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see also ::: Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King

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object:Tao Te Ching
class:Lao Tzu
class:book
class:Taoism
link:http://www.mobilewords.pro/Tao/chap01.htm#top


see also ::: Liber 157 - The Tao Teh King,



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Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King

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8 Secrets of Tao Te Ching
Tao Te Ching
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--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



--- QUOTES [3 / 3 - 105 / 105] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   3 Tao Te Ching

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   58 Lao Tzu
   5 Michael Finkel

   4 Cheryl Strayed

   3 Timothy Ferriss

   3 Tao Te Ching
   3 Stephen Cope

   2 Wayne W Dyer

   2 Ursula K Le Guin

   2 Lao Tzu

   2 Jorge Luis Borges

   2 James Altucher

   2 Anonymous


1:If you want to become full,let yourself be empty. ~ Tao Te Ching, ch.22 ,
2:High winds do not last all morning. Heavy rain does not last all day. ~ Tao Te Ching, ch.23 ,
3:When the student is ready the teacher will appear. When the student is truly ready... The teacher will Disappear. ~ Tao Te Ching,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:"When turmoil rules, go in." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
2:"By letting go it all gets done." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching|
3:"Knowing how to yield is strength." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
4:If a man is bad, do not abandon him. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
5:I am like an idiot, my mind is so empty. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
6:The heart that gives, gathers.” – Tao Te Ching ~ Tricia O Malley
7:Know that you don't know. That is superior. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
8:"The further one goes, the less one knows." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
9:Tao Te Ching saying, “The beginning contains the end. ~ Tosha Silver
10:"To see things in the seed, that is genius." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
11:"The more you know, the less you understand." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching|
12:If you want to know me, look inside your heart. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
13:The best runner leaves no tracks. —Tao Te Ching ~ Christopher McDougall
14:To know you have enough is to be rich. —The Tao Te Ching ~ Larry E Swedroe
15:Those who know do not talk And talkers do not know.”—Tao Te Ching ~ Ram Dass
16:When I let go of what I am,I become what I might be. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
17:"The Tao is always present within you." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Ch. 6 #Tao 道
18:"Abandon knowledge and your worries are over." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Ch. 19
19:"To die but not to perish is to be eternally present." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
20:If you want to become full,
let yourself be empty.
~ Tao Te Ching, ch.22,
21:Stephen Mitchell. Tao te Ching. Harper Perennial: New York, 1991, ~ Stephen Cope
22:"Great fullness seems empty, yet it cannot be exhausted." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
23:Those who flow as life flows know they need no other force. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
24:Those who know, don’t tell.
Those who tell, don’t know. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching,
25:"The sage shuns excess, shuns grandiosity, shuns arrogance." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
26:If you want to lead them you must place yourself behind them. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
27:"The Tao does not show greatness,and is therefore truly great." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
28:A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving.^ ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
29:In work, do what you enjoy. In family life, be completely present. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
30:"The truth is not always beautiful,nor beautiful words the truth." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
31:"A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
32:"A tree as wide as a man's embrace grows from a tiny shoot." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Ch. 64
33:High winds do not last all morning. Heavy rain does not last all day. ~ Tao Te Ching, ch.23,
34:"A multitude of words is tiresome, unlike remaining centered." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Ch. 5
35:Do not conquer the world with force,for force only causes resistance. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
36:Just remain in the center; watching. And then forget that you are there. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
37:Must you value what others value,avoid what others avoid?How ridiculous! ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
38:"Without opening your door,you can open your heart to the world." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Ch. 47
39:Care about what other people think and you will always be their prisoner.^ ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
40:If your happiness depends on money, you will never be happy with yourself. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
41:"Not seeking, not expecting, she is present, and can welcome all things." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching|
42:Simplicity, patience, compassion. These three are your greatest treasures. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
43:The biggest problem in the world could have been solved when it was small. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
44:"Without the Tao, kindness and compassion are replaced by law and justice." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching|
45:He who stands on tiptoe doesn't stand firm.He who rushes ahead doesn't go far. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
46:"There was something that finished chaos, born before Heaven and Earth." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Ch. 25
47:The Way of Life According to Lao Tzu, the Tao Te Ching as translated by Witter Bynner. ~ Timothy Ferriss
48:"A multitude of words is tiresome, unlike remaining centered." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Ch. 5|silence stillness
49:"I alone am different from the others, because I am nourished by the great mother." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Ch. 20
50:"The Tao of heaven is like the bending of a bow.The high is lowered and the low is raised." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
51:"Too much success is not an advantage.Do not tinkle like jade or clatter like stone chimes." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
52:To know that you do not know is the best.To pretend to know when you do not know is a disease. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
53:"To know that you do not know is the best.To pretend to know when you do not know is a disease." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
54:Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don't resist them; that only creates sorrow. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
55:To have without possessing,do without claiming,lead without controlling:this is mysterious power. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
56:Lao-tzu’s Tao Te Ching (I recommend the Red Pine translation), and started swimming from there. Excellent ~ Michael Finkel
57:"Less and less is done until non-action is achieved.When nothing is done, nothing is left undone." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
58:"All things, including the grass and trees, are soft and pliable in life; dry and brittle in death." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
59:The Tao te Ching says, “[The Master] doesn’t glitter like a jewel … [but is] as rugged and common as a stone. ~ Stephen Cope
60:"What is malleable is always superior to that which is immovable.This is mastery through adaptation." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching|
61:When the student is ready the teacher will appear. When the student is truly ready... The teacher will Disappear. ~ Tao Te Ching,
62:"It is the child that sees the primordial secret of Nature and it is the child of ourselves we return to." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
63:The Tao te Ching says, “If you stay in the center and embrace death with your whole heart, you will endure forever. ~ Stephen Cope
64:A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, they will say, 'we did it ourselves.' ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
65:"Blunt the sharpness,untangle the knot,soften the glare,merge with dust.Hidden deep but ever present.This is Tao." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
66:"Best be still; best be empty.In stillness and emptinesswe find where to abide.Talking and moving we lose the place." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching|
67:"The reason why the universe is eternal is that it does not live for itself; it gives life to others as it transforms." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching|
68:"In the pursuit of knowledge:everyday something is added.in the pursuit of enlightenment:everyday something is dropped." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching|
69:"The function of mind is response. The function of life is adaptation;Forests are adaptations of seeds, and seeds of dust." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
70:I have three precious things which I hold fast and prize.The first is gentleness;the second is frugality;the third is humility. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
71:while most readers recognize the profound wisdom imbued in Tao Te Ching, the language remains mysterious to many. Utter simplicity can seem confusing to the complicated mind. ~ Alan Cohen
72:To know without knowing is best.Not knowing without knowing it is sick.To be sick of sicknessis the only cure.The wise aren’t sick.They’re sick of sickness,so they’re well. ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
73:Instead of trying to be a mountain, teaches the ancient Tao Te Ching, “Be the valley of the universe.”4 In this way, you are restored to wholeness and so “all things will come to you. ~ Eckhart Tolle
74:The amount that she loved us was beyond her reach. It could not be quantified or contained. It was the ten thousand named things in the Tao Te Ching’s universe and then ten thousand more. ~ Cheryl Strayed
75:Quien considera el mundo como considera la fortuna de su propio cuerpo puede gobernar el mundo. A quien ama el mundo como ama a su propio cuerpo puede confiársele el mundo.   Tao Te Ching, poema 13 ~ Lou Marinoff
76:People are to be taken in very small doses,” wrote Emerson. “Nothing can bring you peace but yourself.” Knight read the Tao Te Ching and felt a deep-rooted connection to the verses. “Good walking,” says the Tao, “leaves no tracks. ~ Michael Finkel
77:Living by Silent Knowing This is probably the best-known verse of the Tao Te Ching. In fact, the opening two lines (“Those who know do not talk. Those who talk do not know”) are so popular that they’ve almost become a cliché. Nevertheless, ~ Wayne W Dyer
78:The critics often invent authors; they select two dissimilar works - the Tao Te Ching and the 1001 Nights, say - attribute them to the same writer and then determine most scrupulously the psychology of this interesting homme de lettres... ~ Jorge Luis Borges
79:Suffering is such a deep part of living,” wrote Robert Kull, who lived alone on an island in Patagonia for a year, in 2001, “that if we try too hard to avoid it, we end up avoiding life entirely.” The Tao Te Ching says that “happiness rests in misery. ~ Michael Finkel
80:At a more serious level, the desirability of aligning our actions with the more powerful laws of nature, society, and psychology, in order to lead a productive life, is a central theme in many works, particularly the ancient Chinese classic, Tao te Ching. ~ Clayton M Christensen
81:Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu (5 mentions) Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand (4) Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari (4) Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (4) The 4-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferriss (4) The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (4) Dune by Frank Herbert (3) Influence by Robert Cialdini (3) ~ Timothy Ferriss
82:The amount that she loved us was beyond her reach. It could not be quantified or contained. It was the ten thousand named things in the Tao Te Ching’s universe and then ten thousand more. Her love was full-throated and all-encompassing and unadorned. Every day she blew through her entire reserve. ~ Cheryl Strayed
83:Although some popular religious texts such as the New Testament, Quran, Bhagavad Gita, Tao Te Ching, or Tibetan Book of the Dead contain interesting insights and stories, it is the Jewish religious texts such as the Old Testament (Hebrew Scriptures) that contain valuable information on acquiring wealth. ~ H W Charles
84:Initially I was very drawn to the Tao Te Ching, the Taoist philosophy. It was helping me deal with the balance of these external and internal issues with my chess life. Tai chi is the martial embodiment of Taoist philosophy. Initially, I had no intention of competing in the martial arts; it was just the meditation. ~ Joshua Waitzkin
85:Tao Te Ching says that it is only through retreat rather than pursuit, through inaction rather than action, that we acquire wisdom. “Those with less become content,” says the Tao, “those with more become confused.” The poems, still widely read, have been hailed as a hermit manifesto for more than two thousand years. ~ Michael Finkel
86:There is no greater illusion than fear, no greater wrong than preparing to defend yourself, no greater misfortune than having an enemy. Whoever can see through all fear will always be safe. --loc 710

Tao Te Ching: A New English Version
Paperback – Sep 5 2006 | Unabridged
by Lao Tzu and Stephen Mitchell
ISBN-10: 0061142662 ~ Lao Tzu
87:Do the Tao Now At your next meal, practice portion control by asking yourself after several bites if you’re still famished. If not, just stop and wait. If no hunger appears, call it complete. At this one meal, you’ll have practiced the last sentence of the 9th verse of the Tao Te Ching: “Retire when the [eating] is done; this is the way of heaven. ~ Wayne W Dyer
88:Scholarly translations of the Tao Te Ching as a manual for rulers use a vocabulary that emphasizes the uniqueness of the Taoist “sage,” his masculinity, his authority. This language is perpetuated, and degraded, in most popular versions. I wanted a Book of the Way accessible to a present-day, unwise, unpowerful, and perhaps unmale reader, not seeking esoteric secrets, but listening for a voice that speaks to the soul. ~ Anonymous
89:The Tao Te Ching is partly in prose, partly in verse; but as we define poetry now, not by rhyme and meter but as a patterned intensity of language, the whole thing is poetry. I wanted to catch that poetry, its terse, strange beauty. Most translations have caught meanings in their net, but prosily, letting the beauty slip through. And in poetry, beauty is no ornament; it is the meaning. It is the truth. We have that on good authority. ~ Ursula K Le Guin
90:In literary practices the idea of a single subject is also all-powerful. It is uncommon for books to be signed. The concept of plagiarism does not exist: it has been established that all works are the creation of one author, who is atemporal and anonymous. The critics often invent authors: they select two dissimilar works - the Tao Te Ching and the 1001 Nights, say - attribute them to the same writer and then determine most scrupulously the psychology of this interesting homme de lettres... ~ Jorge Luis Borges
91:Sages throughout history have relished the enigma that pleasure is undefined without suffering. In the words of Carl Jung: “There are as many nights as days, and the one is just as long as the other in the year’s course. Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word ‘happy’ would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness.” The Tao Te Ching extends the metaphor: “Difficult and easy accomplish each other, long and short form each other, high and low distinguish each other. ~ Anonymous
92:Scholarly translations of the Tao Te Ching as a manual for rulers use a vocabulary that emphasizes the uniqueness of the Taoist “sage,” his masculinity, his authority. This language is perpetuated, and degraded, in most popular versions. I wanted a Book of the Way accessible to a present-day, unwise, unpowerful, and perhaps unmale reader, not seeking esoteric secrets, but listening for a voice that speaks to the soul. I would like that reader to see why people have loved the book for twenty-five hundred years. ~ Ursula K Le Guin
93:Laozi was an ancient Chinese philosopher. According to Chinese tradition, Laozi lived in the 6th century BC, however many historians contend that Laozi actually lived in the 4th century BC, which was the period of Hundred Schools of Thought and Warring States Period, while others contend he was a mythical figure. Laozi was credited with writing the seminal Taoist work, the Tao Te Ching, which was originally known as the Laozi. Taishang Laojun was a title for Laozi in the Taoist religion. It refers to One of the Three Pure Ones. Source: Wikipedia ~ Lao Tzu
94:According to tradition, the originator of Taoism, Lao-tzu, was an older contemporary of Kung Fu-tzu, or Confucius, who died in 479 B.C.1 Lao-tzu is said to have been the author of the Tao Te Ching, a short book of aphorisms, setting forth the principles of the Tao and its power or virtue (Te e). But traditional Chinese philosophy ascribes both Taoism and Confucianism to a still earlier source, to a work which lies at the very foundation of Chinese thought and culture, dating anywhere from 3000 to 1200 B.C. This is the I Ching, or Book of Changes. ~ Alan W Watts
95:The balanced view is to leave everything up to God, except what is right in front of you to do in this moment. If you are hungry, eat. If you are tired, sleep. If you are sick, find a way to heal. If there's a choice to be made, check what is truest to do and then do it. Then you can forget about the results of your actions because that part isn't up to you. That part is up to the bigger truth of God's will. There is a line in the Tao Te Ching: "Do your work and then step back." This reminds us that our actions are up to us, but the results of our actions are not up to us. ~ Nirmala
96:If you want to be reborn,' it is written in the Tao Te Ching, 'let yourself die.' This is what I've been having trouble with, the fact that letting go can feel, at times, like a death. Someday, I know, I will lose everything. All the small deaths along the way are practice runs for the big ones, asking us to learn to be present, to grow in faith, to be grateful for what is. Life is finite and short. But this new task, figuring out how to let go of so much that has been precious -- my children, my youth, my life as I know it -- can feel like a bitter foretaste of other losses yet to come. ~ Katrina Kenison
97:The first great literary work about solitude, the Tao Te Ching, was written in ancient China, likely in the sixth century B.C., by a protester hermit named Lao-tzu. The book’s eighty-one short verses describe the pleasures of forsaking society and living in harmony with the seasons. The Tao Te Ching says that it is only through retreat rather than pursuit, through inaction rather than action, that we acquire wisdom. “Those with less become content,” says the Tao, “those with more become confused.” The poems, still widely read, have been hailed as a hermit manifesto for more than two thousand years. ~ Michael Finkel
98:Oh wondrous,' murmured Lin Chung. 'Oh, water, mistress of earth, valley spirit, eternal feminine!'
'Taoism again?' Phryne leaned close to hear what he was whispering.
'From the "Tao Te Ching." The old Master should have seen this. All made by water, the female, cold, moon principle.'
'Yin,' said Phryne. 'This is the womb of the earth.'
'Indeed.' He took her hand. 'Completely foreign to all male, hot, sun creatures.'
'Like you?'
'Like me. Yang can only admire and tremble.'
'Come along.' She led him into the centre of the huge space. 'We don't want to get lost in the earthmother's insides. ~ Kerry Greenwood
99:In The Tao of Leadership, John Heider stresses the importance of interfering as little as possible. “Rules reduce freedom and responsibility,” he writes. “Enforcement of rules is coercive and manipulative, which diminishes spontaneity and absorbs group energy. The more coercive you are, the more resistant the group will become.” Heider, whose book is based on Lao-tzu’s Tao Te Ching, suggests that leaders practice becoming more open. “The wise leader is of service: receptive, yielding, following. The group member’s vibration dominates and leads, while the leader follows. But soon it is the member’s consciousness which is transformed, the member’s vibration which is resolved. ~ Phil Jackson
100:Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu, author of the Tao Te Ching, wrote, “He who knows he has enough is rich.” Enough—it’s a slippery concept. What’s enough for one is too little for the next guy and too much for another. Most of us would agree we have enough food, enough water, enough clothing, and enough shelter to meet our basic needs. And anyone reading this book probably feels that they have enough things. So why do we still feel the urge to buy, and own, more? Let’s investigate this word “enough” a little more closely. Dictionary.com defines it as “adequate for the want or need; sufficient for the purpose or to satisfy desire.” Ah, there’s the problem: even though we’ve satisfied our needs, there’s still the matter of our wants and desires. ~ Francine Jay
101:I was her daughter, but more. I was Karen, Cheryl, Leif. Karen Cheryl Leif. KarenCherylLeif. Our names blurred into one in my mother’s mouth all my life. She whispered it and hollered it, hissed it and crooned it. We were her kids, her comrades, the end of her and the beginning. We took turns riding shotgun with her in the car. “Do I love you this much?” she’d ask us, holding her hands six inches apart. “No,” we’d say, with sly smiles. “Do I love you this much?” she’d ask again, and on and on and on, each time moving her hands farther apart. But she would never get there, no matter how wide she stretched her arms. The amount that she loved us was beyond her reach. It could not be quantified or contained. It was the ten thousand named things in the Tao Te Ching’s universe and then ten thousand more. Her love was full-throated and all-encompassing and unadorned. Every day she blew through her entire reserve. ~ Cheryl Strayed
102:We were her kids, her comrades, the end of her and the beginning. We took turns riding shotgun with her in the car. “Do I love you this much?” she’d ask us, holding her hands farther apart. “No,” we’d say, with sly smiles. “Do I love you this much?” she’d ask again, and on and on and on, each time moving her hands farther apart. But she would never get there, no matter how wide she stretched her arms. The amount that she loved us was beyond her reach. It could not be quantified or contained. It was the ten thousand named things in the Tao Te Ching’s universe and then ten thousand more. Her love was full-throated and all-encompassing and unadorned. Every day she blew through her entire reserve….She was optimistic and serene, except a few times when she lost her temper and spanked us with a wooden spoon. Or the one time when she screamed FUCK and broke down crying because we wouldn’t clean our room. She was kindhearted and forgiving, generous and naïve. She dated men with names like Killer and Doobie and Motercycle Dan… ~ Cheryl Strayed
103:What is the book (or books) you’ve given most as a gift, and why? Or what are one to three books that have greatly influenced your life? Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl. He introduces the insights that he learned from surviving imprisonment in a Nazi concentration camp. He outlines methods to discover deep meaning and purpose in life. The Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu. His 81 Zen teachings are the foundation for the religion of Taoism, aimed at understanding “the way of virtues.” Lao Tzu’s depth of teachings are complicated to decode and provide foundations for wisdom. Mind Gym by Gary Mack is a book that strips down the esoteric nature of applied sport psychology. Gary introduces a variety of mindset training principles and makes them extremely easy to understand and practice. What purchase of $ 100 or less has most positively impacted your life in the last six months (or in recent memory)? A book for my son: Inch and Miles, written by coach John Wooden. We read it together on a regular basis. The joy that I get from hearing him understand Coach Wooden’s insights is fantastically rewarding. ~ Timothy Ferriss
104:Try any one of these things each day: A) Sleep eight hours. B) Eat two meals instead of three. C) No TV. D) No junk food. E) No complaining for one whole day. F) No gossip. G) Return an e-mail from five years ago. H) Express thanks to a friend. I) Watch a funny movie or a stand-up comic. J) Write down a list of ideas. The ideas can be about anything. K) Read a spiritual text. Any one that is inspirational to you. The Bible, The Tao te Ching, anything you want. L) Say to yourself when you wake up, “I’m going to save a life today.” Keep an eye out for that life you can save. M) Take up a hobby. Don’t say you don’t have time. Learn the piano. Take chess lessons. Do stand-up comedy. Write a novel. Do something that takes you out of your current rhythm. N) Write down your entire schedule. The schedule you do every day. Cross out one item and don’t do that anymore. O) Surprise someone. P) Think of ten people you are grateful for. Q) Forgive someone. You don’t have to tell them. Just write it down on a piece of paper and burn the paper. It turns out this has the same effect in terms of releasing oxytocin in the brain as actually forgiving them in person. R) Take the stairs instead of the elevator. S) I’m going to steal this next one from the 1970s pop psychology book Don’t Say Yes When You Want to Say No: when you find yourself thinking of that special someone who is causing you grief, think very quietly, “No.” If you think of him and (or?) her again, think loudly, “No!” Again? Whisper, “No!” Again, say it. Louder. Yell it. Louder. And so on. T) Tell someone every day that you love them. U) Don’t have sex with someone you don’t love. V) Shower. Scrub. Clean the toxins off your body. W) Read a chapter in a biography about someone who is an inspiration to you. X) Make plans to spend time with a friend. Y) If you think, “Everything would be better off if I were dead,” then think, “That’s really cool. Now I can do anything I want and I can postpone this thought for a while, maybe even a few months.” Because what does it matter now? The planet might not even be around in a few months. Who knows what could happen with all these solar flares. You know the ones I’m talking about. Z) Deep breathing. When the vagus nerve is inflamed, your breathing becomes shallower. Your breath becomes quick. It’s fight-or-flight time! You are panicking. Stop it! Breathe deep. Let me tell you something: most people think “yoga” is all those exercises where people are standing upside down and doing weird things. In the Yoga Sutras, written in 300 B.C., there are 196 lines divided into four chapters. In all those lines, ONLY THREE OF THEM refer to physical exercise. It basically reads, “Be able to sit up straight.” That’s it. That’s the only reference in the Yoga Sutras to physical exercise. Claudia always tells me that yogis measure their lives in breaths, not years. Deep breathing is what keeps those breaths going. ~ James Altucher
105:For now, the Simple Daily Practice means doing ONE thing every day. Try any one of these things each day: A) Sleep eight hours. B) Eat two meals instead of three. C) No TV. D) No junk food. E) No complaining for one whole day. F) No gossip. G) Return an e-mail from five years ago. H) Express thanks to a friend. I) Watch a funny movie or a stand-up comic. J) Write down a list of ideas. The ideas can be about anything. K) Read a spiritual text. Any one that is inspirational to you. The Bible, The Tao te Ching, anything you want. L) Say to yourself when you wake up, “I’m going to save a life today.” Keep an eye out for that life you can save. M) Take up a hobby. Don’t say you don’t have time. Learn the piano. Take chess lessons. Do stand-up comedy. Write a novel. Do something that takes you out of your current rhythm. N) Write down your entire schedule. The schedule you do every day. Cross out one item and don’t do that anymore. O) Surprise someone. P) Think of ten people you are grateful for. Q) Forgive someone. You don’t have to tell them. Just write it down on a piece of paper and burn the paper. It turns out this has the same effect in terms of releasing oxytocin in the brain as actually forgiving them in person. R) Take the stairs instead of the elevator. S) I’m going to steal this next one from the 1970s pop psychology book Don’t Say Yes When You Want to Say No: when you find yourself thinking of that special someone who is causing you grief, think very quietly, “No.” If you think of him and (or?) her again, think loudly, “No!” Again? Whisper, “No!” Again, say it. Louder. Yell it. Louder. And so on. T) Tell someone every day that you love them. U) Don’t have sex with someone you don’t love. V) Shower. Scrub. Clean the toxins off your body. W) Read a chapter in a biography about someone who is an inspiration to you. X) Make plans to spend time with a friend. Y) If you think, “Everything would be better off if I were dead,” then think, “That’s really cool. Now I can do anything I want and I can postpone this thought for a while, maybe even a few months.” Because what does it matter now? The planet might not even be around in a few months. Who knows what could happen with all these solar flares. You know the ones I’m talking about. Z) Deep breathing. When the vagus nerve is inflamed, your breathing becomes shallower. Your breath becomes quick. It’s fight-or-flight time! You are panicking. Stop it! Breathe deep. Let me tell you something: most people think “yoga” is all those exercises where people are standing upside down and doing weird things. In the Yoga Sutras, written in 300 B.C., there are 196 lines divided into four chapters. In all those lines, ONLY THREE OF THEM refer to physical exercise. It basically reads, “Be able to sit up straight.” That’s it. That’s the only reference in the Yoga Sutras to physical exercise. Claudia always tells me that yogis measure their lives in breaths, not years. Deep breathing is what keeps those breaths going. ~ James Altucher

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



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   2 Psychology


   2 Jordan Peterson


   2 Maps of Meaning


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