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object:The Nicomachean Ethics
author class:Aristotle
class:book
subject class:Philosophy


  Titlepage
  Imprint
  Preface
  Editor’s Note
  Nicomachean Ethics
    Book I
      The End
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
        X
        XI
        XII
        XIII
    Book II
      Moral Virtue
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
    Book III
      The Will
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
      The Several Moral Virtues and Vices
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
        X
        XI
        XII
    Book IV
      The Several Moral Virtues and Vices—Continued
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
    Book V
      Justice
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
        X
        XI
    Book VI
      The Intellectual Virtues
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
        X
        XI
        XII
        XIII
    Book VII
      Characters Other Than Virtue and Vice
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
        X
      Of Pleasure
        XI
        XII
        XIII
        XIV
    Book VIII
      Friendship or Love
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
        X
        XI
        XII
        XIII
        XIV
    Book IX
      Friendship or Love—Continued
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
        X
        XI
        XII
    Book X
      Pleasure
        I
        II
        III
        IV
        V
      Conclusion
        VI
        VII
        VIII
        IX
  Endnotes
  Colophon
  Uncopyright

Landmarks

  Titlepage
  Imprint
  Preface
  Editor’s Note
  Half Title
  Nicomachean Ethics
  Endnotes
  Colophon
  Uncopyright


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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
The_Nicomachean_Ethics

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
Gorgias

PRIMARY CLASS

book
SIMILAR TITLES
The Nicomachean Ethics

DEFINITIONS

Ross, (William) David: (1877-1940) Is principally known as an Aristotelian scholar. He served first as joint editor, later as editor of the Oxford translation of Aristotle. In this series he himself translated the Metaphysics and the Nicomachean Ethics. In addition he published critical texts with commentaries of the Metaphysics and the Physics, and also an edition of Theophrastus's Metaphysics. Besides enjoying a reputation as Aristotelian interpreter, Sir David has gained repute as a writer on morality and ethics. -- C.K.D.



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1:Anyone can become angry —that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way —this is not easy. ARISTOTLE, The Nicomachean Ethics ~ Daniel Goleman,
2:Why is it a good thing to understand this movie so well? Because it will help you live a good life. Absorbing the deep meaning of the Nicomachean Ethics will also help you live a good life, but Groundhog Day will do it with a lot less effort. 35. ~ Charles Murray,

IN CHAPTERS [1/1]



   1 Philosophy






Gorgias, #unset, #Vyasa, #Hinduism
  (1) In the Gorgias, as in nearly all the other dialogues of Plato, we are made aware that formal logic has as yet no existence. The old difficulty of framing a definition recurs. The illusive analogy of the arts and the virtues also continues. The ambiguity of several words, such as nature, custom, the honourable, the good, is not cleared up. The Sophists are still floundering about the distinction of the real and seeming. Figures of speech are made the basis of arguments. The possibility of conceiving a universal art or science, which admits of application to a particular subject-matter, is a difficulty which remains unsolved, and has not altogether ceased to haunt the world at the present day (compare Charmides). The defect of clearness is also apparent in Socrates himself, unless we suppose him to be practising on the simplicity of his opponent, or rather perhaps trying an experiment in dialectics. Nothing can be more fallacious than the contradiction which he pretends to have discovered in the answers of Gorgias (see above). The advantages which he gains over Polus are also due to a false antithesis of pleasure and good, and to an erroneous assertion that an agent and a patient may be described by similar predicates;a mistake which Aristotle partly shares and partly corrects in The Nicomachean Ethics. Traces of a 'robust sophistry' are likewise discernible in his argument with Callicles.
  (2) Although Socrates professes to be convinced by reason only, yet the argument is often a sort of dialectical fiction, by which he conducts himself and others to his own ideal of life and action. And we may sometimes wish that we could have suggested answers to his antagonists, or pointed out to them the rocks which lay concealed under the ambiguous terms good, pleasure, and the like. But it would be as useless to examine his arguments by the requirements of modern logic, as to criticise this ideal from a merely utilitarian point of view. If we say that the ideal is generally regarded as unattainable, and that mankind will by no means agree in thinking that the criminal is happier when punished than when unpunished, any more than they would agree to the stoical paradox that a man may be happy on the rack, Plato has already admitted that the world is against him. Neither does he mean to say that Archelaus is tormented by the stings of conscience; or that the sensations of the impaled criminal are more agreeable than those of the tyrant drowned in luxurious enjoyment. Neither is he speaking, as in the Protagoras, of virtue as a calculation of pleasure, an opinion which he afterwards repudiates in the Phaedo. What then is his meaning? His meaning we shall be able to illustrate best by parallel notions, which, whether justifiable by logic or not, have always existed among mankind. We must remind the reader that Socrates himself implies that he will be understood or appreciated by very few.

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IN WEBGEN [10000/3]

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/31937028-how-to-live-a-good-life
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35488847-how-to-live-a-good-life
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42433243-how-to-live-a-good-life


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