the world to God, synthesis is unnecessary and a waste of time; for then our sole practical aim must be to find out one path out of the thousand that lead to God, one shortest possible of short cuts, and not to linger exploring different paths that end in the same goal. But if our aim be a transformation of our integral being into the terms of God-existence, it is then that a synthesis becomes necessary.
  
  --
  1
  Sadhana, the practice by which perfection, siddhi, is attained; sadhaka, the Yogin who seeks by that practice the siddhi.
  

01.02_-_The_Object_of_the_Integral_Yoga, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  ... the object of the Yoga is to enter into and be possessed by the Divine Presence and Consciousness, to love the Divine for the Divine's sake alone, to be turned in our nature into nature of the Divine and in our will and works and life to be the instrument of the Divine. Its object is not to be a great Yogi or a superman (although that may come) or to grab at the Divine for the sake of the ego's power, pride or pleasure.
  

01.03_-_Yoga_and_the_Ordinary_Life, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  But even if he can live partly in it or keep himself constantly open to it, he receives enough of this spiritual light and peace and strength and happiness to carry him securely through all the shocks of life. What one gains by opening to this spiritual consciousness, depends on what one seeks from it; if it is peace, one gets peace; if it is light or knowledge, one lives in a great light and receives a knowledge deeper and truer than any the normal mind of man can acquire; if it [is] strength or power, one gets a spiritual strength for the inner life or Yogic power to govern the outer work and action; if it is happiness, one enters into a beatitude far greater than any joy or happiness that the ordinary human life can give.
  
  --
  
  I must say in view of something you seem to have said to your father that it is not the object of the one to be a great man or the object of the other to be a great Yogin. The ideal of human life is to establish over the whole being the control of a clear, strong and rational mind and a right and rational will, to master the emotional, vital and physical being, create a harmony of the whole and develop the capacities whatever they are and fulfil them in life. In the terms of Hindu thought, it is to enthrone the rule of the purified and sattwic buddhi, follow the dharma, fulfilling one's own svadharma and doing the work proper to one's capacities, and satisfy kama and artha under the control of the buddhi and the dharma. The object of the divine life, on the other hand, is to realise one's highest self or to realise
  God and to put the whole being into harmony with the truth of the highest self or the law of the divine nature, to find one's own divine capacities great or small and fulfil them in life as a sacrifice to the highest or as a true instrument of the divine

02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  In the East, especially in India, the metaphysical thinkers have tried, as in the West, to determine the nature of the highest Truth by the intellect. But, in the first place, they have not given mental thinking the supreme rank as an instrument in the discovery of Truth, but only a secondary status. The first rank has always been given to spiritual intuition and illumination and spiritual experience; an intellectual conclusion that contradicts this supreme authority is held invalid. Secondly, each philosophy has armed itself with a practical way of reaching to the supreme state of consciousness, so that even when one begins with Thought, the aim is to arrive at a consciousness beyond mental thinking. Each philosophical founder (as also those who continued his work or school) has been a metaphysical thinker doubled with a Yogi. Those who were only philosophic intellectuals were respected for their learning but never took rank as truth discoverers. And the philosophies that lacked a sufficiently powerful means of spiritual experience died out and became things of the past because they were not dynamic for spiritual discovery and realisation.
  

02.06_-_The_Integral_Yoga_and_Other_Yogas, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Yoga does not go beyond the spiritual mind - people feel at the top of the head the joining with the Brahman, but they are not aware of a consciousness above the head. In the same way in the ordinary Yoga one feels the ascent of the awakened inner consciousness (Kundalini) to the brahmarandhra where the Prakriti joins the Brahman-consciousness, but they do not feel the descent. Some may have had these things, but I don't know that they understood their nature, principle or place in a complete sadhana. At least I never heard of these things from others before
  I found them out in my own experience. The reason is that the old Yogins when they went above the spiritual mind passed into samadhi, which means that they did not attempt to be conscious in these higher planes - their aim being to pass away into the
  Superconscient and not to bring the Superconscient into the waking consciousness, which is that of my Yoga.
  --
  
  From where did you get this singular attitude towards the old Yogas and Yogis? Is the wisdom of the Vedanta and Tantra a small and trifling thing? Have then the sadhaks of this Asram attained to self-realisation and are they liberated Jivan-muktas, free from ego and ignorance? If not, why then do you say, "it is not a very difficult stage", "their goal is not high", "is it such a long process?"
  I have said that this Yoga was "new" because it aims at the integrality of the Divine in this world and not only beyond it and at a supramental realisation. But how does that justify a superior contempt for the spiritual realisation which is as much the aim of this Yoga as of any other?

1.008_-_The_Principle_of_Self-Affirmation, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  These are things which cannot be learned theoretically by the study of books, because very few people have lost everything; we always have something with us. But to experience that moment of reckoning, we must lose everything, even our last strip of cloth; no one should want to even look at our face, as if we are the worst perhaps in the whole of creation. Such should be the condition to come upon us nothing to eat, no food of any kind, no place to lie down, no raiment on the body, everything is horrible at that moment the true nature of a person comes out. Otherwise, whatever self-analysis we will do, it will be an analysis of the false personality. Psychological analysis or Yogic investigation conducted by a false mind will produce only false results and, therefore, a very superior type of CID (Central Intelligence Division) agent, who is not involved in the case on hand, is necessary to investigate into the mind someone quite different from and outside the purview of the operation of the involved mind. Such a mind is called the higher mind, which is in us. It is this higher mind that has to do what is called the stock-taking of one's own condition.
  

1.00c_-_INTRODUCTION, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  one great question, upon which the whole theory of religion
  rests, for the Yogis. It seems the consensus of opinion of the
  great minds of the world, and it has been nearly demonstrated

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  The effect of this experience was stronger than that of the vision of Mohammed. In dismay he cried out, "O Mother! What are You doing to me?" And, breaking through the barriers of creed and religion, he entered a new realm of ecstasy. Christ possessed his soul. For three days he did not set foot in the Kli temple. On the fourth day, in the afternoon, as he was walking in the Panchavati, he saw coming toward him a person with beautiful large eyes, serene countenance, and fair skin. As the two faced each other, a voice rang out in the depths of Sri Ramakrishna's soul: "Behold the Christ who shed His heart's blood for the redemption of the world, who suffered a sea of anguish for love of men. It is He, the Master Yogi, who is in eternal union with God. It is Jesus, Love Incarnate." The Son of Man embraced the Son of the Divine Mother and merged in him.
  
  --
  
  In the year 1879 occasional writings about Sri Ramakrishna by the Brahmos, in the Brhmo magazines, began to attract his future disciples from the educated middle-class Benglis, and they continued to come till 1884. But others, too, came, feeling the subtle power of his attraction. They were an ever shifting crowd of people of all castes and creeds: Hindus and Brahmos, Vaishnavas and kts, the educated with university degrees and the illiterate, old and young, maharajas and beggars, journalists and artists, pundits and devotees, philosophers and the worldly-minded, jnnis and Yogis, men of action and men of faith, virtuous women and prostitutes, office-holders and vagabonds, philanthropists and self-seekers, dramatists and drunkards, builders-up and pullers-down. He gave to them all, without stint, from his illimitable store of realization. No one went away empty-handed. He taught them the lofty knowledge of the Vednta and the soul-melting love of the Purn. Twenty hours out of twenty-four he would speak without rest or respite. He gave to all his sympathy and enlightenment, and he touched them with that strange power of the soul which could not but melt even the most hardened. And people understood him according to their powers of comprehension.
  
  --
  
  To those who became his intimate disciples the Master was a friend, companion, and playmate. Even the chores of religious discipline would be lightened in his presence. The devotees would be so inebriated with pure joy in his company that they would have no time to ask themselves whether he was an Incarnation, a perfect soul, or a Yogi. His very presence was a great teaching; words were superfluous. In later years his disciples remarked that while they were with him they would regard him as a comrade, but afterwards would tremble to think of their frivolities in the presence of such a great person. They had convincing proof that the Master could, by his mere wish, kindle in their hearts the love of God and give them His vision.
  
  --
  
  Pundit aadhar one day suggested to the Master that the latter could remove the illness by concentrating his mind on the throat, the scriptures having declared that Yogis had power to cure themselves in that way. The Master rebuked the pundit. "For a scholar like you to make such a proposal!" he said. "How can I withdraw the mind from the Lotus Feet of God and turn it to this worthless cage of flesh and blood?" "For our sake at least", begged Narendra and the other disciples. "But", replied Sri Ramakrishna, "do you think I enjoy this suffering? I wish to recover, but that depends on the Mother."
  

1.00_-_INTRODUCTION, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  There is Sri Aurobindo the philosopher, and Sri Aurobindo the poet, which he was essentially, a visionary of evolution; but not everyone is a philosopher or a poet, much less a seer. But would we not be content if he gave us a way to believe in our own possibilities,
  not only our human but our superhuman and divine possibilities, and not only to believe in them but to discover them ourselves, step by step, to see for ourselves and to become vast, as vast as the earth we love and all the lands and all the seas we hold within us? For there is Sri Aurobindo the explorer, who was also a Yogi; did he not say that Yoga is the art of conscious self-finding? 3 It is this exploration of consciousness that we would like to undertake with him. If we proceed calmly, patiently, and with sincerity, bravely facing the difficulties of the road and God knows it is rugged enough there is no reason that the window should not open at some point and let the sun shine on us forever. Actually, it is not one but several windows that open one after another, each time on a wider perspective, a new dimension of our own kingdom; and each time it means a change of consciousness as radical as going from sleep to the waking state. We are going to outline the main stages of these changes of consciousness,
  as Sri Aurobindo experienced them and described them to his disciples in his integral yoga, until they take us to the threshold of a new, still unknown experience that may have the power to change life itself.

1.01_-_Asana, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  The extreme of Asana is practised by those Yogis who remain in one position without moving, except in the case of absolute necessity, during their whole lives. One should not criticise such persons without a thorough knowledge of the subject. Such knowledge has not yet been published.
  

1.01_-_Hatha_Yoga, #Amrita Gita, #Swami Sivananda Saraswati, #Hinduism
  
  7. Learn the Asanas, Pranayama, Bandhas, Mudras and the Shad Kriyas under an expert Hatha Yogi.
  

1.01_-_Prayer, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  In commenting on the Sutra of Patanjali, Ishvara pranidhndv, i.e. "Or by the worship of the Supreme Lord" Bhoja says, "Pranidhna is that sort of Bhakti in which, without seeking results, such as sense-enjoyments etc., all works are dedicated to that Teacher of teachers." Bhagavan Vysa also, when commenting on the same, defines Pranidhana as "the form of Bhakti by which the mercy of the Supreme Lord comes to the Yogi, and blesses him by granting him his desires". According to Shndilya, "Bhakti is intense love to God." The best definition is, however, that given by the king of Bhaktas, Prahlda:
  

1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  signified. Thirdly, Aptavakyam, the direct perception of the
  Yogi, of those who have seen the truth. We are all of us
  
  --
  hard, and come to knowledge through a long tedious process
  of reasoning, but the Yogi, the pure one, has gone beyond all
  this. Before his mind, the past, the present, and the future, are
  --
  Self. The next aphorism defines Samadhi, perfect
  concentration, which is the goal of the Yogi.
  
  --
  Beyond them there is not an eternally free and blessed Creator
  of the universe. On the other hand the Yogis say, Not so,
  there is a God; there is one Soul separate from all other souls,
  and He is the eternal Master of all creation, the Ever Free, the
  Teacher of all teachers. The Yogis admit that those the
  Sankhyas called merged in nature also exist. They are Yogis
  who have fallen short of perfection, and though, for a time
  --
  is based upon that of the Sankhyas, only that in the latter there
  is no place for God, while with the Yogis God has a place. The
  Yogis, however, avoid many ideas about God, such as
  creating. God as the Creator of the Universe is not meant by
  the Isvara of the Yogis, although, according to the Vedas,
  Isvara is the Creator of the universe. Seeing that the universe
  is harmonious, it must be the manifestation of one will. The
  Yogis and Sankhyas both avoid the question of creation. The
  Yogis want to establish a God, but carefully avoid this
  question; they do not raise it at all. Yet you will find that they
  --
  the very nature of your constitution shows us that there is
  unlimited knowledge, and the Yogis call that unlimited
  knowledge God.
  --
  to know is inside us, it must be called out, and that calling out
  of knowledge can only be got, a Yogi maintains, through
  another knowledge. Dead, insentient matter, never calls out
  --
  limited by time. These are the two peculiar distinctions of the
  Yogis. The first is that in thinking of the limited, the mind
  must think of the unlimited, and that if one part of the
  --
  and more, and all the mental and physical obstacles will begin
  to vanish. What are the obstacles to the Yogil
  
  --
  shore of the ocean of life. It must be taken care of. Unhealthy
  persons cannot be Yogis. Mental laziness makes us lose all
  lively interest in the subject, without which there will neither
  --
  does not give many particular directions about Pranayama,
  but later on other Yogis found out various things about this
  Pranayama, and made of it a great science. With Patanjali ist
  --
  this is evolved a particular science called Pranayama. We
  will hear a little of what thoese later Yogis have to say. Some
  of this I have told you before, but a little repetition will serve
  --
  begin to recognise them, and then we slowly get control over
  them. Now these later Yogis consider that there are three main
  currents of this Prana in the human body. One they call Ida ,
  --
  SuSumna is present in all, as a possibility; but it works only in
  the Yogi. You must remember that the Yogi changes his body;
  as you go on practising your body changes; it is not the same
  --
  
  This naturally comes with Dharana, concentration; the Yogis
  say, if the mind becomes concentrated on the tip of the nose
  --
  paramanu paramamahattvantosya vashikarcih
  The Yogi's mind thus meditating, becomes
  un-obstructed from the atomic to the Infinite.
  --
  
  The Yogi whose Vrttis have thus become powerless
  
  --
  high ones, we get as a result that we can meditate as easily on
  the fine as on the grosser objects. Here the Yogi sees the three
  things, the receiver, the received, and the receiving,
  --
  the Chitta , and third the PuraSa qualified, not the PuraSa
  itself, but the egoism. By practice, the Yogi gets established in
  all these meditations. Whenever he meditates he can keep out
  --
  These do not destroy the seeds of past actions, thus cannot
  give liberation, but what they bring to the Yogi is stated in the
  following aphorisms.
  --
  from testimony of people who are competent. By people
  who are competent, the Yogis always mean the Rishis, or the
  Seers of the thoughts recorded in the Scriptures the Vedas.
  --
  intellectual dissent are not religion. The central idea of the
  Yogis is that just as we come in direct contact with the objects
  of the senses, so religion can be directly perceived in a far
  --
  of perception. It can never go beyond: the whole scope of
  realisation, therefore, is beyond sense perception. The Yogis
  say that man can go beyond his direct sense perception, and

1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  stanzas of the praise, the eight Taras each protecting
  against one of the eight great fears, Tara Yogini, and
  so on. These various forms are not, however, other

1.01_-_The_First_Steps, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  Rja-Yoga is divided into eight steps. The first is Yama non-killing, truthfulness, non-stealing, continence, and non-receiving of any gifts. Next is Niyama cleanliness, contentment, austerity, study, and self-surrender to God. Then comes sana, or posture; Prnyma, or control of Prna; Pratyhra, or restraint of the senses from their objects; Dhran, or fixing the mind on a spot; Dhyna, or meditation; and Samdhi, or superconsciousness. The Yama and Niyama, as we see, are moral trainings; without these as the basis no practice of Yoga will succeed. As these two become established, the Yogi will begin to realise the fruits of his practice; without these it will never bear fruit. A Yogi must not think of injuring anyone, by thought, word, or deed. Mercy shall not be for men alone, but shall go beyond, and embrace the whole world.
  
  --
  
  The result of this branch of Yoga is to make men live long; health is the chief idea, the one goal of the Hatha-Yogi. He is determined not to fall sick, and he never does. He lives long; a hundred years is nothing to him; he is quite young and fresh when he is 150, without one hair turned grey. But that is all. A banyan tree lives sometimes 5000 years, but it is a banyan tree and nothing more. So, if a man lives long, he is only a healthy animal. One or two ordinary lessons of the Hatha-Yogis are very useful. For instance, some of you will find it a good thing for headaches to drink cold water through the nose as soon as you get up in the morning; the whole day your brain will be nice and cool, and you will never catch cold. It is very easy to do; put your nose into the water, draw it up through the nostrils and make a pump action in the throat.
  
  --
  
  Those of you who can afford it will do better to have a room for this practice alone. Do not sleep in that room, it must be kept holy. You must not enter the room until you have bathed, and are perfectly clean in body and mind. Place flowers in that room always; they are the best surroundings for a Yogi; also pictures that are pleasing. Burn incense morning and evening. Have no quarrelling, nor anger, nor unholy thought in that room. Only allow those persons to enter it who are of the same thought as you. Then gradually there will be an atmosphere of holiness in the room, so that when you are miserable, sorrowful, doubtful, or your mind is disturbed, the very fact of entering that room will make you calm. This was the idea of the temple and the church, and in some temples and churches you will find it even now, but in the majority of them the very idea has been lost. The idea is that by keeping holy vibrations there the place becomes and remains illumined. Those who cannot afford to have a room set apart can practice anywhere they like. Sit in a straight posture, and the first thing to do is to send a current of holy thought to all creation. Mentally repeat, "Let all beings be happy; let all beings be peaceful; let all beings be blissful." So do to the east, south, north and west. The more you do that the better you will feel yourself. You will find at last that the easiest way to make ourselves healthy is to see that others are healthy, and the easiest way to make ourselves happy is to see that others are happy. After doing that, those who believe in God should pray not for money, not for health, nor for heaven; pray for knowledge and light; every other prayer is selfish. Then the next thing to do is to think of your own body, and see that it is strong and healthy; it is the best instrument you have. Think of it as being as strong as adamant, and that with the help of this body you will cross the ocean of life. Freedom is never to be reached by the weak. Throw away all weakness. Tell your body that it is strong, tell your mind that it is strong, and have unbounded faith and hope in yourself.
  

1.01_-_The_Four_Aids, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  6:But usually the representative influence occupies a much larger place in the life of the Sadhaka. If the Yoga is guided by a received written Shastra, -- some Word from the past which embodies the experience of former Yogins, -- it may be practised either by personal effort alone or with the aid of a Guru. The spiritual knowledge is then gained through meditation on the truths that are taught and it is made living and conscious by their realisation in the personal experience; the Yoga proceeds by the results of prescribed methods taught in a Scripture or a tradition and reinforced and illumined by the instructions of the Master. This is a narrower practice, but safe and effective within its limits, because it follows a well-beaten track to a long familiar goal.
  
  --
  
  8:Another kind of Shastra is not Scripture, but a statement of the science and methods, the effective principles and way of working of the path of Yoga which the Sadhaka elects to follow. Each path has its Shastra, either written or traditional, passing from mouth to mouth through a long line of Teachers. In India a great authority, a high reverence even is ordinarily attached to the written or traditional teaching. All the lines of the Yoga are supposed to be fixed and the Teacher who has received the Shastra by tradition and realised it in practice guides the disciple along the immemorial tracks. One often even hears the objection urged against a new practice, a new Yogic teaching, the adoption of a new formula, "It is not according to the Shastra." But neither in fact nor in the actual practice of the Yogins is there really any such entire rigidity of an iron door shut against new truth, fresh revelation, widened experience. The written or traditional teaching expresses the knowledge and experiences of many centuries systematised, organised, made attainable to the beginner. Its importance and utility are therefore immense. But a great freedom of variation and development is always practicable. Even so highly scientific a system as Rajayoga can be practised on other lines than the organised method of Patanjali. Each of the three paths, trimarga 51, breaks into many bypaths which meet again at the goal. The general knowledge on which the Yoga depends is fixed, but the order, the succession, the devices, the forms must be allowed to vary, for the needs and particular impulsions of the individual nature have to be satisfied even while the general truths remain firm and constant.
  
  --
  
  21:This inner Guide is often veiled at first by the very intensity of our personal effort and by the ego's preoccupation with itself and its aims. As we gain in clarity and the turmoil of egoistic effort gives place to a calmer self-knowledge, we recognise the source of the growing light within us. We recognise it retrospectively as we realise how all our obscure and conflicting movements have been determined towards an end that we only now begin to perceive, how even before our entrance into the path of the Yoga the evolution of our life has been designedly led towards its turning point. For now we begin to understand the sense of our struggles and efforts, successes and failures. At last we are able to seize the meaning of our ordeals and sufferings and can appreciate the help that was given us by all that hurt and resisted and the utility of our very falls and stumblings. We recognise this divine leading afterwards, not retrospectively but immediately, in the moulding of our thoughts by a transcendent Seer, of our will and actions by an all-embracing Power, of our emotional life by an all-attracting and all-assimilating Bliss and Love. We recognise it too in a more personal relation that from the first touched us or at the last seizes us; we feel the eternal presence of a supreme Master, Friend, Lover, Teacher. We recognise it in the essence of our being as that develops into likeness and oneness with a greater and wider existence; for we perceive that this miraculous development is not the result of our own efforts; an eternal Perfection is moulding us into its own image. One who is the Lord or Ishwara of the Yogic philosophies, the Guide in the conscious being (caitya guru or antaryamin), the Absolute of the thinker, the Unknowable of the Agnostic, the universal Force of the materialist, the supreme Soul and the supreme shakti, the One who is differently named and imaged by the religions, is the Master of our Yoga.
  

1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  object:1.01 - The Ideal of the KarmaYogin
  class:chapter
  --
  
  The Ideal of the KarmaYogin
  
  --
  
  This is the faith in which the KarmaYogin puts its hand to the work and will persist in it, refusing to be discouraged by difficulties however immense and apparently insuperable. We believe that God is with us and in that faith we shall conquer. We believe that humanity needs us and it is the love and service of humanity, of our country, of the race, of our
  
  --
  
  Essays from the KarmaYogin
   religion that will purify our heart and inspire our action in the struggle.
  --
  
  The Ideal of the KarmaYogin
  
  --
  
  Essays from the KarmaYogin
   free in heart can we become socially and politically great and free.
  --
  
  The Ideal of the KarmaYogin
  
  --
  
  We must know our past and recover it for the purposes of our future. Our business is to realise ourselves first and to mould everything to the law of India's eternal life and nature. It will therefore be the object of the KarmaYogin to read the heart of our religion, our society, our philosophy, politics, literature, art, jurisprudence, science, thought, everything that was and is ours, so that we may be able to say to ourselves and our nation, 'This is our dharma.' We shall review European civilisation entirely from the standpoint of Indian thought and knowledge and seek to throw off from us the dominating stamp of the Occident; what we have to take from the West we shall take as Indians.
  
  --
  
  Essays from the KarmaYogin
  

1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The other point is that this practice will not bring results in only a few days. Sa tu drghakla nairantarya satkra sevita dhabhmi (I.14), says Patanjali. In many cases the result will not follow at all, due to obstructing prarabdhas. There were great seekers, sadhakas, who used to perform japa purascharana, the chanting of a mantra, for years and years together, with the hope of having the vision of the deity. But they had no vision of the deity. We hear of the story of the purascharanas performed by Sage Vidyaranya of yore, Yogi Sri Madhusudana Saraswati and others, but they had no vision. The reason mentioned is that they had obstructing prarabdhas.
  

1.02_-_Karmayoga, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Essays from the KarmaYogin
   mountain-peaks above the common level, they have attracted all eyes and fixed this withdrawal as the highest and most commanding Hindu ideal. It is for this reason that Sri Krishna laid so much stress on the perfect Yogin's cleaving to life and human activity even after his need of them was over, lest the people, following, as they always do, the example of their best, turn away from their dharma and bastard confusion reign. The ideal
  Yogin is no withdrawn and pent-up force, but ever engaged in doing good to all creatures, either by the flood of the divine energy that he pours on the world or by himself standing in the front of humanity, its leader in the march and the battle, but unbound by his works and superior to his personality.
  
  --
  
  Yoga is communion with God for knowledge, for love or for work. The Yogin puts himself into direct relation with that which is omniscient and omnipotent within man and without him. He is in tune with the infinite, he becomes a channel for the strength of God to pour itself out upon the world whether through calm benevolence or active beneficence. When a man rises by putting from him the slough of self and lives for others and in the joys and sorrows of others; - when he works perfectly and with love and zeal, but casts away the anxiety for results and is neither eager for victory nor afraid of defeat; - when he devotes all his works to God and lays every thought, word and deed as an offering on the divine altar; - when he gets rid of fear and hatred, repulsion and disgust and attachment, and works like the forces of Nature, unhasting, unresting, inevitably, perfectly; - when he rises above the thought that he is the body or the heart or the mind or the sum of these and finds his own and true self; - when he becomes aware of his immortality and the unreality of death; - when he experiences the advent of knowledge and feels himself passive and the divine force working unresisted through his mind, his speech, his senses and all his organs; - when having thus abandoned whatever he is, does or has to the Lord of all, the Lover and Helper of mankind, he dwells permanently in
  Him and becomes incapable of grief, disquiet or false excitement,
  --
  
  Essays from the KarmaYogin
   man who has not strength or faith or love developed or latent in his nature, and any one of these is a sufficient staff for the Yogin.
  

1.02_-_Karma_Yoga, #Amrita Gita, #Swami Sivananda Saraswati, #Hinduism
  
  19. Cultivate amiable, loving, social nature, generosity, catholic nature. Kill selfishness. Control the senses, practise self-restraint, tolerance, sympathy and mercy. These are the qualifications of a Karma Yogi.
  

1.02_-_Prana, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  This opens to us the door to almost unlimited power. Suppose, for instance, a man understood the Prana perfectly, and could control it, what power on earth would not be his? He would be able to move the sun and stars out of their places, to control everything in the universe, from the atoms to the biggest suns, because he would control the Prana. This is the end and aim of Pranayama. When the Yogi becomes perfect, there will be nothing in nature not under his control. If he orders the gods or the souls of the departed to come, they will come at his bidding. All the forces of nature will obey him as slaves. When the ignorant see these powers of the Yogi, they call them the miracles. One peculiarity of the Hindu mind is that it always inquires for the last possible generalisation, leaving the details to be worked out afterwards. The question is raised in the Vedas, "What is that, knowing which, we shall know everything?" Thus, all books, and all philosophies that have been written, have been only to prove that by knowing which everything is known. If a man wants to know this universe bit by bit he must know every individual grain of sand, which means infinite time; he cannot know all of them. Then how can knowledge be? How is it possible for a man to be all-knowing through particulars? The Yogis say that behind this particular manifestation there is a generalisation. Behind all particular ideas stands a generalised, an abstract principle; grasp it, and you have grasped everything. Just as this whole universe has been generalised in the Vedas into that One Absolute Existence, and he who has grasped that Existence has grasped the whole universe, so all forces have been generalised into this Prana, and he who has grasped the Prana has grasped all the forces of the universe, mental or physical. He who has controlled the Prana has controlled his own mind, and all the minds that exist. He who has controlled the Prana has controlled his body, and all the bodies that exist, because the Prana is the generalised manifestation of force.
  
  How to control the Prana is the one idea of Pranayama. All the trainings and exercises in this regard are for that one end. Each man must begin where he stands, must learn how to control the things that are nearest to him. This body is very near to us, nearer than anything in the external universe, and this mind is the nearest of all. The Prana which is working this mind and body is the nearest to us of all the Prana in this universe. This little wave of the Prana which represents our own energies, mental and physical, is the nearest to us of all the waves of the infinite ocean of Prana. If we can succeed in controlling that little wave, then alone we can hope to control the whole of Prana. The Yogi who has done this gains perfection; no longer is he under any power. He becomes almost almighty, almost all-knowing. We see sects in every country who have attempted this control of Prana. In this country there are Mind-healers, Faith-healers, Spiritualists, Christian Scientists, Hypnotists, etc., and if we examine these different bodies, we shall find at the back of each this control of the Prana, whether they know it or not. If you boil all their theories down, the residuum will be that. It is the one and the same force they are manipulating, only unknowingly. They have stumbled on the discovery of a force and are using it unconsciously without knowing its nature, but it is the same as the Yogi uses, and which comes from Prana.
  
  --
  
  Again, we know that motion which has become latent can be brought back to manifestation. By hard work and practice certain motions of the body which are most dormant can be brought back under perfect control. Reasoning thus we find there is no impossibility, but, on the other hand. every probability that each part of the body can be brought under perfect control. This the Yogi does through Pranayama. Perhaps some of you have read that in Pranayama, when drawing in the breath, you must fill your whole body with Prana. In the English translations Prana is given as breath, and you are inclined to ask how that is to be done. The fault is with the translator. Every part of the body can be filled with Prana, this vital force, and when you are able to do that, you can control the whole body. All the sickness and misery felt in the body will be perfectly controlled; not only so, you will be able to control another's body. Everything is infectious in this world, good or bad. If your body be in a certain state of tension, it will have a tendency to produce the same tension in others. If you are strong and healthy, those that live near you will also have the tendency to become strong and healthy, but if you are sick and weak, those around you will have the tendency to become the same. In the case of one man trying to heal another, the first idea is simply transferring his own health to the other. This is the primitive sort of healing. Consciously or unconsciously, health can be transmitted. A very strong man, living with a weak man, will make him a little stronger, whether he knows it or not. When consciously done, it becomes quicker and better in its action. Next come those cases in which a man may not be very healthy himself, yet we know that he can bring health to another. The first man, in such a case, has a little more control over the Prana, and can rouse, for the time being, his Prana, as it were, to a certain state of vibration, and transmit it to another person.
  
  --
  
  In an ocean there are huge waves, like mountains, then smaller waves, and still smaller, down to little bubbles, but back of all these is the infinite ocean. The bubble is connected with the infinite ocean at one end, and the huge wave at the other end. So, one may be a gigantic man, and another a little bubble, but each is connected with that infinite ocean of energy, which is the common birthright of every animal that exists. Wherever there is life, the storehouse of infinite energy is behind it. Starting as some fungus, some very minute, microscopic bubble, and all the time drawing from that infinite store-house of energy, a form is changed slowly and steadily until in course of time it becomes a plant, then an animal, then man, ultimately God. This is attained through millions of aeons, but what is time? An increase of speed, an increase of struggle, is able to bridge the gulf of time. That which naturally takes a long time to accomplish can be shortened by the intensity of the action, says the Yogi. A man may go on slowly drawing in this energy from the infinite mass that exists in the universe, and, perhaps, he will require a hundred thousand years to become a Deva, and then, perhaps, five hundred thousand years to become still higher, and, perhaps, five millions of years to become perfect. Given rapid growth, the time will be lessened. Why is it not possible, with sufficient effort, to reach this very perfection in six months or six years? There is no limit. Reason shows that. If an engine, with a certain amount of coal, runs two miles an hour, it will run the distance in less time with a greater supply of coal. Similarly, why shall not the soul, by intensifying its action, attain perfection in this very life? All beings will at last attain to that goal, we know. But who cares to wait all these millions of aeons? Why not reach it immediately, in this body even, in this human form? Why shall I not get that infinite knowledge, infinite power, now?
  
  The ideal of the Yogi, the whole science of Yoga, is directed to the end of teaching men how, by intensifying the power of assimilation, to shorten the time for reaching perfection, instead of slowly advancing from point to point and waiting until the whole human race has become perfect. All the great prophets, saints, and seers of the world what did they do? In one span of life they lived the whole life of humanity, traversed the whole length of time that it takes ordinary humanity to come to perfection. In one life they perfect themselves; they have no thought for anything else, never live a moment for any other idea, and thus the way is shortened for them. This is what is meant by concentration, intensifying the power of assimilation, thus shortening the time. Raja-Yoga is the science which teaches us how to gain the power of concentration.
  

1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  The ultimate idea of meditation being to still the mind, it may be considered a useful preliminary to still consciousness of all the functions of the body. This has been dealt with in the chapter on Asana. One may, however, mention that some Yogis carry it to the point of trying to stop the beating of the heart. Whether this be desirable or no it would be useless to the beginner, so he will endeavour to make the breathing very slow and very regular. The rules for this practice are given in Liber CCVI.
  

1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  studies at all. The Yogi is supposed to have finished his period
  of controversy. He has had enough of all that, and has become
  --
  intellectual gymnastics are necessary at first. We must not go
  blindly into anything. The Yogi has passed the argumentative
  stage, and has come to a conclusion, which is like the rocks,
  --
  instrument, and can give only knowledge limited by the
  senses; the Yogi wants to go beyond the senses; therefore the
  intellect is of no use to him. He is certain of this, and therefore
  --
  be the state of a demon or of a god which will come out by and
  by. In the Yogi these impressions, the Samskaras left by past
  actions, are attenuated; that is, in a very fine state, and he can
  --
  we now regard as automatic are degenerated reason. In the
  language of the Yogi , instinct is involved reason.
  Discrimination becomes involved, and gets to be automatic
  --
  Modern scientific menhold that it belongs to the body, but the
  Yogis hold that it is the experience of the soul, transmitted
  through the body. This is called the theory of reincarnation.
  --
  up. They are called pain-bearing obstructions, both happy and
  unhappy thoughts, because according to the Yogis , both, in the
  long run, bring pain. All happiness which comes from the
  --
  to a point where desire cannot be fulfilled, the result is pain.
  Therefore the Yogis regard the sum-total of the impressions,
  good or evil, as pain-bearing obstructions; they obstruct the
  --
  
  goodness, bring their fruits in this life. The Yogis even hold
  that men who are able to acquire a tremendous power of good
  --
  change their bodies into god-bodies. There are several cases
  mentioned by the Yogis in their books. These men change the
  very material of their bodies; they re-arrange the molecules in
  --
  our own. But all assimilate energy in some form or other. The
  Yogis say that they are able to assimilate energy by the power
  of the mind alone, that they can draw in as much as they desire
  --
  called the nerves, and we cannot work except through the
  channels of those nerves. The Yogi says we need not be bound
  by that. Similary, we can send electricity to any part of the
  --
  only send our electricity through these nerve channels. Why
  not send the mental electricity without this aid? The Yogi
  says it is perfectly possible and practicable, and that when you
  --
  becomes painful. It is all the result of their own past.
  According to the philosophy of the Yogis all virtuous actions
  bring pleasure, and all vicious actions bring pain. Any man
  --
  
  The Yogis say that the man who has discriminating powers,
  the man of good sense, sees through all these various things,
  --
  experiences of fickleness, we think our love is the only lasting
  love. How can that be? Even love is selfish, and the Yogi says
  that, in the end, we shall find that even the love of husbands
  --
  bound by laws, Nature never had a bond for you. That is what
  the Yogi tells you; have patience to learn it. And the Yogi
  shows how, by junction with this nature, and identifying itself
  --
  with the mind and the world, the PuruSa thinks itself
  miserable. Then the Yogi goes on to show that the way out is
  through experience. You have to get all this experience, but
  --
  every living being is emanating a certain light, and this, he
  says, can be seen by the Yogi. We do not all see it, but we are
  all throwing out these Tanmatras, just as a flower is
  --
  delusion, the other is also a delusion, because both stand upon
  the same basis consciousness. The Yogi says both are true;
  that we are bound so far as intelligence goes, that we are free
  --
  mistaken. That is why there is this mingled sense of freedom
  and bondage at the same time. The Yogi analyses both what is
  free and what is bound, and his ignorance vanishes. He finds
  --
  the moons light is reflected. All the manifestations of nature
  are caused by this nature itself, according to the Yogis', but
  nature has no purpose in view, except to free the PuruSa.
  --
  makes us feel heat and cold, pain and pleasure. It is our
  business to rise above this superstition, and the Yogi shows us
  how we can do this. It has been demonstrated that, under
  --
  books, or temples, or forms, are but secondary details. The
  Yogi tries to reach this goal through psychic control. Until we
  can free ourselves from nature we are slaves; as she dictates
  so we must go. The Yogi claims that he who controls mind
  controls matter also. The internal nature is much higher that
  --
  effulgent before our knowledge. This will be the last state,
  and the Yogi will become peaceful and calm, never to feel any
  more pain, never to be again deluded, never to touch misery.
  --
  
  A man who wants to be a perfect Yogi must give up the sex
  idea. The Soul has no sex; why should it degrade itself with
  --
  External purification is keeping the body pure; a dirty man
  will never become a Yogi. There must be internal purification
  also. That is obtained by the first-named virtues. Of course
  --
  peaceful. The tiger and the lamb will play together before that
  Yogi and will not hurt each other. When you have come to
  that state, then alone you will understand that you have
  --
  satyap ratishthayam kriyafa lashrayatvam
  By the establishment of truthfulness the Yogi gets the
  power of attaining for himself and others the fruits of
  --
  
  comes to the Yogi.
  
  --
  over mankind. Leaders of men have been very continent, and
  this is what gave them power. Therefore the Yogi must be
  continent.
  --
  
  When the Yogi does not receive presents from others he does
  not become beholden to others, but becomes independent and
  --
  
  Then alone the Yogi becomes perfectly fixed in his ideal,
  because he sees that he has been coming and going so many
  --
  keeping it nice will vanish. What others call the most
  beautiful face to the Yogi will appear to be an animals face, if
  there is not intelligence behind it. What the world will call a
  --
  Tamas. The strong, the well-knit, the young, the healthy, the
  daring alone are fit to be Yogis. To the Yogi everything is bliss,
  every human face that he sees brings cheerfulness to him.
  --
  
  When the Yogi has succeeded in preventing the organs from
  taking the forms of external objects, and in making them
  --
  These organs are divided into organs of work and organs of
  sensation. When the organs are controlled the Yogi can
  control all feeling and doing; the whole of the body will be

1.02_-_Taras_Tantra, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  Maitrepa from Vikramashila University. Maitrepa's .
  behavior was slightly out of the norm but his Yogic
  - 57 -
  --
  
  The Yogini' s Message
  Tara appea red again to Atisha in a dream and
  requested that he visit a certain temple where he
  would meet a Yogini who had something impor tant to
  tell him. The next morning, he went to the temple and
  met the Yogini. Havin g offered her some flowers, he
  told her. "I was invite d to go to Tibet. Will my
  --
  "Your journey to Tibet will be very fruitful,"
  answe red the Yogini. "Besides, you will meet a lay
  perso n (Drom Tonpa) there who will be a tremendous
  --
  through the celestial worlds and the great realized
  Yogis of India, such was the path followed by the
  revelation of the Tara Tantra.

1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  The proletariat among us is sunk in ignorance and overwhelmed with distress!11 exclaimed Sri Aurobindo soon after disembarking in India.
  It was not metaphysical questions that preoccupied him, but questions of action. To act: we are in the world to act. But what action? And above all, what method of action would be the most effective? This very practical concern would remain with Sri Aurobindo from his very first days in India right up to his highest Yogic realizations. I
  personally recall (if you will excuse the digression) traveling to the Himalayas and enjoying a few wonderful days there in the company of a holy man, lost among the pines and the red laurels, with snow sparkling all around us between sky and valley. It was very beautiful,
  --
  indifference to progress, and resignation often wore the face of wisdom; a spiritual ransom also (this one far more serious), because in that immensity too great for our present little consciousness, the destiny of the earth, our earth, became lost somewhere in the deep confines of the galaxy, or nowhere, reabsorbed in Brahman, whence perhaps it had never emerged after all, except in our dreams
  illusionism, trance, the closed eyes of the Yogi were also often mistaken for God. It is therefore essential to define clearly the goal that religious India has in view, then we will better understand what she can or cannot do for we who seek an integral truth.
  To begin with, we must admit that we are faced with a surprising contradiction. India is a country that brought forth a great revelation:
  --
  Depending on the level we choose, we undertake one kind of yoga or another: hatha yoga, raja yoga, mantra yoga, and many others,
  countless others, like so many stages of our effort. We won't discuss here the great value of these methods, or the remarkable intermediate results they can lead to; we will examine only their goal, their final destination. The truth is, this "poise above" seems to have no relation with real life whatsoever; first, because all these disciplines are extremely demanding, requiring hours and hours of work every day, if not complete solitude; secondly, because their ultimate result is a state of trance or Yogic ecstasy, samadhi, perfect equilibrium, ineffable bliss, in which one's awareness of the world is dissolved, annihilated.
  Brahman, the Spirit, appears therefore to have absolutely nothing to do with our regular waking consciousness; He is outside all that we know; He is not of this world. Others who were not Indians have said the same.

1.036_-_The_Rise_of_Obstacles_in_Yoga_Practice, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  For a long time it may look as if nothing is happening in spiritual practice. This has been the experience of all Yogis, saints and sages. For years and years together we will have no experience whatsoever. It will look like everything is dead, there is no life in anything, that we are striking a brick wall or a hard stone with no effect whatsoever, that our japas produce no effect, our meditations mean nothing, our worships are perhaps not heard by God, and there is only suffering. This condition may persist for several years, and the number of years or the extent of their duration depends upon the nature of the case, just as the purifying medical effect of a medicine depends upon the nature of the disease, the intensity of the disease, and the particular case on hand, to give an instance. But, suddenly, there will be a miracle. This is always the case in spiritual experience it always comes like a miracle. It doesn't come very, very slowly with halting steps, giving previous notice. It will give no notice. When there is illumination, we will not know that it is coming; and when we are going to be opposed, we will not know that it is going to happen. Both things will happen without our having previous knowledge of what is happening.
  
  --
  
  Adepts in yoga tell us that there is a gradual exhaustion of karma and a slow diminution of the intensity of obstacles; but others are of the opinion that there can be a sudden end to all this. It is something like the theories of creation whether God created the world item by item, step by step, gradually, stage by stage, or by a fiat, at one stroke. Is it krama srishti, or yugapat srishti? 'Yugapat' means God willed, 'Let there be light,' and there was light; 'Let there be trees,' and there were trees; 'Let there be man,' and there was man. Is it like that? Or, was there an evolutionary process, gradually manifesting form after form? There are two theories of creation, and they are not contradictory both are correct. Likewise, both these views held by Yogic adepts are correct. It is possible that obstacles may cease gradually, step by step, by the diminution of their intensity, or there can be a sudden burning up of everything and an instantaneous illumination. Individual logic or human understanding cannot probe into these mysteries. We have only to accept what comes, and to do our duty in the form of the practice prescribed. But, one thing is certain that whatever be the way in which the obstacles cease, they must cease, one day or the other.
  

1.037_-_Preventing_the_Fall_in_Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The impediments in the practice of yoga are more serious, unpleasant, painful and harassing than the obstacles that ordinary people may face in the world. The little difficulties that the common man has in his day-to-day life are not as painful, annoying or agonising as what the Yogi has to confront on his path. For this also, there is a reason why it is that a student of yoga should suffer much more than ordinary people in the world. The common man does not allow the whole of his personality to function at any time; only a partial personality functions. Not even the busiest person in the world can be said to be engaged in the totality of his being. Only some percentage of his being is active and, therefore, the reactions set up by the activity of a percentage of one's being are less potent than the reactions set up by the activities of the whole of one's being.
  
  The reason is simple. In the practice of yoga the whole being is active and, therefore, it starts waking up every blessed thing in this world whatever may be sleeping anywhere. Even invisible forces, even distant elements may feel that some strange activity is going on in some part of the universe. We must have heard in the Epics and Puranas that even the gods are distressed by the tapas of Yogis. It means that the meditative activity of a sincere seeker can tell upon even very far and distant regions like the heavens, and not merely the corners of the earth. But our ordinary little work that is going on in a shop, a factory or an office may not be felt at all in such regions. The reason is that these ordinary activities are shallow; they are not deep enough. They do not touch the bottom of things, and therefore the reactions set up are also mild.
  

1.03_-_The_End_of_the_Intellect, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  Sri Aurobindo had spent fourteen years traveling the Western path; it would take him almost as much time to travel India's path and to reach the "peak" of traditional Yogic realizations, the starting-point of his own work. What is most interesting for us, however, is that Sri Aurobindo traveled this traditional path, which we may therefore consider as a preparation, outside all customary rules, as a freelancer,
  as it were, or rather as an explorer who does not care about precautions and maps, and hence avoids many unnecessary detours simply because he has the courage to forge straight ahead. Thus, it was not in seclusion or in the lotus position or under the guidance of an enlightened Master that Sri Aurobindo undertook the journey, but just as we might do it ourselves, without any special knowledge, right in the midst of everyday life a life as busy and hectic as ours can be and all alone. Sri Aurobindo's first secret is probably a persistent refusal to cut life in two action vs. meditation, inner vs. outer, and the whole range of our false divisions; from the day he thought of yoga, he put everything into it, high and low, inside and outside, and he set out without ever looking back. Sri Aurobindo does not come to demonstrate exceptional qualities in an exceptional environment; he comes to show us what is possible for man, and to prove that the exceptional is only a normal possibility not yet mastered, just as the supernatural, as he said, is that the nature of which we have not attained or do not yet know, or the means of which we have not yet conquered.20 Ultimately, everything in this world is a matter of proper concentration; there is nothing that will not finally yield to a wellapplied concentration.
  --
  his Bengali teacher continues, "and read by the light of an oil lamp till one in the morning, oblivious of the intolerable mosquito bites. I
  would see him seated there in the same posture for hours on end, his eyes fixed on his book, like a Yogi lost in the contemplation of the Divine, unaware of all that went on around him. Even if the house had caught fire, it would not have broken this concentration." He read English, Russian, German, and French novels, but also, in ever larger numbers, the sacred books of India, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Ramayana, although he had never been in a temple except as an observer. "Once, having returned from the College," one of his friends recalls, "Sri Aurobindo sat down, picked up a book at random and started to read, while Z and some friends began a noisy game of chess. After half an hour, he put the book down and took a cup of tea.
  We had already seen him do this many times and were waiting eagerly for a chance to verify whether he read the books from cover to cover or only scanned a few pages here and there. Soon the test began. Z

1.03_-_The_Psychic_Prana, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  According to the Yogis, there are two nerve currents in the spinal column, called Pingal and Id, and a hollow canal called Sushumn running through the spinal cord. At the lower end of the hollow canal is what the Yogis call the "Lotus of the Kundalini". They describe it as triangular in form in which, in the symbolical language of the Yogis, there is a power called the Kundalini, coiled up. When that Kundalini awakes, it tries to force a passage through this hollow canal, and as it rises step by step, as it were, layer after layer of the mind becomes open and all the different visions and wonderful powers come to the Yogi. When it reaches the brain, the Yogi is perfectly detached from the body and mind; the soul finds itself free. We know that the spinal cord is composed in a peculiar manner. If we take the figure eight horizontally () there are two parts which are connected in the middle. Suppose you add eight after eight, piled one on top of the other, that will represent the spinal cord. The left is the Ida, the right Pingala, and that hollow canal which runs through the centre of the spinal cord is the Sushumna. Where the spinal cord ends in some of the lumbar vertebrae, a fine fibre issues downwards, and the canal runs up even within that fibre, only much finer. The canal is closed at the lower end, which is situated near what is called the sacral plexus, which, according to modern physiology, is triangular in form. The different plexuses that have their centres in the spinal canal can very well stand for the different "lotuses" of the Yogi.
  
  The Yogi conceives of several centres, beginning with the Muldhra, the basic, and ending with the Sahasrra, the thousand-petalled Lotus in the brain. So, if we take these different plexuses as representing these lotuses, the idea of the Yogi can be understood very easily in the language of modern physiology. We know there are two sorts of actions in these nerve currents, one afferent, the other efferent; one sensory and the other motor; one centripetal, and the other centrifugal. One carries the sensations to the brain, and the other from the brain to the outer body. These vibrations are all connected with the brain in the long run. Several other facts we have to remember, in order to clear the way for the explanation which is to come. This spinal cord, at the brain, ends in a sort of bulb, in the medulla, which is not attached to the brain, but floats in a fluid in the brain, so that if there be a blow on the head the force of that blow will be dissipated in the fluid, and will not hurt the bulb. This is an important fact to remember. Secondly, we have also to know that, of all the centres, we have particularly to remember three, the Muladhara (the basic), the Sahasrara (the thousand-petalled lotus of the brain) and the Manipura (the lotus of the navel).
  
  --
  
  Now we shall see why breathing is practised. In the first place, from rhythmical breathing comes a tendency of all the molecules in the body to move in the same direction. When mind changes into will, the nerve currents change into a motion similar to electricity, because the nerves have been proved to show polarity under the action of electric currents. This shows that when the will is transformed into the nerve currents, it is changed into something like electricity. When all the motions of the body have become perfectly rhythmical, the body has, as it were, become a gigantic battery of will. This tremendous will is exactly what the Yogi wants. This is, therefore, a physiological explanation of the breathing exercise. It tends to bring a rhythmic action in the body, and helps us, through the respiratory centre, to control the other centres. The aim of Prnyma here is to rouse the coiled-up power in the Muladhara, called the Kundalini.
  
  Everything that we see, or imagine, or dream, we have to perceive in space. This is the ordinary space, called the Mahksha, or elemental space. When a Yogi reads the thoughts of other men, or perceives supersensuous objects he sees them in another sort of space called the Chittksha, the mental space. When perception has become objectless, and the soul shines in its own nature, it is called the Chidksha, or knowledge space. When the Kundalini is aroused, and enters the canal of the Sushumna, all the perceptions are in the mental space. When it has reached that end of the canal which opens out into the brain, the objectless perception is in the knowledge space. Taking the analogy of electricity, we find that man can send a current only along a wire, (The reader should remember that this was spoken before the discovery of wireless telegraphy. Ed.) but nature requires no wires to send her tremendous currents. This proves that the wire is not really necessary, but that only our inability to dispense with it compels us to use it.
  
  Similarly, all the sensations and motions of the body are being sent into the brain, and sent out of it, through these wires of nerve fibres. The columns of sensory and motor fibres in the spinal cord are the Ida and Pingala of the Yogis. They are the main channels through which the afferent and efferent currents travel. But why should not the mind send news without any wire, or react without any wire? We see this is done in nature. The Yogi says, if you can do that, you have got rid of the bondage of matter. How to do it? If you can make the current pass through the Sushumna, the canal in the middle of the spinal column, you have solved the problem. The mind has made this network of the nervous system, and has to break it, so that no wires will be required to work through. Then alone will all knowledge come to us no more bondage of body; that is why it is so important that we should get control of that Sushumna. If we can send the mental current through the hollow canal without any nerve fibres to act as wires, the Yogi says, the problem is solved, and he also says it can be done.
  
  This Sushumna is in ordinary persons closed up at the lower extremity; no action comes through it. The Yogi proposes a practice by which it can be opened, and the nerve currents made to travel through. When a sensation is carried to a centre, the centre reacts. This reaction, in the case of automatic centres, is followed by motion; in the case of conscious centres it is followed first by perception, and secondly by motion. All perception is the reaction to action from outside. How, then, do perceptions in dreams arise? There is then no action from outside. The sensory motions, therefore, are coiled up somewhere. For instance, I see a city; the perception of that city is from the reaction to the sensations brought from outside objects comprising that city. That is to say, a certain motion in the brain molecules has been set up by the motion in the incarrying nerves, which again are set in motion by external objects in the city. Now, even after a long time I can remember the city. This memory is exactly the same phenomenon, only it is in a milder form. But whence is the action that sets up even the milder form of similar vibrations in the brain? Not certainly from the primary sensations. Therefore it must be that the sensations are coiled up somewhere, and they, by their acting, bring out the mild reaction which we call dream perception.
  
  Now the centre where all these residual sensations are, as it were, stored up, is called the Muladhara, the root receptacle, and the coiled-up energy of action is Kundalini, "the coiled up". It is very probable that the residual motor energy is also stored up in the same centre, as, after deep study or meditation on external objects, the part of the body where the Muladhara centre is situated (probably the sacral plexus) gets heated. Now, if this coiled-up energy be roused and made active, and then consciously made to travel up the Sushumna canal, as it acts upon centre after centre, a tremendous reaction will set in. When a minute portion of energy travels along a nerve fibre and causes reaction from centres, the perception is either dream or imagination. But when by the power of long internal meditation the vast mass of energy stored up travels along the Sushumna, and strikes the centres, the reaction is tremendous, immensely superior to the reaction of dream or imagination, immensely more intense than the reaction of sense-perception. It is super-sensuous perception. And when it reaches the metropolis of all sensations, the brain, the whole brain, as it were, reacts, and the result is the full blaze of illumination, the perception of the Self. As this Kundalini force travels from centre to centre, layer after layer of the mind, as it were, opens up, and this universe is perceived by the Yogi in its fine, or causal form. Then alone the causes of this universe, both as sensation and reaction, are known as they are, and hence comes all knowledge. The causes being known, the knowledge of the effects is sure to follow.
  
  Thus the rousing of the Kundalini is the one and only way to attaining Divine Wisdom, superconscious perception, realisation of the spirit. The rousing may come in various ways, through love for God, through the mercy of perfected sages, or through the power of the analytic will of the philosopher. Wherever there was any manifestation of what is ordinarily called supernatural power or wisdom, there a little current of Kundalini must have found its way into the Sushumna. Only, in the vast majority of such cases, people had ignorantly stumbled on some practice which set free a minute portion of the coiled-up Kundalini. All worship, consciously or unconsciously, leads to this end. The man who thinks that he is receiving response to his prayers does not know that the fulfilment comes from his own nature, that he has succeeded by the mental attitude of prayer in waking up a bit of this infinite power which is coiled up within himself. What, thus, men ignorantly worship under various names, through fear and tribulation, the Yogi declares to the world to be the real power coiled up in every being, the mother of eternal happiness, if we but know how to approach her. And Rja-Yoga is the science of religion, the rationale of all worship, all prayers, forms, ceremonies, and miracles.
  

1.03_-_YIBHOOTI_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  come under his control. This is the great instrument of the
  Yogi. The object of knowledge are infinite, and they are
  divided into the gross, grosser, grossest, and the fine, finer,
  --
  Nirvikalpa, changeless, but would leave the seeds for getting
  bodies again; only when the seeds are, as the Yogi says,
  fried, do they lose the possibility of producing further
  --
  modification which impels the mind to rush out through the
  senses, and the Yogi tries to control it, that very control itself
  will be a modification. One wave will be checked by another
  --
  is change as to state. The concentrations taught in the
  preceding aphorisms were to give the Yogi a voluntary control
  over the transformations of his mind- stuff which alone will
  --
  Ordinarily these three are inseperable; but by practice the
  Yogi can separate them. When a man has attained to this, if he
  makes a Samyama on any sound, he understands the meaning
  --
  is never lost. It remains there in minute form, and if we can
  bring this wave up again, it becomes memory. So, if the Yogi
  can make a Samyama on these past impressions in the mind,
  --
  Suppose each man has particular signs on his body, which
  differentiate him from others; when the Yogi makes a
  Samyama on these signs peculiar to a certain man he knows
  --
  Samyama, first on the signs in the body, and then on the mind
  itself. The Yogi would then know everything that is in that
  
  --
  power of manifestation in the eye being separated, the
  Yogi's body becomes unseen.
  
  A Yogi standing in the midst of this room can apparently
  vanish. He does not really vanish, but he will not be seen by
  anyone. The form and the body are, as it were, separated. You
  must remember that this can only be done when the Yogi has
  attained to that power of concentration when form and the
  --
  to be fructified. By making Sarny ama on that, or by
  the signs called Aristha, portents, the Yogis know the
  exact time of separation from their bodies.
  
  When the Yogi makes a Samyama on his own Karma, upon
  those impressions in his mind which are now working, and
  --
  By making Samyama on the strength of the elephant,
  etc., that strength comes to the Yogi.
  
  When a Yogi has attained to this Samyama and wants strength,
  he makes a Samyama on the strength of the elephant, and gets
  it. Infinite energy is at the disposal of everyone, if he only
  knows how to get it. The Yogi has discovered the science of
  getting it.
  --
  
  When the Yogi makes Samyama on that effulgent light in the
  heart he sees things which are very remote, things, for
  --
  The Siddhas are beings who are a little above ghosts. When
  the Yogi concentrates his mind on the sop of his head he will
  see these Siddhas. The word Siddha does not refer to those
  --
  This power of non-attachment acquired through purity gives
  the Yogi the enlightenment called Pratibha.
  
  --
  
  If the Yogi knows all these enjoyments of the world it comes
  by the junction of the PuruSa and the mind. If he wants to
  --
  highest goal, the knowledge of the pure Self, and freedom;
  these are, as it were, to be met in the way, and if the Yogi
  rejects them, he attains the highest. If he is tempted to acquire
  --
  When the cause of bondage has become loosened, the
  Yogi, by his knowledge of manifestation through the
  organs, enters anothers body.
  
  The Yogi can enter a dead body, and make it get up and move,
  even while he himself is working in another body. Or he can
  --
  check, and for the time being act through the body of that
  man. That is done by the Yogi coming to this discrimination of
  PuruSa and nature. If he wants to enter anothers body he
  --
  
  the Yogi. It is one bit of the universal mind. Now, however, it
  can only work through the nerve currents in this body, but
  when the Yogi has loosened himself from these nerve
  currents, he will be able to work through other things.
  --
  
  By conquering the current called Udana the Yogi
  does not sink in water, or in swamps, and he can walk
  --
  There is the Akasa, the ether, and the instrument, the ear. By
  making Sarny ama on them the Yogi gets divine hearing; he
  hears everything. Anything spoken or sounded miles away he
  --
  By making Samyama on the relation between the
  Akasa and the body the Yogi becoming light as cotton
  wool goes through the skies.
  --
  This Akasa is the material of this body; it is only Akasa in a
  certain form that has become the body. If the Yogi makes
  Samyama on this Akasa material of his body, it acquires the
  --
  
  There is no reason why I should. The Yogi wants to feel the
  Ego wherever he likes. When he has succeeded in that all
  --
  
  The Yogi make Samyama on the elements, first on the gross,
  and then on the finer states. This Samyama is taken up more
  --
  all the fine materials in it, they get power over that element.
  So with all the elements, the Yogi can conquer them all.
  
  --
  
  This means that the Yogi has attained the eight powers. He can
  
  --
  The body becomes indestructible; fire cannot injure it.
  Nothing can injure it. Nothing can destroy it until the Yogi
  wishes. Breaking the rod of time he lives in this universe
  --
  in the mind and go towards the object; that is followed by
  knowledge and egoism. When the Yogi makes Samyama on
  these by gradation he conquers the organs. Take up anything
  --
  between the PuruSa and nature, that the PuruSa is
  indestructible, pure and perfect, when the Yogi has realised
  this, then comes omnipotence and omniscience.
  --
  omniscience, there will be entire rejection of enjoyment, of
  the temptations from celestial beings. When the Yogi has seen
  all these wonderful powers, and rejected them, he reaches the
  --
  
  The Yogi should not feel allured or flattered by the
  overtures of celestial beings, for fear of evil again.
  There are other dangers too; gods and other beings come to
  tempt the Yogi. They do not want anyone to be perfectly free.
  They are jealous, just as we are, and worse than we
  sometimes. They are very much afraid of losing their places.
  Those Yogis who do not reach perfection die and become
  gods; leaving the direct road they go into one of the side
  --
  practice will give us the ability to distinguish them. The
  highest philosophy of the Yogi is based upon this fact, that the
  PuruSa is pure and perfect, and is the only simple that
  --
  
  Saving, because the knowledge takes the Yogi across the
  ocean of birth and death. The whole of Prakriti in all its states,

1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  We have a subtle distractedness in our mind on account of the presence of an absence of friendliness with things. This will cut at the root of all the Yogic practice, because yoga is the attempt to contact Ultimate Reality. It is not a mere social contact that we are trying here, but a contact of utter being the basic reality that is in everything. So there is a requisition for a complete transformation of our personality, inwardly as well as outwardly, even on the unconscious level not merely outwardly so that we get attuned to the structure of anything and everything in the world, under every condition.
  

1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  What is meant by the Dhyana practised by the ignorant? It is the one resorted to by the Yogins who exercise themselves in the disciplines of Sravakas and Pratyekabuddhas (contemplatives and solitary Buddhas of the Hinayana school), who perceiving that there is no ego substance, that the body is a shadow and a skeleton which is transient, impure and full of suffering, persistently cling to these notions, which are regarded as just so and not otherwise, and who, starting from them, advance by stages until they reach the cessation, where there are no thoughts. This is called the Dhyana practised by the ignorant.
  
  --
  
  What is the Dhyana with Tathata (or Suchness) as its object? When the Yogin recognizes that the discrimination of the two forms of egolessness is mere imagination and that where he establishes himself in the reality of Suchness there is no rising of discriminationthis I call the Dhyana with Suchness for its object.
  
  --
  
  What is the Dhyana of the Tathagata? When the Yogin, entering upon the stage of Tathagatahood and abiding in the triple bliss characterizing self-realization attained by noble wisdom, devotes himself for the sake of all beings to the accomplishment of incomprehensible worksthis I call the Dhyana of the Tathagata.
  

1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  The Yogis claim that these powers can be gained by chemical
  means. All of you know that chemistry originally began as
  --
  the Rasayamas, notably the use of metals in medicine.
  Certain sects of Yogis claim that many of their principal
  teachers are still living in their old bodies. Patanjali, the great
  --
  
  To-day the evolution theories of the Yogis will be better
  understood in the light of modern research. And yet the theory
  of the Yogis is a better explanation. The two causes of
  evolution advanced by the moderns, viz., sexual selection and
  --
  like two inexhaustible storehouses. When you have become a
  Yogi you have learned the secret of their control. It was yours
  all the time, but you had forgotten it. When you become a
  Yogi you recollect it. Then you can do anything with it,
  manipulate it any way you like. The material out of which that
  --
  existence out of which these made-minds and made-bodies of
  the Yogi will be manufactured. Therefore, when the Yogi has
  found the secret of these energies of nautre he can
  --
  
  karmashuklakrishnnam Yoginah trividham itaresham
  
  Works are neither black nor white for the Yogis', for
  others they are threefold, black, white, and mixed.
  
  When the Yogi has attained to that state of perfection, the
  actions of that man, and the Karma produced by those actions,
  --
  
  Through discrimination the Yogi knows that the PuruSa is not
  mind.
  --
  
  When the Yogi has attained to this discrimination, all these
  powers will come that were mentioned in the last chapter, but
  the true Yogi rejects them all. Unto him comes a peculiar
  knowledge, a particular light called the Dharma Megha, the
  --
  When that cloud of virtue has come, then no more is there fear
  of falling, nothing can drag the Yogi down. No more will there
  be evils for him. No more pains.
  --
  
  kshannapratiYogi parinamaparantanigrarhyah
  kramah

1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism, #Words Of The Mother III, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  Only a great Yogi can tell you your future correctly. But even then there is the Supreme Will which alone controls and decides everything.
  8 September 1961

1.04_-_Te_Shan_Carrying_His_Bundle, #The Blue Cliff Records, #Yuanwu Keqin, #Zen
  someone once became a wild fox because he said that an ac
  complished Yogi is not subject to cause and effect. However, like
  all'turning words,' this expression also has a positive side, mean

1.04_-_The_Control_of_Psychic_Prana, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  We have now to deal with the exercises in Prnyma. We have seen that the first step, according to the Yogis, is to control the motion of the lungs. What we want to do is to feel the finer motions that are going on in the body. Our minds have become externalised, and have lost sight of the fine motions inside. If we can begin to feel them, we can begin to control them. These nerve currents go on all over the body, bringing life and vitality to every muscle, but we do not feel them. The Yogi says we can learn to do so. How? By taking up and controlling the motion of the lungs; when we have done that for a sufficient length of time, we shall be able to control the finer motions.
  
  --
  
  The first effect of this practice is perceived in the change of expression of one's face; harsh lines disappear; with calm thought calmness comes over the face. Next comes beautiful voice. I never saw a Yogi with a croaking voice. These signs come after a few months' practice. After practicing the above mentioned breathing for a few days, you should take up a higher one. Slowly fill the lungs with breath through the Id, the left nostril, and at the same time concentrate the mind on the nerve current. You are, as it were, sending the nerve current down the spinal column, and striking violently on the last plexus, the basic lotus which is triangular in form, the seat of the Kundalini. Then hold the current there for some time. Imagine that you are slowly drawing that nerve current with the breath through the other side, the Pingal, then slowly throw it out through the right nostril. This you will find a little difficult to practice. The easiest way is to stop the right nostril with the thumb, and then slowly draw in the breath through the left; then close both nostrils with thumb and forefinger, and imagine that you are sending that current down, and striking the base of the Sushumn; then take the thumb off, and let the breath out through the right nostril. Next inhale slowly through that nostril, keeping the other closed by the forefinger, then close both, as before. The way the Hindus practice this would be very difficult for this country, because they do it from their childhood, and their lungs are prepared for it. Here it is well to begin with four seconds, and slowly increase. Draw in four seconds, hold in sixteen seconds, then throw out in eight seconds. This makes one Pranayama. At the same time think of the basic lotus, triangular in form; concentrate the mind on that centre. The imagination can help you a great deal. The next breathing is slowly drawing the breath in, and then immediately throwing it out slowly, and then stopping the breath out, using the same numbers. The only difference is that in the first case the breath was held in, and in the second, held out. This last is the easier one. The breathing in which you hold the breath in the lungs must not be practiced too much. Do it only four times in the morning, and four times in the evening. Then you can slowly increase the time and number. You will find that you have the power to do so, and that you take pleasure in it. So very carefully and cautiously increase as you feel that you have the power, to six instead of four. It may injure you if you practice it irregularly.
  
  Of the three processes for the purification of the nerves, described above, the first and the last are neither difficult nor dangerous. The more you practice the first one the calmer you will be. Just think of "Om," and you can practice even while you are sitting at your work. You will be all the better for it. Some day, if you practice hard, the Kundalini will be aroused. For those who practice once or twice a day, just a little calmness of the body and mind will come, and beautiful voice; only for those who can go on further with it will Kundalini be aroused, and the whole of nature will begin to change, and the book of knowledge will open. No more will you need to go to books for knowledge; your own mind will have become your book, containing infinite knowledge. I have already spoken of the Ida and Pingala currents, flowing through either side of the spinal column, and also of the Sushumna, the passage through the centre of the spinal cord. These three are present in every animal; whatever being has a spinal column has these three lines of action. But the Yogis claim that in an ordinary man the Sushumna is closed; its action is not evident while that of the other two is carrying power to different parts of the body.
  
  The Yogi alone has the Sushumna open. When this Sushumna current opens, and begins to rise, we get beyond the sense, our minds become supersensuous, superconscious we get beyond even the intellect, where reasoning cannot reach. To open that Sushumna is the prime object of the Yogi. According to him, along this Sushumna are ranged these centres, or, in more figurative language, these lotuses, as they are called. The lowest one is at the lower end of the spinal cord, and is called Muldhra, the next higher is called Svdhishthna, the third Manipura, the fourth Anhata, the fifth Vishuddha, the sixth jn and the last, which is in the brain, is the Sahasrra, or "the thousand-petalled". Of these we have to take cognition just now of two centres only, the lowest, the Muladhara, and the highest, the Sahasrara. All energy has to be taken up from its seat in the Muladhara and brought to the Sahasrara. The Yogis claim that of all the energies that are in the human body the highest is what they call "Ojas". Now this Ojas is stored up in the brain, and the more Ojas is in a man's head, the more powerful he is, the more intellectual, the more spiritually strong. One man may speak beautiful language and beautiful thoughts, but they, do not impress people; another man speaks neither beautiful language nor beautiful thoughts, yet his words charm. Every movement of his is powerful. That is the power of Ojas.
  
  Now in every man there is more or less of this Ojas stored up. All the forces that are working in the body in their highest become Ojas. You must remember that it is only a question of transformation. The same force which is working outside as electricity or magnetism will become changed into inner force; the same forces that are working as muscular energy will be changed into Ojas. The Yogis say that that part of the human energy which is expressed as sex energy, in sexual thought, when checked and controlled, easily becomes changed into Ojas, and as the Muladhara guides these, the Yogi pays particular attention to that centre. He tries to take up all his sexual energy and convert it into Ojas. It is only the chaste man or woman who can make the Ojas rise and store it in the brain; that is why chastity has always been considered the highest virtue. A man feels that if he is unchaste, spirituality goes away, he loses mental vigour and moral stamina. That is why in all the religious orders in the world which have produced spiritual giants you will always find absolute chastity insisted upon. That is why the monks came into existence, giving up marriage. There must be perfect chastity in thought, word, and deed; without it the practice of Raja-Yoga is dangerous, and may lead to insanity. If people practice Raja-Yoga and at the same time lead an impure life, how can they expect to become Yogis?
  

1.04_-_The_Praise, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  it seems, the individuals who, after having developed
  psychic powers (Yogic powers) live in nonhuman
  levels, nonetheless without having attained liberation

1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  These are the three fundamental realisations, so fundamental that to the Yogin of the way of Knowledge they seem ultimate, sufficient in themselves, destined to overtop and replace all others. And yet for the integral seeker, whether accorded to him at an early stage suddenly and easily by a miraculous grace or achieved with difficulty after a long progress and endeavour, they are neither the sole truth nor the full and only clues to the integral truth of the Eternal, but rather the unfilled beginning, the vast foundation of a greater divine Knowledge. Other realisations there are that are imperatively needed and must be explored to the full limit of their possibilities; and if some of them appear to a first sight to cover only Divine Aspects that are instrumental to the activity of existence but not inherent in its essence, yet, when followed to their end through that activity to its everlasting
  Source, it is found that they lead to a disclosure of the Divine without which our knowledge of the Truth behind things would be left bare and incomplete. These seeming Instrumentals are the key to a secret without which the Fundamentals themselves would not unveil all their mystery. All the revelatory aspects of the Divine must be caught in the wide net of the integral Yoga.

1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  would normally mean a long labour and be seized, even at the outset,
  by a rapid intervention or manifestation of Silence with an effect out of all proportion to the means used at the beginning. One commences with a method, but the work it taken up by a Grace from above, from That to which one aspires or an irruption of the infinitudes of the Spirit. It was in this last way that I myself came by the mind's absolute silence, unimaginable to me before I had its actual experience. 31 This is a most important point indeed. For we might think that these Yogic experiences are all very nice and interesting, but that they are far beyond our ordinary human grasp; how could we, such as we are, ever get there? Our mistake is in judging with our present self possibilities that belong to another self. By the simple fact of setting out on the path, the yoga automatically awakens a whole range of latent faculties and invisible forces that far exceed the possibilities of our outer being and can do for us things that we are normally incapable of doing: One had to have the passage clear between the outer mind and something in the inner being . . . for they (the Yogic consciousness and its powers) are already there within you,32 and the best way of "clearing"
  the passage is to silence the mind. We do not know who we are, and still less what we are capable of.
  --
  
  upon the fundamental difference between Sri Aurobindo's integral yoga (purna yoga) and the other yogas. If one has practiced other methods of yoga before Sri Aurobindo's, one experiences an ascending Force (called kundalini in India), which awakens rather brutally at the base of the spine and rises from level to level until it reaches the top of the head, where it blossoms into a sort of luminous and radiating pulsation, bringing a sensation of immensity (and often a loss of consciousness called ecstasy), as if one had forever emerged Elsewhere. All Yogic methods, which might be called thermogenetic
  the asanas of hatha yoga, the concentrations of raja yoga, the breathing exercises of pranayama, etc. aim at arousing that ascending Force; they can be dangerous and cause profound perturbations, which make the presence and protection of an enlightened Master indispensable. We will return to this later. The difference in the direction of the current, ascending vs. descending,
  --
  
  the experience as he first had it with another Yogi, Bhaskar Lele, who spent three days with him: All developed mental men, those who get beyond the average, have in one way or other, or at least at certain times and for certain purposes to separate the two parts of the mind,
  the active part, which is a factory of thoughts and the quiet masterful part which is at once a Witness and a Will, observing them, judging,
  --
  the Master in the House of Mind, capable of self-empire, samrajya.
  The Yogi goes still further, he is not only a master there but even while in mind in a way, he gets out of it as it were, and stands above or quite back from it and free. For him the image of the factory of thoughts is no longer quite valid; for he sees that thoughts come from outside, from the universal Mind, or universal Nature, sometimes formed and distinct, sometimes unformed and then they are given shape somewhere in us. The principal business of our mind is either a response of acceptance or a refusal to these thought waves (as also vital waves, subtle physical energy waves) or this giving a personalmental form to thought-stuff (or vital movements) from the environing Nature-Force. It was my great debt to Lele that he showed me this.
  "Sit in meditation," he said, "but do not think, look only at your mind;

1.057_-_The_Four_Manifestations_of_Ignorance, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  But this is precisely what has happened. All our so-called endeavours are backed up by a misconception. Because of the misconception, there is erroneous movement of the mind in its activities. Therefore, the expected results do not follow. It does not matter if we sit for meditation for hours together nothing will happen. No fruit is going to drop from the trees, because this meditation may be like the meditation of the crane for catching fish. That is also meditation. The crane keeps quiet for hours together, without doing anything, and we call it meditation. We call it bahula dhyana in Hindi. Bahula dhyana is a peculiar kind of meditation practised by the crane. It stands on one leg. It is also a great tapasvi and does not budge an inch from that place. We think that the crane is a great Yogi but its mind is on the fish. It wants to see where the fish comes up, and then darts upon it immediately and catches it.
  

1.05_-_Adam_Kadmon, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  Vedanta it is known as the Manomayakosa or the Mental
  Sheath ; the Raja Yogis include with it- several of the
  

1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  companion, her father was so annoyed that he ordered
  the Yogi to be burned alive. However,
  Padmasambhava transformed the blazing fire into a
  --
  himself if he was not confronted by a flesh-eating
  dakini rather than the famous Yogini. Niguma made
  a high mountain appear and from the summit four
  --
  selling barley beer that she brewed herself. In the
  nearby forest, the great Yogi Virupa was dwelling. The
  Yoginis who served him often visited the market and
  bought beer from the old woman because their master
  --
  the beer.
  "It is for our master, the Yogi Virupa," the buyers
  said.
  --
  attain realization.
  In the life of Milarepa, the great Yogi of the Land
  of Snow, we encounter a great number of women

1.05_-_Consciousness, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  in the metal, in the atom, in electricity, in everything that belongs to physical nature; we shall find even that it is not really in all respects a lower or more limited mode than the mental; on the contrary, it is in many "inanimate" forms more intense, rapid, poignant, though less evolved towards the surface.43 The task of the beginning Yogi is therefore to become conscious in every way, at all the levels of his being and all the degrees of universal existence, not just mentally; to become conscious in himself and in others and in all things, while awake and in sleep; and finally, to learn to become conscious in what people call "death," because, to the extent that we have been conscious in our life, we shall be conscious in our death.
  But we do not have to take Sri Aurobindo's word for it. On the contrary, he strongly urges us to see for ourselves. We must therefore strive to unravel that in us which connects all our modes of being
  --
  Generally, in a "normal" man, these centers are asleep or closed, or they only let through whatever small current is necessary for his limited existence; he is truly confined in himself and communicates only indirectly with the outside world, in a very narrow range; in fact,
  he does not see other people or things but himself in others, himself in things, himself in everything, interminably. With yoga, the centers open. They can open in two ways: from bottom to top or from top to bottom, depending on whether we practice traditional Yogic and spiritual methods, or Sri Aurobindo's yoga. As mentioned earlier,
  through concentration and exercises, we can eventually feel a Force awakening at the bottom of the spine and ascending from level to level up to the top of the head, with an undulating movement, just like a snake. At each level this Force pierces (rather violently) through the corresponding center, which opens up, thereby putting us in contact with all the universal vibrations or energies associated with the frequency of that particular center. With Sri Aurobindo's yoga, the descending Force opens the same centers, slowly and gently, from top to bottom. Often, the lower centers do not even fully open until much later. This process has a distinct advantage if we appreciate that each center corresponds to a universal mode of consciousness or energy.
  --
  Consciousness-Force, Consciousness-Joy When we discover consciousness, we find it is a force. Remarkably,
  we even start noticing it as a current or inner force before realizing it is a consciousness. Consciousness is force, consciousness-force, as Sri Aurobindo calls it, for the two terms are truly inseparable and interchangeable. The ancient wisdom of India knew this well, and never spoke of consciousness, Chit, without adjoining to it the term Agni, heat, flame, energy: Chit-Agni (sometimes also called Tapas, a synonym of Agni: Chit-Tapas). The Sanskrit word for spiritual or Yogic discipline is tapasya, that which produces heat or energy, or,
  more correctly, consciousness-heat or consciousness-energy. Agni, or Chit-Agni, is the same everywhere. We speak of descending or ascending Force, of inner force, of mental, vital, or material force, but there are not a hundred different kinds of forces; there is only one Force in the world, a single current that circulates through us as it circulates through all things, and takes on one attribute or another,
  --
  he can attune himself to any plane of universal reality, at any point,
  and perceive or understand the consciousness there, and even act upon it, since the same current of consciousness is everywhere with only different modes of vibration, whether in a plant or in the thoughts of a human mind, whether in the luminous superconscient or the instincts of an animal, whether in metal or in our deepest meditations. If a piece of wood were not conscious, no Yogi could displace it through concentration, because there would be no possibility of contact with it.
  If a single point of the universe were totally unconscious, the whole universe would be totally unconscious, because there cannot be two things. With Einstein we have learned a great discovery indeed
  --
  for example, is absorbed in its whirling, as the consciousness of a potter is absorbed in the pot he is making, oblivious to everything else,
  as the plant is absorbed in its photosynthesis, as our own consciousness can be absorbed in a book or a desire, oblivious to all the other levels of its own reality. All evolutionary progress is ultimately measured by the capacity to extricate and free the element of consciousness from its element of force this is what is meant by "individualization of consciousness." At the spiritual or Yogic stage of evolution, consciousness is completely freed, released from its mental,
  vital, and physical turmoil; it is its own master and can move through the entire range of vibrations of consciousness, from the atom to the Spirit; the Force has totally become Consciousness, totally remembered Itself. Finally, to remember oneself is to remember everything, because it is the Spirit in us remembering the Spirit in everything.
  --
  one can do all sorts of things with it, send it out as a stream of force,
  erect a circle or wall of consciousness around oneself, direct an idea so that it shall enter somebody's head in America, etc. etc. 54 He further explains: The Invisible Force producing tangible results both inward and outward is the whole meaning of the Yogic consciousness. . . . If we had not had thousands of experiences showing that the Power within could alter the mind, develop its powers, add new ones, bring in new ranges of knowledge, master the vital movements, change the character, influence men and things, control the conditions and 54
  
  --
  Moreover, it is not only in its results but in its movements that the Force is tangible and concrete. When I speak of feeling Force or Power, I do not mean simply having a vague sense of it, but feeling it concretely and consequently being able to direct it, manipulate it,
  watch its movements, be conscious of its mass and intensity and in the same way as of other opposing forces. 55 Later we will see that Consciousness can act upon Matter and transform it. This ultimate conversion of Matter into Consciousness, and perhaps one day even of Consciousness into Matter, is the aim of the supramental yoga, which we will discuss later. There are many degrees of development of the consciousness-force, from the seeker or aspirant just awakening to his inner need, to the Yogi; even among Yogis there are many degrees
  that is where the true hierarchy begins.

1.05_-_Pratyahara_and_Dharana, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  The Yogi must always practice. He should try to live alone; the companionship of different sorts of people distracts the mind; he should not speak much, because to speak distracts the mind; not work much, because too much work distracts the mind; the mind cannot be controlled after a whole day's hard work. One observing the above rules becomes a Yogi. Such is the power of Yoga that even the least of it will bring a great amount of benefit. It will not hurt anyone, but will benefit everyone. First of all, it will tone down nervous excitement, bring calmness, enable us to see things more clearly. The temperament will be better, and the health will be better. Sound health will be one of the first signs, and a beautiful voice. Defects in the voice will be changed. This will be among the first of the many effects that will come. Those who practise hard will get many other signs. Sometimes there will be sounds, as a peal of bells heard at a distance, commingling, and falling on the ear as one continuous sound. Sometimes things will be seen, little specks of light floating and becoming bigger and bigger; and when these things come, know that you are progressing fast.
  
  Those who want to be Yogis, and practice hard, must take care of their diet at first. But for those who want only a little practice for everyday business sort of life, let them not eat too much; otherwise they may eat whatever they please. For those who want to make rapid progress, and to practice hard, a strict diet is absolutely necessary. They will find it advantageous to live only on milk and cereals for some months. As the organisation becomes finer and finer, it will be found in the beginning that the least irregularity throws one out of balance. One bit of food more or less will disturb the whole system, until one gets perfect control, and then one will be able to eat whatever one likes.
  
  --
  
  Those who really want to be Yogis must give up, once for all, this nibbling at things. Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life think of it, dream of it, live on that idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, every part of your body, be full of that idea, and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success, and this is the way great spiritual giants are produced. Others are mere talking machines. If we really want to be blessed, and make others blessed, we must go deeper. The first step is not to disturb the mind, not to associate with persons whose ideas are disturbing. All of you know that certain persons, certain places, certain foods, repel you. Avoid them; and those who want to go to the highest, must avoid all company, good or bad. Practise hard; whether you live or die does not matter. You have to plunge in and work, without thinking of the result. If you are brave enough, in six months you will be a perfect Yogi. But those who take up just a bit of it and a little of everything else make no progress. It is of no use simply to take a course of lessons. To those who are full of Tamas, ignorant and dull those whose minds never get fixed on any idea, who only crave for something to amuse them religion and philosophy are simply objects of entertainment. These are the unpersevering. They hear a talk, think it very nice, and then go home and forget all about it. To succeed, you must have tremendous perseverance, tremendous will. "I will drink the ocean," says the persevering soul, "at my will mountains will crumble up." Have that sort of energy, that sort of will, work hard, and you will reach the goal.
  

1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
     It is natural from the point of view of the Yoga to divide into two categories the activities of the human mind in its pursuit of knowledge. There is the supreme supra-intellectual knowledge which concentrates itself on the discovery of the One and Infinite in its transcendence or tries to penetrate by intuition, contemplation, direct inner contact into the ultimate truths behind the appearances of Nature; there is the lower science which diffuses itself in an outward knowledge of phenomena, the disguises of the One and Infinite as it appears to us in and through the more exterior forms of the world-manifestation around us. These two, an upper and a lower hemisphere, in the form of them constructed or conceived by men within the mind's ignorant limits, have even there separated themselves, as they developed, with some sharpness.... Philosophy, sometimes spiritual or at least intuitive, sometimes abstract and intellectual, sometimes intellectualising spiritual experience or supporting with a logical apparatus the discoveries of the spirit, has claimed always to take the fixation of ultimate Truth as its province. But even when it did not separate itself on rarefied metaphysical heights from the knowledge that belongs to the practical world and the pursuit of ephemeral objects, intellectual Philosophy by its habit of abstraction has seldom been a power for life. It has been sometimes powerful for high speculation, pursuing mental Truth for its own sake without any ulterior utility or object, sometimes for a subtle gymnastic of the mind in a mistily bright cloud-land of words and ideas, but it has walked or acrobatised far from the more tangible realities of existence. Ancient Philosophy in Europe was more dynamic, but only for the few; in India in its more spiritualised forms, it strongly influenced but without transforming the life of the race.... Religion did not attempt, like Philosophy, to live alone on the heights; its aim was rather to take hold of man's parts of life even more than his parts of mind and draw them Godwards; it professed to build a bridge between spiritual Truth and the vital and material existence; it strove to subordinate and reconcile the lower to the higher, make life serviceable to God, Earth obedient to Heaven. It has to be admitted that too often this necessary effort had the opposite result of making Heaven a sanction for Earth's desires; for continually the religious idea has been turned into an excuse for the worship and service of the human ego. Religion, leaving constantly its little shining core of spiritual experience, has lost itself in the obscure mass of its ever extending ambiguous compromises with life: in attempting to satisfy the thinking mind, it more often succeeded in oppressing or fettering it with a mass of theological dogmas; while seeking to net the human heart, it fell itself into pits of pietistic emotionalism and sensationalism; in the act of annexing the vital nature of man to dominate it, it grew itself vitiated and fell a prey to all the fanaticism, homicidal fury, savage or harsh turn for oppression, pullulating falsehood, obstinate attachment to ignorance to which that vital nature is prone; its desire to draw the physical in man towards God betrayed it into chaining itself to ecclesiastic mechanism, hollow ceremony and lifeless ritual. The corruption of the best produced the worst by that strange chemistry of the power of life which generates evil out of good even as it can also generate good out of evil. At the same time in a vain effort at self-defence against this downward gravitation. Religion was driven to cut existence into two by a division of knowledge, works, art, life itself into two opposite categories, the spiritual and the worldly, religious and mundane, sacred and profane; but this' defensive distinction itself became conventional and artificial and aggravated rather than healed the disease.... On the other side. Science and Art and the knowledge of life, although at first they served or lived in the shadow of Religion, ended by emancipating themselves, became estranged or hostile, or have even recoiled with indifference, contempt or scepticism from what seem to them the cold, barren and distant or unsubstantial and illusory heights of unreality to which metaphysical Philosophy and Religion aspire. For a time the divorce has been as complete as the one-sided intolerance of the human mind could make it and threatened even to end in a complete extinction of all attempt at a higher or a more spiritual knowledge. Yet even in the earthward life a higher knowledge is indeed the one thing that is throughout needful, and without it the lower sciences and pursuits, however fruitful, however rich, free, miraculous in the abundance of their results, become easily a sacrifice offered without due order and to false gods; corrupting, hardening in the end the heart of man, limiting his mind's horizons, they confine in a stony material imprisonment or lead to a final baffling incertitude and disillusionment. A sterile agnosticism awaits us above the brilliant phosphorescence of a half-knowledge that is still the Ignorance.
     A Yoga turned towards an all-embracing realisation of the Supreme will not despise the works or even the dreams, if dreams they are, of the Cosmic Spirit or shrink from the splendid toil and many-sided victory which he has assigned to himself In the human creature. But its first condition for this liberality is that our works in the world too must be part of the sacrifice offered to the Highest and to none else, to the Divine shakti and to no other Power, in the right spirit and with the right knowledge, by the free soul and not by the hypnotised bondslave of material Nature. If a division of works has to be made, it is between those that are nearest to the heart of the sacred flame and those that are least touched or illumined by it because they are more at a distance, or between the fuel that burns strongly or brightly and the logs that if too thickly heaped on the altar may impede the ardour of the fire by their damp, heavy and diffused abundance. But otherwise, apart from this division, all activities of knowledge that seek after or express Truth are in themselves rightful materials for a complete offering; none ought necessarily to be excluded from the wide framework of the divine life. The mental and physical sciences which examine into the laws and forms and processes of things, those which concern the life of men and animals, the social, political, linguistic and historical and those which seek to know and control the labours and activities by which man subdues and utilises his world and environment, and the noble and beautiful Arts which are at once work and knowledge, -- for every well-made and significant poem, picture, statue or building is an act of creative knowledge, a living discovery of the consciousness, a figure of Truth, a dynamic form of mental and vital self-expression or world-expressions-all that seeks, all that finds, all that voices or figures is a realisation of something of the play of the Infinite and to that extent can be made a means of God-realisation or of divine formation. But the Yogin has to see that it is no longer done as part of an ignorant mental life; it can be accepted by him only if by the feeling, the remembrance, the dedication within it, it is turned into a movement of the spiritual consciousness and becomes a part of its vast grasp of comprehensive illuminating knowledge.
     For all must be done as a sacrifice, all activities must have the One Divine for their object and the heart of their meaning. The Yogin's aim in the sciences that make for knowledge should be to discover and understand the workings of the Divine Consciousness-Puissance in man and creatures and things and forces, her creative significances, her execution of the mysteries, the symbols in which she arranges the manifestation. The Yogin's aim in the practical sciences, whether mental and physical or occult and psychic, should be to enter into the ways of the Divine and his processes, to know the materials and means for the work given to us so that we may use that knowledge for a conscious and faultless expression of the spirit's mastery, joy and self-fulfilment. The Yogin's aim in the Arts should not be a mere aesthetic, mental or vital gratification, but, seeing the Divine everywhere, worshipping it with a revelation of the meaning of its works, to express that One Divine in gods and men and creatures and objects. The theory that sees an intimate connection between religious aspiration and the truest and greatest Art is in essence right; but we must substitute for the mixed and doubtful religious motive a spiritual aspiration, vision, interpreting experience. For the wider and more comprehensive the seeing, the more it contains in itself the sense of the hidden Divine in humanity and in all things and rises beyond a superficial religiosity into the spiritual life, the more luminous, flexible, deep and powerful will the Art be that springs from the high motive. The Yogin's distinction from other men is this that he lives in a higher and vaster spiritual consciousness; all his work of knowledge or creation must then spring from there: it must not be made in the mind, -- for it is a greater truth and vision than mental man's that he has to express or rather that presses to express itself through him and mould his works, not for his personal satisfaction, but for a divine purpose.
     At the same time the Yogin who knows the Supreme is not subject to any need or compulsion in these activities; for to him they are neither a duty nor a necessary occupation for the mind nor a high amusement, nor imposed by the loftiest human purpose. He is not attached, bound and limited by any nor has he any personal motive of fame, greatness or personal satisfaction in these works; he can leave or pursue them as the Divine in him wills, but he need not otherwise abandon them in his pursuit of the higher integral knowledge. He will do these things just as the supreme Power acts and creates, for a certain spiritual joy in creation and expression or to help in the holding together and right ordering or leading of this world of God's workings. The Gita teaches that the man of knowledge shall by his way of life give to those who have not yet the spiritual consciousness, the love and habit of all works and not only of actions recognised as pious, religious or ascetic in their character; he should not draw men away from the world-action by his example. For the world must proceed in its great upward aspiring; men and nations must not be led to fall away from even an ignorant activity into a worse ignorance of inaction or to sink down into that miserable disintegration and tendency of dissolution which comes upon communities and peoples when there predominates the tamasic principle, the principle whether of obscure confusion and error or of weariness and inertia. "For I too," says the Lord in the Gita, "have no need to do works, since there is nothing I have not or must yet gain for myself; yet I do works in the world; for if I did not do works, all laws would fall into confusion, the worlds would sink towards chaos and I would be the destroyer of these peoples." The spiritual life does not need, for its purity, to destroy interest in all things except the Inexpressible or to cut at the roots of the Sciences, the Arts and Life. It may well be one of the effects of an integral spiritual knowledge and activity to lift them out of their limitations, substitute for our mind's ignorant, limited, tepid or trepidant pleasure in them a free, intense and uplifting urge of delight and supply a new source of creative spiritual power and illumination by which they can be carried more swiftly and profoundly towards their absolute light in knowledge and their yet undreamed possibilities and most dynamic energy of content and form and practice. The one thing needful must be pursued first and always, but all things else come with it as its outcome and have not so much to be added to us as recovered and reshaped in its self-light and as portions of its self-expressive force.
  
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     If knowledge is the widest power of the consciousness and its function is to free and illumine, yet love is the deepest and most intense and its privilege is to be the key to the most profound and secret recesses of the Divine Mystery. Man, because he is a mental being, is prone to give the highest importance to the thinking mind and its reason and will and to its way of approach and effectuation of Truth and, even, he is inclined to hold that there is no other. The heart with its emotions and incalculable movements is to the eye of his intellect an obscure, uncertain and often a perilous and misleading power which needs to be kept in control by the reason and the mental will and intelligence. And yet there is in the heart or behind it a profounder mystic light which, if not what we call intuition -- for that, though not of the mind, yet descends through the mind -- has yet a direct touch upon Truth and is nearer to the Divine than the human intellect in its pride of knowledge. According to the ancient teaching the seat of the immanent Divine, the hidden Purusha, is in the mystic heart, -- the secret heart-cave, hrdaye gunayam, as the Upanishads put it, -- and, according to the experience of many Yogins, it is from its depths that there comes the voice or the breath of the inner oracle.
     This ambiguity, these opposing appearances of depth and blindness are created by the double character of the human emotive being. For there is in front in men a heart of vital emotion similar to the animal's, if more variously developed; its emotions are governed by egoistic passion, blind instinctive affections and all the play of the life-impulses with their imperfections, perversions, often sordid degradations, -- heart besieged and given over to the lusts, desires, wraths, intense or fierce demands or little greeds and mean pettinesses of an obscure and fallen life-force and debased by its slavery to any and every impulse. This mixture of the emotive heart and the sensational hungering vital creates in man a false soul of desire; it is this that is the crude and dangerous element which the reason rightly distrusts and feels a need to control, even though the actual control or rather coercion it succeeds in establishing over our raw and insistent vital nature remains always very uncertain and deceptive. But the true soul of man is not there; it is in the true invisible heart hidden in some luminous cave of the nature: there under some infiltration of the divine Light is our soul, a silent inmost being of which few are even aware; for if all have a soul, few are conscious of their true soul or feel its direct impulse. There dwells the little spark of the Divine which supports this obscure mass of our nature and around it grows the psychic being, the formed soul or the real Man within us. It is as this psychic being in him grows and the movements of the heart reflect its divinations and impulsions that man becomes more and more aware of his soul, ceases to be a superior animal, and, awakening to glimpses of the godhead within him, admits more and more its intimations of a deeper life and consciousness and an impulse towards things divine. It is one of the decisive moments of the integral Yoga when this psychic being liberated, brought out from the veil to the front, can pour the full flood of its divinations, seeings and impulsions on the mind, life and body of man and begin to prepare the upbuilding of divinity in the earthly nature.

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