classes ::: subject,
children ::: Ontology (information science), reading list (Science)
branches ::: Cognitive Science, Computer Science, Formal Sciences, Information Science, Library Science, Natural Sciences, Neuroscience, New Science, Science, Science Fiction, Social Sciences, Systems Science

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:Science
class:subject
Elements of the scientific method:
  Define a question
  Gather information and resources (observe)
  Form an explanatory hypothesis
  Test the hypothesis by performing an experiment and collecting data in a reproducible manner
  Analyze the data
  Interpret the data and draw conclusions that serve as a starting point for new hypothesis
  Publish results
  Retest (frequently done by other scientists)

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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [18]


Arthur_C_Clarke
Dune
Frank_Herbert
Georg_C_Lichtenberg
Henri_Bergson
H._G._Wells
Information_Science
Interrogative
James_S_A_Corey
Leviathan_Wakes
Neuromancer
Ready_Player_One
Rick_and_Morty
Snow_Crash
Systems_Science
The_Left_Hand_of_Darkness
Ursula_K_Le_Guin
William_Gibson

--- PRIMARY CLASS


Alfred_Korzybski
book
Genre
Linguistics
subject

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [3]


1.01 - The Science of Living
2.2.03 - The Science of Consciousness
3.1.05 - A Vision of Science
3.5.01 - Science
An Outline of Occult Science
BOOK II. -- PART III. ADDENDA. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED
BOOK I. -- PART III. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED
Cognitive Science
Computer Science
Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology
Essential Books of Computer Science
Formal Sciences
Information Science
Library Science
Natural Sciences
Neuroscience
New Science
Ontology (information science)
reading list (Science)
Religion and Science
Science
Science and Sanity
Science Fiction
Social Sciences
Systems Science
The Gay Science
The Science of Knowing
The Shorter Science and Civilisation in China
The Universe in a Single Atom The Convergence of Science and Spirituality
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, Savitri (extended toc), the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


science ::: Sri Aurobindo: “The beginning of Science is the examination of the truths of the world-force that underlie its apparent workings such as our senses represent them to be; . . .” *The Synthesis of Yoga

science ::: n. --> Knowledge; knowledge of principles and causes; ascertained truth of facts.
Accumulated and established knowledge, which has been systematized and formulated with reference to the discovery of general truths or the operation of general laws; knowledge classified and made available in work, life, or the search for truth; comprehensive, profound, or philosophical knowledge.
Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical

Science::: When the ancient thinkers of India set themselves to study the soul of man in themselves and others, they, unlike any other nation or school of early thought, proceeded at once to a process which resembles exactly enough the process adopted by modern science in its study of physical phenomena. For their object was to study, arrange and utilise the forms, forces and working movements of consciousness, just as the modern physical Sciences study, arrange and utilize the forms, forces and working movements of objective Matter. The material with which they had to deal was more subtle, flexible and versatile than the most impalpable forces of which the physical Sciences have become aware; its motions were more elusive, its processes harder to fix; but once grasped and ascertained, the movements of consciousness were found by Vedic psychologists to be in their process and activity as regular, manageable and utilisable as the movements of physical forces. The powers of the soul can be as perfectly handled and as safely, methodically and puissantly directed to practical life-purposes of joy, power and light as the modern power of electricity can be used for human comfort, industrial and locomotive power and physical illumination; but the results to which they give room and effect are more wonderful and momentous than the results of motorpower and electric luminosity. For there is no difference of essential law in the physical and the psychical, but only a difference and undoubtedly a great difference of energy, instrumentation and exact process.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 12, Page: 314

Science of Science: The analysis and description of science from various points of view, including logic, methodology, sociology, and history of science. One of the chief tasks of the science of science is the ana1ysis of the language of science (see Semiotic). Scientific empiricism (q.v.) emphasizes the role of the science of science, and tries to clarify the different aspects. Some empiricists believe that the chief task of philosophy is the development of the logic and methodology of science, and that most of the problems of traditional philosophy, as far as they have cognitive meaning (see Meaning, Kinds of, 1, 5), may be construed as problems of the science of science. -- R.C.

Science, philosophy of: That philosophic discipline which is the systematic study of the nature of science, especially of its methods, its concepts and presuppositions, and its place in the general scheme of intellectual disciplines.

Science and Engineering Research Council
(SERC) Formerly the largest of the five research
councils funded by the British Government through the Office
of Science and Technology. SERC funded higher education
research in science and engineering, including computing and
was responsible for the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, near
Oxford; the Daresbury Laboratory, near Warrington; the Royal
Greenwich Observatory at Cambridge and the Royal Observatory,
Edinburgh.
In April 1994 SERC was split into the Engineering and Physical
Sciences Research Council and the Particle Physics and
Astronomy Research Council. SERC's remote sensing efforts
have been transferred to the Natural Environment RC and its
biotechnology efforts merged with the Agriculture and Food RC
to make the new Biotechnology and Biological Sciences RC. The
two major SERC laboratories - {Rutherford Appleton Laboratory}
and Daresbury Laboratory are now independent.
{(http://unixfe.rl.ac.uk/serc/serc.php)}.
(1994-12-15)

science ::: n. --> Knowledge; knowledge of principles and causes; ascertained truth of facts.
Accumulated and established knowledge, which has been systematized and formulated with reference to the discovery of general truths or the operation of general laws; knowledge classified and made available in work, life, or the search for truth; comprehensive, profound, or philosophical knowledge.
Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical

Science ::: An operation of the human spirit-mind in its endeavor to understand the how of things -- not anyparticular science whatsoever, but the thing in itself, science per se -- ordered and classified knowledge.One phase of a triform method of understanding the nature of universal nature and its multiform andmultifold workings; and this phase cannot be separated from the other two -- philosophy and religion -- ifwe wish to gain a true picture of things as they are in themselves.Science is the aspect of human thinking in the activity of the mentality in the latter's inquisitive,researching, and classifying functions.

Science has not yet solved the problem of the origin of the Cromagnons. Blavatsky hints that they came indirectly from Atlantis by way of Africa: “The earliest Palaeolithic men in Europe — about whose origin Ethnology is silent, and whose very characteristics are but imperfectly known . . . were of pure Atlantean and ‘Africo’-Atlantean stocks. . . . As to the African tribes — themselves diverging offshoots of Atlanteans modified by climate and conditions — they crossed into Europe over the peninsula which made the Mediterranean an inland sea. Fine races were many of these European cave-men; the Cro-Magnon, for instance. But, as was to be expected, progress is almost non-existent through the whole of the vast period allotted by Science to the Chipped Stone-Age. The cyclic impulse downwards weighs heavily on the stocks thus transplanted — the incubus of the Atlantean Karma is upon them” (SD 2:740-1).

Science admits the existence of vast stores of latent energy in the atoms; and considering everything as a question of physical dynamics, it infers that an equivalent quantity of physical energy must have been expended in creating the atom. Energy or life is a fundamental attribute and function of the universe, which has its manifestations on all seven or ten planes of prakriti, appearing as centers of energy which radiate outwards from within. Also used to denote the female potency or sakti (SD 1:l36); aether too is mentioned as the quintessence of energy. Energy expended on the astral plane is far more productive of results than the same amount expended on the physical plane, according to occult dynamics.

Science [from Latin scientia from scire to know] In its widest sense formulated knowledge, a knowledge of structure, laws, and operations. The unity of human knowledge may be artificially divided into religion, philosophy, and science. Science and philosophy, as presently understood, have in common the quality of being speculative, as opposed to religion, which in the West is supposed to be founded merely on faith and moral sentiments. The present distinction between science and philosophy lies largely in their respective fields of speculation. What is known as modern science investigates the phenomena of physical nature and by inferential reasoning formulates general laws therefrom. Its method is called inductive and its data are so-called facts — i.e., sensory observations; whereas deductive philosophy starts from axioms. Yet a scientist, in order to reason from his data at all, must necessarily use both induction and deduction.

sciences, longevity, etc. Eiael is also one of the 72

Science with Theology in Christendom.

science and wisdom, to be compared wth Raphael

Science Occulte .]

Sciences” in The Secret Doctrine in Israel]

Science. London: Methuen, 1923.

Science. 3 vols. New York: Macmillan [1922-1934],

Science with Theology in Christendom. 2 vols. New

SCIENCE—Knowledge gained and verified by exact observations and correct thinking, methodically formulated and arranged in a rational system.

Science and Engineering Research Council ::: (body) (SERC) Formerly the largest of the five research councils funded by the British Government through the Office of Science and Technology. SERC Daresbury Laboratory, near Warrington; the Royal Greenwich Observatory at Cambridge and the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh.In April 1994 SERC was split into the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. SERC's remote Biotechnology and Biological Sciences RC. The two major SERC laboratories - Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and Daresbury Laboratory are now independent. . (1994-12-15)

science fiction: A genre of literature that features an alternative society that is founded on the imagined technology of the future. The genre stretches the imagination by rooting the fantasy of the future in recognizable elements of modern life. This type of fantasy literature, typically takes the form of a short story or novel.

SCIENCE The task of science is to explore physical, but not superphysical reality. Without the facts of esoterics, mankind will remain ignorant of 46 of the 49 cosmic worlds, science will be able to explore only the 49th. K 1.43.2

Natural science seeks to explore visible, physical reality. Thereby its task is given and at the same time its inevitable limitation. Science is physicalism.

Science makes its way slowly, advancing step by step, by ascertaining facts. These facts are summed up in theories and are explained be hypotheses. Both theories and hypotheses are continually being changed through newly ascertained facts. Facts, theories, and hypotheses are joined together into a thought system which is regarded as scientific truth. These temporarily ruling systems of orientation, which show how far research has advanced, are continually being changed because of new facts with new theories and hypotheses. Facts that cannot be fitted into the prevailing systems of theories and hypotheses, are regarded as doubtful. Facts that it is not possible to ascertain by the methods of research used by scientists, are not regarded as facts. It follows from this that the most important quality of an hypothesis is not its being true, but its being probable: acceptable to science with its tremendously limited ability to explain. K
5.42.1,3




Science ::: A process through which knowledge is acquired. The scientific method conventionally begins with an observation and proceeds to formulate a hypothesis. From there a sound experiment is designed with appropriate variables to study and controls set to try to narrow the focus to the variable of study (i.e. whether the independent variable is causing a change in the dependent variable). If the results of the experiment align with the hypothesis then further experiments are designed and peer-reviewed to ensure validity. If the results do not align then the hypothesis may need to be reworked. This is a simplification of the process but is the primary method of knowledge acquisition in society today. Unfortunately the mental state of the experimenters and the subjects cannot be controlled adequately and there needs to be a rethinking of this method to truly understand and decipher the mystery of consciousness. The process of meditation is used to decipher the factors that give rise to conscious experience.

science ::: Sri Aurobindo: “The beginning of Science is the examination of the truths of the world-force that underlie its apparent workings such as our senses represent them to be; . . .” *The Synthesis of Yoga


--- QUOTES [546 / 546 - 500 / 21281] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   54 Sri Aurobindo
   52 Georg C Lichtenberg
   42 Albert Einstein
   37 Bertrand Russell
   17 Leonardo da Vinci
   17 Blaise Pascal
   16 Richard P Feynman
   16 Alfred Korzybski
   14 Alfred North Whitehead
   13 R Buckminster Fuller
   11 William Gibson
   11 Nikola Tesla
   11 Arthur C Clarke
   8 The Mother
   8 Carl Sagan
   7 Frank Herbert
   6 Philip K Dick
   6 Michio Kaku
   6 James S A Corey
   5 Norbert Wiener
   5 James Clerk Maxwell
   5 Isaac Newton
   5 Charles Darwin
   4 Werner Heisenberg
   4 Ursula K Le Guin
   4 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   4 Omar Khayyam
   4 Lewis Carroll
   4 Ken Wilber
   4 Johannes Kepler
   4 Isaac Asimov
   4 Henri Poincare
   4 Emanuel Swedenborg
   4 Aleister Crowley
   3 Stephen Hawkings
   3 Niels Bohr
   3 Leonard Susskind
   3 H P Blavatsky
   3 Friedrich Nietzsche
   3 Erwin Schrodinger
   3 Douglas Adams
   2 Thomas S Kuhn
   2 Swami Vivekananda
   2 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   2 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   2 Peter J Carroll
   2 Paramahansa Yogananda
   2 Orson Scott Card
   2 Neil deGrasse Tyson
   2 Michael Talbot
   2 Max Planck
   2 Manly P Hall
   2 M Alan Kazlev
   2 Kurt Godel
   2 Jordan Peterson
   2 Galileo Galilei
   2 Eugene Paul Wigner
   2 Eliphas Levi
   2 Carl Jung
   2 Buckminster Fuller
   2 Augustus De Morgan
   2 Alan Wilson
   2
   1 W. V. O Quine
   1 Wikipedia
   1 Vladimir Voevodsky
   1 Victor Hugo
   1 Ursula K LeGuin
   1 To Develop a Mind:
Study the science of art;
Study the art of science.
Learn how to see.
Realize that everything connects
to everything else." - Leonardo da Vinci

   1 Thomas Keating
   1 Susan Sontag
   1 Stephen Covey
   1 Sri Ramakrishna
   1 Saint Padre Pio
   1 Saint John of the Cross
   1 Saint Francis of Assisi
   1 Ronald Decker and Thierry Depaulis and Michael Dummett
   1 Robert Burton
   1 Richard Dawkins
   1 René Guénon
   1 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   1 Noam Chomsky
   1 Mortimer J Adler
   1 Michael J. Gelb
   1 Marie Curie
   1 Louis Pasteur
   1 Leonardo Da Vinci
   1  Leonard Adleman
   1 Ken Wilber?
   1 Julian Huxley
   1 Joseph Campbell
   1 Jonathan Swift
   1 J.K.F.
   1 Jean Gebser
   1 James George Frazer
   1 Immanuel Kant
   1 Hugh of Saint Victor
   1 H P Lovecraft
   1 Howard Gardner
   1 Hippocrates
   1 H G Wells
   1 Henri Bergson
   1 Hasidic Proverb
   1 Harold Abelson
   1 Gary Zukav
   1 Gabor Mate
   1 Fritjof Capra
   1 Fred Hosea
   1 Franz Bardon
   1 Fa.khen-pi.u
   1 Essential Integral
   1 Editors of Discovery Magazine
   1 Ecclesiastious
   1 Dr. John Dee
   1 Daily Evolver
   1 C S Lewis
   1 Charles Sanders Peirce
   1 Bernhard Guenther
   1 Benjamin Disraeli
   1 Baha-ullah: The Seven Valleys
   1 Arthur Koestler
   1 Aristotle
   1 Archimedes
   1 Anonymous
   1 Aleister Crowley?
   1 A E van Vogt
   1 Ada Lovelace
   1 Abu Hamid al-Ghazali

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   10 Anonymous
   6 William Shakespeare
   6 Toba Beta
   5 Francis Bacon
   4 Georges Braque
   4 Claude Bernard
   4 Arthur C Clarke
   4 Alexander Pope
   3 William James
   3 Victor Hugo
   3 Thomas Jefferson
   3 Roger Bacon
   3 Publilius Syrus
   3 Pharrell Williams
   3 Paul Val ry
   3 Otto von Bismarck
   3 Osho
   3 Neil deGrasse Tyson
   3 Max Planck
   3 Mark Twain
   3 Lord Byron
   3 Johann Kaspar Lavater
   3 Jean Cocteau
   3 James Gleick
   3 Freeman Dyson
   3 Bill Bryson
   3 Benjamin Franklin
   2 Winston Churchill
   2 Timothy Leary
   2 Thomas Huxley
   2 Steven Wright
   2 Stephen Hawking
   2 Siddhartha Mukherjee
   2 Seanan McGuire
   2 Sally Ride
   2 Robert Fripp
   2 Richard P Feynman
   2 Richard Dawkins
   2 Plato
   2 Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr
   2 Mustafa Kemal Ataturk
   2 Michael Crichton
   2 Mehmet Murat ildan
   2 Mason Cooley
   2 Mary Augusta Ward
   2 Martin Firrell
   2 Louis Pasteur
   2 Karl Marx
   2 Karl Kraus
   2 John Kenneth Galbraith
   2 John Henry Newman
   2 John Adams
   2 James Madison
   2 Isaac Asimov
   2 Immanuel Kant
   2 Herbert Spencer
   2 Gulzar
   2 George Eliot
   2 Gabriel Garc a M rquez
   2 Friedrich Nietzsche
   2 Frank Herbert
   2 Douglas Preston
   2 China Mieville
   2 Carl Sagan
   2 Carlos Ruiz Zaf n
   2 Carlo Rovelli
   2 Arthur Conan Doyle
   2 Aristotle

1:We are, because God is. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
2:Of all things, I liked books best. ~ Nikola Tesla,
3:Chess is the gymnasium of the mind. ~ Blaise Pascal,
4:Awake, my Little ones, and fill the Cup ~ Omar Khayyam,
5:Learning never exhausts the mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
6:Ideas too are a life and a world. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
7:Eloquence is a painting of the thoughts. ~ Blaise Pascal,
8:I'm smart enough to know that I'm dumb. ~ Richard P Feynman,
9:Wisdom is the daughter of experience. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
10:Art is never finished, only abandoned. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
11:Knowledge shrinks as wisdom grows. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
12:Wine is sunlight, held together by water. ~ Galileo Galilei,
13:Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. ~ Leonardo Da Vinci,
14:What I cannot create, I do not understand. ~ Richard P Feynman,
15:Imagination is more important than knowledge. ~ Albert Einstein,
16:It is harder to crack prejudice than an atom. ~ Albert Einstein,
17:They do not think, therefore they are not. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
18:Intellectual passion drives out sensuality. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
19:He who understands the wise is wise already. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
20:Love has reasons which reason cannot understand. ~ Blaise Pascal,
21:The heart has its reasons which reason knows not. ~ Blaise Pascal,
22:The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time. ~ Bertrand Russell,
23:Truth was the only daughter of Time. ~ Leonardo da Vinci, ., 1152,
24:A physicist is just an atom's way of looking at itself. ~ Niels Bohr,
25:Coincidence is God's way of remaining anonymous. ~ Albert Einstein,
26:Magic is just science that we don't understand yet. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
27:Make your work to be in keeping with your purpose. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
28:Be quiet, darling. Let pattern recognition have its way. ~ William Gibson,
29:Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler. ~ Albert Einstein,
30:To live effectively is to live with adequate information. ~ Norbert Wiener,
31:Anything done against faith or conscience is sinful. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
32:Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life. ~ Immanuel Kant,
33:Be the master of your will and the slave of your conscience. ~ Hasidic Proverb,
34:I want to know God's thoughts - the rest are mere details. ~ Albert Einstein,
35:You may live to see man-made horrors beyond your comprehension. ~ Nikola Tesla,
36:Once we know our weaknesses they cease to do us any harm. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
37:Some people read only because they are too lazy to think. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
38:The book of nature is written in the language of mathematics. ~ Galileo Galilei,
39:The man was such an intellectual he was of almost no use. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
40:There are three sources of belief: reason, custom, inspiration. ~ Blaise Pascal,
41:I am the mother of pure love and of science and of sacred hope. ~ Ecclesiastious,
42:One has to do something new in order to see something new. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
43:A sense of duty is useful in work, but offensive in relations. ~ Bertrand Russell,
44:Before we blame we should first see whether we cannot excuse. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
45:I don't believe in empirical science. I only believe in a priori truth. ~ Kurt Godel,
46:Men despise religion. They hate it and are afraid it may be true. ~ Blaise Pascal,
47:Blind obedience to authority is the greatest enemy of the truth. ~ Albert Einstein,
48:A student should not be taught more than he can think about. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
49:Too little liberty brings stagnation, and too much brings chaos. ~ Bertrand Russell,
50:It is man's natural sickness to believe that he possesses the truth. ~ Blaise Pascal,
51:Do not say hypothesis, and even less theory: say way of thinking. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
52:Little science takes you away from God but more of it takes you to Him. ~ Louis Pasteur,
53:If I have seen further, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants. ~ Isaac Newton,
54:It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer ~ Albert Einstein,
55:I write for the same reason I breathe - because if I didn't, I would die. ~ Isaac Asimov,
56:One can live in this world on soothsaying but not on truth saying. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
57:One scientific epoch ended and another began with James Clerk Maxwell. ~ Albert Einstein,
58:Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind. ~ Albert Einstein,
59:I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
60:One can have no smaller or greater mastery than mastery of oneself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
61:To know how to criticize is good, to know how to create is better. (417) ~ Henri Poincare,
62:Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
63:Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is. ~ Isaac Asimov,
64:The only reason for time is so that everything doesn't happen at once. ~ Albert Einstein,
65:Now the soft-voiced gentle woman of my reverent worship has all but vanished. ~ Nikola Tesla,
66:Peace cannot be kept by force. It can only be achieved by understanding. ~ Albert Einstein,
67:If it can be destroyed by the Truth, it deserves to be destroyed by the Truth. ~ Carl Sagan,
68:Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~ Albert Einstein,
69:It is through science that we prove, but through intuition that we discover. ~ Henri Poincare,
70:People who never have any time on their hands are those who do the least. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
71:But I am very poorly today and very stupid and hate everybody and everything. ~ Charles Darwin,
72:Doubt everything at least once, even the sentence "Two times two is four." ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
73:I never made one of my discoveries through the process of rational thinking. ~ Albert Einstein,
74:Try not to become a man of success, but rather try to become a man of value. ~ Albert Einstein,
75:Always tell only the truth, and all the truth, and do so promptly right now. ~ Buckminster Fuller,
76:If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or objects. ~ Albert Einstein,
77:In looking out upon the world, we forget that the world is looking at itself. ~ Alan Wilson,
78:Success comes from curiosity, concentration, perseverance and self criticism. ~ Albert Einstein,
79:Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so. ~ Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy ,
80:A person reveals his character by nothing so clearly as the joke he resents. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
81:Be alone, that is the secret of invention; be alone, that is when ideas are born. ~ Nikola Tesla,
82:Even truth needs to be clad in new garments if it is to appeal to a new age. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
83:Small minds are concerned with the extraordinary, great minds with the ordinary. ~ Blaise Pascal,
84:A library is the first step of a thousand journeys, portal to a thousand worlds. ~ Orson Scott Card,
85:All men's miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone. ~ Blaise Pascal,
86:The book which most deserved to be banned would be a catalog of banned books. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
87:Wisdom is not a product of schooling but of the lifelong attempt to acquire it. ~ Albert Einstein,
88:Ecclesiastes shows that man without God is in total ignorance and inevitable misery. ~ Blaise Pascal,
89:Faith is different from proof; the latter is human, the former is a Gift from God. ~ Blaise Pascal,
90:I roamed the countryside searching for answers to things I did not understand. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
91:It may be that our role on this planet is not to worship God - but to create him. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
92:Thoroughly conscious ignorance is the prelude to every real advance in science. ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
93:All governments suffer a recurring problem: Power attracts pathological personalities. ~ Frank Herbert,
94:People who deny the existence of dragons are often eaten by dragons. From within. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
95:Perhaps in time the so-called Dark Ages will be thought of as including our own. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
96:All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. ~ Albert Einstein, Relativity ,
97:Intelligence is not the ability to store information, but to know where to find it. ~ Albert Einstein,
98:Neither love without knowledge nor knowledge without love can produce a good life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
99:While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
100:If another Messiah was born he could hardly do so much good as the printing-press. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
101:In the world we live in, one fool makes many fools, but one sage only a few sages. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
102:Not only is the Universe stranger than we think, it is stranger than we can think. ~ Werner Heisenberg,
103:Religion is to mysticism what popularization is to science ~ Henri Bergson,
104:To read means to borrow; to create out of one's readings is paying off one's debts. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
105:Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
106:The game I play is a very interesting one. It's imagination, in a tight straightjacket. ~ Richard P Feynman,
107:It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder. ~ Albert Einstein,
108:Perfection of means and confusion of goals seem, in my opinion, to characterize our age. ~ Albert Einstein,
109:All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone. ~ Blaise Pascal, Pensées ,
110:As our circle of knowledge expands, so does the circumference of darkness surrounding it. ~ Albert Einstein,
111:Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric. ~ Bertrand Russell,
112:How disorienting and isolating immortality must be, and how strong he must be to weather it. ~ Michael Talbot,
113:Don't listen to the person who has the answers; listen to the person who has the questions ~ Albert Einstein,
114:I live in that solitude which is painful in youth, but delicious in the years of maturity. ~ Albert Einstein,
115:Mathematics reveals its secrets only to those who approach it with pure love, for its own beauty. ~ Archimedes,
116:To know and to will are two operations of the human mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci, Notesboooks Philosophy,
117:I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned. ~ Richard P Feynman,
118:The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond them into the impossible. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
119:Within the armor is the butterfly and within the butterfly - is the signal from another star. ~ Philip K Dick,
120:A book is a mirror: if an ape looks into it an apostle is hardly likely to look out. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
121:Each is a mass of forces thrown in shape. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Discoveries of Science - III,
122:The distinction between the past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion. ~ Albert Einstein,
123:The end of all Science is Agnosticism. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad A Commentary on the Isha Upanishad,
124:The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. ~ Richard P Feynman,
125:Yoga is the science which teaches us how to get these perceptions [direct experiences of God]. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
126:Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. ~ , 1 Corinthians 13:7,
127:Man in many respects may be compared with those animals which have long been domesticated. ~ Charles Darwin, 1871 ,
128:Practical sciences proceed by building up; theoretical science by resolving into components. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
129:The only rational way of educating is to be an example - if one can't help it, a warning example. ~ Albert Einstein,
130:There are in fact two things, science and opinion; the former begets knowledge, the latter ignorance. ~ Hippocrates,
131:Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking. ~ Albert Einstein,
132:He who knows himself properly can very soon learn to know all other men. It is all reflection. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
133:The inner self is as distinct from the outer self as heaven is from earth. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg, Secrets of Heaven ,
134:Physics is the most fundamental, and least significant, of the sciences. ~ Ken Wilber, Sex Ecology Spirituality p.93,
135:The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution. ~ Bertrand Russell,
136:The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. ~ Bertrand Russell,
137:Man’s conscience is a creation of his evolving nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Good,
138:He was always smoothing and polishing himself, and in the end he became blunt before he was sharp. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
139:The search for something permanent is one of the deepest of the instincts leading men to philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
140:There should be a science of discontent. People need hard times to develop psychic muscles. ~ Frank Herbert, Dune (1965) ,
141:A good means to discovery is to take away certain parts of a system to find out how the rest behaves. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
142:How few friends would remain friends if each could see the sentiments of the other in their entirety. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
143:Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write. ~ H G Wells,
144:The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. ~ Albert Einstein,
145:Drink ! For you know not whence you came, nor why; Drink ! For you know not why you go nor where. ~ Omar Khayyam, Rubaiyat ,
146:Never undertake anything unless you have the heart to ask Heaven's blessing on your undertaking. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
147:...the only simplicity to be trusted is the simplicity to be found on the far side of complexity. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
148:There comes a time when the mind takes a higher plane of knowledge but can never prove how it got there. ~ Albert Einstein,
149:I much prefer the sharpest criticism of a single intelligent man to the thoughtless approval of the masses. ~ Johannes Kepler,
150:Maybe happiness is this: not feeling like you should be elsewhere, doing something else, being someone else. ~ Isaac Asimov,
151:The significant problems we have cannot be solved at the same level of thinking with which we created them. ~ Albert Einstein,
152:... almost any idea which jogs you out of your current abstractions may be better than nothing. (575) ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
153:But please remember: this is only a work of fiction. The truth, as always, will be far stranger. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
154:Imagine the world so greatly magnified that particles of light look like twenty-four-pound cannon balls. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
155:In some sense, gravity does not exist; what moves the planets and the stars is the distortion of space and time. ~ Michio Kaku,
156:What a blessing it would be if we could open and shut our ears...as easily as we open and shut our eyes. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
157:When the past is always with you, it may as well be present; and if it is present, it will be future as well. ~ William Gibson,
158:Intuition is the father of new knowledge, while empiricism is nothing but an accumulation of old knowledge. ~ Albert Einstein,
159:One gains the purest joy from spirited things only when they are not tied in with earning one's livelihood. ~ Albert Einstein,
160:When ships to sail the void between the stars have been built, there will step forth men to sail these ships. ~ Johannes Kepler,
161:As every divided kingdom falls, so every mind divided between many studies confounds and saps itself ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
162:Imagination grows by exercise and contrary to common belief is more powerful in the mature than in the young. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
163:One's first step in wisdom is to question everything - and one's last is to come to terms with everything. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
164:Magick is the Science and Art of causing Change to occur in conformity with Will. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
165:One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important. ~ Bertrand Russell,
166:Reason is science, it is conscious art, it is invention. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Reason as Governor of Life,
167:You can recognize a small truth because its opposite is a falsehood. The opposite of a great truth is another truth. ~ Niels Bohr,
168:Civilization advances by extending the number of operations we can perform without thinking about them. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
169:Science is always discovering odd scraps of magical wisdom and making a tremendous fuss about its cleverness. ~ Aleister Crowley,
170:Science will, in all probability,be increasingly impregnatedby mysticism. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, My Universe (1924) ,
171:If I have ever made any valuable discoveries, it has been due more to patient attention, than to any other talent. ~ Isaac Newton,
172:Such as the love is, such is the wisdom, consequently such is the man (n. 368) (Divine Love and Wisdom, 1763) ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
173:Truth is so obscure in these times, and falsehood so established, that, unless we love the truth, we cannot know it. ~ Blaise Pascal,
174:Raja-Yoga is the science of religion, the rationale of all worship, all prayers, forms, ceremonies, and miracles. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
175:Study hard what interests you the most in the most undisciplined, irreverent and original manner possible. ~ Richard P Feynman,
176:God desires the smallest degree of purity of conscience in you more than all the works you can perform. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
177:Praise cannot make me any betteR Blame cannot make me any worse. I am what I am before my conscience and God. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
178:The aim of science is to seek the simplest explanations of complex facts. ... Seek simplicity and distrust it. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
179:Philosophy begins in wonder. And, at the end, when philosophic thought has done its best, the wonder remains. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
180:The total number of minds in the universe is one. In fact, consciousness is a singularity phasing within all beings. ~ Erwin Schrodinger,
181:Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less. ~ Marie Curie,
182:Even the animal is more in touch with a certain harmony in things than man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I Science and Yoga,
183:Hegel's philosophy is so odd that one would not have expected him to be able to get some men to accept it, but he did." ~ Bertrand Russell,
184:I have a fundamental belief in the Bible as the Word of God, written by those who were inspired. I study the Bible daily. ~ Isaac Newton,
185:Just as there are polysyllabic words that say very little, so there are also monosyllabic words of infinite meaning. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
186:Nature must flower into artAnd science, or else wherefore are we men? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
187:Drunkenness is temporary suicide: the happiness that it brings is merely negative, a momentary cessation of unhappiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
188:It vexes me greatly that having to earn my living has forced me to interrupt the work and to attend to small matters. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
189:Part of the maturity of the sciences is an appreciation of which questions are best left to other disciplinary approaches. ~ Howard Gardner,
190:A designer is an emerging synthesis of artist, inventor, mechanic, objective economist and evolutionary strategist. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
191:I have remarked very clearly that I am often of one opinion when I am lying down and of another when I am standing up. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
192:Science, philosophy and religion are bound to converge as they draw nearer to the whole. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon Of Man ,
193:The darkness was the Omnipotent’s abode,Hood of omniscience, a blind mask of God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Inconscient,
194:The plants are very psychic, but they can express it only by silence and beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I Science and Yoga,
195:Clarity of mind means clarity of passion; this is why a great and clear mind loves ardently and sees distinctly what it loves. ~ Blaise Pascal,
196:If I had an hour to solve a problem I'd spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and five minutes thinking about solutions. ~ Albert Einstein,
197:Sometimes I think we're alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we're not. In either case the idea is quite staggering. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
198:There are no whole truths, all truths are half-truths. It is trying to treat them as whole truths that plays the devil. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
199:If an angel were to tell us about his philosophy, I believe many of his statements might well sound like '2 x 2= 13'. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
200:Our human ignorance moves towards the TruthThat Nescience may become omniscient, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
201:What you have been obliged to discover by yourself leaves a path in your mind which you can use again when the need arises. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
202:Neither a man nor a crowd nor a nation can be trusted to act humanely or to think sanely under the influence of a great fear. ~ Bertrand Russell,
203:Science and Philosophy are never entirely dispassionate and disinterested. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Reason as Governor of Life,
204:Temporis filia veritas; cui me obstetricari non pudet. (Truth is the daughter of time, and I feel no shame in being her midwife.) ~ Johannes Kepler,
205:I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
206:Science is a light within a limited room, not the sun which illumines the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Glory of God in Man,
207:A painter should begin every canvas with a wash of black, because all things in nature are dark except where exposed by the light. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
208:I have said that the modern man, and especially the modern American, however much 'know-how' he may have, has very little 'know-what' ~ Norbert Wiener,
209:It is in the moments when the mind is most active and the fewest things are forgotten that the most intense joys are experienced. ~ Bertrand Russell,
210:Perhaps science does not develop by the accumulation of individual discoveries and inventions ~ Thomas S Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions ,
211:Sometimes I wonder if people who aggrressively seek political power are precisely those who should not be entrusted to wield it. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
212:The supersession of dualism in biology begins to occur in this science at the moment when the ‘time’ factor is taken into consideration. ~ Jean Gebser,
213:How can one attempt seeing truth without knowing falsehood. It is the attempt to see the light without knowing darkness. It cannot be. ~ Frank Herbert,
214:According to some estimates, almost half the scientists and high technologists on Earth are employed full- or part-time on military matters. ~ Carl Sagan,
215:If one wishes to obtain a definite answer from Nature one must attack the question from a more general and less selfish point of view. (415) ~ Max Planck,
216:Imagination is the Discovering Faculty, pre-eminently. It is that which penetrates into the unseen worlds around us, the worlds of Science. ~ Ada Lovelace,
217:The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane. ~ Nikola Tesla,
218:If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales. ~ Albert Einstein,
219:Life is a scale of the universal Energy in which the transition from inconscience to consciousness is managed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.06 - The Transformation of Dream Life,
220:The first gulp from the glass of natural sciences will turn you into an atheist, but at the bottom of the glass God is waiting for you. ~ Werner Heisenberg,
221:The gift of mental power comes from God, Divine Being, and if we concentrate our minds on that truth, we become in tune with this great power. ~ Nikola Tesla,
222:His science is an artificer of doom;He ransacks earth for means to harm his kind; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
223:It is a great shame; most of our words are misused tools / which often still smell of the mud in which previous owners / desecrated them. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
224:Be a loner. That gives you time to wonder, to search for the truth. Have holy curiosity. Make your life worth living. ~ Albert Einstein, Einstein and the Poet ,
225:Scientific knowledge is a body of statements of varying degrees of certainty -- some most unsure, some nearly sure, none absolutely certain. ~ Richard P Feynman,
226:A civilisation which cannot burst through its current abstractions is doomed to sterility after a very limited period of progress. (575) ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
227:Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic. ~ Frank Herbert,
228:The objection to propaganda is not only its appeal to unreason, but still more the unfair advantage which it gives to the rich and powerful. ~ Bertrand Russell,
229:And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence ~ Bertrand Russell,
230:Mathematics is a language plus reasoning; it is like a language plus logic. Mathematics is a tool for reasoning. ~ Richard P Feynman, The Character of Physical Law ,
231:The data of the senses can bring us, is not true knowledge; it is a science of appearances. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge,
232:The ideals which have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully have been kindness, beauty, and truth ~ Albert Einstein,
233:Every sentence I utter must be understood not as an affirmation but as a question.[A caution he gives his students, to be wary of dogmatism.] ~ Niels Bohr,
234:Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns, so each small piece of her fabric reveals the organization of the entire tapestry. ~ Richard P Feynman,
235:The Inconscience is an inverse reproduction of the supreme superconscience. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.10 - Knowledge by Identity and Separative Knowledge,
236:We know very little, and yet it is astonishing that we know so much, and still more astonishing that so little knowledge can give us so much power. ~ Bertrand Russell,
237:I do not like mystical language, and yet I hardly know how to express what I mean without employing phrases that sound poetic rather than scientific. ~ Bertrand Russell,
238:Pollution is nothing but resources we're not harvesting. We allow them to disperse because we've been ignorant of their value. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, I Seem To Be A Verb ,
239:The words is and is not, which imply the agreement or disagreement of two ideas, must exist, explicitly or implicitly, in every assertion. (354) ~ Augustus De Morgan,
240:When I am working on a problem, I never think about beauty........ but when I have finished, if the solution is not beautiful, I know it is wrong. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
241:Physical science may give clues of process, but cannot lay hold on the reality of things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga Rebirth and Soul Evolution,
242:If it is permissible to write plays that are not intended to be seen, I should like to see who can prevent me from writing a book no one can read. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
243:A stupid man's report of what a clever man says can never be accurate, because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something he can understand. ~ Bertrand Russell,
244:Consciousness cannot be accounted for in physical terms. For consciousness is absolutely fundamental. It cannot be accounted for in terms of anything else. ~ Erwin Schrodinger,
245:A man really writes for an audience of about ten persons. Of course if others like it that is clear gain. But if those ten are satisfied he is content. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
246:Pain warns us not to exert our limbs to the point of breaking them. How much knowledge would we not need to recognize this by the exercise of mere reason. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
247:I believe in Spinoza's God who reveals himself in the orderly harmony of what exists, not in a God who concerns himself with fates and actions of human beings. ~ Albert Einstein,
248:Once men turned their thinking over to machines in the hope that this would set them free. But that only permitted other men with machines to enslave them. ~ Frank Herbert, Dune ,
249:Man is a masterpiece of creation if for no other reason than that, all the weight of evidence for determinism notwithstanding, he believes he has free will. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
250:To Develop a Mind:Study the science of art;Study the art of science.Learn how to see.Realize that everything connects to everything else." - Leonardo da Vinci, ~ To Develop a Mind:
Study the science of art;
Study the art of science.
Learn how to see.
Realize that everything connects
to everything else." - Leonardo da Vinci
,
251:Thus if every intellectual activity [διάνοια] is either practical or productive or speculative (θεωρητική), physics (φυσικὴ) will be a speculative [θεωρητική] science. ~ Aristotle,
252:When reading the works of an important thinker, look first for the apparent absurdities in the text and ask yourself how a sensible person could have written them. ~ Thomas S Kuhn,
253:He felt that his whole life was some kind of dream and he sometimes wondered whose it was and whether they were enjoying it. ~ Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy ,
254:But in introducing me simultaneously to skepticism and to wonder, they taught me the two uneasily cohabiting modes of thought that are central to the scientific method. ~ Carl Sagan,
255:Electric power is everywhere present in unlimited quantities and can drive the world's machinery without the need of coal, oil, gas, or any other of the common fuels. ~ Nikola Tesla,
256:Everyone who has ever written will have discovered that writing always awakens something which, though it lay within us, we failed clearly to recognize before. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
257:Having made the decision, do not revise it unless some new fact comes to your knowledge. Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so futile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
258:To present a whole world that doesn't exist and make it seem real, we have to more or less pretend we're polymaths. That's just the act of all good writing. ~ William Gibson,
259:Its highest wisdom was a brilliant guess,Its mighty structured science of the worldsA passing light on being’s surfaces. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.13 - In the Self of Mind,
260:Perfect rationality consists, not in believing what is true, but in attaching to every proposition a degree of belief corresponding to its degree of credibility. ~ Bertrand Russell,
261:People who deny the existence of dragons are often eaten by dragons from within. ~ Ursula K Le Guin, The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer the Reader and the Imagination,
262:Science gives us the objective truth of existence and the superficial knowledge of our physical and vital being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.20 - The Lower Triple Purusha,
263:A mass of superconscience closed in light,Creator of things in his all-knowing sleep. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
264:He wanted to close his eyes and shut out the pearly nothingness that surrounded him, but that was an act of a coward and he would not yield to it. ~ Arthur C Clarke, Saint Augustine of Hippo,
266:The boundless Nescience of the unconscious depthsCovered eternity with nothingness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The World of Falsehood,
267:You evidently do not suffer from "quotation-hunger" as I do! I get all the dictionaries of quotations I can meet with, as I always want to know where a quotation comes from. ~ Lewis Carroll,
268:Ignorance is no excuse when once we know that ignorance is the only possible excuse. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics ,
269:Fame and power are the objects of all men. Even their partial fruition is gained by very few; and that, too, at the expense of social pleasure, health, conscience, life. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
270:Truth is a shining goddess, always veiled, always distant, never wholly approachable, but worthy of all the devotion of which the human spirit is capable. ~ Bertrand Russell, Fact and Fiction ,
271:I made the journey to knowledge like dogs who go for walks with their masters, a hundred times forward and backward over the same territory; and when I arrived I was tired. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
272:Practice is the act of rehearsing a behavior over and over, or engaging in an activity again and again, for the purpose of improving or mastering it, as in the phrase practice makes perfect. ~ ,
273:As I take up my pen I feel myself so full, so equal to my subject, and see my book so clearly before me in embryo, I would almost like to try to say it all in a single word. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
274:Any given man sees only a tiny portion of the total truth, and very often, in fact almost perpetually, he deliberately deceives himself about that little precious fragment as well. ~ Philip K Dick,
275:In the beginning God said, the four-dimensional divergence of an antisymmetric, second rank tensor equals zero, and there was light, and it was good. And on the seventh day he rested. ~ Michio Kaku,
276:So often, science fiction helps to get young people interested in science. That's why I don't mind talking about science fiction. It has a real role to play: to seize the imagination. ~ Michio Kaku,
277:By relieving the brain of all unnecessary work, a good notation sets it free to concentrate on more advanced problems, and in effect increases the mental power of the race. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
278:Music, that is the science or the sense of proper modulation, is likewise given by God's generosity to mortals having rational souls in order to lead them to higher things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
279:To teach how to live without certainty, and yet without being paralyzed by hesitation, is perhaps the chief thing that philosophy, in our age, can still do for those who study it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
280:Realistic art does not and cannot give us a scientifically accurate presentation of life, because Art is not and cannot be Science. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
281:Since the initial publication of the chart of the electromagnetic spectrum, humans have learned that what they can touch, smell, see, and hear is less than one-millionth of reality. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
282:We as economic society are going to have to pay our whole population to go to school and pay it to stay at school. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studie ,
283:The greatest religious problem today is how to be both a mystic and a militant. In other words how to combine the search for an experience of inner awareness with effective social action. ~ Ursula K LeGuin,
284:The motives that lead us to do anything might be arranged like the thirty-two winds and might be given names on the same pattern: for instance, "bread-bread-fame" or "fame-fame-bread." ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
285:Everything good or true that the angels inspire in us is God's, so God is constantly talking to us. He talks very differently, though, to one person than to another. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg, Secrets of Heaven ,
286:It is of great advantage to the student of any subject to read the original memoirs on that subject, for science is always most completely assimilated when it is in the nascent state... ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
287:My brain is only a receiver, in the Universe there is a core from which we obtain knowledge, strength, inspiration. I have not penetrated into the secrets of this core, but I know it exists. ~ Nikola Tesla,
288:Since the measuring device has been constructed by the observer ... we have to remember that what we observe is not nature itself but nature exposed to our method of questioning. ~ Werner Heisenberg,
289:All mathematical laws which we find in Nature are always suspect to me, in spite of their beauty. They give me no pleasure. They are merely auxiliaries. At close range it is all not true. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
290:Science fiction is a field of writing where, month after month, every printed word implies to hundreds of thousands of people: 'There is change. Look, today's fantastic story is tomorrow's fact. ~ A E van Vogt,
291:Knowledge sets us free, art sets us free. A great library is freedom...and that freedom must not be compromised. It must be available to all who need it, when they need it, and that's always. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
292:People who have read a good deal rarely make great discoveries. I do not say this in excuse of laziness, but because invention presupposes an extensive independent contemplation of things. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
293:Diogenes, filthily attired, paced across the splendid carpets in Plato's dwelling. Thus, said he, do I trample on the pride of Plato. Yes, Plato replied, but only with another kind of pride. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
294:Science is a bit like the joke about the drunk who is looking under a lamppost for a key that he has lost on the other side of the street, because that's where the light is. It has no other choice. ~ Noam Chomsky,
295:The Victorian Age, for all its humbug, was a period of rapid progress, because men were dominated by hope rather than fear. If we are again to have progress, we must again be dominated by hope. ~ Bertrand Russell,
296:It not seldom happens that in the purposeless rovings and wanderings of the imagination we hunt down such game as can be put to use by our purposeful philosophy in its well-ordered household. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
297:Philosophers, for example, often fail to recognize that their remarks about the universe apply also to themselves and their remarks. If the universe is meaningless, so is the statement that it is so. ~ Alan Wilson,
298:The foundation of reverence is this perception, that the present holds within itself the complete sum of existence, backwards and forwards, that whole amplitude of time, which is eternity. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
299:The secret of happiness is this : let your interest be as wide as possible, and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
300:The attempt to diminish the subjective view to the vanishing-point so as to get an accurate presentation is proper to science, not to poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
301:Conspiracy theory's got to be simple. Sense doesn't come into it. People are more scared of how complicated shit actually is than they ever are about whatever's supposed to be behind the conspiracy. ~ William Gibson,
302:The little Mind is tied to little things:Its sense is but the spirit’s outward touch,Half-waked in a world of dark Inconscience. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
303:Although I am a typical loner in my daily life, my awareness of belonging to the invisible community of those who strive for truth, beauty, and justice has prevented me from feelings of isolation. ~ Albert Einstein,
304:Just as we outgrow a pair of trousers, we outgrow acquaintances, libraries, principles, etc., at times before they're worn out and times - and this is the worst of all - before we have new ones. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
305:Quite clearly, our task is predominantly metaphysical, for it is how to get all of humanity to educate itself swiftly enough to generate spontaneous social behaviors that will avoid extinction ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
306:Every judgement of conscience, be it right or wrong, be it about things evil in themselves or morally indifferent, is obligatory, in such wise that he who acts against his conscience always sins. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
307:Do not judge God's world from your own. Trim your own hedge as you wish and plant your flowers in the patterns you can understand, but do not judge the garden of nature from your little window box. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
308:There is no more important rule of conduct in the world than this: attach yourself as much as you can to people who are abler than you and yet not so very different that you cannot understand them. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
309:The human mind has not yet reached that illumination or that sure science by which it can forecast securely even its morrow. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Small Free Unit and the Larger Concentrated Unity,
310:Have courage and do not fear the assaults of the Devil. Remember this forever; it is a healthy sign if the devil shouts and roars around your conscience, since this shows that he is not inside your will. ~ Saint Padre Pio,
311:Philosophy is to be studied, not for the sake of any definite answers to its questions since no definite answers can, as a rule, be known to be true, but rather for the sake of the questions themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
312:If you find from your own experience that something is a fact and it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority and base your reasoning on your own findings. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
313:It is essential to happiness that our way of living should spring from our own deep impulses and not from the accidental tastes and desires of those who happen to be our neighbors, or even our relations. ~ Bertrand Russell,
314:When it comes to truth and justice there is no difference between the small and great problems. Whosoever fails to take small matters seriously in a spirit of truth cannot be trusted in greater affairs. ~ Albert Einstein,
315:I live on Earth at present, and I don't know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing - a noun, I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process - an integral function of the universe. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
316:I would say, then, that you are faced with a future in which education is going to be number one amongst the great world industries. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studies ,
317:The beginning of Science is the examination of the truths of the world-force that underlie its apparent workings such as our senses represent them to be. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.03 - The Purified Understanding,
318:The great social ideal for religion is that it should be the common basis for the unity of civilization. In that way it justifies its insight beyond the transient clash of brute forces ~ Alfred North Whitehead, Adventures In Ideas ,
319:The mind of the most rational among us may be compared to a stormy ocean of passionate convictions based on desire, upon which float perilously a few tiny boats carrying a cargo of scientifically tested beliefs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
320:Come Fill The Cup :::Come, fill the cup, and in the fire of spring Your winter garment of repentance fling. The bird of time has but a little way To flutter - and the bird is on the wing. ~ Omar Khayyam,
321:It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after your own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude. ~ Bertrand Russell,
322:Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature made them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
323:This huge world unintelligibly turnsIn the shadow of a mused Inconscience;It hides a key to inner meanings missed,It locks in our hearts a voice we cannot hear. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
324:Wisdom is greater than all terrestrial sciences and than all human knowledge. She renders a man indifferent to the joys of the world and permits him to consider with an impassive heart their precipitous and tumultous course. ~ Fa.khen-pi.u,
325:Occultism is the ancient science which deals with the hidden forces of nature, the laws governing them, and the means by which such forces can be brought under the control of the enlightened human mind. ~ Manly P Hall, Spiritual Centers in Man ,
326:A map is not the territory it represents, but, if correct, it has a similar structure to the territory, which accounts for its usefulness. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics ,
327:First there is a time when we believe everything, then for a little while we believe with discrimination, then we believe nothing whatever, and then we believe everything again - and, moreover, give reasons why we believe. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
328:It is astonishing how much the word infinitely is misused: everything is infinitely more beautiful, infinitely better, etc. The concept must have something pleasing about it, or its misuse could not have become so general. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
329:Science tears out Nature’s occult powers,Enormous djinns who serve a dwarf’s small needs,Exposes the sealed minutiae of her artAnd conquers her by her own captive force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
330:Yes, my brother, if we think of each world, we shall find there a hundred thousand wonderful sciences. One of these worlds is Sleep.What problems it contains! what wisdom is there concealed! how many worlds it includes! ~ Baha-ullah: The Seven Valleys,
331:The objective level is not words, and cannot be reached by words alone. We must point our finger and be silent, or we will never reach this level. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics ,
332:Never regard study as a duty, but as the enviable opportunity to learn to know the liberating influence of beauty in the realm of the spirit for your own personal joy and to the profit of the community to which your later work belongs. ~ Albert Einstein,
333:The firm determination to submit to experiment is not enough; there are still dangerous hypotheses; first, and above all, those which are tacit and unconscious. Since we make them without knowing it, we are powerless to abandon them. (417) ~ Henri Poincare,
334:The reader must be reminded that it takes a good 'mind' to be 'insane'. Morons, imbeciles, and idiots are 'mentally' deficient, but could not be insane. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics ,
335:Before you become too entranced with gorgeous gadgets and mesmerizing video displays, let me remind you that information is not knowledge, knowledge is not wisdom, and wisdom is not foresight. Each grows out of the other, and we need them all. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
336:Einstein's use of the equivalence of inertial and gravitational mass to derive his principle of equivalence, and eventually all of general relativity, amounts to a relentless march of logical reasoning unmatched in the history of human thought. ~ Stephen Hawkings,
337:Science at its limits, even physical Science, is compelled to perceive in the end the infinite, the universal, the spirit, the divine intelligence and will in the material universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.25 - The Higher and the Lower Knowledge,
338:Some aspects of general semantics have so permeated the (American) culture that behaviors derived from it are common; e.g., wagging fIngers in the air to put 'quotes' around spoken terms which are deemed suspect - Robert P Pula. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity ,
339:For it is necessary in every practical science to proceed in a composite (i.e. deductive) manner. On the contrary in speculative science, it is necessary to proceed in an analytical manner by breaking down the complex into elementary principles. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
340:I never dreamed that islands, about fifty or sixty miles apart, and most of them in sight of each other, formed of precisely the same rocks, placed under a quite similar climate, rising to a nearly equal height, would have been differently tenanted. ~ Charles Darwin,
341:The elements of every concept enter into logical thought at the gate of perception and make their exit at the gate of purposive action; and whatever cannot show its passports at both those two gates is to be arrested as unauthorized by reason. ~ Charles Sanders Peirce,
342:If humans do not understand a proof, then it doesn't count as maths, says Voevodsky. 'The future of mathematics is more a spiritual discipline than an applied art. One of the important functions of mathematics is the development of the human mind.' ~ Vladimir Voevodsky,
343:The Shears Of Fate :::Khayyam, who stitched the tents of science, Has fallen in grief's furnace and been suddenly burned, The shears of Fate have cut the tent ropes of his life, And the broker of Hope has sold him for nothing! ~ Omar Khayyam,
344:Nothing would ever change; nothing new could ever be expected. It had to end, and it did. Now in the dark world where I dwell, ugly things, and surprising things, and sometimes little wondrous things, spill out in me constantly, and I can count on nothing. ~ Philip K Dick,
345:God is, or He is not. But to which side shall we incline? Reason can decide nothing here. There is an infinite chaos which separated us. A game is being played at the extremity of this infinite distance where heads or tails will turn up. What will you wager? ~ Blaise Pascal,
346:Let us remember that the automatic machine is the precise economic equivalent of slave labor this will produce an unemployment situation in comparison with which the depression of the thirties will seem a pleasant joke. ~ Norbert Wiener, The Human Use of Human Beings Questions And Answers 1954,
347:Moreover, every language having a structure, by the very nature of language, reflects in its own structure that of the world as assumed by those who evolve the language. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics ,
348:To call up a demon you must learn its name. Men dreamed that, once, but now it is real in another way. You know that, Case. Your business is to learn the names of programs, the long formal names, names the owners seek to conceal. True names... ~ William Gibson, Neuromancer ,
349:A writer who wishes to be read by posterity must not be averse to putting hints which might give rise to whole books, or ideas for learned discussions, in some corner of a chapter so that one should think he can afford to throw them away by the thousand. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
350:Thus so wretched is man that he would weary even without any cause for weariness... and so frivolous is he that, though full of a thousand reasons for weariness, the least thing, such as playing billiards or hitting a ball, is sufficient enough to amuse him. ~ Blaise Pascal,
351:All governments suffer a recurring problem: Power attracts pathological personalities. It is not that power corrupts but that it is magnetic to the corrupt-able. Such people have a tendency to become drunk on violence, a condition to which they are quickly addicted. ~ Frank Herbert,
352:Physics is becoming so unbelievably complex that it is taking longer and longer to train a physicist. It is taking so long, in fact, to train a physicist to the place where he understands the nature of physical problems that he is already too old to solve them. ~ Eugene Paul Wigner,
353:Writer's block results from too much head. Cut off your head. Pegasus, poetry, was born of Medusa when her head was cut off. You have to be reckless when writing. Be as crazy as your conscience allows. ~ Joseph Campbell, A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living ,
354:I am convinced that the act of thinking logically cannot possibly be natural to the human mind. If it were, then mathematics would be everybody's easiest course at school and our species would not have taken several millennia to figure out the scientific method. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
355:The Wu Li Masters know that science and religion are only dances, and that those who follow them are only dancers. The dancers may claim to follow 'truth' or claim to seek 'reality' but the Wu Li Masters know better. They know that the true love of all dancers is dancing. ~ Gary Zukav,
356:New scientific ideas never spring from a communal body, however organized, but rather from the head of an individually inspired researcher who struggles with his problems in lonely thought and unites all his thought on one single point which is his whole world for the moment. ~ Max Planck,
357:A wisdom waiting on OmniscienceSat voiceless in a vast passivity;It judged not, measured not, nor strove to know,But listened for the veiled all-seeing ThoughtAnd the burden of a calm transcendent Voice. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.15 - The Kingdoms of the Greater Knowledge,
358:It is now highly feasible to take care of everybody on Earth at a 'higher standard of living than any have ever known.' It no longer has to be you or me. Selfishness is unnecessary and henceforth unrationalizable as mandated by survival. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, Critical Path 1981,
359:A new, self-employed architect scientist is the one in all the world who may accelerate realization of a high-standard survival for all, as now completely practical within the scope of available technology. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, Ideas and Integrities: A Spontaneous Autobiographical Disclosure ,
360:Paracelcus, Eliphas Levi, MacGregor Mathers, Aleister Crowley, Austin Spare, and Michael Moorcock all fed ideas into Chaos Magic. Plus it made some acknowledgement to the ideas of Quantum Physics and other bits of strange science. ~ Peter J Carroll, The Octavo: A sorcerer-scientist's grimoire ,
361:Gravity may put the planets into motion, but without the divine Power, it could never put them into such a circulating motion as they have about the Sun; and therefore, for this as well as other reasons, I am compelled to ascribe the frame of this System to an intelligent Agent. ~ Isaac Newton,
362:In string theory, all particles are vibrations on a tiny rubber band; physics is the harmonies on the string; chemistry is the melodies we play on vibrating strings; the universe is a symphony of strings, and the 'Mind of God' is cosmic music resonating in 11-dimensional hyperspace. ~ Michio Kaku,
363:Russell commented that the development of such gifted individuals (referring to polymaths) required a childhood period in which there was little or no pressure for conformity, a time in which the child could develop and pursue his or her own interests no matter how unusual or bizarre. ~ Carl Sagan,
364:Cyberspace is colonising what we used to think of as the real world. I think that our grandchildren will probably regard the distinction we make between what we call the real world and what they think of as simply the world as the quaintest and most incomprehensible thing about us. ~ William Gibson,
365:I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me. ~ Isaac Newton,
366:Sciences omnipotent in vainBy which men learn of what the suns are made,Transform all forms to serve their outward needs,Ride through the sky and sail beneath the sea,But learn not what they are or why they came; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
367:In the moment when I truly understand my enemy, understand him well enough to defeat him, then in that very moment I also love him. I think it's impossible to really understand somebody, what they want, what they believe, and not love them the way they love themselves. ~ Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game ,
368:Each of us assumes everyone else knows what HE is doing. They all assume we know what WE are doing. We don't... Nothing is going on and nobody knows what it is. Nobody is concealing anything except the fact that he does not understand anything anymore and wishes he could go home. ~ Philip K Dick, VALIS ,
369:(Joan,1941) She wrote me a letter asking,"How can I read it?,Its so hard." I told her to start at the beginning and read as far as you can get until you're lost. Then start again at the beginning and keep working through until you can understand the whole book. And thats what she did ~ Richard P Feynman,
370:All Religions and all Sciences connect themselves with one single science, always hidden from the common herd, and transmitted from age to age, from initiate to initiate, beneath the veil of fables and symbols. It preserves for a world yet to come the secrets of a world that has passed away. ~ Eliphas Levi,
371:I have concluded that we are in a world made by rules created by an intelligence. Believe me, everything that we call chance today won't make sense anymore. To me it is clear that we exist in a plan which is governed by rules that were created, shaped by a universal intelligence and not by chance. ~ Michio Kaku,
372:The true method of discovery is like the flight of an airplane. It starts from the ground of particular observation; it makes a flight in the thin air of imaginative generalization; and it again lands for renewed observation rendered acute by rational interpretation. ~ Alfred North Whitehead, Process and Reality ,
373:Everything you've learned in school as 'obvious' becomes less and less obvious as you begin to study the universe. For example, there are no solids in the universe. There's not even a suggestion of a solid. There are no absolute continuums. There are no surfaces. There are no straight lines ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
374:I told you, knowledge is our Holy Grail, and I daresay the wisdom possessed by the vampire would boggle your imagination. You see, we don't have political allegiances to worry about, or religion, or differing mores. We all work together for one purpose: to further our achievements and our learning. ~ Michael Talbot,
375:Amor fati: let that be my love henceforth! I do not want to wage war against what is ugly. I do not want to accuse; I do not even want to accuse those who accuse. Looking away shall be my only negation.And all in all and on the whole: some day I wish to be only a Yes-sayer. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science ,
376:The world is not prepared yet to understand the philosophy of Occult Sciences - let them assure themselves first of all that there are beings in an invisible world, whether 'Spirits' of the dead or Elementals; and that there are hidden powers in man, which are capable of making a God of him on earth. ~ H P Blavatsky,
377:The world is not prepared yet to understand the philosophy of Occult Sciences - let them assure themselves first of all that there are beings in an invisible world, whether 'Spirits' of the dead or Elementals; and that there are hidden powers in man, which are capable of making a God of him on earth. ~ H P Blavatsky,
378:I have said that science is impossible without faith. ... Inductive logic, the logic of Bacon, is rather something on which we can act than something which we can prove, and to act on it is a supreme assertion of faith ... Science is a way of life which can only fluorish when men are free to have faith. ~ Norbert Wiener,
379:We have to realize that science is a double-edged sword. One edge of the sword can cut against poverty, illness, disease and give us more democracies, and democracies never war with other democracies, but the other side of the sword could give us nuclear proliferation, biogerms and even forces of darkness. ~ Michio Kaku,
380:I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain. ~ Frank Herbert, Dune ,
381:The message of this lecture is that black holes ain't as black as they are painted. They are not the eternal prisons they were once thought. Things can get out of a black hole both on the outside and possibly to another universe. So if you feel you are in a black hole, don't give up - there's a way out. ~ Stephen Hawkings,
382:It has often and confidently been asserted, that man's origin can never be known: but ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. ~ Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man ,
383:600 million years ago, the monopolizing grip of the algae was broken and an enormous proliferation of new lifeforms emerged, an event called the Cambrian explosion. Life had arisen almost immediately after the origin of the Earth, which suggests that life may be an inevitable chemical process on an Earth-like planet. ~ Carl Sagan,
384:My desire and wish is that the things I start with should be so obvious that you wonder why I spend my time stating them. This is what I aim at because the point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
385:Everything is determined, the beginning as well as the end, by forces over which we have no control. It is determined for the insect, as well as for the star. Human beings, vegetables, or cosmic dust, we all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible piper. ~ Albert Einstein, The Ultimate Quotable Einstein ,
386:In science, "opinions" are tolerated when and only when facts are lacking. In this case, we have all the facts necessary. We have only to collect them and analyse them, rejecting mere "opinions" as cheap and unworthy. Such as understand this lesson will know how to act for the benefit of all. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
387:The existing scientific concepts cover always only a very limited part of reality, and the other part that has not yet been understood is infinite. Whenever we proceed from the known into the unknown we may hope to understand, but we may have to learn at the same time a new meaning of the word 'understanding'. ~ Werner Heisenberg,
388:I too play with symbols... but I play in such a way that I do not forget that I am playing. For nothing is proved by symbols... unless by sure reasons it can be demonstrated that they are not merely symbolic but are descriptions of the ways in which the two things are connected and of the causes of this connection. ~ Johannes Kepler,
389:Magic is but a science, a profound knowledge of the Occult forces in Nature, and of the laws governing the visible or the invisible world. Spiritualism in the hands of an adept becomes Magic, for he is learned in the art of blending together the laws of the Universe, without breaking any of them and thereby violating Nature. ~ H P Blavatsky,
390:Sin makes a man unhappy and makes him feel inferior. Being unhappy, he is likely to make claims upon other people which are excessive and which prevent him from enjoying happiness in personal relations. Feeling inferior, he will have a grudge against those who seem superior. He will find admiration difficult and envy easy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
391:Addictions [...] started out like magical pets, pocket monsters. They did extraordinary tricks, showed you things you hadn't seen, were fun. But came, through some gradual dire alchemy, to make decisions for you. Eventually, they were making your most crucial life-decisions. And they were [...] less intelligent than goldfish. ~ William Gibson,
392:Only two kinds of people can attain "Self-Knowledge": those who are not encumbered at all with learning, that is to say, whose minds are not over-crowded with thoughts borrowed from others; and those who, after studying all the scriptures and sciences, have come to realize that they know nothing. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, Sayings of Sri Ramakrishna. ,
393:For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh: how much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? ~ Anonymous, The Bible Hewbews,
394:One need only open the eyes to see that the conquests of industry which have enriched so many practical men would never have seen the light, if these practical men alone had existed and if they had not been preceded by unselfish devotees who died poor, who never thought of utility, and yet had a guide far other than caprice. (417) ~ Henri Poincare,
395:What do I advise? Forget it all. Don't be afraid. Do what you get the most pleasure from. Is it to build a cloud chamber? Then go on doing things like that. Develop your talents wherever they may lead. Damn the torpedoes - full speed ahead! If you have any talent, or any occupation that delights you, do it, and do it to the hilt ~ Richard P Feynman,
396:True magic therefore is the high knowledge of the more subtle powers that have not yet been acknowledged by science up to this date because the methods of scrutiny that have been applied so far do not suffice for their grasping, understanding and utilization, although the laws of magic are analogous to all official sciences of the world. ~ Franz Bardon,
397:A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts (still called "leaves") imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and you hear the voice of another person-perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. ~ Carl Sagan,
398:Integral theory is a school of philosophy that seeks to integrate all of human wisdom into a new, emergent worldview that is able to accommodate the gifts of all previous worldviews, including those which have been historically at odds: science and religion, Eastern and Western schools of thought, and pre-modern, modern and post-modern worldviews. ~ Daily Evolver,
399:The complete attempt to deal with the term is would go to the form and matter of every thing in existence, at least, if not to the possible form and matter of all that does not exist, but might. As far as it could be done, it would give the grand Cyclopaedia, and its yearly supplement would be the history of the human race for the time. (354) ~ Augustus De Morgan,
400:But the actual touch of her lingered, inside his heart. That remained. In all the years of his life ahead, the long years without her, with never seeing her or hearing from her or knowing anything about her, if she was alive or happy or dead or what, that touch stayed locked within him, sealed in himself, and never went away. That one touch of her hand. ~ Philip K Dick,
401:When all is said and done, the invention of writing must be reckoned not only as a brilliant innovation but as a surpassing good for humanity. And assuming that we survive long enough to use their inventions wisely, I believe the same will be said of the modern Thoths and Prometheuses who are today devising computers and programs at the edge of machine intelligence. ~ Carl Sagan,
402:One by one he would conjure up the world's major electronic papers; he knew the codes of the more important ones by heart, and had no need to consult the list on the back of his pad. Switching to the display unit's short-term memory, he would hold the front page while he quickly searched the headlines and noted the items that interested him. ~ Arthur C Clarke, Leonard Susskind, The Cosmic Landscape: String Theory and the Illusion of Intelligent Design ,
404:One cannot demand of a scholar that he show himself a scholar everywhere in society, but the whole tenor of his behavior must none the less betray the thinker, he must always be instructive, his way of judging a thing must even in the smallest matters be such that people can see what it will amount to when, quietly and self-collected, he puts this power to scholarly use. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
405:Within the religious realm, the same can be said about that type of'apologetics' that claims to agree with the results of modern science-an utterly illusory undertaking and one that constantly requires revision; one that also runs the risk of linking religion with changing and ephemeral conceptions, from which it must remain completely independent. ~ René Guénon, The Crisis Of The Modern World ,
406:The progress of modem science, including the flew science of man as a lime-binder, has been due uniquely to the freedom of scientists to revise their fundamemal assumptions, terminologies, undefined terms, which involve hidden assumptions, etc., underlying our reflections, a freedom prohibited in 'primitive sciences' and also in dictatorships, past and present. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
407:There is something which unites magic and applied science while separating both from the wisdom of earlier ages. For the wise men of old the cardinal problem had been how to conform the soul to reality, and the solution had been knowledge, self-discipline, and virtue. For magic and applied science alike the problem is how to subdue reality to the wishes of men. ~ C S Lewis, The Abolition of Man (1943) ,
408:Man differs from other animals in one very important respect, and that is that he has some desires which are, so to speak, infinite, which can never be fully gratified, and which would keep him restless even in paradise. The boa constrictor, when he has had an adequate meal, goes to sleep, and does not wake until he needs another meal. Human beings, for the most part, are not like this. ~ Bertrand Russell,
409:The mind is sharper and keener in seclusion and uninterrupted solitude. No big laboratory is needed in which to think. Originality thrives in seclusion free of outside influences beating upon us to cripple the creative mind. Be alone, that is the secret of invention; be alone, that is when ideas are born. That is why many of the earthly miracles have had their genesis in humble surroundings. ~ Nikola Tesla,
410:Not every story has a happy ending, ... but the discoveries of science, the teachings of the heart, and the revelations of the soul all assure us that no human being is ever beyond redemption. The possibility of renewal exists so long as life exists. How to support that possibility in others and in ourselves is the ultimate question. ~ Gabor Mate, In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters with Addiction ,
411:Cyberspace. A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts... A graphic representation of data abstracted from banks of every computer in the human system. Unthinkable complexity. Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data. Like city lights, receding... ~ William Gibson,
412:All of us cherish our beliefs. They are, to a degree, self-defining. When someone comes along who challenges our belief system as insufficiently well-based - or who, like Socrates, merely asks embarrassing questions that we haven't thought of, or demonstrates that we've swept key underlying assumptions under the rug - it becomes much more than a search for knowledge. It feels like a personal assault. ~ Carl Sagan,
413:The striking discoveries of contemporary science are continually telling us new things about how material creation came to be and how it continues to evolve. Although we do not have all the answers, we are clearly going in a direction that transcends the cosmology in which the great world religions came into existence. Our vision, understanding, and our attitudes about God inevitably must change. ~ Thomas Keating,
414:Wherever the Divine is, everything is - it is only concealed, not non-existent. The Divine is there below in the inconscience itself - mind and life are concealed in Matter, so is Supermind and Sachchidananda. The below is not something outside the Divine Existence. But as mind manifested in Matter only after the descent of Mind opened it into creation, so it is with Supermind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I ,
415:Yoga is a method for restraining the natural turbulence of thoughts, which otherwise impartially prevents all men, of all lands, from glimpsing their true nature of Spirit. Like the healing light of the sun, yoga is beneficial equally to men of the East and to men of the West. The thoughts of most persons are restless and capricious; a manifest need exists for yoga: the science of mind control. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
416:When I start writing a new imaginary future, I have no idea what it is. The characters arrive first. They help me figure out where they are living and I get to fill in the gaps with that and where we are. So when I get to the end of the process of composition, if I feel that I have really done my job, I have no idea what I've got - and I then spend essentially the rest of my life figuring out what it might mean. ~ William Gibson,
417:Our total reality and total existence are beautiful and meaningful . . . . We should judge reality by the little which we truly know of it. Since that part which conceptually we know fully turns out to be so beautiful, the real world of which we know so little should also be beautiful. Life may be miserable for seventy years and happy for a million years: the short period of misery may even be necessary for the whole. ~ Kurt Godel,
418:In researching this problem, I did an extensive data search of several hundred hierarchies, taken from systems theory, ecological science, Kabalah, developmental psychology, Yo-gachara Buddhism, moral development, biological evolution, Vedanta Hinduism, Neo-Confucianism, cosmic and stellar evolution, Hwa Yen, the Neoplatonic corpus-an entire spectrum of premodern, modern, and postmodern nests. ~ Ken Wilber, Marriage of Sense and Soul 1998,
419:I want to learn more and more to see as beautiful what is necessary in things; then I shall be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: let that be my love henceforth! I do not want to wage war against what is ugly. I do not want to accuse; I do not even want to accuse those who accuse. Looking away shall be my only negation. And all in all and on the whole: some day I wish to be only a Yes-sayer! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science ,
420:Although it was unfortunate to get motor neurone disease, I have been very fortunate in almost everything else. I have been lucky to work in theoretical physics at a fascinating time and it' s one of the few areas in which my disability was not a serious handicap. It's also important not to become angry, no matter how difficult life may seem because you can lose all hope if you can't laugh at yourself and life in general. ~ Stephen Hawkings,
421:To practise black magic you have to violate every principle of science, decency and intelligence. You must be obsessed with an insane idea of the importance of the petty object of your wretched and selfish desires. . I have been accused of being a 'black magician'. No more foolish statement was ever made about me. I despise the thing to such an extent that I can hardly believe in the existence of people so debased and idiotic as to practise it. ~ Aleister Crowley?,
422:I can live with doubt and uncertainty and not knowing. I think it is much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers that might be wrong. If we will only allow that, as we progress, we remain unsure, we will leave opportunities for alternatives. We will not become enthusiastic for the fact, the knowledge, the absolute truth of the day, but remain always uncertain ... In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar. ~ Richard P Feynman,
423:Fall in love with some activity, and do it! Nobody ever figures out what life is all about, and it doesn't matter. Explore the world. Nearly everything is really interesting if you go into it deeply enough. Work as hard and as much as you want to on the things you like to do the best. Don't think about what you want to be, but what you want to do. Keep up some kind of a minimum with other things so that society doesn't stop you from doing anything at all. ~ Richard P Feynman,
424:Scientists, therefore, are responsible for their research, not only intellectually but also morally. This responsibility has become an important issue in many of today's sciences, but especially so in physics, in which the results of quantum mechanics and relativity theory have opened up two very different paths for physicists to pursue. They may lead us - to put it in extreme terms - to the Buddha or to the Bomb, and it is up to each of us to decide which path to take. ~ Fritjof Capra,
425:For the Ignorance is still in reality a knowledge seeking for itself behind the original mask of Inconscience; the Ignorance does not create a new thing and absolute falsehood but only misrepresents the Truth. The Ignorance is the Mind separated in knowledge from its source of knowledge and giving a false rigidity and a mistaken appearance of opposition and conflictMind and Supermind to the harmonious play of the supreme Truth in its universal manifestation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
426:There is a philosophy that says that if something is unobservable -- unobservable in principle -- it is not part of science. If there is no way to falsify or confirm a hypothesis, it belongs to the realm of metaphysical speculation, together with astrology and spiritualism. By that standard, most of the universe has no scientific reality -- it's just a figment of our imaginations. ~ Leonard Susskind, The Black Hole War: My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics ,
427:the three-dimensional world of ordinary experience-the universe filled with galaxies, stars, planets, houses, boulders, and people-is a hologram, an image of reality coded on a distant two-dimensional surface. This new law of physics, known as the Holographic Principle, asserts that everything inside a region of space can be described by bits of information restricted to the boundary. ~ Leonard Susskind, The Black Hole War: My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics ,
428:Though collecting quotations could be considered as merely an ironic mimetism -- victimless collecting, as it were... in a world that is well on its way to becoming one vast quarry, the collector becomes someone engaged in a pious work of salvage. The course of modern history having already sapped the traditions and shattered the living wholes in which precious objects once found their place, the collector may now in good conscience go about excavating the choicer, more emblematic fragments. ~ Susan Sontag,
429:How many nights have you remained awake repeating science and poring over books, and have denied yourself sleep. I do not know what the purpose of it was. If it was attaining worldly ends and securing its vanities, and acquiring its dignities, and surpassing your contemporaries, and such like, woe to you and again woe; but if your purpose in it was the vitalizing of the Law of the Prophet, and the training of your character, and breaking the soul commanding to evil, then blessed are you and again blessed. ~ Abu Hamid al-Ghazali,
430:Alan Mathison Turing OBE FRS (/ˈtjʊərɪŋ/; 23 June 1912 - 7 June 1954) was an English computer scientist, mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst and theoretical biologist. He was highly influential in the development of theoretical computer science, providing a formalisation of the concepts of algorithm and computation with the Turing machine, which can be considered a model of a general purpose computer.[2][3][4] Turing is widely considered to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence.[5] ~ Wikipedia,
431:A human being is part of a whole, called by us the 'Universe' -a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts, and feelings, as something separated from the rest-a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. ~ Albert Einstein,
432:I AM NOW CLOSE TO 88 and I am confident that the only thing important about me is that I am an average healthy human. I am also a living case history of a thoroughly documented, half-century, search-and-research project designed to discover what, if anything, an unknown, moneyless individual, with a dependent wife and newborn child, might be able to do effectively on behalf of all humanity that could not be accomplished by great nations, great religions or private enterprise, no matter how rich or powerfully armed. ~ Buckminster Fuller, 1983 ,
433:If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps. ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,
434:Our struggle to put first things first can be characterized by the contrast between two powerful tools that direct us: the clock and the compass. The clock represents our commitments, appointments, schedules, goals, activities - what we do with, and how we manage our time. The compass represents our vision, values, principles, mission, conscience, direction - what we feel is important and how we lead our lives. In an effort to close the gap between the clock and the compass in our lives, many of us turn to the field of "time management." ~ Stephen Covey,
435:No government has the right to decide on the truth of scientific principles, nor to prescribe in any way the character of the questions investigated. Neither may a government determine the aesthetic value of artistic creations, nor limit the forms of literacy or artistic expression. Nor should it pronounce on the validity of economic, historic, religious, or philosophical doctrines. Instead it has a duty to its citizens to maintain the freedom, to let those citizens contribute to the further adventure and the development of the human race. ~ Richard P Feynman,
436:It thunders, howls, roars, hisses, whistles, blusters, hums, growls, rumbles, squeaks, groans, sings, crackles, cracks, rattles, flickers, clicks, snarls, tumbles, whimpers, whines, rustles, murmurs, crashes, clucks, to gurgle, tinkles, blows, snores, claps, to lisp, to cough, it boils, to scream, to weep, to sob, to croak, to stutter, to lisp, to coo, to breathe, to clash, to bleat, to neigh, to grumble, to scrape, to bubble. These words, and others like them, which express sounds are more than mere symbols: they are a kind of hieroglyphics for the ear. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
437:Today's news consists of aggregates of fragments. Anyone who has taken part in any event that has subsequently appeared in the news is aware of the gross disparity between the actual and the reported events. We also learn frequently of prefabricated and prevaricated evens of a complex nature purportedly undertaken for the purposes wither of suppressing or rigging the news, which in turn perverts humanity's tactical information resources. All history becomes suspect. Probably our most polluted resource is the tactical information to which humanity spontaneously reflexes. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
438:Flatland accepts no interior domain whatsoever, and reintroducing Spirit is the least of our worries. 'Thus our task is not specifically to reintroduce spirituality and somehow attempt to show that modern science is becoming compatible with God. That approach, which is taken by most of the integrative attempts, does not go nearly deep enough in diagnosing the disease, and thus, in my opinion, never really addresses the crucial issues. 'Rather, it is the rehabilitation of the interior in general that opens the possibility of reconciling science and religion.' ~ Ken Wilber, Marriage of Sense and Soul p. 142.,
439:You could give Aristotle a tutorial. And you could thrill him to the core of his being. Aristotle was an encyclopedic polymath, an all time intellect. Yet not only can you know more than him about the world. You also can have a deeper understanding of how everything works. Such is the privilege of living after Newton, Darwin, Einstein, Planck, Watson, Crick and their colleagues. I'm not saying you're more intelligent than Aristotle, or wiser. For all I know, Aristotle's the cleverest person who ever lived. That's not the point. The point is only that science is cumulative, and we live later. ~ Richard Dawkins,
440:It is the devil's greatest triumph when he can deprive us of the joy of the Spirit. He carries fine dust with him in little boxes and scatters it through the cracks in our conscience in order to dim the soul's pure impulses and its luster. But the joy that fills the heart of the spiritual person destroys the deadly poison of the serpent. But if any are gloomy and think that they are abandoned in their sorrow, gloominess will continuously tear at them or else they will waste away in empty diversions. When gloominess takes root, evil grows. If it is not dissolved by tears, permanent damage is done. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
441:The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age. ~ H P Lovecraft, The Call Of Cthulhu ,
442:sacrifice, the redeeming principle ::: The law of sacrifice is the common divine action that was thrown out into the world in its beginning as a symbol of the solidarity of the universe. It is by the attraction of this law that a divinising principle, a saving power descends to limit and correct and gradually to eliminate the errors of an egoistic and self-divided creation. This descent, this sacrifice of the Purusha, the Divine Soul, submitting itself to Force and Matter so that it may inform and illuminate them, is the seed of redemption of this world of Inconscience and Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 106,
443:Hence, as more individuals are produced than can possibly survive, there must in every case be a struggle for existence, either one individual with another of the same species, or with the individuals of distinct species, or with the physical conditions of life. It is the doctrine of Malthus applied with manifold force to the whole animal and vegetable kingdoms; for in this case there can be no artificial increase of food, and no prudential restraint from marriage. Although some species may be now increasing, more or less rapidly, in numbers, all cannot do so, for the world would not hold them. ~ Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species ,
444:When we wish to correct with advantage, and to show another that he errs, we must notice from what side he views the matter, for on that side it is usually true, and admit that truth to him, but reveal to him the side on which it is false. He is satisfied with that, for he sees that he was not mistaken, and that he only failed to see all sides. Now, no one is offended at not seeing everything; but one does not like to be mistaken, and that perhaps arises from the fact that man naturally cannot see everything, and that naturally he cannot err in the side he looks at, since the perceptions of our senses are always true. ~ Blaise Pascal,
445:The real human division is this: the luminous and the shady. To diminish the number of the shady, to augment the number of the luminous,-that is the object. That is why we cry: Education! science! To teach reading, means to light the fire; every syllable spelled out sparkles. However, he who says light does not, necessarily, say joy. People suffer in the light; excess burns. The flame is the enemy of the wing. To burn without ceasing to fly,-therein lies the marvel of genius. When you shall have learned to know, and to love, you will still suffer. The day is born in tears. The luminous weep, if only over those in darkness. ~ Victor Hugo,
446:What is it that has called you so suddenly out of nothingness to enjoy for a brief while a spectacle which remains quite indifferent to you? The conditions for your existence are as old as the rocks. For thousands of years men have striven and suffered and begotten and women have brought forth in pain. A hundred years ago, perhaps, another man-or woman-sat on this spot; like you he gazed with awe and yearning in his heart at the dying light on the glaciers. Like you he was begotten of man and born of woman. He felt pain and brief joy as you do. Was he someone else? Was it not you yourself? What is this Self of yours? ~ Erwin Schrodinger,
447:Hence the strong attraction which magic and science alike have exercised on the human mind; hence the powerful stimulus that both have given to the pursuit of knowledge. They lure the weary enquirer, the footsore seeker, on through the wilderness of disappointment in the present by their endless promises of the future: they take him up to the top of an exceeding high mountain and show him, beyond the dark clouds and rolling mists at his feet, a vision of the celestial city, far off, it may be, but radiant with unearthly splendour, bathed in the light of dreams. ~ James George Frazer, The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion Volume 1,
448:In the twelve years she had been at this desk, in this room, everything had changed. The alliance between Earth and its upstart brother had been an eternal, unshakable thing once. The Belt had been an annoyance and a haven for tiny cells of renegades and troublemakers as likely to die of a ship malfunction as to be called to justice. Humanity had been alone in the universe. And then the secret discovery that Phoebe, idiosyncratic moon of Saturn, had been an alien weapon, launched at earth when life here was hardly more than an interesting idea wrapped in a lipid bilayer. How could anything be the same after that? ~ James S A Corey, Caliban's War ,
449:Sciences reach a point where they become mathematized..the central issues in the field become sufficiently understood that they can be thought about mathematically..[by the early 1990s] biology was no longer the science of things that smelled funny in refrigerators (my view from undergraduate days in the 1960s)..The field was undergoing a revolution and was rapidly acquiring the depth and power previously associated exclusively with the physical sciences. Biology was now the study of information stored in DNA - strings of four letters: A, T, G, and C..and the transformations that information undergoes in the cell. There was mathematics here! ~  Leonard Adleman,
450:Modern empiricism has been conditioned in large part by two dogmas. One is a belief in some fundamental cleavage between truths which are analytic, or grounded in meanings independently of matters of fact and truths which are synthetic, or grounded in fact. The other dogma is reductionism: the belief that each meaningful statement is equivalent to some logical construct upon terms which refer to immediate experience. Both dogmas, I shall argue, are ill founded. One effect of abandoning them is, as we shall see, a blurring of the supposed boundary between speculative metaphysics and natural science. Another effect is a shift toward pragmatism. ~ W. V. O Quine, Two Dogmas of Empiricism Questions And Answers 1950-1951,
451:[Computer science] is not really about computers -- and it's not about computers in the same sense that physics is not really about particle accelerators, and biology is not about microscopes and Petri dishes...and geometry isn't really about using surveying instruments. Now the reason that we think computer science is about computers is pretty much the same reason that the Egyptians thought geometry was about surveying instruments: when some field is just getting started and you don't really understand it very well, it's very easy to confuse the essence of what you're doing with the tools that you use. ~ Harold Abelson, Introductory lecture to Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs ,
452:Out of all the sciences... the ancients, in their studies, especially selected seven to be mastered by those who were to be educated. These seven they considered so to excel all the rest in usefulness that anyone who had been thoroughly schooled in them might afterward come to knowledge of the others by his own inquiry and effort rather than by listening to a teacher. For these, one might say, constitute the best instruments, the best rudiments, by which the way is prepared for the mind's complete knowledge of philosophic truth. Therefore they are called by the name trivium and quadrivium, because by them, as by certain ways (viae), a quick mind enters into the secret places of wisdom. ~ Hugh of Saint Victor, Didascalicon ,
453:Happy is the man who can recognize in the work of to-day a connected portion of the work of life and an embodiment of the work of Eternity. The foundations of his confidence are unchangeable, for he has been made a partaker of Infinity. He strenuously works out his daily enterprises because the present is given him for a possession. Thus ought man to be an impersonation of the divine process of nature, and to show forth the union of the infinite with the finite, not slighting his temporal existence, remembering that in it only is individual action possible, nor yet shutting out from his view that which is eternal, knowing that Time is a mystery which man cannot endure to contemplate until eternal Truth enlighten it. ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
454:A year here and he still dreamed of cyberspace, hope fading nightly. All the speed he took, all the turns he'd taken and the corners he'd cut in Night City, and still he'd see the matrix in his sleep, bright lattices of logic unfolding across that colorless void.... The Sprawl was a long strange way home over the Pacific now, and he was no console man, no cyberspace cowboy. Just another hustler, trying to make it through. But the dreams came on in the Japanese night like live wire voodoo and he'd cry for it, cry in his sleep, and wake alone in the dark, curled in his capsule in some coffin hotel, his hands clawed into the bedslab, temper foam bunched between his fingers, trying to reach the console that wasn't there. ~ William Gibson, Neuromancer ,
455:But his most important capacity is that of developing the powers of the higher principles in himself, a greater power of life, a purer light of mind, the illumination of supermind, the infinite being, consciousness and delight of spirit. By an ascending movement he can develop his human imperfection towards that greater perfection. But whatever his aim, however exalted his aspiration, he has to begin from the law of his present imperfection, to take full account of it and see how it can be converted to the law of a possible perfection. This present law of his being starts from the inconscience of the material universe, an involution of the soul in form and subjection to material nature; and ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Psychology Of Perfection,
456:Magic is the science and art of causing change to occur in conformity with will. The will can only become magically effective when the mind is focused and not interfering with the will The mind must first discipline itself to focus its entire attention on some meaningless phenomenon. If an attempt is made to focus on some form of desire, the effect is short circuited by lust of result. Egotistical identification, fear of failure, and the reciprocal desire not to achieve desire, arising from our dual nature, destroy the result. Therefore, when selecting topics for concentration, choose subjects of no spiritual, egotistical, intellectual, emotional, or useful significance - meaningless things. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null Liber MMM,
457:Jordan Peterson's Book List1. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley2. 1984 - George Orwell3. Road To Wigan Pier - George Orwell4. Crime And Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky5. Demons - Fyodor Dostoevsky6. Beyond Good And Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche7. Ordinary Men - Christopher Browning8. The Painted Bird - Jerzy Kosinski9. The Rape of Nanking - Iris Chang10. Gulag Archipelago (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, & Vol. 3) - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn11. Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl12. Modern Man in Search of A Soul - Carl Jung13. Maps Of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief - Jordan B. Peterson14. A History of Religious Ideas (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3) - Mircea Eliade15. Affective Neuroscience - Jaak Panksepp ~ Jordan Peterson,
458:For primitive man the world is full of demons and mysterious powers which he fears; the whole of Nature is animated by these forces, which are nothing but man's own inner powers projected into the outside world. Christianity and modern science have de-demonized Nature, which means that the European has consistently taken back the demonic powers out of the world into himself, and has steadily loaded his unconscious with them. Out of man himself the demonic powers rise up in revolt against the supposed spiritual constraints of Christianity. The demons begin to break out in Baroque art: the columns writhe, the furniture sprouts satyr's feet. Man is slowly transformed into a uroboros, the "tail-eater" who devours himself, from ancient times a symbol of the demon-ridden man. ~ Carl Jung,
459:At one stage in the initiation procedure, Christian tells us...the postulant climbs down an iron ladder, with seventy-eight rungs, and enters a hall on either side of which are twelve statues, and, between each pair of statues, a painting. These twenty-two paintings, he is told, are Arcana or symbolic hieroglyphs; the Science of Will, the principle of all wisdom and source of all power, is contained in them. Each corresponds to a "letter of the sacred language" and to a number, and each expresses a reality of the divine world, a reality of the intellectual world and a reality of the physical world. The secret meanings of these twenty-two Arcana are then expounded to him. ~ Ronald Decker and Thierry Depaulis and Michael Dummett, A Wicked Pack of Cards - The Origins of the Occult Tarot ,
460:Systematic study of chemical and physical phenomena has been carried on for many generations and these two sciences now include: (1) knowledge of an enormous number of facts; (2) a large body of natural laws; (3) many fertile working hypotheses respecting the causes and regularities of natural phenomena; and finally (4) many helpful theories held subject to correction by further testing of the hypotheses giving rise to them. When a subject is spoken of as a science, it is understood to include all of the above mentioned parts. Facts alone do not constitute a science any more than a pile of stones constitutes a house, not even do facts and laws alone; there must be facts, hypotheses, theories and laws before the subject is entitled to the rank of a science. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
461:The most general science. Pythagoras is said to have called himself a lover of wisdom. But philosophy has been both the seeking of wisdom and the wisdom sought. Originally, the rational explanation of anything, the general principles under which all facts could be explained; in this sense, indistinguishable from science. Later, the science of the first principles of being; the presuppositions of ultimate reality. Now, popularly, private wisdom or consolation; technically, the science of sciences, the criticism and systematization or organization of all knowledge, drawn from empirical science, rational learning, common experience, or whatever. Philosophy includes metaphysics, or ontology and epistemology, logic, ethics, aesthetics, etc. (all of which see). ~ J.K.F., Dagoberts Dictionary of Philosophy ,
462:We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
463:At her will the inscrutable Supermind leans downTo guide her force that feels but cannot know,Its breath of power controls her restless seasAnd life obeys the governing Idea.At her will, led by a luminous ImmanenceThe hazardous experimenting MindPushes its way through obscure possiblesMid chance formations of an unknowing world.Our human ignorance moves towards the TruthThat Nescience may become omniscient,Transmuted instincts shape to divine thoughts,Thoughts house infallible immortal sightAnd Nature climb towards God's identity.The Master of the worlds self-made her slaveIs the executor of her fantasies:She has canalised the seas of omnipotence;She has limited by her laws the Illimitable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.03 - The Glory and the Fall of Life,
464:But it is evident that all analogies of this kind depend on principles of a more fundamental nature; and that, if we had a true mathematical classification of quantities, we should be able at once to detect the analogy between any system of quantities presented to us and other systems of quantities in known sciences, so that we should lose no time in availing ourselves of the mathematical labors of those who had already solved problems essentially the same. [...] At the same time, I think that the progress of science, both in the way of discovery, and in the way of diffusion, would be greatly aided if more attention were paid in a direct way to the classification of quantities. ~ James Clerk Maxwell, Remarks on the mathematical classification of physical quantities Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society,
465:An integral approach is based on one basic idea: no human mind can be 100% wrong. Or, we might say, nobody is smart enough to be wrong all the time. And that means, when it comes to deciding which approaches, methodologies, epistemologies, or ways or knowing are "correct" the answer can only be, "All of them." That is, all of the numerous practices or paradigms of human inquiry - including physics, chemistry, hermeneutics, collaborative inquiry, meditation, neuroscience, vision quest, phenomenology, structuralism, subtle energy research, systems theory, shamanic voyaging, chaos theory, developmental psychology-all of those modes of inquiry have an important piece of the overall puzzle of a total existence that includes, among other many things, health and illness, doctors and patients, sickness and healing. ~ Ken Wilber,
466:It is the Divine in the inconscient who aspires for the Divine in the consciousness. That is to say, without the Divine there would be no aspiration; without the consciousness hidden in the inconscient, there would be no possibility of changing the inconscience to consciousness. But because at the very heart of the inconscient there is the divine Consciousness, you aspire, and necessarily - this is what he says - automatically, mechanically, the sacrifice is made. And this is why when one says, "It is not you who aspire, it is the Divine, it is not you who make progress, it is the Divine, it is not you who are conscious, it is the Divine" - these are not mere words, it is a fact. And it is simply your ignorance and your unconsciousness which prevent you from realising it. (Meditation) ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956 ,
467:Only, in all he sees God, sees the supreme reality, and his motive of work is to help mankind towards the knowledge of God and the possession of the supreme reality. He sees God through the data of science, God through the conclusions of philosophy, God through the forms of Beauty and the forms of Good, God in all the activities of life, God in the past of the world and its effects, in the present and its tendencies, in the future and its great progression. Into any or all of these he can bring his illumined vision and his liberated power of the spirit. The lower knowledge has been the step from which he has risen to the higher; the higher illumines for him the lower and makes it part of itself, even if only its lower fringe and most external radiation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.25 - The Higher and the Lower Knowledge,
468:THE TRUE STUDENT OF OCCULT SCIENCE The White Magician uses none of the powers of the animal world in his work, but rather seeks to transmute the poles of the beast within himself into higher and finer qualities. The White Magician labors entirely with the finer forces of the elemental planes. He is a builder--not a destroyer--and seeks to liberate rather than to dominate his fellow creatures. The White Magician has dedicated his soul to the immortal light, while the Black Magician has sold his for mortal glory. The Grimores of the Middle Ages are filled with chants and charms for the invoking of spirits. History is filled with stories of Black Magicians but the true student of occult science must have nothing to do with these things other than to protect himself against them. ~ Manly P Hall, Magic: A Treatise on Natural Occultism 2020-08-28,
469:Here where one knows not even the step in frontAnd Truth has her throne on the shadowy back of doubt,On this anguished and precarious field of toilOutspread beneath some large indifferent gaze,Impartial witness of our joy and bale,Our prostrate soil bore the awakening ray.Here too the vision and prophetic gleamLit into miracles common meaningless shapes;Then the divine afflatus, spent, withdrew,Unwanted, fading from the mortal's range.A sacred yearning lingered in its trace,The worship of a Presence and a PowerToo perfect to be held by death-bound hearts,The prescience of a marvellous birth to come.Only a little the god-light can stay:Spiritual beauty illumining human sightLines with its passion and mystery Matter's maskAnd squanders eternity on a beat of Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
470:The ship creaked and gravity shifted a degree to Miller's right. Course correction. Nothing interesting. Miller closed his eyes and tried to will himself to sleep. His mind was full of dead men and Julie and love and sex. There was something Holden had said about the war that was important, but he couldn't make the pieces fit. They kept changing. Miller sighed, shifted his weight so that he blocked one of his drainage tubes and had to shift back to stop the alarm. When the blood pressure cuff fired off again, it was Julie holding him, pulling herself so close her lips brushed his ear. His eyes opened, his mind seeing both the imaginary girl and the monitors that she would have blocked if she'd really been there. I love you too, she said, and I will take care of you. He smiled at seeing the numbers change as his heart raced. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
471:Medieval alchemy prepared the way for the greatest intervention in the divine world that man has ever attempted: alchemy was the dawn of the scientific age, when the daemon of the scientific spirit compelled the forces of nature to serve man to an extent that had never been known before. It was from the spirit of alchemy that Goethe wrought the figure of the "superman" Faust, and this superman led Nietzsche's Zarathustra to declare that God was dead and to proclaim the will to give birth to the superman, to "create a god for yourself out of your seven devils." Here we find the true roots, the preparatory processes deep in the psyche, which unleashed the forces at work in the world today. Science and technology have indeed conquered the world, but whether the psyche has gained anything is another matter. ~ Carl Jung, "Paracelsus as a Spiritual Phenomenon" (1942) CW 13,
472:On the exoteric side if necessary the mind should be trained by the study of any well-developed science, such as chemistry, or mathematics. The idea of organization is the first step, that of interpretation the second. The Master of the Temple, whose grade corresponds to Binah, is sworn to interpret every phenomenon as a particular dealing of God with his soul. {85} But even the beginner may attempt this practice with advantage. Either a fact fits in or it does not; if it does not, harmony is broken; and as the Universal harmony cannot be broken, the discord must be in the mind of the student, thus showing that he is not in tune with that Universal choir. Let him then puzzle out first the great facts, then the little; until one summer, when he is bald and lethargic after lunch, he understands and appreciates the existence of flies! ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
473:The Seven Da Vincian Principles are: Curiosità - An insatiably curious approach to life and an unrelenting quest for continuous learning. Dimostrazione - A commitment to test knowledge through experience, persistence, and a willingness to learn from mistakes. Sensazione - The continual refinement of the senses, especially sight, as the means to enliven experience. Sfumato (literally "Going up in Smoke") - A willingness to embrace ambiguity, paradox, and uncertainty. Arte/Scienza - The development of the balance between science and art, logic and imagination. "Whole-brain" thinking. Corporalità - The cultivation of grace, ambidexterity, fitness, and poise. Connessione - A recognition of and appreciation for the interconnectedness of all things and phenomena. Systems thinking. ~ Michael J. Gelb, How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day ,
474:... if we conceive of a being whose faculties are so sharpened that he can follow every molecule in its course, such a being, whose attributes are as essentially finite as our own, would be able to do what is impossible to us. For we have seen that molecules in a vessel full of air at uniform temperature are moving with velocities by no means uniform, though the mean velocity of any great number of them, arbitrarily selected, is almost exactly uniform. Now let us suppose that such a vessel is divided into two portions, A and B, by a division in which there is a small hole, and that a being, who can see the individual molecules, opens and closes this hole, so as to allow only the swifter molecules to pass from A to B, and only the slower molecules to pass from B to A. He will thus, without expenditure of work, raise the temperature of B and lower that of A, in contradiction to the second law of thermodynamics. ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
475:To The Works Of: Aristotle, Cassius J. Keyser, Eric T. Bell, G. W. Leibnitz, Eugen Bleuler, J. Locke, Niels Bohr, Jacques Loeb, George Boole, H. A. Lorentz, Max Born, Ernst Mach, Louis De Brogue, J. C. Maxwell, Georg Cantor, Adolf Meyer, Ernst Cassirer, Hermann Minkowsja, Charles M. Child, Isaac Newton, C. Darwin, Ivan Pavlov, Rene Descartes, Giuseppe Peano, P. A. M. Dirac, Max Planck, A. S. Eddington, Plato, Albert Einstein, H. Poincare, Euclid, M. Faraday, Sigmund Freud, Josiah Royce, Karl F. Gauss, G. Y. Rainich, G. B. Riemann, Bertrand Russell, Thomas Graham, Ernest Rutherford, Arthur Haas, E. Schrodinger, Wm. R. Hamilton, C. S. Sherrington, Henry Head, Socrates, Werner Heisenberg, Arnold Sommerfeld, C. Judson Herrick, Oswald Veblen, E. V. Huntington, Wm. Alanson White, Smith Ely Jeluffe, Alfred N. Whitehead, Ludwig Wittgenstein Which Have Creatly Influenced My Enquiry This System Is Dedicated ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity ,
476:A silence, an entry into a wide or even immense or infinite emptiness is part of the inner spiritual experience; of this silence and void the physical mind has a certain fear, the small superficially active thinking or vital mind a shrinking from it or dislike, - for it confuses the silence with mental and vital incapacity and the void with cessation or non-existence: but this silence is the silence of the spirit which is the condition of a greater knowledge, power and bliss, and this emptiness is the emptying of the cup of our natural being, a liberation of it from its turbid contents so that it may be filled with the wine of God; it is the passage not into non-existence but to a greater existence. Even when the being turns towards cessation, it is a cessation not in non-existence but into some vast ineffable of spiritual being or the plunge into the incommunicable superconscience of the Absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
477:In the terrestrial formulation of Knowledge and Power, this correlation is not altogether apparent because there consciousness itself is concealed in an original Inconscience and the natural strength and rhythm of its powers in their emergence are diminished and disturbed by the discordances and the veils of the Ignorance. The Inconscient there is the original, potent and automatically effective Force, the conscious mind is only a small labouring agent; but that is because the conscious mind in us has a limited individual action and the Inconscient is an immense action of a universal concealed Consciousness: the cosmic Force, masked as a material Energy, hides from our view by its insistent materiality of process the occult fact that the working of the Inconscient is really the expression of a vast universal Life, a veiled universal Mind, a hooded Gnosis, and without these origins of itself it could have no power of action, no organising coherence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
478:Even on Earth, the first steps in this direction had been taken. There were millions of men, doomed in earlier ages, who now lived active and happy lives thanks to artificial limbs, kidneys, lungs, and hearts. To this process there could be only one conclusion - however far off it might be.And eventually even the brain might go. As the seat of consciousness, It was not essential; the development of electronic intelligence had proved that. The conflict between mind and machine might be resolved at last in the eternal truce of complete symbiosis.But was even this the end? A few mystically inclined biologists went still further. They speculated, taking their cues from the beliefs of many religions, that mind would eventually free itself from matter. The robot body, like the flesh-and-blood one, would be no more than a stepping-stone to something which, long ago, men bad called "spirit."And if there was anything beyond that, its name could only be God. ~ Arthur C Clarke, Bertrand Russell,
480:At every stage of technique since Daedalus or Hero of Alexandria, the ability of the artificer to produce a working simulacrum of a living organism has always intrigued people. This desire to produce and to study automata has always been expressed in terms of the living technique of the age. In the days of magic, we have the bizarre and sinister concept of Golem, that figure of clay into which the Rabbi of Prague breathed life with the blasphemy of the Ineffable Name of God. In the time of Newton, the automaton becomes the clockwork music box, with the little effigies pirouetting stiffly on top. In the nineteenth century, the automaton is a glorified heat engine, burning some combustible fuel instead of the glycogen of the human muscles. Finally, the present automaton opens doors by means of photocells, or points guns to the place at which a radar beam picks up an airplane, or computes the solution of a differential equation. ~ Norbert Wiener, Cybernetics or control and communication in the animal and the machine 1961,
481:[E]very man hath liberty to write, but few ability. Heretofore learning was graced by judicious scholars, but now noble sciences are vilified by base and illiterate scribblers, that either write for vain-glory, need, to get money, or as Parasites to flatter and collogue with some great men, they put out trifles, rubbish and trash. Among so many thousand Authors you shall scarce find one by reading of whom you shall be any whit better, but rather much worse; by which he is rather infected than any way perfected... What a catalogue of new books this year, all his age (I say) have our Frankfurt Marts, our domestic Marts, brought out. Twice a year we stretch out wits out and set them to sale; after great toil we attain nothing...What a glut of books! Who can read them? As already, we shall have a vast Chaos and confusion of Books, we are oppressed with them, our eyes ache with reading, our fingers with turning. For my part I am one of the number-one of the many-I do not deny it... ~ Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy ,
482:This last figure, the White Magician, symbolizes the self-transcending element in the scientist's motivational drive and emotional make-up; his humble immersion into the mysteries of nature, his quest for the harmony of the spheres, the origin of life, the equations of a unified field theory. The conquistadorial urge is derived from a sense of power, the participatory urge from a sense of oceanic wonder. 'Men were first led to the study of natural philosophy', wrote Aristotle, 'as indeed they are today, by wonder.' Maxwell's earliest memory was 'lying on the grass, looking at the sun, and wondering'. Einstein struck the same chord when he wrote that whoever is devoid of the capacity to wonder, 'whoever remains unmoved, whoever cannot contemplate or know the deep shudder of the soul in enchantment, might just as well be dead for he has already closed his eyes upon life'.This oceanic feeling of wonder is the common source of religious mysticism, of pure science and art for art's sake; it is their common denominator and emotional bond. ~ Arthur Koestler,
483:Nature may reach the same result in many ways. Like a wave in the physical world, in the infinite ocean of the medium which pervades all, so in the world of organisms, in life, an impulse started proceeds onward, at times, may be, with the speed of light, at times, again, so slowly that for ages and ages it seems to stay, passing through processes of a complexity inconceivable to men, but in all its forms, in all its stages, its energy ever and ever integrally present. A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably complex are the processes in Nature. In no way can we get such an overwhelming idea of the grandeur of Nature than when we consider, that in accordance with the law of the conservation of energy, throughout the Infinite, the forces are in a perfect balance, and hence the energy of a single thought may determine the motion of a universe. ~ Nikola Tesla,
484:The earth too, one with the surrounding mass of darkness and inconscience is asleep and insentient. She has to wake up and start on her journey moving forward, unveiling her secret mysteries towards the supreme revelation, the Divine incarnation in matter. The Gods are awake, in order to awaken the earth. A first ray is sent down and it touches as it were the sleeping Mother. The Divine Ray is just like a finger of a child touching her mother trying, as it were, to persuade her to open her eyes and look at her child. The first ray, however, comes not as a caress to the inert being of darkness, it is a sharp prick, even a hard blow. Such is the first impact of light upon dead matter; and the light is thrown back, as an unwelcome intruder, into what it came from; and the darkness grovels in its old groove. The second stage comes when the impact is not felt as a pain or something totally foreign and strange; its touch is felt as something soothing, something that heals an eternal sore. But this too was not suffered long and the light has to go back again. ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, On Savitri ,
485:The path of seeking truth within and without is not an easy one. It goes literally against everything we've been told and taught by society and governments. The indoctrination of lies, the conditioning and programming is deep and far reaching. It has been going on for millennia. It takes tremendous effort to wake up from the hypnotic slumber, where most people dream to be awake. At this time of transition, as more and more knowledge is coming to the surface, there is the potential to create a new earth. However, this is also the age of deception for there are forces at work that do not want this to happen. They do their best to vector us away from truth and the most effective way to swallow a lie is to sandwich it between some truth with some emotional hooks. As mentioned many times before, lies are mixed with truth, hence discernment is essential. We need to engage our higher emotional center connecting us to divine intuition and also activate our higher intellect, engaging in sincere, open minded critical thinking, fusing the heart and the mind, mysticism and science. ~ Bernhard Guenther,
486:"Oi, Pampaw," Diogo said as the door to the public hall slid open. "You hear that Eros started talking?"Miller lifted himself to one elbow."Sí," Diogo said. "Whatever that shit is, it started broadcasting. There's even words and shit. I've got a feed. You want a listen?"No, Miller thought. No, I have seen those corridors. What's happened to those people almost happened to me. I don't want anything to do with that abomination."Sure," he said.Diogo scooped up his own hand terminal and keyed in something. Miller's terminal chimed that it had received the new feed route. "Chica perdída in ops been mixing a bunch of it to bhangra," Diogo said, making a shifting dance move with his hips. "Hard-core, eh?"Diogo and the other OPA irregulars had breached a high-value research station, faced down one of the most powerful and evil corporations in a history of power and evil. And now they were making music from the screams of the dying. Of the dead. They were dancing to it in the low-rent clubs. What it must be like, Miller thought, to be young and soulless. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
487:Supermind is the dynamic form of satcitananda (being-consciousness-bliss), and the necessary conduit, mediator or linkage between satcitananda and the manifest creation. (Life Divine Book I, ch.14-16) ... Supermind is spiritual consciousness acting as a self-luminous knowledge, will, sense, aesthesis, energy, self-creative and unveiling power of its own delight and being. Mind is the action of the same powers, but limited and only very indirectly and partially illumined. Supermind lives in unity though it plays with diversity; mind lives in a separative action of diversity, though it may open to unity. Mind is not only capable of ignorance, but, because it acts always partially and by limitation, it works characteristically as a power of ignorance : it may even and it does forget itself in a complete inconscience, or nescience, awaken from it to the ignorance of a partial knowledge and move from the ignorance towards a complete knowledge, -- that is its natural action in the human being, -- but it can never have by itself a complete knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.03 - The Psychology of Self-Perfection,
488:Here I want to make it very clear that mathematics is not what many people think it is; it is not a system of mere formulas and theorems; but as beautifully defined by Professor Cassius J. Keyser, in his book The Human Worth of Rigorous Thinking (Columbia University Press, 1916), mathematics is the science of "Exact thought or rigorous thinking," and one of its distinctive characteristics is "precision, sharpness, completeness of definitions." This quality alone is sufficient to explain why people generally do not like mathematics and why even some scientists bluntly refuse to have anything to do with problems wherein mathematical reasoning is involved. In the meantime, mathematical philosophy has very little, if anything, to do with mere calculations or with numbers as such or with formulas; it is a philosophy wherein precise, sharp and rigorous thinking is essential. Those who deliberately refuse to think "rigorously"-that is mathematically-in connections where such thinking is possible, commit the sin of preferring the worse to the better; they deliberately violate the supreme law of intellectual rectitude. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
489:An Informal Integral Canon: Selected books on Integral Science, Philosophy and the Integral Transformation Sri Aurobindo - The Life Divine Sri Aurobindo - The Synthesis of Yoga Pierre Teilhard de Chardin - The Phenomenon of Man Jean Gebser - The Ever-Present Origin Edward Haskell - Full Circle - The Moral Force of Unified Science Oliver L. Reiser - Cosmic Humanism and World Unity Christopher Hills - Nuclear Evolution: Discovery of the Rainbow Body The Mother - Mother's Agenda Erich Jantsch - The Self-Organizing Universe - Scientific and Human Implications of the Emerging Paradigm of Evolution T. R. Thulasiram - Arut Perum Jyothi and Deathless Body Kees Zoeteman - Gaiasophy Ken Wilber - Sex Ecology Spirituality: The Spirit of Evolution Don Edward Beck - Spiral Dynamics: Mastering Values, Leadership, and Change Kundan Singh - The Evolution of Integral Yoga: Sri Aurobindo, Sri Ramakrishna, and Swami Vivekananda Sean Esbjorn-Hargens - Integral Ecology: Uniting Multiple Perspectives on the Natural World ~ M Alan Kazlev, Kheper.php">Kheper ,
490:The Lord sees in his omniscience the thing that has to be done. This seeing is his Will, it is a form of creative Power, and that which he sees the all-conscious Mother, one with him, takes into her dynamic self and embodies, and executive Nature-Force carries it out as the mechanism of their omnipotent omniscience. But this vision of what is to be and therefore of what is to be done arises out of the very being, pours directly out of the consciousness and delight of existence of the Lord, spontaneously, like light from the Sun. It is not our mortal attempt to see, our difficult arrival at truth of action and motive or just demand of Nature. When the individual soul is entirely at one in its being and knowledge with the Lord and directly in touch with the original Shakti, the transcendent Mother, the supreme Will can then arise in us too in the high divine manner as a thing that must be and is achieved by the spontaneous action of Nature. There is then no desire, no responsibility, no reaction; all takes place in the peace, calm, light, power of the supporting and enveloping and inhabiting Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.08 - The Supreme Will,
491:The key one and threefold, even as universal science. The division of the work is sevenfold, and through these sections are distributed the seven degrees of initiation into is transcendental philosophy.The text is a mystical commentary on the oracles of Solomon, ^ and the work ends with a series of synoptic schedules which are the synthesis of Magic and the occult Kabalah so far as concerns that which can be made public in writing. The rest, being the esoteric and inexpressible part of the science, is formulated in magnificent pantacles carefully designed and engraved. These are nine in number, as follows(1) The dogma of Hermes;(2) Magical realisation;(3) The path of wisdom and the initial procedure in the work(4) The Gate of the Sanctuary enlightened by seven mystic rays;(5) A Rose of Light, in the centre of which a human figure is extending its arms in the form of a cross;(6) The magical laboratory of Khunrath, demonstrating the necessary union of prayer and work(7) The absolute synthesis of science;(8) Universal equilibrium ;(9) A summary of Khunrath's personal embodying an energetic protest against all his detractors. ~ Eliphas Levi, The History Of Magic ,
492:Therefore the age of intuitive knowledge, represented by the early Vedantic thinking of the Upanishads, had to give place to the age of rational knowledge; inspired Scripture made room for metaphysical philosophy, even as afterwards metaphysical philosophy had to give place to experimental Science. Intuitive thought which is a messenger from the superconscient and therefore our highest faculty, was supplanted by the pure reason which is only a sort of deputy and belongs to the middle heights of our being; pure reason in its turn was supplanted for a time by the mixed action of the reason which lives on our plains and lower elevations and does not in its view exceed the horizon of the experience that the physical mind and senses or such aids as we can invent for them can bring to us. And this process which seems to be a descent, is really a circle of progress. For in each case the lower faculty is compelled to take up as much as it can assimilate of what the higher had already given and to attempt to re-establish it by its own methods. By the attempt it is itself enlarged in its scope and arrives eventually at a more supple and a more ample selfaccommodation to the higher faculties. ~ Sri Aurobindo, TLD 1.08-13 ,
493:From what we've seen in sci-fi movies and literature and generally xenophobic public behavior about Others (immigrants, apostates, and liberals, e.g.,), and the primordial urges to solve imagined or perceived threats with military force, I think the only possibly positive version of alien visitations would be if (a) they're sufficiently evolved to be able to understand the utter primitivity of human behavior as collectives, and (b) they're sufficiently caring to treat Earth as a planet of ill-bred children, mostly incapable of acting, as a collective -- on their higher natures. It seems far more likely that we would be perceived as a vastly inferior species of antlike primitives, warring uselessly amongst ourselves with robotic persistence over millennia.If, based on their other cosmic travels and intergalactic species science, the extraterrestrials are able to have undeservedly benign interventions with humans without somehow provoking paranoid hysteria, religious panics and miitary holocaust, then we might have something to look forward to; but this, unfortunately, is placing a huge gamble on extraterrestrials to be the prevailingly benign moderators of our fate than we ourselves are ever likely to be as a species. ~ Fred Hosea,
494:Philosophy, as defined by Fichte, is the "science of sciences." Its aim was to solve the problems of the world. In the past, when all exact sciences were in their infancy, philosophy had to be purely speculative, with little or no regard to realities. But if we regard philosophy as a Mother science, divided into many branches, we find that those branches have grown so large and various, that the Mother science looks like a hen with her little ducklings paddling in a pond, far beyond her reach; she is unable to follow her growing hatchlings. In the meantime, the progress of life and science goes on, irrespective of the cackling of metaphysics. Philosophy does not fulfill her initial aim to bring the results of experimental and exact sciences together and to solve world problems. Through endless, scientific specialization scientific branches multiply, and for want of coordination the great world-problems suffer. This failure of philosophy to fulfill her boasted mission of scientific coordination is responsible for the chaos in the world of general thought. The world has no collective or organized higher ideals and aims, nor even fixed general purposes. Life is an accidental game of private or collective ambitions and greeds. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
495:I have been accused of a habit of changing my opinions. I am not myself in any degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was already active in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions had not changed during the last half century? In science men change their opinions when new knowledge becomes available; but philosophy in the minds of many is assimilated rather to theology than to science. The kind of philosophy that I value and have endeavoured to pursue is scientific, in the sense that there is some definite knowledge to be obtained and that new discoveries can make the admission of former error inevitable to any candid mind. For what I have said, whether early or late, I do not claim the kind of truth which theologians claim for their creeds. I claim only, at best, that the opinion expressed was a sensible one to hold at the time when it was expressed. I should be much surprised if subsequent research did not show that it needed to be modified. I hope, therefore, that whoever uses this dictionary will not suppose the remarks which it quotes to be intended as pontifical pronouncements, but only as the best I could do at the time towards the promotion of clear and accurate thinking. Clarity, above all, has been my aim. ~ Bertrand Russell,
496:Considered from this point of view, the fact that some of the theories which we know to be false give such amazingly accurate results is an adverse factor. Had we somewhat less knowledge, the group of phenomena which these "false" theories explain would appear to us to be large enough to "prove" these theories. However, these theories are considered to be "false" by us just for the reason that they are, in ultimate analysis, incompatible with more encompassing pictures and, if sufficiently many such false theories are discovered, they are bound to prove also to be in conflict with each other. Similarly, it is possible that the theories, which we consider to be "proved" by a number of numerical agreements which appears to be large enough for us, are false because they are in conflict with a possible more encompassing theory which is beyond our means of discovery. If this were true, we would have to expect conflicts between our theories as soon as their number grows beyond a certain point and as soon as they cover a sufficiently large number of groups of phenomena. In contrast to the article of faith of the theoretical physicist mentioned before, this is the nightmare of the theorist. ~ Eugene Paul Wigner, The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences ,
497:If we do not objectify, and feel instinctively and permanently that words are not the things spoken about, then we could not speak abouth such meaningless subjects as the 'beginning' or the 'end' of time. But, if we are semantically disturbed and objectify, then, of course, since objects have a beginning and an end, so also would 'time' have a 'beggining' and an 'end'. In such pathological fancies the universe must have a 'beginning in time' and so must have been made., and all of our old anthropomorphic and objectified mythologies follow, including the older theories of entropy in physics. But, if 'time' is only a human form of representation and not an object, the universe has no 'beginning in time' and no 'end in time'; in other words, the universe is 'time'-less. The moment we realize, feel permanently, and utilize these realizations and feelings that words are not things, then only do we acquire the semantic freedom to use different forms of representation. We can fit better their structure to the facts at hand, become better adjusted to these facts which are not words, and so evaluate properly m.o (multi-ordinal) realities, which evaluation is important for sanity. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics ,
498:I have a friend who's an artist and has sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say "look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. Then he says "I as an artist can see how beautiful this is but you as a scientist take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing," and I think that he's kind of nutty. First of all, the beauty that he sees is available to other people and to me too, I believe. Although I may not be quite as refined aesthetically as he is ... I can appreciate the beauty of a flower. At the same time, I see much more about the flower than he sees. I could imagine the cells in there, the complicated actions inside, which also have a beauty. I mean it's not just beauty at this dimension, at one centimeter; there's also beauty at smaller dimensions, the inner structure, also the processes. The fact that the colors in the flower evolved in order to attract insects to pollinate it is interesting; it means that insects can see the color. It adds a question: does this aesthetic sense also exist in the lower forms? Why is it aesthetic? All kinds of interesting questions which the science knowledge only adds to the excitement, the mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. ~ Richard P Feynman,
499:"Who does not understand should either learn, or be silent.""Perspective is an Art Mathematical which demonstrates the manner and properties of all radiations direct, broken and reflected.""Neither the circle without the line, nor the line without the point, can be artificially produced. It is, therefore, by virtue of the point and the Monad that all things commence to emerge in principle. That which is affected at the periphery, however large it may be, cannot in any way lack the support of the central point.""Therefore, the central point which we see in the centre of the hieroglyphic Monad produces the Earth, round which the Sun, the Moon, and the other planets follow their respective paths. The Sun has the supreme dignity, and we represent him by a circle having a visible centre."There is (gentle reader) nothing (the works of God only set apart) which so much beautifies and adorns the soul and mind of man as does knowledge of the good arts and sciences . Many arts there are which beautify the mind of man; but of all none do more garnish and beautify it than those arts which are called mathematical, unto the knowledge of which no man can attain, without perfect knowledge and instruction of the principles, grounds, and Elements of Geometry." ~ Dr. John Dee, The Hieroglyphic Monad ,
500:A poet once said, 'The whole universe is in a glass of wine.' We will probably never know in what sense he meant it, for poets do not write to be understood. But it is true that if we look at a glass of wine closely enough we see the entire universe. There are the things of physics: the twisting liquid which evaporates depending on the wind and weather, the reflection in the glass; and our imagination adds atoms. The glass is a distillation of the earth's rocks, and in its composition we see the secrets of the universe's age, and the evolution of stars. What strange array of chemicals are in the wine? How did they come to be? There are the ferments, the enzymes, the substrates, and the products. There in wine is found the great generalization; all life is fermentation. Nobody can discover the chemistry of wine without discovering, as did Louis Pasteur, the cause of much disease. How vivid is the claret, pressing its existence into the consciousness that watches it! If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts -- physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on -- remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure; drink it and forget it all! ~ Richard P Feynman,
501:JOSHhmm. its so upsetting.. it seems like the book is a perfect symbol for something terribly wrong. I constantly avoid anything Donald Trump related because I find him so repulsive its upsetting. like its too disgusting of a corruption and i just avoid it. but maybe this book is a lukewarm symbol so I can learn to move towards and fight such darknesses.. I dont know.. so upsetting.and people buy into such double-thought inconscience? I cant even comprehend how this can be like this. I guess its like I turn away from disgust it allows people to turn away from reason through that infantile pre-rational regression or something. I mean we all want safety but..the book itself goes against itself from the title.. like its bashing the left for wanting to divide america but thats what the book is doing by attacking them. so I guess if people cant catch the deception from the title they wont catch it in the book? ayahALANYeah it's the whole white male fragility persecution envy trip. Donny Jnr was so triggered he had to write a whole book (I pity the ghostwriter).And yes it is upsetting, we live in a world where the Lord of Falsehood is on the ascendant, through instruments like Trump, Koch, and Murdoch. Some people are particularly susceptible, others are immune. This is the battle for the Earth ~ M Alan Kazlev, Facebook ,
502:It is also the story of a book, a book called The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy - not an Earth book, never published on Earth, and until the terrible catastrophe occurred, never seen or heard of by any Earthman. Nevertheless, a wholly remarkable book.in fact it was probably the most remarkable book ever to come out of the great publishing houses of Ursa Minor - of which no Earthman had ever heard either. Not only is it a wholly remarkable book, it is also a highly successful one - more popular than the Celestial Home Care Omnibus, better selling than Fifty More Things to do in Zero Gravity, and more controversial than Oolon Colluphid's trilogy of philosophical blockbusters Where God Went Wrong, Some More of God's Greatest Mistakes and Who is this God Person Anyway? In many of the more relaxed civilizations on the Outer Eastern Rim of the Galaxy, the Hitch Hiker's Guide has already supplanted the great Encyclopedia Galactica as the standard repository of all knowledge and wisdom, for though it has many omissions and contains much that is apocryphal, or at least wildly inaccurate, it scores over the older, more pedestrian work in two important respects. First, it is slightly cheaper; and secondly it has the words Don't Panic inscribed in large friendly letters on its cover. ~ Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy ,
503:`No. Stay, doesn't matter.' He settled the black terry sweatband across his forehead, careful not to disturb the flat Sendai dermatrodes [1]. He stared at the deck on his lap, not really seeing it, seeing instead the shop window on Ninsei, the chromed shuriken burning with reflected neon. He glanced up; on the wall, just above the Sony, he'd hung her gift, tacking it there with a yellow-headed drawing pin through the hole at its center.He closed his eyes.Found the ridged face of the power stud.And in the bloodlit dark behind his eyes, silver phosphenes boiling in from the edge of space, hypnagogic images jerking past like film compiled from random frames.Symbols, figures, faces, a blurred, fragmented mandala of visual information.Please, he prayed, now --A gray disk, the color of Chiba sky.Now --Disk beginning to rotate, faster, becoming a sphere of paler gray. Expanding --And flowed, flowered for him, fluid neon origami trick, the unfolding of his distanceless home, his country, transparent 3D chessboard extending to infinity. Inner eye opening to the stepped scarlet pyramid of the Eastern Seaboard Fission Authority burning beyond the green cubes of Mitsubishi Bank of America, and high and very far away he saw the spiral arms of military systems, forever beyond his reach. ~ William Gibson, Neuromancer ,
504:And now, out among the stars, evolution was driving toward new goals. The first explorers of Earth had long since come to the limits of flesh and blood; as soon as their machines were better than their bodies, it was time to move. First their brains, and then their thoughts alone, they transferred into shining new homes of metal and of plastic.In these, they roamed among the stars. They no longer built spaceships. They were spaceships.But the age of the Machine-entities swiftly passed. In their ceaseless experimenting, they had learned to store knowledge in the structure of space itself, and to preserve their thoughts for eternity in frozen lattices of light. They could become creatures of radiation, free at last from the tyranny of matter.Into pure energy, therefore, they presently transformed themselves; and on a thousand worlds, the empty shells they had discarded twitched for a while in a mindless dance of death, then crumbled into rust.Now they were lords of the galaxy, and beyond the reach of time. They could rove at will among the stars, and sink like a subtle mist through the very interstices of space. But despite their godlike powers, they had not wholly forgotten their origin, in the warm slime of a vanished sea.And they still watched over the experiments their ancestors had started, so long ago. ~ Arthur C Clarke, The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
506:The scientists, all of them, have their duties no doubt, but they do not fully use their education if they do not try to broaden their sense of responsibility toward all mankind instead of closing themselves up in a narrow specialization where they find their pleasure. Neither engineers nor other scientific men have any right to prefer their own personal peace to the happiness of mankind; their place and their duty are in the front line of struggling humanity, not in the unperturbed ranks of those who keep themselves aloof from life. If they are indifferent, or discouraged because they feel or think that they know that the situation is hopeless, it may be proved that undue pessimism is as dangerous a "religion" as any other blind creed. Indeed there is very little difference in kind between the medieval fanaticism of the "holy inquisition," and modern intolerance toward new ideas. All kinds of intellect must get together, for as long as we presuppose the situation to be hopeless, the situation will indeed be hopeless. The spirit of Human Engineering does not know the word "hopeless"; for engineers know that wrong methods are alone responsible for disastrous results, and that every situation can be successfully handled by the use of proper means. The task of engineering science is not only to know but to know how. Most of the scientists and engineers do not yet realize that their united judgment would be invincible; no system or class would care to disregard it. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
507:"So," she said. "I've been thinking of it as a computing problem. If the virus or nanomachine or protomolecule or whatever was designed, it has a purpose, right?" "Definitely," Holden said. "And it seems like it's trying to do something-something complex. It doesn't make sense to go to all that trouble just to kill people. Those changes it makes look intentional, just... not complete, to me." "I can see that," Holden said. Alex and Amos nodded along with him but stayed quiet. "So maybe the issue is that the protomolecule isn't smart enough yet. You can compress a lot of data down pretty small, but unless it's a quantum computer, processing takes space. The easiest way to get that processing in tiny machines is through distribution. Maybe the protomolecule isn't finishing its job because it just isn't smart enough to. Yet." "Not enough of them," Alex said. "Right," Naomi said, dropping the towel into a bin under the sink. "So you give them a lot of biomass to work with, and see what it is they are ultimately made to do." "According to that guy in the video, they were made to hijack life on Earth and wipe us out," Miller said. "And that," Holden said, "is why Eros is perfect. Lots of biomass in a vacuum-sealed test tube. And if it gets out of hand, there's already a war going on. A lot of ships and missiles can be used for nuking Eros into glass if the threat seems real. Nothing to make us forget our differences like a new player butting in." ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
508:People think of education as something that they can finish. And what's more, when they finish, it's a rite of passage. You're finished with school. You're no more a child, and therefore anything that reminds you of school - reading books, having ideas, asking questions - that's kid's stuff. Now you're an adult, you don't do that sort of thing any more.You have everybody looking forward to no longer learning, and you make them ashamed afterward of going back to learning. If you have a system of education using computers, then anyone, any age, can learn by himself, can continue to be interested. If you enjoy learning, there's no reason why you should stop at a given age. People don't stop things they enjoy doing just because they reach a certain age.What's exciting is the actual process of broadening yourself, of knowing there's now a little extra facet of the universe you know about and can think about and can understand. It seems to me that when it's time to die, there would be a certain pleasure in thinking that you had utilized your life well, learned as much as you could, gathered in as much as possible of the universe, and enjoyed it. There's only this one universe and only this one lifetime to try to grasp it. And while it is inconceivable that anyone can grasp more than a tiny portion of it, at least you can do that much. What a tragedy just to pass through and get nothing out of it. ~ Isaac Asimov, Carl Freedman - Conversations with Isaac Asimov-University Press of Mississippi (2005).pdf ,
509:At first, needing the companionship of the human voice, he had listened to classical plays especially the works of Shaw, Ibsen, and Shakespeare - or poetry readings from Discovery's enormous library of recorded sounds. The problems they dealt with, however, seemed so remote, or so easily resolved with a little common sense, that after a while he lost patience with them.So he switched to opera - usually in Italian or German, so that he was not distracted even by the minimal intellectual content that most operas contained. This phase lasted for two weeks before he realized that the sound of all these superbly trained voices was only exacerbating his loneliness. But what finally ended this cycle was Verdi's Requiem Mass, which he had never heard performed on Earth. The "Dies Irae," roaring with ominous appropriateness through the empty ship, left him completely shattered; and when the trumpets of Doomsday echoed from the heavens, he could endure no more.Thereafter, he played only instrumental music. He started with the romantic composers, but shed them one by one as their emotional outpourings became too oppressive. Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Berlioz, lasted a few weeks, Beethoven rather longer. He finally found peace, as so many others had done, in the abstract architecture of Bach, occasionally ornamented with Mozart. And so Discovery drove on toward Saturn, as often as not pulsating with the cool music of the harpsichord, the frozen thoughts of a brain that had been dust for twice a hundred years. ~ Arthur C Clarke, Julian Huxley, Transhumanism ,
511:Supermind, on the other hand, as a basic structure-rung (conjoined with nondual Suchness) can only be experienced once all the previous junior levels have emerged and developed, and as in all structure development, stages cannot be skipped. Therefore, unlike Big Mind, supermind can only be experienced after all 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-tier junior stages have been passed through. While, as Genpo Roshi has abundantly demonstrated, Big Mind state experience is available to virtually anybody at almost any age (and will be interpreted according to the View of their current stage), supermind is an extremely rare recognition. Supermind, as the highest structure-rung to date, has access to all previous structures, all the way back to Archaic-and the Archaic itself, of course, has transcended and included, and now embraces, every major structural evolution going all the way back to the Big Bang. (A human being literally enfolds and embraces all the major transformative unfoldings of the entire Kosmic history-strings to quarks to subatomic particles to atoms to molecules to cells, all the way through the Tree of Life up to its latest evolutionary emergent, the triune brain, the most complex structure in the known natural world.) Supermind, in any given individual, is experienced as a type of omniscience-the supermind, since it transcends and includes all of the previous structure-rungs, and inherently is conjoined with the highest nondual Suchness state, has a full and complete knowledge of all of the potentials in that person. It literally knows all, at least for the individual. ~ Ken Wilber?,
512:But even when the desire to know exists in the requisite strength, the mental vision by which abstract truth is recognised is hard to distinguish from vivid imaginability and consonance with mental habits. It is necessary to practise methodological doubt, like Descartes, in order to loosen the hold of mental habits; and it is necessary to cultivate logical imagination, in order to have a number of hypotheses at command, and not to be the slave of the one which common sense has rendered easy to imagine. These two processes, of doubting the familiar and imagining the unfamiliar, are correlative, and form the chief part of the mental training required for a philosopher.The naïve beliefs which we find in ourselves when we first begin the process of philosophic reflection may turn out, in the end, to be almost all capable of a true interpretation; but they ought all, before being admitted into philosophy, to undergo the ordeal of sceptical criticism. Until they have gone through this ordeal, they are mere blind habits, ways of behaving rather than intellectual convictions. And although it may be that a majority will pass the test, we may be pretty sure that some will not, and that a serious readjustment of our outlook ought to result. In order to break the dominion of habit, we must do our best to doubt the senses, reason, morals, everything in short. In some directions, doubt will be found possible; in others, it will be checked by that direct vision of abstract truth upon which the possibility of philosophical knowledge depends. ~ Bertrand Russell, Our Knowledge of the External World ,
513:... Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas, by his contrivance, the most ignorant person, at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, might write books in philosophy, poetry, politics, laws, mathematics, and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study." He then led me to the frame, about the sides, whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty feet square, placed in the middle of the room. The superfices was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a die, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered, on every square, with paper pasted on them; and on these papers were written all the words of their language, in their several moods, tenses, and declensions; but without any order. The professor then desired me "to observe; for he was going to set his engine at work." The pupils, at his command, took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of the words was entirely changed. He then commanded six-and-thirty of the lads, to read the several lines softly, as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys, who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn, the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down. ~ Jonathan Swift, Gullivers Travels ,
514:The whole history of mankind and especially the present condition of the world unite in showing that far from being merely hypothetical, the case supposed has always been actual and is actual to-day on a vaster scale than ever before. My contention is that while progress in some of the great matters of human concern has been long proceeding in accordance with the law of a rapidly increasing geometric progression, progress in the other matters of no less importance has advanced only at the rate of an arithmetical progression or at best at the rate of some geometric progression of relatively slow growth. To see it and to understand it we have to pay the small price of a little observation and a little meditation. Some technological invention is made, like that of a steam engine or a printing press, for example; or some discovery of scientific method, like that of analytical geometry or the infinitesimal calculus; or some discovery of natural law, like that of falling bodies or the Newtonian law of gravitation. What happens? What is the effect upon the progress of knowledge and invention? The effect is stimulation. Each invention leads to new inventions and each discovery to new discoveries; invention breeds invention, science begets science, the children of knowledge produce their kind in larger and larger families; the process goes on from decade to decade, from generation to generation, and the spectacle we behold is that of advancement in scientific knowledge and technological power according to the law and rate of a rapidly increasing geometric progression or logarithmic function. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
515:What is that work and result, if not a self-involution of Consciousness in form and a self-evolution out of form so as to actualise some mighty possibility in the universe which it has created? And what is its will in Man if not a will to unending Life, to unbounded Knowledge, to unfettered Power? Science itself begins to dream of the physical conquest of death, expresses an insatiable thirst for knowledge, is working out something like a terrestrial omnipotence for humanity. Space and Time are contracting to the vanishing-point in its works, and it strives in a hundred ways to make man the master of circumstance and so lighten the fetters of causality. The idea of limit, of the impossible begins to grow a little shadowy and it appears instead that whatever man constantly wills, he must in the end be able to do; for the consciousness in the race eventually finds the means. It is not in the individual that this omnipotence expresses itself, but the collective Will of mankind that works out with the individual as a means. And yet when we look more deeply, it is not any conscious Will of the collectivity, but a superconscious Might that uses the individual as a centre and means, the collectivity as a condition and field. What is this but the God in man, the infinite Identity, the multitudinous Unity, the Omniscient, the Omnipotent, who having made man in His own image, with the ego as a centre of working, with the race, the collective Narayana, the visvamanava as the mould and circumscription, seeks to express in them some image of the unity, omniscience, omnipotence which are the self-conception of the Divine? ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
516:[4:131] A human being is a material system which time, a form of energy, enters. Probably time enters him also as noos-Mind. Time, the future, contains in it all the events which are going to occur. Therefore when time enters a person as energy, and acting as noos to him, it brings with it in potentium all that will happen to him, like a window shade unrolling to display an unfolding pattern. Events in the future pop into being, into actualization, the present, but until they do, they are not truly real-not yet actualized-but there in an encoded form, like the grooves of an LP before the needle reaches it; the only "music" is where the needle touches-ahead lies only an encoded wiggle along a helical spiral. Thus, dreams deal with the future lying direct ahead, as during the night, the next series of encoded future events begin to move toward actualization: i.e., the present. What is hard to realize is that in a certain very real way these events are inside the person, within his head, so to speak; but only in their potential, encoded form; the arena in which they are actualized is that of space; time, in the present, flows out to fill space-i.e., the spatial universe. This is why we experience déjà vu. We have somehow caught a glimpse now and then of the script unrolling in our head-caught a glimpse in advance, so we feel "I know exactly what I'm going to say next, and what gestures he'll make," etc. Sure; they're encoded-encased, waiting-in time, and time, being energy, has entered you; is burning bright inside, like Blake's tyger. Tyger, tyger, burning bright In the forests of the night. . . . Who framed thy awful symmetry? ~ Philip K Dick, Exegesis Of Philip K Dick ,
517:Philosophy, like all other studies, aims primarily at knowledge. The knowledge it aims at is the kind of knowledge which gives unity and system to the body of the sciences, and the kind which results from a critical examination of the grounds of our convictions, prejudices, and beliefs. But it cannot be maintained that philosophy has had any very great measure of success in its attempts to provide definite answers to its questions. If you ask a mathematician, a mineralogist, a historian, or any other man of learning, what definite body of truths has been ascertained by his science, his answer will last as long as you are willing to listen. But if you put the same question to a philosopher, he will, if he is candid, have to confess that his study has not achieved positive results such as have been achieved by other sciences. It is true that this is partly accounted for by the fact that, as soon as definite knowledge concerning any subject becomes possible, this subject ceases to be called philosophy, and becomes a separate science. The whole study of the heavens, which now belongs to astronomy, was once included in philosophy; Newton's great work was called 'the mathematical principles of natural philosophy'. Similarly, the study of the human mind, which was a part of philosophy, has now been separated from philosophy and has become the science of psychology. Thus, to a great extent, the uncertainty of philosophy is more apparent than real: those questions which are already capable of definite answers are placed in the sciences, while those only to which, at present, no definite answer can be given, remain to form the residue which is called philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
518:science of consciousness, the soul and objective matter ::: When the ancient thinkers of India set themselves to study the soul of man in themselves and others, they, unlike any other nation or school of early thought, proceeded at once to a process which resembles exactly enough the process adopted by modern science in its study of physical phenomena. For their object was to study, arrange and utilise the forms, forces and working movements of consciousness, just as the modern physical Sciences study, arrange and utilize the forms, forces and working movements of objective Matter. The material with which they had to deal was more subtle, flexible and versatile than the most impalpable forces of which the physical Sciences have become aware; its motions were more elusive, its processes harder to fix; but once grasped and ascertained, the movements of consciousness were found by Vedic psychologists to be in their process and activity as regular, manageable and utilisable as the movements of physical forces. The powers of the soul can be as perfectly handled and as safely, methodically and puissantly directed to practical life-purposes of joy, power and light as the modern power of electricity can be used for human comfort, industrial and locomotive power and physical illumination; but the results to which they give room and effect are more wonderful and momentous than the results of motorpower and electric luminosity. For there is no difference of essential law in the physical and the psychical, but only a difference and undoubtedly a great difference of energy, instrumentation and exact process. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human Towards a True Scientific Psychology,
519:...that personality, like consciousness, life, soul is not a brief-lived stranger in an impersonal Eternity, but contains the very meaning of existence. This fine flower of the cosmic Energy carries in it a forecast of the aim and a hint of the very motive of the universal labour. As an occult vision opens in him, he becomes aware of worlds behind in which consciousness and personality hold an enormous place and assume a premier value; even here in the material world to this occult vision the inconscience of Matter fills with a secret pervading consciousness, its inanimation harbours a vibrant life, its mechanism is the device of an indwelling Intelligence, God and soul are everywhere. Above all stands an infinite conscious Being who is variously self-expressed in all these worlds; impersonality is only a first means of that expression. It is a field of principles and forces, an equal basis of manifestation; but these forces express themselves through beings, have conscious spirits at their head and are the emanation of a One Conscious Being who is their sorce. A multiple innumberable personality expressing that One is the very sense and central aim of the manifestation and if now personality seems to be narrow, fragmentary, restrictive, it is only because it has not opened to its source or flowered into its own divine truth and fullness packing itself with the universal and the infinite. Thus the world-creation is no more an illusion, a fortuitous mechanism, a play that need not have happened, a flux without consequence; it is an intimate dynamism of the conscious and living Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,
520:science reading list ::: 1. and 2. The Voyage of the Beagle (1845) and The Origin of Species (1859) by Charles Darwin [tie 3. Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy) by Isaac Newton (1687) 4. Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems by Galileo Galilei (1632) 5. De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres) by Nicolaus Copernicus (1543) 6. Physica (Physics) by Aristotle (circa 330 B.C.) 7. De Humani Corporis Fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human Body) by Andreas Vesalius (1543) 8. Relativity: The Special and General Theory by Albert Einstein (1916) 9. The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins (1976) 10. One Two Three . . . Infinity by George Gamow (1947) 11. The Double Helix by James D. Watson (1968) 12. What Is Life? by Erwin Schrodinger (1944) 13. The Cosmic Connection by Carl Sagan (1973) 14. The Insect Societies by Edward O. Wilson (1971) 15. The First Three Minutes by Steven Weinberg (1977) 16. Silent Spring by Rachel Carson (1962) 17. The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould (1981) 18. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Oliver Sacks (1985) 19. The Journals of Lewis and Clark by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark (1814) 20. The Feynman Lectures on Physics by Richard P Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands (1963) 21. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male by Alfred C. Kinsey et al. (1948) 22. Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey (1983) 23. Under a Lucky Star by Roy Chapman Andrews (1943) 24. Micrographia by Robert Hooke (1665) 25. Gaia by James Lovelock (1979) ~ Editors of Discovery Magazine, Website.php">Website ,
521:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. These passions, like great winds, have blown me hither and thither, in a wayward course, over a great ocean of anguish, reaching to the very verge of despair. I have sought love, first, because it brings ecstasy - ecstasy so great that I would often have sacrificed all the rest of life for a few hours of this joy. I have sought it, next, because it relieves loneliness--that terrible loneliness in which one shivering consciousness looks over the rim of the world into the cold unfathomable lifeless abyss. I have sought it finally, because in the union of love I have seen, in a mystic miniature, the prefiguring vision of the heaven that saints and poets have imagined. This is what I sought, and though it might seem too good for human life, this is what--at last--I have found. With equal passion I have sought knowledge. I have wished to understand the hearts of men. I have wished to know why the stars shine. And I have tried to apprehend the Pythagorean power by which number holds sway above the flux. A little of this, but not much, I have achieved. Love and knowledge, so far as they were possible, led upward toward the heavens. But always pity brought me back to earth. Echoes of cries of pain reverberate in my heart. Children in famine, victims tortured by oppressors, helpless old people a burden to their sons, and the whole world of loneliness, poverty, and pain make a mockery of what human life should be. I long to alleviate this evil, but I cannot, and I too suffer. This has been my life. I have found it worth living, and would gladly live it again if the chance were offered me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
522:Sweet Mother, Sri Aurobindo is speaking about occult endeavour here and says that those who don't have the capacity must wait till it is given to them. Can't they get it through practice? No. That is, if it is latent in someone, it can be developed by practice. But if one doesn't have occult power, he may try for fifty years, he won't get anywhere. Everybody cannot have occult power. It is as though you were asking whether everybody could be a musician, everybody could be a painter, everybody could... Some can, some can't. It is a question of temperament. What is the difference between occultism and mysticism? They are not at all the same thing. Mysticism is a more or less emotive relation with what one senses to be a divine power - that kind of highly emotional, affective, very intense relation with something invisible which is or is taken for the Divine. That is mysticism. Occultism is exactly what he has said: it is the knowledge of invisible forces and the power to handle them. It is a science. It is altogether a science. I always compare occultism with chemistry, for it is the same kind of knowledge as the knowledge of chemistry for material things. It is a knowledge of invisible forces, their different vibrations, their interrelations, the combinations which can be made by bringing them together and the power one can exercise over them. It is absolutely scientific; and it ought to be learnt like a science; that is, one cannot practise occultism as something emotional or something vague and imprecise. You must work at it as you would do at chemistry, and learn all the rules or find them if there is nobody to teach you. But it is at some risk to yourself that you can find them. There are combinations here as explosive as certain chemical combinations. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
523:principle of Yogic methods ::: Yogic methods have something of the same relation to the customary psychological workings of man as has the scientific handling of the force of electricity or of steam to their normal operations in Nature. And they, too, like the operations of Science, are formed upon a knowledge developed and confirmed by regular experiment, practical analysis and constant result. All Rajayoga, for instance, depends on this perception and experience that our inner elements, combinations, functions, forces can be separated or dissolved, can be new-combined and set to novel and formerly impossible workings or can be transformed and resolved into a new general synthesis by fixed internal processes. Hathayoga similarly depends on this perception and experience that the vital forces and function to which our life is normally subjected and whose ordinary operations seem set and indispensable, can be mastered and the operations changed or suspended with results that would otherwise be impossible and that seem miraculous to those who have not seized the raionale of their process. And if in some other of its forms this character of Yoga is less apparent, because they are more intuitive and less mechanical, nearer, like the Yoga of Devotion, to a supernal ecstasy or, like the Yoga of Knowledge, to a supernal infinity of consciousness and being, yet they too start from the use of some principal faculty in us by ways and for ends not contemplated in its everyday spontaneous workings. All methods grouped under the common name of Yoga are special psychological processes founded on a fixed truth of Nature and developing, out of normal functions, powers and results which were always latent but which her ordinary movements do not easily or do not often manifest. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Introduction - The Conditions of the Synthesis,
524:Shastra is the knowledge and teaching laid down by intuition, experience and wisdom, the science and art and ethic of life, the best standards available to the race. The half-awakened man who leaves the observance of its rule to follow the guidance of his instincts and desires, can get pleasure but not happiness; for the inner happiness can only come by right living. He cannot move to perfection, cannot acquire the highest spiritual status. The law of instinct and desire seems to come first in the animal world, but the manhood of man grows by the pursuit of truth and religion and knowledge and a right life. The Shastra, the recognised Right that he has set up to govern his lower members by his reason and intelligent will, must therefore first be observed and made the authority for conduct and works and for what should or should not be done, till the instinctive desire nature is schooled and abated and put down by the habit of self-control and man is ready first for a freer intelligent self-guidance and then for the highest supreme law and supreme liberty of the spiritual nature. For the Shastra in its ordinary aspect is not that spiritual law, although at its loftiest point, when it becomes a science and art of spiritual living, Adhyatma-shastra, - the Gita itself describes its own teaching as the highest and most secret Shastra, - it formulates a rule of the self-transcendence of the sattwic nature and develops the discipline which leads to spiritual transmutation. Yet all Shastra is built on a number of preparatory conditions, dharmas; it is a means, not an end. The supreme end is the freedom of the spirit when abandoning all dharmas the soul turns to God for its sole law of action, acts straight from the divine will and lives in the freedom of the divine nature, not in the Law, but in the Spirit. This is the development of the teaching which is prepared by the next question of Arjuna. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita ,
525:More often, he listened to the voice of Eros. Sometimes he watched the video feeds too, but usually, he just listened. Over the hours and days, he began to hear, if not patterns, at least common structures. Some of the voices spooling out of the dying station were consistent-broadcasters and entertainers who were overrepresented in the audio files archives, he guessed. There seemed to be some specific tendencies in, for want of a better term, the music of it too. Hours of random, fluting static and snatched bits of phrases would give way, and Eros would latch on to some word or phrase, fixating on it with greater and greater intensity until it broke apart and the randomness poured back in. "... are, are, are, ARE, ARE, ARE... " Aren't, Miller thought, and the ship suddenly shoved itself up, leaving Miller's stomach about half a foot from where it had been. A series of loud clanks followed, and then the brief wail of a Klaxon. "Dieu! Dieu!" someone shouted. "Bombs son vamen roja! Going to fry it! Fry us toda!" There was the usual polite chuckle that the same joke had occasioned over the course of the trip, and the boy who'd made it-a pimply Belter no more than fifteen years old-grinned with pleasure at his own wit. If he didn't stop that shit, someone was going to beat him with a crowbar before they got back to Tycho. But Miller figured that someone wasn't him. A massive jolt forward pushed him hard into the couch, and then gravity was back, the familiar 0.3 g. Maybe a little more. Except that with the airlocks pointing toward ship's down, the pilot had to grapple the spinning skin of Eros' belly first. The spin gravity made what had been the ceiling the new floor; the lowest rank of couches was now the top; and while they rigged the fusion bombs to the docks, they were all going to have to climb up onto a cold, dark rock that was trying to fling them off into the vacuum. Such were the joys of sabotage. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
526:My method is different. I do not rush into actual work. When I get an idea, I start at once building it up in my imagination. I change the construction, make improvements and operate the device in my mind. It is absolutely immaterial to me whether I run my turbine in thought or test it in my shop. I even note if it is out of balance. There is no difference whatever; the results are the same. In this way I am able to rapidly develop and perfect a conception without touching anything. When I have gone so far as to embody in the invention every possible improvement I can think of and see no fault anywhere, I put into concrete form this final product of my brain. Invariably my device works as I conceived that it should, and the experiment comes out exactly as I planned it. In twenty years there has not been a single exception. Why should it be otherwise? Engineering, electrical and mechanical, is positive in results. There is scarcely a subject that cannot be examined beforehand, from the available theoretical and practical data. The carrying out into practice of a crude idea as is being generally done, is, I hold, nothing but a waste of energy, money, and time. My early affliction had however, another compensation. The incessant mental exertion developed my powers of observation and enabled me to discover a truth of great importance. I had noted that the appearance of images was always preceded by actual vision of scenes under peculiar and generally very exceptional conditions, and I was impelled on each occasion to locate the original impulse. After a while this effort grew to be almost automatic and I gained great facility in connecting cause and effect. Soon I became aware, to my surprise, that every thought I conceived was suggested by an external impression. Not only this but all my actions were prompted in a similar way. In the course of time it became perfectly evident to me that I was merely an automation endowed with power OF MOVEMENT RESPONDING TO THE STIMULI OF THE SENSE ORGANS AND THINKING AND ACTING ACCORDINGLY. ~ Nikola Tesla, The Strange Life of Nikola Tesla ,
527:formal-operational ::: The orange altitude emerged a few hundred years ago with the European Rennisance. Its modern, rational view grew in prominance through the Age of Enlightenment and came to its fullest expression during the Industrial Revolution.Fueling this age of reason and science was the emergence of formal operational cognition, or the ability to operate on thoughts themselves. No longer limited to reflection on concrete objects, cognition moves from representations to abstractions and can now operate on a range of non-tangiable propositions that may not reflect the concrete world. This is the basis of scientific reasoning through hypothesis. Orange also brings multiplistic thinking, or the realization that there are several possible ways of approaching a situation, even though one is still considered most right. Self-sense at orange features two shifts, first to expert and then to achiever, these moves feature an increase in self-awareness and appreciation for multiple possibilities in a given situation. Recognition that one doesnt always live up to idealized social expectations is fueled by an awareness that begins to penetrate the inner world of subjectivity. This is the beginning of introspection. An objectifiable self-sense and the capacity to take a third person perspective. Needs shift from belonging to self-esteem. And values land on pragmatic utiliarian approaches to life that rely on ... and thinking to earn progress, prosperity and self-reliance. Morality at orange sees right defined by universal ethical principles. The emergence of formal operational thinking at orange enables a world-centric care for universal human rights and the right of each individual for autonomy and the pursuit of happiness. A desire for individual dignity and self-respect are also driving forces behind orange morality. A significant number of the founding fathers of the United States harbored orange values. ...Faith at orange is called Individual Reflective and so far as identity and world-view are differentiated from others, and faith takes on an essence of critical thought. Demythologizing symbols into conceptual meanings. At orange we see the emergence of rational deism and secularism. ~ Essential Integral, 4.1-51 Formal Operational,
528:This is the real sense and drive of what we see as evolution: the multiplication and variation of forms is only the means of its process. Each gradation contains the possibility and the certainty of the grades beyond it: the emergence of more and more developed forms and powers points to more perfected forms and greater powers beyond them, and each emergence of consciousness and the conscious beings proper to it enables the rise to a greater consciousness beyond and the greater order of beings up to the ultimate godheads of which Nature is striving and is destined to show herself capable. Matter developed its organised forms until it became capable of embodying living organisms; then life rose from the subconscience of the plant into conscious animal formations and through them to the thinking life of man. Mind founded in life developed intellect, developed its types of knowledge and ignorance, truth and error till it reached the spiritual perception and illumination and now can see as in a glass dimly the possibility of supermind and a truthconscious existence. In this inevitable ascent the mind of Light is a gradation, an inevitable stage. As an evolving principle it will mark a stage in the human ascent and evolve a new type of human being; this development must carry in it an ascending gradation of its own powers and types of an ascending humanity which will embody more and more the turn towards spirituality, capacity for Light, a climb towards a divinised manhood and the divine life. In the birth of the mind of Light and its ascension into its own recognisable self and its true status and right province there must be, in the very nature of things as they are and very nature of the evolutionary process as it is at present, two stages. In the first, we can see the mind of Light gathering itself out of the Ignorance, assembling its constituent elements, building up its shapes and types, however imperfect at first, and pushing them towards perfection till it can cross the border of the Ignorance and appear in the Light, in its own Light. In the second stage we can see it developing itself in that greater natural light, taking its higher shapes and forms till it joins the supermind and lives as its subordinate portion or its delegate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga 5.08 - Supermind and Mind of Light,
529:The object of spiritual knowledge is the Supreme, the Divine, the Infinite and the Absolute. This Supreme has its relations to our individual being and its relations to the universe and it transcends both the soul and the universe. Neither the universe nor the individual are what they seem to be, for the report of them which our mind and our senses give us, is, so long as they are unenlightened by a faculty of higher supramental and suprasensuous knowledge, a false report, an imperfect construction, an attenuated and erroneous figure. And yet that which the universe and the individual seem to be is still a figure of what they really are, a figure that points beyond itself to the reality behind it. Truth proceeds by a correction of the values our mind and senses give us, and first by the action of a higher intelligence that enlightens and sets right as far as may be the conclusions of the ignorant sense-mind and limited physical intelligence; that is the method of all human knowledge and science. But beyond it there is a knowledge, a Truth-Consciousness, that exceeds our intellect and brings us into the true light of which it is a refracted ray. There the abstract terms of pure reason and the constructions .of the mind disappear or are converted into concrete soul-vision and the tremendous actuality of spiritual experience. This knowledge can turn away to the absolute Eternal and lose vision of the soul and the universe; but it can too see that existence from that Eternal. When that is done, we find that the ignorance of the mind and the senses and all the apparent futilities of human life were not an useless excursion of the conscious being, an otiose blunder. Here they were planned as a rough ground for the self-expression of the Soul that comes from the Infinite, a material foundation for its self-unfolding and self-possessing in the terms of the universe. It is true that in themselves they and all that is here have no significance, and to build separate significances for them is to live in an illusion, Maya; but they have a supreme significance in the Supreme, an absolute Power in the Absolute and it is that that assigns to them and refers to that Truth their present relative values. This is the all-uniting experience that is the foundation of the deepest integral and most intimate self-knowledge and world-knowledge ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.01 - The Object of Knowledge,
530:When one is bored, Mother, does that mean one does not progress? At that time, yes, certainly without a doubt; not only does one not progress, but one misses an opportunity for progressing. There was a concurrence of circumstances which seemed to you dull, boring, stupid and you were in their midst; well, if you get bored, it means that you yourself are as boring as the circumstances! And that is a clear proof that you are simply not in a state of progress. There is nothing more contrary to the very reason of existence than this passing wave of boredom. If you make a little effort within yourself at that time, if you tell yourself: "Wait a bit, what is it that I should learn? What does all that bring to me so that I may learn something? What progress should I make in overcoming myself? What is the weakness that I must overcome? What is the inertia that I must conquer?" If you say that to yourself, you will see the next minute you are no longer bored. You will immediately get interested and you will make progress! This is a commonplace of consciousness. And then, you know, most people when they get bored, instead of trying to rise a step higher, descend a step lower, they become still worse than what they were, and they do all the stupid things that others do, go in for all the vulgarities, all the meannesses, everything, in order to amuse themselves. They get intoxicated, take poison, ruin their health, ruin their brain, they utter crudities. They do all that because they are bored. Well, if instead of going down, one had risen up, one would have profited by the circumstances. Instead of profiting, one falls a little lower yet than where one was. When people get a big blow in their life, some misfortune (what men call "misfortune", there are people who do have misfortunes), the first thing they try to do is to forget it - as though one did not forget quickly enough! And to forget, they do anything whatsoever. When there is something painful, they want to distract themselves - what they call distraction, that is, doing stupid things, that is to say, going down in their consciousness, going down a little instead of rising up.... Has something extremely painful happened to you, something very grievous? Do not become stupefied, do not seek forgetfulness, do not go down into the inconscience; you must go to the end and find the light that is behind, the truth, the force and the joy; and for that you must be strong and refuse to slide down. But that we shall see a little later, my children, when you will be a little older. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 Talks 026-050,
531:The Mahashakti, the universal Mother, works out whatever is transmitted by her transcendent consciousness from the Supreme and enters into the worlds that she has made; her presence fills and supports them with the divine spirit and the divine all-sustaining force and delight without which they could not exist. That which we call Nature or Prakriti is only her most outward executive aspect; she marshals and arranges the harmony of her forces and processes, impels the operations of Nature and moves among them secret or manifest in all that can be seen or experienced or put into motion of life. Each of the worlds is nothing but one play of the Mahashakti of that system of worlds or universe, who is there as the cosmic Soul and Personality of the transcendent Mother. Each is something that she has seen in her vision, gathered into her heart of beauty and power and created in her Ananda. But there are many planes of her creation, many steps of the Divine Shakti. At the summit of this manifestation of which we are a part there are worlds of infinite existence, consciousness, force and bliss over which the Mother stands as the unveiled eternal Power. All beings there live and move in an ineffable completeness and unalterable oneness, because she carries them safe in her arms for ever. Nearer to us are the worlds of a perfect supramental creation in which the Mother is the supramental Mahashakti, a Power of divine omniscient Will and omnipotent Knowledge always apparent in its unfailing works and spontaneously perfect in every process. There all movements are the steps of the Truth; there all beings are souls and powers and bodies of the divine Light; there all experiences are seas and floods and waves of an intense and absolute Ananda. But here where we dwell are the worlds of the Ignorance, worlds of mind and life and body separated in consciousness from their source, of which this earth is a significant centre and its evolution a crucial process. This too with all its obscurity and struggle and imperfection is upheld by the Universal Mother; this too is impelled and guided to its secret aim by the Mahashakti. The Mother as the Mahashakti of this triple world of the Ignorance stands in an intermediate plane between the supramental Light, the Truth life, the Truth creation which has to be brought down here and this mounting and descending hierarchy of planes of consciousness that like a double ladder lapse into the nescience of Matter and climb back again through the flowering of life and soul and mind into the infinity of the Spirit. Determining all that shall be in this universe and in the terrestrial evolution by what she sees and feels and pours from her, she stands there... ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother ,
532:- for every well-made and significant poem, picture, statue or building is an act of creative knowledge, a living discovery of the consciousness, a figure of Truth, a dynamic form of mental and vital self-expression or world-expression, - all that seeks, all that finds, all that voices or figures is a realisation of something of the play of the Infinite and to that extent can be made a means of God-realisation or of divine formation. But the Yogin has to see that it is no longer done as part of an ignorant mental life; it can be accepted by him only if by the feeling, the remembrance, the dedication within it, it is turned into a movement of the spiritual consciousness and becomes a part of its vast grasp of comprehensive illuminating knowledge. For all must be done as a sacrifice, all activities must have the One Divine for their object and the heart of their meaning. The Yogin's aim in the sciences that make for knowledge should be to discover and understand the workings of the Divine Consciousness-Puissance in man and creatures and things and forces, her creative significances, her execution of the mysteries, the symbols in which she arranges the manifestation. The Yogin's aim in the practical sciences, whether mental and physical or occult and psychic, should be to enter into the ways of the Divine and his processes, to know the materials and means for the work given to us so that we may use that knowledge for a conscious and faultless expression of the spirit's mastery, joy and self-fulfilment. The Yogin's aim in the Arts should not be a mere aesthetic, mental or vital gratification, but, seeing the Divine everywhere, worshipping it with a revelation of the meaning of its own works, to express that One Divine in ideal forms, the One Divine in principles and forces, the One Divine in gods and men and creatures and objects. The theory that sees an intimate connection between religious aspiration and the truest and greatest Art is in essence right; but we must substitute for the mixed and doubtful religious motive a spiritual aspiration, vision, interpreting experience. For the wider and more comprehensive the seeing, the more it contains in itself the sense of the hidden Divine in humanity and in all things and rises beyond a superficial religiosity into the spiritual life, the more luminous, flexible, deep and powerful will the Art be that springs from that high motive. The Yogin's distinction from other men is this that he lives in a higher and vaster spiritual consciousness; all his work of knowledge or creation must then spring from there: it must not be made in the mind, - for it is a greater truth and vision than mental man's that he has to express or rather that presses to express itself through him and mould his works, not for his personal satisfaction, but for a divine purpose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1,
533:The madman.- Have you not heard of that madman who lit a lantern in the bright morning hours, ran to the market place. and cried incessantly: "I seek God! I seek God!" -As many of those who did not believe in God were standing around just then, he provoked much laughter. Has he got lost? asked one. Did he lose his way like a child? asked another. Or is he hiding? Is he afraid of us? Has he gone on a voyage? emigrated? -Thus they yelled and laughed. The madman jumped into their midst and pierced them with his eyes. "Whither is God?" he cried; "I will tell you. We have killed him-you and I. All of us are his murderers. But how did we do this? How could we drink up the sea? Who gave us the sponge to wipe away the entire horizon? What were we doing when we unchained this earth from its sun? Whither is it moving now? Whither are we moving? Away from all suns? Are we not plunging continually? Backward, sideward. forward. in all directions? be there still any up or down? Are we not straying as through an infinite nothing? Do we not feel the breath of empty space? Has it not become colder? Is not night continually closing in on us? Do we not need to light lanterns in the morning? Do we hear nothing as yet of the noise of the gravediggers who are burying God? Do we smell nothing as yet of the divine decomposition? Gods, too. decompose. God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. "How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers? What was holiest and mightiest of all that the world has yet owned has bled to death under our knives: who will wipe this blood off us? What water is there for us to clean ourselves? What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we have to invent? Is not the greatness of this deed too great for us? Must we ourselves not become gods simply to appear worthy of it? There has never been a greater deed; and whoever is born after us-for the sake of this deed he will belong to a higher history than all history hitherto." Here the madman fell silent and looked again at his listeners; and they, too, were silent and stared at him in astonishment. At last he threw his lantern on the ground, and it broke into pieces and went out. "I have come too early," he said then: "my time is not yet. This tremendous event is still on its way, still wandering; it has not yet reached the ears of men. Lightning and thunder require time; the light of the stars requires time; deeds, though done, still require time to be seen and heard. This deed is still more distant from them than the most distant stars-and yet they have done it themselves... It has been related further that on the same day the madman forced his way into several churches and there struck up his reqttiem aeternam deo. Led out and called to account, he is said always to have replied nothing but: "What after all are these churches now if they are not the tombs and sepulchers of God? ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science trans. Kaufmann,
534:(Novum Organum by Francis Bacon.) 34. "Four species of idols beset the human mind, to which (for distinction's sake) we have assigned names, calling the first Idols of the Tribe, the second Idols of the Den, the third Idols of the Market, the fourth Idols of the Theatre. 40. "The information of notions and axioms on the foundation of true induction is the only fitting remedy by which we can ward off and expel these idols. It is, however, of great service to point them out; for the doctrine of idols bears the same relation to the interpretation of nature as that of the confutation of sophisms does to common logic. 41. "The idols of the tribe are inherent in human nature and the very tribe or race of man; for man's sense is falsely asserted to be the standard of things; on the contrary, all the perceptions both of the senses and the mind bear reference to man and not to the Universe, and the human mind resembles these uneven mirrors which impart their own properties to different objects, from which rays are emitted and distort and disfigure them. 42. "The idols of the den are those of each individual; for everybody (in addition to the errors common to the race of man) has his own individual den or cavern, which intercepts and corrupts the light of nature, either from his own peculiar and singular disposition, or from his education and intercourse with others, or from his reading, and the authority acquired by those whom he reverences and admires, or from the different impressions produced on the mind, as it happens to be preoccupied and predisposed, or equable and tranquil, and the like; so that the spirit of man (according to its several dispositions), is variable, confused, and, as it were, actuated by chance; and Heraclitus said well that men search for knowledge in lesser worlds, and not in the greater or common world. 43. "There are also idols formed by the reciprocal intercourse and society of man with man, which we call idols of the market, from the commerce and association of men with each other; for men converse by means of language, but words are formed at the will of the generality, and there arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. Nor can the definitions and explanations with which learned men are wont to guard and protect themselves in some instances afford a complete remedy-words still manifestly force the understanding, throw everything into confusion, and lead mankind into vain and innumerable controversies and fallacies. 44. "Lastly, there are idols which have crept into men's minds from the various dogmas of peculiar systems of philosophy, and also from the perverted rules of demonstration, and these we denominate idols of the theatre: for we regard all the systems of philosophy hitherto received or imagined, as so many plays brought out and performed, creating fictitious and theatrical worlds. Nor do we speak only of the present systems, or of the philosophy and sects of the ancients, since numerous other plays of a similar nature can be still composed and made to agree with each other, the causes of the most opposite errors being generally the same. Nor, again, do we allude merely to general systems, but also to many elements and axioms of sciences which have become inveterate by tradition, implicit credence, and neglect. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
535:There walled apart by its own innernessIn a mystical barrage of dynamic lightHe saw a lone immense high-curved world-pileErect like a mountain-chariot of the GodsMotionless under an inscrutable sky.As if from Matter's plinth and viewless baseTo a top as viewless, a carved sea of worldsClimbing with foam-maned waves to the SupremeAscended towards breadths immeasurable;It hoped to soar into the Ineffable's reign:A hundred levels raised it to the Unknown.So it towered up to heights intangibleAnd disappeared in the hushed conscious VastAs climbs a storeyed temple-tower to heavenBuilt by the aspiring soul of man to liveNear to his dream of the Invisible.Infinity calls to it as it dreams and climbs;Its spire touches the apex of the world;Mounting into great voiceless stillnessesIt marries the earth to screened eternities.Amid the many systems of the OneMade by an interpreting creative joyAlone it points us to our journey backOut of our long self-loss in Nature's deeps;Planted on earth it holds in it all realms:It is a brief compendium of the Vast.This was the single stair to being's goal.A summary of the stages of the spirit,Its copy of the cosmic hierarchiesRefashioned in our secret air of selfA subtle pattern of the universe.It is within, below, without, above.Acting upon this visible Nature's schemeIt wakens our earth-matter's heavy dozeTo think and feel and to react to joy;It models in us our diviner parts,Lifts mortal mind into a greater air,Makes yearn this life of flesh to intangible aims,Links the body's death with immortality's call:Out of the swoon of the InconscienceIt labours towards a superconscient Light.If earth were all and this were not in her,Thought could not be nor life-delight's response:Only material forms could then be her guestsDriven by an inanimate world-force.Earth by this golden superfluityBore thinking man and more than man shall bear;This higher scheme of being is our causeAnd holds the key to our ascending fate;It calls out of our dense mortalityThe conscious spirit nursed in Matter's house.The living symbol of these conscious planes,Its influences and godheads of the unseen,Its unthought logic of Reality's actsArisen from the unspoken truth in things,Have fixed our inner life's slow-scaled degrees.Its steps are paces of the soul's returnFrom the deep adventure of material birth,A ladder of delivering ascentAnd rungs that Nature climbs to deity.Once in the vigil of a deathless gazeThese grades had marked her giant downward plunge,The wide and prone leap of a godhead's fall.Our life is a holocaust of the Supreme.The great World-Mother by her sacrificeHas made her soul the body of our state;Accepting sorrow and unconsciousnessDivinity's lapse from its own splendours woveThe many-patterned ground of all we are.An idol of self is our mortality.Our earth is a fragment and a residue;Her power is packed with the stuff of greater worldsAnd steeped in their colour-lustres dimmed by her drowse;An atavism of higher births is hers,Her sleep is stirred by their buried memoriesRecalling the lost spheres from which they fell.Unsatisfied forces in her bosom move;They are partners of her greater growing fateAnd her return to immortality;They consent to share her doom of birth and death;They kindle partial gleams of the All and driveHer blind laborious spirit to composeA meagre image of the mighty Whole.The calm and luminous Intimacy within ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
536:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey2. The Old Testament3. Aeschylus - Tragedies4. Sophocles - Tragedies5. Herodotus - Histories6. Euripides - Tragedies7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings9. Aristophanes - Comedies10. Plato - Dialogues11. Aristotle - Works12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus13. Euclid - Elements14.Archimedes - Works15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections16. Cicero - Works17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things18. Virgil - Works19. Horace - Works20. Livy - History of Rome21. Ovid - Works22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion26. Ptolemy - Almagest27. Lucian - Works28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties30. The New Testament31. Plotinus - The Enneads32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine33. The Song of Roland34. The Nibelungenlied35. The Saga of Burnt Njal36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres43. Thomas More - Utopia44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy58. John Milton - Works59. Molière - Comedies60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal69. William Congreve - The Way of the World70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler,
537:There's an idea in Christianity of the image of God as a Trinity. There's the element of the Father, there's the element of the Son, and there's the element of the Holy Spirit. It's something like the spirit of tradition, human beings as the living incarnation of that tradition, and the spirit in people that makes relationship with the spirit and individuals possible. I'm going to bounce my way quickly through some of the classical, metaphorical attributes of God, so that we kind of have a cloud of notions about what we're talking about, when we return to Genesis 1 and talk about the God who spoke chaos into Being.There's a fatherly aspect, so here's what God as a father is like. You can enter into a covenant with it, so you can make a bargain with it. Now, you think about that. Money is like that, because money is a bargain you make with the future. We structured our world so that you can negotiate with the future. I don't think that we would have got to the point where we could do that without having this idea to begin with. You can act as if the future's a reality; there's a spirit of tradition that enables you to act as if the future is something that can be bargained with. That's why you make sacrifices. The sacrifices were acted out for a very long period of time, and now they're psychological. We know that you can sacrifice something valuable in the present and expect that you're negotiating with something that's representing the transcendent future. That's an amazing human discovery. No other creature can do that; to act as if the future is real; to know that you can bargain with reality itself, and that you can do it successfully. It's unbelievable.It responds to sacrifice. It answers prayers. I'm not saying that any of this is true, by the way. I'm just saying what the cloud of ideas represents. It punishes and rewards. It judges and forgives. It's not nature. One of the things weird about the Judeo-Christian tradition is that God and nature are not the same thing, at all. Whatever God is, partially manifest in this logos, is something that stands outside of nature. I think that's something like consciousness as abstracted from the natural world. It built Eden for mankind and then banished us for disobedience. It's too powerful to be touched. It granted free will. Distance from it is hell. Distance from it is death. It reveals itself in dogma and in mystical experience, and it's the law. That's sort of like the fatherly aspect.The son-like aspect. It speaks chaos into order. It slays dragons and feeds people with the remains. It finds gold. It rescues virgins. It is the body and blood of Christ. It is a tragic victim, scapegoat, and eternally triumphant redeemer simultaneously. It cares for the outcast. It dies and is reborn. It is the king of kings and hero of heroes. It's not the state, but is both the fulfillment and critic of the state. It dwells in the perfect house. It is aiming at paradise or heaven. It can rescue from hell. It cares for the outcast. It is the foundation and the cornerstone that was rejected. It is the spirit of the law.The spirit-like aspect. It's akin to the human soul. It's the prophetic voice. It's the still, small voice of conscience. It's the spoken truth. It's called forth by music. It is the enemy of deceit, arrogance, and resentment. It is the water of life. It burns without consuming. It's a blinding light.That's a very well-developed set of poetic metaphors. These are all...what would you say...glimpses of the transcendent ideal. That's the right way of thinking about it. They're glimpses of the transcendent ideal, and all of them have a specific meaning. In part, what we're going to do is go over that meaning, as we continue with this series. What we've got now is a brief description, at least, of what this is. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series 1,
538:Of course we do." Dresden's voice was cutting. "But you're thinking too small. Building humanity's greatest empire is like building the world's largest anthill. Insignificant. There is a civilization out there that built the protomolecule and hurled it at us over two billion years ago. They were already gods at that point. What have they become since then? With another two billion years to advance?" With a growing dread, Holden listened to Dresden speak. This speech had the air of something spoken before. Perhaps many times. And it had worked. It had convinced powerful people. It was why Protogen had stealth ships from the Earth shipyards and seemingly limitless behind-the-scenes support. "We have a terrifying amount of catching up to do, gentlemen," Dresden was saying. "But fortunately we have the tool of our enemy to use in doing it." "Catching up?" a soldier to Holden's left said. Dresden nodded at the man and smiled. "The protomolecule can alter the host organism at the molecular level; it can create genetic change on the fly. Not just DNA, but any stable replicatoR But it is only a machine. It doesn't think. It follows instructions. If we learn how to alter that programming, then we become the architects of that change." Holden interrupted. "If it was supposed to wipe out life on Earth and replace it with whatever the protomolecule's creators wanted, why turn it loose?" "Excellent question," Dresden said, holding up one finger like a college professor about to deliver a lecture. "The protomolecule doesn't come with a user's manual. In fact, we've never before been able to actually watch it carry out its program. The molecule requires significant mass before it develops enough processing power to fulfill its directives. Whatever they are." Dresden pointed at the screens covered with data around them. "We are going to watch it at work. See what it intends to do. How it goes about doing it. And, hopefully, learn how to change that program in the process." "You could do that with a vat of bacteria," Holden said. "I'm not interested in remaking bacteria," Dresden said. "You're fucking insane," Amos said, and took another step toward Dresden. Holden put a hand on the big mechanic's shoulder. "So," Holden said. "You figure out how the bug works, and then what?" "Then everything. Belters who can work outside a ship without wearing a suit. Humans capable of sleeping for hundreds of years at a time flying colony ships to the stars. No longer being bound to the millions of years of evolution inside one atmosphere of pressure at one g, slaves to oxygen and water. We decide what we want to be, and we reprogram ourselves to be that. That's what the protomolecule gives us." Dresden had stood back up as he'd delivered this speech, his face shining with the zeal of a prophet. "What we are doing is the best and only hope of humanity's survival. When we go out there, we will be facing gods." "And if we don't go out?" Fred asked. He sounded thoughtful. "They've already fired a doomsday weapon at us once," Dresden said. The room was silent for a moment. Holden felt his certainty slip. He hated everything about Dresden's argument, but he couldn't quite see his way past it. He knew in his bones that something about it was dead wrong, but he couldn't find the words. Naomi's voice startled him. "Did it convince them?" she asked. "Excuse me?" Dresden said. "The scientists. The technicians. Everyone you needed to make it happen. They actually had to do this. They had to watch the video of people dying all over Eros. They had to design those radioactive murder chambers. So unless you managed to round up every serial killer in the solar system and send them through a postgraduate program, how did you do this?" "We modified our science team to remove ethical restraints." Half a dozen clues clicked into place in Holden's head. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
539:It is natural from the point of view of the Yoga to divide into two categories the activities of the human mind in its pursuit of knowledge. There is the supreme supra-intellectual knowledge which concentrates itself on the discovery of the One and Infinite in its transcendence or tries to penetrate by intuition, contemplation, direct inner contact into the ultimate truths behind the appearances of Nature; there is the lower science which diffuses itself in an outward knowledge of phenomena, the disguises of the One and Infinite as it appears to us in or through the more exterior forms of the world-manifestation around us. These two, an upper and a lower hemisphere, in the form of them constructed or conceived by men within the mind's ignorant limits, have even there separated themselves, as they developed, with some sharpness.... Philosophy, sometimes spiritual or at least intuitive, sometimes abstract and intellectual, sometimes intellectualising spiritual experience or supporting with a logical apparatus the discoveries of the spirit, has claimed always to take the fixation of ultimate Truth as its province. But even when it did not separate itself on rarefied metaphysical heights from the knowledge that belongs to the practical world and the pursuit of ephemeral objects, intellectual Philosophy by its habit of abstraction has seldom been a power for life. It has been sometimes powerful for high speculation, pursuing mental Truth for its own sake without any ulterior utility or object, sometimes for a subtle gymnastic of the mind in a mistily bright cloud-land of words and ideas, but it has walked or acrobatised far from the more tangible realities of existence. Ancient Philosophy in Europe was more dynamic, but only for the few; in India in its more spiritualised forms, it strongly influenced but without transforming the life of the race.... Religion did not attempt, like Philosophy, to live alone on the heights; its aim was rather to take hold of man's parts of life even more than his parts of mind and draw them Godwards; it professed to build a bridge between spiritual Truth and the vital and material human existence; it strove to subordinate and reconcile the lower to the higher, make life serviceable to God, Earth obedient to Heaven. It has to be admitted that too often this necessary effort had the opposite result of making Heaven a sanction for Earth's desires; for, continually, the religious idea has been turned into an excuse for the worship and service of the human ego. Religion, leaving constantly its little shining core of spiritual experience, has lost itself in the obscure mass of its ever extending ambiguous compromises with life: in attempting to satisfy the thinking mind, it more often succeeded in oppressing or fettering it with a mass of theological dogmas; while seeking to net the human heart, it fell itself into pits of pietistic emotionalism and sensationalism; in the act of annexing the vital nature of man to dominate it, it grew itself vitiated and fell a prey to all the fanaticism, homicidal fury, savage or harsh turn for oppression, pullulating falsehood, obstinate attachment to ignorance to which that vital nature is prone; its desire to draw the physical in man towards God betrayed it into chaining itself to ecclesiastic mechanism, hollow ceremony and lifeless ritual. The corruption of the best produced the worst by that strange chemistry of the power of life which generates evil out of good even as it can also generate good out of evil. At the same time in a vain effort at self-defence against this downward gravitation, Religion was driven to cut existence into two by a division of knowledge, works, art, life itself into two opposite categories, the spiritual and the worldly, religious and mundane, sacred and profane; but this defensive distinction itself became conventional and artificial and aggravated rather than healed the disease.... On their side Science and Art and the knowledge of Life, although at first they served or lived in the shadow of Religion, ended by emancipating themselves, became estranged or hostile, or have even recoiled with indifference, contempt or scepticism from what seem to them the cold, barren and distant or unsubstantial and illusory heights of unreality to which metaphysical Philosophy and Religion aspire. For a time the divorce has been as complete as the one-sided intolerance of the human mind could make it and threatened even to end in a complete extinction of all attempt at a higher or a more spiritual knowledge. Yet even in the earthward life a higher knowledge is indeed the one thing that is throughout needful, and without it the lower sciences and pursuits, however fruitful, however rich, free, miraculous in the abundance of their results, become easily a sacrifice offered without due order and to false gods; corrupting, hardening in the end the heart of man, limiting his mind's horizons, they confine in a stony material imprisonment or lead to a final baffling incertitude and disillusionment. A sterile agnosticism awaits us above the brilliant phosphorescence of a half-knowledge that is still the Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1,
540:SECTION 1. Books for Serious Study Liber CCXX. (Liber AL vel Legis.) The Book of the Law. This book is the foundation of the New Æon, and thus of the whole of our work. The Equinox. The standard Work of Reference in all occult matters. The Encyclopaedia of Initiation. Liber ABA (Book 4). A general account in elementary terms of magical and mystical powers. In four parts: (1) Mysticism (2) Magical (Elementary Theory) (3) Magick in Theory and Practice (this book) (4) The Law. Liber II. The Message of the Master Therion. Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner. Liber DCCCXXXVIII. The Law of Liberty. A further explanation of The Book of the Law in reference to certain ethical problems. Collected Works of A. Crowley. These works contain many mystical and magical secrets, both stated clearly in prose, and woven into the Robe of sublimest poesy. The Yi King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XVI], Oxford University Press.) The "Classic of Changes"; give the initiated Chinese system of Magick. The Tao Teh King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XXXIX].) Gives the initiated Chinese system of Mysticism. Tannhäuser, by A. Crowley. An allegorical drama concerning the Progress of the Soul; the Tannhäuser story slightly remodelled. The Upanishads. (S. B. E. Series [vols. I & XV.) The Classical Basis of Vedantism, the best-known form of Hindu Mysticism. The Bhagavad-gita. A dialogue in which Krishna, the Hindu "Christ", expounds a system of Attainment. The Voice of the Silence, by H.P. Blavatsky, with an elaborate commentary by Frater O.M. Frater O.M., 7°=48, is the most learned of all the Brethren of the Order; he has given eighteen years to the study of this masterpiece. Raja-Yoga, by Swami Vivekananda. An excellent elementary study of Hindu mysticism. His Bhakti-Yoga is also good. The Shiva Samhita. An account of various physical means of assisting the discipline of initiation. A famous Hindu treatise on certain physical practices. The Hathayoga Pradipika. Similar to the Shiva Samhita. The Aphorisms of Patanjali. A valuable collection of precepts pertaining to mystical attainment. The Sword of Song. A study of Christian theology and ethics, with a statement and solution of the deepest philosophical problems. Also contains the best account extant of Buddhism, compared with modern science. The Book of the Dead. A collection of Egyptian magical rituals. Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie, by Eliphas Levi. The best general textbook of magical theory and practice for beginners. Written in an easy popular style. The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. The best exoteric account of the Great Work, with careful instructions in procedure. This Book influenced and helped the Master Therion more than any other. The Goetia. The most intelligible of all the mediæval rituals of Evocation. Contains also the favourite Invocation of the Master Therion. Erdmann's History of Philosophy. A compendious account of philosophy from the earliest times. Most valuable as a general education of the mind. The Spiritual Guide of [Miguel de] Molinos. A simple manual of Christian Mysticism. The Star in the West. (Captain Fuller). An introduction to the study of the Works of Aleister Crowley. The Dhammapada. (S. B. E. Series [vol. X], Oxford University Press). The best of the Buddhist classics. The Questions of King Milinda. (S. B. E. Series [vols. XXXV & XXXVI].) Technical points of Buddhist dogma, illustrated bydialogues. Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicam Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ. A complete Dictionary of the Correspondences of all magical elements, reprinted with extensive additions, making it the only standard comprehensive book of reference ever published. It is to the language of Occultism what Webster or Murray is to the English language. Varieties of Religious Experience (William James). Valuable as showing the uniformity of mystical attainment. Kabbala Denudata, von Rosenroth: also The Kabbalah Unveiled, by S.L. Mathers. The text of the Qabalah, with commentary. A good elementary introduction to the subject. Konx Om Pax [by Aleister Crowley]. Four invaluable treatises and a preface on Mysticism and Magick. The Pistis Sophia [translated by G.R.S. Mead or Violet McDermot]. An admirable introduction to the study of Gnosticism. The Oracles of Zoroaster [Chaldæan Oracles]. An invaluable collection of precepts mystical and magical. The Dream of Scipio, by Cicero. Excellent for its Vision and its Philosophy. The Golden Verses of Pythagoras, by Fabre d'Olivet. An interesting study of the exoteric doctrines of this Master. The Divine Pymander, by Hermes Trismegistus. Invaluable as bearing on the Gnostic Philosophy. The Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians, reprint of Franz Hartmann. An invaluable compendium. Scrutinium Chymicum [Atalanta Fugiens]¸ by Michael Maier. One of the best treatises on alchemy. Science and the Infinite, by Sidney Klein. One of the best essays written in recent years. Two Essays on the Worship of Priapus [A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus &c. &c. &c.], by Richard Payne Knight [and Thomas Wright]. Invaluable to all students. The Golden Bough, by J.G. Frazer. The textbook of Folk Lore. Invaluable to all students. The Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine. Excellent, though elementary, as a corrective to superstition. Rivers of Life, by General Forlong. An invaluable textbook of old systems of initiation. Three Dialogues, by Bishop Berkeley. The Classic of Subjective Idealism. Essays of David Hume. The Classic of Academic Scepticism. First Principles by Herbert Spencer. The Classic of Agnosticism. Prolegomena [to any future Metaphysics], by Immanuel Kant. The best introduction to Metaphysics. The Canon [by William Stirling]. The best textbook of Applied Qabalah. The Fourth Dimension, by [Charles] H. Hinton. The best essay on the subject. The Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley. Masterpieces of philosophy, as of prose. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Appendix I: Literature Recommended to Aspirants,
541:Mother, when one imagines something, does it not exist?When you imagine something, it means that you make a mental formation which may be close to the truth or far from the truth - it also depends upon the quality of your formation. You make a mental formation and there are people who have such a power of formation that they succeed in making what they imagine real. There are not many of these but there are some. They imagine something and their formation is so well made and so powerful that it succeeds in being realised. These are creators; there are not many of them but there are some. If one thinks of someone who doesn't exist or who is dead?Ah! What do you mean? What have you just said? Someone who doesn't exist or someone who is dead? These are two absolutely different things. I mean someone who is dead.Someone who is dead! If this person has remained in the mental domain, you can find him immediately. Naturally if he is no longer in the mental domain, if he is in the psychic domain, to think of him is not enough. You must know how to go into the psychic domain to find him. But if he has remained in the mental domain and you think of him, you can find him immediately, and not only that, but you can have a mental contact with him and a kind of mental vision of his existence. The mind has a capacity of vision of its own and it is not the same vision as with these eyes, but it is a vision, it is a perception in forms. But this is not imagination. It has nothing to do with imagination. Imagination, for instance, is when you begin to picture to yourself an ideal being to whom you apply all your conceptions, and when you tell yourself, "Why, it should be like this, like that, its form should be like this, its thought like that, its character like that," when you see all the details and build up the being. Now, writers do this all the time because when they write a novel, they imagine. There are those who take things from life but there are those who are imaginative, creators; they create a character, a personage and then put him in their book later. This is to imagine. To imagine, for example, a whole concurrence of circumstances, a set of events, this is what I call telling a story to oneself. But it can be put down on paper, and then one becomes a novelist. There are very different kinds of writers. Some imagine everything, some gather all sorts of observations from life and construct their book with them. There are a hundred ways of writing a book. But indeed some writers imagine everything from beginning to end. It all comes out of their head and they construct even their whole story without any support in things physically observed. This truly is imagination. But as I say, if they are very powerful and have a considerable capacity for creation, it is possible that one day or other there will be a physical human being who realises their creation. This too is true. What do you suppose imagination is, eh? Have you never imagined anything, you? And what happens? All that one imagines.You mean that you imagine something and it happens like that, eh? Or it is in a dream... What is the function, the use of the imagination?If one knows how to use it, as I said, one can create for oneself his own inner and outer life; one can build his own existence with his imagination, if one knows how to use it and has a power. In fact it is an elementary way of creating, of forming things in the world. I have always felt that if one didn't have the capacity of imagination he would not make any progress. Your imagination always goes ahead of your life. When you think of yourself, usually you imagine what you want to be, don't you, and this goes ahead, then you follow, then it continues to go ahead and you follow. Imagination opens for you the path of realisation. People who are not imaginative - it is very difficult to make them move; they see just what is there before their nose, they feel just what they are moment by moment and they cannot go forward because they are clamped by the immediate thing. It depends a good deal on what one calls imagination. However... Men of science must be having imagination!A lot. Otherwise they would never discover anything. In fact, what is called imagination is a capacity to project oneself outside realised things and towards things realisable, and then to draw them by the projection. One can obviously have progressive and regressive imaginations. There are people who always imagine all the catastrophes possible, and unfortunately they also have the power of making them come. It's like the antennae going into a world that's not yet realised, catching something there and drawing it here. Then naturally it is an addition to the earth atmosphere and these things tend towards manifestation. It is an instrument which can be disciplined, can be used at will; one can discipline it, direct it, orientate it. It is one of the faculties one can develop in himself and render serviceable, that is, use it for definite purposes. Sweet Mother, can one imagine the Divine and have the contact?Certainly if you succeed in imagining the Divine you have the contact, and you can have the contact with what you imagine, in any case. In fact it is absolutely impossible to imagine something which doesn't exist somewhere. You cannot imagine anything at all which doesn't exist somewhere. It is possible that it doesn't exist on the earth, it is possible that it's elsewhere, but it is impossible for you to imagine something which is not already contained in principle in the universe; otherwise it could not occur. Then, Sweet Mother, this means that in the created universe nothing new is added?In the created universe? Yes. The universe is progressive; we said that constantly things manifest, more and more. But for your imagination to be able to go and seek beyond the manifestation something which will be manifested, well, it may happen, in fact it does - I was going to tell you that it is in this way that some beings can cause considerable progress to be made in the world, because they have the capacity of imagining something that's not yet manifested. But there are not many. One must first be capable of going beyond the manifested universe to be able to imagine something which is not there. There are already many things which can be imagined. What is our terrestrial world in the universe? A very small thing. Simply to have the capacity of imagining something which does not exist in the terrestrial manifestation is already very difficult, very difficult. For how many billions of years hasn't it existed, this little earth? And there have been no two identical things. That's much. It is very difficult to go out from the earth atmosphere with one's mind; one can, but it is very difficult. And then if one wants to go out, not only from the earth atmosphere but from the universal life! To be able simply to enter into contact with the life of the earth in its totality from the formation of the earth until now, what can this mean? And then to go beyond this and enter into contact with universal life from its beginnings up to now... and then again to be able to bring something new into the universe, one must go still farther beyond. Not easy! That's all? (To the child) Convinced? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
542:The Supermind [Supramental consciousness] is in its very essence a truth-consciousness, a consciousness always free from the Ignorance which is the foundation of our present natural or evolutionary existence and from which nature in us is trying to arrive at self-knowledge and world-knowledge and a right consciousness and the right use of our existence in the universe. The Supermind, because it is a truth-consciousness, has this knowledge inherent in it and this power of true existence; its course is straight and can go direct to its aim, its field is wide and can even be made illimitable. This is because its very nature is knowledge: it has not to acquire knowledge but possesses it in its own right; its steps are not from nescience or ignorance into some imperfect light, but from truth to greater truth, from right perception to deeper perception, from intuition to intuition, from illumination to utter and boundless luminousness, from growing widenesses to the utter vasts and to very infinitude. On its summits it possesses the divine omniscience and omnipotence, but even in an evolutionary movement of its own graded self-manifestation by which it would eventually reveal its own highest heights, it must be in its very nature essentially free from ignorance and error: it starts from truth and light and moves always in truth and light. As its knowledge is always true, so too its will is always true; it does not fumble in its handling of things or stumble in its paces. In the Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Supermind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural imperfections and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Supermind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness. All the life and action and leading of the Supermind is guarded in its very nature from the falsehoods and uncertainties that are our lot; it moves in safety towards its perfection. Once the truth-consciousness was established here on its own sure foundation, the evolution of divine life would be a progress in felicity, a march through light to Ananda. Supermind is an eternal reality of the divine Being and the divine Nature. In its own plane it already and always exists and possesses its own essential law of being; it has not to be created or to emerge or evolve into existence out of involution in Matter or out of non-existence, as it might seem to the view of mind which itself seems to its own view to have so emerged from life and Matter or to have evolved out of an involution in life and Matter. The nature of Supermind is always the same, a being of knowledge, proceeding from truth to truth, creating or rather manifesting what has to be manifested by the power of a pre-existent knowledge, not by hazard but by a self-existent destiny in the being itself, a necessity of the thing in itself and therefore inevitable. Its -manifestation of the divine life will also be inevitable; its own life on its own plane is divine and, if Supermind descends upon the earth, it will bring necessarily the divine life with it and establish it here. Supermind is the grade of existence beyond mind, life and Matter and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power: if it acts, it is through these inferior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arrival of the descending Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life. It is indeed so that life and mind involved in Matter have realised themselves here; for only what is involved can evolve, otherwise there could be no emergence. The manifestation of a supramental truth-consciousness is therefore the capital reality that will make the divine life possible. It is when all the movements of thought, impulse and action are governed and directed by a self-existent and luminously automatic truth-consciousness and our whole nature comes to be constituted by it and made of its stuff that the life divine will be complete and absolute. Even as it is, in reality though not in the appearance of things, it is a secret self-existent knowledge and truth that is working to manifest itself in the creation here. The Divine is already there immanent within us, ourselves are that in our inmost reality and it is this reality that we have to manifest; it is that which constitutes the urge towards the divine living and makes necessary the creation of the life divine even in this material existence. A manifestation of the Supermind and its truth-consciousness is then inevitable; it must happen in this world sooner or lateR But it has two aspects, a descent from above, an ascent from below, a self-revelation of the Spirit, an evolution in Nature. The ascent is necessarily an effort, a working of Nature, an urge or nisus on her side to raise her lower parts by an evolutionary or revolutionary change, conversion or transformation into the divine reality and it may happen by a process and progress or by a rapid miracle. The descent or self-revelation of the Spirit is an act of the supreme Reality from above which makes the realisation possible and it can appear either as the divine aid which brings about the fulfilment of the progress and process or as the sanction of the miracle. Evolution, as we see it in this world, is a slow and difficult process and, indeed, needs usually ages to reach abiding results; but this is because it is in its nature an emergence from inconscient beginnings, a start from nescience and a working in the ignorance of natural beings by what seems to be an unconscious force. There can be, on the contrary, an evolution in the light and no longer in the darkness, in which the evolving being is a conscious participant and cooperator, and this is precisely what must take place here. Even in the effort and progress from the Ignorance to Knowledge this must be in part if not wholly the endeavour to be made on the heights of the nature, and it must be wholly that in the final movement towards the spiritual change, realisation, transformation. It must be still more so when there is a transition across the dividing line between the Ignorance and the Knowledge and the evolution is from knowledge to greater knowledge, from consciousness to greater consciousness, from being to greater being. There is then no longer any necessity for the slow pace of the ordinary evolution; there can be rapid conversion, quick transformation after transformation, what would seem to our normal present mind a succession of miracles. An evolution on the supramental levels could well be of that nature; it could be equally, if the being so chose, a more leisurely passage of one supramental state or condition of things to something beyond but still supramental, from level to divine level, a building up of divine gradations, a free growth to the supreme Supermind or beyond it to yet undreamed levels of being, consciousness and Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga 558,
543:Intuition And The Value Of Concentration ::: Mother, how can the faculty of intuition be developed? ... There are different kinds of intuition, and we carry these capacities within us. They are always active to some extent but we don't notice them because we don't pay enough attention to what is going on in us. Behind the emotions, deep within the being, in a consciousness seated somewhere near the level of the solar plexus, there is a sort of prescience, a kind of capacity for foresight, but not in the form of ideas: rather in the form of feelings, almost a perception of sensations. For instance, when one is going to decide to do something, there is sometimes a kind of uneasiness or inner refusal, and usually, if one listens to this deeper indication, one realises that it was justified. In other cases there is something that urges, indicates, insists - I am not speaking of impulses, you understand, of all the movements which come from the vital and much lower still - indications which are behind the feelings, which come from the affective part of the being; there too one can receive a fairly sure indication of the thing to be done. These are forms of intuition or of a higher instinct which can be cultivated by observation and also by studying the results. Naturally, it must be done very sincerely, objectively, without prejudice. If one wants to see things in a particular way and at the same time practise this observation, it is all useless. One must do it as if one were looking at what is happening from outside oneself, in someone else. It is one form of intuition and perhaps the first one that usually manifests. There is also another form but that one is much more difficult to observe because for those who are accustomed to think, to act by reason - not by impulse but by reason - to reflect before doing anything, there is an extremely swift process from cause to effect in the half-conscious thought which prevents you from seeing the line, the whole line of reasoning and so you don't think that it is a chain of reasoning, and that is quite deceptive. You have the impression of an intuition but it is not an intuition, it is an extremely rapid subconscious reasoning, which takes up a problem and goes straight to the conclusions. This must not be mistaken for intuition. In the ordinary functioning of the brain, intuition is something which suddenly falls like a drop of light. If one has the faculty, the beginning of a faculty of mental vision, it gives the impression of something coming from outside or above, like a little impact of a drop of light in the brain, absolutely independent of all reasoning. This is perceived more easily when one is able to silence one's mind, hold it still and attentive, arresting its usual functioning, as if the mind were changed into a kind of mirror turned towards a higher faculty in a sustained and silent attention. That too one can learn to do. One must learn to do it, it is a necessary discipline. When you have a question to solve, whatever it may be, usually you concentrate your attention here (pointing between the eyebrows), at the centre just above the eyes, the centre of the conscious will. But then if you do that, you cannot be in contact with intuition. You can be in contact with the source of the will, of effort, even of a certain kind of knowledge, but in the outer, almost material field; whereas, if you want to contact the intuition, you must keep this (Mother indicates the forehead) completely immobile. Active thought must be stopped as far as possible and the entire mental faculty must form - at the top of the head and a little further above if possible - a kind of mirror, very quiet, very still, turned upwards, in silent, very concentrated attention. If you succeed, you can - perhaps not immediately - but you can have the perception of the drops of light falling upon the mirror from a still unknown region and expressing themselves as a conscious thought which has no connection with all the rest of your thought since you have been able to keep it silent. That is the real beginning of the intellectual intuition. It is a discipline to be followed. For a long time one may try and not succeed, but as soon as one succeeds in making a mirror, still and attentive, one always obtains a result, not necessarily with a precise form of thought but always with the sensations of a light coming from above. And then, if one can receive this light coming from above without entering immediately into a whirl of activity, receive it in calm and silence and let it penetrate deep into the being, then after a while it expresses itself either as a luminous thought or as a very precise indication here (Mother indicates the heart), in this other centre. Naturally, first these two faculties must be developed; then, as soon as there is any result, one must observe the result, as I said, and see the connection with what is happening, the consequences: see, observe very attentively what has come in, what may have caused a distortion, what one has added by way of more or less conscious reasoning or the intervention of a lower will, also more or less conscious; and it is by a very deep study - indeed, almost of every moment, in any case daily and very frequent - that one succeeds in developing one's intuition. It takes a long time. It takes a long time and there are ambushes: one can deceive oneself, take for intuitions subconscious wills which try to manifest, indications given by impulses one has refused to receive openly, indeed all sorts of difficulties. One must be prepared for that. But if one persists, one is sure to succeed. And there comes a time when one feels a kind of inner guidance, something which is leading one very perceptibly in all that one does. But then, for the guidance to have its maximum power, one must naturally add to it a conscious surrender: one must be sincerely determined to follow the indication given by the higher force. If one does that, then... one saves years of study, one can seize the result extremely rapidly. If one also does that, the result comes very rapidly. But for that, it must be done with sincerity and... a kind of inner spontaneity. If one wants to try without this surrender, one may succeed - as one can also succeed in developing one's personal will and making it into a very considerable power - but that takes a very long time and one meets many obstacles and the result is very precarious; one must be very persistent, obstinate, persevering, and one is sure to succeed, but only after a great labour. Make your surrender with a sincere, complete self-giving, and you will go ahead at full speed, you will go much faster - but you must not do this calculatingly, for that spoils everything! (Silence) Moreover, whatever you may want to do in life, one thing is absolutely indispensable and at the basis of everything, the capacity of concentrating the attention. If you are able to gather together the rays of attention and consciousness on one point and can maintain this concentration with a persistent will, nothing can resist it - whatever it may be, from the most material physical development to the highest spiritual one. But this discipline must be followed in a constant and, it may be said, imperturbable way; not that you should always be concentrated on the same thing - that's not what I mean, I mean learning to concentrate. And materially, for studies, sports, all physical or mental development, it is absolutely indispensable. And the value of an individual is proportionate to the value of his attention. And from the spiritual point of view it is still more important. There is no spiritual obstacle which can resist a penetrating power of concentration. For instance, the discovery of the psychic being, union with the inner Divine, opening to the higher spheres, all can be obtained by an intense and obstinate power of concentration - but one must learn how to do it. There is nothing in the human or even in the superhuman field, to which the power of concentration is not the key. You can be the best athlete, you can be the best student, you can be an artistic, literary or scientific genius, you can be the greatest saint with that faculty. And everyone has in himself a tiny little beginning of it - it is given to everybody, but people do not cultivate it. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958 ,
544:The Science of Living To know oneself and to control oneself AN AIMLESS life is always a miserable life. Every one of you should have an aim. But do not forget that on the quality of your aim will depend the quality of your life. Your aim should be high and wide, generous and disinterested; this will make your life precious to yourself and to others. But whatever your ideal, it cannot be perfectly realised unless you have realised perfection in yourself. To work for your perfection, the first step is to become conscious of yourself, of the different parts of your being and their respective activities. You must learn to distinguish these different parts one from another, so that you may become clearly aware of the origin of the movements that occur in you, the many impulses, reactions and conflicting wills that drive you to action. It is an assiduous study which demands much perseverance and sincerity. For man's nature, especially his mental nature, has a spontaneous tendency to give a favourable explanation for everything he thinks, feels, says and does. It is only by observing these movements with great care, by bringing them, as it were, before the tribunal of our highest ideal, with a sincere will to submit to its judgment, that we can hope to form in ourselves a discernment that never errs. For if we truly want to progress and acquire the capacity of knowing the truth of our being, that is to say, what we are truly created for, what we can call our mission upon earth, then we must, in a very regular and constant manner, reject from us or eliminate in us whatever contradicts the truth of our existence, whatever is opposed to it. In this way, little by little, all the parts, all the elements of our being can be organised into a homogeneous whole around our psychic centre. This work of unification requires much time to be brought to some degree of perfection. Therefore, in order to accomplish it, we must arm ourselves with patience and endurance, with a determination to prolong our life as long as necessary for the success of our endeavour. As you pursue this labour of purification and unification, you must at the same time take great care to perfect the external and instrumental part of your being. When the higher truth manifests, it must find in you a mind that is supple and rich enough to be able to give the idea that seeks to express itself a form of thought which preserves its force and clarity. This thought, again, when it seeks to clothe itself in words, must find in you a sufficient power of expression so that the words reveal the thought and do not deform it. And the formula in which you embody the truth should be manifested in all your feelings, all your acts of will, all your actions, in all the movements of your being. Finally, these movements themselves should, by constant effort, attain their highest perfection. All this can be realised by means of a fourfold discipline, the general outline of which is given here. The four aspects of the discipline do not exclude each other, and can be followed at the same time; indeed, this is preferable. The starting-point is what can be called the psychic discipline. We give the name "psychic" to the psychological centre of our being, the seat within us of the highest truth of our existence, that which can know this truth and set it in movement. It is therefore of capital importance to become conscious of its presence in us, to concentrate on this presence until it becomes a living fact for us and we can identify ourselves with it. In various times and places many methods have been prescribed for attaining this perception and ultimately achieving this identification. Some methods are psychological, some religious, some even mechanical. In reality, everyone has to find the one which suits him best, and if one has an ardent and steadfast aspiration, a persistent and dynamic will, one is sure to meet, in one way or another - outwardly through reading and study, inwardly through concentration, meditation, revelation and experience - the help one needs to reach the goal. Only one thing is absolutely indispensable: the will to discover and to realise. This discovery and realisation should be the primary preoccupation of our being, the pearl of great price which we must acquire at any cost. Whatever you do, whatever your occupations and activities, the will to find the truth of your being and to unite with it must be always living and present behind all that you do, all that you feel, all that you think. To complement this movement of inner discovery, it would be good not to neglect the development of the mind. For the mental instrument can equally be a great help or a great hindrance. In its natural state the human mind is always limited in its vision, narrow in its understanding, rigid in its conceptions, and a constant effort is therefore needed to widen it, to make it more supple and profound. So it is very necessary to consider everything from as many points of view as possible. Towards this end, there is an exercise which gives great suppleness and elevation to the thought. It is as follows: a clearly formulated thesis is set; against it is opposed its antithesis, formulated with the same precision. Then by careful reflection the problem must be widened or transcended until a synthesis is found which unites the two contraries in a larger, higher and more comprehensive idea. Many other exercises of the same kind can be undertaken; some have a beneficial effect on the character and so possess a double advantage: that of educating the mind and that of establishing control over the feelings and their consequences. For example, you must never allow your mind to judge things and people, for the mind is not an instrument of knowledge; it is incapable of finding knowledge, but it must be moved by knowledge. Knowledge belongs to a much higher domain than that of the human mind, far above the region of pure ideas. The mind has to be silent and attentive to receive knowledge from above and manifest it. For it is an instrument of formation, of organisation and action, and it is in these functions that it attains its full value and real usefulness. There is another practice which can be very helpful to the progress of the consciousness. Whenever there is a disagreement on any matter, such as a decision to be taken, or an action to be carried out, one must never remain closed up in one's own conception or point of view. On the contrary, one must make an effort to understand the other's point of view, to put oneself in his place and, instead of quarrelling or even fighting, find the solution which can reasonably satisfy both parties; there always is one for men of goodwill. Here we must mention the discipline of the vital. The vital being in us is the seat of impulses and desires, of enthusiasm and violence, of dynamic energy and desperate depressions, of passions and revolts. It can set everything in motion, build and realise; but it can also destroy and mar everything. Thus it may be the most difficult part to discipline in the human being. It is a long and exacting labour requiring great patience and perfect sincerity, for without sincerity you will deceive yourself from the very outset, and all endeavour for progress will be in vain. With the collaboration of the vital no realisation seems impossible, no transformation impracticable. But the difficulty lies in securing this constant collaboration. The vital is a good worker, but most often it seeks its own satisfaction. If that is refused, totally or even partially, the vital gets vexed, sulks and goes on strike. Its energy disappears more or less completely and in its place leaves disgust for people and things, discouragement or revolt, depression and dissatisfaction. At such moments it is good to remain quiet and refuse to act; for these are the times when one does stupid things and in a few moments one can destroy or spoil the progress that has been made during months of regular effort. These crises are shorter and less dangerous for those who have established a contact with their psychic being which is sufficient to keep alive in them the flame of aspiration and the consciousness of the ideal to be realised. They can, with the help of this consciousness, deal with their vital as one deals with a rebellious child, with patience and perseverance, showing it the truth and light, endeavouring to convince it and awaken in it the goodwill which has been veiled for a time. By means of such patient intervention each crisis can be turned into a new progress, into one more step towards the goal. Progress may be slow, relapses may be frequent, but if a courageous will is maintained, one is sure to triumph one day and see all difficulties melt and vanish before the radiance of the truth-consciousness. Lastly, by means of a rational and discerning physical education, we must make our body strong and supple enough to become a fit instrument in the material world for the truth-force which wants to manifest through us. In fact, the body must not rule, it must obey. By its very nature it is a docile and faithful servant. Unfortunately, it rarely has the capacity of discernment it ought to have with regard to its masters, the mind and the vital. It obeys them blindly, at the cost of its own well-being. The mind with its dogmas, its rigid and arbitrary principles, the vital with its passions, its excesses and dissipations soon destroy the natural balance of the body and create in it fatigue, exhaustion and disease. It must be freed from this tyranny and this can be done only through a constant union with the psychic centre of the being. The body has a wonderful capacity of adaptation and endurance. It is able to do so many more things than one usually imagines. If, instead of the ignorant and despotic masters that now govern it, it is ruled by the central truth of the being, you will be amazed at what it is capable of doing. Calm and quiet, strong and poised, at every minute it will be able to put forth the effort that is demanded of it, for it will have learnt to find rest in action and to recuperate, through contact with the universal forces, the energies it expends consciously and usefully. In this sound and balanced life a new harmony will manifest in the body, reflecting the harmony of the higher regions, which will give it perfect proportions and ideal beauty of form. And this harmony will be progressive, for the truth of the being is never static; it is a perpetual unfolding of a growing perfection that is more and more total and comprehensive. As soon as the body has learnt to follow this movement of progressive harmony, it will be possible for it to escape, through a continuous process of transformation, from the necessity of disintegration and destruction. Thus the irrevocable law of death will no longer have any reason to exist. When we reach this degree of perfection which is our goal, we shall perceive that the truth we seek is made up of four major aspects: Love, Knowledge, Power and Beauty. These four attributes of the Truth will express themselves spontaneously in our being. The psychic will be the vehicle of true and pure love, the mind will be the vehicle of infallible knowledge, the vital will manifest an invincible power and strength and the body will be the expression of a perfect beauty and harmony. Bulletin, November 1950 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
545:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step. But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort. Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection. You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, WIKI am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: WIKI have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages. In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything. It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM. My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga. All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind. These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness. And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed. And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen. My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal. Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967 ~ The Mother, Sweet Mother The Mother to Mona Sarkar,
546:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passageOmnes eodem cogimur, omniumVersatur urna serius ociusSors exitura et nos in aeternumExilium impositura cymbae.Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vainUpon the axis of its pain,Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!'Farewell, farewell! but this I tellTo thee, thou Wedding-Guest!He prayeth well, who loveth wellBoth man and bird and beast.He prayeth best, who loveth bestAll things both great and small;For the dear God who loveth us,He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:inspirational, science ~ Unknown,
2: Inconscience
~ Emile Verhaeren,
3:science needs skeptics). ~ Anonymous,
4:found science in fiction. ~ Anonymous,
5: La Conscience
~ Anna de Noailles,
6:Bill Nye the Science Guy ~ Rick Riordan,
7:Science is not wisdom. ~ Fulton J Sheen,
8:I love science fiction. ~ Moon Bloodgood,
9:is the ultimate science, ~ Frank Herbert,
10:Science is all metaphor. ~ Timothy Leary,
11:Science is in low regard. ~ Leo Kadanoff,
12:Science is not gadgetry. ~ Warren Weaver,
13:War mobilizes science. ~ Walter Isaacson,
14:Art is science made clear. ~ Jean Cocteau,
15:Art is science made flesh. ~ Jean Cocteau,
16:Go by your own conscience. ~ Steve Chabot,
17:Science is uncertain. ~ Richard P Feynman,
18:Science of Deduction ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
19:Freedom is a clear conscience. ~ Periander,
20:I quite enjoy science fiction. ~ Lexa Doig,
21:I think science is real. ~ Hillary Clinton,
22:Metaphysics is a science. ~ Gabriel Marcel,
23:Science is always inquiring. ~ Thabo Mbeki,
24:Science is nothing but perception. ~ Plato,
25:Science only answers 'How?' ~ Amir Mohamed,
26:Art is science in the flesh. ~ Jean Cocteau,
27:Cycling is not rocket science. ~ Jens Voigt,
28:It's not art, it's science. ~ Billy Sheehan,
29:Science demands patience. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
30:une science indigeste? ~ Napol on Bonaparte,
31:Combine science and humanities. ~ Steve Jobs,
32:Don't sneeze in the science room. ~ Isabella,
33:I don't read Science Fiction. ~ Brent Spiner,
34:I have a clear conscience. ~ Wilhelm Canaris,
35:Is revenge a science, or an art? ~ Anonymous,
36:I've lost my faith in science. ~ Bette Davis,
37:Law is the ultimate science. ~ Frank Herbert,
38:Nature's hasty conscience. ~ Maria Edgeworth,
39:Science is magic that works. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
40:Science is the true theology. ~ Thomas Paine,
41:Art is 'I'; science is 'we'. ~ Claude Bernard,
42:Conscience gets expensive, doesn't it? ~ Saul,
43:Is medicine a science? ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
44:Science begins with a vision. ~ Carlo Rovelli,
45:Science is the poetry of reality. ~ Anonymous,
46:Stephenie Meyer + Science = wrong! ~ Alex Day,
47:Always remember: science first! ~ Andy Andrews,
48:Art upsets, science reasures. ~ Georges Braque,
49:Conscience is a God to all mortals. ~ Menander,
50:Conscience is the chamber of justice. ~ Origen,
51:Science always uses metaphor. ~ James Lovelock,
52:Science begins with a vision". ~ Carlo Rovelli,
53:All science requires mathematics. ~ Roger Bacon,
54:Conscience is God present in man. ~ Victor Hugo,
55:conscience swelled nightly ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
56:Fear nothing but your conscience. ~ Suzy Kassem,
57:Ideology is the science of idiots. ~ John Adams,
58:I have a heart, science told me so. ~ Anonymous,
59:Intelligence is not a science. ~ Frank Carlucci,
60:Magic is the science of the jungle. ~ Carl Jung,
61:Science and art are not opposed. ~ Samuel Morse,
62:Science finds it methods. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
63:Science is not inherently good. ~ Frans de Waal,
64:Science is the enemy of the certain ~ Brian Cox,
65:SCIENCE! thou fair effusive ray ~ Mark Akenside,
66:Art can contradict Science. ~ Austin Osman Spare,
67:A satellite has no conscience. ~ Edward R Murrow,
68:can give you whatever science ~ Michael Connelly,
69:Conscience is a Jewish invention. ~ Adolf Hitler,
70:Conscience is a thousand witnesses. ~ Quintilian,
71:I don't believe in natural science. ~ Kurt Godel,
72:Science advances funeral by funeral ~ Max Planck,
73:Science disembodies; art embodies. ~ John Fowles,
74:Science is the search for truth. ~ Linus Pauling,
75:Science leads you to killing people. ~ Ben Stein,
76:Science makes God unnecessary. ~ Stephen Hawking,
77:Science never sucks, it vacuums! ~ Julie Halpern,
78:Science your way out of this. ~ Peter F Hamilton,
79:We need to make science cool again. ~ Sally Ride,
80:You can't buy a clean conscience. ~ Jodi Picoult,
81:A good conscience is paradise. ~ Jacobus Arminius,
82:A quiet conscience makes one strong! ~ Anne Frank,
83:Art disturbs, science reassures. ~ Georges Braque,
84:Conscience is a man's compass. ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
85:Human science is an uncertain guess. ~ Matt Prior,
86:It's not about size, it's a science. ~ Andre Ward,
87:Politics is no exact science. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
88:Resistance has no conscience. ~ Steven Pressfield,
89:Science brings men nearer to God. ~ Louis Pasteur,
90:Science is organised knowledge. ~ Herbert Spencer,
91:Science is organized knowledge. ~ Herbert Spencer,
92:Science is practical philosophy. ~ Rene Descartes,
93:Science values static patterns. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
94:The law is the public conscience. ~ Thomas Hobbes,
95:There is no conscience in a real war. ~ Toba Beta,
96:Conscience makes egotists of us all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
97:He’s our chief science guru.” Dr. ~ Robert J Crane,
98:I'm a huge science fiction fan... ~ Emma Caulfield,
99:Science belongs to no one country. ~ Louis Pasteur,
100:Science changes. Truth doesn't. ~ Elizabeth Hunter,
101:The Gay Science, section 108 ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
102:the Séance & Science Brigade ~ Jeff VanderMeer,
103:Astrology is a disease, not a science. ~ Maimonides,
104:Don't throw away your conscience. ~ George McGovern,
105:Everyone has his own conscience, ~ Ernest Hemingway,
106:Geometry is a Deductive Science. ~ John Stuart Mill,
107:I don't know anything about science. ~ Rachel Weisz,
108:Language is more fashion than science ~ Bill Bryson,
109:Man's conscience is the oracle of God. ~ Lord Byron,
110:Policy sits above conscience. ~ William Shakespeare,
111:Religion has always persecuted science. ~ Dan Brown,
112:Science doesn’t take sides, does it? ~ James Luceno,
113:Science has failed our mother Earth. ~ Serj Tankian,
114:Science is the art of the solvable. ~ Peter Medawar,
115:Science is the poetry of reality. ~ Richard Dawkins,
116:Science rejects the indeterminate. ~ Claude Bernard,
117:Science was the siren that lured him. ~ Gina Conkle,
118:She Blinded Me with Science. ~ Rachel Ren e Russell,
119:The perfect killer has no conscience. ~ Brent Weeks,
120:Yoga is the art and science of living. ~ Indra Devi,
121:A quiet conscience makes one so serene. ~ Lord Byron,
122:Art for me is the science of freedom. ~ Joseph Beuys,
123:common prick of conscience. ~ Gabriel Garc a M rquez,
124:Conscience, man's moral medicine chest. ~ Mark Twain,
125:Knowledge is not happiness, and science ~ Lord Byron,
126:O Conscience, into what abyss of fears ~ John Milton,
127:Science advances one funeral at a time. ~ Max Planck,
128:Science does not permit exceptions. ~ Claude Bernard,
129:Science is a way to not fool ourselves. ~ Carl Sagan,
130:Science is but a perversion of itself ~ Nikola Tesla,
131:Science is just as important as magic. ~ Donna Grant,
132:Science is prediction, not explanation. ~ Fred Hoyle,
133:Science probes; it does not prove. ~ Gregory Bateson,
134:Science's job is to map our ignorance. ~ David Byrne,
135:Science will win because it works. ~ Stephen Hawking,
136:Statistics is the grammar of science. ~ Karl Pearson,
137:And what is impossible to science? ~ Friedrich Engels,
138:Art is nothing but humanized science. ~ Gino Severini,
139:Astrology, the noblest of sciences. ~ Dante Alighieri,
140:Conscience is harder than our enemies, ~ George Eliot,
141:every man’s watchman, is his conscience. ~ Harper Lee,
142:Evolution is a religion; it is not science! ~ Ken Ham,
143:Experience by itself is not science. ~ Edmund Husserl,
144:One science only will one genius fit ~ Alexander Pope,
145:Politics is not an exact science. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
146:Science doesn't care what you believe in. ~ Anonymous,
147:Science is but an image of the truth. ~ Francis Bacon,
148:When science starts to be interpretive ~ D H Lawrence,
149:Yoga is the science to be in the here and now. ~ Osho,
150:You could say science also is an art. ~ Freeman Dyson,
151:Conscience is a thousand swords. ~ William Shakespeare,
152:Freedom, the first-born of science. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
153:Geometry is the most complete science. ~ David Hilbert,
154:Hubris and science are incompatible. ~ Douglas Preston,
155:In science, nothing is ever 100% proven. ~ Michio Kaku,
156:Let your conscience be your guide. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
157:Science is a form of arrogance control. ~ Carol Tavris,
158:Science is our century's art. ~ Horace Freeland Judson,
159:The aim is freedom conscience and truth ~ Robert Fripp,
160:The real name for 'science' is magic. ~ Harlan Ellison,
161:The sewer is the conscience of the city. ~ Victor Hugo,
162:A good conscience is a continual feast. ~ Francis Bacon,
163:All a man can betray is his conscience. ~ Joseph Conrad,
164:Authority. The antithesis of science. ~ Stephen Baxter,
165:I donated my body to science...fiction. ~ Steven Wright,
166:It's a sin only if conscience confirmed it. ~ Toba Beta,
167:La conscience règne mais ne gouverne pas. ~ Paul Val ry,
168:Languages are the keys of science. ~ Jean de la Bruyere,
169:Living is an art, not a science. ~ Benjamin Alire S enz,
170:Man lives for science as well as bread. ~ William James,
171:Science Fiction is the jazz of literature. ~ David Brin,
172:Science is not addressed to poets. ~ George Henry Lewes,
173:Science is only a Latin word for knowledge ~ Carl Sagan,
174:Science is wisdom reduced to practice. ~ Phineas Quimby,
175:the moment, she was very self-conscience. ~ Holly Kelly,
176:Wisdom alone is the science of others sciences. ~ Plato,
177:A gift of science to a world of horrors. ~ Nick Harkaway,
178:A writer is the conscience of the world. ~ Doris Lessing,
179:Don't mistake dramatics for a conscience. ~ Louise Penny,
180:good storyteller is the conscience-keeper of a ~ Gulzar,
181:History is the science of people. ~ Jose Ortega y Gasset,
182:Hitting is an art, but not an exact science. ~ Rod Carew,
183:Hope is cruel and has no conscience. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
184:I do enjoy reading some science fiction. ~ Colin Farrell,
185:I'm a science fiction and fantasy geek. ~ China Mieville,
186:I've always tried to vote my conscience. ~ Leonard Lance,
187:Knowledge is a weight added to conscience. ~ Victor Hugo,
188:Music is an experience, not a science. ~ Ennio Morricone,
189:Nobody ever flunked a science museum ~ Frank Oppenheimer,
190:Politics are the divine science, after all. ~ John Adams,
191:Prudence approaches, conscience accuses. ~ Immanuel Kant,
192:Prudence reproaches; conscience accuses. ~ Immanuel Kant,
193:Psychology is the science of mental life ~ William James,
194:Science grew out of the craft tradition ~ Richard Rhodes,
195:Science is about filling in the details. ~ Graham Hawkes,
196:Science is a cemetary of dead ideas. ~ Miguel de Unamuno,
197:Science is just magic with better PR. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
198:The conscience of a people is their power. ~ John Dryden,
199:The heart of science is measurement. ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
200:What's up with chicks and science? ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
201:wonders of science. I like it that both ~ Shani Boianjiu,
202:A guilty conscience never feels secure. ~ Publilius Syrus,
203:An uneasy conscience is a hair in the mouth. ~ Mark Twain,
204:biology has become an information science, ~ James Gleick,
205:Conscience is wiser than science. ~ Johann Kaspar Lavater,
206:Every science has a beginning but no end. ~ Anton Chekhov,
207:History is not a science, it's an art. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
208:Hope is cruel, and has no conscience. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
209:I am the conscience of the 21st Century. ~ Martin Firrell,
210:If you have science and art, ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
211:I had a hangover you could sell to science, ~ Bill Bryson,
212:Influence: Science and Practice by Robert ~ Daniel H Pink,
213:Mathematics is the gate and key to science. ~ Roger Bacon,
214:Modesty is the conscience of the body. ~ Honore de Balzac,
215:No science ever defends its first principles. ~ Aristotle,
216:Persuasion is not a science but an art ~ William Bernbach,
217:Sarcastic Science, she would like to know, ~ Robert Frost,
218:Science asymptotically approaches reality. ~ Philip Plait,
219:Science fiction is an extension of science. ~ Len Wiseman,
220:Science grows and Beauty dwindles. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
221:Science has eliminated distance. ~ Gabriel Garc a M rquez,
222:SCIENCE is a part of EVERYONE'S everyday life. ~ Bill Nye,
223:Science is not always what scientists do. ~ J Allen Hynek,
224:[Science is] the desire to know causes. ~ William Hazlitt,
225:Science should be on tap, not on top. ~ Winston Churchill,
226:Success is not a mystery. It is a science. ~ John Assaraf,
227:The bite of conscience is indecent. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
228:Today's science is tomorrow's technology. ~ Edward Teller,
229:AI is a bridge between art and science. ~ Pamela McCorduck,
230:Betrayal is common for men with no conscience. ~ Toba Beta,
231:Bio-technology is the science of the future. ~ Nita Ambani,
232:Conscience doth make cowards of us all. ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
233:Cosmetics is the science of a woman's cosmos. ~ Karl Kraus,
234:Even true believers had consciences, Too bad. ~ Tom Clancy,
235:Halt you villains! Unhand that science! ~ Noelle Stevenson,
236:I'm donating my body to science...fiction. ~ Steven Wright,
237:It is sure the hardest science to forget! ~ Alexander Pope,
238:Nature engenders the science of painting ~ Robert Delaunay,
239:Science begs literature to develop wings. ~ Santosh Kalwar,
240:Science isn't about WHY, it's about WHY NOT! ~ J K Simmons,
241:Science is the future of mankind. ~ Claude Cohen Tannoudji,
242:Science is the only religion of mankind. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
243:Technology. It's like science, only useless. ~ Jon Stewart,
244:The simplest science book is over my head. ~ James Merrill,
245:A clear conscience is a soft pillow. ~ Suzanne Woods Fisher,
246:A guilty conscience is not worth extra food. ~ Ruta Sepetys,
247:A little science estranges a man from God; ~ Francis Bacon,
248:ALL GLORY TO THE SCIENCE RULES OF SCIENCE! ~ Seanan McGuire,
249:A twinge of conscience is a glimpse of God. ~ Peter Ustinov,
250:Conscience is the perfect interpreter of life. ~ Karl Barth,
251:Conscience is the pulse of reason ~ Samuel Taylor Coleridge,
252:Conscience. That stuff can drive you nuts. ~ Budd Schulberg,
253:Economics is not an exact science. ~ John Kenneth Galbraith,
254:Experimenters are the shock troops of science. ~ Max Planck,
255:Fashion is more than fell about science ~ Pharrell Williams,
256:his conscience washed clean by happiness. ~ Fran oise Sagan,
257:Horst, I think I may have a conscience. ~ Jonathan L Howard,
258:Keep conscience clear, then never fear. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
259:Let's go commit senseless acts of science. ~ Seanan McGuire,
260:Management is not a science, it is an art. ~ Michael Eisner,
261:My best ‘inorganic friend’ is science! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
262:My conscience is captive to the Word of God ~ Martin Luther,
263:Our garage was basically science fair central. ~ Jeff Bezos,
264:Our science is a drop, our ignorance a sea. ~ William James,
265:Our true mentor in life is science. ~ Mustafa Kemal Atat rk,
266:Our true mentor in life is science. ~ Mustafa Kemal Ataturk,
267:Perfect specimens for an exacting science... ~ D E Meredith,
268:Politics is not a science...but an art. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
269:Racism is a blight on the human conscience ~ Nelson Mandela,
270:Science begets knowledge; opinion, ignorance. ~ Hippocrates,
271:Science cannot avert a single thunderbolt. ~ Camille Paglia,
272:Science is global, but solution is local. ~ Ellen J Kullman,
273:Science is simply common sense at its best. ~ Thomas Huxley,
274:So I decided on science when I was in college. ~ Sally Ride,
275:Space, man, have you no respect for science? ~ Isaac Asimov,
276:The Golden Age of science fiction is thirteen. ~ Terry Carr,
277:The law is a sort of hocus-pocus science. ~ Charles Macklin,
278:The man of science is a poor philosopher. ~ Albert Einstein,
279:Thus conscience does make cowards of us all… ~ Kol Anderson,
280:Welcome to science. You’re gonna like it here. ~ Phil Plait,
281:We're nothing without science. Nothing. ~ Pharrell Williams,
282:WHERE CHAOS BEGINS, classical science stops. ~ James Gleick,
283:A clear and innocent conscience fears nothing. ~ Elizabeth I,
284:Art is meant to disturb. Science reassures. ~ Georges Braque,
285:Art is that which science has not yet explained, ~ Anonymous,
286:A soldiers first duty is to their conscience. ~ Amie Kaufman,
287:As we all know, blinking lights means science. ~ Joss Whedon,
288:But no man has a monopoly of conscience. ~ Mary Augusta Ward,
289:But time is short, and science is infinite... ~ Thomas Hardy,
290:Conscience is God's presence in humans. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
291:Curiosity engenders both science and scandal. ~ Mason Cooley,
292:Economics is a very dangerous science. ~ John Maynard Keynes,
293:Fashion is more about feel than science. ~ Pharrell Williams,
294:Go on, fair Science; soon to thee ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr,
295:Happiness hates the timid! So does science! ~ Eugene O Neill,
296:I'd always been a science fiction enthusiast. ~ Ivan Reitman,
297:I don’t know the science behind climate change. ~ Joni Ernst,
298:Ikatlah ilmu dengan menuliskannya (Tie science by writing) ~,
299:Last century’s magic is this year’s science. ~ Cherie Priest,
300:leadership is really more art than science. ~ John C Maxwell,
301:Mankind is a science that defies definitions. ~ Robert Burns,
302:Mathematics is really an art, not a science. ~ Freeman Dyson,
303:Philosophy is the science which considers truth. ~ Aristotle,
304:Science is a collection of successful recipes. ~ Paul Val ry,
305:Science is public, not private, knowledge. ~ Robert K Merton,
306:Spirituality is the science of the Soul. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
307:Theology is the science of the divine lie. ~ Mikhail Bakunin,
308:The only guide to man is his conscience. ~ Winston Churchill,
309:An exact science is one that admits loss. ~ Genesis P Orridge,
310:Certainty could only come from the science. ~ Charles Graeber,
311:Coincidence is the science of the true believer. ~ Chet Raymo,
312:conscience does make cowards of us all; ~ William Shakespeare,
313:Conscience doth make cowards of us all. ~ William Shakespeare,
314:Conscience is its own readiest accuser. ~ Edwin Hubbel Chapin,
315:Conscience is the sentinel of virtue. ~ Johann Kaspar Lavater,
316:Conviction is the conscience of intellect. ~ Nicolas Chamfort,
317:Conviction is the conscience of the mind. ~ Mary Augusta Ward,
318:Experimental science is the queen of knowledge. ~ Roger Bacon,
319:History is the shank of the social sciences. ~ C Wright Mills,
320:Lire aussi : La science française face à la crise ~ Anonymous,
321:Listen to your conscience. Let it guide you. ~ Robin S Sharma,
322:Logic is neither an art nor a science but a dodge. ~ Stendhal,
323:magic is just science we don’t understand yet, ~ Chris Colfer,
324:Mankind needs new law
to embrace new science. ~ Toba Beta,
325:No definite science
without trial & error. ~ Toba Beta,
326:Perhaps all science is merely self-investigation. ~ Lily King,
327:Science fiction is a literature of possibilities. ~ Liu Cixin,
328:[Science is] piecemeal revelation. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
329:Sci-fi opens the way in mind for the new science. ~ Toba Beta,
330:Trace Science, then, with Modesty thy guide, ~ Alexander Pope,
331:We need a science to save us from science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
332:Without science, everything is a miracle. ~ Lawrence M Krauss,
333:You can't have a conscience in the pimp game. ~ Mark Wahlberg,
334:A guilty conscience means at least you have one. ~ Jakob Dylan,
335:Art is made to trouble but science reassures. ~ Georges Braque,
336:Chess is everything: art, science, and sport. ~ Anatoly Karpov,
337:Computer Science is embarrassed by the computer. ~ Alan Perlis,
338:Conscience is the most sacred of all property. ~ James Madison,
339:Disobedience to conscience makes conscience blind. ~ C S Lewis,
340:Fear is religion, courage is science. ~ Robert Green Ingersoll,
341:Few things are as bad as a guilty conscience. ~ Buchi Emecheta,
342:Honor is the moral conscience of the great. ~ William Davenant,
343:I've always been interested in science fiction ~ Martin Landau,
344:I was a science fiction junkie for a long time. ~ William Hurt,
345:I was a very keen reader of science fiction. ~ Terry Pratchett,
346:Meditation is a science, not a superstition. Meditation ~ Osho,
347:One prisoner of conscience is one too many. ~ Aung San Suu Kyi,
348:Our enemies are our outward consciences. ~ William Shakespeare,
349:Our ignorance is God; what we know is science. ~ Edward Gibbon,
350:Psychology is a very unsatisfactory science. ~ Wolfgang Kohler,
351:Reason deceives us; conscience, never. ~ Jean Jacques Rousseau,
352:Reduction is at the heart of progress in science. ~ Jon Elster,
353:Respectable Professors of the Dismal Science. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
354:Science fiction is very healthy in its form. ~ Robert Sheckley,
355:Science, you don't know, looks like magic. ~ Christopher Moore,
356:Shut up in the prison of their own consciences. ~ James Ussher,
357:Taste is the literary conscience of the soul. ~ Joseph Joubert,
358:The American conscience died with the Kennedys. ~ Frank Miller,
359:Toil of science swells the wealth of art. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
360:To teach vain Wits that Science little known, ~ Alexander Pope,
361:unpredictable. No conscience; no remorse. ~ Douglas E Richards,
362:A good conscience is a continual Christmas. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
363:Conscience is better served by a myth. ~ John Kenneth Galbraith,
364:First causes are outside the realm of science. ~ Claude Bernard,
365:Freedom of conscience is the core of all freedom ~ Benedict XVI,
366:He had a clear conscience. Never used it. ~ Stanis aw Jerzy Lec,
367:I believe in science but I also believe in fate. ~ Gao Xingjian,
368:If you cannot measure it, then it is not science. ~ Lord Kelvin,
369:In science, mistakes always precede the truth. ~ Horace Walpole,
370:Let every reader do as his conscience bids him. ~ Hermann Hesse,
371:Live with honor and follow your conscience. ~ Benigno Aquino Jr,
372:Magic is just science we don't understand yet ~ Arthur C Clarke,
373:My mom introduced me to science-fiction. ~ Logan Marshall Green,
374:Nothing awakens the conscience like a lot of money. ~ P Sainath,
375:Our consciences are not all of the same pattern. ~ George Eliot,
376:Philosophy is to science as masturbation is to sex. ~ Karl Marx,
377:Science Can Build the Computer but Not the Operator ~ Anonymous,
378:Science can't tell you why anything happens. ~ Michael Crichton,
379:Science commits suicide when it adopts a creed. ~ Thomas Huxley,
380:Science is the only true guide in life. ~ Mustafa Kemal Ataturk,
381:Science only goes so far, and then comes God. ~ Nicholas Sparks,
382:The dusk reeks of fornication and bad consciences. ~ Alan Moore,
383:The Internet of Things is not just science fiction; ~ Anonymous,
384:There's a lot of magic in science, so to speak. ~ Larry Wilmore,
385:The wounds of conscience always leave a scar. ~ Publilius Syrus,
386:This isn’t divinity, Eli. It’s science and chance. ~ V E Schwab,
387:We’ll die, and then we’ll become science, ~ Svetlana Alexievich,
388:We need James Bond with a library science degree. ~ Robin Sloan,
389:With science fiction there's endless possibilities. ~ Anna Torv,
390:All science is either physics or stamp collecting, ~ Bill Bryson,
391:Besides, they are our outward consciences, ~ William Shakespeare,
392:Courage without conscience is a wild beast. ~ Robert G Ingersoll,
393:Every beginning is difficult, holds in all sciences. ~ Karl Marx,
394:Fantasy and science fiction are where my brain lives. ~ Marie Lu,
395:If we reject science, we reject the common man. ~ Naguib Mahfouz,
396:If you live by your conscience you do what you want. ~ Anne Rice,
397:Im a massive science fiction and fantasy geek. ~ Robert Kazinsky,
398:I think science and religion should be separate. ~ Freeman Dyson,
399:I was like I was in science class: I was curious. ~ Alice Sebold,
400:Mathematics is the queen of the sciences. ~ Carl Friedrich Gauss,
401:None but a woman can teach the science of herself. ~ Jane Austen,
402:Only love with its science makes us so innocent. ~ Violeta Parra,
403:Religion and science look at reality differently. ~ Robert Lanza,
404:science is about how not to be a sucker. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
405:Science is an essentially anarchic enterprise. ~ Paul Feyerabend,
406:Science is our last and greatest frontier. ~ Antony Garrett Lisi,
407:Science requires us to transform into spies. ~ Becca Fitzpatrick,
408:The best tranquilizer is a clear conscience. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
409:The conscience of the dying belies their life. ~ Luc de Clapiers,
410:There are no limits to what science can explore. ~ Ernest Solvay,
411:There's no softer pillow than a clear conscience. ~ Jay Kristoff,
412:The science is in knowing; the art in perceiving. ~ Robert Fripp,
413:When Art becomes a Science it is no longer an Art. ~ Kevin James,
414:Writing adds up to the conscience of our times. ~ Martin Firrell,
415:A clear conscience is the sure sign of a bad memory. ~ Mark Twain,
416:An overblown conscience is an empty conscience. ~ Pascal Bruckner,
417:Archaeology is not a science, it's a vendetta. ~ Mortimer Wheeler,
418:Botany I rank with the most valuable sciences. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
419:But what science cannot understand, it dismisses. ~ Michael Scott,
420:Clear conscience never fear midnight knocking. . ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
421:Conscience is no more than the dead speaking to us. ~ Jim Carroll,
422:Conscience is the aboriginal Vicar of Christ. ~ John Henry Newman,
423:Even when there is no law, there is conscience. ~ Publilius Syrus,
424:Everything I did, I did as a matter of conscience. ~ Daniel Silva,
425:Evil societies always kill their consciences. ~ James L Farmer Jr,
426:Farscape is not what you call hard science fiction. ~ Ben Browder,
427:Health has its science, as well as disease. ~ Elizabeth Blackwell,
428:He had the mathematics of fighting down to a science. ~ R F Kuang,
429:History is the science of what never happens twice. ~ Paul Val ry,
430:History repeats, but science reverberates. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
431:I am a man of science, not someone's snuggle-bunny! ~ Chuck Lorre,
432:I do love science-fiction and horror movies. ~ Nicolas Ghesquiere,
433:I haven’t added in the extra points from the science ~ Kelly Oram,
434:In science, compromise is a betrayal of truth. ~ Ludwig von Mises,
435:I seek no better warrant than my own, conscience. ~ Philip Sidney,
436:Math is sometimes called the science of patterns. ~ Ronald Graham,
437:Philosophy is the true mother of science. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
438:Poetics is a science for stammering poets. ~ Shirley Geok lin Lim,
439:Public sharing is an important part of science. ~ Richard Dawkins,
440:Science Fiction has rivets, fantasy has trees. ~ Orson Scott Card,
441:Science fiction is the very literature of change. ~ Frederik Pohl,
442:Science fiction works best when it stimulates debate. ~ Greg Bear,
443:Science is the storytelling of our time. ~ William Irwin Thompson,
444:Science was constructed against a lot of nonsense, ~ James Gleick,
445:Science will...produce the data..., but never the ~ Lewis Thomas,
446:Some people are good at war. I preferred science. ~ Mariko Tamaki,
447:The conscience is more wise than science. ~ Johann Kaspar Lavater,
448:the eloquent science journalist Richard Dawkins ~ Edward O Wilson,
449:Traditional science is all about finding shortcuts. ~ Rudy Rucker,
450:Transparency and detail are everything in science. ~ Ben Goldacre,
451:Valuing a business is part art and part science. ~ Warren Buffett,
452:We can't allow science to undo its own good work. ~ Aldous Huxley,
453:What pillow can one have like a good conscience? ~ John Steinbeck,
454:A good storyteller is the conscience-keeper of a nation. ~ Gulzar,
455:Before you develop a conscience, torture is amusing. ~ Paul Graham,
456:Cinema, heir of alchemy, last of an erotic science. ~ Jim Morrison,
457:Conscience and wealth are not always neighbors. ~ Philip Massinger,
458:Conscience is the root of all true courage. ~ James Freeman Clarke,
459:Conscience, the executioner, shaking her secret scourge. ~ Juvenal,
460:Consciousness is yours. Conscience is given by the society. ~ Osho,
461:Curiosity is the starting point for great science. ~ Philip Kotler,
462:Freedom [is] the first-born daughter of science ~ Thomas Jefferson,
463:Good conscience is the most valuable asset of all! ~ James Madison,
464:I can't tell my conscience from my insecurities. ~ Cathy Guisewite,
465:I like science - geography, meteorology, cosmology. ~ Randy Newman,
466:I'm just doing what my conscience asks me to do. ~ Chen Guangcheng,
467:I've called science fiction 'reality ahead of schedule' ~ Syd Mead,
468:Joe Paterno left this world with a clear conscience. ~ Jay Paterno,
469:Journalism is not a precise science, it's a crude art ~ Dan Rather,
470:Magic is just science we haven't figured out yet ~ Arthur C Clarke,
471:Mathematics is the key and door to the sciences. ~ Galileo Galilei,
472:Perfect typography is more a science than an art. ~ Jan Tschichold,
473:Political ideology can corrupt the mind, and science. ~ E O Wilson,
474:Science and art are the handmaids of religion. ~ Francois Delsarte,
475:Science is a way for us to not fool ourselves. ~ Richard P Feynman,
476:Science is spectral analysis. Art is light synthesis. ~ Karl Kraus,
477:[Science is] the labor and handicraft of the mind. ~ Francis Bacon,
478:Science is the topography of ignorance. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
479:Science is voiceless; it is the scientists who talk. ~ Simone Weil,
480:Sciences may be learned by rote, but wisdom not. ~ Laurence Sterne,
481:Theology is a science of mind applied to God. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
482:There is nothing inherently wrong about science. ~ Douglas Preston,
483:The world is my country. Science my religion. ~ Christiaan Huygens,
484:Today's science fiction is tomorrow's science fact. ~ Isaac Asimov,
485:We need more science in the world. Train me. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
486:Auschwitz exists because of politicized science. ~ Michael Crichton,
487:Books must follow sciences, and not sciences books. ~ Francis Bacon,
488:Conscience is a mother-in-law whose visit never ends. ~ H L Mencken,
489:Conscience is the moralized form of self-absorption. ~ Mason Cooley,
490:Conscience - the only incorruptible thing about us ~ Henry Fielding,
491:Enjoying science shouldn't be rocket science. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
492:Genetics is a science full of gods, Mr. Sanchez. ~ Valeria Luiselli,
493:Good science is always humanity’s best friend! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
494:History is a priori amoral; it has no conscience. ~ Arthur Koestler,
495:I like to think of music as an emotional science. ~ George Gershwin,
496:I'm going to be a president who believes in science. ~ John F Kerry,
497:I think science fiction is very bad at prediction. ~ China Mieville,
498:I toast the Pope, but I toast conscience first. ~ John Henry Newman,
499:I wanted to scientize myth and mythologize science. ~ Timothy Leary,
500:I wanted to speak my conscience and have it matter. ~ Sue Monk Kidd,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



100

   52 Occultism
   33 Yoga
   28 Philosophy
   16 Integral Yoga
   9 Hinduism
   6 Christianity
   2 Buddhism


   91 Sri Aurobindo
   49 Aleister Crowley
   20 Swami Vivekananda
   15 The Mother
   15 Aldous Huxley
   10 Satprem
   10 Friedrich Nietzsche
   8 Swami Krishnananda
   8 Carl Jung
   6 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   6 Saint Teresa of Avila
   5 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   5 Patanjali
   3 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   3 Sri Ramakrishna
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Jean Gebser
   2 Bokar Rinpoche


   52 The Life Divine
   39 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   35 Magick Without Tears
   29 Savitri
   20 Liber ABA
   19 Essays Divine And Human
   16 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   15 The Perennial Philosophy
   13 Letters On Yoga I
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   10 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   9 Twilight of the Idols
   9 Raja-Yoga
   9 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   8 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   8 Aion
   7 Words Of Long Ago
   7 The Divine Comedy
   7 Essays On The Gita
   7 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 The Problems of Philosophy
   6 Theosophy
   6 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   6 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   6 Talks
   6 Bhakti-Yoga
   5 The Way of Perfection
   5 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   5 Amrita Gita
   4 The Red Book Liber Novus
   4 Letters On Yoga II
   4 Kena and Other Upanishads
   4 Collected Poems
   3 The Interior Castle or The Mansions
   3 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   3 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   3 Poetics
   3 On Education
   3 Isha Upanishad
   3 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   2 Walden
   2 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   2 The Ever-Present Origin
   2 The Bible
   2 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Liber Null
   2 Agenda Vol 1


00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri, #Sweet Mother - Harmonies of Light, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the InconScience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconScience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga.
  
  --
  
  These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconScience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness.
  

0.01_-_Introduction, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  She was uprooting a new Matter, free, free from the habit of inexorably being a man who repeats himself ad infinitum with a few improvements in the way of organ transplants or monetary exchanges. In fact, She was there to discover what would happen after materialism and after spiritualism, these prodigal twin brothers. Because Materialism is dying in the West for the same reason that Spiritualism is dying in the East: it is the hour of the new species. Man needs to awaken, not only from his demons but also from his gods. A new Matter, yes, like a new Spirit, yes, because we still know neither one nor the other. It is the hour when Science, like Spirituality, at the end of their roads, must discover what Matter TRULY is, for it is really there that a Spirit as yet unknown to us is to be found. It is a time when all the 'isms' of the old species are dying: 'The age of
  Capitalism and business is drawing to its close. But the age of Communism too will pass ... 'It is the hour of a pure little cell THAT WILL HAVE TERRESTRIAL REPERCUSSIONS, infinitely more radical than all our political and scientific or spiritualistic panaceas.

0.01_-_Life_and_Yoga, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Yogic methods have something of the same relation to the customary psychological workings of man as has the scientific handling of the force of electricity or of steam to their normal operations in Nature. And they, too, like the operations of Science, are formed upon a knowledge developed and confirmed by regular experiment, practical analysis and constant result. All
  Rajayoga, for instance, depends on this perception and experience that our inner elements, combinations, functions, forces, can be separated or dissolved, can be new-combined and set to novel and formerly impossible workings or can be transformed and resolved into a new general synthesis by fixed internal processes. Hathayoga similarly depends on this perception and experience that the vital forces and functions to which our life is normally subjected and whose ordinary operations seem set and indispensable, can be mastered and the operations changed or suspended with results that would otherwise be impossible and that seem miraculous to those who have not seized the rationale of their process. And if in some other of its forms this character of Yoga is less apparent, because they are more intuitive and less mechanical, nearer, like the Yoga of Devotion, to a supernal ecstasy or, like the Yoga of Knowledge, to a supernal infinity of consciousness and being, yet they too start from the use of some principal faculty in us by ways and for ends not contemplated in its everyday spontaneous workings. All methods grouped under the common name of Yoga are special psychological processes founded on a fixed truth of Nature and developing, out of normal functions, powers and results which were always latent but which her ordinary movements do not easily or do not often manifest.

0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  15
   towards ideal social and economic conditions, by the labour of Science towards an improved health, longevity and sound physique in civilised humanity, the sense and drift of this vast movement translates itself in easily intelligible signs. The right or at least the ultimate means may not always be employed, but their aim is the right preliminary aim, - a sound individual and social body and the satisfaction of the legitimate needs and demands of the material mind, sufficient ease, leisure, equal opportunity, so that the whole of mankind and no longer only the favoured race, class or individual may be free to develop the emotional and intellectual being to its full capacity. At present the material and economic aim may predominate, but always, behind, there works or there waits in reserve the higher and major impulse.
  

0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Mind finds fully its force and action only when it casts itself upon life and accepts equally its possibilities and its resistances as the means of a greater self-perfection. In the struggle with the difficulties of the material world the ethical development of the individual is firmly shaped and the great schools of conduct are formed; by contact with the facts of life Art attains to vitality, Thought assures its abstractions, the generalisations of the philosopher base themselves on a stable foundation of Science and experience.
  
  --
  
  But their aim is one in the end. The generalisation of Yoga in humanity must be the last victory of Nature over her own delays and concealments. Even as now by the progressive mind in Science she seeks to make all mankind fit for the full development of the mental life, so by Yoga must she inevitably seek to make all mankind fit for the higher evolution, the second birth, the spiritual existence. And as the mental life uses and perfects the material, so will the spiritual use and perfect the material and the mental existence as the instruments of a divine self-expression.
  

0.04_-_1951-1954, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  ***
  It is only in its outward form, in its most superficial appearance - as illusory for the latest discoveries of today's Science as for the experience of spirituality in former ages - that the body is not divine.
  

01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  An unshaped consciousness desired light
  And a blank preScience yearned towards distant change.
  As if a childlike finger laid on a cheek
  --
  Too perfect to be held by death-bound hearts,
  The preScience of a marvellous birth to come.
  Only a little the god-light can stay:

01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And, striking off subjection's rigorous clause,
  Annulled the soul's treaty with Nature's neScience.
  All the grey inhibitions were torn off
  --
  Rained from the all-powerful Mystery above.
  Thence stooped the eagles of OmniScience.
  A dense veil was rent, a mighty whisper heard;
  --
  A great nude arm of splendour suddenly rose;
  It rent the gauze opaque of NeScience:
  Her lifted finger's keen unthinkable tip
  --
  Overleaping with a sole and perilous bound
  The high black wall hiding superconScience,
  She broke in with inspired speech for scythe

01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Far from the original Dusk, the final Flame
  In some huge void InconScience it lives,
  Like a thought persisting in a wide emptiness.
  --
  He works through our sins and sorrows and our tears,
  His knowledge overrules our neScience;
  Whatever the appearance we must bear,
  --
  And chance that wears the rigid face of fate
  And her sport of death and pain and NeScience,
  His changed and struggling immortality.

01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    A conscious wideness filled the old dumb Space.
    In the Void he saw throned the OmniScience supreme.
    \tA Will, a hope immense now seized his heart,
  --
    Jets of the screened subliminal's caprice,
    Tags of the gramarye of InconScience,
    Freedom of a sovereign Truth without a law,

02.01_-_The_World-Stair, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
      Links the body's death with immortality's call:
    Out of the swoon of the InconScience
    It labours towards a superconscient Light.

02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Invests with grace the demon and the snake.
  Its trance imposes earth's inconScience,
  Immortal it weaves for us death's sombre robe
  --
  A Being woke and lived in the meaningless void,
  A world-wide NeScience strove towards life and thought,
  A Consciousness plucked out from mindless sleep.
  --
  A mind that must recover a knowledge lost
  Held in stone grip by the world's inconScience,
  And wearing still these countless knots of Law

02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Our human ignorance moves towards the Truth
  That NeScience may become omniscient,
  Transmuted instincts shape to divine thoughts,
  --
  Hungered for the beat of yearning and response.
  The poised inconScience shaken with a touch,
  The intuitive Silence trembling with a name,

02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Instinct was hers, the chrysalis of Truth,
  And effort and growth and striving neScience.
  Inflicting on the body desire and hope,
  Imposing on inconScience consciousness,
  She brought into Matter's dull tenacity
  --
  Or a dark clue to some diviner state.
  In NeScience began her mighty task,
  In Ignorance she pursues the unfinished work,
  --
  She was their inmate and adopted waif.
  Accepting subconScience, in dumb darkness' reign
  A sojourner, she hoped not any more.
  --
  Being became the Void and Conscious-Force
  NeScience and walk of a blind Energy
  And Ecstasy took the figure of world-pain.
  --
  Arming its creatures with delight and hope
  A half-awakened NeScience struggled there
  To know by sight and touch the outside of things.
  --
  Came winging its way through a wide air of Time;
  A march of knowledge moved in NeScience
  And guarded in the form a separate soul.

02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  This huge world unintelligibly turns
  In the shadow of a mused InconScience;
  It hides a key to inner meanings missed,
  --
  For the right to live and his last wages death.
  An inertia sunk towards inconScience,
  A sleep that imitates death is his repose.
  --
  Matter that chanced to read itself by Mind,
  InconScience monstrously engendering soul.
  At times all looks unreal and remote:
  --
  This the weird purport of the picture shown
  To Science the giantess, measurer of her field,
  As she pores on the record of her close survey

02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Her quick creative passion cannot cease.
  InconScience is her long gigantic pause,
  Her cosmic swoon is a stupendous phase:
  --
  All was imperfect still, half-known, half-done:
  The miracle of InconScience overpassed,
  The miracle of the Superconscient still,
  --
  In Nature's endless lines is lost the God.
  In knowledge to sum up omniScience,
  In action to erect the Omnipotent,
  --
  On a soil of yearning tread her sumptuous hours.
  A leaden NeScience weighs the wings of Thought,
  Her power oppresses the being with its garbs,

02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    From a stark ridge overlooking all that is,
    A tenebrous awakened NeScience,
    Her wide blank eyes wondering at Time and Form,

02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  That yet was a zero parent of the worlds;
  InconScience swallowing up the cosmic Mind
  Produced a universe from its lethal sleep;
  --
  A vast Non-Being robed itself with shape,
  The boundless NeScience of the unconscious depths
  Covered eternity with nothingness.
  --
  The wisdom embodied mind could not reveal,
  InconScience chased from the world's voiceless breast;
  Transfigured were the fixed schemes of reasoning Thought.

02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  This was the first means of our slow ascent
  From the half-conScience of the animal soul
  Living in a crowded press of shape-events
  --
  Cut sentient passages for the mind of flesh
  And found a means for NeScience to know.
  Offering its little squares and cubes of word
  --
  All was a chaos of the true and false,
  Mind sought amid deep mists of NeScience;
  It looked within itself but saw not God.
  --
  Looking from a gleam-ridge into the Night
  In her first tamperings with InconScience:
  Its alien dusk baffles her luminous eyes;
  --
  A passage she cut through from Night to Light,
  And searched for an ungrasped OmniScience.
  A dwarf three-bodied trinity was her serf.
  --
  Like rails for the World-Magician's power to run,
  Her Sciences precise and absolute.
  On the huge bare walls of human neScience
  Written round Nature's deep dumb hieroglyphs
  --
  In society build a just exact machine.
  Then Science and reason careless of the soul
  Could iron out a tranquil uniform world,
  --
  Its sense is but the spirit's outward touch,
  Half-waked in a world of dark InconScience;
  It feels out for its beings and its forms
  --
  Of a traveller towards the half-found truth in things
  Moving twixt neScience and neScience.
  For nothing is known while aught remains concealed;
  --
  Its darkness is a blackened knot of light;
  Thought dances hand in hand with NeScience
  On the grey road that winds towards the Sun.
  --
  A greater Gnosis shall regard the world
  Crossing out of some far omniScience
  On lustrous seas from the still rapt Alone

02.13_-_In_the_Self_of_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And smote at the very roots of thought and sense.
  In a universe of NeScience they have grown,
  Aspiring towards a superconscient Sun,
  --
  In which it shrines its image of the Real,
  Collapsed into the NeScience whence it rose.
  Only a gleam was there of symbol facts
  --
  Its highest wisdom was a brilliant guess,
  Its mighty structured Science of the worlds
  A passing light on being's surfaces.

02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Calm's wide epiphany, wisdom's mute home,
  A lonely station of OmniScience,
  A diving-board of the Eternal's power,
  --
  And the tiered planes and the immutable Lords.
  A wisdom waiting on OmniScience
  Sat voiceless in a vast passivity;

03.01_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The Science of the West has discovered evolution as the secret of life and its process in this material world; but it has laid more stress on the growth of form and species than on the growth of consciousness: even, consciousness has been regarded as an incident and not the whole secret of the meaning of the evolution. An evolution has been admitted by certain minds in the East, certain philosophies and Scriptures, but there its sense has been the growth of the soul through developing or successive forms and many lives of the individual to its own highest reality.
  
  --
  The Creation has descended all the degrees of being from the Supermind to Matter and in each degree it has created a world, reign, plane or order proper to that degree. In the creating of the material world there was a plunge of this descending
  Consciousness into an apparent InconScience and an emergence of it out of that InconScience, degree by degree, until it recovers its own highest spiritual and supramental summits and manifests their powers here in Matter. But even in the InconScience there is a secret Consciousness which works, one may say, by an involved and hidden Intuition proper to itself.
  

03.01_-_The_Pursuit_of_the_Unknowable, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The symbol modes of being helped no more,
  The structures NeScience builds collapsing failed,
  And even the spirit that holds the universe
  --
  
  object:programs (Computer Science)
  class:Computer Science
  class:programming
  --
  
  see also ::: Computer Science
  

03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The Enigma ceased that rules our nature's night,
  The covering NeScience was unmasked and slain;
  Its mind of error was stripped off from things
  --
  Condemned to an imperfect body and mind,
  In the inconScience of material things
  And the indignity of mortal life.

03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Concealing the omnipotence of its Force,
  Concealing the omniScience of its Soul;
  An agent of its own transcendent Will,

03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Alight, the dun unplumbed subconscient caves
  Thrilled with the preScience of her longed-for tread
  And filled with flickering crests and praying tongues.
  --
  He is compelled to be what he is not;
  He obeys the InconScience he had come to rule
  

04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A mind but half-awake in the swing of the void
  On the bosom of InconScience dreamed out life
  And bore this finite world of thought and deed
  --
  And life invaded the material sheath
  Afflicting InconScience with the need to feel,
  Since in Infinity's silence woke a word,
  --
  An infant heart of the deep-caved world-plan
  In cradle of divine inconScience rocked
  

05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Aroused by some foreshadowing touch within,
  An early preScience in my mind approached
  The great dumb animal consciousness of earth

06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Our fount of action from a darkness wells;
  In ignorance and neScience are our roots.
  
  --
  
  His Science is an artificer of doom;
  He ransacks earth for means to harm his kind;
  --
  Its brilliant curtain hides from thee God's face.
  It illumes a world born from the InconScience
  But hides the Immortal's meaning in the world.
  --
  Thy grief is a cry of darkness to the Light;
  Pain was the first-born of the InconScience
  Which was thy body's dumb original base;
  --
  Arisen from Nothingness and towards Nothingness turned,
  Its dark and potent neScience was earth's start;
  It is the waste stuff from which all was made;

07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Impotent against his calm omnipotent Law
  And InconScience and the almighty hands of Death.
  
  --
  A portion of us lives in present Time,
  A secret mass in dim inconScience gropes;
  Out of the inconscient and subliminal

07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All then becomes subconscient, tenebrous,
  InconScience puts its seal on Nature's page
  Or else a mad disorder whirls the brain

07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  No wish I harbour unfulfilled shall die:
  Omnipotence and omniScience shall be mine."
  And Savitri heard the voice, the warped echo heard

10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But knowledge in this world is error's mate,
  A brilliant procuress of NeScience,
  And human love a posturer on earth-stage

10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  His consciousness dived into inconscient depths,
  All-Knowledge seemed a huge dark NeScience;
  Infinity wore a boundless zero's form.
  --
  Philosophy climbs up Thought's cloud-bank peaks
  And Science tears out Nature's occult powers,
  Enormous djinns who serve a dwarf's small needs,

10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Each in its hour eternal claimed went by:
  Ideals, systems, Sciences, poems, crafts
  Tireless there perished and again recurred,
  --
  But nothing ever have solved since earth began,
  And Sciences omnipotent in vain
  By which men learn of what the suns are made,
  --
  Waster of the energy that has made the stars,
  InconScience, carrier of the seeds of thought,
  NeScience in which All-Knowledge sleeps entombed
  And slowly emerges in its hollow breast

1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  Reality as can be directly apprehended by a mind in a state of detachment, charity
  and humility. Natural Science is empirical; but it does not confine itself to the
  experience of human beings in their merely human and unmodified condition. Why

1.00c_-_INTRODUCTION, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  take us to the other shore of this ocean of ignorance; that is
  the Science of religion; nothing else can be.
  

1.00_-_Foreword, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
    "Nevertheless and notwithstanding! For many years the Master Therion has felt acutely the need of some groundwork-teaching suited to those who have only just begun the study of Magick and its subsidiary Sciences, or are merely curious about it, or interested in it with intent to study. Always he has done his utmost to make his meaning clear to the average intelligent educated person, but even those who understand him perfectly and are most sympathetic to his work, agree that in this respect he has often failed.
  
  --
  
    "One genius, inspired of the gods, suggested recently that the riddle might be solved somewhat on the old and well-tried lines of 'Dr. Brewer's Guide to Science'; i.e., by having aspirants write to the Master asking questions, the kind of problem that naturally comes into the mind of any sensible enquirer, and getting his answer in the form of a letter. 'What is it?' 'Why should I bother my head about it?' 'What are its principles?' 'What use is it?' 'How do I begin?', and the like.
  

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Sri Ramakrishna said sharply. "You dare to slight in these terms renunciation and piety, which our scriptures describe as the greatest of all virtues! After reading two pages of English you think you have come to know the world! You appear to think you are omniscient. Well, have you seen those tiny crabs that are born in the Ganges just when the rains set in? In this big universe you are even less significant than one of those small creatures. How dare you talk of helping the world? The Lord will look to that. You haven't the power in you to do it." After a pause the Master continued: "Can you explain to me how you can work for others? I know what you mean by helping them. To feed a number of persons, to treat them when they are sick, to construct a road or dig a well - Isn't that all? These are good deeds, no doubt, but how trifling in comparison with the vastness of the universe! How far can a man advance in this line? How many people can you save from famine? Malaria has ruined a whole province; what could you do to stop its onslaught? God alone looks after the world. Let a man first realize Him. Let a man get the authority from God and be endowed with His power; then, and then alone, may he think of doing good to others. A man should first be purged of all egotism. Then alone will the Blissful Mother ask him to work for the world." Sri Ramakrishna mistrusted philanthropy that presumed to pose as charity. He warned people against it. He saw in most acts of philanthropy nothing but egotism, vanity, a desire for glory, a barren excitement to kill the boredom of life, or an attempt to soothe a guilty conScience. True charity, he taught, is the result of love of God - service to man in a spirit of worship.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  The reader will find mentioned in this work many visions and experiences that fall outside the ken of physical Science and even psychology. With the development of modern knowledge the border line between the natural and the supernatural is ever shifting its position. Genuine mystical experiences are not as suspect now as they were half a century ago. The words of Sri Ramakrishna have already exerted a tremendous influence in the land of his birth. Savants of Europe have found in his words the ring of universal truth.
  
  But these words were not the product of intellectual cogitation; they were rooted in direct experience. Hence, to students of religion, psychology, and physical Science, these experiences of the Master are of immense value for the understanding of religious phenomena in general. No doubt Sri Ramakrishna was a Hindu of the Hindus; yet his experiences transcended the limits of the dogmas and creeds of Hinduism. Mystics of religions other than Hinduism will find in Sri Ramakrishna's experiences a corroboration of the experiences of their own prophets and seers. And this is very important today for the resuscitation of religious values. The sceptical reader may pass by the supernatural experiences; he will yet find in the book enough material to provoke his serious thought and solve many of his spiritual problems.
  

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  God hath relieved you of the ordinance laid down in the Bayan concerning the destruction of books. We have permitted you to read such Sciences as are profitable unto you, not such as end in idle disputation; better is this for you, if ye be of them that comprehend.
  
  --
  
  Say: O leaders of religion! Weigh not the Book of God with such standards and Sciences as are current amongst you, for the Book itself is the unerring Balance established amongst men. In this most perfect Balance whatsoever the peoples and kindreds of the earth possess must be weighed, while the measure of its weight should be tested according to its own standard, did ye but know it.
  

1.00_-_PREFACE, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  perhaps, live better than we do. Indeed, we must first realize that we can do better than our machines, and that the enormous Mechanism that is suffocating us is liable to collapse as quickly as it came into being, provided we are willing to seize on the true power and go down into our own hearts, as methodical, rigorous, and clearheaded explorers.
  Then we may discover that our splendid twentieth century is still the Stone Age of psychology, that, in spite of all our Science, we have not yet entered the true Science of living, the real mastery of the world and of ourselves, and that there lie before us horizons of perfection,
  harmony and beauty, compared to which our most superb scientific discoveries are like the roughcasts of an apprentice.

1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Philosophy
  
    The spirit of the depths has subjugated all pride and arrogance to the power of judgment. He took away my belief in Science, he robbed me of the joy of explaining and ordering things, and he let devotion to the ideals of this time die out in me. He forced me down to the last and simplest things.
  
  --
  38. In Psychological Types (1921) Jung noted that in psychology, conceptions are a product of the subjective psychological constellation of the researcher (CW 6, 9). This reflexivity formed an important theme in his later work (see my jung and the Making of Modem Psychology: The
  Dream of a Science, I).
  39. The Draft continues: a dead system that I had contrived, assembled from so-called experiences and judgments (p. 16).

1.01_-_Appearance_and_Reality, #The Problems of Philosophy, #Bertrand Russell, #Philosophy
  
  Is there any knowledge in the world which is so certain that no reasonable man could doubt it? This question, which at first sight might not seem difficult, is really one of the most difficult that can be asked. When we have realized the obstacles in the way of a straightforward and confident answer, we shall be well launched on the study of philosophy--for philosophy is merely the attempt to answer such ultimate questions, not carelessly and dogmatically, as we do in ordinary life and even in the Sciences, but critically, after exploring all that makes such questions puzzling, and after realizing all the vagueness and confusion that underlie our ordinary ideas.
  
  --
  
  Such questions are bewildering, and it is difficult to know that even the strangest hypotheses may not be true. Thus our familiar table, which has roused but the slightest thoughts in us hitherto, has become a problem full of surprising possibilities. The one thing we know about it is that it is not what it seems. Beyond this modest result, so far, we have the most complete liberty of conjecture. Leibniz tells us it is a community of souls: Berkeley tells us it is an idea in the mind of God; sober Science, scarcely less wonderful, tells us it is a vast collection of electric charges in violent motion.
  

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  I have always endeavored to acquire strict business habits; they are indispensable to every man. If your trade is with the Celestial Empire, then some small counting house on the coast, in some Salem harbor, will be fixture enough. You will export such articles as the country affords, purely native products, much ice and pine timber and a little granite, always in native bottoms. These will be good ventures. To oversee all the details yourself in person; to be at once pilot and captain, and owner and underwriter; to buy and sell and keep the accounts; to read every letter received, and write or read every letter sent; to superintend the discharge of imports night and day; to be upon many parts of the coast almost at the same time;often the richest freight will be discharged upon a Jersey shore;to be your own telegraph, unweariedly sweeping the horizon, speaking all passing vessels bound coastwise; to keep up a steady despatch of commodities, for the supply of such a distant and exorbitant market; to keep yourself informed of the state of the markets, prospects of war and peace every where, and anticipate the tendencies of trade and civilization,taking advantage of the results of all exploring expeditions, using new passages and all improvements in navigation;charts to be studied, the position of reefs and new lights and buoys to be ascertained, and ever, and ever, the logarithmic tables to be corrected, for by the error of some calculator the vessel often splits upon a rock that should have reached a friendly pier,there is the untold fate of La Perouse;universal Science to be kept pace with, studying the lives of all great discoverers and navigators, great adventurers and merchants, from Hanno and the Phnicians down to our day; in fine, account of stock to be taken from time to time, to know how you stand. It is a labor to task the faculties of a man,such problems of profit and loss, of interest, of tare and tret, and gauging of all kinds in it, as demand a universal knowledge.
  
  --
  
  Every day our garments become more assimilated to ourselves, receiving the impress of the wearers character, until we hesitate to lay them aside, without such delay and medical appliances and some such solemnity even as our bodies. No man ever stood the lower in my estimation for having a patch in his clothes; yet I am sure that there is greater anxiety, commonly, to have fashionable, or at least clean and unpatched clothes, than to have a sound conScience. But even if the rent is not mended, perhaps the worst vice betrayed is improvidence. I sometimes try my acquaintances by such tests as this;who could wear a patch, or two extra seams only, over the knee? Most behave as if they believed that their prospects for life would be ruined if they should do it. It would be easier for them to hobble to town with a broken leg than with a broken pantaloon. Often if an accident happens to a gentlemans legs, they can be mended; but if a similar accident happens to the legs of his pantaloons, there is no help for it; for he considers, not what is truly respectable, but what is respected. We know but few men, a great many coats and breeches. Dress a scarecrow in your last shift, you standing shiftless by, who would not soonest salute the scarecrow? Passing a cornfield the other day, close by a hat and coat on a stake, I recognized the owner of the farm. He was only a little more weather-beaten than when I saw him last. I have heard of a dog that barked at every stranger who approached his masters premises with clothes on, but was easily quieted by a naked thief. It is an interesting question how far men would retain their relative rank if they were divested of their clothes. Could you, in such a case, tell surely of any company of civilized men, which belonged to the most respected class? When Madam Pfeiffer, in her adventurous travels round the world, from east to west, had got so near home as Asiatic Russia, she says that she felt the necessity of wearing other than a travelling dress, when she went to meet the authorities, for she was now in a civilized country, where people are judged of by their clothes.
  Even in our democratic New England towns the accidental possession of wealth, and its manifestation in dress and equipage alone, obtain for the possessor almost universal respect. But they yield such respect, numerous as they are, are so far heathen, and need to have a missionary sent to them. Beside, clothes introduced sewing, a kind of work which you may call endless; a womans dress, at least, is never done.
  --
     But lo! they have taken wings,
     The arts and Sciences,
     And a thousand appliances;
  --
  Those things for which the most money is demanded are never the things which the student most wants. Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made. The mode of founding a college is, commonly, to get up a subscription of dollars and cents, and then following blindly the principles of a division of labor to its extreme, a principle which should never be followed but with circumspection,to call in a contractor who makes this a subject of speculation, and he employs
  Irishmen or other operatives actually to lay the foundations, while the students that are to be are said to be fitting themselves for it; and for these oversights successive generations have to pay. I think that it would be _better than this_, for the students, or those who desire to be benefited by it, even to lay the foundation themselves. The student who secures his coveted leisure and retirement by systematically shirking any labor necessary to man obtains but an ignoble and unprofitable leisure, defrauding himself of the experience which alone can make leisure fruitful. But, says one, you do not mean that the students should go to work with their hands instead of their heads? I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not _play_ life, or _study_ it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly _live_ it from beginning to end. How could youths better learn to live than by at once trying the experiment of living? Methinks this would exercise their minds as much as mathematics. If I wished a boy to know something about the arts and Sciences, for instance, I would not pursue the common course, which is merely to send him into the neighborhood of some professor, where any thing is professed and practised but the art of life;to survey the world through a telescope or a microscope, and never with his natural eye; to study chemistry, and not learn how his bread is made, or mechanics, and not learn how it is earned; to discover new satellites to Neptune, and not detect the motes in his eyes, or to what vagabond he is a satellite himself; or to be devoured by the monsters that swarm all around him, while contemplating the monsters in a drop of vinegar.
  

1.01_-_Foreward, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  manners and habits through the development of intellect and
  reason, art, philosophy and Science and a clearer and sounder,
  more matter-of-fact intelligence. The ancient idea about the Veda

1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  
  It is our belief that the essential traits of a new age and a new reality are discernible in nearly all forms of contemporary expression, whether in the creations of modern art, or in the recent findings of the natural Sciences, or in the results of the humanities and Sciences of the mind. Moreover we are in a position to define this new reality in such a way as to emphasize one of its most significant elements. Our definition is a natural corollary of the recognition that mans coming to awareness is inseparably bound to his consciousness of space and time.
  
  --
  
  Finally, we would emphasize the general validity of the term aperspectival; it is definitely not intended to be understood as an extension of concepts used in art history and should not be so construed. When we introduced the concept in 1936/1939, it was within the context of scientific as well as artistic traditions. The perspectival structure as fully realized by Leonardo da Vinci is of fundamental importance not only to our scientific-technological but also artistic understanding of the world. Without perspective neither technical drafting nor three-dimensional painting would have been possible. Leonardo - scientist, engineer, and artist in one - was the first to fully develop drafting techniques and perspectival painting. In this same sense, that is from a scientific as well as artistic standpoint, the term aperspectival is valid, and the basis for this significance must not be overlooked, for it legitimizes the validity and applicability of the term to the Sciences, the humanities, and the arts.
  
  --
  
  It is our task in this book to work out this aperspectival basis. Our discussion will rely more an the evidence presented in the history of thought than on the findings of the natural Sciences as is the case with the authors Transformation of the Occident. Among the disciplines of historical thought the investigation of language will form the predominant source of our insight since it is the preeminent means of reciprocal communication between man and the world.
  

1.01_-_Historical_Survey, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  The Zohar so impressed the celebrated scholastic meta- physician and experimental chemist, Raymond Lully, that it suggested to him the development of the Ars Magna (The
  Great Work), an idea in the exposition of which he exhibits the loftiest conceptions of the Qabalah, regarding it as a divine Science and a genuine revelation of Light to the human soul. He was one of those few isolated figures attracted to its study, who saw through its use of a peculiar type of symbol, and endeavoured to construct a workable magical or philosophical alphabet, an explanation of which will be attempted in the remaining chapters of this work.
  

1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
   p. 2
   possessing these higher faculties gave instruction to others who were in search of them. Such a training is called occult (esoteric) training, and the instruction received therefrom is called occult (esoteric) teaching, or spiritual Science. This designation naturally awakens misunderstanding. The one who hears it may very easily be misled into the belief that this training is the concern of a special, privileged class, withholding its knowledge arbitrarily from its fellow-creatures. He may even think that nothing of real importance lies behind such knowledge, for if it were a true knowledge-he is tempted to think-there would be no need of making a secret of it; it might be publicly imparted and its advantages made accessible to all. Those who have been initiated into the nature of this higher knowledge are not in the least surprised that the uninitiated should so think, for the secret of initiation can only be understood by those who have to a certain degree experienced this initiation into the higher knowledge of existence. The question may be raised: how, then, under these circumstances, are the uninitiated to develop any human interest in this so-called esoteric knowledge?
   p. 3
  --
  
  He must begin with a certain fundamental attitude of soul. In spiritual Science this fundamental attitude is called the path of veneration, of devotion to truth and knowledge. Without this attitude no one can become a student. The disposition
   p. 6
  --
  
  If we do not develop within ourselves this deeply rooted feeling that there is something higher than ourselves, we shall never find the strength to evolve to something higher. The initiate has only acquired the strength to lift his head to the heights of knowledge by guiding his heart to the depths of veneration and devotion. The heights of the spirit can only be climbed by passing through the portals of humility. You can only acquire right knowledge when you have learnt to esteem it. Man has certainly the right to turn his eyes to the light, but he must first acquire this right. There are laws in the spiritual life, as in the physical life. Rub a glass rod with an appropriate material and it will become electric, that is, it will receive the power of attracting small bodies. This is in keeping with a law of nature. It is known to all who have learnt a little physics. Similarly, acquaintance with the first principles of spiritual Science shows that every
   p. 8
  --
   p. 9
   hold fast what is best," we owe the greatness of our civilization. Man could never have attained to the Science, the industry, the commerce, the rights relationships of our time, had he not applied to all things the standard of his critical judgment. But what we have thereby gained in external culture we have had to pay for with a corresponding loss of higher knowledge of spiritual life. It must be emphasized that higher knowledge is not concerned with the veneration of persons but the veneration of truth and knowledge.
  
  --
  
  In all spiritual Science there is a fundamental principle which cannot be transgressed without sacrificing success, and it should be impressed on the student in every form of esoteric training. It runs as follows: All knowledge pursued merely for the enrichment of personal learning and the accumulation of personal treasure leads you away from the path; but all knowledge pursued for growth to ripeness within the process of human ennoblement and cosmic development brings you a step forward. This law must be strictly observed, and no student is genuine until he has adopted it as a guide for his whole life. This truth can be expressed in the following short sentence: Every idea which does not become your ideal slays a force in your soul; every idea which becomes your ideal creates within you life-forces.
  
  --
   p. 18
   development of the inner life. Spiritual Science now also gives him practical rules by observing which he may tread that path and develop that inner life. These practical rules have no arbitrary origin. They rest upon ancient experience and ancient wisdom, and are given out in the same manner, wheresoever the ways to higher knowledge are indicated. All true teachers of the spiritual life are in agreement as to the substance of these rules, even though they do not always clothe them in the same words. This difference, which is of a minor character and is more apparent than real, is due to circumstances which need not be dwelt upon here.
  
  --
  
  One of the first of these rules can be expressed somewhat in the following words of our language: Provide for yourself moments of inner tranquility, and in these moments learn to distinguish between the essential and the non-essential. It is said advisedly: "expressed in the words of our language." Originally all rules and teachings of spiritual Science were expressed in a symbolical sign-language, some understanding of which must be acquired before its whole meaning and scope can be realized. This understanding is dependent on the first steps toward higher knowledge, and these steps result from the exact
   p. 20
  --
  
  No doubt a great effort is required in many stations of life to provide these moments of inner calm; but the greater the effort needed, the more important is the achievement. In spiritual Science everything depends upon energy, inward truthfulness, and uncompromising sincerity with which we confront our own selves, with all our deeds and actions, as a complete stranger.
  
  --
  
  This life of the soul in thought, which gradually widens into a life in spiritual being, is called by Gnosis, and by Spiritual Science, Meditation (contemplative reflection). This meditation is the means to supersensible knowledge. But the
   p. 31
   student in such moments must not merely indulge in feelings; he must not have indefinite sensations in his soul. That would only hinder him from reaching true spiritual knowledge. His thoughts must be clear, sharp and definite, and he will be helped in this if he does not cling blindly to the thoughts that rise within him. Rather must he permeate himself with the lofty thoughts by which men already advanced and possessed of the spirit were inspired at such moments. He should start with the writings which themselves had their origin in just such revelation during meditation. In the mystic, gnostic and spiritual scientific literature of today the student will find such writings, and in them the material for his meditation. The seekers of the spirit have themselves set down in such writings the thoughts of the divine Science which the Spirit has directed his messengers to proclaim to the world.
  
  --
  
  When, by means of meditation, a man rises to union with the spirit, he brings to life the eternal in him, which is limited by neither birth nor death. The existence of this eternal being can only be doubted by those who have not themselves experienced it. Thus meditation is the way which also leads man to the knowledge, to the contemplation of his eternal, indestructible, essential being; and it is only through meditation that man can attain to such knowledge. Gnosis and Spiritual Science tell of the eternal nature of this being and of its reincarnation. The question is often asked: Why does a man know nothing of his experiences beyond the borders of life and death? Not thus should we ask, but rather: How can we attain such knowledge? In right meditation the path is opened. This alone can
   p. 34
   revive the memory of experiences beyond the border of life and death. Everyone can attain this knowledge; in each one of us lies the faculty of recognizing and contemplating for ourselves what genuine Mysticism, Spiritual Science, Anthroposophy, and Gnosis teach. Only the right means must be chosen. Only a being with ears and eyes can apprehend sounds and colors; nor can the eye perceive if the light which makes things visible is wanting. Spiritual Science gives the means of developing the spiritual ears and eyes, and of kindling the spiritual light; and this method of spiritual training: (1) Preparation; this develops the spiritual senses. (2) Enlightenment; this kindles the spiritual light. (3) Initiation; this establishes intercourse with the higher spiritual beings.
  

1.01_-_'Imitation'_the_common_principle_of_the_Arts_of_Poetry., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  
  There is another art which imitates by means of language alone, and that either in prose or verse--which, verse, again, may either combine different metres or consist of but one kind--but this has hitherto been without a name. For there is no common term we could apply to the mimes of Sophron and Xenarchus and the Socratic dialogues on the one hand; and, on the other, to poetic imitations in iambic, elegiac, or any similar metre. People do, indeed, add the word 'maker' or 'poet' to the name of the metre, and speak of elegiac poets, or epic (that is, hexameter) poets, as if it were not the imitation that makes the poet, but the verse that entitles them all indiscriminately to the name. Even when a treatise on medicine or natural Science is brought out in verse, the name of poet is by custom given to the author; and yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common but the metre, so that it would be right to call the one poet, the other physicist rather than poet. On the same principle, even if a writer in his poetic imitation were to combine all metres, as Chaeremon did in his Centaur, which is a medley composed of metres of all kinds, we should bring him too under the general term poet. So much then for these distinctions.
  

1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  A man should not play the coward to his deeds. He should not repudiate
  them once he has performed them. Pangs of conScience are indecent.
  
  --
  
  "How often conScience had to bite in times gone by! What good teeth it
  must have had! And to-day, what is amiss?"--A dentist's question.
  --
  exception? A third alternative would be the fugitive.... First question
  of conScience.
  
  --
  or the thing represented, itself? Finally, art thou perhaps simply a
  copy of an actor? ... Second question of conScience.
  
  --
  wheel?--Or art thou one who looks away, or who turns aside?... Third
  question of conScience.
  
  --
  know what he desires, and that he desires something.--Fourth question
  of conScience.
  

1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  HE WORLD abounds with scriptures sacred and profane, with revelations and half-revelations, with religions and philosophies, sects and schools and systems. To these the many minds of a half-ripe knowledge or no knowledge at all attach themselves with exclusiveness and passion and will have it that this or the other book is alone the eternal Word of
  God and all others are either impostures or at best imperfectly inspired, that this or that philosophy is the last word of the reasoning intellect and other systems are either errors or saved only by such partial truth in them as links them to the one true philosophical cult. Even the discoveries of physical Science have been elevated into a creed and in its name religion and spirituality banned as ignorance and superstition, philosophy as frippery and moonshine. And to these bigoted exclusions and vain wranglings even the wise have often lent themselves, misled by some spirit of darkness that has mingled with their light and overshadowed it with some cloud of intellectual egoism or spiritual pride. Mankind seems now indeed inclined to grow a little modester and wiser; we no longer slay our fellows in the name of God's truth or because they have minds differently trained or differently constituted from ours; we are less ready to curse and revile our neighbour because he is wicked or presumptuous enough to differ from us in opinion; we are ready even to admit that Truth is everywhere and cannot be our sole monopoly; we are beginning to look at other religions and philosophies for the truth and help they contain and no longer merely in order to damn them as false or criticise what we conceive to be their errors. But we are still apt to declare that our truth gives us the supreme knowledge which other religions or philosophies
  

1.01_-_Prayer, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  "Meditation again is a constant remembrance (of the thing meditated upon) flowing like an unbroken stream of oil poured out from one vessel to another. When this kind of remembering has been attained (in relation to God) all bandages break. Thus it is spoken of in the scriptures regarding constant remembering as a means to liberation. This remembering again is of the same form as seeing, because it is of the same meaning as in the passage, 'When He who is far and near is seen, the bonds of the heart are broken, all doubts vanish, and all effects of work disappear' He who is near can be seen, but he who is far can only be remembered. Nevertheless the scripture says that he have to see Him who is near as well as Him who, is far, thereby indicating to us that the above kind of remembering is as good as seeing. This remembrance when exalted assumes the same form as seeing. . . . Worship is constant remembering as may be seen from the essential texts of scriptures. Knowing, which is the same as repeated worship, has been described as constant remembering. . . . Thus the memory, which has attained to the height of what is as good as direct perception, is spoken of in the Shruti as a means of liberation. 'This Atman is not to be reached through various Sciences, nor by intellect, nor by much study of the Vedas. Whomsoever this Atman desires, by him is the Atman attained, unto him this Atman discovers Himself.' Here, after saying that mere hearing, thinking and meditating are not the means of attaining this Atman, it is said, 'Whom this Atman desires, by him the Atman is attained.' The extremely beloved is desired; by whomsoever this Atman is extremely beloved, he becomes the most beloved of the Atman. So that this beloved may attain the Atman, the Lord Himself helps. For it has been said by the Lord: 'Those who are constantly attached to Me and worship Me with love I give that direction to their will by which they come to Me.' Therefore it is said that, to whomsoever this remembering, which is of the same form as direct perception, is very dear, because it is dear to the Object of such memory perception, he is desired by the Supreme Atman, by him the Supreme Atman is attained. This constant remembrance is denoted by the word Bhakti." So says Bhagavn Rmnuja in his commentary on the Sutra Athto Brahma-jijns (Hence follows a dissertation on Brahman.).
  

1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  Though, as a scientist, Patanjali is bound to point out the
  possibilities of this Science, he never misses an opportunity to
  warn us against these powers. Knowledge is power, and as
  --
  be the will nor the energy to practice. Doubts will arise in the
  mind about the truth of the Science, however strong ones
  intellectual conviction may be, until certain peculiar psychic
  --
  but later on other Yogis found out various things about this
  Pranayama, and made of it a great Science. With Patanjali ist
  is one of the many ways, but he does not lay much stress on it.
  --
  become a little calmner. But, later on, you will find that out of
  this is evolved a particular Science called Pranayama. We
  will hear a little of what thoese later Yogis have to say. Some

1.01_-_Soul_and_God, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Philosophy
  Society on January 31,1913, Jung said: The dream is not only the fulfillment of infantile desires, but also symbolizes the future... The dream provides the answer through the symbol, which one must understand" (MZS, p. 5). On the development of Jung's dream theory, see my
  Jung and the Making of Modern Psychology: The Dream of a Science, 2.
  
  --
  
  55. In 1912, Jung argued that scholarliness was insufficient if one wanted to become a knower of the human soul. To do this, one had to hang up exact Science and put away the scholar's gown, to say farewell to his study and wander with human heart through the world, through the horror of prisons, mad houses and hospitals, through drab suburban pubs, in brothels and gambling dens, through the salons of elegant society, the stock exchanges, the socialist meetings, the churches, the revivals and ecstasies of the sects, to experience love, hate and passion in every form in one's body (New paths of psychology, cw 7, 409).
  

1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  In the present section we shall confine our attention to but a single feature of this traditional psychologythe most important, the most emphatically insisted upon by all exponents of the Perennial Philosophy and, we may add, the least psychological. For the doctrine that is to be illustrated in this section belongs to autology rather than psychologyto the Science, not of the personal ego, but of that eternal Self in the depth of particular, individualized selves, and identical with, or at least akin to, the divine Ground. Based upon the direct experience of those who have fulfilled the necessary conditions of such knowledge, this teaching is expressed most succinctly in the Sanskrit formula, tat tvam asi (That art thou); the Atman, or immanent eternal Self, is one with Brahman, the Absolute Principle of all existence; and the last end of every human being is to discover the fact for himself, to find out Who he really is.
  
  --
  
  It is from the more or less obscure intuition of the oneness that is the ground and principle of all multiplicity that philosophy takes its source. And not alone philosophy, but natural Science as well. All Science, in Meyersons phrase, is the reduction of multiplicities to identities. Divining the One within and beyond the many, we find an intrinsic plausibility in any explanation of the diverse in terms of a single principle.
  
  --
  
  It is, however, certain that many activities undertaken by some minds at the present time were not, in the remote past, undertaken by any minds at all. For this there are several obvious reasons. Certain thoughts are practically unthinkable except in terms of an appropriate language and within the framework of an appropriate system of classification. Where these necessary instruments do not exist, the thoughts in question are not expressed and not even conceived. Nor is this all: the incentive to develop the instruments of certain kinds of thinking is not always present. For long periods of history and prehistory it would seem that men and women, though perfectly capable of doing so, did not wish to pay attention to problems, which their descendants found absorbingly interesting. For example, there is no reason to suppose that, between the thirteenth century and the twentieth, the human mind underwent any kind of evolutionary change, comparable to the change, let us say, in the physical structure of the horses foot during an incomparably longer span of geological time. What happened was that men turned their attention from certain aspects of reality to certain other aspects. The result, among other things, was the development of the natural Sciences. Our perceptions and our understanding are directed, in large measure, by our will. We are aware of, and we think about, the things which, for one reason or another, we want to see and understand. Where theres a will there is always an intellectual way. The capacities of the human mind are almost indefinitely great. Whatever we will to do, whether it be to come to the unitive knowledge of the Godhead, or to manufacture self-propelled flame-throwersthat we are able to do, provided always that the willing be sufficiently intense and sustained. It is clear that many of the things to which modern men have chosen to pay attention were ignored by their predecessors. Consequently the very means for thinking clearly and fruitfully about those things remained uninvented, not merely during prehistoric times, but even to the opening of the modern era.
  

1.01_-_The_First_Steps, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  Practice is absolutely necessary. You may sit down and listen to me by the hour every day, but if you do not practice, you will not get one step further. It all depends on practice. We never understand these things until we experience them. We will have to see and feel them for ourselves. Simply listening to explanations and theories will not do. There are several obstructions to practice. The first obstruction is an unhealthy body: if the body is not in a fit state, the practice will be obstructed. Therefore we have to keep the body in good health; we have to take care of what we eat and drink, and what we do. Always use a mental effort, what is usually called "Christian Science," to keep the body strong. That is all nothing further of the body. We must not forget that health is only a means to an end. If health were the end, we would be like animals; animals rarely become unhealthy.
  
  --
  
  This world has a good many of these demoniac natures, but there are some gods too. If one proposes to teach any Science to increase the power of sense-enjoyment, one finds multitudes ready for it. If one undertakes to show the supreme goal, one finds few to listen to him. Very few have the power to grasp the higher, fewer still the patience to attain to it. But there are a few also who know that even if the body can be made to live for a thousand years, the result in the end will be the same. When the forces that hold it together go away, the body must fall. No man was ever born who could stop his body one moment from changing. Body is the name of a series of changes. "As in a river the masses of water are changing before you every moment, and new masses are coming, yet taking similar form, so is it with this body." Yet the body must be kept strong and healthy. It is the best instrument we have.
  

1.01_-_The_Four_Aids, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  8:Another kind of Shastra is not Scripture, but a statement of the Science and methods, the effective principles and way of working of the path of Yoga which the Sadhaka elects to follow. Each path has its Shastra, either written or traditional, passing from mouth to mouth through a long line of Teachers. In India a great authority, a high reverence even is ordinarily attached to the written or traditional teaching. All the lines of the Yoga are supposed to be fixed and the Teacher who has received the Shastra by tradition and realised it in practice guides the disciple along the immemorial tracks. One often even hears the objection urged against a new practice, a new Yogic teaching, the adoption of a new formula, "It is not according to the Shastra." But neither in fact nor in the actual practice of the Yogins is there really any such entire rigidity of an iron door shut against new truth, fresh revelation, widened experience. The written or traditional teaching expresses the knowledge and experiences of many centuries systematised, organised, made attainable to the beginner. Its importance and utility are therefore immense. But a great freedom of variation and development is always practicable. Even so highly scientific a system as Rajayoga can be practised on other lines than the organised method of Patanjali. Each of the three paths, trimarga 51, breaks into many bypaths which meet again at the goal. The general knowledge on which the Yoga depends is fixed, but the order, the succession, the devices, the forms must be allowed to vary, for the needs and particular impulsions of the individual nature have to be satisfied even while the general truths remain firm and constant.
  

1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The task we set before ourselves is not mechanical but moral and spiritual. We aim not at the alteration of a form of government but at the building up of a nation. Of that task politics is a part, but only a part. We shall devote ourselves not to politics alone, nor to social questions alone, nor to theology or philosophy or literature or Science by themselves, but we include all these in one entity which we believe to be all-important, the dharma, the national religion which we also believe to be universal. There is a mighty law of life, a great principle of human evolution, a body of spiritual knowledge and experience of which India has always been destined to be guardian, exemplar and missionary. This is the sanatana dharma, the eternal religion. Under the stress of alien impacts she has largely lost hold not of the structure of that dharma, but of its living reality.
  
  For the religion of India is nothing if it is not lived. It has to be applied not only to life, but to the whole of life; its spirit has to enter into and mould our society, our politics, our literature, our Science, our individual character, affections and aspirations.
  
  --
  
  We do not believe that by multiplying new sects limited within the narrower and inferior ideas of religion imported from the West or by creating organisations for the perpetuation of the mere dress and body of Hinduism we can recover our spiritual health, energy and greatness. The world moves through an indispensable interregnum of free thought and materialism to a new synthesis of religious thought and experience, a new religious world-life free from intolerance, yet full of faith and fervour, accepting all forms of religion because it has an unshakable faith in the One. The religion which embraces Science and faith,
  Theism, Christianity, Mahomedanism and Buddhism and yet is none of these, is that to which the World-Spirit moves. In our own, which is the most sceptical and the most believing of all, the most sceptical because it has questioned and experimented the most, the most believing because it has the deepest experience and the most varied and positive spiritual knowledge, - that wider Hinduism which is not a dogma or combination of dogmas but a law of life, which is not a social framework but the spirit of a past and future social evolution, which rejects nothing but insists on testing and experiencing everything and when tested and experienced turning it to the soul's uses, in this
  --
  
  We must know our past and recover it for the purposes of our future. Our business is to realise ourselves first and to mould everything to the law of India's eternal life and nature. It will therefore be the object of the Karmayogin to read the heart of our religion, our society, our philosophy, politics, literature, art, jurisprudence, Science, thought, everything that was and is ours, so that we may be able to say to ourselves and our nation, 'This is our dharma.' We shall review European civilisation entirely from the standpoint of Indian thought and knowledge and seek to throw off from us the dominating stamp of the Occident; what we have to take from the West we shall take as Indians.
  

1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living, #On Education, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  object:1.01 - The Science of Living
  class:chapter
  --
  
  The Science of Living
   To know oneself and to control oneself

1.01_-_What_is_Magick?, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
    is the Science and Art of causing Change to occur in conformity with Will.*[AC1]
  
  --
  
    (Illustration: When Civil War rages in a nation, it is in no condition to undertake the invasion of other countries. A man with cancer employs his nourishment alike to his own use and to that of the enemy which is part of himself. He soon fails to resist the pressure of his environment. In practical life, a man who is doing what his conScience tells him to be wrong will do it very clumsily. At first!)
  
  --
  
    11. Science enables us to take advantage of the continuity of Nature by the empirical application of certain principles whose interplay involves different orders of idea, connected with each other in a way beyond our present comprehension.
  
  --
  
    (Illustration: You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. A true man of Science learns from every phenomenon. But Nature is dumb to the hypocrite; for in her there is nothing false.*[AC5])
  
  --
  
    23. Magick is the Science of understanding oneself and one's conditions. It is the Art of applying that understanding in action.
  
  --
  
  * [AC01] In one sense Magick may be said to be the name given to Science by the vulgar.
  

1.02.4.1_-_The_Worlds_-_Surya, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  but they are really one. For all pure existence is in its essence
  pure self-conScience and all pure self-conScience is in its essence
  pure self-delight. At the same time our consciousness is capable
  --
  bhava). Without it no world-existence is possible.
  The agent of this becoming is always the self-conScience of
  the Being. The power by which the self-conScience brings out of
  itself its potential complexities is termed Tapas, Force or Energy,
  --
  We can conceive three principal formations.
  When Tapas or energy of self-conScience dwells upon Sat or
  pure existence as its basis, the result is Satyaloka or world of true
  existence. The soul in Satyaloka is one with all its manifestations
  by oneness of essence and therefore one in self-conScience and
  in energy of self-conScience and one also in bliss.
  When Tapas dwells upon active power of Chit as its basis,
  the result is Tapoloka or world of energy of self-conScience. The
  soul in Tapoloka is one with all manifestations in this Energy
  --
  carries with it always the knowledge of the Truth behind the
  form. It is in its nature self-conScience of the being and power
  of the One, aware always of its totality, starting therefore from

1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  This is a very interesting subject in political Science, where political thinkers differ in their opinions as to whether there is a total absence of improvement in quality when there is social order, and there is only a quantitative increase, or whether there is also an element of an increase of quality in thinking. This has led to divergent opinions among statesmen and political philosophers right from Plato and Aristotle onwards, through to Chanakya and other thinkers in India - where the opinion swung like a pendulum. One side held that there is absolutely no improvement in quality, though there is a large improvement in quantity, and the other side thought that there is an element of qualitative superiority. We are not going to discuss this subject at present, as it is outside the jurisdiction of our current topic.
  

1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  It is impossible to do anything wholly good on account of it being impossible for us to wholly understand the total pattern involved in the movement of any successful action. No human being can wholly succeed in life, because a wholly correct action cannot be performed. The reason is that all the contributory factors tending towards the success of an action cannot become the object of knowledge of any individual, because that would call for omniScience, almost, and no one can be omniscient; therefore, no one can be wholly successful. Entire success is possible only when there is omniScience, and not before. So, we have to swallow the bitter pill and then try to be satisfied with whatever we get. Nevertheless, it is up to us to see that we put forth the best of our abilities, commensurate with the extent of knowledge with which we are endowed in our life.
  
  --
  
  Whole-souled dedication to the practice is possible only when there is perfect understanding. Why is it that our mind is not entirely dedicated to this practice, and part of it is thinking of something else? The reason is that our understanding of the efficacy and the value and the worthwhileness of the practice is inadequate. Our faith in God, our trust in God, and our feeling that God is everything is half-baked it is not perfect. We do not have, even today, full faith that God is everything. "There is something else which is also good." Such thinking is lurking in the mind. "Though God is all alright, the scriptures say that but my subtle conScience says that there is something else also, something else that is also sweet. God is sweet, but there is something else also, equally sweet. Why should I not go there?.
  

1.02_-_Karma_Yoga, #Amrita Gita, #Swami Sivananda Saraswati, #Hinduism
  
  35. Sastras and saints and your own pure, clean conScience will point out to you what is right, what is wrong. Follow them and do the right.
  

1.02_-_On_the_Service_of_the_Soul, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Philosophy
  
  64. In Black Book 2, Jung wrote down here the two pivotal dreams he had when he was nineteen years old which led him to turn to natural Science (p. 13f); they are described in Memories, p.
  

1.02_-_Prana, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  The ideal of the Yogi, the whole Science of Yoga, is directed to the end of teaching men how, by intensifying the power of assimilation, to shorten the time for reaching perfection, instead of slowly advancing from point to point and waiting until the whole human race has become perfect. All the great prophets, saints, and seers of the world what did they do? In one span of life they lived the whole life of humanity, traversed the whole length of time that it takes ordinary humanity to come to perfection. In one life they perfect themselves; they have no thought for anything else, never live a moment for any other idea, and thus the way is shortened for them. This is what is meant by concentration, intensifying the power of assimilation, thus shortening the time. Raja-Yoga is the Science which teaches us how to gain the power of concentration.
  
  --
  
  Thus we see that Pranayama includes all that is true of spiritualism even. Similarly, you will find that wherever any sect or body of people is trying to search out anything occult and mystical, or hidden, what they are doing is really this Yoga, this attempt to control the Prana. You will find that wherever there is any extraordinary display of power, it is the manifestation of this Prana. Even the physical Sciences can be included in Pranayama. What moves the steam engine? Prana, acting through the steam. What are all these phenomena of electricity and so forth but Prana? What is physical Science? The Science of Pranayama, by external means. Prana, manifesting itself as mental power, can only be controlled by mental means. That part of Pranayama which attempts to control the physical manifestations of the Prana by physical means is called physical Science, and that part which tries to control the manifestations of the Prana as mental force by mental means is called Raja-Yoga.
  

1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  Some schools advocate practising a mantra with the aid of instrumental music and dancing. Certainly very remarkable effects are obtained in the way of "magic" powers; whether great spiritual results are equally common is a doubtful point. Persons wishing to study them may remember that the Sahara desert is within three days of London; and no doubt the Sidi Aissawa would be glad to accept pupils. This discussion of the parallel Science of mantra-yoga has led us far indeed from the subject of Pranayama.
  

1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  from the sun. This energy has reached the plant, the plant is
  eaten by an animal, and the animal by us. The Science of it is
  that we take so much energy from the sun, and make it part of
  --
  manifestations proceed. The last is the signless. Here there
  seems to be a great fight between modern Science and all
  religion. Every religion has this idea that this universe comes
  --
  spiritual, to give us pain. The third will be that we shall get
  full knowledge, that omniScience will be ours. Next will come
  what is called freedom of the Chitta. We shall realise that all

1.02_-_Skillful_Means, #The Lotus Sutra, #Anonymous, #Various
  O riputra! All the buddhas of the past expounded the teachings for the sake of sentient beings, using incalculable and innumerable skillful means and various explanations and illustrations. These teachings were all for the sake of the single buddha vehicle. All these sentient beings, hearing the
  Dharma from the buddhas, nally attained omniScience.
  O riputra! All the future buddhas who will appear in the world will expound the teachings for the sake of sentient beings, using incalculable and innumerable skillful means and various explanations and illustrations. These teachings will all be for the single buddha vehicle. All sentient beings who hear this Dharma from these buddhas will ultimately attain omniScience.
  O riputra! All the Buddha Bhagavats of the present, in immeasurable hundreds of thousands of myriads of kois of buddha worlds of the ten directions, teach the Dharma to sentient beings using incalculable and innumerable skillful means with various explanations and illustrations to benet many of them and cause them to feel at peace. These Dharmas are all of the single buddha vehicle. All the sentient beings who hear the Dharma from these buddhas will ultimately attain omniScience.
  O riputra! These buddhas lead and inspire only bodhisattvas, because they want to teach sentient beings with the wisdom and insight of the Buddha, to enlighten sentient beings with the wisdom and insight of the Buddha, and to cause sentient beings to enter the path of the wisdom and insight of the
  --
  
  O riputra! I do this in order to cause them to attain the omniScience of the single buddha vehicle.
  O riputra! Since there is no second vehicle in the worlds of the ten directions, how could there be a third!

1.02_-_Taras_Tantra, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  cannot be located in time. Tantras belong to the
  omniScience of the buddhas who utter a tantra as it is
  needed in a given epoch. Therefore, it is impossible to
  --
  leading her beloved child to the Land of Snow.
  From the eternal omniScience of the buddhas to
  their transmission in the Land of Snow, passing
  --
  purity of his or her mind.
  In fact, Science places laypeople in the same
  situation. We cannot verify ourselves the claims of
  --
  conceptions are not false but partially true. Likewise,
  when we study a Science, the more subtle subjects
  analyzed at the end of the study do not destro y the

1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  This at least; what more there may be in the Veda of ancient Science, lost knowledge, old psycho-physical tradition remains yet to be discovered.
  

1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  found thousands of miles apart in civilizations totally unknown to one another? True, the Age of the Mysteries is behind us; everything is wonderfully Cartesian and pragmatic, but still, something is missing.
  The first sign announcing a new being, probably, is the dawning sense of a terrible lack of something, which neither his Science nor his churches nor his garish pleasures can ever fulfill. Man cannot be dispossessed of his secrets with impunity. This, too, was a living testimonial India imparted to Sri Aurobindo, unless he knew it already in his own flesh.
  However, if we expect India, the land where ancient Mysteries survive, to give us the practical solution we are seeking, we may be disappointed. Sri Aurobindo, who soon learned to appreciate the freedom, spiritual breadth, and immense experimental knowledge India offers a seeker, did not subscribe to everything there, far from it;

1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  Finally we come to such occurrences as faith healing and levitationoccurrences supernormally strange, but nevertheless attested by masses of evidence which it is hard to discount completely. Precisely how faith cures diseases (whether at Lourdes or in the hypnotists consulting room), or how St. Joseph of Cupertino was able to ignore the laws of gravitation, we do not know. (But let us remember that we are no less ignorant of the way in which minds and bodies are related in the most ordinary of everyday activities.) In the same way we are unable to form any idea of the modus operandi of what Professor Rhine has called the PK effect. Nevertheless the fact that the fall of dice can be influenced by the mental states of certain individuals seems now to have been established beyond the possibility of doubt. And if the PK effect can be demonstrated in the laboratory and measured by statistical methods, then, obviously, the intrinsic credibility of the scattered anecdotal evidence for the direct influence of mind upon matter, not merely within the body, but outside in the external world, is thereby notably increased. The same is true of extra-sensory perception. Apparent examples of it are constantly turning up in ordinary life. But Science is almost impotent to cope with the particular case, the isolated instance. Promoting their methodological ineptitude to the rank of a criterion of truth, dogmatic scientists have often branded everything beyond the pale of their limited competence as unreal and even impossible. But when tests for ESP can be repeated under standardized conditions, the subject comes under the jurisdiction of the law of probabilities and achieves (in the teeth of what passionate opposition!) a measure of scientific respectability.
  

1.02_-_The_Necessity_of_Magick_for_All, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  Right glad am I to hear that you have been so thoroughly satisfied with my explanation of what Magick is, and on what its theories rest. It is good, too, hearing how much you were interested in the glimpse that you have had of some of its work in the world; more, that you grasped the fact that this apparently recondite and irrelevant information has an immediate bearing on your personal life of today. Still, I was not surprised that you should add: "But why should I make a special study of, and devote my time and energy to acquiring proficiency in, the Science and Art of Magick?
  
  --
  
  Here we are, then, caught in a net of circumstances; if we are to do anything at all beyond automatic vegetative living, we must consciously apply ourselves to Magick, "the Science and Art" (let me remind you!) "of causing change to occur in conformity with the Will." Observe that the least slackness or error means that things happen which do not thus conform; when this is so despite our efforts, we are (temporarily) baffled; when it is our own ignorance of what we ought to will, or lack of skill in adapting our means to the right end, then we set up a conflict in our own Nature: our act is suicidal. Such interior struggle is at the base of nearly all neuroses, as Freud recently "discovered" as if this had not been taught, and taught without his massed errors, by the great teachers of the past! The Taoist doctrine, in particular, is most precise and most emphatic on this point; indeed, it may seem to some of us to overshoot the mark; for nothing is permissible in that scheme but frictionless adjustment and adaptation to circumstance. "Benevolence and righteousness" are actually deprecated! That any such ideas should ever have existed (says Lao-tse) is merely evidence of the universal disorder.
  
  Taoist sectaries appear to assume that Perfection consists in the absence of any disturbance of the Stream of NeScience; and this is very much like the Buddhist idea of Nibbana.
  

1.02_-_The_Pit, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  Secular Science or Positivism has busied itself with the investigation of matter and the visible universe as perceived through the five senses. It affirms that by a study of phenomena we are able to approach to the world as it really is, to the things-in-themselves. It is that system which affirms that apprehension is only a name for a certain series of biological and chemical changes occurring in certain of the contents of our material skulls, and that by an investigation of things as they appear to be we can come to an understanding of their causes, what they really are.
  
  --
  So simple an enquiry, too, as "Why is sugar sweet? " involves a vast multitude of very highly complicated chemical researches, each one of which eventually leads to that blindest of all blank walls-what is matter ?-what the perceiving mind ?
  We may continue further, if we wish, and ask: "What is the Moon?" Science (let us facetiously suppose) replies
  "Green cheese I" For our one moon we have now two distinct ideas and all simplicity vanishes and recedes in the darkness. Greenness and Cheese I The one depends on the light of the sun, the sense apparatus of the optic nerves and organs, and a thousand of other things; the latter on bacteria, fermentation, and the nature of the cow. Then we continue to split hairs and juggle words-naught but hairs and words,and juggling and splitting-and we have got no single question answered in any ultimate sense at all.
  --
  There is, therefore, no possible escape from this bottomless pit of confusion save by the development of a faculty of mind which shall not be manifestly inadequate in any of these ways. 'We must employ means other than, and superior to, ratiocination. We thus approach the problem of the development of the Neschamali (Intuition), and it is here that the Qabalah differs in method and content from
  Secular Science and Academic Philosophy.
  
  Yet the progress of secular Sciencein the last thirty years
  
  --
   certainly brings it nearer to the Qabalistic conception of things; the old sanctions of a scientific mechanism have nearly all disappeared, and the terms which appeared to the
  Victorians so simple, objective, and intelligible-such as matter, energy, space, etc.-have completely failed to resist analysis. A few modern thinkers, seeing clearly the absolute debacle in which the old positivist Science was bound to lead them, the breaking up of this icy expanse of frozen thought, determined at all costs to find a modus vivendi for
  Athena. This necessity was emphasized in the most surprising way by the result of the Michelson-Morley experiments, when Physics itself calmly and frankly offered a contradiction in terms. It was not the metaphysicians this time who were picking holes in a vacuum. It was the mathematicians and the physicists who found the ground completely cut away from under their feet. It was not enough to replace the geometry of Euclid by those of Riemann and Lobatchevsky and the mechanics of Newton by those of Einstein, so long as any of the axioms of the old thought and the definitions of its terms survived. They deliberately abandoned positivism and materialism for an indeterminate mysticism, creating a new mathematical philosophy and a new logic, wherein infinite-or rather transfinite-ideas might be made commensurable with those of ordinary thought in the forlorn hope that all might live happily ever after. In short, to use a Qabalistic nomenclature, they found it incumbent upon themselves to adopt for inclusion of terms of Ruach (intellect) concepts which are proper only to Neschamah (the organ and faculty of direct spiritual apperception and intuition). This same process took place in Philosophy years earlier. Had the dialectic of Hegel been only. half understood, the major portion of philosophical speculation from the Schoolmen to
  --
  
  Thirdly, the meaning of the terms is not as clear, precise, and comprehensive as could be wished. There is most certainly a great deal of pedantry, disputed matter, and confusion. Only recently, I learn that Mrs. Rhys Davids hes issued a book on Buddhist Origins, in which the question among others is raised by her as to the correct translation or meaning of the Pali word" Dhamma"; whether it implies "law", "conScience", "life", or simply the
  Buddhist doctrine.
  --
  
  The system of the Qabalah, whose terms as we shall see are largely symbolic, is of course superficially open to this last objection. But because it is very largely symbolic, it has the best sanction of those who are considered eminent authorities in the Sciences, for the whole of modern Science occupies itself with various symbols by which it endeavours to comprehend the physical world-symbols beyond which, however, it frankly confesses itself unable to pass. An illuminating remark occurs in Prof. Eddington's 1928
  Swarthmore Lecture, Science and the Unseen World.!
  " I can only say that physical Science has turned its back on all such models, regarding them now rather as a hindrance to the apprehension of the truth behind phenomena. . . . And if to-day you ask a physicist what he has finally made out the rether or the electron to be, the answer will not be a description in terms of billiard balls or flywheels or anything concrete; he will point instead to a number of symbols and a set of mathematical equations which they satisfy. What do the symbols stand for? The mysterious reply is given that physics is indifferent to that;
   it has no means of probing beneath the symbolism. To understand the phenomena of the physical world it is necessary to know the equations which the symbols obey but not the nature of that which is being symbolized."
  --
  
  Modern conceptions of mathematics, chemistry, and physics are sheer paradox to the" plain man" who thinks of matter, for example, as something that he can knock up against. There appears to be no doubt nowadays that the ultimate nature of Science in any of its branches will be purely abstract, almost of a
  Qabalistic character one might say, even though it may never be officially denominated the Qabalah. It is natural and proper to represent the Cosmos or any part of it, or its

1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  They'll baulk him when seeking the strange device, Excelsior,
  Tho' waste he a thousand of years in the study of Science and lore. "
  And when he had ended his verses he continued, "O my father, wedlock is a thing whereto I will never consent; no, not though

1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
   p. 36
   a higher strictly disciplined school bears to the incidental training. But impatient dabbling, devoid of earnest perseverance, can lead to nothing at all. The study of Spiritual Science can only be successful if the student retain what has already been indicated in the preceding chapter, and on the basis of this proceed further.
  
  --
  
  A further point of importance is what spiritual Science calls orientation in the higher worlds. This is attained when the student is permeated, through and through, with the conscious realization that feelings and thoughts are just as much veritable realities as are tables and chairs in the world of the physical senses. In the soul and thought world, feelings and thoughts react upon each other just as do physical objects in the physical world. As long as the student is not vividly permeated with this consciousness, he will not believe that a wrong thought in his mind may have as devastating an effect upon other thoughts that spread life in the thought world as the effect wrought by a bullet fired at random upon the physical objects it hits. He will perhaps never allow himself to perform a physically visible action which he considers to be wrong, though he will not shrink from harboring wrong thoughts and feelings, for these appear harmless to the rest of the world. There can be no progress, however, on
   p. 43
  --
   p. 48
   the soul of the other. Through continued exercise of this kind, sound becomes the right medium for the perception of soul and spirit. Of course it implies the very strictest self-discipline, but the latter leads to a high goal. When these exercises are practiced in connection with the other already given, dealing with the sounds of nature, the soul develops a new sense of hearing. She is now able to perceive manifestations from the spiritual world which do not find their expression in sounds perceptible to the physical ear. The perception of the "inner word" awakens. Gradually truths reveal themselves to the student from the spiritual world. He hears speech uttered to him in a spiritual way. Only to those who, by selfless listening, train themselves to be really receptive from within, in stillness, unmoved by personal opinion or feeling only to such can the higher beings speak of whom spiritual Science tells. As long as one hurls any personal opinion or feeling against the speaker to whom one must listen, the beings of the spiritual world remain silent.
  
  --
   p. 49
   from the lips of a true spiritual teacher has been experienced by him in this manner. But this does not mean that it is unimportant for us to acquaint ourselves with the writings of spiritual Science before we can ourselves hear such inwardly instilled speech. On the contrary, the reading of such writings and the listening to the teachings of spiritual Science are themselves means of attaining personal knowledge. Every sentence of spiritual Science we hear is of a nature to direct the mind to the point which must be reached before the soul can experience real progress. To the practice of all that has here been indicated must be added the ardent study of what the spiritual researchers impart to the world. In all esoteric training such study belongs to the preparatory period, and all other methods will prove ineffective if due receptivity for the teachings of the spiritual researcher is lacking. For since these instructions are culled from the living inner word, from the living inwardly instilled speech, they are themselves gifted with spiritual life. They are not mere words; they are living powers. And while you follow the words of one who knows, while you read a book that springs from real inner
   p. 50
  --
  
  [paragraph continues] This cannot be otherwise if ordinary language is used, for this language was created to suit physical conditions. Spiritual Science describes that which, for clairvoyant organs, flows from the stone, as blue, or blue-red; and that which is felt as coming from the animal as red or red-yellow. In reality, colors of a spiritual kind are seen. The color proceeding the plant is green which little by little turns into a light ethereal pink. The plant is actually that product of nature which in higher worlds resembles, in certain respects, its constitution in the physical world. The same does not apply to the stone and the animal. It must now be clearly understood that the above-mentioned colors only represent the principal shades in the stone, plant and animal kingdom. In reality, all possible intermediate shades are present. Every stone, every plant, every animal has its own particular shade of color. In addition to these there are also the beings of the higher worlds who never incarnate physically, but who have their colors, often wonderful, often horrible. Indeed, the wealth of color in these higher worlds is immeasurably greater than in the physical world.
  
  --
  
  In our time the path to spiritual Science is sought by many. It is sought in many ways, and many dangerous and even despicable practices are attempted. It is for this reason that they who claim to know something of the truth in these matters place before others the possibility of learning something of esoteric training. Only so much is here imparted as accords with this possibility. It is necessary that something of the truth
   p. 56
  --
   p. 69
   human nature must follow the golden rule of true spiritual Science. This golden rule is as follows: For every one step that you take in the pursuit of higher knowledge, take three steps in the perfection of your own character. If this rule is observed, such exercise as the following may be attempted:
  
  --
  
  The first trial consists in obtaining a truer vision than the average man has of the corporeal attributes of lifeless things, and later of plants, animals and human beings. This does not mean what at present is called scientific knowledge, for it is a question not of Science but of vision. As a rule, the would-be initiate proceeds to learn how the objects of nature and the beings gifted with life manifest themselves to the spiritual ear and the spiritual eye. In a certain way these things then lie stripped-naked-before the beholder. The qualities which can then be seen and heard are hidden from the physical eyes and ears. For physical perception they are concealed as if by a veil, and the falling away of this veil for the would-be initiate consists in a process designated as the process of Purification by Fire. The first trial is therefore known as the Fire-Trial.
  

1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  
  It is, of course, considered disreputable today to trace or uncover subtle linguistic relationships that exist, for example, between the terms "eight" (acht) and "night" (Nacht). Eventhough language points to such relationships and interconnections, present-day man carefully avoids them, so as to keep them from bothering his conScience. Yet despite this, the things speak for themselves regardless of our attempts to denature them, and their roots remain as long as the word remains that holds them under its spell. It will be necessary, for instance, to discuss in Part Two the significance of the pivotal and ancient word "muse," whose multifarious background of meanings vividly suggests a possible aperspectivity. Here we would only point to the illumination of the nocturnal-unperspectival world which takes place when perspective is enthroned as the eighth art. The old, seven-fold, simple planetary cavern space is suddenly flooded by the light of human consciousness and is rendered visible, as it were, from outside.
  
  --
  
  "Perspective is a proof or test confirmed by our experience, that all things project their images toward the eye in pyramidal lines." In addition to the fact that we again meet up with Alberti's important idea of the pyramid, now given its valid restatement by Leonardo, the remark expresses the very essence of Leonardo's rather dramatic situation: it expresses his Platonic, even pre-Platonic animistic attitude that "all things project their image toward the eye," which the eye does not perceive, but rather suffers or endures. This creates an unusual and even disquieting tension between the two parts of the sentence, since the purely Aristotelian notion of the first part not only speaks of proof but indeed proceeds from the "experience" of early Science. This struggle in Leonardo himself between the scientist demonstrating things and the artist enduring them reflects the transitional situation between the unperspectival and the perspectival worlds.
  
  --
  
  The European of today, either as an individual or as a member of the collective, can perceive only his own sector. This is true of all spheres, the religious as well as the political, the social as well as the scientific. The rise of Protestantism fragmented religion; the ascendancy of national states divided the Christian Occident into separate individual states; the rise of political parties divided the people (or the former Christian community) into political interest groups. In the Sciences, this process of segmentation led to the contemporary state of narrow specialization and the "great achievements" of the man with tunnel vision. And there is no "going back"; the ties to the past, the re-ligio, are almost non-existent, having been severed, as it were, by the cutting edge of the visual pyramid. As for a simple onward progression and continuity (which has almost taken an the character of a flight), they lead only to further sectors of particularization and, ultimately, to atomization. After that, what remains, like what was left in the crater of Hiroshima, is only an amorphous dust; and it is probable that at least one part of humanity will follow this path, at least in "spirit," i.e., psychologically.
  
  --
  
  Aperspectivity, through which it is possible to grasp and express the new emerging consciousness structure, cannot be perceived in all its consequences be they positive or negative unless certain still valid concepts, attitudes, and forms of thought are more closely scrutinized and clarified. Otherwise we commit the error of expressing the "new" with old and inadequate means of statement. We will, for example, have to furnish evidence that the concretion of time is not only occurring in the previously cited examples from painting, but in the natural Sciences and in literature, poetry, music, sculpture, and various other areas. And this we can do only after we have worked out the new forms and modes necessary for an understanding of aperspectivity.
  

1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  16:If modern Materialism were simply an unintelligent acquiescence in the material life, the advance might be indefinitely delayed. But since its very soul is the search for Knowledge, it will be unable to cry a halt; as it reaches the barriers of senseknowledge and of the reasoning from sense-knowledge, its very rush will carry it beyond and the rapidity and sureness with which it has embraced the visible universe is only an earnest of the energy and success which we may hope to see repeated in the conquest of what lies beyond, once the stride is taken that crosses the barrier. We see already that advance in its obscure beginnings.
  17:Not only in the one final conception, but in the great line of its general results Knowledge, by whatever path it is followed, tends to become one. Nothing can be more remarkable and suggestive than the extent to which modern Science confirms in the domain of Matter the conceptions and even the very formulae of language which were arrived at, by a very different method, in the Vedanta, - the original Vedanta, not of the schools of metaphysical philosophy, but of the Upanishads. And these, on the other hand, often reveal their full significance, their richer contents only when they are viewed in the new light shed by the discoveries of modern Science, - for instance, that Vedantic expression which describes things in the Cosmos as one seed arranged by the universal Energy in multitudinous forms.6 Significant, especially, is the drive of Science towards a Monism which is consistent with multiplicity, towards the Vedic idea of the one essence with its many becomings. Even if the dualistic appearance of Matter and Force be insisted on, it does not really stand in the way of this Monism. For it will be evident that essential Matter is a thing non-existent to the senses and only, like the Pradhana of the Sankhyas, a conceptual form of substance; and in fact the point is increasingly reached where only an arbitrary distinction in thought divides form of substance from form of energy.
  18:Matter expresses itself eventually as a formulation of some unknown Force. Life, too, that yet unfathomed mystery, begins to reveal itself as an obscure energy of sensibility imprisoned in its material formulation; and when the dividing ignorance is cured which gives us the sense of a gulf between Life and Matter, it is difficult to suppose that Mind, Life and Matter will be found to be anything else than one Energy triply formulated, the triple world of the Vedic seers. Nor will the conception then be able to endure of a brute material Force as the mother of Mind. The Energy that creates the world can be nothing else than a Will, and Will is only consciousness applying itself to a work and a result.
  19:What is that work and result, if not a self-involution of Consciousness in form and a self-evolution out of form so as to actualise some mighty possibility in the universe which it has created? And what is its will in Man if not a will to unending Life, to unbounded Knowledge, to unfettered Power? Science itself begins to dream of the physical conquest of death, expresses an insatiable thirst for knowledge, is working out something like a terrestrial omnipotence for humanity. Space and Time are contracting to the vanishing-point in its works, and it strives in a hundred ways to make man the master of circumstance and so lighten the fetters of causality. The idea of limit, of the impossible begins to grow a little shadowy and it appears instead that whatever man constantly wills, he must in the end be able to do; for the consciousness in the race eventually finds the means. It is not in the individual that this omnipotence expresses itself, but the collective Will of mankind that works out with the individual as a means. And yet when we look more deeply, it is not any conscious Will of the collectivity, but a superconscious Might that uses the individual as a centre and means, the collectivity as a condition and field. What is this but the God in man, the infinite Identity, the multitudinous Unity, the Omniscient, the Omnipotent, who having made man in His own image, with the ego as a centre of working, with the race, the collective Narayana,7 the visvamanava8 as the mould and circumscription, seeks to express in them some image of the unity, omniScience, omnipotence which are the self-conception of the Divine? "That which is immortal in mortals is a God and established inwardly as an energy working out in our divine powers."9 It is this vast cosmic impulse which the modern world, without quite knowing its own aim, yet serves in all its activities and labours subconsciously to fulfil.
  20:But there is always a limit and an encumbrance, - the limit of the material field in the Knowledge, the encumbrance of the material machinery in the Power. But here also the latest trend is highly significant of a freer future. As the outposts of scientific Knowledge come more and more to be set on the borders that divide the material from the immaterial, so also the highest achievements of practical Science are those which tend to simplify and reduce to the vanishing-point the machinery by which the greatest effects are produced. Wireless telegraphy is Nature's exterior sign and pretext for a new orientation. The sensible physical means for the intermediate transmission of the physical force is removed; it is only preserved at the points of impulsion and reception. Eventually even these must disappear; for when the laws and forces of the supraphysical are studied with the right starting-point, the means will infallibly be found for Mind directly to seize on the physical energy and speed it accurately upon its errand. There, once we bring ourselves to recognise it, lie the gates that open upon the enormous vistas of the future.
  21:Yet even if we had full knowledge and control of the worlds immediately above Matter, there would still be a limitation and still a beyond. The last knot of our bondage is at that point where the external draws into oneness with the internal, the machinery of ego itself becomes subtilised to the vanishing-point and the law of our action is at last unity embracing and possessing multiplicity and no longer, as now, multiplicity struggling towards some figure of unity. There is the central throne of cosmic Knowledge looking out on her widest dominion; there the empire of oneself with the empire of one's world;10 there the life11 in the eternally consummate Being and the realisation of His divine nature12 in our human existence.

1.03_-_A_Sapphire_Tale, #Words Of Long Ago, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Farmers, craftsmen, workmen and merchants all had but one ambition, one concern: to do their work as best they could. This was in their own interest, firstly because, since each one had freely chosen his occupation, it suited his nature and gave him pleasure, and also because they knew that all good work was fairly rewarded, so that they, their wives and their children could lead a quiet and peaceful life, without useless luxury, but with a generous provision for their needs, which was enough to satisfy them.
  The artists and scientists, few in number but each devoted to his Science or art - his purpose in life - were supported by the grateful nation, which was the first to benefit from their useful discoveries and to enjoy their ennobling works. Thus sheltered from the cares of the struggle for life, these scientists had a single aim: that their experimental research, their sincere and earnest studies should serve to allay the sufferings of humanity, to increase its strength and well-being by making superstition and fear draw back as far as possible before the knowledge that brings solace and enlightenment. The artists, whose whole will was free to concentrate upon their art, had only one desire: to manifest beauty, each according to his own highest conception.
  Among them, as friends and guides, were four philosophers, whose entire life was spent in profound study and luminous contemplations, to widen constantly the field of human knowledge and one by one to lift the veils from what is still a mystery.

1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  The biographies of the saints testify unequivocally to the fact that spiritual training leads to a transcendence of personality, not merely in the special circumstances of battle, but in all circumstances and in relation to all creatures, so that the saint loves his enemies or, if he is a Buddhist, does not even recognize the existence of enemies, but treats all sentient beings, sub-human as well as human, with the same compassion and disinterested good will. Those who win through to the unitive knowledge of God set out upon their course from the most diverse starting points. One is a man, another a woman; one a born active, another a born contemplative. No two of them inherit the same temperament and physical constitution, and their lives are passed in material, moral and intellectual environments that are profoundly dissimilar. Nevertheless, insofar as they are saints, insofar as they possess the unitive knowledge that makes them perfect as their Father which is in heaven is perfect, they are all astonishingly alike. Their actions are uniformly selfless and they are constantly recollected, so that at every moment they know who they are and what is their true relation to the universe and its spiritual Ground. Of even plain average people it may be said that their name is Legionmuch more so of exceptionally complex personalities, who identify themselves with a wide diversity of moods, cravings and opinions. Saints, on the contrary, are neither double-minded nor half-hearted, but single and, however great their intellectual gifts, profoundly simple. The multiplicity of Legion has given place to one-pointednessnot to any of those evil one-pointednesses of ambition or covetousness, or lust for power and fame, not even to any of the nobler, but still all too human one-pointednesses of art, scholarship and Science, regarded as ends in themselves, but to the supreme, more than human one-pointedness that is the very being of those souls who consciously and consistently pursue mans final end, the knowledge of eternal Reality. In one of the Pali scriptures there is a significant anecdote about the Brahman Drona who, seeing the Blessed One sitting at the foot of a tree, asked him, Are you a deva? And the Exalted One answered, I am not. Are you a gandharva? I am not, Are you a yaksha? I am not. Are you a man? I am not a man. On the Brahman asking what he might be, the Blessed One replied, Those evil influences, those cravings, whose non-destruction would have individualized me as a deva, a gandharva, a yaksha (three types of supernatural being), or a man, I have completely annihilated. Know therefore that I am Buddha.
  
  --
  
  This sensitive affection for Christ was always presented by St. Bernard as love of a relatively inferior order. It is so precisely on account of its sensitive character, for charity is of a purely spiritual essence. In right the soul should be able to enter directly into union, in virtue of its spiritual powers, with a God Who is pure spirit. The Incarnation, moreover, should be regarded as one of the consequences of mans transgression, so that love for the Person of Christ is, as a matter of fact, bound up with the history of a fall which need not, and should not, have happened. St. Bernard furthermore, and in several places, notes-that this affection cannot stand safely alone, but needs to be supported by what he calls Science. He had examples before him of the deviations into which even the most ardent devotion can fall, when it is not allied with, and ruled by, a sane theology.
  

1.03_-_.REASON._IN_PHILOSOPHY, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  sharpened and armed them, and learned to follow them up to the
  end. What remains is abortive and not yet Science--that is to say,
  metaphysics, theology, psychology, epistemology, or formal Science, or
  a doctrine of symbols, like logic and its applied form mathematics.

1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The individual soul or the conscious being in a form may identify itself with this experiencing Purusha or with this active Prakriti. If it identifies itself with Prakriti, it is not master, enjoyer and knower, but reflects the modes and workings of
  Prakriti. It enters by its identification into that subjection and mechanical working which is characteristic of her. And even, by an entire immersion in Prakriti, this soul becomes inconscient or subconscient, asleep in her forms as in the earth and the metal or almost asleep as in plant life. There, in that inconScience, it is subject to the domination of tamas, the principle, the power, the qualitative mode of obscurity and inertia: sattwa and rajas are there, but they are concealed in the thick coating of tamas.
  
  Emerging into its own proper nature of consciousness but not yet truly conscious, because there is still too great a domination of tamas in the nature, the embodied being becomes more and more subject to rajas, the principle, the power, the qualitative mode of action and passion impelled by desire and instinct. There is then formed and developed the animal nature, narrow in consciousness, rudimentary in intelligence, rajaso-tamasic in vital habit and impulse. Emerging yet farther from the great InconScience towards a spiritual status the embodied being liberates sattwa, the mode of light, and acquires a relative freedom and mastery and knowledge and with it a qualified and conditioned sense of inner satisfaction and happiness. Man, the mental being in a physical body, should be but is not, except in a few among this multitude of ensouled bodies, of this nature. Ordinarily he has too much in him of the obscure earth-inertia and a troubled ignorant animal life-force to be a soul of light and bliss or even a mind of harmonious will and knowledge. There is here in man an incomplete and still hampered and baffled ascension towards the true character of the Purusha, free, master, knower and enjoyer.
  

1.03_-_Some_Practical_Aspects, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
  
  In the following pages some practical aspects of the higher education of soul and spirit will be treated in greater detail. They are such that anyone can put them into practice regardless of other rules, and thereby be led some distance further into spiritual Science.
  
  --
  
  Special attention must be paid in esoteric training to the education of the life of desires. This does not mean that we are to become free of desire, for if we are to attain something we must also desire it, and desire will always tend to fulfillment if backed by a particular force. This force is derived from a right knowledge. Do not desire at all until you know what is right in any one sphere. That is one of the golden rules for the student. The wise man first ascertains the laws of the world, and then his desires become powers which realize themselves. The following example brings this out clearly. There are certainly many people who would like to learn from their own observation something about their life before birth. Such a desire is altogether useless and leads to no result so long as the person in question has not acquired a knowledge of the laws that govern the nature of the eternal, a knowledge of these laws in their subtlest and most intimate character, through the study of spiritual Science. But if, having really acquired this knowledge,
   p. 104
  --
   p. 112
   the silent activity of woodland creatures and insects. Yet no city-dweller should fail to give to the organs of his soul and spirit, as they develop, the nurture that comes from the inspired teachings of spiritual research. If our eyes cannot follow the woods in their mantel of green every spring, day by day, we should instead open our soul to the glorious teachings of the Bhagavad Gita, or of St. John's Gospel, or of St. Thomas Kempis, and to the descriptions resulting from spiritual Science. There are many ways to the summit of insight, but much depends on the right choice. The spiritually experienced could say much concerning these paths, much that might seem strange to the uninitiated. Someone, for instance, might be very far advanced on the path; he might be standing, so to speak, at the very entrance of sight and hearing with soul and spirit; he is then fortunate enough to make a journey over the calm or maybe tempestuous ocean, and a veil falls away from the eyes of his soul; suddenly he becomes a seer. Another is also so far advanced that this veil only needs to be loosened; this occurs through some stroke of destiny. On another this stroke might well have had the effect
   p. 113

1.03_-_The_Psychic_Prana, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  Thus the rousing of the Kundalini is the one and only way to attaining Divine Wisdom, superconscious perception, realisation of the spirit. The rousing may come in various ways, through love for God, through the mercy of perfected sages, or through the power of the analytic will of the philosopher. Wherever there was any manifestation of what is ordinarily called supernatural power or wisdom, there a little current of Kundalini must have found its way into the Sushumna. Only, in the vast majority of such cases, people had ignorantly stumbled on some practice which set free a minute portion of the coiled-up Kundalini. All worship, consciously or unconsciously, leads to this end. The man who thinks that he is receiving response to his prayers does not know that the fulfilment comes from his own nature, that he has succeeded by the mental attitude of prayer in waking up a bit of this infinite power which is coiled up within himself. What, thus, men ignorantly worship under various names, through fear and tribulation, the Yogi declares to the world to be the real power coiled up in every being, the mother of eternal happiness, if we but know how to approach her. And Rja-Yoga is the Science of religion, the rationale of all worship, all prayers, forms, ceremonies, and miracles.
  

1.03_-_The_Sephiros, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  Many Qabalists have referred to the Tree of Life the seventy-eight Tarot cards, which are a series of pictorial representations of the universe. Eliphaz Levi writes in
  La Histoire de la Magie as follows : " The absolute hiero- glyphical Science had for its basis an alphabet of which all the gods were letters, all the letters ideas, all the ideas numbers, and all the numbers perfect signs. This hiero- glyphical alphabet, of which Moses made the great secret of his Cabalah, is the famous book of Thoth ".
  
  --
  
  It was only in the last century that we had the statement of Eliphaz Levi that were a man incarcerated in a dungeon cell in solitary confinement, without books or instructions of any kind, it would still be possible for him to obtain from this set of cards an encyclopaedic knowledge of the essence of all Sciences, religions, and philosophies. Ignoring this specimen of typical Levi verbosity, it is only necessary to point out that instead of using the ten digits and the twenty-two letters of the Hebrew Alphabet for the basis of his magical alphabet, Levi adopted as his fundamental framework the twenty-two trump cards of the Book of
  Thoth, attributing to them his knowledge and experience in a way similar to the attributions of the thirty-two Paths of Wisdom.
  --
  
  " Victory again, meant originally, mythologic Science tells us, only the great victory of the sky, the triumph of morning over darkness. But that physical morning of her origin has its ministry to the later {esthetic sense also. For if Nike, when she appears in company with the mortal, and wholly fleshly hero, in whose chariot she stands to guide the horses, or whom she crowns with her garland of parsley or bay, or whose names she writes on a shield, is imaginatively conceived, it is because the old skyey influences are still not quite suppressed in her clear-set eyes, and the dew of the morning still clings to her wings and her floating hair."
  

1.03_-_The_Two_Negations_2_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Ascetic, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  18:For an age out of sympathy with the ascetic spirit - and throughout all the rest of the world the hour of the Anchorite may seem to have passed or to be passing - it is easy to attribute this great trend to the failing of vital energy in an ancient race tired out by its burden, its once vast share in the common advance, exhausted by its many-sided contribution to the sum of human effort and human knowledge. But we have seen that it corresponds to a truth of existence, a state of conscious realisation which stands at the very summit of our possibility. In practice also the ascetic spirit is an indispensable element in human perfection and even its separate affirmation cannot be avoided so long as the race has not at the other end liberated its intellect and its vital habits from subjection to an always insistent animalism.
  19:We seek indeed a larger and completer affirmation. We perceive that in the Indian ascetic ideal the great Vedantic formula, "One without a second", has not been read sufficiently in the light of that other formula equally imperative, "All this is the Brahman". The passionate aspiration of man upward to the Divine has not been sufficiently related to the descending movement of the Divine leaning downward to embrace eternally Its manifestation. Its meaning in Matter has not been so well understood as Its truth in the Spirit. The Reality which the Sannyasin seeks has been grasped in its full height, but not, as by the ancient Vedantins, in its full extent and comprehensiveness. But in our completer affirmation we must not minimise the part of the pure spiritual impulse. As we have seen how greatly Materialism has served the ends of the Divine, so we must acknowledge the still greater service rendered by Asceticism to Life. We shall preserve the truths of material Science and its real utilities in the final harmony, even if many or even if all of its existing forms have to be broken or left aside. An even greater scruple of right preservation must guide us in our dealing with the legacy, however actually diminished or depreciated, of the Aryan past.
  

1.03_-_YIBHOOTI_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  external to the seedless Samadhi. When a man has attained to
  them he may attain to omniScience and omnipresence, but that
  would not be salvation. These three would not make the mind
  --
  it. Infinite energy is at the disposal of everyone, if he only
  knows how to get it. The Yogi has discovered the Science of
  getting it.
  --
  discriminated between the intellect and the PuruSa
  comes omnipresence and omniScience.
  
  --
  indestructible, pure and perfect, when the Yogi has realised
  this, then comes omnipotence and omniScience.
  
  --
  When he gives up even the ideas of omnipotence and
  omniScience, there will be entire rejection of enjoyment, of
  the temptations from celestial beings. When the Yogi has seen

1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  In the beginning stages, for the purpose of novitiates absolutely unfamiliar with this subject, what is prescribed is a conceptual form of the ideal that one would regard as the highest possible, and this is the philosophy behind the worship of the gods of religions. It is not the worship of many gods, but the worship of any aspect of the one God, which can be taken as the means to the realisation of that all-inclusive background of these various manifestations called 'gods'. Sometimes, especially in the field of pure psychic Science and occultism, any object is taken for the purpose of concentration, provided the will is strong enough. The object of meditation or concentration need not necessarily be a deity in the sense of a divine being it can be anything. It can be even a candlestick, or even a fountain pen or a pencil; the only condition is that we should not think of anything else except that pencil in front of us.
  
  --
  
  It is very well known why we practise yoga, or for the matter of that, why we engage ourselves in any activity at all. The purpose is to fulfil a wish, whether it is a particularised one or a larger one. This wish is supposed to be fulfilled by the practice of concentration of mind. Here, it would be advantageous to note how a wish can be fulfilled by mere concentration of mind. If that had not been the case, why should be there any attempt at all at concentration? Is it possible to fulfil a desire, or come to the attainment of any wish, for the matter of that, by concentration of mind? The answer is yes, as given by the Science of yoga. Any wish can be fulfilled, whatever it be, on earth or in heaven, provided we can adjust our thoughts properly, in a prescribed manner. The absence of success in the pursuit of any objective is due to absence of sufficient concentration on the objective. We are not fully interested in anything, as I mentioned sometime back. That is the reason why we cannot achieve anything fully. There is nothing in this world which can draw our attention wholly, and that is why nothing comes to us as we expect it. A half-hearted friendship with anything in this world cannot lead to a permanent success in the matter of union with that object, or utilisation of that object for one's purpose.
  

1.04_-_Body,_Soul_and_Spirit, #Theosophy, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
  
  To the investigator of spiritual life this matter presents itself in the following manner: The ether-body is for him not merely a product of the materials and forces of the physical body, but a real independent entity which first calls forth these physical materials and forces into life. One speaks in harmony with spiritual Science when one says: a mere physical body, a crystal for example, has its form by means of the physical formative forces dwelling within it. A living body does not have its form by means of these forces, for in the moment in which life is extinct in it, and it is given over to the physical forces only, it falls to pieces. The ether-body is an organism which preserves the physical body every moment during life from dissolution. In order to see this body, to perceive it in another
  

1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Philosophy
  
  How shall I ever walk under your sun if I do not drink the bitter draught of slumber to the lees? Help me so that I do not choke on my own knowledge. The fullness of my knowledge threatens to fall in on me. My knowledge has a thousand voices, an army roaring like lions; the air trembles when they speak, and I am their defenseless sacrifice. Keep it far from me, Science that clever knower, 86 that bad prison master who binds the soul and imprisons it in a lightless cell.
  
  --
  
  86. The Corrected Draft continues: "Science" is deleted (p. 37).
  
  --
  
  86). See my Jung and the Making of Modern Psychology: The Dream of a Science, pp. 57-61.
  

1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  St. Bernard speaks in what seems a similar strain. What I know of the divine Sciences and Holy Scripture, I learnt in woods and fields. I have had no other masters than the beeches and the oaks. And in another of his letters he says: Listen to a man of experience: thou wilt learn more in the woods than in books. Trees and stones will teach thee more than thou canst acquire from the mouth of a magister. The phrases are similar; but their inner significance is very different. In Augustines language, God alone is to be enjoyed; creatures are not to be enjoyed but usedused with love and compassion and a wondering, detached appreciation, as means to the knowledge of that which may be enjoyed. Wordsworth, like almost all other literary Nature-worshippers, preaches the enjoyment of creatures rather than their use for the attainment of spiritual endsa use which, as we shall see, entails much self-discipline for the user. For Bernard it goes without saying that his correspondents are actively practising this self-discipline and that Nature, though loved and heeded as a teacher, is only being used as a means to God, not enjoyed as though she were God. The beauty of flowers and landscape is not merely to be relished as one wanders lonely as a cloud about the countryside, is not merely to be pleasurably remembered when one is lying in vacant or in pensive mood on the sofa in the library, after tea. The reaction must be a little more strenuous and purposeful. Here, my brothers, says an ancient Buddhist author, are the roots of trees, here are empty places; meditate. The truth is, of course, that the world is only for those who have deserved it; for, in Philos words, even though a man may be incapable of making himself worthy of the creator of the cosmos, yet he ought to try to make himself worthy of the cosmos. He ought to transform himself from being a man into the nature of the cosmos and become, if one may say so, a little cosmos. For those who have not deserved the world, either by making themselves worthy of its creator (that is to say, by non-attachment and a total self-naughting), or, less arduously, by making themselves worthy of the cosmos (by bringing order and a measure of unity to the manifold confusion of undisciplined human personality), the world is, spiritually speaking, a very dangerous place.
  
  That Nirvana and Samsara are one is a fact about the nature of the universe; but it is a fact which cannot be fully realized or directly experienced, except by souls far advanced in spirituality. For ordinary, nice, unregenerate people to accept this truth by hearsay, and to act upon it in practice, is merely to court disaster. All the dismal story of antinomianism is there to warn us of what happens when men and women make practical applications of a merely intellectual and unrealized theory that all is God and God is all. And hardly less depressing than the spectacle of antinomianism is that of the earnestly respectable well-rounded life of good citizens who do their best to live sacramentally, but dont in fact have any direct acquaintance with that for which the sacramental activity really stands. Dr. Oman, in his The Natural and the Supernatural, writes at length on the theme that reconciliation to the evanescent is revelation of the eternal; and in a recent volume, Science, Religion and the Future, Canon Raven applauds Dr. Oman for having stated the principles of a theology, in which there could be no ultimate antithesis between nature and grace, Science and religion, in which, indeed, the worlds of the scientist and the theologian are seen to be one and the same. All this is in full accord with Taoism and Zen Buddhism and with such Christian teachings as St. Augustines Ama et fac quod vis and Father Lallemants advice to theocentric contemplatives to go out and act in the world, since their actions are the only ones capable of doing any real good to the world. But what neither Dr. Oman nor Canon Raven makes sufficiently clear is that nature and grace, Samsara and Nirvana, perpetual perishing and eternity, are really and experientially one only to persons who have fulfilled certain conditions. Fac quod vis in the temporal worldbut only when you have learnt the infinitely difficult art of loving God with all your mind and heart and your neighbor as yourself. If you havent learnt this lesson, you will either be an antinomian eccentric or criminal or else a respectable well-rounded-lifer, who has left himself no time to understand either nature or grace. The Gospels are perfectly clear about the process by which, and by which alone, a man may gain the right to live in the world as though he were at home in it: he must make a total denial of selfhood, submit to a complete and absolute mortification. At one period of his career, Jesus himself seems to have undertaken austerities, not merely of the mind, but of the body. There is the record of his forty days fast and his statement, evidently drawn from personal experience, that some demons cannot be cast out except by those who have fasted much as well as prayed. (The Cur dArs, whose knowledge of miracles and corporal penance was based on personal experience, insists on the close correlation between severe bodily austerities and the power to get petitionary prayer answered in ways that are sometimes supernormal.) The Pharisees reproached Jesus because he came eating and drinking, and associated with publicans and sinners; they ignored, or were unaware of, the fact that this apparently worldly prophet had at one time rivalled the physical austerities of John the Baptist and was practising the spiritual mortifications which he consistently preached. The pattern of Jesus life is essentially similar to that of the ideal sage, whose career is traced in the Oxherding Pictures, so popular among Zen Buddhists. The wild ox, symbolizing the unregenerate self, is caught, made to change its direction, then tamed and gradually transformed from black to white. Regeneration goes so far that for a time the ox is completely lost, so that nothing remains to be pictured but the full-orbed moon, symbolizing Mind, Suchness, the Ground. But this is not the final stage. In the end, the herdsman comes back to the world of men, riding on the back of his ox. Because he now loves, loves to the extent of being identified with the divine object of his love, he can do what he likes; for what he likes is what the Nature of Things likes. He is found in company with wine-bibbers and butchers; he and they are all converted into Buddhas. For him, there is complete reconciliation to the evanescent and, through that reconciliation, revelation of the eternal. But for nice ordinary unregenerate people the only reconciliation to the evanescent is that of indulged passions, of distractions submitted to and enjoyed. To tell such persons that evanescence and eternity are the same, and not immediately to qualify the statement, is positively fatalfor, in practice, they are not the same except to the saint; and there is no record that anybody ever came to sanctity, who did not, at the outset of his or her career, behave as if evanescence and eternity, nature and grace, were profoundly different and in many respects incompatible. As always, the path of spirituality is a knife-edge between abysses. On one side is the danger of mere rejection and escape, on the other the danger of mere acceptance and the enjoyment of things which should only be used as instruments or symbols. The versified caption which accompanies the last of the Oxherding Pictures runs as follows.
  

1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  Concentration. The concentration is Samadhi, and that is
  Yoga proper; that is the principle theme of this Science, and it
  is the highest means. The preceding ones are only secondary,
  --
  the result of this theory is to furnish every oppressor with an
  argument to calm the qualms of conScience, and men are not
  lacking, who, posing as philosophers, want to kill out all

1.04_-_Of_other_imperfections_which_these_beginners_are_apt_to_have_with_respect_to_the_third_sin,_which_is_luxury., #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  
  7. Some of these persons make friendships of a spiritual kind with others, which oftentimes arise from luxury and not from spirituality; this may be known to be the case when the remembrance of that friendship causes not the remembrance and love of God to grow, but occasions remorse of conScience. For, when the friendship is purely spiritual, the love of God grows with it; and the more the soul remembers it, the more it remembers the love of God, and the greater the desire it has for God; so that, as the one grows, the other grows also. For the spirit of God has this property, that it increases good by adding to it more good, inasmuch as there is likeness and conformity between them. But, when this love arises from the vice of sensuality aforementioned, it produces the contrary effects; for the more the one grows, the more the other decreases, and the remembrance of it likewise. If that sensual love grows, it will at once be observed that the soul's love of God is becoming colder, and that it is forgetting Him as it remembers that love; there comes to it, too, a certain remorse of conScience. And, on the other hand, if the love of God grows in the soul, that other love becomes cold and is forgotten; for, as the two are contrary to one another, not only does the one not aid the other, but the one which predominates quenches and confounds the other, and becomes strengthened in itself, as the philosophers say. Wherefore Our Saviour said in the Gospel: 'That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.'38
  

1.04_-_Reality_Omnipresent, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  2:We have found already in the cosmic consciousness a meeting-place where Matter becomes real to Spirit, Spirit becomes real to Matter. For in the cosmic consciousness Mind and Life are intermediaries and no longer, as they seem in the ordinary egoistic mentality, agents of separation, fomenters of an artificial quarrel between the positive and negative principles of the same unknowable Reality. Attaining to the cosmic consciousness Mind, illuminated by a knowledge that perceives at once the truth of Unity and the truth of Multiplicity and seizes on the formulae of their interaction, finds its own discords at once explained and reconciled by the divine Harmony; satisfied, it consents to become the agent of that supreme union between God and Life towards which we tend. Matter reveals itself to the realising thought and to the subtilised senses as the figure and body of Spirit, - Spirit in its self-formative extension. Spirit reveals itself through the same consenting agents as the soul, the truth, the essence of Matter. Both admit and confess each other as divine, real and essentially one. Mind and Life are disclosed in that illumination as at once figures and instruments of the supreme Conscious Being by which It extends and houses Itself in material form and in that form unveils Itself to Its multiple centres of consciousness. Mind attains its self-fulfilment when it becomes a pure mirror of the Truth of Being which expresses itself in the symbols of the universe; Life, when it consciously lends its energies to the perfect self-figuration of the Divine in ever-new forms and activities of the universal existence.
  3:In the light of this conception we can perceive the possibility of a divine life for man in the world which will at once justify Science by disclosing a living sense and intelligible aim for the cosmic and the terrestrial evolution and realise by the transfiguration of the human soul into the divine the great ideal dream of all high religions.
  4:But what then of that silent Self, inactive, pure, self-existent, self-enjoying, which presented itself to us as the abiding justification of the ascetic? Here also harmony and not irreconcilable opposition must be the illuminative truth. The silent and the active Brahman are not different, opposite and irreconcilable entities, the one denying, the other affirming a cosmic illusion; they are one Brahman in two aspects, positive and negative, and each is necessary to the other. It is out of this Silence that the Word which creates the worlds for ever proceeds; for the Word expresses that which is self-hidden in the Silence. It is an eternal passivity which makes possible the perfect freedom and omnipotence of an eternal divine activity in innumerable cosmic systems. For the becomings of that activity derive their energies and their illimitable potency of variation and harmony from the impartial support of the immutable Being, its consent to this infinite fecundity of its own dynamic Nature.

1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
  
  If this fact be overlooked, esoteric training can easily appear in the light of a coercion of the soul or the conScience; for the training is based on the development of the inner life, and the teacher must necessarily give advice concerning this inner life. But there is no question of compulsion when a demand is met out of free choice. To ask
   p. 116
  --
   p. 123
   as to discover what those around him need, and what is good for them. In this way he will develop within himself what is known in spiritual Science as the "spiritual balance." An open heart for the needs of the outer world lies on one of the scales, and inner fortitude and unfaltering endurance on the other.
  
  --
   p. 130
   for himself But they lie deeply buried, and can only be brought up from their deep shafts after all obstacles have been cleared away. Only the experienced can advise how this may be done. Such advice is found in spiritual Science. No truth is forced on anyone; no dogma is proclaimed; a way only is pointed out. It is true that everyone could find this way unaided, but only perhaps after many incarnations. By esoteric training this way is shortened. We thus reach more quickly a point from which we can cooperate in those worlds where the salvation and evolution of man are furthered by spiritual work.
  

1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Essays on the Gita
   very roots. And if that is what the Gita has to say on a most poignant moral and spiritual problem, we must put it out of the list of the world's Scriptures and thrust it, if anywhere, then into our library of political Science and ethical casuistry.
  
  Undoubtedly, the Gita does, like the Upanishads, teach the equality which rises above sin and virtue, beyond good and evil, but only as a part of the Brahmic consciousness and for the man who is on the path and advanced enough to fulfil the supreme rule. It does not preach indifference to good and evil for the ordinary life of man, where such a doctrine would have the most pernicious consequences. On the contrary it affirms that the doers of evil shall not attain to God. Therefore if Arjuna simply seeks to fulfil in the best way the ordinary law of man's life, disinterested performance of what he feels to be a sin, a thing of Hell, will not help him, even though that sin be his duty as a soldier. He must refrain from what his conScience abhors though a thousand duties were shattered to pieces.
  
  --
  
  There are in the world, in fact, two different laws of conduct each valid on its own plane, the rule principally dependent on external status and the rule independent of status and entirely dependent on the thought and conScience. The Gita does not teach us to subordinate the higher plane to the lower, it does not ask the awakened moral consciousness to slay itself on the altar of duty as a sacrifice and victim to the law of the social status. It calls us higher and not lower; from the conflict of the two planes it bids us ascend to a supreme poise above the mainly practical, above the purely ethical, to the Brahmic consciousness. It replaces the conception of social duty by a divine obligation. The subjection to external law gives place to a certain principle of inner self-determination of action proceeding by the soul's freedom from the tangled law of works. And this, as we shall see, - the Brahmic consciousness, the soul's freedom from works and the determination of works in the nature by the Lord within and above us, - is the kernel of the Gita's teaching with regard to action.
  

1.04_-_The_First_Circle,_Limbo_Virtuous_Pagans_and_the_Unbaptized._The_Four_Poets,_Homer,_Horace,_Ovid,_and_Lucan._The_Noble_Castle_of_Philosophy., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  That honourable people held that place.
  "O thou who honourest every art and Science,
  Who may these be, which such great honour have,

1.04_-_The_Praise, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  We saw earlier that tantras dwell in the
  omniScience of the mind of the buddh as beyon d all
  time and manifestation and that they were revealed in

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