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object:The Perennial Philosophy
author class:Aldous Huxley
class:book
subject class:Philosophy

THE PERENNIAL PHILOSOPHY

TABLE OF CONTENTS


1.00b - INTRODUCTION
1.01 - THAT ARE THOU
1.02 - THE NATURE OF THE GROUND
1.03 - PERSONALITY, SANCTITY, DIVINE INCARNATION
1.04 - GOD IN THE WORLD
1.05 - CHARITY
1.06 - MORTIFICATION, NON-ATTACHMENT, RIGHT LIVELIHOOD
1.07 - TRUTH
1.08 - RELIGION AND TEMPERAMENT
1.09 - SELF-KNOWLEDGE
1.10 - GRACE AND FREE WILL
1.11 - GOOD AND EVIL
1.12 - TIME AND ETERNITY
1.13 - SALVATION, DELIVERANCE, ENLIGHTENMENT
1.14 - IMMORTALITY AND SURVIVAL
1.15 - SILENCE
1.16 - PRAYER
1.17 - SUFFERING
1.18 - FAITH
1.19 - GOD IS NOT MOCKED
1.20 - TANTUM RELIGIO POTUIT SUADERE MALORUM
1.21 - IDOLATRY
1.22 - EMOTIONALISM
1.23 - THE MIRACULOUS
1.24 - RITUAL, SYMBOL, SACRAMENT
1.25 - SPIRITUAL EXERCISES
1.26 - PERSEVERANCE AND REGULARITY
1.27 - CONTEMPLATION, ACTION AND SOCIAL UTILITY

Bibliography
Index



Acknowledgments


For permission to use the following selections, grateful acknowledgment and thanks are extended to the following authors and publishers :

George Allen & Unwin Ltd.: MONKEY and THE WAY AND ITS POWER, translated by Arthur Waley; LETTERS, by Spinoza.

Burns, Oates & Washbourne Ltd. : THE CLOUD OF UNKNOW-
ING, edited by McCann ; THE WORKS OF ST. JOHN OF THE CROSS, translated by Allison Piers.

Cambridge University Press: STUDIES IN ISLAMIC MYSTICISM,
by R. A. Nicholson.

/. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.: ADORNMENT OF THE SPIRITUAL
MARRIAGE, by Ruysbroeck, translated by Winschenk Dom.

P. J. and A. E. Dobell: CENTURIES OF MEDITATION, by Thomas Traherne.

Dwight Goddard Estate: A BUDDHIST BIBLE, by Dwight Goddard.

Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co. Ltd. : MASNAVI, by Jalaluddin Rumi, translated by Whinfield.

Longmans, Green & Co. Ltd.: THE SPIRIT OF ST. FRANCIS DE SALES, by Jean Pierre Camus, translated by Lear;
CATHERINE OF SIENA, by Johannes Jorgensen.

Macmillan & Co. Ltd.: THEOLOGIA GERMANICA, translated by Winkworth; THE SPIRITUAL REFORMERS, by Rufus Jones; MYSTICISM EAST AND WEST, by Rudolph Otto;
ONE HUNDRED POEMS OF KABiR, by Rabindranath Tagore.

John Murray and Mr. Lionel Giles : MUSINGS OF A CHINESE MYSTIC, from THE WISDOM OF THE EAST series, trans-
lated by Herbert Giles.

Oxford University Press and Harvard University Press: THE TRANSFORMATION OF NATURE IN ART, by Amanda K.
Coomaraswamy.

Oxford University Press and The Pali Text Society: THE PATH OF PURITY, by Buddhaghosha.

Oxford University Press: THE TIBETAN BOOK OF THE DEAD,
translated by Dr. Evans- Wentz.

Paramananda and the publishers of BHAGAVAD-GITA.

George Routledge & Sons Ltd.: STUDIES IN THE LANKAVATARA SUTRA, by Suzuki.

Skeed & Ward Ltd.: THE MYSTICAL THEOLOGY OF ST.
BERNARD, by Etienne Gilson.

The Society far Promoting Christian Knowledge: DIONYSIUS THE AREOPAGITE, translated b^ C. E. Rolt.

John M. Watkins: WORKS OF MEISTER ECKHART, translated by Evans; THE CREST-JEWEL OF WISDOM, by Shankara,
translated by Charles Johnston.




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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [0]

TOPICS


AUTH


BOOKS


CHAPTERS

1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.09_-_SELF-KNOWLEDGE
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT
1.14_-_IMMORTALITY_AND_SURVIVAL
1.15_-_SILENCE
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.17_-_SUFFERING
1.18_-_FAITH
1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.21_-_IDOLATRY
1.22_-_EMOTIONALISM
1.23_-_THE_MIRACULOUS
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.26_-_PERSEVERANCE_AND_REGULARITY
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
2.00_-_BIBLIOGRAPHY

--- PRIMARY CLASS


book

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [0]


01.11 - Aldous Huxley: The Perennial Philosophy
The Perennial Philosophy
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
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--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



--- QUOTES [1 / 1 - 11 / 11] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   1 Ken Wilber

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   3 Ken Wilber

   3 Aldous Huxley

   2 Ken Wilber

1:There is one point in particular I would like to single out and stress, namely, the notion of evolution. It is common to assume that one of the doctrines of the perennial philosophy... is the idea of involution-evolution. That is, the manifest world was created as a "fall" or "breaking away" from the Absolute (involution), but that all things are now returning to the Absolute (via evolution). In fact, the doctrine of progressive temporal return to Source (evolution) does not appear anywhere, according to scholars as Joseph Campbell, until the axial period (i.e. a mere two thousand years ago). And even then, the idea was somewhat convoluted and backwards. The doctrine of the yugas, for example, sees the world as proceeding through various stages of development, but the direction is backward: yesterday was the Golden Age, and time ever since has been a devolutionary slide downhill, resulting in the present-day Kali-Yuga. Indeed, this notion of a historical fall from Eden was ubiquitous during the axial period; the idea that we are, at this moment, actually evolving toward Spirit was simply not conceived in any sort of influential fashion. But sometime during the modern era-it is almost impossible to pinpoint exactly-the idea of history as devolution (or a fall from God) was slowly replaced by the idea of history as evolution (or a growth towards God). We see it explicitly in Schelling (1775-1854); Hegel (1770-1831) propounded the doctrine with a genius rarely equaled; Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) made evolution a universal law, and his friend Charles Darwin (1809-1882) applied it to biology. We find it next appearing in Aurobindo (1872-1950), who gave perhaps its most accurate and profound spiritual context, and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955) who made it famous in the West. But here is my point: we might say that the idea of evolution as return-to-Spirit is part of the perennial philosophy, but the idea itself, in any adequate form, is no more than a few hundred years old. It might be 'ancient' as timeless, but it is certainly not ancient as "old."... This fundamental shift in the sense or form of the perennial philosophy-as represented in, say, Aurobindo, Hegel, Adi Da, Schelling, Teilhard de Chardin, Radhakrishnan, to name a few-I should like to call the "neoperennial philosophy." ~ Ken Wilber, The Eye Of Spirit ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Hinduism the perennial philosophy that is at the core of all religions. ~ Aldous Huxley
2:The most striking feature of the perennial philosophy/psychology is that it presents being and consciousness as a hierarchy of dimensional levels, moving from the lowest, densest, and most fragmentary realms to the highest, subtlest, and most unitary ones. ~ Ken Wilber
3:Meditation, then, is not so much a part of this or that particular religion, but rather part of the universal spiritual culture of all humankind--an effort to bring awareness to bear on all aspects of life. It is, in other words, part of what has been called the perennial philosophy. ~ Ken Wilber
4:Maintaining, in this matter, the attitude of a strict operationalist, the Buddha would speak only of the spiritual experience, not of the metaphysical entity presumed by the theologians of other religions, as also of later Buddhism, to be the object ... of that experience. ~ Aldous Huxley, The Perennial Philosophy (1944), p.45
5:The Perennial Philosophy is expressed most succinctly in the Sanskrit formula, tat tvam asi ('That art thou'); the Atman, or immanent eternal Self, is one with Brahman, the Absolute Principle of all existence; and the last end of every human being, is to discover the fact for himself, to find out who he really is. ~ Aldous Huxley
6:The integral approach is committed to the full spectrum of consciousness as it manifests in all its extraordinary diversity. This allows the integral approach to recognize and honor the Great Holarchy of Being first elucidated by the perennial philosophy and the great wisdom traditions in general... The integral vision embodies an attempt to take the best of both worlds, ancient and modern. But that demands a critical stance willing to reject unflinchingly the worst of both as well. ~ Ken Wilber
7:To the exponents of the Perennial Philosophy, the question whether Progress is inevitable or even real is not a matter of primary importance. For them, the important thing is that individual men and women should come to the unitive knowledge of the divine Ground, and what interests them in regard to the social environment is not its progressiveness or non-progressiveness (whatever those terms may mean), but the degree to which it helps or hinders individuals in the their advance towards man's final end. ~ Aldous Huxley
8:Their findings can be summarized in three statements which Aldous Huxley, following Leibnitz, has called the Perennial Philosophy because they appear in every age and civilization: (1) there is an infinite, changeless reality beneath the world of change; (2) this same reality lies at the core of every human personality; (3) the purpose of life is to discover this reality experientially: that is, to realize God while here on earth. These principles and the interior experiments for realizing them were taught systematically in “forest academies” or ashrams – a tradition which continues unbroken after some three thousand years. ~ Anonymous
9:To take the last issue, the difficult issue, first. The first great Dharma systems, East and West, all arose, without exception, in the so-called “axial period” (Karl Jaspers), that rather extraordinary period beginning around the 6th century B.C. (plus or minus several centuries), a period that saw the birth of Gautama Buddha, Lao Tzu, Confucius, Moses, Plato, Patanjali—a period that would soon give way, over the next few centuries, to include Ashvaghosa, Nagarjuna, Plotinus, Jesus, Philo, Valentinus…. Virtually all of the major tenets of the perennial philosophy were first laid down during this amazing era (in Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity….) ~ Ken Wilber, Integral Life, right-bucks
10:Ancient philosophies were entranced by the order of the cosmos; they marveled at the mysterious power that kept the heavenly bodies in their orbits and the seas within bounds and that ensured that the earth regularly came to life again after the dearth of winter, and they longed to participate in this richer and more permanent existence. They expressed this yearning in terms of what is known as the perennial philosophy, so called because it was present, in some form, in most premodern cultures.11 Every single person, object, or experience was seen as a replica, a pale shadow, of a reality that was stronger and more enduring than anything in their ordinary experience but that they only glimpsed in visionary moments or in dreams. By ritually imitating what they understood to be the gestures and actions of their celestial alter egos—whether gods, ancestors, or culture heroes—premodern folk felt themselves to be caught up in their larger dimension of being. ~ Karen Armstrong
11:There is one point in particular I would like to single out and stress, namely, the notion of evolution. It is common to assume that one of the doctrines of the perennial philosophy... is the idea of involution-evolution. That is, the manifest world was created as a "fall" or "breaking away" from the Absolute (involution), but that all things are now returning to the Absolute (via evolution). In fact, the doctrine of progressive temporal return to Source (evolution) does not appear anywhere, according to scholars as Joseph Campbell, until the axial period (i.e. a mere two thousand years ago). And even then, the idea was somewhat convoluted and backwards. The doctrine of the yugas, for example, sees the world as proceeding through various stages of development, but the direction is backward: yesterday was the Golden Age, and time ever since has been a devolutionary slide downhill, resulting in the present-day Kali-Yuga. Indeed, this notion of a historical fall from Eden was ubiquitous during the axial period; the idea that we are, at this moment, actually evolving toward Spirit was simply not conceived in any sort of influential fashion.

  But sometime during the modern era-it is almost impossible to pinpoint exactly-the idea of history as devolution (or a fall from God) was slowly replaced by the idea of history as evolution (or a growth towards God). We see it explicitly in Schelling (1775-1854); Hegel (1770-1831) propounded the doctrine with a genius rarely equaled; Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) made evolution a universal law, and his friend Charles Darwin (1809-1882) applied it to biology. We find it next appearing in Aurobindo (1872-1950), who gave perhaps its most accurate and profound spiritual context, and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955) who made it famous in the West.

  But here is my point: we might say that the idea of evolution as return-to-Spirit is part of the perennial philosophy, but the idea itself, in any adequate form, is no more than a few hundred years old. It might be 'ancient' as timeless, but it is certainly not ancient as "old."...

  This fundamental shift in the sense or form of the perennial philosophy-as represented in, say, Aurobindo, Hegel, Adi Da, Schelling, Teilhard de Chardin, Radhakrishnan, to name a few-I should like to call the "neoperennial philosophy." ~ Ken Wilber, The Eye Of Spirit,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



0

   23 Philosophy
   5 Integral Yoga


   23 Aldous Huxley
   3 Nolini Kanta Gupta


   23 The Perennial Philosophy
   3 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02


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