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   94 Antoine de Saint Exup ry

   14 Antoine de Saint Exupery

   3 Nicola Yoon

   3 L J Shen

   3 Connie Willis

   2 Randall Munroe

   2 Megan Hart

   2 Leo Tolstoy

   2 Conrad Potter Aiken

   2 Anonymous


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1:I don't know anyone who can't learn something from The Little Prince. ~ Veronica Henry
2:I got the boot once from Stanley Donen. The film was called The Little Prince. ~ Julie Harris
3:The Little Prince - He was one of the first books I read and I sincerely love ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
4:If an asteroid was very small but supermassive, could you really live on it like the Little Prince? ~ Randall Munroe
5:What makes the desert beautiful,' said the little prince, 'is that somewhere it hides a well... ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
6:Anything essential is invisible to the eye.” My eyes shot up. I’d recognize those words anywhere. “The Little Prince. ~ L J Shen
7:THE LITTLE PRINCE BY ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPERY
Spoiler alert: Love is worth everything. Everything. ~ Nicola Yoon
8:a quote from The Little Prince: “True love is visible not to the eyes, but to the heart, for eyes may be deceived. ~ Gloria Steinem
9:I am who I am and I have the need to be.- Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little PrinceLife is real only then, when "I am". ~ Gurdjieff
10:I am beginning to understand," said the little prince. "There is a flower... I think that she has tamed me. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
11:I am beginning to understand," said the little prince. "There is a flower... I think that she has tamed me... ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
12:The little prince blushed once more. He never answered questions, but when someone blushes, doesn't that mean "yes"? ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
13:It is your own fault, said the little prince. "I never wished you any sort of harm; but you wanted me to tame you . . . ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
14:It is with the heart that one sees rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye. ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPÉRY, The Little Prince ~ Daniel Goleman
15:What does this mean?” “‘What is essential is invisible to the eye.’ It’s a quote from The Little Prince. It was my mom’s favorite book. ~ Mia Asher
16:Were they not satisfied where they were?" asked the little prince.

"No one is ever satisfied where he is," said the switchman. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
17:And the little prince broke into a lovely peal of laughter, which irritated me very much. I like my misfortunes to be taken seriously. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
18:And the little prince broke into a lovely peal of laughter, which irritated me very much. I like my misfortunes to be taken seriously. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
19:I admire you", said the little prince, with a little shrug of his shoulders, "but what is there about my admiration that interests you so much? ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
20:Men in your planet”, said the little prince, “cultivate five thousand roses in the same garden… and they do not find what they are looking for. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
21:What have you come to Earth for?' 'I'm having difficulties with a flower,' the little prince said. 'Ah!' said the snake. And they were both silent. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
22:Oh! That is funny.' And the little prince broke into a lovely peal of laughter which annoyed me no end. I like my misfortunes to be taken seriously. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
23:4 I had thus learned a second fact of great importance: this was that the planet the little prince came from was scarcely any larger than a house! But ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
24:So the little princess thinks she can beat the big bad King for the position", he almost chuckled

"I´ll rip through you like a bull shark as I take my prize". ~ Z Stefani
25:"It's a question of discipline," the little prince told me later on. "When you've finished washing and dressing each morning, you must tend your planet." ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
26:And the fox said to the little prince: men have forgotten this truth, but you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
27:What have you come to Earth for?'
'I'm having difficulties with a flower,' the little prince said.
'Ah!' said the snake.
And they were both silent. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
28:Where are the people?” resumed the little prince at last. “It’s a little lonely in the desert…” “It is lonely when you’re among people, too,” said the snake. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
29:Where are the people?” resumed the little prince at last. “It’s a little lonely in the desert…” “It is lonely when you’re among people, too,” said the snake. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
30:Where are the people?” resumed the little prince at last. “It’s a little lonely in the desert…” “It is lonely when you’re among people, too,” said the snake. a ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
31:Here is my secret. It’s quite simple: One sees clearly only with the heart.Anything essential is invisible to the eyes.”

—Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince ~ Nicola Yoon
32:The proof that the little prince existed is that he was fascinating, that he laughed, that he wanted a sheep. If someone wants a sheep it proves that they exist, ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
33:And the little prince said to the man, 'Grownups never understand anything for themselves, and it is tiresome for children to be always explaining things to them. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
34:For my part,' said the little prince to himself, 'if I had fifty-three minutes to spare, I would take my time walking slowly towards the nearest fountain of water. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
35:My star will just be one of the stars, for you. And so you will love to watch all the stars in the heavens...they will all be your friends."

-the little prince ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
36:Where are the men?" the little prince at last took up the conversation again. "It is a little lonely in the desert..."
"It is also lonely among men," the snake said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
37:My flower is ephemeral," the little prince said to himself, "and she has only four thorns to defend herself against the world. And I have left her on my planet, all alone! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
38:Grown-ups never understand anything by themselves, and it is tiresome for children to be always and forever explaining things to them.” —ANTOINE DE SAINT EXUPÉRY, The Little Prince If ~ Connie Willis
39:Where are the men?" the little prince at last took up the conversation again. "It is a little lonely in the desert..."

"It is also lonely among men," the snake said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
40:You know-- one loves the sunset, when one is so sad..."
"Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?"
But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
41:Where are the men?” the little prince at last took up the conversation
again. “It is a little lonely in the desert. . . ”
“It is also lonely among men,” the snake said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
42:What the little prince would not admit to himself was that he was sorry to leave this planet, blessed as it was with one thousand and four hundred and forty sunsets every day. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
43:The proof that the little prince existed is that he was charming, that he laughed, and that he was looking for a sheep. If anybody wants a sheep, that is a proof that he exists. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
44:The proof that the little prince existed is that he was charming, that he laughed, and that he was looking for a sheep. If anybody wants a sheep, that is a proof that he exists. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
45:Men," said the little prince, "set out on their way in express trains, but they do not know what they are looking for. Then they rush about, and get excited, and turn round and round . . . ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
46:What makes the desert beautiful,” the little prince said, “is that it hides a well somewhere… [...] Whether it’s a house or the stars or the desert, what makes them beautiful is invisible! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
47:It's a question of discipline, — the little prince said to me later. — When you've attended to your own needs in the morning, you've got to attend carefully to the needs of the planet. You've ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
48:The little prince in the book is so wise but so sad. Has so much to offer this world and yet he can’t stop pining for the one he loves.”
Colchester looked right into my eyes and I could not look away. ~ Sierra Simone
49:And I would travel from asteroid to asteroid Trying to find the one that would be ours Building palace after palace until it feels like home From London to Paris, from New York to Rome The Little Prince, Alex Winslow ~ L J Shen
50:People where you live, the little prince said, grow five thousand roses in one garden... Yet they don't find what they're looking for... And yet what they're looking for could be found in a single rose. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
51:It is a question of discipline," the little prince said to me later on. "When you've finished your own toilet in the morning, then it is time to attend to the toilet of your planet, just so, with the greatest care. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
52:People where you live,' the little prince said, 'grow five thousand roses in one garden...yet they don't find what they're looking for'...'And yet what they're looking for could be found in a single rose, or a little water'". ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
53:— One day I saw the sunset forty-four times! And a bit later you added: — You know… when you're so sad, it's lovely to see sunsets … — The day you saw it forty-four times, were you so very sad?" But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
54:Shakespeare put no children in his plays for a reason," Sir Godfrey muttered, glaring at Alf and Binnie. "You're forgetting the Little Prince," Polly reminded him. "Who he had the good sense to kill off in the second act," snapped Sir Godfrey. ~ Connie Willis
55:The little princess, like an old war horse that hears the trumpet, unconsciously and quite forgetting her condition, prepared for the familiar gallop of coquetry, without any ulterior motive or any struggle, but with naive and lighthearted gaiety. ~ Leo Tolstoy
56:At one time I say to myself: "Surely not! The little prince shuts his flower under her glass globe every night, and he watches over his sheep very carefully . . ." Then I am happy. And there is sweetness in the laughter of all the stars. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
57:At one time I say to myself: "Surely not! The little prince shuts his flower under her glass globe every night, and he watches over his sheep very carefully . . ." Then I am happy. And there is sweetness in the laughter of all the stars. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
58:No one has tamed you, and you have tamed no one. You are like my fox when I first knew him. He was only a fox like a hundred thousand foxes. But I have made him my friend, and now he is unique in all the world"

- the little prince ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
59:Shakespeare put no children in his plays for a reason," Sir Godfrey muttered, glaring at Alf and Binnie.
"You're forgetting the Little Prince," Polly reminded him.
"Who he had the good sense to kill off in the second act," snapped Sir Godfrey. ~ Connie Willis
60:It is such a secret place, the land of tears. That is what the narrator ofThe Little Prince says after the little prince argues with him the first time about matters of consequence. And he was right. My land of tears had been a secret for a very long time. ~ Megan Hart
61:My flower is ephemeral," the little prince said to himself, "and she has only four thorns to defend herself against the world. And I have left her on my planet, all alone!"
That was his first moment of regret. But he took courage once more. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
62:One day I saw the sun set forty-four times!' And a little later you added, 'You know, when you're feeling very sad, sunsets are wonderful...'
'On the day of the forty-four times, were you feeling very sad?'
But the little prince didn't answer. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
63:One day," you said to me, "I saw the sunset forty-four times!" And a little later you added: "You know-- one loves the sunset, when one is so sad..." "Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?" But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
64:One day," you said to me, "I saw the sunset forty-four times!"
And a little later you added:
"You know- one loves the sunset, when one is sad..."
"Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?"
But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
65:One day,” you said to me, “I saw the sunset forty-four times!”
And a little later you added:
“You know– one loves the sunset, when one is so sad. . . ”
“Were you so sad, then?” I asked, “on the day of the forty-four sunsets?”
But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
66:One day, I watched the sun setting forty-four times," you told me. And a little later, you added: "You know... when one is so terribly sad, one loves sunsets..."
"The day you watched those fourty-four sunsets, were you sad?" I asked.
But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
67:The men where you live," said the little prince, "raise five thousand roses in the same garden--and they do not find in it what they are looking for." "They do not find it," I replied. "And yet what they are looking for could be found in one single rose, or in a little water. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
68:The men where you live,” said the little prince, “raise five thousand roses in the same garden– and they do not find in it what they are looking for.”
“They do not find it,” I replied.
“And yet what they are looking for could be found in one single rose, or in a little water. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
69:One day," you said to me, "I saw the sunset forty-four times!"

And a little later you added:
"You know-- one loves the sunset, when one is so sad..."

"Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?"

But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
70:One day," you said to me, "I saw the sunset forty-four times!"

And a little later you added:

"You know-- one loves the sunet, when one is so sad..."

"Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?"

But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
71:One day," you said to me, "I saw the sunset forty-four times!"

And a little later you added:

"You know--one loves the sunset, when one is so sad . . ."

"Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?"

But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
72:Now, let me tell you something about my album. Midnight Blue broke the record for fastest-recording album in the history of that Williamsburg studio. It took me one week to record and produce twelve songs. The Little Prince Chasing Asteroids Under Darker Skies Maybe It’s You Was She Worth It? Perfectly Paranoid ~ L J Shen
73:The Little Prince took this a step further, imagining an asteroid as a tiny planet with gravity, air, and a rose. There’s no point in trying to critique the science here, because (1) it’s not a story about asteroids, and (2) it opens with a parable about how foolish adults are for looking at everything too literally. ~ Randall Munroe
74:Do you remember when we read The Little Prince together for the first time? I was so upset that he died in the end. I didn’t understand how he could choose death just so he could get back to his rose. I think I understand it now. He wasn’t choosing to die. His rose was his whole life. Without her, he wasn’t really alive. ~ Nicola Yoon
75:Why are you drinking?" demanded the little prince. "So that I may forget," repiled the tipper. "Forget what?" inquired the little prince, who already was sorry for him. "Forget that I am ashamed," the tipper confessed, hanging his head. "Ashamed of what?" insisted the little prince, who wanted to help him. "Ashamed of drinking! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
76:The fox is answering the Little Prince's question. What does that mean . . . tame? asks the Little Prince. It
means to establish ties. One only understands the things that one tames. Men have no more time to understand anything, they buy things all ready made at the shops, but there is no shop anywhere one can buy friendship. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
77:The Little Prince : What are you doing there?
The Tippler : I am drinking.

The Little Prince : Why are you drinking?
The Tippler : So that I may forget.

The Little Prince : Forget what?
The Tippler : Forget that I am ashamed.

The Little Prince : Ashamed of what?
The Tippler : Ashamed of drinking! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
78:Why are you drinking? demanded the little prince. "So that I may forget," replied the tippler. "Forget what?" inquired the little prince, who was already sorry for him. "Forget that I am ashamed," the tippler confessed, hanging his head. "Ashamed of what?" insisted the little prince, who wanted to help him. "Ashamed of drinking! ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
79:I wasn't into fairytales when I was little. I was of the generation of the earlier Disney films where many of the female characters, with the exception of the Maleficent's, were not little girls that I admired... the little princesses. They weren't characters that I identified with. I think that's very different now for my girls and more recent films. ~ Angelina Jolie
80:Why are you drinking? demanded the little prince.
"So that I may forget," replied the tippler.
"Forget what?" inquired the little prince, who was already sorry for him.
"Forget that I am ashamed," the tippler confessed, hanging his head.
"Ashamed of what?" insisted the little prince, who wanted to help him.
"Ashamed of drinking! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
81:People do not have time to know anything. They buy things ready, from sellers. But as there are no vendors of friends, people have no friends anymore. If you want to have a friend, tame me! If you tame me, we'll need each other. You will be, for me, unmatched in the world.
I will be for you unnamed in the world ... (Fox to the Little Prince) ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
82:The little prince went away, to look again at the roses.
"You are not at all like my rose," he said. "As yet, you are nothing. No one has tamed you, and you have tamed no one.
"You're like my fox when I first knew him. He was only a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But I have made him my friend, and now he is unique in all the world. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
83:It's a question of discipline,' the little prince told me later on. 'when you've finished washing and dressing each morning, you must tend your planet. you must be sure you pull up the baobabs regularly, as soon as you can tell them apart from the rosebushes, which they closely resemble when they're very young. It's very tedious work, but very easy. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
84:It's a question of discipline,' the little prince told me later on. 'when you've finished washing and dressing each morning, you must tend your planet. you must be sure you pull up the baobabs regularly, as soon as you can tell them apart from the rosebushes, which they closely resemble when they're very young. It's very tedious work, but very easy. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
85:What must I do, to tame you?” asked the little prince.

“You must be very patient,” replied the fox. “First you will sit down at a little distance from me, like that, in the grass. I shall look at you out of the corner of my eye, and you will say nothing. Words are the source of misunderstandings. But you will sit a little closer to me, every day... ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
86:So you fell out of the sky, too?" the Little Prince asked the pilot who tells the story, and I thought yes, I'd fallen out of the sky, too, but there was no possible testimony of my fall, there was no black box that anybody could consult, nor was there any black box of Ricardo Laverde's fall, human lives don't have these technological luxuries to fall back on. ~ Juan Gabriel V squez
87:Why are you drinking? - the little prince asked.
- In order to forget - replied the drunkard.
- To forget what? - enquired the little prince, who was already feeling sorry for him.
- To forget that I am ashamed - the drunkard confessed, hanging his head.
- Ashamed of what? - asked the little prince who wanted to help him.
- Ashamed of drinking! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
88:- What does it mean to admire?
- To admire means to recognize that I am the most beautiful, the best dressed, the richest and the most intelligent man on the planet.
- But you're alone on your planet!
- Make me this pleasure. Admire me anyway!
"I admire you," said the little prince, shrugging his shoulders a little, "but how can that interest you? ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
89:People where you live," the little prince said, "grow five thousand roses in one garden... yet they don't find what they're looking for... They don't find it," I answered. And yet what they're looking for could be found in a single rose, or a little water..." Of course," I answered. And the little prince added, "But eyes are blind. You have to look with the heart. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
90:Feeling like she really was just seven or eight, Claire sat down on the floor, books all around her, and she opened the last one she’d picked up. Even though it was dark, and even though her eyes couldn’t see the words, she knew them.

Knew the little prince’s story as well as her own.

She closed her eyes. She leaned her head forward against the book. And she sobbed. ~ Jennifer Lynn Barnes
91:The men where you live," said the little prince, "raise five thousand roses in the same garden--and they do not find in it what they are looking for." "They do not find it," I replied. "And yet what they are looking for could be found in one single rose, or in a little water." "Yes, that is true," I said. And the little prince added: "But the eyes are blind. One must look with the heart... ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
92:People where you live," the little prince said, "grow five thousand roses in one garden... yet they don't find what they're looking for...

They don't find it," I answered.

And yet what they're looking for could be found in a single rose, or a little water..."

Of course," I answered.

And the little prince added, "But eyes are blind. You have to look with the heart. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
93:What is that big book?" said the little prince. "What are you doing?"

"I am a geographer," said the old gentleman.

"What is a geographer?" asked the little prince.

"A geographer is a scholar who knows the location of all the seas, rivers, towns, mountains, and deserts."

"That is very interesting," said the little prince. "Here at last is a man who has a real profession! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
94:Good morning," said the little prince. "Good morning," said the flower. "Where are the men?" the little prince asked, politely. The flower had once seen a caravan passing. "Men?" she echoed. "I think there are six or seven of them in existence. I saw them, several years ago. But one never knows where to find them. The wind blows them away. they have no roots, and that makes their life very difficult. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
95:It's all a great mystery. For you, who love the little prince, too. As for me, nothing in the universe can be the same if somewhere, no one knows where, a sheep we never saw has or has not eaten a rose....
Look up at the sky. Ask yourself, "Has the sheep eaten the flower or not?" And you'll see how everything changes....
And no grown-up will ever understand how such a thing could be so important! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
96:Here, then, is a great mystery. For you who also love the little prince, and for me, nothing in the universe can be the same if somewhere, we do not know, a sheep that we never saw has, yes or no?- eaten a rose...
Look up at the sky, ask yourselves: is it yes or no? Has the sheep eaten the flower? And you will see how everything changes....
And no grownup will ever understand that this is a matter of so much of importance! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
97:Good morning," said the flower.
"Where are the men?" the little prince asked, politely. The flower had once seen a caravan passing.
"Men?" she echoed. "I think there are six or seven of them in existence. I saw them, several years ago. But one never knows where to find them. The wind blows them away. They have no roots, and that makes their life very difficult."
"Goodbye," said the little prince. "Goodbye," said the flower. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
98:But on your tiny planet, my little prince, all you need do is move your chair a few steps. You can see the day end and the twilight falling whenever you like...

"One day," you said to me, "I saw the sunset forty-four times!"

And a little later you added: "You know, one loves the sunset, when one is so sad..." "Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?"

But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
99:This novel was in a sense developed in stages. First published as a series in St. Nicholas Magazine in 1887 as Sara Crewe, or What Happened at Miss Minchin’s, it proved extremely popular and Burnett followed this with an equally popular dramatisation of the serial, re-named The Little Princess. Burnett was then persuaded to re-write the fictional version under the new name, whilst including the numerous amendments she had made to the story in the play. ~ Frances Hodgson Burnett
100:So the little prince tamed the fox. And when the hour of his departure drew near-- Ah," said the fox, "I shall cry." It is your own fault," said the little prince. "I never wished you any sort of harm; but you wanted me to tame you . . ." Yes, that is so," said the fox. But now you are going to cry!" said the little prince. Yes, that is so," said the fox. Then it has done you no good at all!" It has done me good," said the fox, "because of the color of the wheat fields. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
101:The stars are beautiful, because of a flower that cannot be seen... The desert is beautiful," the little prince added. And that was true. I have always loved the desert. One sits down on a desert sand dune, sees nothing, hears nothing. Yet through the silence something throbs, and gleams... "What makes the desert beautiful," said the little prince, "is that somewhere it hides a well..." I was astonished by a sudden understanding of that mysterious radiation of the sands. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
102:Yet last night he had dreamt of Rhaegar’s children. Lord Tywin had laid the bodies beneath the Iron Throne, wrapped in the crimson cloaks of his house guard. That was clever of him; the blood did not show so badly against the red cloth. The little princess had been barefoot, still dressed in her bed gown, and the boy … the boy … Ned could not let that happen again. The realm could not withstand a second mad king, another dance of blood and vengeance. He must find some way to save the children. ~ Anonymous
103:So the little prince tamed the fox. And when the time for him to leave was approaching:
"Oh!", said the fox. "I am going to cry."
"It's your own fault," said the little prince. "I never wished you any harm; but you wanted me to tame you..."
"I know," said the fox.
"And now you're going to cry!" said the little prince.
"I know," said the fox.
"So you have gained nothing from it at all!"
"Yes, I have gained something," said the fox, "because of the colour of the corn. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
104:That was how the little prince tamed the fox. And when the time was near:
"Ah!" the fox said. "I shall weep."
"It's your own fault," the little prince said. "I never wanted to do you any harm, but you insisted that I tame you...."
"Yes, of course," the fox said.
"Then you get nothing out of it?"
"I get something," the fox said, "because of the color of the wheat." Then he added, "Go look at the roses again. You'll understand that yours is the only rose in all the world. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
105:So the little prince tamed the fox. And when the hour of his departure drew near--

Ah," said the fox, "I shall cry."

It is your own fault," said the little prince. "I never wished you any sort of harm; but you wanted me to tame you . . ."

Yes, that is so," said the fox.

But now you are going to cry!" said the little prince.

Yes, that is so," said the fox.

Then it has done you no good at all!"

It has done me good," said the fox, "because of the color of the wheat fields. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
106:Why are you drinking? - the little prince asked.
- In order to forget - replied the drunkard.
- To forget what? - inquired the little prince, who was already feeling sorry for him.
- To forget that I am ashamed - the drunkard confessed, hanging his head.
- Ashamed of what? - asked the little prince who wanted to help him.
- Ashamed of drinking! - concluded the drunkard, withdrawing into total silence.
And the little prince went away, puzzled.
'Grown-ups really are very, very odd', he said to himself as he continued his journey. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
107:GOOD MORNING," said the little prince. "Good Morning," said the salesclerk. This was a salesclerk who sold pills invented to quench thirst. Swallow one a week and you no longer feel any need to drink. "Why do you sell these pills?" "They save so much time," the salesclerk said. "Experts have calculated that you can save fifty-three minutes a week." "And what do you do with those fifty-three minutes?" "Whatever you like." "If I had fifty-three minutes to spend as I liked," the little prince said to himself, "I'd walk very slowly toward a water fountain. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
108:Fiction, literature, all art, connects us to our past, explains our present, and predicts our future. Without that universality, we would be very savage to one another, even more savage than we are now. That is why it becomes so dangerous when our elite, in terms of our education policy, deprive our children by reducing the role of literature. We must give our students the opportunity to, for example, read The Little Prince in the 21st century and connect to that Frenchman who has been gone for a long, long time. This experience has heartbreaking power, and is beautiful. ~ Anonymous
109:Do you really admire me very much.?" he asked the little prince.
"What does "admire" mean.?"
"To admire means that you consider me the handsomest, the best dressed, the richest and the most intelligent man on this planet."
"But you are all alone on your planet.!"
"Do me this kindness. Admire me all the same.!"
"I admire you," said the little prince with a slight shrug of his shoulders, "but why should that mean so much to you.?"
And the little prince went away.
"Grown- ups are really very odd," he said to himself, as he continued on his journey. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
110:And they heard the roaring thunder of a third brilliantly lighted express. "Are they pursuing the first travelers?" demanded the little prince. "They are pursuing nothing at all," said the switchman. "They are asleep in there, or if they are not asleep they are yawning. Only the children are flattening their noses against the windowpanes." "Only the children know what they are looking for," said the little prince. "They waste their time over a rag doll and it becomes very important to them; and if anybody takes it away from them, they cry..." "They are lucky," the switchman said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery
111:If you could fly to France in one minute, you could go straight into the sunset, right from noon. Unfortunately, France is too far away for that. But on your tiny planet, my little prince, all you need do is move your chair a few steps. You can see the day end and the twilight falling whenever you like...
"One day," you said to me, "I saw the sunset forty-four times!"
And a little later you added:
"You know -- one loves the sunset, when one is so sad..."
"Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?"
But the little prince made no reply. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
112:The little prince, who was present at the first appearance of a huge bud, felt
at once that some sort of miraculous apparition must emerge from it. But
the flower was not satisfied to complete the preparations for her beauty in the
shelter of her green chamber. She chose her colours with the greatest care. She
adjusted her petals one by one. She did not wish to go out into the world all
rumpled, like the field poppies. It was only in the full radiance of her beauty
that she wished to appear. Oh, yes! She was a coquettish creature! And her
mysterious adornment lasted for days and days. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
113:And they heard the roaring thunder of a third brilliantly lighted express.

"Are they pursuing the first travelers?" demanded the little prince.

"They are pursuing nothing at all," said the switchman. "They are asleep in there, or if they are not asleep they are yawning. Only the children are flattening their noses against the windowpanes."

"Only the children know what they are looking for," said the little prince. "They waste their time over a rag doll and it becomes very important to them; and if anybody takes it away from them, they cry..."

"They are lucky," the switchman said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
114:When Cold December
WHEN cold December
Froze to grisamber
The jangling bells on the sweet rose-trees-Then fading slow
And furred is the snow
As the almond's sweet husk-And smelling like musk.
The snow amygdaline
Under the eglantine
Where the bristling stars shine
Like a gilt porcupine-The snow confesses
The little Princesses
On their small chioppines
Dance under the orpines.
See the casuistries
Of their slant fluttering eyes-Gilt as the zodiac
(Dancing Herodiac).
Only the snow slides
Like gilded myrrh-From the rose-branches--hides
Rose-roots that stir.
~ Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell
115:If I ordered a general to fly from one flower to another like a butterfly, or to write a tragic drama, or to change himself into a sea bird, and if the general did not carry out the order that he had received, which one of us would be in the wrong?" The king demanded. "The general or myself?" "You," said the little prince firmly. "Exactly. One must require from each one the duty which each one can perform," the king went on. "Accepted authority rests first of all on reason. If you ordered your people to go and throw themselves into the sea, they would rise up in revolution. I have the right to require obedience because my orders are reasonable. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
116:This is, to me, the loveliest and saddest landscape in the world. It is the same as that on the preceding page, but I have drawn it again to impress it on your memory. It is here that the little prince appeared on Earth, and disappeared.

Look at it carefully so that you will be sure to recognise it in case you travel some day to the African desert. And, if you should come upon this spot, please do not hurry on. Wait for a time, exactly under the star. Then, if a little man appears who laughs, who has golden hair and who refuses to answer questions, you will know who he is. If this should happen, please comfort me. Send me word that he has come back. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
117:If I ordered a general to fly from one flower to another like a butterfly, or to write a tragic drama, or to change himself into a sea bird, and if the general did not carry out the order that he had received, which one of us would be in the wrong?" the king demanded. "The general, or myself?"

"You," said the little prince firmly.

"Exactly. One much require from each one the duty which each one can perform," the king went on. "Accepted authority rests first of all on reason. If you ordered your people to go and throw themselves into the sea, they would rise up in revolution. I have the right to require obedience because my orders are reasonable. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
118:What are you doing?’ he asked the drunkard, who was sitting silently in front of a collection of bottles, some empty and some full. ‘I’m drinking,’ replied the drunkard gloomily. ‘Why do you drink?’ the little prince asked. ‘To forget,’ replied the drunkard. ‘To forget what?’ enquired the little prince, who already felt sorry for him. ‘To forget that I’m ashamed,’ confessed the drunkard hanging his head. ‘Ashamed of what?’ asked the little prince, who wanted to help him. ‘Ashamed of drinking!’ ended the drunkard, with-drawing into a permanent silence. And the little prince left, puzzled. Grown-ups really are very strange, mused the little prince as he continued on his travels. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
119:Good morning," said the little prince.

Good morning," said the merchant.

This was a merchant who sold pills that had been invented to quench thirst. You need only swallow one pill a week, and you would feel no need for anything to drink.

Why are you selling those?" asked the little prince.

Because they save a tremendous amount of time," said the merchant. "Computations have been made by experts. With these pills, you save fifty-three minutes in every week."
And what do I do with those fifty-three minutes?"

Anything you like..."

As for me," said the little prince to himself, "if I had fifty-three minutes to spend as I liked, I should walk at my leisure toward a spring of fresh water. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
120:The fifth planet was very strange. It was the smallest of all. There was just enough room on it for a street lamp and a lamp-lighter. The little prince was not able to reach any explanation of the use of a street lamp and a lamplighter, somewhere in the heavens, on a planet which had no people, and not one house. But he said to himself, nevertheless: "It may well be that this man is absurd. But he is not so absurd as the king, the conceited man, the businessman, and the tippler. For at least his work has some meaning. When he lights his street lamp, it is as if he brought one more star to life, or one flower. When he puts out his lamp, he sends the flower, or the star, to sleep. That is a beautiful occupation. And since it is beautiful, it is truly useful. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
121:Nothing is perfect," sighed the fox. "My life is very monotonous. I run after the chickens; the men run after me. All the chickens are the same; all the men are the same. Consequently, I get a little bored. But if you tame me, my days will be as if filled with sunlight. I shall know the sound of a footstep different from all the rest. ...You see the fields of corn? Well, I don't eat bread. Corn is of no use to me. Corn fields remind me of nothing. Which is sad. On the other hand, your hair is the colour of gold. So think how wonderful it will be when you have tamed me. The corn, which is golden, will remind me of you. And I will come to love the sound of the wind in the field of corn.
The fox fell silent and looked steadily at the little prince for a long time.
"Please," he said, "tame me! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
122:Please-tame me!' he said.

'I want to, very much,' the little prince replied. 'But I have not much time. I have friends to discover, and a great many things to understand.'

'One only understands the things that one tames,' said the fox. 'Men have no more time to understand anything. They buy things all ready made at the shops. But there is no shop anywhere where one can buy friendship, and so men have no friends any more. If you want a friend, tame me.'

'What must I do, to tame you?' asked the little prince.

'You must be very patient,' replied the fox. 'First you will sit down at a little distance from me-like that-in the grass. I shall look at you out of the corner of my eye, and you will say nothing. Words are the source of misunderstandings. But you will sit a little closer to me, every day... ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
123:What must I do, to tame you?" asked the little prince.
"You must be very patient," replied the fox. "First you will sit down at a little distance from me--like that--in the grass. I shall look at you out of the corner of my eye, and you will say nothing. Words are the source of misunderstandings. But you will sit a little closer to me, every day . . ."

The next day the little prince came back.
"It would have been better to come back at the same hour," said the fox. "If, for example, you come at four o'clock in the afternoon, then at three o'clock I shall begin to be happy. I shall feel happier and happier as the hour advances. At four o'clock, I shall already be worrying and jumping about. I shall show you how happy I am! But if you come at just any time, I shall never know at what hour my heart is to be ready to greet you... ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
124:Men," said the fox. "They have guns, and they hunt. It is very disturbing. They also raise chickens. these are their only interests. Are you looking fir chickens?" "No," said the little prince. "I am looking for friends. What does that mean-- 'tame'?" "It is an act to often neglected," said the fox. "It means to establish ties." "'To establish ties'?" "Just that," said the fox. "To me, you are still nothing more than a little boy who is just like a hundred thousand other little boys, And I have no need of you. And you, on your part, have no need of me. To you, I am nothing more than a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But if you tame me, then we shall need each other. To me, you will be unique in all the world. To you, I shall be unique in all the world..." "I am beginning to understand," said the little prince. "there is a flower... I think that she has tamed me... ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
125:Improvisations: Light And Snow: 13
My heart is an old house, and in that forlorn old house,
In the very centre, dark and forgotten,
Is a locked room where an enchanted princess
Lies sleeping.
But sometimes, in that dark house,
As if almost from the stars, far away,
Sounds whisper in that secret room —
Faint voices, music, a dying trill of laughter?
And suddenly, from her long sleep,
The beautiful princess awakes and dances.
Who is she? I do not know.
Why does she dance? Do not ask me! —
Yet to-day, when I saw you,
When I saw your eyes troubled with the trouble of happiness,
And your mouth trembling into a smile,
And your fingers pull shyly forward, —
Softly, in that room,
The little princess arose
And danced;
And as she danced the old house gravely trembled
With its vague and delicious secret.
~ Conrad Potter Aiken
126:But he came back to his idea.

"My life is very monotonous," the fox said. "I hunt chickens; men hunt me. All the chickens are just alike, and all the men are just alike. And, in consequence, I am a little bored. But if you tame me, it will be as if the sun came to shine on my life. I shall know the sound of a step that will be different from all the others. Other steps send me hurrying back underneath the ground. Yours will call me, like music, out of my burrow. And then look: you see the grain-fields down yonder? I do not eat bread. Wheat is of no use to me. The wheat fields have nothing to say to me. And that is sad. But you have hair that is the color of gold. Think how wonderful that will be when you have tamed me! The grain, which is also golden, will bring me back the thought of you. And I shall love to listen to the wind in the wheat . . ."

The fox gazed at the little prince, for a long time. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
127:The little Pprince looked at the snake for a long time. "You're a funny little creature," he said at last, "no thicker than a finger."
But I'm more powerful than a king's finger," the snake said.
The little Prince smiled.
"You're not very powerful. . . You don't even have feet, You can't travel very far."
I can take you further than a ship," the snake said. He coiled around the prince's ankle, like a golden bracelet. "Anyone I touch, I send back to the land from which he came," the snake went on. "But you're innocent, and you come from a star. . . "
The little prince made no reply.
"I feel sorry for you, being so weak on this granite earth," said the snake. "I can help you, someday, if you grow too homesick for your planet, I can---"
"Oh I understand just what you mean," said the little primce,"but why do you always speak in riddles?"
"I solve them all.," said the snake.
And then were both silent. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
128:After dinner Natasha went to the clavichord, at Prince Andrey's request, and began singing. Prince Andrey stood at the window, talking to the ladies, and listened to her. In the middle of a phrase, Prince Andrey ceased speaking, and felt suddenly a lump in his throat from tears, the possibility of which he had never dreamed of in himself. He looked at Natasha singing, and something new and blissful stirred in his soul. He was happy, and at the same time he was sad. He certainly had nothing to weep about, but he was ready to weep. For what? For his past love? For the little princess? For his lost illusions? For his hopes for the future? Yes, and no. The chief thing which made him ready to weep was a sudden, vivid sense of the fearful contrast between something infinitely great and illimitable existing in him, and something limited and material, which he himself was, and even she was. This contrast made his heart ache, and rejoiced him while she was singing. ~ Leo Tolstoy
129:The little prince went back to look at the roses again.
"You're not at all like my rose. You're nothing at all yet," he told them. "No one has tamed you and you haven't tamed anyone. You're the way my fox was. He was just a fox like a hundred thousand others. But I've made him my friend, and now he's the only fox in all the world."
And the roses were humbled.
"You're lovely, but you're empty," he went on. "One couldn't die for you. Of course, an ordinary passerby would think my rose looked just like you. But my rose, all on her own, is more important than all of you together, since she's the one I've watered. Since she's the one I put under glass. Since she's the one I sheltered behind a screen. Since she's the one for whom I killed the caterpillars (except the two or three for butterflies.) Since she's the one I listened to when she complained, or when she boasted, or even sometimes when she said nothing at all. Since she's my rose. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
130:Good evening," said the little prince courteously. "Good evening," said the snake. "What planet is this on which I have come down?" asked the little prince. "This is Earth; this is Africa," the snake answered. "Ah! Then there are no people eon the Earth?" "This is the desert. there are no people in the desert. The Earth is large," said the snake. the little prince sat down on a stone, and raised his eyes toward the sky. "I wonder," he said, "whether the stars are set alight in heaven so that one day each one of us may find his own again... Look at my planet. It is right there above us. But how far away it is! "It is beautiful," the snake said. "What has brought you here?" "I have been having some trouble with a flower," said the little prince. "Ah!" said the snake. And they were both silent. "Where are the men?" the little prince at last took up the conversation again. "It is a little lonely in the desert..." "it is also lonely among men," the snake said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
131:But Hock Seng doesn’t contest the foreigner’s words. He’ll put out the bounty, regardless. If the cats are allowed to stay, the workers will start rumors that Phii Oun the cheshire trickster spirit has caused the calamity. The devil cats flicker closer. Calico and ginger, black as night—all of them fading in and out of view as their bodies take on the colors of their surroundings. They shade red as they dip into the blood pool.  Hock Seng has heard that cheshires were supposedly created by a calorie executive—some PurCal or AgriGen man, most likely—for a daughter’s birthday. A party favor for when the little princess turned as old as Lewis Carroll’s Alice.  The child guests took their new pets home where they mated with natural felines, and within twenty years, the devil cats were on every continent and Felis domesticus was gone from the face of the world, replaced by a genetic string that bred true ninety-eight percent of the time. The Green Headbands in Malaya hated Chinese people and cheshires equally, but as far as Hock Seng knows, the devil cats still thrive there.  ~ Paolo Bacigalupi
132:The little prince went away, to look again at the roses.

"You are not at all like my rose," he said. "As yet you are nothing. No one has tamed you, and you have tamed no one. You are like my fox when I first knew him. He was only a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But I have made him my friend, and now he is unique in all the world."

And the roses were very much embarassed.

"You are beautiful, but you are empty," he went on. "One could not die for you. To be sure, an ordinary passerby would think that my rose looked just like you--the rose that belongs to me. But in herself alone she is more important than all the hundreds of you other roses: because it is she that I have watered; because it is she that I have put under the glass globe; because it is she that I have sheltered behind the screen; because it is for her that I have killed the caterpillars (except the two or three that we saved to become butterflies); because it is she that I have listened to, when she grumbled, or boasted, or ever sometimes when she said nothing. Because she is my rose. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
133:To me, you are still nothing more than a little boy who is just like a hundred thousand other little boys. And I have no need of you. And you, on your part, have no need of me. To you, I am nothing more than a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But if you tame me, then we shall need each other. To me, you will be unique in all the world. To you, I shall be unique in all the world..."

But if you tame me, it will be as if the sun came to shine on my life . I shall know the sound of a step that will be different from all the others. Other steps send me hurrying back underneath the ground. Yours will call me, like music, out of my burrow. And then look: you see the grain-fields down yonder? I do not eat bread. Wheat is of no use to me. The wheat fields have nothing to say to me. And that is sad. But you have hair that is the colour of gold. Think how wonderful that will be when you have tamed me! The grain, which is also golden, will bring me back the thought of you. And I shall love to listen to the wind in the wheat..." The fox gazed at the little prince, for a long time. "Please, tame me!" he said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
134:,Grown-ups love figures. When you describe a new friend to them, they never ask you about the important things. They never say 'What's his voice like? What are his favourite games? Does he collect butterflies?' Instead they demand 'How old is he? How many brothers has he? How much does he weigh? How much does his father earn?' Only then do they feel they know him. If you say to the grown-ups: 'I've seen a lovely house made of pink brick, with geraniums in the windows and doves on the rood', they are unable to picture such a house. You must say: I saw a house that come a hundred thousand francs.' Then they cry out: 'How pretty!'
Again, you might say to them: 'The proof that the little prince existed is that he was enchanting, that he laughed, and that he was looking for a sheep. When someone wants a sheep, it is proof that they exist.' The grown-ups will merely shrug their shoulders, and treat you like a child. But if you tell them: 'The planet he came from is Asteroid B 612', then they will be convinced, and will spare you all their question. That is how they are. You must not hold it against them. Children have to be very indulgent towards grown-ups. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
135:Who are you?” asked the little prince, and added, “You are very pretty to
look at.”
“I am a fox,” said the fox.
“Come and play with me,” proposed the little prince. “I am so unhappy.”
“I cannot play with you,” the fox said. “I am not tamed.”
“Ah! Please excuse me,” said the little prince.
But, after some thought, he added: “What does that mean– ‘tame’?”
“You do not live here,” said the fox. “What is it that you are looking for?”
“I am looking for men,” said the little prince. “What does that mean–
‘tame’?”
“Men,” said the fox. “They have guns, and they hunt. It is very disturbing.
They also raise chickens. These are their only interests. Are you looking for
chickens?”
“No,” said the little prince. “I am looking for friends. What does that
mean– ‘tame’?”
“It is an act too often neglected,” said the fox. It means to establish ties.”
“ ‘To establish ties’?”
“Just that,” said the fox. “To me, you are still nothing more than a little
boy who is just like a hundred thousand other little boys. And I have no need
of you. And you, on your part, have no need of me. To you, I am nothing more
than a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But if you tame me, then we
shall need each other. To me, you will be unique in all the world. To you, I
shall be unique in all the world. . . ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
136:Good morning," said the little prince.
"Good morning," said the railway switchman.
"What do you do here?" the little prince asked.
"I sort out travelers, in bundles of a thousand," said the switchman.
"I send off the trains that carry them: now to the right, now to the left."

And a brilliantly lighted express train shook the switchman's cabin as it rushed by with a roar like thunder.

"They are in a great hurry," said the little prince. "What are they looking for?"
"Not even the locomotive engineer knows that," said the switchman.

And a second brilliantly lighted express thundered by, in the opposite direction.

"Are they coming back already?" demanded the little prince.
"These are not the same ones," said the switchman. "It is an exchange."
"Were they not satisfied where they were?" asked the little prince.
"No one is ever satisfied where he is," said the switchman.

And they heard the roaring thunder of a third brilliantly lighted express.

"Are they pursuing the first travelers?" demanded the little prince.
"They are pursuing nothing at all," said the switchman.
"They are asleep in there, or if they are not asleep they are yawning.
Only the children are flattening their noses against the windowpanes."

"Only the children know what they are looking for," said the little prince.
"They waste their time over a rag doll and it becomes very important to them;
and if anybody takes it away from them, they cry . . ."

"They are lucky," the switchman said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
137:And when the hour of his departure drew near--

"Ah," said the fox, "I shall cry."

"It is your own fault," said the little prince. "I never wished you any sort of harm; but you wanted me to tame you . . ."

"Yes, that is so," said the fox.

"But now you are going to cry!" said the little prince.

"Yes, that is so," said the fox.

"Then it has done you no good at all!"

"It has done me good," said the fox, "because of the color of the wheat fields." And then he added:

"Go and look again at the roses. You will understand now that yours is unique in all the world. Then come back to say goodbye to me, and I will make you a present of a secret."


The little prince went away, to look again at the roses.
....
And he went back to meet the fox.

"Goodbye," he said.

"Goodbye," said the fox. "And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."

"What is essential is invisible to the eye," the little prince repeated, so that he would be sure to remember.

"It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important."

"It is the time I have wasted for my rose--" said the little prince, so that he would be sure to remember.

"Men have forgotten this truth," said the fox. "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. You are responsible for your rose . . ."


"I am responsible for my rose," the little prince repeated, so that he would be sure to remember. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
138:When the Devil was a woman,
When Lilith wound
Her ebony hair in heavy braids,
And framed
Her pale features all 'round
With Botticelli's tangled thoughts,
When she, smiling softly,
Ringed all her slim fingers
In golden bands with brilliant stones,
When she leafed through Villiers
And loved Huysmans,
When she fathomed Maeterlinck's silence
And bathed her Soul
In Gabriel d'Annunzio's colors,
She even laughed
And as she laughed,
The little princess of serpents sprang
Out of her mouth.
Then the most beautiful of she-devils
Sought after the serpent,
She seized the Queen of Serpents
With her ringed finger,
So that she wound and hissed
Hissed, hissed
And spit venom.
In a heavy copper vase;
Damp earth,
Black damp earth
She scattered upon it.
Lightly her great hands caressed
This heavy copper vase
All around,
Her pale lips lightly sang
Her ancient curse.
Like a children's rhyme her curses chimed,
Soft and languid
Languid as the kisses,
That the damp earth drank
From her mouth,
But life arose in the vase,
And tempted by her languid kisses,
And tempted by those sweet tones,
From the black earth slowly there crept,
Orchids -
When the most beloved
Adorns her pale features before the mirror
All 'round with Botticelli's adders,
There creep sideways from the copper vase,
Orchids-
Devil's blossoms which the ancient earth,
Wed by Lilith's curse
To serpent's venom, has borne to the light
Orchids-
The Devil's blossoms-

"The Diary Of An Orange Tree ~ Hanns Heinz Ewers
139:These portraits were extraordinary enough, but dominating the whole room was a painting the like of which I’d never seen before, of a small girl, perhaps four or five years old, encased in a stiff satin dress as wide as a table at the hips, very strange on a child. Las Meninas, it was called, which means The Maids of Honour, and sure enough the princess was surrounded by courtiers, a nun, a finely dressed female dwarf and a small boy, or perhaps he was another dwarf, prodding a dog with his foot. To the left, a painter with a comically Spanish moustache – a likeness, I supposed, of Velázquez himself – stood in front of a huge canvas, facing out as if he was painting not the little girl but the viewer, specifically me, Douglas Timothy Petersen, the illusion so convincing that I wanted to crane around the canvas to see what he’d made of my nose. A mirror on the back wall showed two other figures, the girl’s parents I guessed, Mariana and Philip IV, the large-chinned gentleman on the wall to my left. Despite being distant and blurred, it seemed that they were the true subject of the artist’s portrait, but nevertheless the artist, the little girl, the female dwarf all seemed to stare out of the painting at me with such level intensity that I began to feel rather self-conscious, and confused, too, as to how a painting could have so many subjects: the little princess, the ladies in waiting, the artist, the royal couple, and me. It was as disorientating as the moment when you step between two mirrors and see infinite versions of yourself stretching into, well, infinity. Clearly there was ‘a lot going on’ in this painting too, and I’d return with Albie soon. ~ David Nicholls
140:No, Dan.”

“And you want me to go.”

I looked into his eyes. “No. I don’t.”

He moved closer, encouraged, and put his hand on my shoulder. “Then what do you want, Elle?”

“I want you not to have to settle,” I told him.

“Is that what you think I’m doing?”

“I know that’s what you’ll be doing. Because if you want more from me, you’re not going to get it.”

He said nothing for a long time. “When I readThe Little Prince, I thought you must be the rose. You with your four thorns, convincing me you’re able to defend yourself. But now I know you hate roses. So you must be the fox instead.

So maybe what you really want is for me to tame you.”

From a lot of men, that speech would have made me laugh, or roll my eyes. Then again, a lot of men wouldn’t have

read Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s classic story ofThe Little Prince, or bothered to try and understand it.

I reached for his hand and held it between both of mine. “The fox tells the Little Prince he is a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. Just like the flower was like a hundred thousand other flowers.”

Dan tucked a strand of hair behind my ear with the hand I wasn’t holding. “But the fox asked the prince to tame him.

To make it so they’d need each other and be unique to each other. And he did it.”

“And then the prince went away, Dan, and left the fox bereft.” I looked down at my hands, holding his.

“Would you be sad if I left you?” He asked me, and at first I wasn’t sure how I would reply.

At last the answer came on breath as tremulous as a breeze wafting curtains from an open window.

“Yes. I would.”

He squeezed my hand. “Then I won’t. ~ Megan Hart
141:The little prince went away, to look again at the roses. "You are not at all like my rose," he said. "As yet you are nothing. No one has tamed you, and you have tamed no one. You are like my fox when I first knew him. He was only a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But I have made him my friend, and now he is unique in all the world." And the roses were very much embarassed. "You are beautiful, but you are empty," he went on. "One could not die for you. To be sure, an ordinary passerby would think that my rose looked just like you--the rose that belongs to me. But in herself alone she is more important than all the hundreds of you other roses: because it is she that I have watered; because it is she that I have put under the glass globe; because it is she that I have sheltered behind the screen; because it is for her that I have killed the caterpillars (except the two or three that we saved to become butterflies); because it is she that I have listened to, when she grumbled, or boasted, or ever sometimes when she said nothing. Because she is my rose. And he went back to meet the fox. "Goodbye," he said. "Goodbye," said the fox. "And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye." "What is essential is invisible to the eye," the little prince repeated, so that he would be sure to remember. "It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important." "It is the time I have wasted for my rose--" said the little prince, so that he would be sure to remember. "Men have forgotten this truth," said the fox. "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. You are responsible for your rose . . ." "I am responsible for my rose," the little prince repeated, so that he would be sure to remember. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
142:And what do you do with these stars?" "What do I do with them?" "Yes." "Nothing. I own them." "You own the stars?" "Yes" "But I have already seen a king who--" "Kings do not own, they reign over. It is a very different matter." "And what good does it do you to own the stars?" "It does me the good of making me rich." "And what good does it do you to be rich?" "It makes it possible for me to buy more stars, if any are ever discovered." "This man," said the little prince to himself, "reasons a little like my poor tippler..." Nevertheless, he still had some more questions. "How is it possible for one to own the stars?" "To whom do they belong?" the businessman retorted, peevishly. "I don't know. To nobody." "Then they belong to me, because I was the first person to think of it." "Is that all that is necessary?" "Certainly. When you find a diamond that belongs to nobody, it is yours. When you discover an island that belongs to nobody, it is yours. When you get an idea before any one else , you take out a patent on it: it is yours. So with me: I own the stars, because nobody else before me ever though about owning them." "Yes, that is true," said the little prince. "And what do you do with them?" "I administer them, " replied the businessman. "I count them and recount them. It is difficult. But I am a man who is naturally interested in matters of consequence. The little prince was still not satisfied. "If I owned a silk scarf," he said, "I could put it around my neck and take it away with me. If I owned a flower, I could pluck that flower and take it away with me. But you cannot pluck the stars from heaven..." "No. But I can put them in the bank." "Whatever does that mean?" "That means I write down the number of my stars on a little paper. And then I put this paper in a drawer and lock it with a key." "And that is all?" "That is enough," said the businessman. "It is entertaining," thought the little prince. "It is rather poetic. But it is of no great consequence." On matters of consequence the little prince had ideas which were very different from those of the grown-ups. "I myself own a flower," he continued his conversation with the businessman, "which I water every day. I own three volcanoes, which I clean out every week (for I also clean out the one that is extinct; one never knows). It is of some use to my volcanoes, and it is of some use to my flower, that I own them. But you are of no use to the stars..." The businessman opened his mouth, but he found nothing to say in answer. And the little prince went away. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry
143:Improvisations: Light And Snow
The girl in the room beneath
Before going to bed
Strums on a mandolin
The three simple tunes she knows.
How inadequate they are to tell how her heart feels!
When she has finished them several times
She thrums the strings aimlessly with her finger-nails
And smiles, and thinks happily of many things.
II
I stood for a long while before the shop window
Looking at the blue butterflies embroidered on tawny silk.
The building was a tower before me,
Time was loud behind me,
Sun went over the housetops and dusty trees;
And there they were, glistening, brilliant, motionless,
Stitched in a golden sky
By yellow patient fingers long since turned to dust.
III
The first bell is silver,
And breathing darkness I think only of the long scythe of time.
The second bell is crimson,
And I think of a holiday night, with rockets
Furrowing the sky with red, and a soft shatter of stars.
The third bell is saffron and slow,
And I behold a long sunset over the sea
With wall on wall of castled cloud and glittering balustrades.
The fourth bell is color of bronze,
I walk by a frozen lake in the dun light of dusk:
Muffled crackings run in the ice,
Trees creak, birds fly.
The fifth bell is cold clear azure,
Delicately tinged with green:
One golden star hangs melting in it,
58
And towards this, sleepily, I go.
The sixth bell is as if a pebble
Had been dropped into a deep sea far above me . . .
Rings of sound ebb slowly into the silence.
IV
On the day when my uncle and I drove to the cemetery,
Rain rattled on the roof of the carriage;
And talkng constrainedly of this and that
We refrained from looking at the child's coffin on the seat before us.
When we reached the cemetery
We found that the thin snow on the grass
Was already transparent with rain;
And boards had been laid upon it
That we might walk without wetting our feet.
When I was a boy, and saw bright rows of icicles
In many lengths along a wall
I was dissappointed to find
That I could not play music upon them:
I ran my hand lightly across them
And they fell, tinkling.
I tell you this, young man, so that your expectations of life
Will not be too great.
VI
It is now two hours since I left you,
And the perfume of your hands is still on my hands.
And though since then
I have looked at the stars, walked in the cold blue streets,
And heard the dead leaves blowing over the ground
Under the trees,
I still remember the sound of your laughter.
How will it be, lady, when there is none left to remember you
Even as long as this?
Will the dust braid your hair?
VII
59
The day opens with the brown light of snowfall
And past the window snowflakes fall and fall.
I sit in my chair all day and work and work
Measuring words against each other.
I open the piano and play a tune
But find it does not say what I feel,
I grow tired of measuring words against each other,
I grow tired of these four walls,
And I think of you, who write me that you have just had a daughter
And named her after your first sweetheart,
And you, who break your heart, far away,
In the confusion and savagery of a long war,
And you who, worn by the bitterness of winter,
Will soon go south.
The snowflakes fall almost straight in the brown light
Past my window,
And a sparrow finds refuge on my window-ledge.
This alone comes to me out of the world outside
As I measure word with word.
VIII
Many things perplex me and leave me troubled,
Many things are locked away in the white book of stars
Never to be opened by me.
The starr'd leaves are silently turned,
And the mooned leaves;
And as they are turned, fall the shadows of life and death.
Perplexed and troubled,
I light a small light in a small room,
The lighted walls come closer to me,
The familiar pictures are clear.
I sit in my favourite chair and turn in my mind
The tiny pages of my own life, whereon so little is written,
And hear at the eastern window the pressure of a long wind, coming
From I know not where.
How many times have I sat here,
How many times will I sit here again,
Thinking these same things over and over in solitude
As a child says over and over
60
The first word he has learned to say.
IX
This girl gave her heart to me,
And this, and this.
This one looked at me as if she loved me,
And silently walked away.
This one I saw once and loved, and never saw her again.
Shall I count them for you upon my fingers?
Or like a priest solemnly sliding beads?
Or pretend they are roses, pale pink, yellow, and white,
And arrange them for you in a wide bowl
To be set in sunlight?
See how nicely it sounds as I count them for you -'This girl gave her heart to me
And this, and this, . . . !
And nevertheless, my heart breaks when I think of them,
When I think their names,
And how, like leaves, they have changed and blown
And will lie, at last, forgotten,
Under the snow.
It is night time, and cold, and snow is falling,
And no wind grieves the walls.
In the small world of light around the arc-lamp
A swarm of snowflakes falls and falls.
The street grows silent. The last stranger passes.
The sound of his feet, in the snow, is indistinct.
What forgotten sadness is it, on a night like this,
Takes possession of my heart?
Why do I think of a camellia tree in a southern garden,
With pink blossoms among dark leaves,
Standing, surprised, in the snow?
Why do I think of spring?
The snowflakes, helplessly veering,,
Fall silently past my window;
61
They come from darkness and enter darkness.
What is it in my heart is surprised and bewildered
Like that camellia tree,
Beautiful still in its glittering anguish?
And spring so far away!
XI
As I walked through the lamplit gardens,
On the thin white crust of snow,
So intensely was I thinking of my misfortune,
So clearly were my eyes fixed
On the face of this grief which has come to me,
That I did not notice the beautiful pale colouring
Of lamplight on the snow;
Nor the interlaced long blue shadows of trees;
And yet these things were there,
And the white lamps, and the orange lamps, and the lamps of lilac were there,
As I have seen them so often before;
As they will be so often again
Long after my grief is forgotten.
And still, though I know this, and say this, it cannot console me.
XII
How many times have we been interrupted
Just as I was about to make up a story for you!
One time it was because we suddenly saw a firefly
Lighting his green lantern among the boughs of a fir-tree.
Marvellous! Marvellous! He is making for himself
A little tent of light in the darkness!
And one time it was because we saw a lilac lightning flash
Run wrinkling into the blue top of the mountain, -We heard boulders of thunder rolling down upon us
And the plat-plat of drops on the window,
And we ran to watch the rain
Charging in wavering clouds across the long grass of the field!
Or at other times it was because we saw a star
Slipping easily out of the sky and falling, far off,
Among pine-dark hills;
62
Or because we found a crimson eft
Darting in the cold grass!
These things interrupted us and left us wondering;
And the stories, whatever they might have been,
Were never told.
A fairy, binding a daisy down and laughing?
A golden-haired princess caught in a cobweb?
A love-story of long ago?
Some day, just as we are beginning again,
Just as we blow the first sweet note,
Death itself will interrupt us.
XIII
My heart is an old house, and in that forlorn old house,
In the very centre, dark and forgotten,
Is a locked room where an enchanted princess
Lies sleeping.
But sometimes, in that dark house,
As if almost from the stars, far away,
Sounds whisper in that secret room -Faint voices, music, a dying trill of laughter?
And suddenly, from her long sleep,
The beautiful princess awakes and dances.
Who is she? I do not know.
Why does she dance? Do not ask me! -Yet to-day, when I saw you,
When I saw your eyes troubled with the trouble of happiness,
And your mouth trembling into a smile,
And your fingers pull shyly forward, -Softly, in that room,
The little princess arose
And danced;
And as she danced the old house gravely trembled
With its vague and delicious secret.
XIV
Like an old tree uprooted by the wind
And flung down cruelly
63
With roots bared to the sun and stars
And limp leaves brought to earth -Torn from its house -So do I seem to myself
When you have left me.
XV
The music of the morning is red and warm;
Snow lies against the walls;
And on the sloping roof in the yellow sunlight
Pigeons huddle against the wind.
The music of evening is attenuated and thin -The moon seen through a wave by a mermaid;
The crying of a violin.
Far down there, far down where the river turns to the west,
The delicate lights begin to twinkle
On the dusky arches of the bridge:
In the green sky a long cloud,
A smouldering wave of smoky crimson,
Breaks in the freezing wind: and above it, unabashed,
Remote, untouched, fierly palpitant,
Sings the first star.
~ Conrad Potter Aiken

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



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The Little Prince (1974) ::: 6.6/10 -- G | 1h 28min | Family, Fantasy, Musical | 7 November 1974 (USA) -- A pilot, stranded in the desert, meets a little boy who is a prince on a planet. Director: Stanley Donen Writers: Antoine de Saint-Exupry (story "Le Petit Prince"), Alan Jay Lerner | 1 more credit Stars:
The Little Prince (2015) ::: 7.7/10 -- Le Petit Prince (original title) -- The Little Prince Poster -- A little girl lives in a very grown-up world with her mother, who tries to prepare her for it. Her neighbor, the Aviator, introduces the girl to an extraordinary world where anything is possible, the world of the Little Prince. Director: Mark Osborne
The Little Princess (1939) ::: 7.2/10 -- Approved | 1h 33min | Comedy, Drama, Family | 17 March 1939 (USA) -- A little girl is left by her father in an exclusive seminary for girls, when her father fights in the Second Boer War. Later, when he is presumed dead she is forced to become a servant. Directors: Walter Lang, William A. Seiter (uncredited) Writers: Ethel Hill (screen play), Walter Ferris (screen play) | 1 more credit Stars:
Wikipedia - The Little Prince
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