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object:The Sickness Unto Death
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class:Soren Kierkegaard
subject class:Christianity
subject:Christianity
subject class:Philosophy


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Soren_Kierkegaard

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The Sickness Unto Death
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--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



--- QUOTES [2 / 2 - 7 / 7] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



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   2 Soren Kierkegaard

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   2 Soren Kierkegaard

1:With every increase in the degree of consciousness, and in proportion to that increase, the intensity of despair increases: the more consciousness the more intense the despair. ~ Soren Kierkegaard, The Sickness Unto Death ,
2:The greatest hazard of all, losing one's self, can occur very quietly in the world, as if it were nothing at all. No other loss can occur so quietly; any other loss - an arm, a leg, five dollars, a wife, etc. - is sure to be noticed. ~ Soren Kierkegaard, The Sickness Unto Death ,

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1:"But in ancient times as well as in the Middle Ages people were aware of the need of solitude and had respect for what it signifies." ~ Søren Kierkegaard, The Sickness Unto Death
2:With every increase in the degree of consciousness, and in proportion to that increase, the intensity of despair increases: the more consciousness the more intense the despair. ~ Soren Kierkegaard, The Sickness Unto Death,
3:As Soren Kierkegaard says in the opening pages of The Sickness unto Death (the sickness in question is despair): “Everything essentially Christian must have in its presentation a resemblance to the way a physician speaks at the sickbed. ~ Kevin J Vanhoozer
4:The greatest hazard of all, losing one's self, can occur very quietly in the world, as if it were nothing at all. No other loss can occur so quietly; any other loss - an arm, a leg, five dollars, a wife, etc. - is sure to be noticed.
   ~ Soren Kierkegaard, The Sickness Unto Death,
5:The greatest hazard of all, losing one’s self, can occur very quietly in the world, as if it were nothing at all. No other loss can occur so quietly; any other loss—an arm, a leg, five dollars, a wife, etc.—is sure to be noticed. —Soren Kierkegaard The Sickness Unto Death ~ Michael Marshall Smith
6:As a movement (rather than a preference), the goal of antinatalism is that no humans should have children. What ambassadors, then, are we to send to the Brazilian Amazonian Pirahã people to persuade them to stop reproducing? According, at least, to Professor Daniel Everett, here is a people who have no knowledge of regret, depression or suicide. Are we to enlighten them in order to appease a group of discontented intellectuals in the first world? The Pirahã would appear to be one pocket of humanity to whom the sickness unto death does not apply, and this reveals a crack, which may grow, in the antinatalist edifice. ~ Quentin S Crisp
7:Yet in another and still more definite sense despair is the sickness unto death. It is indeed very far from being true that, literally understood, one dies of this sickness, or that this sickness ends with bodily death. On the contrary, the torment of despair is precisely this, not to be able to die So it has much in common with the situation of the moribund when he lies and struggles with death, and cannot die. So to be sick unto death is, not to be able to die -- yet not as though there were hope of life; no the hopelessness in this case is that even the last hope, death, is not available. When death is the greatest danger, one hopes for life; but when one becomes acquainted with an even more dreadful danger, one hopes for death. So when the danger is so great that death has become one’s hope, despair is the disconsolateness of not being able to die. ~ S ren Kierkegaard

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