classes ::: place, noun,
children ::: the Temple (inside), the Temple of Sages (notes), the Temple (quotes)
branches ::: Temple, the Temple, the Temple-City

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:Temple
object:temple
class:place
word class:noun
the_Temple

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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [2]


Altar
the_Temple_of_Sages_(notes)

--- PRIMARY CLASS


place

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [1]


1.23 - Improvising a Temple
2.01 - The Temple
7.5.59 - The Hill-top Temple
Hearts temple-shrine to Savitri
Liber 7 - Io Pan! - Birth-Words of a Master of the Temple
Temple
the Astral Temple
the Garden-Temple of Dreams
the Temple
the Temple-City
the Temple (inside)
the Temple of Boundless Light
the Temple of Knowledge
the Temple of our HGA
the Temple of Remembrance
the Temple of Sages
the Temple of Sages (notes)
the Temple of Savitri
the Temple of the Beloved
the Temple of the Divine within you
the Temple of the Mind
the Temple of the Morning Star
the Temple of the Mother
the Temple of Timelessness
the Temple (quotes)
the Temple-Tower to Heaven
upon the Mountain-top in the Temple of Light chanting and praying and studying Savitri always the Child-Priest's endless Sacrifice of Love and Knowledge and Bliss
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


temple ::: 1. A building or place dedicated to the worship of a deity or deities. 2. Fig. Something regarded as having within it a divine presence. temples, temple-door, temple-soil, temple-tower, rock-temple’s.

templed ::: like a temple or enclosed as in a temple.

templed ::: a. --> Supplied with a temple or temples, or with churches; inclosed in a temple.

temple ::: n. --> A contrivence used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.
The space, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear.
One of the side bars of a pair of spectacles, jointed to the bows, and passing one on either side of the head to hold the spectacles in place.
A place or edifice dedicated to the worship of some deity;

templet ::: n. --> A gauge, pattern, or mold, commonly a thin plate or board, used as a guide to the form of the work to be executed; as, a mason&

Temple, William: For many years Archbishop of York, Temple (born 1881) has written extensively on the philosophy of religion. In Mens Creatrix and most recently in Nature Man and God, he has argued for a universe of levels, culminating in value, and pointing to God as Supreme Value and hence Ultimate Reality. Recent work on the nature of revelation has given him the definition of revelation as "coincidence of divinely guided event and divinely guided apprehension", in this setting he places (see Christ the Truth) the Incarnation as central and most significant event apprehended by the Christian community. He is a Platonist in tendency, although within recent years this has been modified by scholasticism, and a study of Marxian philosophy. -- W.N.P.

templed ::: a. --> Supplied with a temple or temples, or with churches; inclosed in a temple.

temple ::: n. --> A contrivence used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.
The space, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear.
One of the side bars of a pair of spectacles, jointed to the bows, and passing one on either side of the head to hold the spectacles in place.
A place or edifice dedicated to the worship of some deity;

templet ::: n. --> A gauge, pattern, or mold, commonly a thin plate or board, used as a guide to the form of the work to be executed; as, a mason&

Temple: Any place or edifice dedicated to the worship of deity or regarded as the dwelling place of deity. Also, the meeting place of esoteric or mystic fraternal orders, where their secret rituals are carried out.

Temple of the flesh: The physical body.

Temple [from Latin templum, tempulum a small division from Greek, Latin tem to cut off, mark out] Templum was a spot marked off for sacred purposes by the augur with his staff, and might be on the ground or in the sky, where it was a region designated for the observation of omens. This connects the idea with that of the celestial mansions or zodiacal signs. From being a mere marked-off spot, it gradually evolved into elaborate edifices, and it has also a figurative use, as when the body is called the temple of God or the earth is described as a temple. When a temple in ancient days was constructed by adepts for specific purposes, it became a center or receptacle of spiritual energies attracted and focused there; and from this arose the merely exoteric ideas, true in their origin but absurdly untrue today, that a consecrated portion of a temple or church was the Holy of Holies or the Seat of God, etc.

Temple of Solomon The building of this temple, according to the Bible, was first projected by King David, but on command of the Lord was not carried out by him because he had “shed much blood.” David, however, assembled materials and workmen. To aid him in building the Temple, his son Solomon appealed to Hiram or Huram, King of Tyre, to send him a skillful artisan, and King Hiram sent Hiram Abif to Solomon, also workmen and additional supplies of timber.

temples and palaces must have been general in

Temple (or &

Temple ::: In the ancient world, temples were the centers of outward religious life, places at which public religious observances were normally conducted by the priestly professionals. In traditional Judaism, the only legitimate Temple was the one in Jerusalem, built first by King Solomon around 950 B.C.E., destroyed by Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar around 587/6 B.C.E., and rebuilt about 70 years later. It was destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE. The site of the ancient Jewish Temple is now occupied, in part, by the “Dome of the Rock” Mosque. In recent times, “temple” has come to be used synonymously with synagogue in some Jewish usage.

Temple Mount ::: The platform on Mt. Moriah where both Jewish Temples once stood.

Temple Mount Faithful ::: A religious group committed to the reconstruction of the Jewish Temple on the Temple Mount.

Templer ::: German sect that founded settlements in Palestine in the 19th and 20th centuries.

temple ::: 1. A building or place dedicated to the worship of a deity or deities. 2. Fig. Something regarded as having within it a divine presence. temples, temple-door, temple-soil, temple-tower, rock-temple’s.

templed ::: like a temple or enclosed as in a temple.

temple. See VIHĀRA; CHŎL; TERA; DGON PA.

temple


--- QUOTES [80 / 80 - 500 / 4014] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   19 Sri Aurobindo
   9 Aleister Crowley
   5 The Mother
   3 Taigu Ryokan
   3 Peter J Carroll
   3 Joseph Campbell
   2 Sri Ramakrishna
   2 Satprem
   2 Matsuo Basho
   2 Manly P Hall
   2 Henry David Thoreau
   1 Vemana
   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 the Temple of Apollo at Delphi
   1 Stephen King
   1 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   1 Rudolf Steiner
   1 Rajneesh
   1 Rabindranath Tagore
   1 Plato
   1 Pasteur
   1 Neil Gaiman
   1 Leo Tolstoy
   1 Kabir
   1 Jetsun Milarepa
   1 Jean-Paul Sartre
   1 James Austin
   1 Israel Regardie
   1 Immanuel Kant
   1 Hermann Hesse
   1 Haruki Murakami
   1 Friedrich Nietzsche
   1 Ella Wheeler Wilcox
   1 Carl Jung
   1 Bulleh Shah
   1 Benjamin Franklin
   1 Anonymous
   1 Alfred Korzybski
   1

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   92 Temple Grandin
   16 Juno Temple
   14 Eric Temple Bell
   14 Anonymous
   10 Mehmet Murat ildan
   7 John Temple
   6 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints
   6 Mahatma Gandhi
   6 Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston
   5 Various
   4 Rumi
   4 J A Templeton
   4 Anthony Bourdain
   3 Thomas B Macaulay
   3 Terry Pratchett
   3 Peter Temple
   3 Khalil Gibran
   3 Julien Temple
   3 Henry David Thoreau
   3 Brad Templeton
   3 B K S Iyengar
   2 William Temple
   2 William N Thorndike Jr
   2 Vladimir Zhirinovsky
   2 Swami Vivekananda
   2 Suzy Kassem
   2 Suzanne Collins
   2 Savannah Brown
   2 Sally Thorne
   2 Sabaa Tahir
   2 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   2 Rajneesh
   2 Pythagoras
   2 Phil Knight
   2 Philip James Bailey
   2 Michael Baigent
   2 Maya Angelou
   2 Marianne Williamson
   2 Margaret Fuller
   2 Lisa C Temple
   2 Joseph Smith Jr
   2 Joe Abercrombie
   2 Jiddu Krishnamurti
   2 Geshe Kelsang Gyatso
   2 Gayle Forman
   2 Ezra Pound
   2 Dalai Lama
   2 C S Lewis
   2 Charles Haddon Spurgeon
   2 Charles Dickens

1:The temple bell stops but I still hear the sound coming out of the flowers. ~ Matsuo Basho,
2:The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is a knowledge of our own ignorance. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
3:While God waits for his temple to be built of love, Men bring stones. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
4:In the monastery of your heart, you have a temple where all Buddhas unite. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
5:Yes, yes; you’ve read thousands of books but you’ve never tried to read your own self; you rush into your temples, into your mosques, but you have never tried to enter your own heart; futile are all your battles with the devil for you have never tried to fight your own desires. ~ Bulleh Shah,
6:Know thyself, and thou shalt know all the mysteries of the gods and the universe. ~ the Temple of Apollo at Delphi,
7:I had found my religion: nothing seemed more important to me than a book. I saw the library as a temple. ~ Jean-Paul Sartre,
8:In us the secret Spirit can inditeA page and summary of the Infinite, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.59 - The Hill-top Temple,
9:It was Aomame's firm belief that the human body was a temple, to be kept as strong and beautiful and clean as possible. ~ Haruki Murakami,
10:Our body is an epitome of some Vast    That masks its presence by our humanness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.59 - The Hill-top Temple,
11:As if in a rock-temple’s solitude hid,God’s refuge from an ignorant worshipping world, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
12:Go deep inside the temple and you will find me there. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I The Mother With Letters On The Mother,
13:Does one enter a temple with dirty feet?Likewise, one does not enter the temple of the spirit with a sullied mind. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
14:The One devised innumerably to be;His oneness in invisible forms he hides,Time’s tiny temples to eternity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Electron,
15:Purify thyself and thou shalt see God. Transform thy body into a temple, cast from thee evil thoughts and contemplate God with the eye of thy conscious soul. ~ Vemana,
16:Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own ~ Anonymous, The Bible 1 Corinthians 6:19 ESV,
17:The tinkling pace of a long caravanIt seemed at times, or a vast forest’s hymn,The solemn reminder of a temple gong, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.14 - The World-Soul,
18:As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light of meaning in the darkness of mere being. ~ Carl Jung, Memories the Garden-Temple of Dreams,
19:Then by a touch, a presence or a voiceThe world is turned into a temple groundAnd all discloses the unknown Beloved. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.12 - The Heavens of the Ideal,
20:He that sees the Lord in the temple, the living body, by seeking Him within, can alone see Him, the Infinite, in the temple of the universe, having become the Endless Eye. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
21:Your life sparks fires from within your innermost temple. No one can reach there but you, it is your inner sanctum. You are your own master there, only you can reach and ignite the fire. ~ Rajneesh,
22:The youth gets together his materials to build a bridge to the moon, or, perchance, a palace or temple on the earth, and, at length, the middle-aged man concludes to build a woodshed with them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
23:Temple-groundMan, shun the impulses dire that spring armed from thy nature’s abysms!Dread the dusk rose of the gods, flee the honey that tempts from its petals! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
24:Still have we parts that grow towards the light,Yet are there luminous tracts and heavens serene And Eldorados of splendor and ecstacy And temples to the godhead none can see ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
25:This is the practical and active form of that obligation of a Master of the Temple in which it said:: 'I will interpret every phenomenon as a particular dealing of God with my soul.' ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Magick,
26:It was the hour before the Gods awake. Across the path of the divine Event The huge foreboding mind of Night, alone In her unlit temple of eternity, Lay stretched immobile upon Silence marge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01,
27:The Way Of The Holy Fool ::: At the crossroads this year, after begging all day I lingered at the village temple. Children gather round me and whisper, "The crazy monk has come back to play." ~ Taigu Ryokan,
28:No one can attain to truth by himself. Only by laying stone on stone with the cooperation of all, by the millions of generations from our forefather Adam to our own times, is that temple reared which is to be a worthy dwelling place of the Great God. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
29:As climbs a storeyed temple-tower to heavenBuilt by the aspiring soul of man to liveNear to his dream of the Invisible.Infinity calls to it as it dreams and climbs;Its spire touches the apex of the world; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
30:170. A magnificent temple towers to heaven by the Eternal Bridge.Priests rival in its halls the sermons of rocks and streams.I, for one, would gladly sacrifice my brows for my brethren,But I fear I might aggravate the war, already rank as weeds. ~ Taigu Ryokan,
31:The man who proclaims the existence of the Infinite accumulates, in this affirmation, more of the supernatural than there is in the miracles of all the religions. So long as the mystery of the Infinite weighs upon human thought, temples will be raised for the cult of the Infinite. ~ Pasteur,
32:The idea of organization is the first step, that of interpretation the second. The Master of the Temple, whose grade corresponds to Binah, is sworn to interpret every phenomenon as a particular dealing of God with his soul. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
33:DAWN I have returned to my native village after twenty years; No sign of old friends or relatives-they have all died or gone away. My dreams are shattered by the sound of the temple bell struck at sunrise. An empty floor, no shadows; the light has long been extinguished. ~ Taigu Ryokan,
34:In ancient times, anterior to our history, the temples of the spirit were also outwardly visible; today, because our life has become so unspiritual, they are not to be found in the world visible to external sight; yet they are present spiritually everywhere, and all who seek may find them. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
35:Message for 4. 5. 67 "Earth-life is the self-chosen habitation of a great Divinity and his aeonic will is to change it from a blind prison into his splendid mansion and high heaven-reaching temple." - Sri Aurobindo The Divinity mentioned by Sri Aurobindo is not a person but a condition that will be shared by all those who have prepared themselves to receive it. May 1967 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
36:Are you looking for me?I am in the next seat.My shoulder is againstyour own neckYou won't find me in the mosqueor the sadhus temple.You wont find me in holy booksor behind the lips of priests.Nor in eating nothing but vegetablesYou will find me in the tiniest house of time.Kabir says : Student, tell me, what is God?He is the breath inside the breath.... ~ Kabir,
37:There is also a third kind of madness, which is possession by the Muses, enters into a delicate and virgin soul, and there inspiring frenzy, awakens lyric....But he, who, not being inspired and having no touch of madness in his soul, comes to the door and thinks he will get into the temple by the help of art--he, I say, and his poetry are not admitted; the sane man is nowhere at all when he enters into rivalry with the madman. ~ Plato,
38:A truly good book is something as natural, and as unexpectedly and unaccountably fair and perfect, as a wild flower discovered on the prairies of the West or in the jungles of the East. Genius is a light which makes the darkness visible, like the lightning's flash, which perchance shatters the temple of knowledge itself,--and not a taper lighted at the hearth-stone of the race, which pales before the light of common day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
39:It should never be forgotten for a single moment that the central and essential work of the Magician is the attainment of the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. Once he has achieved this he must of course be left entirely in the hands of that Angel, who can be invariably and inevitably relied upon to lead him to the further great step-crossing of the Abyss and the attainment of the grade of Master of the Temple. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magic Without Tears ,
40:As in a mystic and dynamic dance A priestess of immaculate ecstasies Inspired and ruled from Truth's revealing vault Moves in some prophet cavern of the gods A heart of silence in the hands of joy Inhabited with rich creative beats A body like a parable of dawn That seemed a niche for veiled divinity Or golden temple-door to things beyond. Immortal rhythms swayed in her time-born steps; Her look, her smile awoke celestial sense Even in earth-stuff, and their intense delight Poured a supernal beauty on men's lives. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
41:In ancient times many years of preparation were required before the neophyte was permitted to enter the temple of the Mysteries. In this way the shallow, the curious, the faint of heart, and those unable to withstand the temptations of life were automatically eliminated by their inability to meet the requirements for admission. The successful candidate who did pass between the pillars entered the temple, keenly realizing his sublime opportunity, his divine obligation, and the mystic privilege which he had earned for himself through years of special preparation. ~ Manly P Hall,
42:The Temple represents the external Universe. The Magician must take it as he finds it, so that it is of no particular shape; yet we find written, \Liber VII,\ V:I:2 \We made us a temple of stones in the shape of the Universem even ashou didst wear openly and I concealed.\ This shape is the vesica piscis; but it is only the greeatest Magicians who can thus fashion the Temple. There may, however, be some choice of rooms; this refers to the power of the Magician to reincarnate in a suitable body. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 04: Magick,
43:To return to the question of the development of the Will. It is always something to pluck up the weeds, but the flower itself needs tending. Having crushed all volitions in ourselves, and if necessary in others, which we find opposing our real Will, that Will itself will grow naturally with greater freedom. But it is not only necessary to purify the temple itself and consecrate it; invocations must be made. Hence it is necessary to be constantly doing things of a positive, not merely of a negative nature, to affirm that Will. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
44:There are not many, those who have no secret garden of the mind. For this garden alone can give refreshment when life is barren of peace or sustenance or satisfactory answer. Such sanctuaries may be reached by a certain philosophy or faith, by the guidance of a beloved author or an understanding friend, by way of the temples of music and art, or by groping after truth through the vast kingdoms of knowledge. They encompass almost always truth and beauty, and are radiant with the light that never was on sea or land. - Clare Cameron, Green Fields of England ~ Israel Regardie, A Garden Of Pomegranates ,
45:Inside the temple Richard found a life waiting for him, all ready to be worn and lived, and inside that life, another. Each life he tried on, he slipped into and it pulled him farther in, farther away from the world he came from; one by one, existence following existence, rivers of dreams and fields of stars, a hawk with a sparrow clutched in its talons flies low above the grass, and here are tiny intricate people waiting for him to fill their heads with life, and thousands of years pass and he is engaged in strange work of great importance and sharp beauty, and he is loved, and he is honored, and then a pull, a sharp tug, and it's... ~ Neil Gaiman,
46:Although there is a difference of procedure between a Shaman of the Tungas and a Catholic prelate of Europe or between a coarse and sensual Vogul and a Puritan Independent of Connecticut, there is no difference in the principle of their creeds; for they all belong to the same category of people whose religion consists not in becoming better, but in believing in and carrying out certain arbitrary regulations. Only those who believe that the worship of God consists in aspiring to a better life differ from the first because they recognize quite another and certainly a loftier principle uniting all men of good faith in an invisible temple which alone can be the universal temple. ~ Immanuel Kant,
47:The Golden Light ::: Thy golden Light came down into my brainAnd the grey rooms of mind sun-touched becameA bright reply to Wisdom's occult plane,A calm illumination and a flame.Thy golden Light came down into my throat,And all my speech is now a tune divine,A paean-song of Thee my single note;My words are drunk with the Immortal's wine.Thy golden Light came down into my heartSmiting my life with Thy eternity;Now has it grown a temple where Thou artAnd all its passions point towards only Thee.Thy golden Light came down into my feet,My earth is now Thy playfield and Thy seat. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems ,
48:As if from Matter's plinth and viewless base To a top as viewless, a carved sea of worlds Climbing with foam-maned waves to the Supreme Ascended towards breadths immeasurable; It hoped to soar into the Ineffable's reign: A hundred levels raised it to the Unknown. So it towered up to heights intangible And disappeared in the hushed conscious Vast As climbs a storeyed temple-tower to heaven Built by the aspiring soul of man to live Near to his dream of the Invisible. Infinity calls to it as it dreams and climbs; Its spire touches the apex of the world; Mounting into great voiceless stillnesses It marries the earth to screened eternities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
49:None is travelling :::None is travelling Here along this way but I, This autumn evening. The first day of the year: thoughts come - and there is loneliness; the autumn dusk is here. An old pond A frog jumps in - Splash! Lightening - Heron's cry Stabs the darkness Clouds come from time to time - and bring to men a chance to rest from looking at the moon. In the cicada's cry There's no sign that can foretell How soon it must die. Poverty's child - he starts to grind the rice, and gazes at the moon. Won't you come and see loneliness? Just one leaf from the kiri tree. Temple bells die out. The fragrant blossoms remain. A perfect evening! ~ Matsuo Basho,
50:The Magician works in a Temple; the Universe, which is (be it remembered!) conterminous with himself. In this temple a Circle is drawn upon the floor for the limitation of his working. This circle is protected by divine names, the influences on which he relies to keep out hostile thoughts. Within the circle stands an Altar, the solid basis on which he works, the foundation of all. Upon the Altar are his Wand, Cup, Sword, and Pantacle, to represent his Will, his Understanding, his Reason, and the lower parts of his being, respectively. On the Altar, too, is a phial of Oil, surrounded by a Scourge, a Dagger, and a Chain, while above the Altar hangs a Lamp. The Magician wears a Crown, a single Robe, and a Lamen, and he bears a Book of Conjurations and a Bell. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
51:On the exoteric side if necessary the mind should be trained by the study of any well-developed science, such as chemistry, or mathematics. The idea of organization is the first step, that of interpretation the second. The Master of the Temple, whose grade corresponds to Binah, is sworn to interpret every phenomenon as a particular dealing of God with his soul. {85} But even the beginner may attempt this practice with advantage. Either a fact fits in or it does not; if it does not, harmony is broken; and as the Universal harmony cannot be broken, the discord must be in the mind of the student, thus showing that he is not in tune with that Universal choir. Let him then puzzle out first the great facts, then the little; until one summer, when he is bald and lethargic after lunch, he understands and appreciates the existence of flies! ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
52:Sri Ramakrishna has described the incident: "The Divine Mother revealed to me in the Kāli temple that it was She who had become everything. She showed me that everything was full of Consciousness. The image was Consciousness, the Altar was Consciousness, the water-vessels were Consciousness, the door-sill was Consciousness, the marble floor was Consciousness - all was Consciousness. I found everything inside the room soaked, as it were, in Bliss - the Bliss of God. I saw a wicked man in front of the Kāli temple; but in him also I saw the power of the Divine Mother vibrating. That was why I fed a cat with the food that was to be offered to the Divine Mother. I clearly perceived that all this was the Divine Mother - even the cat. The manager of the temple garden wrote to Mathur Bābu saying that I was feeding the cat with the offering intended for the Divine Mother. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna ,
53:Every human acheivement, be it a scientific discovery, a picture, a statue, a temple, a home or a bridge, has to be conceived in the mind first-the plan thought out-before it can be made a reality, and when anything is to be attempted that involves any number of individuals-methods of coordination have to be considered-the methods have to be the best suited for such undertakings are engineering methods-the engineering of an idea towards a complete realization. Every engineer has to know the materials with which he has to work and the natural laws of these materials, as discovered by observation and experiment and formulated by mathematics and mechanics else he can not calculate the forces at his disposal; he can not compute the resistance of his materials; he can not determine the capacity and requirements of his power plant; in short, he can not make the most profitable use of his resources. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
54:Gradually a separation took place among the schools of the Mysteries. The zeal of the priests to spread their doctrines in many cases apparently exceeded their intelligence. As a result, many were allowed to enter the temples before they had really prepared themselves for the wisdom they were to receive. The result was that these untutored minds, slowly gaining positions of authority, became at last incapable of maintaining the institution because they were unable to contact the spiritual powers behind the material enterprise. So the Mystery Schools vanished. The spiritual hierarchy, served through all generations by a limited number of true and devoted followers, withdrew from the world; while the colossal material organizations, having no longer any contact with the divine source, wandered in circles, daily becoming more involved in the rituals and symbols which they had lost the power of interpreting. ~ Manly P Hall, What the Ancient Wisdom Expects of Its Disciples ,
55:7. The Meeting with the Goddess:The ultimate adventure, when all the barriers and ogres have been overcome, is commonly represented as a mystical marriage of the triumphant hero-soul with the Queen Goddess of the World. This is the crisis at the nadir, the zenith, or at the uttermost edge of the earth, at the central point of the cosmos, in the tabernacle of the temple, or within the darkness of the deepest chamber of the heart. The meeting with the goddess (who is incarnate in every woman) is the final test of the talent of the hero to win the boon of love (charity: amor fati), which is life itself enjoyed as the encasement of eternity. And when the adventurer, in this context, is not a youth but a maid, she is the one who, by her qualities, her beauty, or her yearning, is fit to become the consort of an immortal. Then the heavenly husband descends to her and conducts her to his bed-whether she will or not. And if she has shunned him, the scales fall from her eyes; if she has sought him, her desire finds its peace. ~ Joseph Campbell,
56:In the depths of your consciousness is the psychic being, the temple of the Divine within you. This is the centre round which should come about the unification of all these divergent parts, all these contradictory movements of your being. Once you have got the consciousness of the psychic being and its aspiration, these doubts and difficulties can be destroyed. It takes more or less time, but you will surely succeed in the end. Once you have turned to the Divine, saying, "I want to be yours", and the Divine has said, "Yes", the whole world cannot keep you from it. When the central being has made its surrender, the chief difficulty has disappeared. The outer being is like a crust. In ordinary people the crust is so hard and thick that they are not conscious of the Divine within them. If once, even for a moment only, the inner being has said, "I am here and I am yours", then it is as though a bridge has been built and little by little the crust becomes thinner and thinner until the two parts are wholly joined and the inner and the outer become one. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 ,
57:Anyway, in instances of this kind, I think it is people's faith, above all, which saves them. When they have performed their little ceremony properly, they feel confident, "Oh! now it will be over, for she is satisfied." And because they feel confident, it helps them to react and the illness disappears. I have seen this very often in the street. There might be a small hostile entity there, but these are very insignificant things. In other cases, in some temples, there are vital beings who are more or less powerful and have made their home there. But what Sri Aurobindo means here is that there is nothing, not even the most anti-divine force, which in its origin is not the Supreme Divine. So, necessarily, everything goes back to Him, consciously or unconsciously. In the consciousness of the one who makes the offering it does not go to the Divine: it goes to the greater or smaller demon to whom he turns. But through everything, through the wood of the idol or even the ill-will of the vital adversary, ultimately, all returns to the Divine, since all comes from Him. Only, the one who has made the offering or the sacrifice receives but in proportion to his own consciousness... ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956 ,
58:The Tower. Somewhere ahead, it waited for him - the nexus of Time, the nexus of Size. He began west again, his back set against the sunrise, heading toward the ocean, realizing that a great passage of his life had come and gone. 'I loved you Jake,' he said aloud. The stiffness wore out of his body and he began to walk more rapidly. By that evening he had come to the end of the land. He sat in a beach which stretched left and right forever, deserted. The waves beat endlessly against the shore, pounding and pounding. The setting sun painted the water in a wide strip of fool's gold.There the gunslinger sat, his face turned up into the fading light. He dreamed his dreams and watched as the stars came out; his purpose did not flag, nor did his heart falter; his hair, finer now and gray at the temples, blew around his head, and the sandalwood-inlaid guns of his father lay smooth and deadly against his hips, and he was lonely but did not find loneliness in any way a bad or ignoble thing. The dark came down and the world moved on. The gunslinger waited for the time of the drawing and dreamed his long dreams of the Dark Tower, to which he would someday come at dusk and approach, winding his horn, to do some unimaginable final battle. ~ Stephen King,
59:If we are religious-minded, perhaps we will see the gods who inhabit this world. Beings, forces, sounds, lights, and rhythms are just so many true forms of the same indefinable, but not unknowable, Essence we call God; we have spoken of God, and made temples, laws or poems to try to capture the one little pulsation filling us with sunshine, but it is free as the wind on foam-flecked shores. We may also enter the world of music, which in fact is not different from the others but a special extension of this same, great inexpressible Vibration. If once, only once, even for a few moments in a lifetime, we can hear that Music, that Joy singing above, we will know what Beethoven and Bach heard; we will know what God is because we will have heard God. We will probably not say anything grandiose; we will just know that That exists, whereupon all the suffering in the world will seem redeemed. At the extreme summit of the overmind, there only remain great waves of multi-hued light, says the Mother, the play of spiritual forces, which later translate - sometimes much later - into new ideas, social changes, or earthly events, after crossing one by one all the layers of consciousness and suffering a considerable distortion and loss of light... ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure Of Consciousness ,
60:Directly on awakening, preferably at dawn, the initiate goes to the place of invocation. Figuring to himself as he goes that being born anew each day brings with it the chance of greater rebirth, first he banishes the temple of his mind by ritual or by some magical trance. Then he unveils some token or symbol or sigil which represents to him the Holy Guardian Angel. This symbol he will likely have to change during the great work as the inspiration begins to move him. Next he invokes an image of the Angel into his minds eye. It may be considered as a luminous duplicate of ones own form standing in front of or behind one, or simply as a ball of brilliant light above ones head. Then he formulates his aspirations in what manner he will, humbling himself in prayer or exalting himself in loud proclamation as his need be. The best form of this invocation is spoken spontaneously from the heart, and if halting at first, will prove itself in time. He is aiming to establish a set of ideas and images which correspond to the nature of his genius, and at the same time receive inspiration from that source. As the magician begins to manifest more of his true will, the Augoeides will reveal images, names, and spiritual principles by which it can be drawn into greater manifestation. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
61:Adoration, before it turns into an element of the deeper Yoga of devotion, a petal of the flower of love, its homage and self-uplifting to its sun, must bring with it, if it is profound, an increasing consecration of the being to the Divine who is adored. And one element of this consecration must be a self-purifying so as to become fit for the divine contact, or for the entrance of the Divine into the temple of our inner being, or for his self-revelation in the shrine of the heart. This purifying may be ethical in its character, but it will not be merely the moralists seeking for the right and blameless action or even, when once we reach the stage of Yoga, an obedience to the law of God as revealed in formal religion; but it will be a throwing away, katharsis, of all that conflicts whether with the idea of the Divine in himself or of the Divine in ourselves. In the former case it becomes in habit of feeling and outer act an imitation of the Divine, in the latter a growing into his likeness in our nature. What inner adoration is to ceremonial worship, this growing into the divine likeness is to the outward ethical life. It culminates in a sort of liberation by likeness to the Divine, a liberation from our lower nature and a change into the divine nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.04 - The Way of Devotion,
62:To prepare for Astral Magic a temple or series of temples needs to be erected on the plane of visualized imagination. Such temples can take any convenient form although some magicians prefer to work with an exact simulacrum of their physical temple. The astral temple is visualized in fine detail and should contain all the equipment required for ritual or at least cupboards where any required instruments can be found. Any objects visualized into the temple should always remain there for subsequent inspection unless specifically dissolved or removed. The most important object in the temple is the magician's image of himself working in it. At first it may seem that he is merely manipulating a puppet of himself in the temple but with persistence this should give way to a feeling of actually being there. Before beginning Astral Magic proper, the required temple and instruments together with an image of the magician moving about in it should be built up by a repeated series of visualizations until all the details are perfect. Only when this is complete should the magician begin to use the temple. Each conjuration that is performed should be planned in advance with the same attention to detail as in Ritual Magic. The various acts of astral evocation, divination, enchantment, invocation and illumination take on a similar general form to the acts of Ritual Magic which the magician adapts for astral work. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Kaos ,
63:5. Belly of the Whale:The idea that the passage of the magical threshold is a transit into a sphere of rebirth is symbolized in the worldwide womb image of the belly of the whale. The hero, instead of conquering or conciliating the power of the threshold, is swallowed into the unknown and would appear to have died. This popular motif gives emphasis to the lesson that the passage of the threshold is a form of self-annihilation. Instead of passing outward, beyond the confines of the visible world, the hero goes inward, to be born again. The disappearance corresponds to the passing of a worshipper into a temple-where he is to be quickened by the recollection of who and what he is, namely dust and ashes unless immortal. The temple interior, the belly of the whale, and the heavenly land beyond, above, and below the confines of the world, are one and the same. That is why the approaches and entrances to temples are flanked and defended by colossal gargoyles: dragons, lions, devil-slayers with drawn swords, resentful dwarfs, winged bulls. The devotee at the moment of entry into a temple undergoes a metamorphosis. Once inside he may be said to have died to time and returned to the World Womb, the World Navel, the Earthly Paradise. Allegorically, then, the passage into a temple and the hero-dive through the jaws of the whale are identical adventures, both denoting in picture language, the life-centering, life-renewing act. ~ Joseph Campbell,
64:On a thousand bridges and paths they shall throng to the future, and ever more war and inequality shall divide them: thus does my great love make me speak.In their hostilities they shall become inventors of images and ghosts, and with their images and ghosts they shall yet fight the highest fight against one another. Good and evil, and rich and poor, and high and low, and all the names of values-arms shall they be and clattering signs that life must overcome itself again and again.Life wants to build itself up into the heights with pillars and steps; it wants to look into vast distances and out toward stirring beauties: therefore it requires height. And because it requires height, it requires steps and contradiction among the steps and the climbers.Life wants to climb and to overcome itself climbing.And behold, my friends: here where the tarantula has its hole, the ruins of an ancient temple rise; behold it with enlightened eyes Verily, the man who once piled his thoughts to the sky in these stones-he, like the wisest, knew the secret of all life. That struggle and inequality are present even in beauty, and also war for power and more power: that is what he teaches us here in the plainest parable. How divinely vault and arches break through each other in a wrestling match; how they strive against each other with light and shade, the godlike strivers-with such assurance and beauty let us be enemies too, my friends Let us strive against one another like gods. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra trans. Fred Kaufmann,
65:Yet this was only a foretaste of the intense experiences to come. The first glimpse of the Divine Mother made him the more eager for Her uninterrupted vision. He wanted to see Her both in meditation and with eyes open. But the Mother began to play a teasing game of hide-and-seek with him, intensifying both his joy and his suffering. Weeping bitterly during the moments of separation from Her, he would pass into a trance and then find Her standing before him, smiling, talking, consoling, bidding him be of good cheer, and instructing him. During this period of spiritual practice he had many uncommon experiences. When he sat to meditate, he would hear strange clicking sounds in the joints of his legs, as if someone were locking them up, one after the other, to keep him motionless; and at the conclusion of his meditation he would again hear the same sounds, this time unlocking them and leaving him free to move about. He would see flashes like a swarm of fire-flies floating before his eyes, or a sea of deep mist around him, with luminous waves of molten silver. Again, from a sea of translucent mist he would behold the Mother rising, first Her feet, then Her waist, body, face, and head, finally Her whole person; he would feel Her breath and hear Her voice. Worshipping in the temple, sometimes he would become exalted, sometimes he would remain motionless as stone, sometimes he would almost collapse from excessive emotion. Many of his actions, contrary to all tradition, seemed sacrilegious to the people. He would take a flower and touch it to his own head, body, and feet, and then offer it to the Goddess. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, Gospel ,
66:In the Judeo-Christian tradition, it is called 'the resurrection body ' and 'the glorified body.' The prophet Isaiah said, 'The dead shall live, their bodies shall rise' (Isa. 26:19). St. Paul called it 'the celestial body' or 'spiritual body ' (soma pneumatikon) (I Corinthians 15:40). In Sufism it is called 'the most sacred body ' (wujud al-aqdas) and 'supracelestial body ' (jism asli haqiqi). In Taoism, it is called 'the diamond body,' and those who have attained it are called 'the immortals' and 'the cloudwalkers.' In Tibetan Buddhism it is called 'the light body.' In Tantrism and some schools of yoga, it is called 'the vajra body,' 'the adamantine body,' and 'the divine body.' In Kriya yoga it is called 'the body of bliss.' In Vedanta it is called 'the superconductive body.' In Gnosticism and Neoplatonism, it is called 'the radiant body.' In the alchemical tradition, the Emerald Tablet calls it 'the Glory of the Whole Universe' and 'the golden body.' The alchemist Paracelsus called it 'the astral body.' In the Hermetic Corpus, it is called 'the immortal body ' (soma athanaton). In some mystery schools, it is called 'the solar body.' In Rosicrucianism, it is called 'the diamond body of the temple of God.' In ancient Egypt it was called 'the luminous body or being' (akh). In Old Persia it was called 'the indwelling divine potential' (fravashi or fravarti). In the Mithraic liturgy it was called 'the perfect body ' (soma teilion). In the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo, it is called 'the divine body,' composed of supramental substance. In the philosophy of Teilhard de Chardin, it is called 'the ultrahuman'. ~ , http://herebedragons.weebly.com/homo-lumen.php ,
67:Self-Abuse by Drugs Not a drop of alcohol is to be brought into this temple. Master Bassui (1327-1387)1 (His dying instructions: first rule) In swinging between liberal tolerance one moment and outraged repression the next, modern societies seem chronically incapable of reaching consistent attitudes about drugs. Stephen Batchelor2 Drugs won't show you the truth. Drugs will only show you what it's like to be on drugs. Brad Warner3 Implicit in the authentic Buddhist Path is sila. It is the time-honored practice of exercising sensible restraints [Z:73-74]. Sila's ethical guidelines provide the bedrock foundation for one's personal behavior in daily life. At the core of every religion are some self-disciplined renunciations corresponding to sila. Yet, a profound irony has been reshaping the human condition in most cultures during the last half century. It dates from the years when psychoactive drugs became readily available. During this era, many naturally curious persons could try psychedelic short-cuts and experience the way their consciousness might seem to ''expand.'' A fortunate few of these experimenters would become motivated to follow the nondrug meditative route when they pursued various spiritual paths. One fact is often overlooked. Meditation itself has many mind-expanding, psychedelic properties [Z:418-426]. These meditative experiences can also stimulate a drug-free spiritual quest. Meanwhile, we live in a drug culture. It is increasingly a drugged culture, for which overprescribing physicians must shoulder part of the blame. Do drugs have any place along the spiritual path? This issue will always be hotly debated.4 In Zen, the central issue is not whether each spiritual aspirant has the ''right'' to exercise their own curiosity, or the ''right'' to experiment on their own brains in the name of freedom of religion. It is a free country. Drugs are out there. The real questions are:  Can you exercise the requisite self-discipline to follow the Zen Buddhist Path?  Do you already have enough common sense to ask that seemingly naive question, ''What would Buddha do?'' (WWBD). ~ James Austin, Zen-Brain Reflections _Reviewing_Recent_Developments_in_Meditation_and_States_of_Consciousness,
68:The general characteristics and attributions of these Grades are indicated by their correspondences on the Tree of Life, as may be studied in detail in the Book 777. Student. -- His business is to acquire a general intellectual knowledge of all systems of attainment, as declared in the prescribed books. (See curriculum in Appendix I.) {231} Probationer. -- His principal business is to begin such practices as he my prefer, and to write a careful record of the same for one year. Neophyte. -- Has to acquire perfect control of the Astral Plane. Zelator. -- His main work is to achieve complete success in Asana and Pranayama. He also begins to study the formula of the Rosy Cross. Practicus. -- Is expected to complete his intellectual training, and in particular to study the Qabalah. Philosophus. -- Is expected to complete his moral training. He is tested in Devotion to the Order. Dominus Liminis. -- Is expected to show mastery of Pratyahara and Dharana. Adeptus (without). -- is expected to perform the Great Work and to attain the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. Adeptus (within). -- Is admitted to the practice of the formula of the Rosy Cross on entering the College of the Holy Ghost. Adeptus (Major). -- Obtains a general mastery of practical Magick, though without comprehension. Adeptus (Exemptus). -- Completes in perfection all these matters. He then either ("a") becomes a Brother of the Left Hand Path or, ("b") is stripped of all his attainments and of himself as well, even of his Holy Guardian Angel, and becomes a babe of the Abyss, who, having transcended the Reason, does nothing but grow in the womb of its mother. It then finds itself a Magister Templi. -- (Master of the Temple): whose functions are fully described in Liber 418, as is this whole initiation from Adeptus Exemptus. See also "Aha!". His principal business is to tend his "garden" of disciples, and to obtain a perfect understanding of the Universe. He is a Master of Samadhi. {232} Magus. -- Attains to wisdom, declares his law (See Liber I, vel Magi) and is a Master of all Magick in its greatest and highest sense. Ipsissimus. -- Is beyond all this and beyond all comprehension of those of lower degrees. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
69:the ways of the Bhakta and man of Knowledge ::: In the ordinary paths of Yoga the method used for dealing with these conflicting materials is direct and simple. One or another of the principal psychological forces in us is selected as our single means for attaining to the Divine; the rest is quieted into inertia or left to starve in its smallness. The Bhakta, seizing on the emotional forces of the being, the intense activities of the heart, abides concentrated in the love of God, gathered up as into a single one-pointed tongue of fire; he is indifferent to the activities of thought, throws behind him the importunities of the reason, cares nothing for the mind's thirst for knowledge. All the knowledge he needs is his faith and the inspirations that well up from a heart in communion with the Divine. He has no use for any will to works that is not turned to the direct worship of the Beloved or the service of the temple. The man of Knowledge, self-confined by a deliberate choice to the force and activities of discriminative thought, finds release in the mind's inward-drawn endeavour. He concentrates on the idea of the self, succeeds by a subtle inner discernment in distinguishing its silent presence amid the veiling activities of Nature, and through the perceptive idea arrives at the concrete spiritual experience. He is indifferent to the play of the emotions, deaf to the hunger-call of passion, closed to the activities of Life, -- the more blessed he, the sooner they fall away from him and leave him free, still and mute, the eternal non-doer. The body is his stumbling-block, the vital functions are his enemies; if their demands can be reduced to a minimum, that is his great good fortune. The endless difficulties that arise from the environing world are dismissed by erecting firmly against them a defence of outer physical and inner spiritual solitude; safe behind a wall of inner silence, he remains impassive and untouched by the world and by others. To be alone with oneself or alone with the Divine, to walk apart with God and his devotees, to entrench oneself in the single self-ward endeavour of the mind or Godward passion of the heart is the trend of these Yogas. The problem is solved by the excision of all but the one central difficulty which pursues the only chosen motive-force; into the midst of the dividing calls of our nature the principle of an exclusive concentration comes sovereignly to our rescue. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Self-Consecration. 76-77,
70:Who could have thought that this tanned young man with gentle, dreamy eyes, long wavy hair parted in the middle and falling to the neck, clad in a common coarse Ahmedabad dhoti, a close-fitting Indian jacket, and old-fashioned slippers with upturned toes, and whose face was slightly marked with smallpox, was no other than Mister Aurobindo Ghose, living treasure of French, Latin and Greek?" Actually, Sri Aurobindo was not yet through with books; the Western momentum was still there; he devoured books ordered from Bombay and Calcutta by the case. "Aurobindo would sit at his desk," his Bengali teacher continues, "and read by the light of an oil lamp till one in the morning, oblivious of the intolerable mosquito bites. I would see him seated there in the same posture for hours on end, his eyes fixed on his book, like a yogi lost in the contemplation of the Divine, unaware of all that went on around him. Even if the house had caught fire, it would not have broken this concentration." He read English, Russian, German, and French novels, but also, in ever larger numbers, the sacred books of India, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Ramayana, although he had never been in a temple except as an observer. "Once, having returned from the College," one of his friends recalls, "Sri Aurobindo sat down, picked up a book at random and started to read, while Z and some friends began a noisy game of chess. After half an hour, he put the book down and took a cup of tea. We had already seen him do this many times and were waiting eagerly for a chance to verify whether he read the books from cover to cover or only scanned a few pages here and there. Soon the test began. Z opened the book, read a line aloud and asked Sri Aurobindo to recite what followed. Sri Aurobindo concentrated for a moment, and then repeated the entire page without a single mistake. If he could read a hundred pages in half an hour, no wonder he could go through a case of books in such an incredibly short time." But Sri Aurobindo did not stop at the translations of the sacred texts; he began to study Sanskrit, which, typically, he learned by himself. When a subject was known to be difficult or impossible, he would refuse to take anyone's word for it, whether he were a grammarian, pandit, or clergyman, and would insist upon trying it himself. The method seemed to have some merit, for not only did he learn Sanskrit, but a few years later he discovered the lost meaning of the Veda. ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure of Consciousness ,
71:Worthy The Name Of Sir Knight Sir Knight of the world's oldest order, Sir Knight of the Army of God, You have crossed the strange mystical border, The ground floor of truth you have trod; You have entered the sanctum sanctorum, Which leads to the temple above, Where you come as a stone, and a Christ-chosen one, In the kingdom of Friendship and Love. II As you stand in this new realm of beauty, Where each man you meet is your friend, Think not that your promise of duty In hall, or asylum, shall end; Outside, in the great world of pleasure, Beyond, in the clamor of trade, In the battle of life and its coarse daily strife Remember the vows you have made. III Your service, majestic and solemn, Your symbols, suggestive and sweet, Your uniformed phalanx in column On gala days marching the street; Your sword and your plume and your helmet, Your 'secrets' hid from the world's sight; These things are the small, lesser parts of the all Which are needed to form the true Knight. IV The martyrs who perished rejoicing In Templary's glorious laws, Who died 'midst the fagots while voicing The glory and worth of their cause- 935 They honored the title of 'Templar' No more than the Knight of to-day Who mars not the name with one blemish of shame, But carries it clean through life's fray. To live for a cause, to endeavor To make your deeds grace it, to try And uphold its precepts forever, Is harder by far than to die. For the battle of life is unending, The enemy, Self, never tires, And the true Knight must slay that sly foe every day Ere he reaches the heights he desires. VI Sir Knight, have you pondered the meaning Of all you have heard and been told? Have you strengthened your heart for its weaning From vices and faults loved of old? Will you honor, in hours of temptation, Your promises noble and grand? Will your spirit be strong to do battle with wrong, 'And having done all, to stand?' VII Will you ever be true to a brother In actions as well as in creed? Will you stand by his side as no other Could stand in the hour of his need? Will you boldly defend him from peril, And lift him from poverty's curseWill the promise of aid which you willingly made, Reach down from your lips to your purse? VIII The world's battle field is before you! Let Wisdom walk close by your side, 936 Let Faith spread her snowy wings o'er you, Let Truth be your comrade and guide; Let Fortitude, Justice and Mercy Direct all your conduct aright, And let each word and act tell to men the proud fact, You are worthy the name of 'Sir Knight'. ~ Ella Wheeler Wilcox,
72:Eternal, unconfined, unextended, without cause and without effect, the Holy Lamp mysteriously burns. Without quantity or quality, unconditioned and sempiternal, is this Light.It is not possible for anyone to advise or approve; for this Lamp is not made with hands; it exists alone for ever; it has no parts, no person; it is before "I am." Few can behold it, yet it is always there. For it there is no "here" nor "there," no "then" nor "now;" all parts of speech are abolished, save the noun; and this noun is not found either in {106} human speech or in Divine. It is the Lost Word, the dying music of whose sevenfold echo is I A O and A U M.Without this Light the Magician could not work at all; yet few indeed are the Magicians that have know of it, and far fewer They that have beheld its brilliance!The Temple and all that is in it must be destroyed again and again before it is worthy to receive that Light. Hence it so often seems that the only advice that any master can give to any pupil is to destroy the Temple."Whatever you have" and "whatever you are" are veils before that Light. Yet in so great a matter all advice is vain. There is no master so great that he can see clearly the whole character of any pupil. What helped him in the past may hinder another in the future.Yet since the Master is pledged to serve, he may take up that service on these simple lines. Since all thoughts are veils of this Light, he may advise the destruction of all thoughts, and to that end teach those practices which are clearly conductive to such destruction.These practices have now fortunately been set down in clear language by order of the A.'.A.'..In these instructions the relativity and limitation of each practice is clearly taught, and all dogmatic interpretations are carefully avoided. Each practice is in itself a demon which must be destroyed; but to be destroyed it must first be evoked.Shame upon that Master who shirks any one of these practices, however distasteful or useless it may be to him! For in the detailed knowledge of it, which experience alone can give him, may lie his opportunity for crucial assistance to a pupil. However dull the drudgery, it should be undergone. If it were possible to regret anything in life, which is fortunately not the case, it would be the hours wasted in fruitful practices which might have been more profitably employed on sterile ones: for NEMO<Temple, whose task it is to develop the beginner. See Liber CDXVIII, Aethyr XIII.>> in tending his garden seeketh not to single out the flower that shall be NEMO after him. And we are not told that NEMO might have used other things than those which he actually does use; it seems possible that if he had not the acid or the knife, or the fire, or the oil, he might miss tending just that one flower which was to be NEMO after him! ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA 2.10 - The Lamp,
73:reading ::: 50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered: Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927) Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954) Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997) Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997) Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964) Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980) Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006) David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980) Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012) Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984) Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997) Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006) Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961) Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958) Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947) Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969) Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936) Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901) Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983) Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006) Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005) Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998) John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999) Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013) Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958) Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967) Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951) Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945) William James - Principles of Psychology (1890) Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953) Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011) Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953) RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959) Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970) Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974) Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014) Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012) IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927) Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951) Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966) Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002) VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998) Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961) Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970) Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004) Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002) BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953) Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000) William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics ,
74:Apotheosis ::: One of the most powerful and beloved of the Bodhisattvas of the Mahayana Buddhism of Tibet, China, and Japan is the Lotus Bearer, Avalokiteshvara, "The Lord Looking Down in Pity," so called because he regards with compassion all sentient creatures suffering the evils of existence. To him goes the millionfold repeated prayer of the prayer wheels and temple gongs of Tibet: Om mani padme hum, "The jewel is in the lotus." To him go perhaps more prayers per minute than to any single divinity known to man; for when, during his final life on earth as a human being, he shattered for himself the bounds of the last threshold (which moment opened to him the timelessness of the void beyond the frustrating mirage-enigmas of the named and bounded cosmos), he paused: he made a vow that before entering the void he would bring all creatures without exception to enlightenment; and since then he has permeated the whole texture of existence with the divine grace of his assisting presence, so that the least prayer addressed to him, throughout the vast spiritual empire of the Buddha, is graciously heard. Under differing forms he traverses the ten thousand worlds, and appears in the hour of need and prayer. He reveals himself in human form with two arms, in superhuman forms with four arms, or with six, or twelve, or a thousand, and he holds in one of his left hands the lotus of the world.Like the Buddha himself, this godlike being is a pattern of the divine state to which the human hero attains who has gone beyond the last terrors of ignorance. "When the envelopment of consciousness has been annihilated, then he becomes free of all fear, beyond the reach of change." This is the release potential within us all, and which anyone can attain-through herohood; for, as we read: "All things are Buddha-things"; or again (and this is the other way of making the same statement) : "All beings are without self."The world is filled and illumined by, but does not hold, the Bodhisattva ("he whose being is enlightenment"); rather, it is he who holds the world, the lotus. Pain and pleasure do not enclose him, he encloses them-and with profound repose. And since he is what all of us may be, his presence, his image, the mere naming of him, helps. "He wears a garland of eight thousand rays, in which is seen fully reflected a state of perfect beauty.The color of his body is purple gold. His palms have the mixed color of five hundred lotuses, while each finger tip has eighty-four thousand signet-marks, and each mark eighty-four thousand colors; each color has eighty-four thousand rays which are soft and mild and shine over all things that exist. With these jewel hands he draws and embraces all beings. The halo surrounding his head is studded with five hundred Buddhas, miraculously transformed, each attended by five hundred Bodhisattvas, who are attended, in turn, by numberless gods. And when he puts his feet down to the ground, the flowers of diamonds and jewels that are scattered cover everything in all directions. The color of his face is gold. While in his towering crown of gems stands a Buddha, two hundred and fifty miles high." - Amitayur-Dhyana Sutra, 19; ibid., pp. 182-183. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces Liber 132 - Apotheosis,
75:On that spring day in the park I saw a young woman who attracted me. She was tall and slender, elegantly dressed, and had an intelligent and boyish face. I liked her at once. She was my type and began to fill my imagination. She probably was not much older than I but seemed far more mature, well-defined, a full-grown woman, but with a touch of exuberance and boyishness in her face, and this was what I liked above all . I had never managed to approach a girl with whom I had fallen in love, nor did I manage in this case. But the impression she made on me was deeper than any previous one had been and the infatuation had a profound influence on my life. Suddenly a new image had risen up before me, a lofty and cherished image. And no need, no urge was as deep or as fervent within me as the craving to worship and admire. I gave her the name Beatrice, for, even though I had not read Dante, I knew about Beatrice from an English painting of which I owned a reproduction. It showed a young pre-Raphaelite woman, long-limbed and slender, with long head and etherealized hands and features. My beautiful young woman did not quite resemble her, even though she, too, revealed that slender and boyish figure which I loved, and something of the ethereal, soulful quality of her face. Although I never addressed a single word to Beatrice, she exerted a profound influence on me at that time. She raised her image before me, she gave me access to a holy shrine, she transformed me into a worshiper in a temple. From one day to the next I stayed clear of all bars and nocturnal exploits. I could be alone with myself again and enjoyed reading and going for long walks. My sudden conversion drew a good deal of mockery in its wake. But now I had something I loved and venerated, I had an ideal again, life was rich with intimations of mystery and a feeling of dawn that made me immune to all taunts. I had come home again to myself, even if only as the slave and servant of a cherished image. I find it difficult to think back to that time without a certain fondness. Once more I was trying most strenuously to construct an intimate "world of light" for myself out of the shambles of a period of devastation; once more I sacrificed everything within me to the aim of banishing darkness and evil from myself. And, furthermore, this present "world of light" was to some extent my own creation; it was no longer an escape, no crawling back to -nether and the safety of irresponsibility; it was a new duty, one I had invented and desired on my own, with responsibility and self-control. My sexuality, a torment from which I was in constant flight, was to be transfigured nto spirituality and devotion by this holy fire. Everything :brk and hateful was to be banished, there were to be no more tortured nights, no excitement before lascivious picures, no eavesdropping at forbidden doors, no lust. In place of all this I raised my altar to the image of Beatrice, :.. and by consecrating myself to her I consecrated myself to the spirit and to the gods, sacrificing that part of life which I withdrew from the forces of darkness to those of light. My goal was not joy but purity, not happiness but beauty, and spirituality. This cult of Beatrice completely changed my life. ~ Hermann Hesse, Demian ,
76:[desire and its divine form:] Into all our endeavour upward the lower element of desire will at first naturally enter. For what the enlightened will sees as the thing to be done and pursues as the crown to be conquered, what the heart embraces as the one thing delightful, that in us which feels itself limited and opposed and, because it is limited, craves and struggles, will seek with the troubled passion of an egoistic desire. This craving life-force or desire-soul in us has to be accepted at first, but only in order that it may be transformed. Even from the very beginning it has to be taught to renounce all other desires and concentrate itself on the passion for the Divine. This capital point gained, it has to be aught to desire, not for its own separate sake, but for God in the world and for the Divine in ourselves; it has to fix itself upon no personal spiritual gain, though of all possible spiritual gains we are sure, but on the great work to be done in us and others, on the high coming manifestation which is to be the glorious fulfilment of the Divine in the world, on the Truth that has to be sought and lived and enthroned for eveR But last, most difficult for it, more difficult than to seek with the right object, it has to be taught to seek in the right manner; for it must learn to desire, not in its own egoistic way, but in the way of the Divine. It must insist no longer, as the strong separative will always insists, on its own manner of fulfilment, its own dream of possession, its own idea of the right and the desirable; it must yearn to fulfil a larger and greater Will and consent to wait upon a less interested and ignorant guidance. Thus trained, Desire, that great unquiet harasser and troubler of man and cause of every kind of stumbling, will become fit to be transformed into its divine counterpart. For desire and passion too have their divine forms; there is a pure ecstasy of the soul's seeking beyond all craving and grief, there is a Will of Ananda that sits glorified in the possession of the supreme beatitudes. When once the object of concentration has possessed and is possessed by the three master instruments, the thought, the heart and the will,-a consummation fully possible only when the desire-soul in us has submitted to the Divine Law,-the perfection of mind and life and body can be effectively fulfilled in our transmuted nature. This will be done, not for the personal satisfaction of the ego, but that the whole may constitute a fit temple for the Divine Presence, a faultless instrument for the divine work. For that work can be truly performed only when the instrument, consecrated and perfected, has grown fit for a selfless action,-and that will be when personal desire and egoism are abolished, but not the liberated individual. Even when the little ego has been abolished, the true spiritual Person can still remain and God's will and work and delight in him and the spiritual use of his perfection and fulfilment. Our works will then be divine and done divinely; our mind and life and will, devoted to the Divine, will be used to help fulfil in others and in the world that which has been first realised in ourselves,- all that we can manifest of the embodied Unity, Love, Freedom, Strength, Power, Splendour, immortal Joy which is the goal of the Spirit's terrestrial adventure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Self-Consecration [83],
77:There walled apart by its own innernessIn a mystical barrage of dynamic lightHe saw a lone immense high-curved world-pileErect like a mountain-chariot of the GodsMotionless under an inscrutable sky.As if from Matter's plinth and viewless baseTo a top as viewless, a carved sea of worldsClimbing with foam-maned waves to the SupremeAscended towards breadths immeasurable;It hoped to soar into the Ineffable's reign:A hundred levels raised it to the Unknown.So it towered up to heights intangibleAnd disappeared in the hushed conscious VastAs climbs a storeyed temple-tower to heavenBuilt by the aspiring soul of man to liveNear to his dream of the Invisible.Infinity calls to it as it dreams and climbs;Its spire touches the apex of the world;Mounting into great voiceless stillnessesIt marries the earth to screened eternities.Amid the many systems of the OneMade by an interpreting creative joyAlone it points us to our journey backOut of our long self-loss in Nature's deeps;Planted on earth it holds in it all realms:It is a brief compendium of the Vast.This was the single stair to being's goal.A summary of the stages of the spirit,Its copy of the cosmic hierarchiesRefashioned in our secret air of selfA subtle pattern of the universe.It is within, below, without, above.Acting upon this visible Nature's schemeIt wakens our earth-matter's heavy dozeTo think and feel and to react to joy;It models in us our diviner parts,Lifts mortal mind into a greater air,Makes yearn this life of flesh to intangible aims,Links the body's death with immortality's call:Out of the swoon of the InconscienceIt labours towards a superconscient Light.If earth were all and this were not in her,Thought could not be nor life-delight's response:Only material forms could then be her guestsDriven by an inanimate world-force.Earth by this golden superfluityBore thinking man and more than man shall bear;This higher scheme of being is our causeAnd holds the key to our ascending fate;It calls out of our dense mortalityThe conscious spirit nursed in Matter's house.The living symbol of these conscious planes,Its influences and godheads of the unseen,Its unthought logic of Reality's actsArisen from the unspoken truth in things,Have fixed our inner life's slow-scaled degrees.Its steps are paces of the soul's returnFrom the deep adventure of material birth,A ladder of delivering ascentAnd rungs that Nature climbs to deity.Once in the vigil of a deathless gazeThese grades had marked her giant downward plunge,The wide and prone leap of a godhead's fall.Our life is a holocaust of the Supreme.The great World-Mother by her sacrificeHas made her soul the body of our state;Accepting sorrow and unconsciousnessDivinity's lapse from its own splendours woveThe many-patterned ground of all we are.An idol of self is our mortality.Our earth is a fragment and a residue;Her power is packed with the stuff of greater worldsAnd steeped in their colour-lustres dimmed by her drowse;An atavism of higher births is hers,Her sleep is stirred by their buried memoriesRecalling the lost spheres from which they fell.Unsatisfied forces in her bosom move;They are partners of her greater growing fateAnd her return to immortality;They consent to share her doom of birth and death;They kindle partial gleams of the All and driveHer blind laborious spirit to composeA meagre image of the mighty Whole.The calm and luminous Intimacy within ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
78:All Yoga is a turning of the human mind and the human soul, not yet divine in realisation, but feeling the divine impulse and attraction in it, towards that by which it finds its greater being. Emotionally, the first form which this turning takes must be that of adoration. In ordinary religion this adoration wears the form of external worship and that again develops a most external form of ceremonial worship. This element is ordinarily necessary because the mass of men live in their physical minds, cannot realise anything except by the force of a physical symbol and cannot feel that they are living anything except by the force of a physical action. We might apply here the Tantric gradation of sadhana, which makes the way of the pasu, the herd, the animal or physical being, the lowest stage of its discipline, and say that the purely or predominantly ceremonial adoration is the first step of this lowest part of the way. It is evident that even real religion, - and Yoga is something more than religion, - only begins when this quite outward worship corresponds to something really felt within the mind, some genuine submission, awe or spiritual aspiration, to which it becomes an aid, an outward expression and also a sort of periodical or constant reminder helping to draw back the mind to it from the preoccupations of ordinary life. But so long as it is only an idea of the Godhead to which one renders reverence or homage, we have not yet got to the beginning of Yoga. The aim of Yoga being union, its beginning must always be a seeking after the Divine, a longing after some kind of touch, closeness or possession. When this comes on us, the adoration becomes always primarily an inner worship; we begin to make ourselves a temple of the Divine, our thoughts and feelings a constant prayer of aspiration and seeking, our whole life an external service and worship. It is as this change, this new soul-tendency grows, that the religion of the devotee becomes a Yoga, a growing contact and union. It does not follow that the outward worship will necessarily be dispensed with, but it will increasingly become only a physical expression or outflowing of the inner devotion and adoration, the wave of the soul throwing itself out in speech and symbolic act. Adoration, before it turns into an element of the deeper Yoga of devotion, a petal of the flower of love, its homage and self-uplifting to its sun, must bring with it, if it is profound, an increasing consecration of the being to the Divine who is adored. And one element of this consecration must be a self-purifying so as to become fit for the divine contact, or for the entrance of the Divine into the temple of our inner being, or for his selfrevelation in the shrine of the heart. This purifying may be ethical in its character, but it will not be merely the moralist's seeking for the right and blameless action or even, when once we reach the stage of Yoga, an obedience to the law of God as revealed in formal religion; but it will be a throwing away, katharsis, of all that conflicts whether with the idea of the Divine in himself or of the Divine in ourselves. In the former case it becomes in habit of feeling and outer act an imitation of the Divine, in the latter a growing into his likeness in our nature. What inner adoration is to ceremonial worship, this growing into the divine likeness is to the outward ethical life. It culminates in a sort of liberation by likeness to the Divine,1 a liberation from our lower nature and a change into the divine nature. Consecration becomes in its fullness a devoting of all our being to the Divine; therefore also of all our thoughts and our works. Here the Yoga takes into itself the essential elements of the Yoga of works and the Yoga of knowledge, but in its own manner and with its own peculiar spirit. It is a sacrifice of life and works to the Divine, but a sacrifice of love more than a tuning of the will to the divine Will. The bhakta offers up his life and all that he is and all that he has and all that he does to the Divine. This surrender may take the ascetic form, as when he leaves the ordinary life of men and devotes his days solely to prayer ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.04 - The Way of Devotion,
79:AUGOEIDES: The magicians most important invocation is that of his Genius, Daemon, True Will, or Augoeides. This operation is traditionally known as attaining the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. It is sometimes known as the Magnum Opus or Great Work. The Augoeides may be defined as the most perfect vehicle of Kia on the plane of duality. As the avatar of Kia on earth, the Augoeides represents the true will, the raison detre of the magician, his purpose in existing. The discovery of ones true will or real nature may be difficult and fraught with danger, since a false identification leads to obsession and madness. The operation of obtaining the knowledge and conversation is usually a lengthy one. The magician is attempting a progressive metamorphosis, a complete overhaul of his entire existence. Yet he has to seek the blueprint for his reborn self as he goes along. Life is less the meaningless accident it seems. Kia has incarnated in these particular conditions of duality for some purpose. The inertia of previous existences propels Kia into new forms of manifestation. Each incarnation represents a task, or a puzzle to be solved, on the way to some greater form of completion. The key to this puzzle is in the phenomena of the plane of duality in which we find ourselves. We are, as it were, trapped in a labyrinth or maze. The only thing to do is move about and keep a close watch on the way the walls turn. In a completely chaotic universe such as this one, there are no accidents. Everything is signifcant. Move a single grain of sand on a distant shore and the entire future history of the world will eventually be changed. A person doing his true will is assisted by the momentum of the universe and seems possessed of amazing good luck. In beginning the great work of obtaining the knowledge and conversation, the magician vows to interpret every manifestation of existence as a direct message from the infinite Chaos to himself personally. To do this is to enter the magical world view in its totality. He takes complete responsibility for his present incarnation and must consider every experience, thing, or piece of information which assails him from any source, as a reflection of the way he is conducting his existence. The idea that things happen to one that may or may not be related to the way one acts is an illusion created by our shallow awareness. Keeping a close eye on the walls of the labyrinth, the conditions of his existence, the magician may then begin his invocation. The genius is not something added to oneself. Rather it is a stripping away of excess to reveal the god within. Directly on awakening, preferably at dawn, the initiate goes to the place of invocation. Figuring to himself as he goes that being born anew each day brings with it the chance of greater rebirth, first he banishes the temple of his mind by ritual or by some magical trance. Then he unveils some token or symbol or sigil which represents to him the Holy Guardian Angel. This symbol he will likely have to change during the great work as the inspiration begins to move him. Next he invokes an image of the Angel into his minds eye. It may be considered as a luminous duplicate of ones own form standing in front of or behind one, or simply as a ball of brilliant light above ones head. Then he formulates his aspirations in what manner he will, humbling himself in prayer or exalting himself in loud proclamation as his need be. The best form of this invocation is spoken spontaneously from the heart, and if halting at first, will prove itself in time. He is aiming to establish a set of ideas and images which correspond to the nature of his genius, and at the same time receive inspiration from that source. As the magician begins to manifest more of his true will, the Augoeides will reveal images, names, and spiritual principles by which it can be drawn into greater manifestation. Having communicated with the invoked form, the magician should draw it into himself and go forth to live in the way he hath willed. The ritual may be concluded with an aspiration to the wisdom of silence by a brief concentration on the sigil of the Augoeides, but never by banishing. Periodically more elaborate forms of ritual, using more powerful forms of gnosis, may be employed. At the end of the day, there should be an accounting and fresh resolution made. Though every day be a catalog of failure, there should be no sense of sin or guilt. Magic is the raising of the whole individual in perfect balance to the power of Infinity, and such feelings are symptomatic of imbalance. If any unnecessary or imbalanced scraps of ego become identified with the genius by mistake, then disaster awaits. The life force flows directly into these complexes and bloats them into grotesque monsters variously known as the demon Choronzon. Some magicians attempting to go too fast with this invocation have failed to banish this demon, and have gone spectacularly insane as a result. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
80:This, in short, is the demand made on us, that we should turn our whole life into a conscious sacrifice. Every moment and every movement of our being is to be resolved into a continuous and a devoted self-giving to the Eternal. All our actions, not less the smallest and most ordinary and trifling than the greatest and most uncommon and noble, must be performed as consecrated acts. Our individualised nature must live in the single consciousness of an inner and outer movement dedicated to Something that is beyond us and greater than our ego. No matter what the gift or to whom it is presented by us, there must be a consciousness in the act that we are presenting it to the one divine Being in all beings. Our commonest or most grossly material actions must assume this sublimated character; when we eat, we should be conscious that we are giving our food to that Presence in us; it must be a sacred offering in a temple and the sense of a mere physical need or self-gratification must pass away from us. In any great labour, in any high discipline, in any difficult or noble enterprise, whether undertaken for ourselves, for others or for the race, it will no longer be possible to stop short at the idea of the race, of ourselves or of others. The thing we are doing must be consciously offered as a sacrifice of works, not to these, but either through them or directly to the One Godhead; the Divine Inhabitant who was hidden by these figures must be no longer hidden but ever present to our soul, our mind, our sense. The workings and results of our acts must be put in the hands of that One in the feeling that that Presence is the Infinite and Most High by whom alone our labour and our aspiration are possible. For in his being all takes place; for him all labour and aspiration are taken from us by Nature and offered on his altar. Even in those things in which Nature is herself very plainly the worker and we only the witnesses of her working and its containers and supporters, there should be the same constant memory and insistent consciousness of a work and of its divine Master. Our very inspiration and respiration, our very heart-beats can and must be made conscious in us as the living rhythm of the universal sacrifice. It is clear that a conception of this kind and its effective practice must carry in them three results that are of a central importance for our spiritual ideal. It is evident, to begin with, that, even if such a discipline is begun without devotion, it leads straight and inevitably towards the highest devotion possible; for it must deepen naturally into the completest adoration imaginable, the most profound God-love. There is bound up with it a growing sense of the Divine in all things, a deepening communion with the Divine in all our thought, will and action and at every moment of our lives, a more and more moved consecration to the Divine of the totality of our being. Now these implications of the Yoga of works are also of the very essence of an integral and absolute Bhakti. The seeker who puts them into living practice makes in himself continually a constant, active and effective representation of the very spirit of self-devotion, and it is inevitable that out of it there should emerge the most engrossing worship of the Highest to whom is given this service. An absorbing love for the Divine Presence to whom he feels an always more intimate closeness, grows upon the consecrated worker. And with it is born or in it is contained a universal love too for all these beings, living forms and creatures that are habitations of the Divine - not the brief restless grasping emotions of division, but the settled selfless love that is the deeper vibration of oneness. In all the seeker begins to meet the one Object of his adoration and service. The way of works turns by this road of sacrifice to meet the path of Devotion; it can be itself a devotion as complete, as absorbing, as integral as any the desire of the heart can ask for or the passion of the mind can imagine. Next, the practice of this Yoga demands a constant inward remembrance of the one central liberating knowledge, and a constant active externalising of it in works comes in too to intensify the remembrance. In all is the one Self, the one Divine is all; all are in the Divine, all are the Divine and there is nothing else in the universe, - this thought or this faith is the whole background until it becomes the whole substance of the consciousness of the worker. A memory, a self-dynamising meditation of this kind, must and does in its end turn into a profound and uninterrupted vision and a vivid and all-embracing consciousness of that which we so powerfully remember or on which we so constantly meditate. For it compels a constant reference at each moment to the Origin of all being and will and action and there is at once an embracing and exceeding of all particular forms and appearances in That which is their cause and upholder. This way cannot go to its end without a seeing vivid and vital, as concrete in its way as physical sight, of the works of the universal Spirit everywhere. On its summits it rises into a constant living and thinking and willing and acting in the presence of the Supramental, the Transcendent. Whatever we see and hear, whatever we touch and sense, all of which we are conscious, has to be known and felt by us as That which we worship and serve; all has to be turned into an image of the Divinity, perceived as a dwelling-place of his Godhead, enveloped with the eternal Omnipresence. In its close, if not long before it, this way of works turns by communion with the Divine Presence, Will and Force into a way of Knowledge more complete and integral than any the mere creature intelligence can construct or the search of the intellect can discover. Lastly, the practice of this Yoga of sacrifice compels us to renounce all the inner supports of egoism, casting them out of our mind and will and actions, and to eliminate its seed, its presence, its influence out of our nature. All must be done for the Divine; all must be directed towards the Divine. Nothing must be attempted for ourselves as a separate existence; nothing done for others, whether neighbours, friends, family, country or mankind or other creatures merely because they are connected with our personal life and thought and sentiment or because the ego takes a preferential interest in their welfare. In this way of doing and seeing all works and all life become only a daily dynamic worship and service of the Divine in the unbounded temple of his own vast cosmic existence. Life becomes more and more the sacrifice of the eternal in the individual constantly self-offered to the eternal Transcendence. It is offered in the wide sacrificial ground of the field of the eternal cosmic Spirit; and the Force too that offers it is the eternal Force, the omnipresent Mother. Therefore is this way a way of union and communion by acts and by the spirit and knowledge in the act as complete and integral as any our Godward will can hope for or our soul's strength execute. It has all the power of a way of works integral and absolute, but because of its law of sacrifice and self-giving to the Divine Self and Master, it is accompanied on its one side by the whole power of the path of Love and on the other by the whole power of the path of Knowledge. At its end all these three divine Powers work together, fused, united, completed, perfected by each other. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:DIFFERENT NOT LESS ~ Temple Grandin,
2:Animals make us Human. ~ Temple Grandin,
3:walks into a church, a temple ~ Various,
4:The Mind of a Mnemonist ~ Temple Grandin,
5:Your heart is your temple. ~ Suzy Kassem,
6:I am different, not less ~ Temple Grandin,
7:My friends call me Ryder. ~ J A Templeton,
8:I am different, not less. ~ Temple Grandin,
9:I'm pure geek, pure logic. ~ Temple Grandin,
10:Autism is part of who I am. ~ Temple Grandin,
11:I went to Temple? ~ Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,
12:There's nothing in the street ~ Julien Temple,
13:It is human nature to strive. ~ Temple Grandin,
14:My life is basically my work. ~ Temple Grandin,
15:Inscribed on the temple of Apollo ~ Maya Angelou,
16:etiolated skin.’ Anselm blew smoke. ~ Peter Temple,
17:Woman is a temple built over a sewer. ~ Tertullian,
18:A temple, first of all, is a place of ~ B H Roberts,
19:Ethan pressed a kiss to her temple, ~ Melinda Leigh,
20:Everything I think is in pictures. ~ Temple Grandin,
21:It All Started with a Moose ~ Nancy Temple Rodrigue,
22:The world needs all types of minds. ~ Temple Grandin,
23:dwelleth not in temples made with hands;  ~ Anonymous,
24:Library: The Temple of the Wise! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
25:A temple is a landscape of the soul. ~ Joseph Campbell,
26:I didn't realize I was in a Buddhist temple. ~ Al Gore,
27:Our body is the temple of our spirit. ~ George W Romney,
28:author Donna Williams, who is autistic, ~ Temple Grandin,
29:Curiosity is the other side of caution. ~ Temple Grandin,
30:Nature is cruel but we don't have to be ~ Temple Grandin,
31:See how ye Pharisee in the Temple stands, ~ John Bunyan,
32:Temple Bar was hundreds of miles away, ~ Charles Dickens,
33:Any building is a temple if you make it so. ~ Phil Knight,
34:His hand fell like a prayer on her temple. ~ Jodi Picoult,
35:MRS. BREYDON, TEMPLE Boone has assured us ~ Louis L Amour,
36:Autism is an extremely variable disorder. ~ Temple Grandin,
37:Dogs serve people, but people serve cats. ~ Temple Grandin,
38:In the temple of his spirit, each man is alone. ~ Ayn Rand,
39:Nature is cruel, but we don't have to be. ~ Temple Grandin,
40:rubbed his temples. He hated these exercises. ~ K F Breene,
41:The groves were God's first temple ~ William Cullen Bryant,
42:The temple is holy because it is not for sale ~ Ezra Pound,
43:I am a big believer in early intervention. ~ Temple Grandin,
44:Pressure is calming to the nervous system. ~ Temple Grandin,
45:The temple is holy because it is not for sale. ~ Ezra Pound,
46:My favoured temple is an humble heart. ~ Philip James Bailey,
47:that makes the hair on my arms stand on end. ~ J A Templeton,
48:the clinic was inhaling $100,000 a day. A day. ~ John Temple,
49:the Temple of Solomon was founded in 1118. ~ Michael Baigent,
50:The body is my temple, asanas are my prayers. ~ B K S Iyengar,
51:The temple of silence and reconciliation. ~ Thomas B Macaulay,
52:Where there is no temple there shall be no homes. ~ T S Eliot,
53:Every sport needs its temple, its cathedral. ~ Thomas Friedman,
54:Bookstores are temples and stories are my prayers. ~ Jaye Wells,
55:Success leaves traces. —John Templeton ~ William N Thorndike Jr,
56:If only he knew how little I cared about living. ~ J A Templeton,
57:I have met the devil, and her name is Cecily Temple ~ Libba Bray,
58:I like to figure things out and solve problems. ~ Temple Grandin,
59:I think toilets are more important than temples. ~ Narendra Modi,
60:Kids are among the most bored people in temples. ~ Chetan Bhagat,
61:No temple made with hands can compare with Yosemite. ~ John Muir,
62:The man who builds a factory, builds a temple. ~ Calvin Coolidge,
63:the temple was to be filled with art work. ~ Francis A Schaeffer,
64:Templeton is as hot as you can be and still walk! ~ Jerry Coleman,
65:The heart with compassion is the temple of God. ~ Sathya Sai Baba,
66:Your body is a temple. You don’t shit on the temple. ~ Kim Holden,
67:All nature is the temple; earth the altar. ~ Alphonse de Lamartine,
68:Discussing how old you are is the temple of boredom. ~ Ruth Gordon,
69:Temple going is for the purification of the soul. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
70:The temples perish, but the God still lives. ~ Philip James Bailey,
71:The time has come to turn your heart into a temple of fire. ~ Rumi,
72:A tattoo is graffiti on the temple of the body. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
73:I use my mind to solve problems and invent things. ~ Temple Grandin,
74:My Advice is: You always have to keep persevering. ~ Temple Grandin,
75:The grander the temple, the lousier its hangers-on. ~ Lindsey Davis,
76:Truth,” I whispered against her temple. “I love you. ~ Aly Martinez,
77:You get these fear memories that are hard to undo. ~ Temple Grandin,
78:A new clinic was opening every three days, on average, ~ John Temple,
79:Fashion as King is sometimes a very stupid ruler. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
80:India cannot be India again until temples become alive again. ~ Osho,
81:Judea is, for all intents and purposes, a temple-state. ~ Reza Aslan,
82:My body is a temple, and my temple needs redecorating. ~ Joan Rivers,
83:Neither living nor learning was good without order. ~ Temple Grandin,
84:Wherever you live is your temple, if you treat it like one. ~ Buddha,
85:Half of Silicon Valley's got a little bit of autism. ~ Temple Grandin,
86:Obvious is the most dangerous word in mathematics. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
87:Thomas McKean, an autistic champion of self-advocacy ~ Temple Grandin,
88:your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. ~ Anthony Bourdain,
89:If I did not have my work, I would not have any life. ~ Temple Grandin,
90:Obvious" is the most dangerous word in mathematics. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
91:An act of senseless Discord produces a Temple of Concord’. ~ Mary Beard,
92:A temple’s sanctity lies in its soul, not in its stones. ~ Phil Brucato,
93:I obtain great satisfaction out of using my intellect. ~ Temple Grandin,
94:I think its so exciting to try anything you possibly can. ~ Juno Temple,
95:my body is a temple, and I am the god it was built for ~ Savannah Brown,
96:Remember, your body is a temple, not a 7-Eleven. ~ Jennifer Love Hewitt,
97:Revere the body and care for it, for it is a temple. ~ Swami Muktananda,
98:There's a point where anecdotal evidence becomes truth ~ Temple Grandin,
99:Delay is a gun pointed at the temple of confidence. ~ Augusten Burroughs,
100:Except for our bodies there are no other temples in the world ~ Rajneesh,
101:I find hope is best abandoned early,’ muttered Temple. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
102:my body is a temple
and i'm the god it was built for ~ Savannah Brown,
103:Those whose hearts are pure are temples of the Holy Spirit. ~ Saint Lucy,
104:You aren’t the only one who is confused and . . . scared. ~ Lisa C Temple,
105:Christ is our temple, in whom by faith all believers meet. ~ Matthew Henry,
106:It pays to save things'...Templeton the rat from Chalotte's web. ~ Collins,
107:Men and women just look at sex in very, very different ways. ~ Juno Temple,
108:People with autism aren't interested in social chit-chat. ~ Temple Grandin,
109:Science has its being in a perpetual mental restlessness. ~ William Temple,
110:There is a tremendous range of children with a PDD label. ~ Temple Grandin,
111:9Within your temple, O God, we meditate on your unfailing love. ~ Anonymous,
112:Every man is the builder of a temple called his body. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
113:Prisons are the temples where devils learn to prey. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
114:The only royal road to elementary geometry is ingenuity. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
115:The world needs different kinds of minds to work together. ~ Temple Grandin,
116:I cannot emphasize enough the importance of a good teacher. ~ Temple Grandin,
117:I want get people to think about sensory based of thinking. ~ Temple Grandin,
118:Temples cannot imprison within their walls the divine Substance. ~ Euripides,
119:Wherever you live is your temple, if you treat it like one. ~ Gautama Buddha,
120:You have gone into the Temple...and found Him, as always, there. ~ C S Lewis,
121:I'm against the capturing of Eastern Orthodox temples. ~ Vladimir Zhirinovsky,
122:the first temple in Europe, ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
123:The true Mason is the Tiler of the Temple of the Heart. ~ William Howard Taft,
124:Your pain is a school unto itself–– and your joy a lovely temple. ~ Aberjhani,
125:Dirt is matter in the wrong place. ~ Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston,
126:Engineering is easy - it's the people problems that are hard. ~ Temple Grandin,
127:I belong to no religion. My religion is love. Every heart is my temple. ~ Rumi,
128:The last thing I need to do is act like I’m butt-hurt, though. ~ J A Templeton,
129:we build him a temple, but we live in our own houses.” Religion ~ Eric Metaxas,
130:You can't really help people until you've helped yourself first. ~ Juno Temple,
131:A sort of cross between a temple dancer and a band-saw.” They ~ Terry Pratchett,
132:At the moment she’s planning on applying to Temple and Princeton, ~ Kelly Harms,
133:If you kill God, you must also leave the shelter of the temple. ~ Irvin D Yalom,
134:There is but one temple in the universe, and that is the body of man. ~ Novalis,
135:Yes, Dr. Templeman? Care to share?" My audacity is breathtaking. ~ Sally Thorne,
136:You can be honest without sharing your opinions on everything. ~ Temple Grandin,
137:Archimedes, Newton, and Gauss, these three, are in a class by ~ Eric Temple Bell,
138:If a temple is to be erected, a temple must be destroyed . ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
139:My Brain and My Heart are my Temples. My true Religion is Kindness. ~ Dalai Lama,
140:The temple through which alone lies the road to that of Liberty. ~ James Madison,
141:It is important to remember that when it comes to law, computers ~ Brad Templeton,
142:We're not just building a Temple here, the Lord is building us. ~ Joseph Smith Jr,
143:I'll keep you here.' He taps his temple. 'Where you can't get lost. ~ Gayle Forman,
144:Que uno contemple el cielo por la noche no lo convierte en astrónomo. ~ John Boyne,
145:Science makes no pretension to eternal truth or absolute truth. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
146:You belong, Echo,” he says against my temple. “Right here with me. ~ Katie McGarry,
147:Every calm and quiet place is the true temple of the wise man! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
148:If the body is a temple, then tattoos are its stained glass windows. ~ Sylvia Plath,
149:It's quite quick for me to know if I want to play a character or not. ~ Juno Temple,
150:The word comes from Latin roots com and templum, “with” and “temple. ~ Gerald G May,
151:I am also a believer in an integrated treatment approach to autism. ~ Temple Grandin,
152:Nature is not a temple, but a workshop, and man's the workman in it. ~ Ivan Turgenev,
153:Our own brain, our own heart is our temple; the philosophy is kindness. ~ Dalai Lama,
154:20The LORD is in his holy temple; let all the earth be silent before him. ~ Anonymous,
155:Colors fade, temples crumble, empires fall, but wise words endure. ~ Edward Thorndike,
156:I'll keep you up here." He taps his temple. "Where you can't get lost. ~ Gayle Forman,
157:In the monastery of your heart, you have a temple where all Buddhas unite. ~ Milarepa,
158:We are bored in the city, there is no longer any Temple of the Sun. ~ Ivan Chtcheglov,
159:your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. Enjoy the ride. ~ Anthony Bourdain,
160:To understand animal thinking you've got to get away from a language. ~ Temple Grandin,
161:I always felt there was kind of a millennial aspect to The Sex Pistols. ~ Julien Temple,
162:including the blessings of the temple ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
163:Satan's smoke has made its way into the Temple of God through some crack ~ Pope Paul VI,
164:All animals and people have the same core emotion systems in the brain. ~ Temple Grandin,
165:bartender walks into a church, a temple and a mosque. He has no idea how jokes ~ Various,
166:But the LORD is in his holy Temple;        the LORD still rules from heaven. ~ Anonymous,
167:Dhaka the city of mosques has become the city of Hindu temples. ~ Delwar Hossain Sayeedi,
168:I looked in temples churches and mosques. But I found the Divine within my heart. ~ Rumi,
169:In the Art, Science, Philosophy and Mystic rests the temple of Wisdom. ~ Samael Aun Weor,
170:People on the autistic spectrum tend to get fixated on what they think. ~ Temple Grandin,
171:The sound of laughter is like the vaulted dome of a temple of happiness. ~ Milan Kundera,
172:We are here to dig tombs for vices and to raise temples to virtue. ~ Jean Louis de Biasi,
173:You can't punish a child who is acting out because of sensory overload. ~ Temple Grandin,
174:Even the Jonestown Peoples’ Temple Agricultural Project built community. ~ Leigh Phillips,
175:I treat my body like a temple. A temple of doom, but a temple nonetheless. ~ Jim Gaffigan,
176:...I worship at the temple of your body and without you, I'd have no art... ~ John Geddes,
177:Like I said before, your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. ~ Anthony Bourdain,
178:America, the temple of invention and industry, doesn't make things anymore. ~ Nick Clooney,
179:Ay, in the very temple of Delight
Veil’d Melancholy has her sovran shrine, ~ John Keats,
180:Five days a week my body is a temple; the other two, it's an amusement park. ~ Jerry Doyle,
181:If your body is a temple, you can pile up too much deferred maintenance. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
182:I looked in temples, churches, and mosques. But I found the Divine within my heart. ~ Rumi,
183:It's OK to be an eccentric; it's not OK to be a rude and dirty eccentric. ~ Temple Grandin,
184:Medication should never be considered the only tool for helping a person. ~ Temple Grandin,
185:Romance is one of the sacred temples that dot the landscape of life. ~ Marianne Williamson,
186:The body is your temple. Keep it pure and clean for the soul to reside in. ~ B K S Iyengar,
187:The temple bell stops but I still hear the sound coming out of the flowers. ~ Matsuo Basho,
188:You are my temple. You are my priest. You are my prayer. You are my release. ~ Sabaa Tahir,
189:You need a temple to feel good spiritually? Go to a beautiful garden! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
190:I'd rather see a kid get fixated on something they can turn into a career. ~ Temple Grandin,
191:My kitchen is a mystical place, a kind of temple for me. It is a place where ~ Pearl Bailey,
192:Pensieve upon it, and raised his wand to his own temple. From it, he withdrew ~ J K Rowling,
193:Religion is the frozen thought of man out of which they build temples. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
194:run, run, you can’t get away, the monk can run but the temple will never get away! ~ Mo Yan,
195:The body is your temple. Keep it pure and clean for your soul to reside in. ~ B K S Iyengar,
196:The most important thing people did for me was to expose me to new things. ~ Temple Grandin,
197:The older Romans used temples as their banks, as we use banks as our temples; ~ Will Durant,
198:There were no temples or shrines among us save those of nature. ~ Charles Alexander Eastman,
199:The worst thing you can do is nothing. (re: teaching children with autism) ~ Temple Grandin,
200:When art find no temple open, it takes refuge in the workshop. ~ Marie von Ebner Eschenbach,
201:When you're a weird geek, the way to sell yourself is to show your skills. ~ Temple Grandin,
202:While God waits for his temple to be built of love, man brings stones.’ Or ~ Shashi Tharoor,
203:While God waits for His temple to be built of love, men bring stones. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
204:A man is the facade of a temple wherein all wisdom and all good abide. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
205:God is not present in idols. Your feelings are your god. The soul is your temple. ~ Chanakya,
206:I know a number of autistic adults that are doing extremely well on Prozac. ~ Temple Grandin,
207:It is never too late to expand the mind of a person on the autism spectrum. ~ Temple Grandin,
208:People can live up to high standards, but they can't live up to perfection. ~ Temple Grandin,
209:The body is God's temple, but we are to worship God, not the temple. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
210:There was in Athens a temple dedicated to old age. Children were taken there. ~ Albert Camus,
211:The risen Lord is the new Temple, the real meeting place between God and man. ~ Benedict XVI,
212:No sooner is a Temple built to God but the Devill builds a Chappell hard by. ~ George Herbert,
213:The doorstep to the temple of wisdom is a knowledge of our own ignorance. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
214:When I go home to England, my friends all make fun of me for sounding American. ~ Juno Temple,
215:MAT21.14 And the blind and the lame came to him in the temple; and he healed them. ~ Anonymous,
216:Nature is not a temple, but a ruin. A beautiful ruin, but a ruin all the same. ~ J B MacKinnon,
217:No one should approach the temple of science with the soul of a money changer. ~ Thomas Browne,
218:the Lord is in His holy temple; let everyone on earth be silent in His presence. t ~ Anonymous,
219:Animals do have emotion. But fear tends to be one of the most primal emotions. ~ Temple Grandin,
220:My grandfather was an engineer who invented the automatic pilot for airplanes. ~ Temple Grandin,
221:People wouldn’t have become who we are today if we hadn’t coevolved with dogs. ~ Temple Grandin,
222:Sometimes you have to go outside your field of study to find the right people. ~ Temple Grandin,
223:Wicca's temples are flowered-splashed meadows, forest, beaches, and deserts. ~ Scott Cunningham,
224:A bartender walks into a church, a temple and a mosque. He has no idea how jokes work. ~ Various,
225:Being a woman is a very powerful thing, I think, and you don't want to abuse that. ~ Juno Temple,
226:God builds his temple in the heart on the ruins of churches and religions. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
227:In a temple everything should be serious except the thing that is being worshiped. ~ Oscar Wilde,
228:I think Temple is wrong. I don't think I'd dig that kind of art party at all. ~ Kathleen Glasgow,
229:There is but one temple - the body. It is the only temple that ever existed. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
230:There is justice nowhere for a fool. A fool they whip even in the Holy Temple. ~ Anzia Yezierska,
231:To me, nature is sacred. Trees are my temples and forests are my cathedrals. ~ Mikhail Gorbachev,
232:He grinned, but a bead of sweat ran down his temple. “Then with your permission. ~ Elizabeth Hoyt,
233:I'm a private person; I stick to my neighbourhood and eat in my little restaurants. ~ Juno Temple,
234:Know thyself and thou shalt know the universe and the gods. ~ Inscription of the Temple of Delphi,
235:When I was younger, I didn't even realize the way I think visually is different. ~ Temple Grandin,
236:It is impossible to find God outside of ourselves. We are the greatest temple. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
237:We have no permanent allies, only permanent interests. ~ Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston,
238:When all the Temple is prepared within,
Why nods the drowsy Worshipper outside? ~ Omar Khayy m,
239:Your body is your temple. You do your body good, your body will do you good. ~ Floyd Mayweather Jr,
240:Alexander raised his shaking right hand to his temple, to his lips, to his heart. ~ Paullina Simons,
241:An angel once told me, "The inevitable consequence of love is the building of Temples." ~ Alex Grey,
242:Enough to make a man believe in God,’ said Temple. ‘And that He’s somewhere else. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
243:Holiness is the architectural plan upon which God buildeth up His living temple. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
244:I press my lips to her temple, tightening my arms around her. “Let’s see what finds us. ~ Nina Lane,
245:There exists no temple more beautiful and more calming than the nature itself! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
246:As far as our physical form, the mind is a great temple. But it has a life span and it dies. ~ Rakim,
247:Every language is a temple, in which the soul of those who speak it is enshrined. ~ Christina Sunley,
248:If we were living in a better age they'd build a temple around a woman like that. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
249:I looked in temples, churches and mosques. But I found the Divine within my heart. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
250:I'm a visual thinker, not a language-based thinker. My brain is like Google Images. ~ Temple Grandin,
251:Man must be arched and buttressed from within, else the temple wavers to the dust. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
252:My mind works like Google for images. You put in a key word; it brings up pictures. ~ Temple Grandin,
253:Nature is not a temple but a ruin. A beautiful ruin, but a ruin all the same. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
254:Time makes fools of us all. Our only comfort is that greater shall come after us. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
255:You got barn cats and you want to make them tamed, you need to get them as kittens. ~ Temple Grandin,
256:Another thing I recall was falling in love with Shirley Temple when I was nine or ten. ~ Clint Walker,
257:Banks are the temples of America. This is a holy war. Our economy is our religion. ~ Giannina Braschi,
258:Dirt is not dirty, but only something in the wrong place. ~ Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston,
259:God gave me a great body and it's my duty to take care of my physical temple. ~ Jean Claude Van Damme,
260:If people want to criticize a performance, that I understand. I think that's important. ~ Juno Temple,
261:If the law was a temple, it was built on human misery and jails were the cornerstones. ~ Michael Nava,
262:Know ye not that ye are the atemple of God, and that the bSpirit of God dwelleth cin you? ~ Anonymous,
263:No temple can still the personal griefs and strifes in the breasts of its visitors. ~ Margaret Fuller,
264:Smoothing the stray hairs at her temples, she cursed again. A nice, juicy little F-bomb. Her ~ J Lynn,
265:The Greek temple is the creation, par excellence, of mind and spirit in equilibrium. ~ Edith Hamilton,
266:What is merit? The opinion one man entertains of another. ~ Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston,
267:You simply cannot tell other people they are stupid, even if they really are stupid. ~ Temple Grandin,
268:If Jesus came back today, he wouldn’t cleanse the temple, he’d cleanse the pulpit. ~ Leonard Ravenhill,
269:Nakari would place bullet holes on their temples like periods at the end of a sentence. ~ Kevin Hearne,
270:the deepening hollows of his temples where tender clocksprings of veins pulsed steadily ~ Stephen King,
271:The demolition of a Temple is possible at any time, as it cannot walk away from its place. ~ Aurangzeb,
272:The living room should be a place where we feel totally at ease - temple of the soul. ~ Terence Conran,
273:The only thing I oppose is persecuting of Eastern Orthodox priests and temples. ~ Vladimir Zhirinovsky,
274:unless all existence is a medium of Revelation, no particular Revelation is possible. ~ William Temple,
275:Nature is a temple in which living pillars Sometimes give voice to confused words; ~ Charles Baudelaire,
276:One man practicing kindness in the wilderness is worth all the temples this world pulls. ~ Jack Kerouac,
277:The Internet may be the best thing yet for improving an autistic person’s social life. ~ Temple Grandin,
278:There are no permanent alliances, only permanent interests. ~ Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston,
279:To walk into the Jefferson memorial is to be in a temple of the pure idolatry of reason ~ Scot McKnight,
280:When we are under a tree, we are under a temple, a temple of countless goodnesses! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
281:A bartender walks into a church, a temple and a mosque. He has no idea how jokes work. ♦◊♦◊♦◊♦ ~ Various,
282:-Estoy enamorada de Joshua Templeman.
La respuesta me la susurra al oído.
-Por fin. ~ Sally Thorne,
283:I want to look after you forever.” He whispers, pressing his lips against my temple. ~ Jodi Ellen Malpas,
284:Rubbing absently at my temple, I do declare this woman leaves me flabbergasted and tongue tied. ~ Poppet,
285:start calling the area hospitals. Temple, Aria, Hahnemann, Jefferson, and Einstein. ~ William L Myers Jr,
286:The slaves toiling in the temple of this god began to feel rebellion at his harsh tasks. ~ Stephen Crane,
287:We are learning that before the body can become a temple, it first must become our home. ~ Lucy H Pearce,
288:1978, October 30 Dedicates the São Paulo Brazil Temple. ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
289:Every Masonic Lodge is a temple of religion; and its teachings are instruction in religion. ~ Albert Pike,
290:Home can be something as vast as a country, as holy as a temple, or as simple as a cake. ~ Elizabeth Bard,
291:If I could snap my fingers and be nonautistic, I would not. Autism is part of what I am. ~ Temple Grandin,
292:If you're asked: What is the silence? Respond: It is the first stone of the Wisdom's temple. ~ Pythagoras,
293:Like I said before, your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. Enjoy the ride. ~ Anthony Bourdain,
294:Money doesn't make you happy... but it sure doesn't make you said either!" - Nate Temple ~ Shayne Silvers,
295:Spirit of the Lord doth not bdwell in cunholy dtemples— ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
296:What do I do when I go home? Work. That's basically my social life. I'm married to work. ~ Temple Grandin,
297:Your body is a temple. The question is, how many thousands of people do you want inside? ~ Isaac Bonewits,
298:A mind not set on God is given to wandering and lacks the quality of a temple of worship. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
299:Believe me, the library is the temple of God. Education is the most sacred religion of all. ~ Gene Simmons,
300:Hinduism loses its right to make a universal appeal if it closes its temples to Harijans. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
301:Imagine a temple inside your mind, a haven from the chaos of the world. Visit often. ~ Marianne Williamson,
302:In my mind I saw my own temples in ruins, before even one brick had been laid upon another. ~ Henry Miller,
303:Teachers who work with autistic children need to understand associative thought patterns. ~ Temple Grandin,
304:Galois read the geometry from cover to cover as easily as other boys read a pirate yarn. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
305:My body is a temple not just any boy gets to worship at. I won't do any more than I want to do. ~ Jenny Han,
306:Whoever cannot find a temple in his heart, the same can never find his heart in any temple. ~ Mikhail Naimy,
307:If Christ came back he would drive his treacherous servants out of the temple with a whip. ~ Joseph Goebbels,
308:There needs to be a lot more emphasis on what a child CAN do, instead of what he cannot do. ~ Temple Grandin,
309:They say you should treat your body like a temple. I treat mine like a fast-moving dumpster. ~ Matthew Inman,
310:think about food as a medicine and your body as a temple -treat it according to that belief. ~ Jonathan Vine,
311:I went to temple at crowded times when Brahmins were too distracted to come between me and God. ~ Yann Martel,
312:Large republics seem to be essentially and inherently aggressive. ~ Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston,
313:The autistic brain tends to be a specialist brain, good at one thing, bad at something else. ~ Temple Grandin,
314:To be coordinated with the power of balance, your mind and your temple must be running parallel. ~ Peter Tosh,
315:Venice, it's temples and palaces did seem like fabrics of enchantment piled to heaven. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
316:when all temples on this earth will be going night and day. ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
317:When I pray, coincidences happen,” said Archbishop William Temple; “when I don’t, they don’t. ~ Philip Yancey,
318:Within the hollow crown That rounds the mortal temples of a king Keeps Death his court. ~ William Shakespeare,
319:You have got to keep autistic children engaged with the world. You cannot let them tune out. ~ Temple Grandin,
320:All the quiet corners of the world are the great temples for the wise and for the wisdom! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
321:And while we are on the subject of medication you always need to look at risk versus benefit. ~ Temple Grandin,
322:Bottom line, your body is a temple, and you have to treat it that way. That's how God designed it. ~ Ray Lewis,
323:Even serving God in his holy temple, Zechariah was unprepared for something holy to happen. ~ Liz Curtis Higgs,
324:In a noisy place I can’t understand speech, because I cannot screen out the background noise. ~ Temple Grandin,
325:I was convinced there as only one actor to play Templeton the Rat, and that was Tony Randall. ~ Joseph Barbera,
326:The chiefest sanctity of a temple is that it is a place to which men go to weep in common. ~ Miguel de Unamuno,
327:You know, I do projects that I really care about. I hope I'll stand by that until the day I die! ~ Juno Temple,
328:Acting is the most minor of gifts. After all, Shirley Temple could do it when she was four. ~ Katharine Hepburn,
329:If you have autism in the family history, you still vaccinate. Delay it a bit, space them out. ~ Temple Grandin,
330:Sometimes we forget about common sense. Autism is used too much as an excuse for bad behavior. ~ Temple Grandin,
331:The rest of the world views the USA the way Silicon Valley views Microsoft. Except with tanks. ~ Brad Templeton,
332:And the companies developed one new opioid narcotic after another, hailing each as a breakthrough. ~ John Temple,
333:God, I love you." She kissed his temple and for a second it felt like something in him responded. ~ Nalini Singh,
334:Here's the Middle East. Here's the mosque, here's the church, open the temple, everybody's MAD! ~ Maria Bamford,
335:Mammon, n. The god of the world's leading religion. His chief temple is in the city of New York ~ Ambrose Bierce,
336:There’s a saying in engineering: You can build things cheap, fast, or right, but not all three. ~ Temple Grandin,
337:Your daily life is your temple and your religion. When you enter into it take with you your all. ~ Khalil Gibran,
338:Building a temple didn't mean you believed in gods, it just meant you believed in architecture. ~ Terry Pratchett,
339:Building a temple didn’t mean you believed in gods, it just meant you believed in architecture. ~ Terry Pratchett,
340:curved horns that sprout from his temples and sweep into twisting points around his head. Gold, ~ Zoraida C rdova,
341:I realised that the pure and eternal source of all things would not be illuminated in this temple ~ Hermann Hesse,
342:Most universities are no longer temples of knowledge, but of power, and true moderns worship there. ~ Dean Koontz,
343:The dog is more social. I am not saying that cats are totally unsocial but dogs are more social. ~ Temple Grandin,
344:Some children may need a behavioral approach, whereas other children may need a sensory approach. ~ Temple Grandin,
345:The art of healing is like an unroofed temple, uncovered at the top and cracked at the foundation. ~ Benjamin Rush,
346:He who learns to be happy in nature gains an endless temple for happiness every time he needs! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
347:It's better not to read your reviews. Just go and do the thing... it would drive you crazy otherwise. ~ Juno Temple,
348:It's my new best friend, Claudius Templesmith, and as I expected it, he's inviting us to a feast. ~ Suzanne Collins,
349:Some teachers just have a knack for working with autistic children. Other teachers do not have it. ~ Temple Grandin,
350:sparking floor fan resulted in the loss of all the books in Temple University’s law library in 1972. ~ Susan Orlean,
351:Vous avez besoin d'un Temple pour vous sentir bien Spirituellement? Allez dans un Beau Jardin! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
352:I'm banged up and bloody and someone seems to be hammering on my left temple from inside my skull. ~ Suzanne Collins,
353:It's important to not be naive about this world and know that it's not necessarily a good place to be. ~ Juno Temple,
354:Temple was a man of the world amongst men of letters, a man of letters amongst men of the world. ~ Thomas B Macaulay,
355:The body is more than the temple of the soul. It’s the grounded celebration of its rapture. ~ S Kelley Harrell M Div,
356:We reject the teaching that God will reinstate the temple and its rites and ceremonies. Heb. 9:1-10, 28. ~ Anonymous,
357:Whenever anyone, Buddhist or not, sees a Temple or an image of Buddha they receive blessings. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
358:15En cuanto a mí, en justicia contemplaré tu rostro; al despertar, me saciaré cuando contemple tu imagen. ~ Anonymous,
359:After Voltaire: envy is chained to the portico of the temple of glory and can neither enter nor leave. ~ Mason Cooley,
360:As my life was fading away, I remembered the Lord. My prayer came to You, to Your holy temple. Jonah 2:7 ~ Beth Moore,
361:I doubt if the public thought of me as Christ when they next saw me as Temple Houston on television. ~ Jeffrey Hunter,
362:intense stereotypies—stereotypies an animal spends hours a day doing—almost never occur in the wild, ~ Temple Grandin,
363:My heart is my temple and with it I can see and hear Truth. My heart is my conscience and Truth is God. ~ Suzy Kassem,
364:Our bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit (1 Cor. 6:19a). Therefore, we should glorify God in our bodies. ~ Anonymous,
365:The great Emathian conqueror bid spare The house of Pindarus, when temple and tower Went to the ground. ~ John Milton,
366:The idol in the temple is not God. But since God resides in every atom, He resides in that idol too. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
367:The mind is not, I know, a highway, but a temple, and its doors should not be carelessly left open. ~ Margaret Fuller,
368:They used to photograph Shirley Temple through gauze. They should photograph me through linoleum. ~ Tallulah Bankhead,
369:A bowling ball rolled through his head, diagonally from nape to temple; it paused and started back. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
370:And he reports the battle news, and then says, ‘Oh, and by the way, Pan wants you to build him a temple. ~ Neil Gaiman,
371:Every time you speak evil about a member of the Church, it is like taking a sledgehammer to the temple. ~ Francis Chan,
372:In special education, there's too much emphasis placed on the deficit and not enough on the strength. ~ Temple Grandin,
373:To reject the necessity of temples is to reject the necessity of God, religion and earthly existence. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
374:Vice takes up her abode in many temples; and who can say that a fair outside shall not enshrine her? ~ Charles Dickens,
375:And Zeus will destroy this race of mortal men too, when they, at their birth, have grey hair on their temples. ~ Hesiod,
376:I’m here, Delaney,” he whispered before placing a chaste kiss on her temple. “You’re not alone anymore. ~ Scarlett Cole,
377:Jesus overturned money-changing tables in the temple, but set up banqueting tables in his Father’s house. ~ Brian Zahnd,
378:The boy gathers materials for a temple, and then when he is thirty, concludes to build a woodshed ~ Henry David Thoreau,
379:There is but one temple in this Universe: The Body. We speak to God whenever we lay our hands upon it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
380:For we did not and do not wish the Temple to be placed in any servitude except that which is fitting. ~ Jacques de Molay,
381:Kiss the mouth which tells you, here, here is the world. This mouth. This laughter. These temple bones. ~ Galway Kinnell,
382:matter what the bastards do. So what if my dad beat my mum, so what if my hubby fucked the babysitter, so ~ Peter Temple,
383:Sure, if you liked sleeping in a cold temple by yourself with Hippie Zeus frowning down at you all night. ~ Rick Riordan,
384:The boy gathers materials for a temple, and then when he is thirty, concludes to build a woodshed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
385:Ya es bastante grave /que un solo hombre / o una sola mujer /contemplen distraídos el horizonte neutro ~ Mario Benedetti,
386:For me, there is safety in playing a woman that is very sexualized and having a woman direct you with that. ~ Juno Temple,
387:I learned from Whitman that the poem is a temple--or a green field--a place to enter, and in which to feel. ~ Mary Oliver,
388:It wasn’t hard to get urine. Folks back home had taken to selling Mason jars of it at flea markets. Whitney ~ John Temple,
389:Things like microphones are dangerous things because you never know when they might feedback and squeal. ~ Temple Grandin,
390:Us visual thinkers like me, be good at things like industrial design, graphics, art, those kind of jobs. ~ Temple Grandin,
391:Why do you amass stones and construct great temples? Why do you vex yourselves thus when God dwells within you ? ~ Vemara,
392:I started rubbing my temples and she suggested I don't really get headaches. It just hurts me to think. ~ Kelley Armstrong,
393:It is necessary first to purify the drunken and dissolute worshippers in charge of some of these temples. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
394:Skulduggery Pleasant walked off the battlefield, and Lord Vile walked into my Temple. - High Priest Tenebrae ~ Derek Landy,
395:God is not in heaven - God is in the present moment. If you are also in the present moment you enter the temple. ~ Rajneesh,
396:Gracie, you are exactly where you are supposed to be and everything is going to be all right.

Willem ~ Lisa C Temple,
397:How many adorn their temples, and decorate their priests—but refuse to obey the Word of the Lord! ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
398:I had found my religion: nothing seemed more important to me than a book. I saw the library as a temple. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
399:I hadn't really even been thinking about TV. To me, it seemed like such a commitment, almost like a marriage. ~ Juno Temple,
400:In those days in New York there were still a few altar-fires flickering in the temple of Republican simplicity, ~ Anonymous,
401:Jesus defied all of these rules. He taught in the outer courts of the Temple so women could join the audience. ~ Danny Silk,
402:Love--that divine fire which was made to light and warm the temple of home--sometimes burns at unholy altars. ~ Horace Mann,
403:People need to learn how to work, learn how to support themselves. I think it's just fine to be eccentric. ~ Temple Grandin,
404:Do you see this egg? With this you can topple every theological theory, every church or temple in the world. ~ Denis Diderot,
405:I believe in blessings," he replied, against my temple, "I believe that for every curse, there is a blessing. ~ Anne Fortier,
406:I don't build no heathen temples, where the Lord has done laid a hand. There's a well on the hill, let it be. ~ James Taylor,
407:It is impossible to produce superior performance unless you do something different. —John Templeton ~ William N Thorndike Jr,
408:That's always the way with fanatics; they cross themselves at the tavern and throw stones at the temple. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
409:thou buildest upon the bosom of darkness, out of the fantastic imagery of the brain, cities and temples. ~ Thomas de Quincey,
410:You are my temple,” I murmur as I kneel beside her. “You are my priest. You are my prayer. You are my release. ~ Sabaa Tahir,
411:Animals like novelty if they can choose to investigate it; they fear novelty if you shove it in their faces. ~ Temple Grandin,
412:He rests his lips against my temple. 'You need to figure out what you really want from this - from us. ~ Mandy Hubbard,
413:Now Peter and John were going up together to the •temple complex at the hour of prayer at three in the afternoon. ~ Anonymous,
414:If Music is a Place -- then Jazz is the City, Folk is the Wilderness, Rock is the Road, Classical is a Temple. ~ Vera Nazarian,
415:Kneeling in the temple doesn’t make you godly any more than standing in a stable makes you a horse, to my mind. ~ Peter McLean,
416:People are getting too far away from the real-world. Politics is just ridiculous, it's totally dysfunctional. ~ Temple Grandin,
417:I can direct dial today a man my parents warred with. They wanted to kill him, I want to sell software to him. ~ Brad Templeton,
418:I fear theology is--in the words attributed to William Temple--"still in its infancy" when it comes to animals. ~ Andrew Linzey,
419:I want you now. I want you forever. But if now is all I get, your body will be the temple I will always worship. ~ Leigh Lennon,
420:Jesus was the temple to end all temples, the priest to end all priests, & the sacrifice to end all sacrifices. ~ Timothy Keller,
421:Man is the creator of the gods whom he worships in his temples. Therefore humanity has made its gods in its own image. ~ Hermes,
422:Nothing contemporary is as extreme or as strongly stated as what the Sex Pistols were able to do in their time. ~ Julien Temple,
423:the manufacturing companies keep asking the DEA for permission to make more pills, and the DEA keeps granting it. ~ John Temple,
424:Your mind is a your temple, keep it beautiful and free. Don't let an egg get laid in it by something you can't see. ~ Bob Dylan,
425:He always knew that my temple was a house of cards. His only way of making me realize the fact was to knock it down. ~ C S Lewis,
426:I like to leave the movie theater and still be thinking about the film and questioning why the character did that. ~ Juno Temple,
427:Marriage is like a temple resting on two pillars. If they come too close to each other the temple will collapse. ~ Khalil Gibran,
428:People talk about curing autism. But if you got rid of all those traits, who's going to make the next computer? ~ Temple Grandin,
429:When you do something nice for somebody, it is just like walking around a temple. It is just like saying a prayer. ~ Pam Houston,
430:You’re home,” he whispered into her temple. “No matter what happens, you will always be home. I love you, Ams. ~ Airicka Phoenix,
431:I just want to work forever. I absolutely love what I'm doing. I learn all the time from all these amazing artists. ~ Juno Temple,
432:The longer mathematics lives the more abstract - and therefore, possibly also the more practical - it becomes. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
433:usually perfectly curled and braided, has been slicked back into a simple bun. When I see gray at her temples, ~ Victoria Aveyard,
434:We are lucky because we still have a magnificent temple called nature where we can find peace of mind in it! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
435:You can tame feral cats, but you are never gonna get them like a cat that's been socialized at a very young age. ~ Temple Grandin,
436:And how can man die better than by facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers, And the temples of his gods. ~ Mark Lawrence,
437:A Temple is one of the best ways of benefiting other living beings - it is the best form of public service. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
438:...a temple was never perfectly a temple, till it was ruined and mixed up with the winds and the sky and the herbs. ~ D H Lawrence,
439:If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy, for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are. ~ Paul the Apostle,
440:I said, "Thank you. Go the Saints. Goodbye." Go the Saints; I'd said it. The first time. It felt like...coming out. ~ Peter Temple,
441:Tear down the mosque, the temple, everything in sight. But don't break a human heart. For that is where God resides. ~ Bulleh Shah,
442:The animal that I have worked with the most is beef cattle, so that's my favorite animal, but I like all animals. ~ Temple Grandin,
443:There comes Emerson first, whose rich words, every one, Are like gold nails in temples to hang trophies on. ~ James Russell Lowell,
444:Wherever groups disclosed themselves, or could be introduced, simplicity crystallized out of comparative chaos. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
445:And how can man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers, and the temples of his Gods? ~ Thomas B Macaulay,
446:I'm seeing too many geeky, nerdy kids get addicted to video games and they're going nowhere. It's making me crazy. ~ Temple Grandin,
447:Modern man worships at the temple of science, but science tells him only what is possible, not what is right. ~ Milton S Eisenhower,
448:Theater is my temple and my religion and my act of faith. Strangers sit in a room together and believe together. ~ Harvey Fierstein,
449:We spent a few minutes catching up. I told Bowerman about my trip around the world. Kobe, Jordan, the Temple of Nike. ~ Phil Knight,
450:We've had several cats. I had a cat when I was a kid. My Aunt had lots of cats and I got lots of calls about cats. ~ Temple Grandin,
451:7 But I, by your great love,        can come into your house;    in reverence I bow down        toward your holy temple. ~ Anonymous,
452:Angel, shiny armor just means the knight never went to battle." He kissed my temple. "And I'd fight dragons for you. ~ Nichole Chase,
453:Destroy the mosque! Destroy the temple! Destroy whatever you please. Do not break the human heart, For God Dwells therein! ~ Various,
454:Euclid taught me that without assumptions there is no proof. Therefore, in any argument, examine the assumptions. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
455:I wondered – would a bullet through my temple actually kill me or just leave a really big mess for me to clean up? ~ Stephenie Meyer,
456:Many of these individuals agree that sensory issues are the primary challenge of autism in their daily lives. There ~ Temple Grandin,
457:[T]he only place on earth where immortality is provided is in libraries. This is the collective memory of humanity. ~ Temple Grandin,
458:There had been earlier incidents of sacrilege by placing heads and other parts of the anatomy of cows in Hindu temples, ~ Mark Tully,
459:Though one believes in nothing, there are moments in life when one accepts the religion of the temple nearest at hand. ~ Victor Hugo,
460:We worshipped in the temple of cutthroat competition, and so some cooked the books, because the treasure is so great. ~ Desmond Tutu,
461:When one loses the deep intimate relationship with nature, then temples, mosques and churches become important. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
462:Bad things always happen when an animal is overselected for any single trait. Nature will give you a nasty surprise. ~ Temple Grandin,
463:I have always hated machinery, and the only machine I ever understood was a wheelbarrow, and that but imperfectly. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
464:I want my house open to sun and wind and the voice of the sea, like a Greek temple, and light, light, light everywhere! ~ Axel Munthe,
465:That’s oxycodone—one of the most irresistible opioid narcotics ever cooked up in the six-thousand-year history of dope. ~ John Temple,
466:This monumental work, Taijang-Kyung, is now preserved in eternity in the Hal-in-sa Temple, Mount Kaya, in the province ~ Pearl S Buck,
467:You can read books without ever stepping into a library; and practice spirituality without ever going to a temple. ~ Anthony de Mello,
468:Hallow the body as a temple to comeliness and sanctify the heart as a sacrifice to love; love recompenses the adorers. ~ Khalil Gibran,
469:Her melodious laughter sounded like the distant tinkling of soft bells and he stored the sound in her temple- his heart. ~ Faraaz Kazi,
470:I think that the definition of autism is too broad. You got to remember, autism definition is a behavioral profiling. ~ Temple Grandin,
471:When the wise man opens his mouth, the beauties of his soul present themselves to the view, like the statues in a temple. ~ Pythagoras,
472:You could train cats do things, a lot of people don't think cats aren't trainable. Cats can be trusted just a friend. ~ Temple Grandin,
473:As the flow of patients and cash had continued to rise, Ethan was spending up to six hours each night counting the money. ~ John Temple,
474:Don't rush to fellowship at the church, temple or mosque if you don't do so at the house - first. "Charity begins at home". ~ T F Hodge,
475:For a woman, body image is always a palpable thing. Weirdly, for me, the only time I don't care is when I'm in character. ~ Juno Temple,
476:For freemen like brothers agree; With one spirit endured, they one friendship pursued, And their temple was Liberty Tree ~ Thomas Paine,
477:I believe that the scriptures, the Sabbath, and the temple [are] mediums of holiness extended into this unholy world. ~ James L Ferrell,
478:If you want to see the real Saints, don't go to the Temples of the Religion, but go to the Temples of the Science! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
479:Tell me what you need," he said between raining soft kisses against my hair, temple, and cheek. "I'll do anything for you. ~ Penny Reid,
480:The shop, the barn, the kitchen, and the office become temples—when men and women do all to the glory of God! ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
481:We are all broken shards of glass, rejected building stones, being fitted into a temple we cannot fully even imagine. ~ Russell D Moore,
482:We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves. ~ Langston Hughes,
483:I am in the hands of Deori Maa. Every time I come to Ranchi, I visit her temple. I still remember my first visit. ~ Mahendra Singh Dhoni,
484:If we are not able to fix the Lord firmly in our hearts, even a lifetime of temple-going does not do us any good. ~ Mata Amritanandamayi,
485:These are pious, clean-living men, worshipping at the temple of their own bodies.”
“Hmm. Sounds distinctly erotic. ~ Richard K Morgan,
486:The temple of fame stands upon the grave: the flame that burns upon its altars is kindled from the ashes of great men. ~ William Hazlitt,
487:All that exists is the temple. In this sacred place, the only religion without atheists puts its divinities on display. ~ Eduardo Galeano,
488:But if it be defiled I will not come into it, and my glory shall not be there; for I will not come into unholy temples. ~ Joseph Smith Jr,
489:It was Aomame’s firm belief that the human body was a temple, to be kept as strong and beautiful and clean as possible. ~ Haruki Murakami,
490:Buddhism is in your heart. Even if you don't have any temple or any monks, you can still be a Buddhist in your heart and life. ~ Nhat Hanh,
491:I don't want to rush this," he whispered against her temple.
"Brody," she pleaded again. "Don't rush it the second time. ~ B J Daniels,
492:If "Number rules the universe" as Pythagoras asserted, Number is merely our delegate to the throne, for we rule Number. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
493:I get great satisfaction out of doing clever things with my mind, but I don’t know what it is like to feel rapturous joy. ~ Temple Grandin,
494:Like Samson, I am ready to pull down the white man's temple, knowing full well that I will be destroyed by the falling rubble. ~ Malcolm X,
495:Seek patience and passion in equal amounts. Patience alone will not build the temple. Passion alone will destroy its walls. ~ Maya Angelou,
496:The mistakes and unresolved difficulties of the past in mathematics have always been the opportunities of its future... ~ Eric Temple Bell,
497:The sack of Jerusalem in A.D. 70 and the destruction of the temple prompted a massive exodus of Jews from the Holy Land. ~ Michael Baigent,
498:carved over the portal of the Temple of Isis: 'I am whatever has been, is, or ever will be; and my veil no man hath yet lifted. ~ Anonymous,
499:Curriculum Planning, 50 E. North Temple St., Rm. 2420, Salt Lake City, UT 84150-0024 USA. ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
500:He who writes prose builds his temple to Fame in rubble; he who writes verses builds it in granite. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton 1st Baron Lytton,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



100

   36 Occultism
   11 Yoga
   7 Philosophy
   4 Integral Yoga
   4 Christianity
   3 Kabbalah
   3 Buddhism
   2 Hinduism


   32 Aleister Crowley
   21 Sri Ramakrishna
   20 Sri Aurobindo
   10 The Mother
   8 Swami Vivekananda
   5 Jorge Luis Borges
   5 Carl Jung
   5 Aldous Huxley
   3 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   3 Satprem
   3 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   3 Bokar Rinpoche
   2 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   2 Swami Krishnananda
   2 Saint Teresa of Avila
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Friedrich Nietzsche


   26 Liber ABA
   24 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   20 Savitri
   16 Magick Without Tears
   10 The Mothers Agenda
   7 Talks
   6 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 The Bible
   6 Collected Poems
   5 The Perennial Philosophy
   5 Bhakti-Yoga
   5 Aion
   5 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   4 The Life Divine
   4 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   4 The Divine Comedy
   4 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   4 Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin
   3 Words Of Long Ago
   3 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   3 The Blue Cliff Records
   3 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   3 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   3 Isha Upanishad
   3 Essays On The Gita
   2 Words Of The Mother II
   2 Walden
   2 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   2 Raja-Yoga
   2 Liber Null
   2 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   2 General Principles of Kabbalah
   2 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   2 Essays Divine And Human
   2 Book of Certitude


01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The huge foreboding mind of Night, alone
  In her unlit Temple of eternity,
  Lay stretched immobile upon Silence' marge.

01.02_-_The_Issue, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    That seemed a niche for veiled divinity
    Or golden Temple-door to things beyond.
    Immortal rhythms swayed in her time-born steps;

01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And Eldorados of splendour and ecstasy
  And Temples to the godhead none can see.
  A shapeless memory lingers in us still

02.01_-_The_World-Stair, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    And disappeared in the hushed conscious Vast
      As climbs a storeyed Temple-tower to heaven
      Built by the aspiring soul of man to live

02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Or with the ego's factories and marts
  Surround the beautiful Temple of the soul.
  Artists minute of the hues of littleness,

02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  In the wideness and the daring of that air,
  Each builds its Temple and expands its cult,
  And Sin too there is a divinity.

02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Have built their altars of triumphant Night
  In the clay Temple of terrestrial life.
  In the vacant precincts of the sacred Fire,

02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Then by a touch, a presence or a voice
  The world is turned into a Temple ground
  And all discloses the unknown Beloved.

02.14_-_The_World-Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  It seemed at times, or a vast forest's hymn,
  The solemn reminder of a Temple gong,
  A bee-croon honey-drunk in summer isles

03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Its power that makes the unknowable near and true,
  In the Temple of the ideal shrined the One:
  It peopled thought and mind and happy sense

04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Her mind sat high pouring its golden beams,
  Her heart was a crowded Temple of delight.
  A single lamp lit in perfection's house,

04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A bright moved torch of incense and of flame
  That from the sky-roofed Temple-soil of earth
  A pilgrim hand lifts in an invisible shrine.

04.04_-_The_Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Small fanes where one calm Image watched man's life
  And Temples hewn as if by exiled gods
  To imitate their lost eternity.
  --
  And trees that worshipped on a praying shore,
  A domed and Templed air's serene repose
  Beckoned to her hurrying wheels to stay their speed.

05.01_-_The_Destined_Meeting-Place, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The wings that murmur in the golden house,
  The Temple of sweetness and the fiery aisle.
  

05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The new deep covert of her felicity,
  Preferred to heaven her soul's Temple and home.
  

07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Truth's last retreat from thought's profaning touch,
  As if in a rock-Temple's solitude hid,
  God's refuge from an ignorant worshipping world,
  --
  A face, a form came down into her heart
  And made of it its Temple and pure abode.
  
  --
  Out of the wood and stone of our nature's stuff
  A Temple is shaped where the high gods could live.
  

09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  But still in its lone niche of Templed strength
  Motionless, her flame-bright spirit, mute, erect,
  --
  Who made for vanity the brilliant stars?
  Not he who has reared his Temple in my thoughts
  And made his sacred floor my human heart.

10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Unwillingly it descends to earthly air
  To inhabit a white Temple in man's heart:
  In his heart it shines rejected by his life.

1.00a_-_Introduction, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  There is really only one point for your judgment. "By their fruits ye shall know them." You have read Liber LXV and Liber VII; That shows you what states you can attain by this cirriculum. Now read "A Master of the Temple" (Blue Equinox, pp. 127-170) for an account of the early stages of training, and their results. (Of course, your path might not coincide with, or even resemble, his path.)
  

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Sri Ramakrishna, the God-man of modern India, was born at Kmrpukur. This village in the Hooghly District preserved during the last century the idyllic simplicity of the rural areas of Bengl. Situated far from the railway, it was untouched by the glamour of the city. It contained rice-fields, tall palms, royal banyans, a few lakes, and two cremation grounds. South of the village a stream took its leisurely course. A mango orchard dedicated by a neighbouring zamindr to the public use was frequented by the boys for their noonday sports. A highway passed through the village to the great Temple of Jagannth at Puri, and the villagers, most of whom were farmers and craftsmen, entertained many passing holy men and pilgrims. The dull round of the rural life was broken by lively festivals, the observance of sacred days, religious singing, and other innocent pleasures.
  
  --
  
  Ten years after his coming to Kmrpukur, Khudirm made a pilgrimage on foot to Rmeswar, at the southern extremity of India. Two years later was born his second son, whom he named Rmewar. Again in 1835, at the age of sixty, he made a pilgrimage, this time to Gay. Here, from ancient times, Hindus have come from the four corners of India to discharge their duties to their departed ancestors by offering them food and drink at the sacred footprint of the Lord Vishnu. At this holy place Khudirm had a dream in which the Lord Vishnu promised to be born as his son. And Chandr Devi, too, in front of the iva Temple at Kmrpukur, had a vision indicating the birth of a divine child.
  
  --
  
  Kli Temple at Dakshinewar
  
  --
  
  In 1847 the Rni purchased twenty acres of land at Dakshinewar, a village about four miles north of Calcutta. Here she created a Temple garden and constructed several Temples. Her Ishta, or Chosen Ideal, was the Divine Mother, Kli.
  
  The Temple garden stands directly on the east bank of the Ganges. The northern section of the land and a portion to the east contain an orchard, flower gardens, and two small reservoirs. The southern section is paved with brick and mortar. The visitor arriving by boat ascends the steps of an imposing bathing-Ght, which leads to the Chndni, a roofed terrace, on either side of which stand in a row six Temples of iva. East of the terrace and the iva Temples is a large court, paved, rectangular in shape, and running north and south. Two Temples stand in the centre of this court, the larger one, to the south and facing south, being dedicated to Kli, and the smaller one, facing the Ganges, to Radhknta, that is, Krishna, the Consort of Rdh. Nine domes with spires surmount the Temple of Kli, and before it stands the spacious Natmandir, or music hall, the terrace of which is supported by stately pillars. At the northwest and southwest corners of the Temple compound are two Nahabats, or music towers, from which music flows at different times of day, especially at sunup, noon, and sundown, when the worship is performed in the Temples. Three sides of the paved courtyard -all except the west - are lined with rooms set apart for kitchens, store-rooms, dining-rooms, and quarters for the Temple staff and guests. The chamber in the northwest angle, just beyond the last of the iva Temples, is of special interest to us; for here Sri Ramakrishna was to spend a considerable part of his life. To the west of this chamber is a semicircular porch overlooking the river. In front of the porch runs a footpath, north and south, and beyond the path is a large garden and, below the garden, the Ganges. The orchard to the north of the buildings contains the Panchavati, the banyan, and the bel-tree, associated with Sri Ramakrishna's spiritual practices. Outside and to the north of the Temple compound proper is the Kuthi, or bungalow, used by members of Rni Rsmani's family visiting the garden. And north of the Temple garden, separated from it by a high wall, is a powder-magazine belonging to the British Government.
  
  --
  
  In the twelve iva Temples are installed the emblems of the Great God of renunciation in His various aspects, worshipped daily with proper rites. iva requires few articles of worship. White flowers and bel-leaves and a little Ganges water offered with devotion are enough to satisfy the benign Deity and win from Him the boon of liberation.
  
  --
  
  The Temple of Radhknta, also known as the Temple of Vishnu, contains the images of Rdh and Krishna, the symbol of union with God through ecstatic love. The two images stand on a pedestal facing the west. The floor is paved with marble. From the ceiling of the porch hang chandeliers protected from dust by coverings of red cloth. Canvas screens shield the images from the rays of the setting sun. Close to the threshold of the inner shrine is a small brass cup containing holy water. Devoted visitors reverently drink a few drops from the vessel.
  
  --
  
  The main Temple is dedicated to Kli, the Divine Mother, here worshipped as Bhavatrini, the Saviour of the Universe. The floor of this Temple also is paved with marble. The basalt image of the Mother, dressed in gorgeous gold brocade, stands on a white marble image of the prostrate body of Her Divine Consort, iva, the symbol of the Absolute. On the feet of the Goddess are, among other ornaments, anklets of gold. Her arms are decked with jeweled ornaments of gold. She wears necklaces of gold and pearls, a golden garland of human heads, and a girdle of human arms. She wears a golden crown, golden ear-rings, and a golden nose-ring with a pearl-drop. She has four arms. The lower left hand holds a severed human head and the upper grips a blood-stained sabre.
  
  --
  
  The whole symbolic world is represented in the Temple garden - the Trinity of the Nature Mother (Kli), the Absolute (iva), and Love (Radhknta), the Arch spanning heaven and earth. The terrific Goddess of the Tantra, the soul-enthralling Flute-Player of the Bhgavata, and the Self-absorbed Absolute of the Vedas live together, creating the greatest synthesis of religions. All aspects of Reality are represented there. But of this divine household, Kli is the pivot, the sovereign Mistress. She is Prakriti, the Procreatrix, Nature, the Destroyer, the Creator. Nay, She is something greater and deeper still for those who have eyes to see. She is the Universal Mother, "my Mother" as Ramakrishna would say, the All-powerful, who reveals Herself to Her children under different aspects and Divine Incarnations, the Visible God, who leads the elect to the Invisible Reality; and if it so pleases Her, She takes away the last trace of ego from created beings and merges it in the consciousness of the Absolute, the undifferentiated God. Through Her grace "the finite ego loses itself in the illimitable Ego-tman-Brahman".
  
  Rni Rsmani spent a fortune for the construction of the Temple garden and another fortune for its dedication ceremony, which took place on May 31, 1855.
  
  Sri Ramakrishna - henceforth we shall call Gaddhar by this familiar name - came to the Temple garden with his elder brother Rmkumr, who was appointed priest of the Ka1i Temple. Sri Ramakrishna did not at first approve of Rmkumr's working for the udr
  
  --
  
  He objected also to the eating of the cooked offerings of the Temple, since, according to orthodox Hindu custom, such food can be offered to the Deity only in the house of a brhmin. But the holy atmosphere of the Temple grounds, the solitude of the surrounding wood, the loving care of his brother, the respect shown him by Rni Rsmani and Mathur Bbu, the living presence of the Goddess Kli in the Temple, and, above all, the proximity of the sacred Ganges, which Sri Ramakrishna always held in the highest respect, gradually overcame his disapproval, and he began to feel at home.
  
  Within a very short time Sri Ramakrishna attracted the notice of Mathur Bbu, who was impressed by the young man's religious fervour and wanted him to participate in the worship in the Kli Temple. But Sri Ramakrishna loved his freedom and was indifferent to any worldly career. The profession of the priesthood in a Temple founded by a rich woman did not appeal to his mind. Further, he hesitated to take upon himself the responsibility for the ornaments and jewellery of the Temple. Mathur had to wait for a suitable occasion.
  
  --
  
  Unable to resist the persuasion of Mathur Bbu, Sri Ramakrishna at last entered the Temple service, on condition that Hriday should be asked to assist him. His first duty was to dress and decorate the image of Kli.
  
  One day the priest of the Radhknta Temple accidentally dropped the image of Krishna on the floor, breaking one of its legs. The pundits advised the Rni to install a new image, since the worship of an image with a broken limb was against the scriptural injunctions. But the Rni was fond of the image, and she asked Sri Ramakrishna's opinion. In an abstracted mood, he said: "This solution is ridiculous. If a son-in-law of the Rni broke his leg, would she discard him and put another in his place? Wouldn't she rather arrange for his treatment? Why should she not do the same thing in this case too?
  
  Let the image be repaired and worshipped as before." It was a simple, straightforward solution and was accepted by the Rni. Sri Ramakrishna himself mended the break. The priest was dismissed for his carelessness, and at Mathur Bbu's earnest request, Sri Ramakrishna accepted the Office of priest in the Radhknta Temple.
  
  --
  
  The glow on his face, his deep absorption, and the intense atmosphere of the Temple impressed everyone who saw him worship the Deity.
  
  --
  
  Mathur begged Sri Ramakrishna to take charge of the worship in the Kli Temple. The young priest pleaded his incompetence and his ignorance of the scriptures. Mathur insisted that devotion and sincerity would more than compensate for any lack of formal knowledge and make the Divine Mother manifest Herself through the image. In the end, Sri Ramakrishna had to yield to Mathur's request. He became the priest of Kli.
  
  --
  
  The worship in the Temple intensified Sri Ramakrishna's yearning for a living vision of the Mother of the Universe. He began to spend in meditation the time not actually employed in the Temple service; and for this purpose he selected an extremely solitary place. A deep jungle, thick with underbrush and prickly plants, lay to the north of the Temples.
  
  --
  
  Suddenly my glance fell on the sword that was kept in the Mother's Temple. I determined to put an end to my life. When I jumped up like a madman and seized it, suddenly the blessed Mother revealed Herself. The buildings with their different parts, the Temple, and everything else vanished from my sight, leaving no trace whatsoever, and in their stead I saw a limitless, infinite, effulgent Ocean of Consciousness. As far as the eye could see, the shining billows were madly rushing at me from all sides with a terrific noise, to swallow me up! I was panting for breath. I was caught in the rush and collapsed, unconscious. What was happening in the outside world I did not know; but within me there was a steady flow of undiluted bliss, altogether new, and I felt the presence of the Divine Mother." On his lips when he regained consciousness of the world was the word "Mother".
  
  --
  
  Yet this was only a foretaste of the intense experiences to come. The first glimpse of the Divine Mother made him the more eager for Her uninterrupted vision. He wanted to see Her both in meditation and with eyes open. But the Mother began to play a teasing game of hide-and-seek with him, intensifying both his joy and his suffering. Weeping bitterly during the moments of separation from Her, he would pass into a trance and then find Her standing before him, smiling, talking, consoling, bidding him be of good cheer, and instructing him. During this period of spiritual practice he had many uncommon experiences. When he sat to meditate, he would hear strange clicking sounds in the joints of his legs, as if someone were locking them up, one after the other, to keep him motionless; and at the conclusion of his meditation he would again hear the same sounds, this time unlocking them and leaving him free to move about. He would see flashes like a swarm of fire-flies floating before his eyes, or a sea of deep mist around him, with luminous waves of molten silver. Again, from a sea of translucent mist he would behold the Mother rising, first Her feet, then Her waist, body, face, and head, finally Her whole person; he would feel Her breath and hear Her voice. Worshipping in the Temple, sometimes he would become exalted, sometimes he would remain motionless as stone, sometimes he would almost collapse from excessive emotion. Many of his actions, contrary to all tradition, seemed sacrilegious to the people. He would take a flower and touch it to his own head, body, and feet, and then offer it to the Goddess.
  
  Or, like a drunkard, he would reel to the throne of the Mother, touch Her chin by way of showing his affection for Her, and sing, talk, joke, laugh, and dance. Or he would take a morsel of food from the plate and hold it to Her mouth, begging Her to eat it, and would not be satisfied till he was convinced that She had really eaten. After the Mother had been put to sleep at night, from his own room he would hear Her ascending to the upper storey of the Temple with the light steps of a happy girl, Her anklets jingling. Then he would discover Her standing with flowing hair, Her black form silhouetted against the sky of the night looking at the Ganges or at the distant lights of Calcutta.
  
  Naturally the Temple officials took him for an insane person. His worldly well-wishers brought him to skilled physicians; but no medicine could cure his malady. Many a time he doubted his sanity himself. For he had been sailing across an uncharted sea, with no earthly guide to direct him. His only haven of security was the Divine Mother Herself. To Her he would pray: "I do not know what these things are. I am ignorant of mantras and the scriptures. Teach me, Mother, how to realize Thee. Who else can help me? Art Thou not my only refuge and guide?" And the sustaining presence of the Mother never failed him in his distress or doubt. Even those who criticized his conduct were greatly impressed with his purity, guilelessness, truthfulness, integrity, and holiness. They felt an uplifting influence in his presence.
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna felt an unquenchable desire to enjoy God in various ways. For his meditation he built a place in the northern wooded section of the Temple garden. With Hriday's help he planted there five sacred trees. The spot, known as the Panchavati, became the scene of many of his visions.
  
  --
  
  His visions became deeper and more intimate. He no longer had to meditate to behold the Divine Mother. Even while retaining consciousness of the outer world, he would see Her as tangibly as the Temples, the trees, the river, and the men around him.
  
  On a certain occasion Mathur Bbu stealthily entered the Temple to watch the worship.
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna one day fed a cat with the food that was to be offered to Kli. This was too much for the manager of the Temple garden, who considered himself responsible for the proper conduct of the worship. He reported Sri Ramakrishna's insane behaviour to Mathur Bbu.
  
  Sri Ramakrishna has described the incident: "The Divine Mother revealed to me in the Kli Temple that it was She who had become everything. She showed me that everything was full of Consciousness. The image was Consciousness, the altar was Consciousness, the water-vessels were Consciousness, the door-sill was Consciousness, the marble floor was Consciousness - all was Consciousness. I found everything inside the room soaked, as it were, in Bliss - the Bliss of God. I saw a wicked man in front of the Kli Temple; but in him also I saw the power of the Divine Mother vibrating. That was why I fed a cat with the food that was to be offered to the Divine Mother. I clearly perceived that all this was the Divine Mother - even the cat. The manager of the Temple garden wrote to Mathur Bbu saying that I was feeding the cat with the offering intended for the Divine Mother.
  
  --
  
  One of the painful ailments from which Sri Ramakrishna suffered at this time was a burning sensation in his body, and he was cured by a strange vision. During worship in the Temple, following the scriptural injunctions, he would imagine the presence of the "sinner" in himself and the destruction of this "sinner". One day he was meditating in the Panchavati, when he saw come out of him a red-eyed man of black complexion, reeling like a drunkard. Soon there emerged from him another person, of serene countenance, wearing the ochre cloth of a sannysi and carrying in his hand a trident. The second person attacked the first and killed him with the trident. Thereafter Sri Ramakrishna was free of his pain.
  
  --
  
  Mathur had faith in the sincerity of Sri Ramakrishna's spiritual zeal, but began now to doubt his sanity. He had watched him jumping about like a monkey. One day, when Rni Rsmani was listening to Sri Ramakrishna's singing in the Temple, the young priest abruptly turned and slapped her. Apparently listening to his song, she had actually been thinking of a lawsuit. She accepted the punishment as though the Divine Mother Herself had imposed it; but Mathur was distressed. He begged Sri Ramakrishna to keep his feelings under control and to heed the conventions of society. God Himself, he argued, follows laws. God never permitted, for instance, flowers of two colours to grow on the same stalk. The following day Sri Ramakrishna presented Mathur Bbu with two hibiscus flowers growing on the same stalk, one red and one white.
  
  --
  
  In 1858 there came to Dakshinewar a cousin of Sri Ramakrishna, Haladhri by name, who was to remain there about eight years. On account of Sri Ramakrishna's indifferent health, Mathur appointed this man to the office of priest in the Kli Temple. He was a complex character, versed in the letter of the scriptures, but hardly aware of their spirit.
  
  --
  
  Hardly had he crossed the threshold of the Kli Temple when he found himself again in the whirlwind. His madness reappeared tenfold. The same meditation and prayer, the same ecstatic moods, the same burning sensation, the same weeping, the same sleeplessness, the same indifference to the body and the outside world, the same divine delirium. He subjected himself to fresh disciplines in order to eradicate greed and lust, the two great impediments to spiritual progress. With a rupee in one hand and some earth in the other, he would reflect on the comparative value of these two for the realization of God, and finding them equally worthless he would toss them, with equal indifference, into the Ganges. Women he regarded as the manifestations of the Divine Mother. Never even in a dream did he feel the impulses of lust. And to root out of his mind the idea of caste superiority, he cleaned a pariah's house with his long and neglected hair. When he would sit in meditation, birds would perch on his head and peck in his hair for grains of food. Snakes would crawl over his body, and neither would he aware of the other. Sleep left him altogether. Day and night, visions flitted before him.
  
  --
  
  Rni Rsmani, the foundress of the Temple garden, passed away in 1861. After her death her son-in-law Mathur became the sole executor of the estate. He placed himself and his resources at the disposal of Sri Ramakrishna and began to look after his physical comfort. Sri Ramakrishna later spoke of him as one of his five "suppliers of stores"
  
  --
  
  When Sri Ramakrishna told Mathur what the Brhmani had said about him, Mathur shook his head in doubt. He was reluctant to accept him as an Incarnation of God, an Avatar comparable to Rm, Krishna, Buddha, and Chaitanya, though he admitted Sri Ramakrishna's extraordinary spirituality. Whereupon the Brhmani asked Mathur to arrange a conference of scholars who should discuss the matter with her. He agreed to the proposal and the meeting was arranged. It was to be held in the Natmandir in front of the Kli Temple.
  
  Two famous pundits of the time were invited: Vaishnavcharan, the leader of the Vaishnava society, and Gauri. The first to arrive was Vaishnavcharan, with a distinguished company of scholars and devotees. The Brhmani, like a proud mother, proclaimed her view before him and supported it with quotations from the scriptures. As the pundits discussed the deep theological question, Sri Ramakrishna, perfectly indifferent to everything happening around him, sat in their midst like a child, immersed in his own thoughts, sometimes smiling, sometimes chewing a pinch of spices from a pouch, or again saying to Vaishnavcharan with a nudge: "Look here. Sometimes I feel like this, too." Presently Vaishnavcharan arose to declare himself in total agreement with the view of the Brhmani. He declared that Sri Ramakrishna had undoubtedly experienced Mah-bhva and that this was the certain sign of the rare manifestation of God in a man. The people assembled there, especially the officers of the Temple garden, were struck dumb. Sri Ramakrishna said to Mathur, like a boy: "Just fancy, he too says so! Well, I am glad to learn that, after all, it is not a disease."
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna set himself to the task of practising the disciplines of Tantra; and at the bidding of the Divine Mother Herself he accepted the Brhmani as his guru. He performed profound and delicate ceremonies in the Panchavati and under the bel-tree at the northern extremity of the Temple compound. He practised all the disciplines of the sixty-four principal Tantra books, and it took him never more than three days to achieve the result promised in any one of them. After the observance of a few preliminary rites, he would be overwhelmed with a strange divine fervour and would go into Samdhi, where his mind would dwell in exaltation. Evil ceased to exist for him. The word "carnal"
  
  --
  
  One day, listening to a recitation of the Bhgavata on the verandah of the Radhknta Temple he fell into a divine mood and saw the enchanting form of Krishna. He perceived the luminous rays issuing from Krishna's Lotus Feet in the form of a stout rope, which touched first the Bhgavata and then his own chest, connecting all three - God, the scripture, and the devotee. "After this vision," he used to say, "I came to realize that Bhagavn-Bhakta-and-Bhgavata -- God-Devotee-and-Scripture -- are in reality, one and the same."
  
  --
  
  Totpuri arrived at the Dakshinewar Temple garden toward the end of 1864. Perhaps born in the Punjab, he was the head of a monastery in that province of India and claimed leadership of seven hundred sannysis. Trained from early youth in the disciplines of the Advaita Vednta, he looked upon the world as an illusion. The gods and goddesses of the dualistic worship were to him mere fantasies of the deluded mind.
  
  --
  
  One day, when guru and disciple were engaged in an animated discussion about Vednta, a servant of the Temple garden came there and took a coal from the sacred fire that had been lighted by the great ascetic. He wanted it to light his tobacco. Totpuri flew into a rage and was about to beat the man. Sri Ramakrishna rocked with laughter.
  
  --
  
  But, lo! He walks to the other bank. Is there not enough water in the Ganges? Standing dumbfounded on the other bank he looks back across the water. The trees, the Temples, the houses, are silhouetted against the sky. Suddenly, in one dazzling moment, he sees on all sides the presence of the Divine Mother. She is in everything; She is everything.
  
  --
  
  Totpuri returned to Dakshinewar and spent the remaining hours of the night meditating on the Divine Mother. In the morning he went to the Kli Temple with Sri Ramakrishna and prostrated himself before the image of the Mother. He now realized why he had spent eleven months at Dakshinewar. Bidding farewell to the disciple, he continued on his way, enlightened.
  
  --
  
  His prayers took the form of the Islamic devotions. He forgot the Hindu gods and goddesses - even Kli - and gave up visiting the Temples. He took up his residence outside the Temple precincts. After three days he saw the vision of a radiant figure, perhaps Mohammed. This figure gently approached him and finally lost himself in Sri Ramakrishna. Thus he realized the Mussalman God. Thence he passed into communion with Brahman. The mighty river of Islam also led him back to the Ocean of the Absolute.
  
  --
  
  The effect of this experience was stronger than that of the vision of Mohammed. In dismay he cried out, "O Mother! What are You doing to me?" And, breaking through the barriers of creed and religion, he entered a new realm of ecstasy. Christ possessed his soul. For three days he did not set foot in the Kli Temple. On the fourth day, in the afternoon, as he was walking in the Panchavati, he saw coming toward him a person with beautiful large eyes, serene countenance, and fair skin. As the two faced each other, a voice rang out in the depths of Sri Ramakrishna's soul: "Behold the Christ who shed His heart's blood for the redemption of the world, who suffered a sea of anguish for love of men. It is He, the Master Yogi, who is in eternal union with God. It is Jesus, Love Incarnate." The Son of Man embraced the Son of the Divine Mother and merged in him.
  
  --
  
  He recalled his father's vision at Gay before his own birth and felt that in the Temple of Vishnu he would become permanently absorbed in God. Mathur, honouring the Master's wish, returned with his party to Calcutta.
  
  --
  
  Since then she had become even more gentle, tender, introspective, serious, and unselfish. She had heard many rumours about her husband's insanity. People had shown her pity in her misfortune. The more she thought, the more she felt that her duty was to be with him, giving him, in whatever measure she could, a wife's devoted service. She was now eighteen years old. Accompanied by her father, she arrived at Dakshinewar, having come on foot the distance of eighty miles. She had had an attack of fever on the way. When she arrived at the Temple garden the Master said sorrowfully: "Ah! You have come too late. My Mathur is no longer here to look after you." Mathur had passed away the previous year.
  
  --
  
  Quick came the answer: "The Mother who is worshipped in the Temple is the mother who has given birth to my body and is now living in the Nahabat, and it is She again who is stroking my feet at this moment. Indeed, I always look on you as the personification of the Blissful Mother Kli."
  
  --
  
  Keshab's sincerity was enough for Sri Ramakrishna. Henceforth the two saw each other frequently, either at Dakshinewar or at the Temple of the Brhmo Samj. Whenever the Master was in the Temple at the time of divine service, Keshab would request him to speak to the congregation. And Keshab would visit the saint, in his turn, with offerings of flowers and fruits.
  
  --
  
  ivanth, one day, was greatly impressed by the Master's utter simplicity and abhorrence of praise. He was seated with Sri Ramakrishna in the latter's room when several rich men of Calcutta arrived. The Master left the room for a few minutes. In the mean time Hriday, his nephew, began to describe his Samdhi to the visitors. The last few words caught the Master's ear as he entered the room. He said to Hriday: "What a mean-spirited fellow you must be to extol me thus before these rich men! You have seen their costly apparel and their gold watches and chains, and your object is to get from them as much money as you can. What do I care about what they think of me? (Turning to the gentlemen) No, my friends, what he has told you about me is not true. It was not love of God that made me absorbed in God and indifferent to external life. I became positively insane for some time. The sdhus who frequented this Temple told me to practise many things. I tried to follow them, and the consequence was that my austerities drove me to insanity." This is a quotation from one of ivanth's books. He took the Master's words literally and failed to see their real import.
  
  --
  
  Contact with the Brahmos increased Sri Ramakrishna's longing to encounter aspirants who would be able to follow his teachings in their purest form. "There was no limit", he once declared, "to the longing I felt at that time. During the day-time I somehow managed to control it. The secular talk of the worldly-minded was galling to me, and I would look wistfully to the day when my own beloved companions would come. I hoped to find solace in conversing with them and relating to them my own realizations. Every little incident would remind me of them, and thoughts of them wholly engrossed me. I was already arranging in my mind what I should say to one and give to another, and so on. But when the day would come to a close I would not be able to curb my feelings. The thought that another day had gone by, and they had not come, oppressed me. When, during the evening service, the Temples rang with the sound of bells and conchshells, I would climb to the roof of the Kuthi in the garden and, writhing in anguish of heart, cry at the top of my voice: 'Come, my children! Oh, where are you? I cannot bear to live without you.' A mother never longed so intensely for the sight of her child, nor a friend for his companions, nor a lover for his sweetheart, as I longed for them. Oh, it was indescribable! Shortly after this period of yearning the devotees began to come."
  
  --
  
  Pratp Hazra, a middle-aged man, hailed from a village near Kmrpukur. He was not altogether unresponsive to religious feelings. On a moment's impulse he had left his home, aged mother, wife, and children, and had found shelter in the Temple garden at Dakshinewar, where he intended to lead a spiritual life. He loved to argue, and the Master often pointed him out as an example of barren argumentation. He was hypercritical of others and cherished an exaggerated notion of his own spiritual advancement. He was mischievous and often tried to upset the minds of the Master's young disciples, criticizing them for their happy and joyous life and asking them to devote their time to meditation. The Master teasingly compared Hazra to Jatila and Kutila, the two women who always created obstructions in Krishna's sport with the gopis, and said that Hazra lived at Dakshinewar to "thicken the plot" by adding complications.
  
  --
  
  The Master wanted to train Narendra in the teachings of the non-dualistic Vednta philosophy. But Narendra, because of his Brhmo upbringing, considered it wholly blasphemous to look on man as one with his Creator. One day at the Temple garden he laughingly said to a friend: "How silly! This jug is God! This cup is God! Whatever we see is God! And we too are God! Nothing could be more absurd." Sri Ramakrishna came out of his room and gently touched him. Spellbound, he immediately perceived that everything in the world was indeed God. A new universe opened around him. Returning home in a dazed state, he found there too that the food, the plate, the eater himself, the people around him, were all God. When he walked in the street, he saw that the cabs, the horses, the streams of people, the buildings, were all Brahman. He could hardly go about his day's business. His parents became anxious about him and thought him ill. And when the intensity of the experience abated a little, he saw the world as a dream.
  
  --
  
  One day, soon after, Narendra requested Sri Ramakrishna to pray to the Divine Mother to remove his poverty. Sri Ramakrishna bade him pray to Her himself, for She would certainly listen to his prayer. Narendra entered the shrine of Kli. As he stood before the image of the Mother, he beheld Her as a living Goddess, ready to give wisdom and liberation. Unable to ask Her for petty worldly things, he prayed only for knowledge and renunciation, love and liberation. The Master rebuked him for his failure to ask the Divine Mother to remove his poverty and sent him back to the Temple. But Narendra, standing in Her presence, again forgot the purpose of his coming. Thrice he went to the Temple at the bidding of the Master, and thrice he returned, having forgotten in Her presence why he had come. He was wondering about it when it suddenly flashed in his mind that this was all the work of Sri Ramakrishna; so now he asked the Master himself to remove his poverty, and was assured that his family would not lack simple food and clothing.
  
  --
  
  Give me something to eat." With great hesitation she gave him some ordinary sweets that she had purchased for him on the way. The Master ate them with relish and asked her to bring him simple curries or sweets prepared by her own hands. Gopl M thought him a queer kind of monk, for, instead of talking of God, he always asked for food. She did not want to visit him again, but an irresistible attraction brought her back to the Temple garden. She carried with her some simple curries that she had cooked herself.
  
  --
  
  In 1882 Hriday was, dismissed from service in the Ka1i Temple, for an act of indiscretion, and was ordered by the authorities never again to enter the garden. In a way the hand of the Divine Mother may be seen even in this. Having taken care of Sri Ramakrishna during the stormy days of his spiritual discipline, Hriday had come naturally to consider himself the sole guardian of his uncle. None could approach the Master without his knowledge. And he would be extremely jealous if Sri Ramakrishna paid attention to anyone else. Hriday's removal made it possible for the real devotees of the Master to approach him freely and live with him in the Temple garden.
  
  --
  
  The Holy Mother secretly went to a iva Temple across the Ganges to intercede with the Deity for the Master's recovery. In a revelation she was told to prepare herself for the inevitable end.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Imparting secular education was, however, only his profession ; his main concern was with the spiritual regeneration of man a calling for which Destiny seems to have chosen him. From his childhood he was deeply pious, and he used to be moved very much by Sdhus, Temples and Durga Puja celebrations. The piety and eloquence of the great Brahmo leader of the times, Keshab Chander Sen, elicited a powerful response from the impressionable mind of Mahendra Nath, as it did in the case of many an idealistic young man of Calcutta, and prepared him to receive the great Light that was to dawn on him with the coming of Sri Ramakrishna into his life.
  
  
  This epoch-making event of his life came about in a very strange way. M. belonged to a joint family with several collateral members. Some ten years after he began his career as an educationist, bitter quarrels broke out among the members of the family, driving the sensitive M. to despair and utter despondency. He lost all interest in life and left home one night to go into the wide world with the idea of ending his life. At dead of night he took rest in his sister's house at Baranagar, and in the morning, accompanied by a nephew Siddheswar, he wandered from one garden to another in Calcutta until Siddheswar brought him to the Temple Garden of Dakshineswar where Sri Ramakrishna was then living. After spending some time in the beautiful rose gardens there, he was directed to the room of the Paramahamsa, where the eventful meeting of the Master and the disciple took place on a blessed evening (the exact date is not on record) on a Sunday in March 1882. As regards what took place on the occasion, the reader is referred to the opening section of the first chapter of the Gospel.
  
  --
  
  Even as a boy of about thirteen, while he was a student in the 3rd class of the Hare School, he was in the habit of keeping a diary. "Today on rising," he wrote in his diary, "I greeted my father and mother, prostrating on the ground before them" (Swami Nityatmananda's 'M The Apostle and the Evangelist' Part I. P 29.) At another place he wrote, "Today, while on my way to school, I visited, as usual, the Temples of Kli, the Mother at Tharitharia, and of Mother Sitala, and paid my obeisance to them." About twenty-five years after, when he met the Great Master in the spring of 1882, it was the same instinct of a born diary-writer that made him begin his book, 'unique in the literature of hagiography', with the memorable words: "When hearing the name of Hari or Rma once, you shed tears and your hair stands on end, then you may know for certain that you do not have to perform devotions such as Sandhya any more."
  

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  Say: O King of Berlin! Give ear unto the Voice calling from this manifest Temple: "Verily, there is none other God but Me, the Everlasting, the Peerless, the Ancient of Days." Take heed lest pride debar thee from recognizing the Dayspring of Divine Revelation, lest earthly desires shut thee out, as by a veil, from the Lord of the Throne above and of the earth below. Thus counselleth thee the Pen of the Most High. He, verily, is the Most Gracious, the All-Bountiful. Do thou remember the one (Napoleon III) whose power transcended thy power, and whose station excelled thy station. Where is he? Whither are gone the things he possessed? Take warning, and be not of them that are fast asleep. He it was who cast the Tablet of God behind him when We made known unto him what the hosts of tyranny had caused Us to suffer. Wherefore, disgrace assailed him from all sides, and he went down to dust in great loss. Think deeply, O King, concerning him, and concerning them who, like unto thee, have conquered cities and ruled over men. The All-Merciful brought them down from their palaces to their graves. Be warned, be of them who reflect.
  
  --
  
  Hearken ye, O Rulers of America and the Presidents of the Republics therein, unto that which the Dove is warbling on the Branch of Eternity: "There is none other God but Me, the Ever-Abiding, the Forgiving, the All-Bountiful." Adorn ye the Temple of dominion with the ornament of justice and of the fear of God, and its head with the crown of the remembrance of your Lord, the Creator of the heavens.
  
  --
  
  O Most Mighty Ocean! Sprinkle upon the nations that with which Thou hast been charged by Him Who is the Sovereign of Eternity, and adorn the Temples of all the dwellers of the earth with the vesture of His laws +F1 Khurasan through which all hearts will rejoice and all eyes be brightened.
  
  --
  
  Adorn your heads with the garlands of trustworthiness and fidelity, your hearts with the attire of the fear of God, your tongues with absolute truthfulness, your bodies with the vesture of courtesy. These are in truth seemly adornings unto the Temple of man, if ye be of them that reflect. Cling, O ye people of Baha, to the cord of servitude unto God, the True One, for thereby your stations shall be made manifest, your names written and preserved, your ranks raised and your memory exalted in the Preserved Tablet. Beware lest the dwellers on earth hinder you from this glorious and exalted station. Thus have We exhorted you in most of Our Epistles and now in this, Our Holy Tablet, above which hath beamed the Day-Star of the Laws of the Lord, your God, the Powerful, the All-Wise.
  
  --
  
  Gambling and the use of opium have been forbidden unto you. Eschew them both, O people, and be not of those who transgress. Beware of using any substance that induceth sluggishness and torpor in the human Temple and inflicteth harm upon the body. We, verily, desire for you naught save what shall profit you, and to this bear witness all created things, had ye but ears to hear.
  

1.00_-_Preface, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  This book goes forth then in the hope that, as a modern writer has put it:
    "There are not many, those who have no secret garden of the mind. For this garden alone can give refreshment when life is barren of peace or sustenance or satisfactory answer. Such sanctuaries may be reached by a certain philosophy or faith, by the guidance of a beloved author or an understanding friend, by way of the Temples of music and art, or by groping after truth through the vast kingdoms of knowledge. They encompass almost always truth and beauty, and are radiant with the light that never was on sea or land."
  

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  I am wont to think that men are not so much the keepers of herds as herds are the keepers of men, the former are so much the freer. Men and oxen exchange work; but if we consider necessary work only, the oxen will be seen to have greatly the advantage, their farm is so much the larger. Man does some of his part of the exchange work in his six weeks of haying, and it is no boys play. Certainly no nation that lived simply in all respects, that is, no nation of philosophers, would commit so great a blunder as to use the labor of animals. True, there never was and is not likely soon to be a nation of philosophers, nor am
  I certain it is desirable that there should be. However, _I_ should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horse-man or a herds-man merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one mans gain is not anothers loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied? Granted that some public works would not have been constructed without this aid, and let man share the glory of such with the ox and horse; does it follow that he could not have accomplished works yet more worthy of himself in that case? When men begin to do, not merely unnecessary or artistic, but luxurious and idle work, with their assistance, it is inevitable that a few do all the exchange work with the oxen, or, in other words, become the slaves of the strongest. Man thus not only works for the animal within him, but, for a symbol of this, he works for the animal without him. Though we have many substantial houses of brick or stone, the prosperity of the farmer is still measured by the degree to which the barn overshadows the house. This town is said to have the largest houses for oxen, cows, and horses hereabouts, and it is not behindhand in its public buildings; but there are very few halls for free worship or free speech in this county. It should not be by their architecture, but why not even by their power of abstract thought, that nations should seek to commemorate themselves? How much more admirable the Bhagvat-Geeta than all the ruins of the East! Towers and Temples are the luxury of princes. A simple and independent mind does not toil at the bidding of any prince. Genius is not a retainer to any emperor, nor is its material silver, or gold, or marble, except to a trifling extent. To what end, pray, is so much stone hammered? In
  Arcadia, when I was there, I did not see any hammering stone. Nations are possessed with an insane ambition to perpetuate the memory of themselves by the amount of hammered stone they leave. What if equal pains were taken to smooth and polish their manners? One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon. I love better to see stones in place. The grandeur of Thebes was a vulgar grandeur. More sensible is a rod of stone wall that bounds an honest mans field than a hundred-gated Thebes that has wandered farther from the true end of life. The religion and civilization which are barbaric and heathenish build splendid Temples; but what you might call
  Christianity does not. Most of the stone a nation hammers goes toward its tomb only. It buries itself alive. As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs. I might possibly invent some excuse for them and him, but I have no time for it. As for the religion and love of art of the builders, it is much the same all the world over, whether the building be an Egyptian Temple or the United States Bank. It costs more than it comes to. The mainspring is vanity, assisted by the love of garlic and bread and butter. Mr.
  

1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Theosophy
  
  The methods by which a student is prepared for the reception of higher knowledge are minutely prescribed. The direction he is to take is traced with unfading, everlasting letters in the worlds of the spirit where the initiates guard the higher secrets. In ancient times, anterior to our history, the Temples of the spirit were also outwardly visible; today, because our life has become so unspiritual, they are not to be found in the world visible to external sight; yet they are present spiritually everywhere, and all who seek may find them.
  

1.01_-_On_Love, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  For the pillars of the Temple stand apart,
  

1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  surrounded by smaller representations of twenty-one
  Taras that can still be seen in the Temple. Her devotion
  to Tara was so exclusive that, Kalu Rinpoche, having
  --
  representing White Tara painted on the wall of the
  main Temple of Tashi lhunpo, the residence of the
  Panchen Lamas in the city of Shigatse.
  --
  and more clearly, exiting out of the rock. A small
  Temple has been built to protect and honor it.
  Why does this statue produce itself today? Maybe

1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  Philo was the exponent of the Hellenistic Mystery Religion which grew up, as Professor Goodenough has shown, among the Jews of the Dispersion, between about 200 B. C. and 100 A. D. Reinterpreting the Pentateuch in terms of a metaphysical system derived from Platonism, Neo-Pythagoreanism and Stoicism, Philo transformed the wholly transcendental and almost anthropomorphically personal God of the Old Testament into the immanent-transcendent Absolute Mind of the Perennial Philosophy. But even from the orthodox scribes and Pharisees of that momentous century which witnessed, along with the dissemination of Philos doctrines, the first beginnings of Christianity and the destruction of the Temple at Jerusalem, even from the guardians of the Law we hear significantly mystical utterances. Hillel, the great rabbi whose teachings on humility and the love of God and man read like an earlier, cruder version of some of the Gospel sermons, is reported to have spoken these words to an assemblage in the courts of the Temple. If I am here, (it is Jehovah who is speaking through the mouth of his prophet) everyone is here. If I am not here, no one is here.
  

1.01_-_The_First_Steps, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  Those of you who can afford it will do better to have a room for this practice alone. Do not sleep in that room, it must be kept holy. You must not enter the room until you have bathed, and are perfectly clean in body and mind. Place flowers in that room always; they are the best surroundings for a Yogi; also pictures that are pleasing. Burn incense morning and evening. Have no quarrelling, nor anger, nor unholy thought in that room. Only allow those persons to enter it who are of the same thought as you. Then gradually there will be an atmosphere of holiness in the room, so that when you are miserable, sorrowful, doubtful, or your mind is disturbed, the very fact of entering that room will make you calm. This was the idea of the Temple and the church, and in some Temples and churches you will find it even now, but in the majority of them the very idea has been lost. The idea is that by keeping holy vibrations there the place becomes and remains illumined. Those who cannot afford to have a room set apart can practice anywhere they like. Sit in a straight posture, and the first thing to do is to send a current of holy thought to all creation. Mentally repeat, "Let all beings be happy; let all beings be peaceful; let all beings be blissful." So do to the east, south, north and west. The more you do that the better you will feel yourself. You will find at last that the easiest way to make ourselves healthy is to see that others are healthy, and the easiest way to make ourselves happy is to see that others are happy. After doing that, those who believe in God should pray not for money, not for health, nor for heaven; pray for knowledge and light; every other prayer is selfish. Then the next thing to do is to think of your own body, and see that it is strong and healthy; it is the best instrument you have. Think of it as being as strong as adamant, and that with the help of this body you will cross the ocean of life. Freedom is never to be reached by the weak. Throw away all weakness. Tell your body that it is strong, tell your mind that it is strong, and have unbounded faith and hope in yourself.
  

1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths, #The Blue Cliff Records, #Yuanwu Keqin, #Zen
  gold. He studied the Path and humbly served the Buddha, issu
  ing orders through out his realm to build Temples and ordain
  monks, and practicing in accordance with the Teaching. People
  --
  When Bodhidharma first met Emperor Wu, the Emperor
  asked, "I have built Temples and ordained monks; what merit
  is there in this?" Bodhidharma said, "There is no merit." He
  --
  Bodhidharma personally. Now tell me, why is there no merit at
  all in building Temples and ordaining monks? Where does the
  meaning of this lie?
  --
  further attempt to save himself, but sat upright and passed on.
  He was buried at Tinglin Temple on Bear Ear Mountain. Af
  terwards, while Sung Yun of Wei was on a mission, he met the

1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  
  It was a truly dreadful state of affairs. Being wealthy, the family freely dispensed money for physicians. Practitioners were called in to employ their magic spells and incantations. But none of them was able to diminish the young man's suffering. At this point, with the situation becoming extremely dire, they came to the Temple where I was staying to offer prayers and other devotions. The assembly of monks performed secret rites on the afflicted man's behalf throughout the night. When morning came, they brought me some purified rice, saying, "He should sleep easier tonight."
  I immediately scotched that assumption. "No, he will probably suffer even more tonight. Despite your prayers, I am afraid he will undergo even worse sweating spells. Prayers and religious rites cannot help people who are suffering retribution for unfilial acts."
  After I left the Temple, word reached me that the gods and Buddhas had protected him and that his life was no longer in danger. But his eyes had been destroyed, his hearing was gone, and he seemed to have lost his desire to live.
  
  --
  
  THE FIRST [FOURTH] YEAR OF SHTOKU (1714), AT THE INRY-JI Temple AT SHINODA IN IZUMI
  PROVINCE.
  --
  
  Hakuin was still a young monk when he composed this letter, nearing the end of a decade-long pilgrimage and well into the post-satori phase of his practice, having achieved several satori experiences earlier in his twenties. He was staying at Inry-ji, a St Temple in Izumi Province south of Osaka, and was writing in response to a letter from Watanabe Sukefusa's father Heizaemon, who was the proprietor of an important honjin inn at the Hara post station (the kind reserved for the use of
  Daimyo and others of high rank), informing him of his son's unfilial behavior.
  --
  
  Forty years ago, my childhood friend Watanabe Sukefusa contracted a serious illness of this nature, throwing his parents into a state of constant distress. I was staying at a Temple in Shinoda,
  Izumi Province, at the time, so I sent Sukefusa a long letter. It made a strong impression on him.
  --
  
  Today his son cherishes the letter as a family treasure. Recently, on the occasion of an annual festival, some elderly laymen who frequent my Temple borrowed the letter and brought it to my Temple. They asked me to copy it out and write some prefatory remarks. I complied with their wishes, and have taken the opportunity to add much new material as well.
  

1.01_-_Two_Powers_Alone, #The Mother With Letters On The Mother, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  6:If behind your devotion and surrender you make a cover for your desires, egoistic demands and vital insistences, if you put these things in place of the true aspiration or mix them with it and try to impose them on the Divine Shakti, then it is idle to invoke the divine Grace to transform you.
  7:If you open yourself on one side or in one part to the Truth and on another side are constantly opening the gates to hostile forces, it is vain to expect that the divine Grace will abide with you. You must keep the Temple clean if you wish to instal there the living Presence.
  8:If each time the Power intervenes and brings in the Truth, you turn your back on it and call in again the falsehood that has been expelled, it is not the divine Grace that you must blame for failing you, but the falsity of your own will and the imperfection of your own surrender.

1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  these materials, and that is how there came to the human
  mind, even unconsciously, the idea of building Temples and
  churches? Why should man build churches in which to
  --
  him, and arouse his Sattva quality. Here, therefore, is the
  significance of all Temples and holy places, but you must
  remember that their holiness depends on holy people
  --
  is the whole of religion. Doctrines, or dogmas, or rituals, or
  books, or Temples, or forms, are but secondary details. The
  Yogi tries to reach this goal through psychic control. Until we

1.02_-_Self-Consecration, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  12:In the ordinary paths of Yoga the method used for dealing with these conflicting materials is direct and simple. One or another of the principal psychological forces in us is selected as our single means for attaining to the Divine; the rest is quieted into inertia or left to starve in its smallness. The Bhakta, seizing on the emotional forces of the being, the intense activities of the heart, abides concentrated in the love of God, gathered up as into a single one-pointed tongue of fire; he is indifferent to the activities of thought, throws behind him the importunities of the reason, cares nothing for the mind's thirst for knowledge. All the knowledge he needs is his faith and the inspirations that well up from a heart in communion with the Divine. He has no use for any will to works that is not turned to the direct worship of the Beloved or the service of the Temple. The man of Knowledge, self-confined by a deliberate choice to the force and activities of discriminative thought, finds release in the mind's inward-drawn endeavour. He concentrates on the idea of the self, succeeds by a subtle inner discernment in distinguishing its silent presence amid the veiling activities of Nature, and through the perceptive idea arrives at the concrete spiritual experience. He is indifferent to the play of the emotions, deaf to the hunger-call of passion, closed to the activities of Life, -- the more blessed he, the sooner they fall away from him and leave him free, still and mute, the eternal non-doer. The body is his stumbling-block, the vital functions are his enemies; if their demands can be reduced to a minimum, that is his great good fortune. The endless difficulties that arise from the environing world are dismissed by erecting firmly against them a defence of outer physical and inner spiritual solitude; safe behind a wall of inner silence, he remains impassive and untouched by the world and by others. To be alone with oneself or alone with the Divine, to walk apart with God and his devotees, to entrench oneself in the single self-ward endeavour of the mind or Godward passion of the heart is the trend of these Yogas. The problem is solved by the excision of all but the one central difficulty which pursues the only chosen motive-force; into the midst of the dividing calls of our nature the principle of an exclusive concentration comes sovereignly to our rescue.
  
  --
  
  22:When once the object of concentration has possessed and is possessed by the three master instruments, the thought, the heart and the will, -- a consummation fully possible only when the desire-soul in us has submitted to the Divine Law, -- the perfection of mind and life and body can be effectively fulfilled in our transmuted nature. This will be done, not for the personal satisfaction of the ego, but that the whole may constitute a fit Temple for the Divine Presence, a faultless instrument for the divine work. For the work can be truly performed only when the instrument, consecrated and perfected, has grown fit for a selfless action, -- and that will be when personal desire and egoism are abolished, but not the liberated individual. Even when the little ego has been abolished, the true Spiritual Person can still remain and God's will and work and delight in him and the spiritual use of his perfection and fulfilment. Our works will then be divine and done divinely; our mind arid life and will, devoted to the Divine, will be used to help fulfil in others and in the world that which has been first realised in ourselves, -all that we can manifest of the embodied Unity, Love, Freedom, Strength, Power, Splendour, immortal Joy which is the goal of the spirit's terrestrial adventure.
  

1.02_-_Taras_Tantra, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  He then return ed to India and stayed in the city of
  Tipurar where he built a Temple especially to house
  these tantras. He transm itted the Prajnaparamita
  --
  Tara appea red again to Atisha in a dream and
  requested that he visit a certain Temple where he
  would meet a yogini who had something impor tant to
  tell him. The next morning, he went to the Temple and
  met the yogini. Havin g offered her some flowers, he

1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Master of all and on the Godhead secret in man. It is this internal divinity who is meant when the Gita speaks of the doer of violent
  Asuric austerities troubling the God within or of the sin of those who despise the Divine lodged in the human body or of the same Godhead destroying our ignorance by the blazing lamp of knowledge. It is then the eternal Avatar, this God in man, the divine Consciousness always present in the human being who manifested in a visible form speaks to the human soul in the Gita, illumines the meaning of life and the secret of divine action and gives it the light of the divine knowledge and guidance and the assuring and fortifying word of the Master of existence in the hour when it comes face to face with the painful mystery of the world. This is what the Indian religious consciousness seeks to make near to itself in whatever form, whether in the symbolic human image it enshrines in its Temples or in the worship of its
  Avatars or in the devotion to the human Guru through whom the voice of the one world-Teacher makes itself heard. Through these it strives to awaken to that inner voice, unveil that form of the Formless and stand face to face with that manifest divine

1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  and that he needs to love what he himself understands of God at his own level and particular stage of inner development, and Peter's way is not John's. That everyone should love a crucified god, for instance,
  seems unnatural to the average Indian, who will bow respectfully before Christ (with as much spontaneous reverence as before his own image of God), but who will see also the face of God in the laughter of Krishna, the terror of Kali, the sweetness of Saraswati, and in the thousands upon thousands of other gods who dance, multicolored and mustachioed, mirthful or terrifying, illuminated or compassionate, on the deliriously carved towers of Indian Temples. A God who cannot smile could not have created this humorous universe,13 said Sri Aurobindo. All is His face, all is His play, terrible or beautiful, as many-faceted as our world itself. For this country so teeming with 13
  

1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Theosophy
  
  Upon successfully passing this trial the student is permitted to enter the Temple of higher wisdom. All that is here said on this subject can only be the slenderest allusion. The task now to be performed is often expressed in the statement that the student must take an oath never to betray anything
   p. 94

1.02_-_To_Zen_Monks_Kin_and_Koku, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  This letter, in which Hakuin declines an invitation to lecture on the Vimalakirti Sutra, can be dated from internal evidence to 1729. As one of very few letters that can be dated confidently to Hakuin's forties, it gives us a rare glimpse of Shin-ji during the early years of Hakuin's residency. Neither
  Kin or Koku, nor the name of the Temple issuing the invitation to Hakuin, have been identified, although the Temple was no doubt located close by, probably in Suruga Province.
  
  --
  
  I, alas, am not a superior man. I have neither wisdom nor virtue. I am sure you have heard about the adversities we've been experiencing at Shin-ji. After my first eight years here as head priest, and a great deal of trouble, we finally succeeded in striking a vein of water and reviving the dried-up old well. Now four years and a great deal of additional hardship later, we have managed to finish rethatching the leaky roofs. I still do not have a student able to aid me in running the affairs of the Temple, and there are no parishioners to turn to for financial help.
  
  --
  
  In his autobiographies, Hakuin describes his small, impoverished Temple as being in an
  "indescribable state of disrepair" when he was installed as abbot in 1717. Judging from occasional references in his books and letters to the privations of life at Shin-ji, there does not seem to have
  --
  Bodhisattvas."
  In view of how vigorously Hakuin dedicated himself to such teaching activity during his sixties and seventies-in one two-year period, for example, he visited and taught at twenty-five different Temples
  -it is interesting to find him here at the age of forty-three, at the start of his teaching career, showing such reluctance to accept a teaching assignment. Evidently, Hakuin did not lecture at the request of another Temple until eight years after this. His text was the Blue Cliff Record.
  

1.03_-_Master_Ma_is_Unwell, #The Blue Cliff Records, #Yuanwu Keqin, #Zen
  
  Great Master Ma was unwell.1 The Temple superintendent
  asked him, "Teacher, how has your venerable health been in
  --
  
  The Great Master Ma was unwell, so the Temple superinten
  dent asked him, "Teacher, how has your venerable health been

1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  94. QUESTION: Concerning mosques, chapels and Temples.
  
  
  ANSWER: Whatever hath been constructed for the worship of the one true God, such as mosques, chapels and Temples, must not be used for any purpose other than the commemoration of His Name. This is an ordinance of God, and he who violateth it is verily of those who have transgressed. No harm attacheth to the builder, for he hath performed his deed for the sake of God, and hath received and will continue to receive his just reward.
  

1.03_-_The_End_of_the_Intellect, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  his Bengali teacher continues, "and read by the light of an oil lamp till one in the morning, oblivious of the intolerable mosquito bites. I
  would see him seated there in the same posture for hours on end, his eyes fixed on his book, like a yogi lost in the contemplation of the Divine, unaware of all that went on around him. Even if the house had caught fire, it would not have broken this concentration." He read English, Russian, German, and French novels, but also, in ever larger numbers, the sacred books of India, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Ramayana, although he had never been in a Temple except as an observer. "Once, having returned from the College," one of his friends recalls, "Sri Aurobindo sat down, picked up a book at random and started to read, while Z and some friends began a noisy game of chess. After half an hour, he put the book down and took a cup of tea.
  We had already seen him do this many times and were waiting eagerly for a chance to verify whether he read the books from cover to cover or only scanned a few pages here and there. Soon the test began. Z
  --
  but something behind it which uses it: The capital period of my intellectual development, Sri Aurobindo confided to a disciple, was when I could see clearly that what the intellect said might be correct and not correct, that what the intellect justified was true and its opposite also was true. I never admitted a truth in the mind without simultaneously keeping it open to the contrary of it. . . . And the first result was that the prestige of the intellect was gone!24
  Sri Aurobindo had come to a turning point; Temples did not interest him and books were empty. A friend advised him to practice yoga, but Sri Aurobindo refused: A yoga which requires me to give up the world is not for me,25 he moreover added: a solitary salvation leaving the world to its fate was felt as almost distasteful. 26 Then one day Sri Aurobindo witnessed a curious scene, though not uncommon in India (to be sure, banality is often the best trigger of inner movements),
  when his brother Barin was ill with a severe fever. (Barin, born while Sri Aurobindo was in England, was Sri Aurobindo's secret emissary in the organization of Indian resistance in Bengal.) One of those halfnaked wandering monks appeared. He was probably begging for food from door to door as is their custom, when he saw Barin rolled up in blankets, shivering with fever. Without a word, he asked for a glass of 23

1.03_-_The_Sephiros, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  Ganesha, the elephant God who breaks down all obstacles, and supports the universe while himself standing on a tortoise. Diana was the Goddess of Light and in the
  Roman Temples represented the moon. The general conception of Yesod is of change with stability. Some writers have referred to the Astral Light which is the sphere of Yesod as the Anima Mundi, the Soul of the World. The psycho-analyst Jung has a very similar concept which he terms the Collective Unconscious which, as I see it, differs in no wise from the Qabalistic idea.
  

1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  Layman sees how troubled you are, he is sure to be greatly concerned and want to help you. But whatever help you receive now, even though you may gain something from it, it is going to stick to your bones and cling to your hide, and will prevent you from experiencing the intense joy that should accompany the sudden entrance into satori. You will remain a humble little stable boy the rest of your life, your wisdom never completely clear, your attainment never truly alive and vital. b A most regrettable outcome!"
  Yesterday, the evening of the twelfth, Boku returned to Shin-ji. I sat waiting for him with a black snake in my sleeve.c By and by, an unkempt and disheveled Boku entered the Temple gates. His face looked unchanged, no different from when he had left.
  
  --
  "A foolish man long ago heard that if you put a leech out under the sun in very hot weather, it would transform into a dragonfly and soar into the sky. One summer day, he decided to put it to the test. Wading into a marsh, he poked around until he found a particularly large old leech. Throwing it on the hot ground, he watched very carefully as the worm squirmed and writhed in agony. Suddenly, it flipped over on its back, split in two, and transformed into a ugly creature with a hundred legs like a centipede. It scowled furiously at him, snapping its fangs in anger. Ahh! This creature that was supposed to soar freely through the skies had turned into a repulsive worm that could only crawl miserably over the ground. A truly terrifying turn of events!
  "There was a servant in ancient China who worked in the kitchen of a Temple in the far western regions of the country. The Temple was filled with monks engaged in the rigors of training. All the time the servant wasn't engaged in his main job preparing meals for the brotherhood, he spent doing zazen. One day, he suddenly entered a profound samadhi, and since he showed no sign of coming out of it, the head priest of the Temple directed the senior monk in charge of the training hall to keep an eye on him. When the servant finally got up from his zazen cushion three days later, he had penetrated the heart and marrow of the Dharma, and had attained an ability to clearly see the karma of his previous lives. He went to the head priest and began setting forth the realization he had attained, but before he had finished, the head priest suddenly put his hands over his ears. 'Stop! Stop!' he said.
  
  --
  
  "Long ago, when Lin-chi practiced for three years at Huang-po's Temple, he received words of sanction from Huang-po's disciple Chen Tsun-su: 'Someone whose practice is this pure and genuine is certain to become a great shade tree for the beings of the world.'k Lin-chi was by that time widely versed in the sutras and commentaries, and he had exhaustively investigated the precepts as well.
  
  --
  
  "The great teacher Hsuan-sha practiced arduously at Hsueh-feng's mountain hermitage, forgetting both food and sleep, but was unable to achieve a breakthrough of any kind. He left the Temple with tears in his eyes, yet Hsueh-feng did not utter a single word to help him. At this point, you can be sure that one of today's teachers would have burdened him with a copious load of warm shit. As it turned out, when Hsuan-sha reached the foot of the mountain, he tripped and fell, and experienced a sudden realization.n
  "It is like a melon grower harvesting his crop. He waits until their fragrance and flavor are at their peak before he goes into the melon patch. When he does, he has no need to carry a knife with him, only a bamboo basket. As the melons are fully ripe, the roots and tendrils and stems don't have to be cut; they have fallen away of themselves, leaving the fruit lying there on the ground. All he has to do is to go and pick them up.
  --
  
  "Hsiang-yen trained at his teacher Kuei-shan's Temple for many years without attaining even a glimpse of realization. Making up his mind to leave, he went to inform Kuei-shan with tears in his eyes. Kuei-shan was completely unsympathetic. He didn't even look at him. Hsiang-yen traveled around, and then took up residence in a solitary hermitage. One day as he was sweeping, his broom threw a fragment of tile against a bamboo trunk. When the sound it made reached his ears, all the barriers suddenly fell away. He bathed and put on a clean robe. Facing in the direction of the Kueishan's Temple, he offered some incense, performed three prostrations, and said, 'It is not my late
  31
  --
  
  Then one day he suddenly grabbed the master and hurried him to a secluded spot at the rear of the Temple. He seated the master on the ground, spread out his prostration cloth before him, and performed three bows. 'I appeal to your great mercy and compassion,' he said. 'Please teach me the principles of Zen. Guide me to sudden enlightenment.' The master ignored him, enraging the monk, who flew into a fit of passion, sprang to his feet and, eyes red with anger, broke off a large branch from a nearby tree. Brandishing it, he stood in front of the master glaring scornfully at him. 'Priest!' he cried. 'If you don't tell me what you know, I am going to club you to death, cast your body down the cliff, and leave this place for good.' 'If you want to beat me to death, go ahead,' replied the master. 'I'm not going to teach you any Zen.' What a pity. This monk was obviously gifted with special capacity and spiritual strength. He had what it takes to penetrate the truth and perish into the great death. But notice what great caution and infinite care these ancient teachers exercised when leading students to self-awakening.
  
  --
  
  Some find ways to attract large numbers of people to their Temples, believing to the end of their days that this is proof of a successful teaching career. Now it is true that compared to fellows of that stamp, students who reach satori thanks to teachings they hear, or arrive at cessation thanks to advice they receive from a teacher, are indeed wonderful occurrences-as rare as lotus flowers blossoming amid a raging fire. They owe the attainment they achieve to the large store of karmic merit they accumulated in previous existences. Attainment such as theirs is not easy to achieve, it is not insignificant, and it must be valued and deeply respected.
  
  --
  "Finally, there are students who come to believe in a teaching they hear, accepting it as true even though it has no more substance than a shadow, and cling fast to it until the day they die. These are the hoodwinked. They have been bamboozled by words, yet continue to follow them scrupulously. They have not penetrated the wondrous and perfect self-nature that exists within their own minds, nor do they understand that the true reality of all forms in the external world is no-form. They follow arbitrarily the movements of their own minds and perceptions, confounding them for manifestations of truth, picking up various plausible notions that they begin spouting to everyone they meet: 'It's like a precious mirror that reflects unerringly a Chinese or a foreigner in all their perfections and imperfections when they come before it. It's like a mani gem set out on a tray reflecting all shapes and all colors without a single trace remaining behind. Your own mind is like that intrinsically. There is no need to refine it. No need to attain it through practice.' Having no doubt that they themselves belong to the ranks of the genuine priests who have achieved final cessation, if they hear of someone engaging in secret training and hidden practice, they fall about clutching their bellies in paroxysms of laughter.v
  "Ahh! They are plausible, all too plausible. The trouble is, having not yet broken free of that indestructible adamantine cage, they wander ever deeper into a forest of thorn, acknowledging a thief as their own son. It is because of this that the great master Ch'ang-sha said, 'The reason practicers fail to attain the Way is because they confound the ordinary working of their minds for truth. Although that has been the source of birth and death from the beginning of time, the fools insist on calling it their "original self."' They are like Temple Supervisor Tse before he visited master Fa-yen, like
  Chen Tien-hsiung before his encounter with Huang-lung.5
  --
  
  Ishii became an important patron of the impoverished Temple, and later helped fund a number of
  Hakuin's building and publishing projects. Most of the half-dozen or so other letters that Hakuin wrote Ishii are expressions of gratitude for donations and gifts received, or services rendered. In one letter, Hakuin thanks Ishii for a large supply of cut tobacco that Ishii had sent to fuel Hakuin's wellknown pipe habit. A long verse Hakuin sent Ishii, one of the most remarkable pieces in the Poison
  --
  
  Attendant Boku's unspecified complaint may have been purely physical in nature, but it may also have been practice related, perhaps even a touch of the "Zen sickness" that had troubled Hakuin during his early years of training. The identity of this attendant monk is uncertain. The most logical candidate, Sui Genro (1717-89), Hakuin's successor at Shin-ji, who as a young monk used the name [E]Boku, has to be rejected, since Sui's study at Shin-ji did not begin until 1746, twelve years after this letter was written. The Hakuin specialist Rikugawa Taiun identified Boku as "a monk from western Japan who fell ill while training at Shin-ji and subsequently left the Temple" (Detailed
  Biography of Priest Hakuin, p. 252), but offered no details. An anonymous annotator inscribed another hypothesis in a copy of Poison Blossoms from a Thicket of Thorn: "Attendant Boku is not an actual person. The master seems to be using the name in an allegorical sense for a story on the oxherding theme" [Boku translates literally as "herder"]. Again, it would be entirely in character for
  --
  Buddha who manifested himself in the human world as a good teacher for eighty lifetimes in order to help others" (cited in Trei's Snake Legs for Kaien-fusetsu, 21v). k The head monk in Huang-po's assembly at this time is not identified in the standard accounts of this episode in Record of Lin-chi and Records of the Lamp. He is given as Chen Tsun-su (Mu-chou Taotsung, n.d.) in some other accounts. In none of the versions does he utter such words directly to Linchi. l A winged tiger would be even more formidable. m In the Record of Lin-chi account (also Blue Cliff Record, Case 11), the head monk in Huang-po's assembly tells Lin-chi to ask Huang-po about the essential meaning of the Buddha Dharma. He goes to
  Huang-po three times, each time receiving blows, and he decides to leave the Temple. The head monk tells Huang-po, "That young fellow who's been coming to you [Lin-chi] is a real Dharma vessel. If he comes and tells you he's going to leave, please use your expedient means in dealing with him. I'm sure that if he can continue to bore his way through, he will become a great tree that will provide cool shade to all the world." Huang-po suggests to Lin-chi that he might visit Ta-yu. At Ta-yu's Temple,
  Lin-chi explained why he had left Huang-po, adding that he wasn't sure whether he was at fault or not. Ta-yu said, "Huang-po spared no effort. He treated you with utmost tenderness and grandmotherly kindness. Why do you talk about fault and no fault?" Lin-chi suddenly experienced enlightenment, and said, "There's not much to Huang-po's Dharma." Lin-chi returned to Huang-po and related what had happened at Ta-yu's place. Huang-po said, "I'd like to get hold of that fellow and give him a good dose of my stick!" n "One day Hsuan-sha took up a traveling pouch and left his Temple to complete his training by visiting others teachers around the country. On the way down the mountain, he struck his toe hard on a rock. Blood appeared, but amid the intense pain he had an abrupt self-realization. 'This body does not exist. Where is the pain coming from?' he said, and promptly returned to Hsueh-feng" (Essentials of
  Successive Records of the Lamp, ch. 23). o This generally follows the account in Compendium of the Five Lamps, ch. 9. p Tao-wu Yuan-chih (769-835) and his student Chien-yuan went to pay their respects to someone who had passed away. Chien-yuan rapped on the coffin and said, "Living or dead?" Tao-wu replied,
  --
  
   replied Tao-wu. On their way back to the Temple, Chien-yuan said, "If you don't say it right this minute, I'm going to hit you." "Hit me if you like," said Tao-wu. "I won't say living, I won't say dead." Chien-yuan hit him. When they were back at the Temple, Tao-wu told Chien-yuan that the Temple supervisor would give him a beating if he found out what he had done, and suggested that he go away for a while. Chien-yuan left and studied under Master Shih-shuang, attaining a realization upon hearing him repeat the words, "I won't say, I won't say" (Records of the Lamp, ch. 15. Also
  Blue Cliff Record, Case 55). q These are some of the eighteen types of questions Zen students are said to ask their teachers. This is a formulation by Fen-yang (947-1024) in The Eye of Men and Gods. r Free up the cicada's wings . Although a similar expression is used in the Book of Latter Han to describe a lord showing great partiality to a favorite, here it refers to the statement made earlier about a teacher ruining a student's chances by stepping in to help the student prematurely. s Two of eight difficult places or situations (hachinan) in which it is difficult for people to encounter a Buddha, hear him preach the Dharma, and attain liberation: Uttarakuru, the continent to the north of
  --
  
  5. A monk named Hsuan-tse was Temple steward in the brotherhood of Zen Master Fa-yen Wen-i. The master said, "How long have you been here with me?" "It's been three years now," he replied. "As a member of the younger generation that is responsible for carrying on the transmission, why haven't you ever asked me about the Dharma?" "To tell the truth," Tse replied, "I already entered the Dharma realm of peace and comfort when I was studying with Zen Master Ch'ing-feng." "By what words did you attain that realm?" Fa-yen asked. Tse replied, "I once asked Ch'ing-feng, 'What is the self of a
  Buddhist monk?' He answered, 'Ping-ting t'ung-tzu [the fire god] comes for fire.'" "Those are fine words," said Fa-yen. "But you probably didn't understand them." Tse said, "I understand them to

1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The one reality which Patanjali speaks of in his sutra ekatattva abhyasah (I.32) can be interpreted to be any kind of object, for the matter of that, provided that there is no other object attracting our attention. Though, in a way, the universal is that which is inclusive of all particulars and, therefore, it may appear that to concentrate on the universal would be equivalent to concentrating on the background of every particular conceivable, nevertheless, the characteristic of the universal can be visualised even in a particular object. This is the significance of idol worship or the ritualistic adorations that we perform in Temples and in religious fields, generally speaking.
  
  --
  
  It is possible to concentrate the mind on an object merely on the surface level, though at the bottom there may be a feeling of irreconcilability. That will not lead to success. We may be praying to God through an image in a Temple, and yet have a suspicion in the mind that we are praying only to an idol made of stone. This suspicion will spoil all our devotion. "After all, I am praying to a small wooden image. How will this bring fulfilment of my wish or the satisfaction of my desires? I want to be a king, an emperor, and for that purpose I am praying to an idol which is unconscious, which cannot listen to anything that I say." This suspicion will shake the very foundation of devotion, and religion will become merely a pharisaical ritual.
  

1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  The world is a mirror of Infinite Beauty, yet no man sees it. It is a Temple of Majesty, yet no man regards it. It is a region of Light and Peace, did not men disquiet it. It is the Paradise of God. It is more to man since he is fallen than it was before. It is the place of Angels and the Gate of Heaven. When Jacob waked out of his dream, he said, God is here, and I wist it not. How dreadful is this place! This is none other than the House of God and the Gate of Heaven.
  
  --
  
  The corn was orient and immortal wheat, which never should be reaped, nor was ever sown. I thought it had stood from everlasting to everlasting. The dust and stones of the street were as precious as gold. The gates at first were the end of the world. The green trees, when I saw them first through one of the gates, transported and ravished me; their sweetness and unusual beauty made my heart to leap, and almost mad with ecstasy, they were such strange and wonderful things. The Men! O what venerable and reverend creatures did the aged seem! Immortal Cherubim! And young men glittering and sparkling angels, and maids strange seraphic pieces of life and beauty! Boys and girls tumbling in the street, and playing, were moving jewels. I knew not that they were born or should the. But all things abided eternally as they were in their proper places. Eternity was manifested in the light of the day, and something infinite behind everything appeared; which talked with my expectation and moved my desire. The city seemed to stand in Eden, or to be built in Heaven. The streets were mine, the Temple was mine, the people were mine, their clothes and gold and silver were mine, as much as their sparkling eyes, fair skins and ruddy faces. The skies were mine, and so were the sun and moon and stars, and all the world was mine; and I the only spectator and enjoyer of it. And so it was that with much ado I was corrupted and made to learn the dirty devices of the world. Which now I unlearn, and become as it were a little child again, that I may enter into the Kingdom of God.
  

1.04_-_The_33_seven_double_letters, #Sefer Yetzirah The Book of Creation In Theory and Practice, #Anonymous, #Various
  
  The seven double consonants are analogous to the six dimensions: height and depth, East and West, North and South, and the holy Temple that stands in the centre, which carries them all.
  

1.04_-_The_Paths, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  In India we see the sacred bull revered as typifying Shiva in his creative aspect ; also as glyphed in their Temples by an erect Lingam. Here, the Goddess of Marriage, and
  Hymen, the god carrying the nuptial veil, are also corres- pondences.

1.04_-_The_Qabalah_The_Best_Training_for_Memory, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  P.S. You should study the Equinox Vol. I, No. 5, "The Temple of Solomon the King" for a more elaborate exposition of the Qabalah.
  

1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  This, in short, is the demand made on us, that we should turn our whole life into a conscious sacrifice. Every moment and every movement of our being is to be resolved into a continuous and a devoted self-giving to the Eternal. All our actions, not less the smallest and most ordinary and trifling than the greatest and most uncommon and noble, must be performed as consecrated acts. Our individualised nature must live in the single consciousness of an inner and outer movement dedicated to Something that is beyond us and greater than our ego. No matter what the gift or to whom it is presented by us, there must be a consciousness in the act that we are presenting it to the one divine Being in all beings. Our commonest or most grossly material actions must assume this sublimated character; when we eat, we should be conscious that we are giving our food to that Presence in us; it must be a sacred offering in a Temple and the sense of a mere physical need or self-gratification must pass away from us. In any great labour, in any high discipline, in any difficult or noble enterprise, whether undertaken for ourselves, for others or for the race, it will no longer be possible to stop short at the idea of the race, of ourselves or of others. The thing we are doing must be consciously offered as a sacrifice of works, not to these, but either through them or directly to the
  One Godhead; the Divine Inhabitant who was hidden by these figures must be no longer hidden but ever present to our soul, our mind, our sense. The workings and results of our acts must be put in the hands of that One in the feeling that that Presence is the Infinite and Most High by whom alone our labour and our aspiration are possible. For in his being all takes place; for him all labour and aspiration are taken from us by Nature and offered on his altar. Even in those things in which Nature is herself very plainly the worker and we only the witnesses of her working and its containers and supporters, there should be the same constant memory and insistent consciousness of a work and of its divine Master. Our very inspiration and respiration, our very heart-beats can and must be made conscious in us as the living rhythm of the universal sacrifice.
  --
  
  Lastly, the practice of this Yoga of sacrifice compels us to renounce all the inner supports of egoism, casting them out of our mind and will and actions, and to eliminate its seed, its presence, its influence out of our nature. All must be done for the Divine; all must be directed towards the Divine. Nothing must be attempted for ourselves as a separate existence; nothing done for others, whether neighbours, friends, family, country or mankind or other creatures merely because they are connected with our personal life and thought and sentiment or because the ego takes a preferential interest in their welfare. In this way of doing and seeing all works and all life become only a daily dynamic worship and service of the Divine in the unbounded Temple of his own vast cosmic existence. Life becomes more and more the sacrifice of the eternal in the individual constantly selfoffered to the eternal Transcendence. It is offered in the wide sacrificial ground of the field of the eternal cosmic Spirit; and the Force too that offers it is the eternal Force, the omnipresent
  

1.04_-_To_the_Priest_of_Rytan-ji, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  
  This letter from Hakuin's mid-fifties shows him accepting an invitation from a Temple in neighboring
  Ttmi Province to lecture on a Chinese Zen text, Precious Lessons of the Zen School. He was in the middle of his second decade of teaching at Shin-ji, having two years before completed a highly successful meeting that had established his reputation as one of the foremost Zen teachers in the country, and had also attracted a large assembly of trainees to the Temple. Hakuin now seems more willing to accept requests from other Temples to conduct lecture meetings.
  
  --
  I break into a nervous sweat just thinking about it. And we are talking about Rytan-ji (Dragon-Pool
  Temple), one of the most celebrated Temples in all of Ttmi and Mikawa. Even gods and demons tremble in fear when they hear of the dragons lurking in that poisonous pool. The prospect is so terrifying it sets my knees to shaking. In any case, that is the reason I have delayed so long in sending you my answer. Accept my most profuse apologies.
  
  Some time ago Dait Osh made the long trip here to Shin-ji with Senior Monk Zents to convey the sentiments of the Temple priests in your area, including the abbot of Seiken-ji. They presented their case skillfully, with admirable powers of persuasion. They informed me of your feelings on the matter and of the enthusiastic support shown by other members of the monastic and lay community. It seems everyone is very eager for the talks to be held.
  
  --
  
  Rytan-ji was a large and important Rinzai Temple located at Iinoya village in Ttmi Province (now incorporated into the city of Ha-mamatsu in present-day Shizuoka Prefecture). It would have been about an eighty-mile trip west from Shin-ji in Hara village, traveling along the Tkaid Road. The
  Rytan-ji abbot at the time was Dokus Hun (n.d.), about whom little is known. Senior Monk Zents
  --
  
  Seiken-ji was a large Myshin-ji Temple in Okitsu on the coast west of Hara; Shin-ji was a small branch Temple under its jurisdiction.
  
  --
  Ttmi Province to lecture on Precious Lessons of the Zen School."
  But we learn from Trei's draft manuscript of the Chronological Biography that the meeting was actually held in autumn to commemorate the 650th anniversary of the Temple's founding, and that "a hundred monks accompanied Hakuin on the journey to Ttmi to take part in the meeting." Precious
  Lessons of the Zen School is a late twelfth-century work Hakuin frequently used as a text for lectures.

1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  A daily recitation with the understanding of the meaning of such hymns as the Purusha Sukta from the Veda, for instance, is a great svadhyaya, as Vachaspati Mishra, the commentator on the Yoga Sutras, mentions. Also, the Satarudriya which we chant daily in the Temple without perhaps knowing its meaning is a great meditation if it is properly understood and recited with a proper devout attitude of mind. Vachaspati Mishra specifically refers to two great hymns of the Veda the Purusha Sukta and the Satarudriya which he says are highly purifying, not only from the point of view of their being conducive to meditation or concentration of mind, but also in other purifying processes which will take place in the body and the whole system due to the chanting of these mantras. These Veda mantras are immense potencies, like atom bombs, and to handle them and to energise the system with their forces is a spiritual practice by itself. This is one suggestion.
  

1.05_-_Bhakti_Yoga, #Amrita Gita, #Swami Sivananda Saraswati, #Hinduism
  
  24. Consider your house as a Temple of the Lord, every action as service of Lord, the light that you burn as waving lights to the Lord, every word you speak as the Japa of the Lords Name, your daily walk as perambulation to the Lord. This is an easy way of worship of the Lord.
  

1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  also brought with her a statue of Akshobya Buddha,
  and it is kept in another Temple of Lhassa, the
  Ramoche.
  Both of them had many Temples built and strongly
  supported the development of buddhism.

1.05_-_CHARITY, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  By a kind of philological accident (which is probably no accident at all, but one of the more subtle expressions of mans deep-seated will to ignorance and spiritual darkness), the word charity has come, in modern English, to be synonymous with almsgiving, and is almost never used in its original sense, as signifying the highest and most divine form of love. Owing to this impoverishment of our, at the best of times, very inadequate vocabulary of psychological and spiritual terms, the word love has had to assume an added burden. God is love, we repeat glibly, and that we must love our neighbours as ourselves; but love, unfortunately, stands for everything from what happens when, on the screen, two close-ups rapturously collide to what happens when a John Woolman or a Peter Claver feels a concern about Negro slaves, because they are Temples of the Holy Spiritfrom what happens when crowds shout and sing and wave flags in the Sport-Palast or the Red Square to what happens when a solitary contemplative becomes absorbed in the prayer of simple regard. Ambiguity in vocabulary leads to confusion of thought; and, in this matter of love, confusion of thought admirably serves the purpose of an unregenerate and divided human nature that is determined to make the best of both worldsto say that it is serving God, while in fact it is serving Mammon, Mars or Priapus.
  
  Systematically or in brief aphorism and parable, the masters of the spiritual life have described the nature of true charity and have distinguished it from the other, lower forms of love. Let us consider its principal characteristics in order. First, charity is disinterested, seeking no reward, nor allowing itself to be diminished by any return of evil for its good. God is to be loved for Himself, not for his gifts, and persons and things are to be loved for Gods sake, because they are Temples of the Holy Ghost. Moreover, since charity is disinterested, it must of necessity be universal.
  

1.05_-_Hsueh_Feng's_Grain_of_Rice, #The Blue Cliff Records, #Yuanwu Keqin, #Zen
  Do not let there be any dust.
  Hui Neng, however, then a workman in the Temple, composed
  the following verse:

1.05_-_The_Belly_of_the_Whale, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  world, the hero goes inward, to be born again. The disappear
  ance corresponds to the passing of a worshiper into a Temple
  where he is to be quickened by the recollection of who and what
  he is, namely dust and ashes unless immortal. The Temple inte
  rior, the belly of the whale, and the heavenly land beyond,
  above, and below the confines of the world, are one and the same.
  That is why the approaches and entrances to Temples are flanked
  and defended by colossal gargoyles: dragons, lions, devil-slayers
  --
  the two rows of teeth of the whale. They illustrate the fact that the
  devotee at the moment of entry into a Temple undergoes a meta
  morphosis. His secular character remains without; he sheds it,
  --
  Earthly Paradise. The mere fact that anyone can physically walk
  past the Temple guardians does not invalidate their significance;
  for if the intruder is incapable of encompassing the sanctuary,
  --
  derstand a god sees it as a devil and is thus defended from the
  approach. Allegorically, then, the passage into a Temple and the
  hero-dive through the jaws of the whale are identical adven
  --
  bathed in a tank, with great ceremonies and to the sound of
  music, he then came to the Temple, where he did worship before
  the divinity. Thereafter, he mounted the scaffolding and, before

1.06_-_On_Work, #The Prophet, #Kahlil Gibran, #Poetry
  
  And if you cannot work with love but only with distaste, it is better that you should leave your work and sit at the gate of the Temple and take alms of those who work with joy.
  

1.06_-_Psychic_Education, #On Education, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  The child should be taught that whenever there is an inner uneasiness, he should not pass it off and try to forget it, but should attend to it and try to find out by an inner observation the cause of the uneasiness so that it may be removed by some methods, inner or outer.
  When the psychic being begins to be discovered, we find that it burns in the Temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of the ignorant mind, life and body. As Sri Aurobindo points out:
  "The veiled psychic is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature... It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic... It is the individual soul, caitya purusa, supporting mind, life and body, standing behind the mental, the vital, the subtle-physical being in us and watching and profiting by their development and experience... It is this secret psychic entity which is the true original Conscience in us deeper than the constructed and conventional conscience of the moralist, for it is this which points always towards Truth and Right and Beauty, towards Love and Harmony and all that is a divine possibility in us, and persists till these things become the major need of our nature... If the secret psychic person can come forward into the front... the whole nature can be turned towards the real aim of life, the supreme victory, the ascent into spiritual existence."2

1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  Worship (far more than mere Phallieism) in all countries of all ages which ever has been the problem to archaeologists.
  The word Naga, too, or Naja is discovered, so I am informed, on some of the cuneiform tablets in the ancient Temples of
  Egypt where Osiris, the Sun-God was hailed when arising from the primordial deep. The Neophyte, during his initiation, when he was Osirified and plunged into a deep trance enduring for three days, was crowned with glory when the sun's rays would illumine the cross to which he had been secured, and given a head-dress marked by a

1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  follows the astronomical configuration and is therefore natural-
  istic. 76 The zodiac from the Temple of Hathor at Denderah (ist
  cent, b.c.) shows the fishes, but they both face the same way. The

1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  guides in the way that the Three Jewels are. In Singapore, where I lived for a
  while, there were Temples where people would go into trances and channel
  spirits who would then give advice and tell fortunes. This is commonly
  --
  benet living beings in whatever way they can.
  Bodhisattvas guide us in a variety of ways. Sometimes they do so in formal situations such as a Dharma teaching at a Temple or Dharma center.
  Sometimes they teach by informal contactthrough casual conversations

1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine, #Sex Ecology Spirituality, #Ken Wilber, #Philosophy
  The observer in you, the Witness in you, transcends the isolated person in you and opens instead-from within or from behind, as Emerson said-onto a vast expanse of awareness no longer obsessed with the individual bodymind, no longer a respecter or abuser of persons, no longer fascinated by the passing joys and set-apart sorrows of the lonely self, but standing still in silence as an opening or clearing through which light shines, not from the world but into it-"a light shines through us upon things." That which observes or witnesses the self, the person, is precisely to that degree free of the self, the person, and through that opening comes pouring the light and power of a Self, a Soul, that, as Emerson puts it, "would make our knees bend."
  :::A man is the facade of a Temple wherein all wisdom and all good abide. What we commonly call man [as an "individual person" or ego], the eating, drinking, counting man, does not, as we know him, represent himself, but misrepresents himself. Him we do not respect, but the soul, whose organ he is, if he would let it appear through his action, would make our knees bend. When it breathes through his intellect, it is genius; when it breathes through his will, it is virtue; when it flows through his affection, it is love. And the blindness of the intellect begins when it would be something of itself [be its "own person"]. The weakness of the will begins when the individual would be something of himself. All reform aims in some one particular to let the soul have its way through us. . . .3
  And those persons through whom the soul shines, through whom the "soul has its way," are not therefore weak characters, timid personalities, meek presences among us. They are personal plus, not personal minus. Precisely because they are no longer exclusively identified with the individual personality, and yet because they still preserve the personality, then through that personality flows the force and fire of the soul. They may be soft-spoken and often remain in silence, but it is a thunderous silence that veritably drowns out the egos chattering loudly all around them. Or they may be animated and very outgoing, but their dynamism is magnetic, and people are drawn somehow to the presence, fascinated. Make no mistake: these are strong characters, these souls, sometimes wildly exaggerated characters, sometimes world-historical, precisely because their personalities are plugged into a universal source that rumbles through their veins and rudely rattles those around them.
  --
  :::For the sense of being which in calm hour arises, we know not how, in the Soul, is not diverse from things, from space, from light, from time, from man, but one with them and proceeds obviously from the same source whence their life and being also proceed. . . . Here is the fountain of action and of thought. Here are the lungs of that inspiration which giveth man wisdom. . . . We lie in the lap of immense intelligence, which makes us receivers of its truth and organs of its activity. When we discern justice, when we discern truth, we do nothing of ourselves, but allow a passage to its beams. . . .
  :::The relations of the Soul to the divine spirit are so pure that it is profane to seek to interpose helps. It must be that when God speaketh he should communicate, not one thing, but all things; should fill the world with his voice; should scatter forth light, nature, time, souls, from the center of the present thought; and new date and new create the whole. Whenever a mind is simple and receives a divine wisdom, old things pass away-means, teachers, texts, Temples fall; it lives now and absorbs past and future into the present hour. All things are made sacred by relation to it-one as much as another. All things are dissolved to their center by their cause, and in the universal miracle petty and particular miracles disappear.
  :::If therefore a man claims to know and speak of God and carries you backward to the phraseology of some old mouldered nation in another country, in another world, believe him not. Is the acorn better than the oak which is its fullness and completion? Whence then this worship of the past? The centuries are conspirators against the sanity and authority of the Soul. Time and space are but physiological colors which the eye makes, but the Soul is light: where it is, is day; where it was, is night; and history is an impertinence and an injury if it be any thing more than a cheerful apologue or parable of my being and becoming.5

1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  in gold. They carry this carved image seven times round the middle
  of the Temple precincts, to the sound of flutes and tambourines and
  hymns, and after the procession they carry it down again into the
  --
  explained that her son had been born at an evil hour, just when
  the Temple was destroyed. Elias admonished her to look after the
  child. When he came back again five weeks later, he asked about

1.08_-_The_Ladder, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  In a Temple which typifies the universe as he is aware of it, he draws a circle to announce the nature of his operation.
  
  --
  Upon this altar are arrayed his Wand, Sword, Cup, and
  Pantacle. The Wand is the terrestrial symbol of his God- like Will, Wisdom, and Creative Word, his divine force - just as the Sword is his human force, the sharp analytical faculty of the Ruach. It is the mind which is his mechanism for dealing symbolically with impressions, and his capacity for criticism. The Cup is his Understanding, the passive aspect of his Will ; it links him with That which is beyond, on the negative side, being hollow and receptive of the influence descending from on high. The Pantacle is flat, the Temple of his Holy Ghost ; of the earth earthy, it is his lower nature, his body. On the altar is a phial of Oil, his aspiration towards a nobler self, towards a higher reality, consecrating him and all it touches to the performance of the
  Great Work. Three other weapons surround the oil, the
  --
  
  Temple, circle,
  
  The Temple of the Holy Ghost
  

1.08_-_Worship_of_Substitutes_and_Images, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  The same ideas apply to the worship of the Pratimas as to that of the Pratikas; that is to say, if the image stands for a god or a saint, the worship is not the result of Bhakti, and does not lead lo liberation; but if it stands for the one God, the worship thereof will bring both Bhakti and Mukti. Of the principal religions of the world we see Vedantism, Buddhism, and certain forms of Christianity freely using images; only two religions, Mohammedanism and Protestantism, refuse such help. Yet the Mohammedans use the grave of their saints and martyrs almost in the place of images; and the Protestants, in rejecting all concrete helps to religion, are drifting away every year farther and farther from spirituality till at present there is scarcely any difference between the advanced Protestants and the followers of August Comte, or agnostics who preach ethics alone. Again, in Christianity and Mohammedanism whatever exists of image worship is made to fall under that category in which the Pratika or the Pratima is worshipped in itself, but not as a "help to the vision" (Drishtisaukaryam) of God; therefore it is at best only of the nature of ritualistic Karmas and cannot produce either Bhakti or Mukti. In this form of image-worship, the allegiance of the soul is given to other things than Ishvara, and, therefore, such use of images, or graves, or Temples, or tombs, is real idolatry; it is in itself neither sinful nor wicked it is a rite a Karma, and worshippers must and will get the fruit thereof.
  

1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  connections with the Syrophoenician fish cult of Atargatis. Her
  Temples had pools with sacred fishes in them which no one was
  allowed to touch. 14 Similarly, meals of fish were ritually eaten
  in the Temples. "This cult and these customs, which originated
  in Syria, may well have engendered the Ichthys symbolism in
  --
  (purgatory and the entrance to the Anu-heaven). Hence the
  northern corner of the Temple built around the tower at Nippur
  was called the kibla (point of orientation). In like manner the

1.09_-_The_Furies_and_Medusa._The_Angel._The_City_of_Dis._The_Sixth_Circle_Heresiarchs., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  Small serpents and cerastes were their tresses,
  Wherewith their horrid Temples were entwined.
  And he who well the handmaids of the Queen

1.09_-_The_Secret_Chiefs, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  Accordingly, it stands to reason that those charged with the conduct of the Order should be at least Masters of the Temple, or their judgment would be worthless, and at least Magi (though not that particular kind of Magus who brings the Word of a New Formula to the world every 2,000 years of so) or they would be unable to influence events on any scale commensurate with the scope of the Work.
  

11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day_The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And etched the borders of heaven's lustrous noon
  Climbed like piled Temple stairs and from their heads
  Of topless meditation heard below
  --
  An immobile centre of many infinitudes
  In his thousand-pillared Temple by Time's sea.
  

1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  Now we shall understand the aphorism that the states of the qualities are defined, undefined, indicated only, and signess. By the "defined" are meant the gross elements, which we can sense. By the "undefined" are meant the very fine materials, the Tanmatras, which cannot be sensed by ordinary men. If you practise Yoga, however, says Patanjali, after a while your perceptions will become so fine that you will actually see the Tanmatras. For instance, you have heard how every man has a certain light about him; every living being emits a certain light, and this, he says, can be seen by the Yogi. We do not all see it, but we all throw out these Tanmatras, just as a flower continuously sends out fine particles which enable us to smell it. Every day of our lives we throw out a mass of good or evil, and everywhere we go the atmosphere is full of these materials. That is how there came to the human mind, unconsciously, the idea of building Temples and churches. Why should man build churches in which to worship God? Why not worship Him anywhere? Even if he did not know the reason, man found that the place where people worshipped God became full of good Tanmatras. Every day people go there, and the more they go the holier they get, and the holier that place becomes. If any man who has not much Sattva in him goes there, the place will influence him and arouse his Sattva quality. Here, therefore, is the significance of all Temples and holy places, but you must remember that their holiness depends on holy people congregating there. The difficulty with man is that he forgets the original meaning, and puts the cart before the horse. It was men who made these places holy, and then the effect became the cause and made men holy. If the wicked only were to go there, it would become as bad as any other place. It is not the building, but the people that make a church, and that is what we always forget. That is why sages and holy persons, who have much of this Sattva quality, can send it out and exert a tremendous influence day and night on their surroundings. A man may become so pure that his purity will become tangible. Whosoever comes in contact with him becomes pure.
  
  --
  
  According to Yoga philosophy, it is through ignorance that the soul has been joined with nature. The aim is to get rid of nature's control over us. That is the goal of all religions. Each soul is potentially divine. The goal is to manifest this Divinity within, by controlling nature, external and internal. Do this either by work, or worship, or psychic control, or philosophy by one or more or all of these and be free. This is the whole of religion. Doctrines, or dogmas, or rituals, or books, or Temples, or forms, are but secondary details. The Yogi tries to reach this goal through psychic control. Until we can free ourselves from nature, we are slaves; as she dictates so we must go. The Yogi claims that he who controls mind controls matter also. The internal nature is much higher than the external and much more difficult to grapple with, much more difficult to control. Therefore he who has conquered the internal nature controls the whole universe; it becomes his servant. Raja-Yoga propounds the methods of gaining this control. Forces higher than we know in physical nature will have to be subdued. This body is just the external crust of the mind. They are not two different things; they are just as the oyster and its shell. They are but two aspects of one thing; the internal substance of the oyster takes up matter from outside, and manufactures the shell. In the same way the internal fine forces which are called mind take up gross matter from outside, and from that manufacture this external shell, the body. If, then, we have control of the internal, it is very easy to have control of the external. Then again, these forces are not different. It is not that some forces are physical, and some mental; the physical forces are but the gross manifestations of the fine forces, just as the physical world is but the gross manifestation of the fine world.
  

1.10_-_Farinata_and_Cavalcante_de'_Cavalcanti._Discourse_on_the_Knowledge_of_the_Damned., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  Which have with crimson stained the Arbia, cause
  Such orisons in our Temple to be made."
  After his head he with a sigh had shaken,

1.11_-_Higher_Laws, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  Every man is the builder of a Temple, called his body, to the god he worships, after a style purely his own, nor can he get off by hammering marble instead. We are all sculptors and painters, and our material is our own flesh and blood and bones. Any nobleness begins at once to refine a mans features, any meanness or sensuality to imbrute them.
  

1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_.The_Black_Brothers., #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  Every accretion must modify me. I want it to do so. I want to assimilate it absolutely. I want to make it a permanent feature of my Temple. I am not afraid of losing myself to it, if only because it also is modified by myself in the act of union. I am not afraid of its being the "wrong" thing, because every experience is a "play of Nuit," and the worst that can happen is a temporary loss of balance, which is instantly adjusted, as soon as it is noticed, by recalling and putting into action the formula of contradiction.
  
  --
  
    The egg of the spirit is a basilisk egg, and the gates of the understanding are fifty, that is the sign of the Scorpion. The pillars about the Neophyte are crowned with flame, and the vault of the Adepts is lighted by the Rose. And in the abyss is the eye of the hawk. But upon the great sea shall the Master of the Temple find neither star nor moon.
  
  --
  
    And the Angel sayeth: Verily is the Pyramid a Temple of Initiation. Verily also is it a tomb. Thinkest thou that there is life within the Masters of the Temple that sit hooded, encamped upon the Sea? Verily, there is no life in them.
  
  --
  
  Thus for the Masters of the Temple; for the Black Brothers, how?
  

1.12_-_The_Superconscient, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  Constantly and unknowingly, we receive influences and inspirations from these higher, superconscious regions, which express themselves inside us as ideas, ideals, aspirations, or works of art; they secretly mold our life, our future. Similarly, we constantly and unknowingly receive vital and subtle-physical vibrations, which determine our emotional life and relationship with the world every moment of the day. We are enclosed in an individual, personal body only through a stubborn visual delusion; in fact, we are porous throughout and bathe in universal forces, like an anemone in the sea: Man twitters intellectually (=foolishly) about the surface results and attributes them all to his "noble self," ignoring the fact that his noble self is hidden far away from his own vision behind the veil of his dimly sparkling intellect and the reeking fog of his vital feelings, emotions, impulses, sensations and impressions.183 Our sole freedom is to lift ourselves to higher planes through individual evolution. Our only role is to transcribe and materially embody the truths of the plane we belong to. Two important points, which apply to every plane of consciousness, from the highest to the lowest, deserve to be underscored in order for us better to understand the mechanism of the universe. First, these planes do not depend upon us or upon what we think of them any more than the sea depends on the anemone; they exist independently of man. Modern psychology, for which all the levels of being are mixed together in a so-called collective unconscious, like some big magician's hat from which to draw archetypes and neuroses at random, betrays in this respect a serious lack of vision: first, because the forces of these planes are not at all unconscious (except to us), but very conscious, definitely more so than we are; and secondly, because these forces are not "collective," in the sense that they are no more a human product than the sea is the product of the anemone; it is rather the frontal man who is the product of that Immensity behind. The gradations of consciousness are universal states not dependent on the outlook of the subjective personality; rather the outlook of the subjective personality is determined by the grade of consciousness in which it is organized according to its typal nature or its evolutionary stage.184 Naturally, it is only human to reverse the order of things and put ourselves in the center of the world. But this is not a matter of theory, always debatable, but of experience, which everyone can have. If we go out of our body and consciously enter these planes, we realize that they exist outside us, just as the entire world exists outside Manhattan, with forces and beings and even places that have nothing in common with our earthly world; entire civilizations have attested to this, stating it, engraving it, or painting it on their walls or in their Temples, civilizations that were perhaps less ingenious than ours, but certainly not less intelligent.
  
  --
  
  If we are religious-minded, perhaps we will see the gods who inhabit this world. Beings, forces, sounds, lights, and rhythms are just so many true forms of the same indefinable, but not unknowable, Essence we call "God"; we have spoken of God, and made Temples, laws or poems to try to capture the one little pulsation filling us with sunshine, but it is free as the wind on foam-flecked shores. We may also enter the world of music, which in fact is not different from the others but a special extension of this same, great inexpressible Vibration. If once, only once, even for a few moments in a lifetime, we can hear that Music, that Joy singing above, we will know what Beethoven and Bach heard; we will know what God is because we will have heard God. We will probably not say anything grandiose; we will just know that That exists, whereupon all the suffering in the world will seem redeemed.
  

1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  131 When I visited the ancient pagoda at Turukalukundram, southern India, a
  local pundit explained to me that the old Temples were purposely covered on the
  outside, from top to bottom, with obscene sculptures, in order to remind ordi-
  --
  the spiritual path. The obscenities were intended to arouse the erotic curiosity of
  visitors to the Temples, so that they should not forget their dharma; otherwise
  they would not fulfil it. Only the man who was qualified by his karma (the fate
  --
  ties mean nothing. That was also why the two seductresses stood at the entrance
  of the Temple, luring the people to fulfil their dharma, because only in this way
  could the ordinary man attain to higher spiritual development. And since the
  Temple represented the whole world, all human activities were portrayed in it;
  and because most people are always thinking of sex anyway, the great majority
  of the Temple sculptures were of an erotic nature. For this reason too, he said,
  the lingam (phallus) stands in the sacred cavity of the adyton (Holy of Holies), in

1.15_-_Index, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  Hartmann, E. von, 6
  Hathor, Temple of, 91
  heaven(s), 155; in Ascension of

1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  E SEE that the mystery of the divine Incarnation in man, the assumption by the Godhead of the human type and the human nature, is in the view of the Gita only the other side of the eternal mystery of human birth itself which is always in its essence, though not in its phenomenal appearance, even such a miraculous assumption. The eternal and universal self of every human being is God; even his personal self is a part of the Godhead, mamaivamsah., - not a fraction or fragment, surely, since we cannot think of God as broken up into little pieces, but a partial consciousness of the one Consciousness, a partial power of the one Power, a partial enjoyment of world-being by the one and universal Delight of being, and therefore in manifestation or, as we say, in Nature a limited and finite being of the one infinite and illimitable Being. The stamp of that limitation is an ignorance by which he forgets, not only the Godhead from which he came forth, but the Godhead which is always within him, there living in the secret heart of his own nature, there burning like a veiled Fire on the inner altar in his own Temple-house of human consciousness.
  

1.17_-_Astral_Journey_Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  I certainly have no intention of "holding you down" to "a narrow path of work" or any path. All I can do is to help you to understand clearly the laws of your own nature, so that you may go ahead without extraneous influence. It does not follow that a plan that I have found successful in my own case will be any use to you. That is another cardinal mistake of most teachers. One must have become a Master of the Temple to annihilate one's ego. Most teachers, consciously or unconsciously, try to get others to follow in their steps. I might as well dress you up in my castoff clothing! (In the steps of the Master. At the feet of the Master. Steward!)
  
  --
  
  Naturally one cannot realize this until one becomes a Master of the Temple; consequently one is perpetually plunged in sorrow and despair. There is, you see, a good deal more to it than merely learning one's mistakes. One can never be sure what is right and what is wrong, until one appreciates that "wrong" is equally "right." Now then one gets rid of the idea of "effort" which is associated with "lust of result." All that one does is to exercise pleasantly and healthfully one's energies.
  

1.17_-_On_Teaching, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The teacher who walks in the shadow of the Temple, among his followers, gives not of his wisdom but rather of his faith and his lovingness.
  

1.17_-_Practical_rules_for_the_Tragic_Poet., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Philosophy
  
  In constructing the plot and working it out with the proper diction, the poet should place the scene, as far as possible, before his eyes. In this way, seeing everything with the utmost vividness, as if he were a spectator of the action, he will discover what is in keeping with it, and be most unlikely to overlook inconsistencies. The need of such a rule is shown by the fault found in Carcinus. Amphiaraus was on his way from the Temple. This fact escaped the observation of one who did not see the situation. On the stage, however, the piece failed, the audience being offended at the oversight.
  

1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  Archbishop Temple
  

1.200-1.224_Talks, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
  Maharshi observed: Pradakshina (the Hindu rite of going round the object of worship) is All is within me. The true significance of the act of going round Arunachala is said to be as effective as circuit round the world. That means that the whole world is condensed into this Hill.
  The circuit round the Temple of Arunachala is equally good; and selfcircuit (i.e., turning round and round) is as good as the last. So all are contained in the Self. Says the Ribhu Gita: I remain fixed, whereas innumerable universes becoming concepts within my mind, rotate within me. This meditation is the highest circuit (pradakshina).
  

12.01_-_The_Return_to_Earth, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Rapture's possession, love's sweet property,
  A statue of silence in my Templed spirit,
  A yearning godhead and a golden bride.

1.22_-_On_Prayer, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Therefore let your visit to that Temple invisible be for naught but ecstasy and sweet communion.
  
  
  For if you should enter the Temple for no other purpose than asking you shall not receive:
  
  --
  
  It is enough that you enter the Temple invisible.
  

1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  object:1.23 - Improvising a Temple
  class:chapter
  --
  LETTER 23
  Improvising a Temple
  
  --
  
  If you propose to erect a regular Temple, the most precise instructions in every detail are given in Book 4, Part II. (But I haven't so much as seen a copy for years!) There is a good deal scattered about in Part III (Magick, which you have) especially about the four elemental weapons.
  

1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  9:In the view of old philosophies pleasure and pain are inseparable like intellectual truth and falsehood and power and incapacity and birth and death; therefore the only possible escape from them would be a total indifference, a blank response to the excitations of the world-self. But a subtler psychological knowledge shows us that this view which is based on the surface facts of existence only, does not really exhaust the possibilities of the problem. It is possible by bringing the real soul to the surface to replace the egoistic standards of pleasure and pain by an equal, an all-embracing personal-impersonal delight. The lover of Nature does this when he takes joy in all the things of Nature universally without admitting repulsion or fear or mere liking and disliking, perceiving beauty in that which seems to others mean and insignificant, bare and savage, terrible and repellent. The artist and the poet do it when they seek the rasa of the universal from the aesthetic emotion or from the physical line or from the mental form of beauty or from the inner sense and power alike of that from which the ordinary man turns away and of that to which he is attached by a sense of pleasure. The seeker of knowledge, the God-lover who finds the object of his love everywhere, the spiritual man, the intellectual, the sensuous, the aesthetic all do this in their own fashion and must do it if they would find embracingly the Knowledge, the Beauty, the Joy or the Divinity which they seek. It is only in the parts where the little ego is usually too strong for us, it is only in our emotional or physical joy and suffering, our pleasure and pain of life, before which the desire-soul in us is utterly weak and cowardly, that the application of the divine principle becomes supremely difficult and seems to many impossible or even monstrous and repellent. Here the ignorance of the ego shrinks from the principle of impersonality which it yet applies without too much difficulty in Science, in Art and even in a certain kind of imperfect spiritual living because there the rule of impersonality does not attack those desires cherished by the surface soul and those values of desire fixed by the surface mind in which our outward life is most vitally interested. In the freer and higher movements there is demanded of us only a limited and specialised equality and impersonality proper to a particular field of consciousness and activity while the egoistic basis of our practical life remains to us; in the lower movements the whole foundation of our life has to be changed in order to make room for impersonality, and this the desire-soul finds impossible.
  10:The true soul secret in us - subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the Temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, - this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine. Not the unborn Self or Atman, for the Self even in presiding over the existence of the individual is aware always of its universality and transcendence, it is yet its deputy in the forms of Nature, the individual soul, caitya purus.a, supporting mind, life and body, standing behind the mental, the vital, the subtle-physical being in us and watching and profiting by their development and experience. These other person-powers in man, these beings of his being, are also veiled in their true entity, but they put forward temporary personalities which compose our outer individuality and whose combined superficial action and appearance of status we call ourselves: this inmost entity also, taking form in us as the psychic Person, puts forward a psychic personality which changes, grows, develops from life to life; for this is the traveller between birth and death and between death and birth, our nature parts are only its manifold and changing vesture. The psychic being can at first exercise only a concealed and partial and indirect action through the mind, the life and the body, since it is these parts of Nature that have to be developed as its instruments of self-expression, and it is long confined by their evolution. Missioned to lead man in the Ignorance towards the light of the Divine Consciousness, it takes the essence of all experience in the Ignorance to form a nucleus of soul-growth in the nature; the rest it turns into material for the future growth of the instruments which it has to use until they are ready to be a luminous instrumentation of the Divine. It is this secret psychic entity which is the true original Conscience in us deeper than the constructed and conventional conscience of the moralist, for it is this which points always towards Truth and Right and Beauty, towards Love and Harmony and all that is a divine possibility in us, and persists till these things become the major need of our nature. It is the psychic personality in us that flowers as the saint, the sage, the seer; when it reaches its full strength, it turns the being towards the Knowledge of Self and the Divine, towards the supreme Truth, the supreme Good, the supreme Beauty, Love and Bliss, the divine heights and largenesses, and opens us to the touch of spiritual sympathy, universality, oneness. On the contrary, where the psychic personality is weak, crude or ill-developed, the finer parts and movements in us are lacking or poor in character and power, even though the mind may be forceful and brilliant, the heart of vital emotions hard and strong and masterful, the life-force dominant and successful, the bodily existence rich and fortunate and an apparent lord and victor. It is then the outer desire-soul, the pseudo-psychic entity, that reigns and we mistake its misinterpretations of psychic suggestion and aspiration, its ideas and ideals, its desires and yearnings for true soul-stuff and wealth of spiritual experience.7 If the secret psychic Person can come forward into the front and, replacing the desire-soul, govern overtly and entirely and not only partially and from behind the veil this outer nature of mind, life and body, then these can be cast into soul images of what is true, right and beautiful and in the end the whole nature can be turned towards the real aim of life, the supreme victory, the ascent into spiritual existence.
  11:But it might seem then that by bringing this psychic entity, this true soul in us, into the front and giving it there the lead and rule we shall gain all the fulfilment of our natural being that we can seek for and open also the gates of the kingdom of the Spirit. And it might well be reasoned that there is no need for any intervention of a superior Truth-Consciousness or principle of Supermind to help us to attain to the divine status or the divine perfection. Yet, although the psychic transformation is one necessary condition of the total transformation of our existence, it is not all that is needed for the largest spiritual change. In the first place, since this is the individual soul in Nature, it can open to the hidden diviner ranges of our being and receive and reflect their light and power and experience, but another, a spiritual transformation from above is needed for us to possess our self in its universality and transcendence. By itself the psychic being at a certain stage might be content to create a formation of truth, good and beauty and make that its station; at a farther stage it might become passively subject to the worldself, a mirror of the universal existence, consciousness, power, delight, but not their full participant or possessor. Although more nearly and thrillingly united to the cosmic consciousness in knowledge, emotion and even appreciation through the senses, it might become purely recipient and passive, remote from mastery and action in the world; or, one with the static self behind the cosmos, but separate inwardly from the world-movement, losing its individuality in its Source, it might return to that Source and have neither the will nor the power any further for that which was its ultimate mission here, to lead the nature also towards its divine realisation. For the psychic being came into Nature from the Self, the Divine, and it can turn back from Nature to the silent Divine through the silence of the Self and a supreme spiritual immobility. Again, an eternal portion of the Divine,8 this part is by the law of the Infinite inseparable from its Divine Whole, this part is indeed itself that Whole, except in its frontal appearance, its frontal separative self-experience; it may awaken to that reality and plunge into it to the apparent extinction or at least the merging of the individual existence. A small nucleus here in the mass of our ignorant Nature, so that it is described in the Upanishad as no bigger than a man's thumb, it can by the spiritual influx enlarge itself and embrace the whole world with the heart and mind in an intimate communion or oneness. Or it may become aware of its eternal Companion and elect to live for ever in His presence, in an imperishable union and oneness as the eternal lover with the eternal Beloved, which of all spiritual experiences is the most intense in beauty and rapture. All these are great and splendid achievements of our spiritual self-finding, but they are not necessarily the last end and entire consummation; more is possible.

1.240_-_1.300_Talks, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
  
  Q.: How did you approve the building of Skandasramam on the Hill which was Temple-land, without previously obtaining permission from the authorities?
  M.: Guided by the same Power which made me come here and reside on the Hill.

1.240_-_Talks_2, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  I say to them? I do not call myself a disciple or a Guru.
  Q.: How did you approve the building of Skandasramam on the Hill which was Temple-land, without previously obtaining permission from the authorities?
  M.: Guided by the same Power which made me come here and reside on the Hill.
  --
  Sri Bhagavan said: The Non-self is untouchable. The social untouchability is man-made, whereas the other untouchability is natural and divine.
  D.: Should the untouchables be allowed into our Temples?
  M.: There are others to decide it.
  --
  (3) Sri Bhagavan says that the peacock, as soon as it sights a green lizard, goes straight to it and meekly places its neck down before the lizard which bites it off and kills the peacock.
  (4) Rangaswami Iyengar was once out on the hill. A leopard was nearby. He threw a stone. It turned towards him. He hurried away for his life. Sri Bhagavan met him on the way and asked what the matter was. Iyengar simply said leopard as he was running. Sri Bhagavan went where the beast was and it moved away soon after. All this happened at the time of the plague. Leopards used to roam freely by the side of the Temple, sometimes in twos and threes.
  (5) Sri Bhagavan said, A frog is often compared to a yogi. It remains quiet for a long time, the only sign of life being the rhythmic movement of the under-skin below the neck.
  --
  Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi island. Sri Bhagavan emphasised the point that the mental approach accomplishes the purpose earlier than physical action.
  (7) Sri Bhagavan related the following funny anecdote; Ezhuthachan, a great Malayali saint and author, had a few fish concealed in him when he entered the Temple. Some enemy reported it to the worshippers in the Temple. The man was searched and taken to the king. The king asked him Why did you take the fish into the Temple? He replied: It is not my fault. I had it concealed in my clothes. The others exposed the fish in the Temple. The fault lies in exposure. Excreta within the body are not considered filthy; but when excreted, they are considered filthy. So also with this.
  
  --
  Again, there was a dialogue between Siva and Parvati in Kailas.
  Siva said that Allama was one who would not be affected by Her blandishments. Parvati wanted to try it and so sent Her tamasic quality to incarnate as a kings daughter on the Earth in order that she might entice Allama. She grew up as a highly accomplished girl. She used to sing in the Temple. Allama used to go there and play on the drum. She lost herself in the play of the drum. She fell in love with him. They met in her bedroom. When she embraced him he became intangible. She grew lovesick. But a celestial damsel was sent to remind her of her purpose on the Earth. She resolved to overthrow Allama but did not succeed. Finally she went up to Kailas. Then Parvati sent Her satvic quality who was born as a Brahman sanyasini. When she surrendered to Allama she realised his true greatness.
  Sri Bhagavan spoke very appreciatively of Nayana, i.e., Kavyakantha
  --
  3. J.P., though represented in the book Self-Realisation as having sought to injure Sri Bhagavan, was really kind to Him and his pranks were misunderstood to be acts of malice. His only weakness was that he wanted to make capital out of Sri Bhagavan for raising funds; which, of course, the Maharshi did not like. There was nothing wrong with J.P.
  4. Madhavaswami, the attendant, asked if Sri Bhagavan remained without food for months in the underground cellar in the Temple.
  M.: Um! - Um! - food was forthcoming - Milk, fruits - but whoever thought of food.
  5. While staying in the mango-tree cave Sri Bhagavan used to string garlands for the images in the Temple, with lotuses, yellow flowers
  (sarakonnai) and green leaves.
  6. After the completion of the Kalyanamantapam Sri Bhagavan had stayed there one night in disguise.
  7. When He was sitting under a tree in the Temple compound He was covered with dirt, for He never used to bathe. In the cold nights of
  
  --
  M.: Listen to what happened once, years ago.
  There was a saint by name Namdev. He could see, talk and play with Vithoba as we do with one another. He used to spend most of his time in the Temple playing with Vithoba.
  On one occasion the saints had assembled together, among whom was one Jnandev of well-established fame and eminence. Jnandev asked
  Gora Kumbhar (a potter-saint) to use his proficiency in testing the soundness of baked pots and find out which of the assembled saints was properly baked clay. So Gora Kumbhar took his stick and gently struck each ones head in joke as if to test. When he came to Namdev the latter protested in a huff; all laughed and hooted. Namdev was enraged and he sought Vithoba in the Temple. Vithoba said that the saints knew best; this unexpected reply upset Namdev all the more.
  He said: You are God. I converse and play with you. Can there be anything more to be gained by man?
  --
  So Namdev asked him: You are said to be a saint, why do you desecrate the linga? The saint replied. Indeed I am too old and weak to do the right thing. Please lift my feet and place them where there is no linga. Namdev accordingly lifted the saints feet and placed them elsewhere. But there was again a linga below them.
  Wherever the feet were placed then and there appeared a linga underneath. Namdev finally placed the feet on himself and he turned into a linga. Then Namdev understood that God was immanent and learnt the truth and departed. He went home and did not go to the Temple for several days. Vithoba now sought him out in his home and asked why Namdev would not go to the Temple to see God.
  Namdev said: Is there a place where He is not?

1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  If sacramental rites are constantly repeated in a spirit of faith and devotion, a more or less enduring effect is produced in the psychic medium, in which individual minds bathe and from which they have, so to speak, been crystallized out into personalities more or less fully developed, according to the more or less perfect development of the bodies with which they are associated. (Of this psychic medium an eminent contemporary philosopher, Dr. C. D. Broad, has written, in an essay on telepathy contributed to the Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, as follows. We must therefore consider seriously the possibility that a persons experience initiates more or less permanent modifications of structure or process in something which is neither his mind nor his brain. There is no reason to suppose that this substratum would be anything to which possessive adjectives, such as mine and yours and his, could properly be applied, as they can be to minds and animated bothes. Modifications which have been produced in the substratum by certain of Ms past experience are activated by Ns present experiences or interests, and they become cause factors in producing or modifying Ns later experiences.) Within this psychic medium or non-personal substratum of individual minds, something which we may think of metaphorically as a vortex persists as an independent existence, possessing its own derived and secondary objectivity, so that, wherever the rites are performed, those whose faith and devotion are sufficiently intense actually discover something out there, as distinct from the subjective something in their own imaginations. And so long as this projected psychic entity is nourished by the faith and love of its worshippers, it will possess, not merely objectivity, but power to get peoples prayers answered. Ultimately, of course, I alone am the giver, in the sense that all this happens in accordance with the divine laws governing the universe in its psychic and spiritual, no less than in its material, aspects. Nevertheless, the devas (those imperfect forms under which, because of their own voluntary ignorance, men worship the divine Ground) may be thought of as relatively independent powers. The primitive notion that the gods feed on the sacrifices made to them is simply the crude expression of a profound truth. When their worship falls off, when faith and devotion lose their intensity, the devas sicken and finally the. Europe is full of old shrines, whose saints and Virgins and relics have lost the power and the second-hand psychic objectivity which they once possessed. Thus, when Chaucer lived and wrote, the deva called Thomas Becket was giving to any Canterbury pilgrim, who had sufficient faith, all the boons he could ask for. This once-powerful deity is now stone-dead; but there are still certain churches in the West, certain mosques and Temples in the East, where even the most irreligious and un-psychic tourist cannot fail to be aware of some intensely numinous presence. It would, of course, be a mistake to imagine that this presence is the presence of that God who is a Spirit and must be worshipped in spirit; it is rather the psychic presence of mens thoughts and feelings about the particular, limited form of God, to which they have resorted according to the impulse of their inborn naturethoughts and feelings projected into objectivity and haunting the sacred place in the same way as thoughts and feeling of another kind, but of equal intensity, haunt the scenes of some past suffering or crime. The presence in these consecrated buildings, the presence evoked by the performance of traditional rites, the presence inherent in a sacramental object, name or formulaall these are real presences, but real presences, not of God or the Avatar, but of something which, though it may reflect the divine Reality, is yet less and other than it.
  
  --
  
  That very large numbers of men and women have an ineradicable desire for rites and ceremonies is clearly demonstrated by the history of religion. Almost all the Hebrew prophets were opposed to ritualism. Rend your hearts and not your garments. I desire mercy and not sacrifice. I hate, I despise your feasts; I take no delight in your solemn assemblies. And yet, in spite of the fact that what the prophets wrote was regarded as divinely inspired, the Temple at Jerusalem continued to be, for hundreds of years after their time, the centre of a religion of rites, ceremonials and blood sacrifice. (It may be remarked in passing that the shedding of blood, ones own or that of animals or other human beings, seems to be a peculiarly efficacious way of constraining the occult or psychic world to answer petitions and confer supernormal powers. If this is a fact, as from the anthropological and antiquarian evidence it appears to be, it would supply yet another cogent reason for avoiding animal sacrifices, savage bodily austerities and even, since thought is a form of action, that imaginative gloating over spilled blood, which is so common in certain Christian circles.) What the Jews did in spite of their prophets, Christians have done in spite of Christ. The Christ of the Gospels is a preacher and not a dispenser of sacraments or performer of rites; he speaks against vain repetitions; he insists on the supreme importance of private worship; he has no use for sacrifices and not much use for the Temple. But this did not prevent historic Christianity from going its own, all too human, way. A precisely similar development took place in Buddhism. For the Buddha of the Pali scriptures, ritual was one of the fetters holding back the soul from enlightenment and liberation. Nevertheless, the religion he founded has made full use of ceremonies, vain repetitions and sacramental rites.
  
  --
  
  We have seen that, when they are promoted to be the central core of organized religious worship, ritualism and sacramentalism are by no means unmixed blessings. But that the whole of a mans workaday life should be transformed by him into a kind of continuous ritual, that every object in the world around him should be regarded as a symbol of the worlds eternal Ground, that all his actions should be performed sacramentallythis would seem to be wholly desirable. All the masters of the spiritual life, from the authors of the Upanishads to Socrates, from Buddha to St. Bernard are agreed that, without self-knowledge there cannot be adequate knowledge of God, that without a constant recollectedness there can be no complete deliverance. The man who has learnt to regard things as symbols, persons as Temples of the Holy Spirit and actions as sacraments, is a man who has learned constantly to remind himself who he is, where he stands in relation to the universe and its Ground, how he should behave towards his fellows and what he must do to come to his final end.
  
  --
  
  Precisely similar teachings are found in Christian writers, who recommend that persons and even things should be regarded as Temples of the Holy Ghost and that everything done or suffered should be constantly offered to God.
  

1.25_-_Fascinations,_Invisibility,_Levitation,_Transmutations,_.Kinks_in_Time., #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  This is not one of my notorious digressions; and this is how transmutation comes into it. I found that by first taking the shape of a golden hawk, and resuming my own form after landing in her "Temple" a room she had fitted ad hoc the whole operation became incomparably easier. I shall not indulge in hypotheses of why this should have been the case.
  
  --
  
  In the summer of 1910 e.v. I was living at 125 Victoria Street, in a studio converted into a Temple by means of a Circle, an Altar and the rest. West of the Altar was a big fireplace with a fender settee; the East wall was covered with bookshelves. Enter the late Theodor Reuss, O.H.O. and Frater Superior of the O.T.O. He wanted me to join that Order. I recommended him, in politer language to repeat the Novocastrian Experiment. Undeterred, he insisted: "But you must."
  

1.25_-_On_Religion, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Your daily life is your Temple and your religion.
  

1.25_-_Vanni_Fucci's_Punishment._Agnello_Brunelleschi,_Buoso_degli_Abati,_Puccio_Sciancato,_Cianfa_de'_Donati,_and_Guercio_Cavalcanti., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  Underneath which each one his muzzle changed.
  He who was standing drew it tow'rds the Temples,
  And from excess of matter, which came thither,

1.29_-_What_is_Certainty?, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  The Master of the Temple deals very simply and efficiently with problems of this kind. "The Mind" (says he) of this Party of the First Part, hereinafter referred to as Frater N (or whatever his 8 = 3 motto may be) is so constructed that the interval from C to C is most harmoniously divided into n notes; that of the Party of the Second Part hereinafter referred to as not a Heretic, an Atheist, a Bolshie, ad Die-hard, a Schismatic, an Anarchist, a Black Magician, a Friend of Aleister Crowley, or whatever may be the current term of abuse Mr. A, Lord B, the Duke of C, Mrs. X, or whatever he or she may chance to be called into five. The Structure called of-all-Truth in neither of us is affected in the least, any more than in the reading of a Thermometer with Fahrenheit on one side and Centigrade on the other.
  
  --
  
  Not unaware am I that these conceptions are at first exceedingly difficult to formulate clearly. I wouldn't go so far as to say that one would have to be a Master of the Temple to understand them; but it is really very necessary to have grasped firmly the doctrine that "a thing is only true insofar as it contains its contradiction in itself." (A good way to realize this is by keeping up a merry dance of paradoxes, such as infest Logic and Mathematics. The repeated butting of the head against a brick wall is bound in the long run to shake up the little grey cells (as Poirot[57] might say), teach you to distrust any train of argument, however apparently impeccable the syllogisms, and to seek ever more eagerly the dawn of that Neschamic consciousness where all these things are clearly understood, although impossible to express in rational language.)
  

1.300_-_1.400_Talks, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
  
  D.: Should the untouchables be allowed into our Temples?
  M.: There are others to decide it.
  --
  
  (4) Rangaswami Iyengar was once out on the hill. A leopard was nearby. He threw a stone. It turned towards him. He hurried away for his life. Sri Bhagavan met him on the way and asked what the matter was. Iyengar simply said 'leopard' as he was running. Sri Bhagavan went where the beast was and it moved away soon after. All this happened at the time of the plague. Leopards used to roam freely by the side of the Temple, sometimes in twos and threes.
  
  --
  
  (7) Sri Bhagavan related the following funny anecdote; Ezhuthachan, a great Malayali saint and author, had a few fish concealed in him when he entered the Temple. Some enemy reported it to the worshippers in the Temple. The man was searched and taken to the king. The king asked him "Why did you take the fish into the Temple"? He replied: "It is not my fault. I had it concealed in my clothes. The others exposed the fish in the Temple. The fault lies in exposure. Excreta within the body are not considered filthy; but when excreted, they are considered filthy. So also with this."
  
  --
  
  Siva said that Allama was one who would not be affected by Her blandishments. Parvati wanted to try it and so sent Her tamasic quality to incarnate as a king's daughter on the Earth in order that she might entice Allama. She grew up as a highly accomplished girl. She used to sing in the Temple. Allama used to go there and play on the drum. She lost herself in the play of the drum. She fell in love with him. They met in her bedroom. When she embraced him he became intangible. She grew lovesick. But a celestial damsel was sent to remind her of her purpose on the Earth. She resolved to overthrow Allama but did not succeed. Finally she went up to Kailas. Then Parvati sent Her satvic quality who was born as a Brahman sanyasini. When she surrendered to Allama she realised his true greatness.
  
  --
  
  4. Madhavaswami, the attendant, asked if Sri Bhagavan remained without food for months in the underground cellar in the Temple.
  
  --
  
  5. While staying in the mango-tree cave Sri Bhagavan used to string garlands for the images in the Temple, with lotuses, yellow flowers
  (sarakonnai) and green leaves.
  --
  
  7. When He was sitting under a tree in the Temple compound He was covered with dirt, for He never used to bathe. In the cold nights of
  337
  --
  
  There was a saint by name Namdev. He could see, talk and play with Vithoba as we do with one another. He used to spend most of his time in the Temple playing with Vithoba.
  
  On one occasion the saints had assembled together, among whom was one Jnandev of well-established fame and eminence. Jnandev asked
  Gora Kumbhar (a potter-saint) to use his proficiency in testing the soundness of baked pots and find out which of the assembled saints was properly baked clay. So Gora Kumbhar took his stick and gently struck each one's head in joke as if to test. When he came to Namdev the latter protested in a huff; all laughed and hooted. Namdev was enraged and he sought Vithoba in the Temple. Vithoba said that the saints knew best; this unexpected reply upset Namdev all the more.
  
  --
  
  Wherever the feet were placed then and there appeared a linga underneath. Namdev finally placed the feet on himself and he turned into a linga. Then Namdev understood that God was immanent and learnt the truth and departed. He went home and did not go to the Temple for several days. Vithoba now sought him out in his home and asked why Namdev would not go to the Temple to see God.
  

1.32_-_How_can_a_Yogi_ever_be_Worried?, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  I admit that it looks like a strong case. Here (you put it in your more elegant prose) we have a Yogi, nay more, a Paramahamsa, a Bodhisattva of the best: yea, further, we have a Master of the Temple and is not his Motto "Vi veri vniversom vivus vici?" and yet we find him fussing like an old hen over the most trivial of troubles; we find him wrapped in the lacustrine vapours of Avernus, fretting himself into a fever about imaginary misfortunes at which no normal person would do more than cast a contemptuous glance, and get on with the job.
  
  --
  
  The other way may be called the Taoist aspect. First, however, let me explain the point of view of the Master of the Temple, as it is so similar. You should remember from your reading what happens in this Grade. The new Master is "cast out" into the sphere appropriate to the nature of his own particular Great Work. And it is proper for him to act in true accordance with the nature of the man as he was when he passed through that Sphere (or Grade) on his upward journey. Thus, if he be cast out into 3 = 8, it is no part of his work to aim at the virtues of a 4 = 7; all that has been done long before. It is no business of his to be bothering his head about anything at all but his Work; so he must react to events as they occur in the way natural to him without trying to "improve himself." (This, of course, applies not only to worry, but to all his funny little ways.)
  

1.32_-_The_Ninth_Circle_Traitors._The_Frozen_Lake_of_Cocytus._First_Division,_Caina_Traitors_to_their_Kindred._Camicion_de'_Pazzi._Second_Division,_Antenora_Traitors_to_their_Country._Dante_questions_Bocca_degli, #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  Not in another fashion Tydeus gnawed
  The Temples of Menalippus in disdain,
  Than that one did the skull and the other things.

1.3.5.03_-_The_Involved_and_Evolving_Godhead, #Essays Divine And Human, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The involution of a superconscient Spirit in inconscient Matter is the secret cause of this visible and apparent world. The keyword of the earth's riddle is the gradual evolution of a hidden illimitable consciousness and power out of the seemingly inert yet furiously driven force of insensible Nature. Earth-life is one self-chosen habitation of a great Divinity and his aeonic will is to change it from a blind prison into his splendid mansion and high heaven-reaching Temple.
  

1.400_-_1.450_Talks, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
  
  II. THONDARADIPODI (Bhaktanghrirenu) ALWAR: One who delights in the dust of the feet of devotees. A devotee (of this name) was keeping a plot of land in which he grew tulasi, the sacred basil, made garlands of it, and supplied the same to the God in the Temple.
  
  --
  
  The ornament was found missing in the Temple. The worshipper reported the loss to the proper authorities. They offered a tempting reward for anyone who would give the clue for the recovery of the lost property. The maid servant afforded the clue and claimed the reward.
  

1.439, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
  She kept her ears close to his lips and heard the word Rama repeated continually as in japa. She was delighted and the next day ordered the minister to hold a feast. The king having partaken of the feast asked his wife for an explanation. She related the whole occurrence and said that the feast was in gratitude to God for the fulfilment of her long cherished wish. The king was however annoyed that his devotion should have been found out. Some say that having thus betrayed God he considered himself unworthy of God and so committed suicide. It means that one should not openly display ones piety. We may take it that the king told the queen not to make a fuss over his piety and they then lived happily together.
  II. THONDARADIPODI (Bhaktanghrirenu) ALWAR: One who delights in the dust of the feet of devotees. A devotee (of this name) was keeping a plot of land in which he grew tulasi, the sacred basil, made garlands of it, and supplied the same to the God in the Temple.
  He remained a bachelor and was respected for his life and conduct.
  --
  She was very pleased with it and hid it under her pillow. He then disappeared. All these were secretly observed by a maid servant in the house.
  The ornament was found missing in the Temple. The worshipper reported the loss to the proper authorities. They offered a tempting reward for anyone who would give the clue for the recovery of the lost property. The maid servant afforded the clue and claimed the reward.
  The police recovered the ornament and arrested the dasi who said that the devotee gave her the same. He was then roughly handled. A supernatural voice said. I did it. Leave him alone.
  --
  Talk 492.
  In a suit by the Temple against the Government regarding the ownership of the Hill Sri Bhagavan was cited as a witness. He was examined by a commission. In the course of the examination-in-chief Sri Bhagavan said that Siva always remains in three forms: (1) as Parabrahman (2) as Linga (here as the Hill) and (3) as Siddha. (Brahma Rupa; Linga
  Rupa; Siddha Rupa).
  --
  In the course of conversation Sri Bhagavan said that Thirujnanasambandar had sung in praise of Sri Arunachala. He also mentioned the story briefly as follows:
  Jnanasambandar was born in an orthodox family about 1,500 years ago. When he was three years old his father took him to the Temple in
  Shiyali. He left the boy on the bank of the sacred tank and went in to bathe. As he dipped in the water the boy, not finding his father, began to cry out. Immediately Siva and Parvati appeared in a vimana. Siva told Parvati to feed the boy with her milk. So she drew out milk in a cup and handed it to the boy. He drank it and was happy.
  --
  He sang, The One with ear-rings... the Robber, who robbed me of my mind....
  He thus became one of the most famous bhaktas and was much sought after. He led a vigorous and active life; went on pilgrimage to several places in South India. He got married in his sixteenth year. The bride and the bridegroom went to have darsan of God in the local Temple soon after the marriage ceremonies were over. A large party went with them. When they reached the Temple the place was a blaze of light and the Temple was not visible. There was however a passage visible in the blaze of light. Jnanasambandar told the people to enter the passage. They did so. He himself went round the light with his young wife, came to the passage and entered it as the others had done earlier. The Light vanished leaving no trace of those who entered it.
  The Temple again came into view as usual. Such was the brief but very eventful life of the sage.
  In one of his tours he had come to Ariyanainallur or Tirukkoilur, eighteen miles from Tiruvannamalai. The place is famous for its Siva Temple.
  (It was here that Sri Bhagavan had that vision of Light on his way to
  --
  Jnanasambandar is contained in 300 slokas in Upamanyus Bhakta
  Charita. One of the Archakas of the Temple had it with him and showed it to Sri Bhagavan on the occasion of the Temple suit within the last few months. Sri Bhagavan copied the slokas.
  
  --
  2. Later when I was in Virupaksha Cave, I saw a red wasp construct five or six hives in each of which it placed five or six grubs and flew away. After about ten days, a black beetle, smaller than the wasp, buzzed round the hives and closed each of then, with a little black mud and flew away. I was wondering at the intrusion of the beetle on the hive of the wasp. I waited a few days and then gently opened one of the hives. Five or six black bodies came out and each of them was a black beetle. I thought it strange.
  3. Again when I was in Pachyamman Temple, I saw a red wasp constructing five or six hives on a pillar in the Temple. It placed five or six grubs in each of them and buzzed away. I watched it for several days. The wasp did not return. There was no black beetle also.
  After about fifteen days, I opened one of the hives. All the grubs had united into a white mass of wasp-like form. It dropped down and was stunned by the fall. After a few minutes, it began to crawl. Its colour was gradually changing. In a short time, there were two little specks on its sides which grew into wings as I watched and the full-grown wasp flew away from the ground.
  --
  
  The village had a sacred tank in front of the Temple, which was the
  spot of the eddy created by the spear of Siva. Even now the waters in

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