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object:Saint Augustine of Hippo
object:Saint Augustine
title class:Saint
class:author
subject class:Christianity
subject:Christianity
class:person

--- WIKI
Augustine of Hippo (Aurelius Augustinus Hipponensis; 13 November 354 28 August 430 AD), also known as Saint Augustine, was a Roman African, Manichaean, early Christian theologian, doctor of the Church, and Neoplatonic philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of the Western Church and Western philosophy, and indirectly all of Western Christianity. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius in North Africa and is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers of the Latin Church for his writings in the Patristic Period. Among his most important works are The City of God, De doctrina Christiana, and Confessions. According to his contemporary, Jerome, Augustine "established anew the ancient Faith". In his youth he was drawn to Manichaeism and later to neoplatonism. After his baptism and conversion to Christianity in 386, Augustine developed his own approach to philosophy and theology, accommodating a variety of methods and perspectives. Believing that the grace of Christ was indispensable to human freedom, he helped formulate the doctrine of original sin and made seminal contributions to the development of just war theory. When the Western Roman Empire began to disintegrate, Augustine imagined the Church as a spiritual City of God, distinct from the material Earthly City. His thoughts profoundly influenced the medieval worldview. The segment of the Church that adhered to the concept of the Trinity as defined by the Council of Nicaea and the Council of Constantinople closely identified with Augustine's On the Trinity. Augustine is recognized as a saint in the Catholic Churches, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Anglican Communion and as a preeminent Doctor of the Church. He is also the patron of the Augustinians. His memorial is celebrated on 28 August, the day of his death. Augustine is the patron saint of brewers, printers, theologians, and a number of cities and dioceses. Many Protestants, especially Calvinists and Lutherans, consider him to be one of the theological fathers of the Protestant Reformation due to his teachings on salvation and divine grace. Protestant Reformers generally, and Martin Luther in particular, held Augustine in preeminence among early Church Fathers. Luther himself was, from 1505 to 1521, a member of the Order of the Augustinian Eremites. In the East, his teachings are more disputed, and were notably attacked by John Romanides. But other theologians and figures of the Eastern Orthodox Church have shown significant approbation of his writings, chiefly Georges Florovsky. The most controversial doctrine associated with him, the filioque, was rejected by the Orthodox Church as Heretic Teaching. Other disputed teachings include his views on original sin, the doctrine of grace, and predestination. Nevertheless, though considered to be mistaken on some points, he is still considered a saint, and has even had influence on some Eastern Church Fathers, most notably Gregory Palamas. In the Orthodox Church his feast day is celebrated on 15 June. Historian Diarmaid MacCulloch has written: "Augustine's impact on Western Christian thought can hardly be overstated; only his beloved example Paul of Tarsus, has been more influential, and Westerners have generally seen Paul through Augustine's eyes."
Influences:Plato, Plotinus, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Ambrose of Milan

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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [0]


--- PRIMARY CLASS


author
person

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [0]


Saint Augustine of Hippo

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



--- QUOTES [1000 / 1000 - 500 / 500] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   56 Saint Augustine of Hippo

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  497 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   2 Saint Augustine of Hippo

1:He who labours, prays. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
2:What a man loves, a man is. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
3:Tolle, lege: take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
4:Truth is not private property. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
5:Things are solved by walking around. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
6:We speak, but it is God who teaches. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
7:We should never use the truth to wound. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
8:Is any man skillful enough to have fashioned himself? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
9:For what is faith unless it is to believe what you do not see? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
10:Let us sing a new song, not with our lips, but with our lives. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
11:No one can begin a new life, unless he repent of the old. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
12:There is no greater invitation to love than loving first. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
13:Angels surround and help the priest when he is celebrating Mass. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
14:Pride changes angels into devils, humility makes man into angels. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
15:God had one son on earth without sin, but never one without suffering. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
16:A free curiosity is more effective in learning than a rigid discipline. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
17:The greatest kindness one can render to any man is leading him to truth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
18:Yet we must say something when those who say the most are saying nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
19:The words printed here are concepts. You must go through the experiences. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
20:He who has God has everything; he who has everything but God has nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
21:The world is a great book, of which they that never stir from home read only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
22:All truth and understanding is a result of a divine light which is God Himself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
23:Pray as though everything depended on God. Work as though everything depended on you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
24:The true religion has always been one from the beginning, and will always be the same. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
25:What you are must always displease you, if you would attain to that which you are not. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
26:God is more truly imagined than expressed, and He exists more truly than He is imagined. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
27:In failing to confess, Lord, I would only hide You from myself, not myself from You. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
28:Do not wander far and wide but return into yourself. Deep within man there dwells the truth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
29:To dye oneself with paints in order to have a rosier or a paler complexion is a lying counterfeit. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
30:He who denies the existence of God, has some reason for wishing that God did not exist. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
31:Two works of mercy set a person free: Forgive and you will be forgiven, and give and you will receive. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
32:When regard for truth has been broken down or even slightly weakened, all things will remain doubtful. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
33:For where I found Truth, there found I my God, the Truth itself; which since I learnt, I have not forgotten. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
34:To wisdom belongs the intellectual apprehension of eternal things; to knowledge, the rational knowledge of temporal things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
35:And he departed from our sight that we might return to our hearts and find him there. For he left us, and behold, he is here. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
36:Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending. You plan a tower that will pierce the clouds? Lay first the foundation of humility. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
37:How can you draw close to God when you are far from your own self? Grant, Lord, that I may know myself that I may know thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
38:Love God and do whatever you please: for the soul trained in love to God will do nothing to offend the One who is Beloved. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
39:God bestows more consideration on the purity of the intention with which our actions are performed than on the actions themselves. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
40:By faithfulness we are collected and wound up into unity within ourselves, whereas we had been scattered abroad in multiplicity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
41:To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek him the greatest adventure; to find him, the greatest human achievement. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
42:Try to acquire the virtues you believe lacking in your brothers. Then you will no longer see their defects, for you will no longer have them yourself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
43:Let your old age be childlike, and your childhood like old age; that is, so that neither may your wisdom be with pride, nor your humility without wisdom. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
44:We must be on our guard against giving interpretations which are hazardous or opposed to science, and so exposing the word of God to the ridicule of unbelievers. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
45:Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved you! You were within me, but I was outside, and it was there that I searched for you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
46:A Christian is: a mind through which Christ thinks, a heart through which Christ loves, a voice through which Christ speaks, and a hand through which Christ helps. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
47:Humility is the foundation of all the other virtues hence, in the soul in which this virtue does not exist there cannot be any other virtue except in mere appearance. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
48:Do not be afraid to throw yourself on the Lord! He will not draw back and let you fall! Put your worries aside and throw yourself on him; He will welcome you and heal you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
49:Music, that is the science or the sense of proper modulation, is likewise given by God's generosity to mortals having rational souls in order to lead them to higher things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
50:The good man, though a slave, is free; the wicked, though he reigns, is a slave, and not the slave of a single man, but- what is worse - the slave of as many masters as he has vices. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
51:What is reprehensible is that while leading good lives themselves and abhorring those of wicked men, some, fearing to offend, shut their eyes to evil deeds instead of condemning them and pointing out their malice. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
52:Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them as does not tend to build up this twofold love of God and our neighbor, does not yet understand them as he ought. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
53:Give me yourself, O my God, give yourself back to me. Lo, I love you, but if my love is too mean, let me love more passionately. I cannot gauge my love, nor know how far it fails, how much more love I need for my life to set its course straight into your arms, never swerving until hidden in the covert of your face. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
54:Far be it from us to doubt that all number is known to Him 'Whose understanding is infinite' (Ps. 147:5). The infinity of number, though there be no numbering of infinite numbers, is yet not incomprehensible by Him Whose understanding is infinite. And thus, if everything which is comprehended is defined or made finite by the comprehension of him who knows it, then all infinity is in some ineffable way made finite to God, for it is comprehensible by His knowledge. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
55:To seek the greatest good is to live well, and to live well is nothing other than to love God with the whole heart, the whole soul, and the whole mind: It is therefore obvious that this love must be kept whole and uncorrupt, that is temperance; it should not be overcome with difficulties, that is fortitude, it must not be subservient to anything else, that is justice; it must discriminate among things so as not to be deceived by falsity or fraud, that is prudence. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
56:What art Thou then, my God? what, but the Lord God? For who is Lord but the Lord? or who is God save our God? Most highest, most good, most potent, most omnipotent; most merciful, yet most just; most hidden, yet most present; most beautiful, yet most strong; stable, yet incomprehensible; unchangeable, yet all-changing; never new, never old; all-renewing, and bringing age upon the proud, and they know it not; ever working, ever at rest; still gathering, yet nothing lacking; supporting, filling, and overspreading; creating, nourishing, and maturing; seeking, yet having all things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Fallor Ergo Sum. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
2:Sin, but sin boldly. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
3:My weight is my love. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
4:You raise us upright. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
5:I err, therefore I am. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
6:Desiderium sinus cordis ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
7:Love, then do as you like. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
8:This disease of curiosity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
9:Si comprehendis non est Deus ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
10:For in our hope we are saved. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
11:I cannot grasp all that I am. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
12:i understand that i understand ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
13:Love is the beauty of the soul ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
14:Nondum amabam, et amare amabam ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
15:Tolle, lege: take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
16:An unjust law is no law at all. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
17:Love and say it with your life. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
18:Love the sinner and hate the sin. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
19:My sin grew sleek on my excesses. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
20:He that is jealous is not in love. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
21:What do I love when I love my God? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
22:Sin is Energy in the wrong channel. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
23:Take up and read, take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
24:Patience is the companion of wisdom. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
25:We speak, but it is God who teaches. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
26:God gives where he finds empty hands. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
27:219Take up and read, take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
28:Anyone wants to be true what one loves ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
29:Man cannot believe unless he wishes to. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
30:E în noi ceva mai adânc decât noi înșine. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
31:With love for mankind and hatred of sins. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
32:If you understood him, it would not be God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
33:He who has no tomb has the sky for his vault. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
34:Salvator ambulado. (It is solved by walking.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
35:Charity is no substitute for justice withheld. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
36:For the love of money is the root of all evil; ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
37:For this my good from them, was good for them. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
38:la mesure de l'amour c'est d'aimer sans mesure ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
39:Love is ever new because it never groweth old. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
40:Omnis natura, inquantum natura est, bonum est. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
41:The Holy Scriptures are our letters from home. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
42:God provides the wind, Man must raise the sail. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
43:Habits, if not resisted, soon become necessity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
44:I know what it is, but when you ask me I don’t. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
45:Si precisas una mano, recuerda que yo tengo dos ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
46:The measure of love is to love without measure. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
47:Embrace the love of God, and by love embrace God ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
48:Thou madest him, but sin in him Thou madest not. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
49:To spare the conquered, and beat down the proud. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
50:Lavish spending cloaks the dark side of generosity ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
51:A Christian should be an Alleluia from head to foot ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
52:credo ut intelligam. (i believe so i can understand). ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
53:El mundo no se hizo en el tiempo, sino con el tiempo. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
54:Give what you command, and command what you will. You ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
55:God loves each of us as if there were only one of us. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
56:He who is filled with love is filled with God himself ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
57:Is any man skillful enough to have fashioned himself? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
58:Lord give me chastity and self control - but not yet. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
59:The peace of all things is the tranquillity of order. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
60:There are wolves within, and there are sheep without. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
61:Adalet olmayınca devlet büyük bir çeteden başka nedir? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
62:Complete abstinence is easier than perfect moderation. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
63:He then goes on to show that love--the love of God for ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
64:He who is filled with love is filled with God himself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
65:Sin is looking for the right thing in the wrong place. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
66:Dai-me o que me ordenais, e ordenai-me o que quiserdes. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
67:I do not know where I came from..For I do not remember. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
68:Vatru u drugima može zapaliti samo onaj tko sam izgara. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
69:In my deepest wound I saw your glory, and it dazzled me. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
70:Nada está perdido mientras haya ilusión por encontrarlo. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
71:Place your hopes in the man from whom you do not inherit ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
72:You know how stupid and weak I am: teach me and heal me. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
73:God has one Son without sin, but none without affliction. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
74:Le bonheur, c'est continuer à désirer ce que l'on a déjà. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
75:The soul is the life whereby we are joined into the body. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
76:You are my Lord, because You have no need of my goodness. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
77:A wholesome fear would be a fit guardian for the citizens. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
78:Dilige et quod vis fac. (Love and then what you will, do.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
79:Christ is not valued at all, unless he is valued above all. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
80:crucified Christ, when He, mindful of mercy, said, "Father, ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
81:... It is humility which has access to the highest regions. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
82:The punishment of every disordered mind is its own disorder. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
83:Sing with your voices, your hearts, your lips and your lives. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
84:There is no saint without a past, no sinner without a future. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
85:what you want to ignite in others must first burn in yourself ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
86:being taken away, then, what are kingdoms but great robberies? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
87:Every where the greater joy is ushered in by the greater pain. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
88:Humility raises us not by human arrogance but by divine grace. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
89:Saviour had not styled us the sugar but the salt of the earth, ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
90:There is more than one way of sacrificing to the rebel angels. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
91:Even the straws under my knees shout to distract me from prayer ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
92:You have stricken my heart with your word and I have loved you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
93:As flattering friends mislead, quarreling foes can often correct ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
94:He who created you without you will not justify you without you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
95:Still, dust and ashes I am, allow me to speak before your mercy. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
96:The greatest and worst of all deaths is where death does not die ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
97:THE WORLD IS A BOOK AND THOSE WHO DO NOT TRAVEL READ ONLY A PAGE ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
98:he World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
99:If you have understood, then what you have understood is not God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
100:The end of life puts the longest life on a par with the shortest. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
101:The world is a book and those who do not travel read only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
102:What are kingdoms without justice? They're just gangs of bandits. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
103:He that becomes protector of sin shall surely become its prisoner. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
104:In seeking him they find him, and in finding they will praise him. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
105:The confession of evil works is the first beginning of good works. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
106:The weakness then of infant limbs, not its will, is its innocence. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
107:The world is a book, and he who does not travel reads only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
108:The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
109:Why are you relying on yourself, only to find yourself unreliable? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
110:Why then should a man, who has done no wrong, do wrong to himself? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
111:Every visible thing in this world is put in the charge of an Angel. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
112:In doing what we ought we deserve no praise, because it is our duty ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
113:I was still unteachable, being inflated with the novelty of heresy. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
114:No man can be a good bishop if he loves his title but not his task. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
115:The happy life is this - to rejoice to thee, in thee, and for thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
116:The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
117:The world is a book, and those who don't travel only read one page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
118:For what am I to myself without You, but a guide to my own downfall? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
119:Give, O Lord, what Thou commandest, and then command what Thou wilt. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
120:No eulogy is due to a man who simply does his duty and nothing more. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
121:Clearly, it is a happier lot to be the slave of a man than of a lust: ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
122:el mal no es más que privación del bien hasta llegar a la misma nada. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
123:In faith, unity, in doubtful matters, liberty, in all things charity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
124:Inter faeces et urinam nascimur. (We are born between shit and piss.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
125:In the absence of justice, what is sovereignty but organized robbery? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
126:Des Elends voll ist dieses Leben und ungewiß ist die Stunde des Todes. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
127:God had one son on earth without sin, but never one without suffering. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
128:In the usual course of study I had come to a book of a certain Cicero. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
129:Love begins with a smile, grows with a kiss, and ends with a teardrop. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
130:Noli foras ire, in te ipsum redi. In interiore homine habitat veritas. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
131:Thou distributest Thy riches through the hidden springs of all things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
132:For what is the self-complacent man but a slave to his own self-praise. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
133:HE THAT LOVETH LITTLE PRAYETH LITTLE, HE THAT LOVETH MUCH PRAYETH MUCH. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
134:I write because I've made progress and I make progress because I write. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
135:A community is nothing else than a harmonious collection of individuals. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
136:Moral character is assessed not by what a man knows but by what he loves ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
137:This is the very perfection of a man, to find out his own imperfections. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
138:But no one doth well against his will, even though what he doth, be well. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
139:In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
140:My questioning was my attentive spirit,
and their reply, their beauty. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
141:Oh! for Thy mercies' sake, tell me, O Lord my God, what Thou art unto me. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
142:Yet we must say something when those who say the most are saying nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
143:Better to have fewer wants than greater riches to supply increasing wants. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
144:Every good man resists others in those points in which he resists himself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
145:God grants us not always what we ask so as to bestow something preferable. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
146:Nemo nisi per amicitiam cognoscitur. (No one learns except by friendship.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
147:Celui qui se perd dans sa passion perd moins que celui qui perd sa passion. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
148:The world is a great book...they who never stir from home read only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
149:Whither do I call Thee, since I am in Thee? or whence canst Thou enter into ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
150:Anyone who does not love Him Who made man has not learned to love man aright. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
151:He who falls, falls by his own will; and he who stands, stands by God's will. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
152:Narrow is the mansion of my soul; enlarge Thou it, that Thou mayest enter in. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
153:São quatro as perturbações da alma: o desejo, a alegria, o medo e a tristeza. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
154: Book I. Containing a General View of the Subjects Treated in Holy Scripture. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
155:He cannot have God for his Father who will not have the Church for his mother. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
156:La ira busca vengarse; pero, ¿qué venganza puede ser tan justa como las tuyas? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
157:Learn to dance, so when you get to heaven the angels know what to do with you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
158:... the earthly city glories in itself, the Heavenly City glories in the Lord. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
159:You never depart from us, but yet, only with difficulties do we return to You. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
160:God judged it better to bring good out of evil than to permit no evil to exist. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
161:Our sole hope, our sole confidence, our
only assured promise, is your mercy. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
162:When men do what is displeasing to God, they perform their own will, not God's. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
163:As the flattery of friends corrupts, so often do the taunts of enemies instruct. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
164:¡ay de los que se callan acerca de ti!, porque no son más que mudos charlatanes. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
165:Narrow is the mansion of my soul;
enlarge Thou it, that Thou mayest enter in. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
166:Woe betide those who fail to speak, while the chatterboxes go on saying nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
167:Since love grows within you, so beauty grows. For love is the beauty of the soul. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
168:Miracles are not contrary to nature but only contrary to what we know about nature. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
169:Pray as though everything depends on God. And work as if everything depends on you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
170:Come, O Lord, and stir our hearts. Call us back to yourself. Kindle your fire in us. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
171:In order to discover the character of people we have only to observe what they love. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
172:O God, who is ever at work and ever at rest. May I be ever at work and ever at rest. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
173:Seek not to understand that you may believe, but believe so that you may understand. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
174:Cantare amantis est ... Singing belongs to one who loves." (s. 336, 1 – PL 38, 1472). ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
175:El único cometido en esta vida es procurar ver a Dios con los ojos de nuestro corazón ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
176:Em certos casos, podemos, pois aprovar que haja alguma dor, mas nunca a podemos amar. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
177:Indeed, man wishes to be happy even when he lives so as to make happiness impossible. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
178:My God, how I burned, how I burned with longing to leave earthly and fly back to you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
179:Da quod iubes et iube quod vis
Give what thou commandest and command what thou wilt ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
180:I have said before, and shall say again, that I write this book for love of your love. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
181:It was pride that changed angels into devils; it is humility that makes men as angels. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
182:Really great things, when discussed by little men, can usually make such men grow big. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
183:En las cosas necesarias, la unidad; en las dudosas, la libertad, y en todas, la caridad ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
184:He who denies the existence of God, has some reason for wishing that God did not exist. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
185:Right is right even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong even if everyone is doing it. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
186:That Christians Have No Authority for Committing Suicide in Any Circumstances Whatever. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
187:O mundo é um imenso livro do qual aqueles que nunca saem de casa lêem apenas uma página. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
188:el sonido no es el artífice del canto, antes está sujeto al alma que canta por el cuerpo, ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
189:I did not yet love, and I loved to love; I sought what I might love, in love with loving. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
190:nos creaste para ti y nuestro corazón andará siempre inquieto mientras no descanse en ti. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
191:To my God a heart of flame; To my fellow man a heart of love; To myself a heart of steel. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
192:...nothing could perish on earth save what they would be ashamed to carry away from earth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
193:Sing with your voices, your hearts, your lips and your lives: Sing to the Lord a new song. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
194:The past times that you think were good, are good because they are not yours here and now. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
195:Do not abandon what You have begun in me, but go on to perfect all that remains unfinished. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
196:God is always trying to give good things to us, but our hands are too full to receive them. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
197:Our hearts have been made for you, O God, and they shall never rest until they rest in you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
198:That vague and wandering opinion of Deity is declared by an apostle to be ignorance of God: ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
199:The Bible was composed in such a way that as beginners mature, its meaning grows with them. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
200:The good man is free, even if he is a slave. The evil man is a slave, even if he is a king. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
201:The person who knows the truth knows it, and he who knows it knows eternity. Love knows it. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
202:The truth is like a lion. You don't have to defend it. Let it loose. It will defend itself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
203:The truth is like a lion; you don’t have to defend it. Let it loose; it will defend itself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
204:To abstain from sin when one can no longer sin is to be forsaken by sin, not to forsake it. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
205:To love and to be loved was sweet to me, and all the more if I enjoyed my loved one's body. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
206:For every man, however laudably he lives, yet yields in some points to the lust of the flesh. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
207:for Thou hast formed us for Thyself, and our hearts are restless till they find rest in Thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
208:I was not yet in love, yet I loved to love...I sought what I might love, in love with loving. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
209:Trust the past to God's mercy, the present to God's love, and the future to God's providence. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
210:O that men would know themselves to be men; and that he that glorieth would glory in the Lord. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
211:Some things are to be enjoyed, others to be used, and there are others to be enjoyed and used. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
212:Faith is to believe what we cannot see, and the reward of this faith is to see what we believe. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
213:A sense of Deity is inscribed on every heart. Nay, even idolatry is ample evidence of this fact. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
214:Do not feel surprise at being schooled amid toil: you are being schooled for a wondrous destiny. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
215:A person can do other things against his will, but belief is possible only in one who is willing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
216:He loves Thee too little, who loves anything together with Thee, which he loves not for Thy sake. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
217:the soul is not moved to abandon higher things and love inferior things unless it wills to do so. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
218:The wicked have told me of things that delight them, but not such things as your law has to tell. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
219:Thou hast made us for thyself, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it finds its rest in thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
220:Faith is to believe what you do not yet see; the reward for this faith is to see what you believe. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
221:Inasmuch as love grows in you, in so much beauty grows; for love is itself the beauty of the soul. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
222:It is greater felicity to have a good neighbour at peace, than to conquer a bad one by making war. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
223:The mind commands the body and is instantly obeyed. The mind commands itself and meets resistance. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
224:Trust the past to the mercy of God, the present to God’s love, and the future to God’s providence. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
225:I didn't know that evil doesn't exist except as the absence of good up to the point of annihilation ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
226:266. "Faith is to believe what we do not see; and the reward of the faith is to see what we believe. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
227:Don't you believe that there is in man a deep so profound as to be hidden even to him in whom it is? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
228:For grace is given not because we have done good works, but in order that we may be able to do them. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
229:divides into three classes,--things to be enjoyed, things to be used, and things which use and enjoy. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
230:it is grace that makes us fulfil the law, and causes nature to be liberated from the dominion of sin. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
231:See, heaven and earth exist, they cry aloud that they are made, for they suffer change and variation. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
232:So material a difference does it make, not what ills are suffered, but what kind of man suffers them. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
233:Unless someone is faithful in handling the temptations of wealth, who will commit to him true riches? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
234:... Unscrupulous ambition has nothing to work upon, save in a nation corrupted by avarice and luxury. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
235:Da mihi castitatem et continentiam, sed noli modo (Give me chastity and continence, but not just yet)! ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
236:Find out how much God has given you and from it take what you need; the remainder is needed by others. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
237:Let him love to find You while not finding it out, rather than, while finding it out, not to find You. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
238:O crooked paths! Woe to the audacious soul, which hoped, by forsaking Thee, to gain some better thing! ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
239:I am no more than a child, but my Father lives for ever and I have a Protector great enough to save me. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
240:Lord Jesus, don't let me lie when I say that I love you...and protect me, for today I could betray you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
241:No one will make a good end to the life into which he is born unless he is born again before he ends it. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
242:The Trinity, one God, of whom are all things, through whom are all things, in whom are all things. [1723] ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
243:For you have imposed order, and so it is that the punishment of every disordered mind is its own disorder. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
244:God has promised forgiveness to your repentance, but He has not promised tomorrow to your procrastination. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
245:his own sake and the love of our neighbor for God's sake--is the fulfillment and the end of all Scripture. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
246:For the human race is, more than any other species, at once social by nature and quarrelsome by perversion. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
247:Our hearts were made for You, O Lord, and they are restless until they rest in you." -St. Augustine of Hippo ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
248:The only object which ought to be enjoyed is the triune God, who is our highest good and our true happiness. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
249:the mode of ascertaining the proper meaning, and the mode of making known the meaning when it is ascertained. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
250:I will plant my feet on that step where my parents put me as a child, until self-evident truth comes to light. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
251:We are Christians, and strangers on earth. Let none of us be frightened; our native land is not in this world. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
252:And thus it is that in the same affliction the wicked detest God and blaspheme, while the good pray and praise. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
253:Our whole business therefore in this life is to restore to health the eye of the heart whereby God may be seen. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
254:Porque más vencido es el enemigo en aquel a quien más tiene preso y por cuyo medio tiene a otros muchos presos; ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
255:No doubt, then, that a free curiosity has more force in our learning these things, than a frightful enforcement. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
256:Thus it is that love is not without hope, hope is not without love, and neither hope nor love are without faith. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
257:Tu excitas, ut laudare te delectet, quia fecisti nos ad te et inquietum est cor nostrum, donec requiescat in te. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
258:Do not say that the past was better than the present. Virtues are what make the good times and vices that go bad. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
259:I count myself one of the number of those who write as they learn and learn as they write.” Augustine/John Calvin ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
260:This power is that of my mind and is a natural endowment, but I myself cannot grasp the totality of what I am. Is ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
261:Prayer is the key that opens heaven; the favors we ask descend upon us the very instant our prayers ascend to God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
262:Homer invented these fictions and attributed human powers to the gods; I wish he had attributed divine powers to us ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
263:Indeed, the only cause of their [Rome] perishing was that they chose for their protectors gods condemned to perish. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
264:...those victories they boast were not the substantial joys of the happy, but the empty comforts of wretched men... ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
265:Ah, God, my God, what wretchedness I suffered in that world, and how I trifled with!

-St. Augustine on school ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
266:For it is one thing to see the Land of Peace from a wooded ridge, and yet another to walk the road that leads to it. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
267:The nature of God can never and nowhere be deficient in anything, while things made out of nothing can be deficient. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
268:But my sin was this, that I looked for pleasure, beauty, and truth not in [God] but in myself and his other creatures ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
269:Care for your body as though you were going to live forever. Care for your soul as if you were going to die tomorrow. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
270:Hence it is not the case that every bad man will become good, but no one will be good who was not bad originally. Yet ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
271:I was not yet in love, but I was in love with love itself; and I sought for something to love, since I loved nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
272:The house of my soul is too small to receive Thee: let it be enlarged by Thee. It is all in ruins: do Thou repair it. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
273:Alabarán al Señor quienes lo buscan; pues si lo buscan lo habrán de encontrar; y si lo encuentran lo habrán de alabar. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
274:Ignorance and stupidity are given the names of simplicity and innocence...Idleness appears as desire for a quiet life. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
275:I was inflamed to love, and seek, and obtain, and hold, and embrace, not some sect, but wisdom itself-whatever it was. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
276:Thy purpose unchanged; receivest again what Thou findest, yet didst never lose; never in need, yet rejoicing in gains; ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
277:entre más se engaña, más se es alabado. ¡Tanta es la ceguera de los hombres, que hasta de, su misma ceguera se glorían! ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
278:the poverty of human intelligence has plenty to say, for inquiry employs more words than the discovery of the solution; ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
279:Every day my conscience makes confession relying on the hope of Your mercy as more to be trusted than its own innocence. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
280:Oh! that Thou wouldest enter into my heart, and inebriate it, that I may forget my ills, and embrace Thee, my sole good! ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
281:For no one should consider anything his own, except perhaps a lie, since all truth is from Him who said, "I am the truth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
282:Late have I loved you, Beauty so very ancient and so ever new. Late I have loved you! You were within, but I was without. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
283:Men are so blind in their impiety that, as it were, they bump into mountains and refuse to see what hits them in the eye. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
284:We made bad use of immortality, and so ended up dying; Christ made good use of mortality, so that we might end up living. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
285:For out of the perverse will came lust, and the service of lust ended in habit, and habit, not resisted, became necessity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
286:Have I not confessed against myself my transgressions unto Thee, and Thou, my God, hast forgiven the iniquity of my heart? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
287:If you believe what you like in the Gospel, and reject what you don't like, it is not the Gospel you believe, but yourself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
288:I know well enough what it is, provided that nobody asks me; but if I am asked what it is and try to explain, I am baffled. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
289:Your wishes are bad, when you desire that one whom you hate or fear should be in such a condition that you can conquer him. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
290:The promise of satisfaction in worldly loves is an enduring lie that moves the soul to unfaithfulness from its proper lover. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
291:Conviértanse pues a ti; que te busquen, pues tú, el creador, no abandonas jamás a tus criaturas como ellas te abandonan a ti. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
292:Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending. You plan a tower that will pierce the clouds? Lay first the foundation of humility. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
293:Every soul must pay back what it owes, either by using well what it received, or by losing what it was unwilling to use well. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
294:Where your pleasure is, there is your treasure: where your treasure, there your heart; where your heart, there your happiness ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
295:His knowledge is not like ours, which has three tenses: present, past, and future. God's knowledge has no change or variation. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
296:However alarming, however distressing self-knowledge may be, better that than the tremendous evils of self-ignorance."--Caird. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
297:...It is no less impossible for us not to taste as bitter the death of those whose life for us was such a source of sweetness. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
298:Justice being taken away, then, what are kingdoms but great robberies? For what are robberies themselves, but little kingdoms? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
299:Remove justice and what are states but gangs of bandits on a large scale? And what are bandit gangs but kingdoms in miniature? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
300:Forgiveness is the remission of sins. For it is by this that what has been lost, and was found, is saved from being lost again. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
301:Let Him do what pleases Him; let Him disclose Himself when it pleases Him! I now commit myself wholly to His care and clemency. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
302:The promise of satisfaction in worldly loves is an enduring lie that moves the soul to unfaithfulness from its proper lover. We ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
303:Those who ask ‘What was God doing before he made heaven and earth?’ are still steeped in error which they should have discarded. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
304:Where shall I go, beyond the bounds of heaven and earth, that God may come to me, since He has said: Heaven and earth do I fill. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
305:For the good make use of this world in order to enjoy God, whereas the evil want to make use of God in order to enjoy the world – ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
306:To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek him the greatest adventure; to find him, the greatest human achievement. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
307:Understanding is the reward of faith. Therefore, seek not to understand that you may believe, but believe that you may understand. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
308:Who can plumb its depths? And yet it is a faculty of my soul. Although it is part of my nature, I cannot understand all that I am. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
309:Thus, every entity, even if it is a defective one, in so far as it is an entity, is good. In so far as it is defective, it is evil. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
310:Woe is me! how high art Thou in the highest, and how deep in the deepest! and Thou never departest, and we scarcely return to Thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
311:What is time then? If nobody asks me, I know; but if I were desirous to explain it to one that should ask me, plainly I do not know. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
312:When it happens that I am more moved by the song than the thing which is sung, I confess that I sin in a manner deserving punishment ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
313:But it must not be supposed that folly is as powerful as truth, just because it can, if it likes, shout louder and longer than truth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
314:Why, therefore, do we delay to abandon our hopes of this world, and give ourselves wholly to seek after God and the blessed life? But ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
315:You stir us to take pleasure in praising you, because you have made us for yourself, and our heart is restless until it rests in you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
316:Faith is to believe that which you do not yet see; and the reward of this faith is to see that which you believe. - Saint Augustine of Hippo P.g64 ~ Rhonda Byrne,
317:Your best servant is the person who does not attend so much to hearing what he himself wants as to willing what he has heard from you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
318:You stir man to take pleasure in praising you, because you have made us for yourself, and our heart is restless until it rests in you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
319: Chapter XVI.--He Disapproves of the Mode of Educating Youth, and He Points Out Why Wickedness is Attributed to the Gods by the Poets. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
320:Si nemo me queret, scio; si aliqui explicare velim, nescio.

"If no one asks me, I know. If I am asked to explain,I do not know". ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
321:was not yet in love, but I was in love with love, and from the very depth of my need hated myself for not more keenly feeling the need. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
322:Volgevo le spalle alla luce e la faccia agli oggetti da essa illuminati, per cui la faccia vedeva le cose luminose, ma non era luminosa. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
323:I fell away from you, my God, and I went astray, too far astray from you, the support of my youth, and I became to myself a land of want. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
324:Ami e non ti scomponi, sei geloso e imperturbabile, ti penti e non provi rimorso, ti infurii e resti in pace, muti le opere ma non l’idea. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
325:They, then, who are destined to die, need not be careful to inquire what death they are to die, but into what place death will usher them. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
326:Thou owest men nothing, yet payest out to them as if in debt to thy creature, and when thou dost cancel debts thou losest nothing thereby. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
327:Vous cherchez la vie heureuse dans la région de la mort. Elle n'est pas là. Comment y aurait-il vie heureuse où il n'y a même pas de vie ? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
328:Y la ambición, ¿qué busca, sino honores y gloria, siendo tú el único sobre todas las cosas digno de ser honrado y glorificado eternamente? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
329:The peace of the celestial city is the perfectly ordered and harmonious enjoyment of God, and of one another in God. (City of God, Book 19) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
330:So too let him rejoice and delight in finding you who are beyond discovery rather than fail to find you by supposing you to be discoverable. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
331:¿De dónde me viene pues esta vacilación para dejar de lado las esperanzas del mundo y consagrarme a la búsqueda de Dios y de la vida feliz?". ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
332:Men go forth to wonder at the heights of mountains, the extent of the oceans, and the courses of the stars, and omit to wonder at themselves. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
333:O Holy Spirit, descend plentifully into my heart. Enlighten the dark corners of this neglected dwelling and scatter there Thy cheerful beams. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
334:He is Thy best servant who looks not so much to hear that from Thee which himself willeth, as rather to will that, which from Thee he heareth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
335:He is Thy best servant who looks not so much to hear that from Whee which himself willeth, as rather to will that, which from Thee he heareth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
336:Too late came I to love you, O Beauty both so ancient and so new! Too late came I to love you - and behold you were with me all the time . . . ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
337:Hence a ‘bishop’ who has set his heart on a position of eminence rather than an opportunity for service should realize that he is no bishop. So ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
338:it is a higher glory... to stay war itself with a word, than to slay men with the sword, and to procure or maintain peace by peace, not by war. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
339:186. " I never have any difficulty believing in miracles, since I experienced the miracle of change in my own heart." ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
340:be ye transformed (saith he) by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God. Wherefore ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
341:For a prohibition always increases an illicit desire so long as the love of and joy in holiness is too weak to conquer the inclination to sin... ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
342:The whole of history since the ascension of Jesus into heaven is concerned with one work only: the building and perfecting of this “City of God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
343:For whence had that former sorrow so easily penetrated to the quick, but that I had poured out my soul upon the dust, in loving one who must die? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
344:Variation on the middle sentence: A thing is not necessarily false because it is badly expressed, nor true because it is expressed magnificently. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
345:For in truth lust is made out of a perverse will, and when lust is served, it becomes habit, and when habit is not resisted, it becomes necessity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
346:It is not reason which turns the young man from God; it is the flesh. Skepticism but provides him with the excuses for the new life he is leading. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
347:La esperanza que se ve, ya no es esperanza. ¿Cómo esperar lo que uno ve? Pero si esperamos lo que no vemos, en paciencia esperamos (Rm. 8, 24-25), ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
348:Only one possibility remains: the movement by which the will turns from enjoying the Creator to enjoying his creatures belongs to the will itself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
349:That joy is to know You as You are. This is the happy life, to rejoice in You, of You, and for You. This is the happy life, and there is no other. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
350:There can only be two basic loves... the love of God unto the forgetfulness of self, or the love of self unto the forgetfulness and denial of God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
351:... They who have just ideas, and express them in suitable language, would need to use no long discourse to refute the errors of empty conjecture. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
352:The Incarnate Word has been spoken. It calls the soul back to its place of peace that cannot be disturbed and love that will never be disappointed. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
353:No one should be ashamed to admit that they do not know what they do not know, in case while feigning knowledge, they come to deserve to never know. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
354:Often the contempt of vainglory becomes a source of even more vainglory, for it is not being scorned when the contempt is something one is proud of. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
355:This experience sufficiently illuminates the truth that free curiosity has greater power to stimulate learning than rigorous coercion. Nevertheless, ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
356:To confess, then, is to praise and glorify God; it is an exercise in self-knowledge and true humility in the atmosphere of grace and reconciliation. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
357:You are not the mind itself. For You are the Lord God of the mind. All these things are liable to change, but You remain immutable above all things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
358:Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
359:But whosoever recount his true merits to Thee, what is it that he recounts to Thee but Thine own gifts? Oh, if men would know themselves to be men... ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
360:No longer was he the man who had joined the crowd; he was now one of the crowd he had joined, and a genuine companion of those who had led him there. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
361:Oh! that I might repose on Thee! Oh! that Thou wouldest enter into my heart, inebriate it, that I may forget my ills, and embrace Thee, my sole good? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
362:they have only that power which the secret decree of the Almighty allots to them, in order that we may not set too great store by earthly prosperity, ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
363:This only I know, that woe is me except in Thee: not only without but within myself also; and all abundance, which is not my God, is emptiness to me. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
364:What great good, then, we are to expect and hope from participating in his divinity, when even his distress calms us and his weakness strengthens us. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
365:Los hombres están siempre dispuestos a curiosear y averiguar sobre las vidas ajenas, pero les da pereza conocerse a sí mismos y corregir su propia vida ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
366:Ni son las mismas cosas las que entran, sino las imágenes de las cosas sentidas, las cuales quedan allí a disposición del pensamiento que las recuerda. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
367:O Vosso servo mais fiel é aquele que não espera nem prefere ouvir aquilo que quer, mas se propõe a aceitar, antes de tudo, a resposta que de Vós ouvis. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
368:There is no sin unless through a man's own will, and hence the reward when we do right things also of our own will."

(Against Fortunatus) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
369:This, then, is true liberty: the joy that comes in doing what is right. At the same time, it is also devoted service in obedience to righteous precept. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
370:What, then, is the God I worship? He can be none but the Lord God himself, for who but the Lord is God? What other refuge can there be, except our God? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
371:What we say would not be complete if one word did not cease to exist when it has sounded its constituent parts, so that it can be succeeded by another. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
372:For instantly, as the sentence ended, there was infused in my heart something like the light of full certainty and all the gloom of doubt vanished away. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
373:The reward of virtue will be God himself, who gave the virtue, together with the promise of himself, the best and greatest of all possible promises. For ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
374:Hope has two beautiful daughters; their names are Anger and Courage. Anger at the way things are, and Courage to see that they do not remain as they are. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
375:Oh! that I might repose on Thee! Oh! that Thou wouldest enter into my heart, and inebriate it, that I may forget my ills, and embrace Thee, my sole good! ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
376:What should you, O man, do, you who seek your own glory whenever you do anything good, while when you do something bad, you figure out ways to blame God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
377:Y es que el alimento que se toma en sueños, no obstante ser muy semejante al que se toma despierto, no alimenta a los que duermen, porque están dormidos. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
378:Heaven forbid that we should believe in such a way as not to accept or seek reasons, since we could not even believe if we did not possess rational souls. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
379:243. “Faith seeks, understanding finds. This is why the prophet says, ‘Unless you believe, you will not understand’.[Isaiah 7:9]”~ Saint Augustine of Hippo ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
380:memoria por sí mismo, sino por su imagen, puesto que, si estuviese presente por sí mismo, el olvido no haría que nos acordásemos, sino que nos olvidásemos? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
381:The winds of gossip blow from the chests of people ventilating their opinions; so the soul is carried about and turned, twisted and twisted back again. The ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
382:Bad times, hard times, this is what people keep saying; but let us live well, and times shall be good. We are the times: Such as we are, such are the times. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
383:Can human folly harbour a more arrogant or ungrateful thought than the notion that whereas God makes man beautiful in body, man makes himself pure in heart? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
384:Volved, transgresores, al corazón y adheríos a aquél que es vuestro Hacedor. Estad con él, y permaneceréis estables; descansad en él, y estaréis tranquilos. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
385:FR : Celui qui perd sa passion perd plus que celui qui se perd dans sa passion
EN : Whoever loses his passion loses more than he who is lost in his passion ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
386:Go on, O Lord, and act: stir us up and call us back; inflame us and draw us to thee; stir us up and grow sweet to us; let us now love thee, let us run to thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
387:I held my heart back from positively accepting anything, since I was afraid of another fall, and in this condition of suspense I was being all the more killed. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
388:Purity both of the body and the soul rests on the steadfastness of the will strengthened by God's grace, and cannot be forcibly taken from an unwilling person. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
389:The soul is "torn apart in a painful condition as long as it prefers the eternal because of its Truth but does not discard the temporal because of familiarity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
390:The wicked make all God's good works serve evil purposes but the person of good will, to the contrary, makes the evil doings of the wicked serve good purposes. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
391:Though I was retreating from the Truth, I appeared to myself to be going toward it because I did not yet know that evil with nothing but the privation of good. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
392:Señor, cualquiera que delante de Vos contara y alegara sus verdaderos méritos, ¿qué hacía sino contar lo que Vos le habíais dado, pues todos son dones vuestros? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
393:If you find physical pleasure in earthly experiences, use the occasion to praise God for these gifts. Turn your love not on the pleasures but toward their Maker. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
394:Since God is the highest good, he would not allow any evil to exist in his works unless his omnipotence and goodness were such as to bring good even out of evil. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
395:Idling of our elders is called business; the idling of boys, though quite like it, is punished by those same elders, and no one pities either the boys or the men. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
396:how shall we be beautiful? By loving the One who is always beautiful. The more love grows in you, the more beauty grows: for love itself is the beauty of the soul. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
397:I call [love to God] the motion of the soul toward the enjoyment of God for his own sake, and the enjoyment of one's self and of one's neighbor for the sake of God ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
398:I write because I've made progress and I make progress because I write." (i.e. I write as I learn and I learn as I write)

St. Augustine
(354 - 430 A.D.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
399:When I come to be united to thee with all my being, then there will be no more pain and toil for me, and my life shall be a real life, being wholly filled by thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
400:In yourself you rouse us, giving us delight in glorifying you, because you made us with yourself as our goal, and our heart is restless until it rests in you. Grant ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
401:It’s not in the book or in the writer that readers discern the truth of what they read; they see it in themselves, if the light of truth has penetrated their minds. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
402:Such is the strength of the burden of habit. Here I have the power to be but do not wish it. There I wish to be but lacks the power. On both grounds, I'm in misery. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
403:word "thing" in a strict sense, to signify that which is never employed as a sign of anything else: for example, wood, stone, cattle, and other things of that kind. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
404:Thus I remained to myself an unhappy lodging where I could neither stay nor leave.
For where could my heart fly from my heart? Where could I fly from my own self? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
405:I have read in Plato and Cicero sayings that are wise and very beautiful; but I have never read in either of them: Come unto me all ye that labor and are heavy laden. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
406:I write because I've made progress and I make progress because I write."

(I write as I learn and I learn as I write)

St. Augustine
(354 - 430 A.D.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
407:My mother was already well aware of that, and her plan was to commit to the waves the clay out of which I would later be shaped rather than the actual image itself.20 ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
408:This is pride when the soul abandons Him to Whom it ought to cleave as its end and becomes a kind of end to itself. This happens when it becomes its own satisfaction. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
409:Though defensive violence will always be 'a sad necessity' in the eyes of men of principle, it would be still more unfortunate if wrongdoers should dominate just men. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
410:But unscrupulous ambition has nothing to work upon, save in a nation corrupted by avarice and luxury. Moreover, a people becomes avaricious and luxurious by prosperity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
411:But where could I find such pleasure in you, Lord - except in you, who teaches us by sorrow, who wound us to heal us, and kill us so that we may not die apart from you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
412:Thou gavest; and to my nurses willingly to give me what Thou gavest them. For they, with a heaven-taught affection, willingly gave me what they abounded with from Thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
413:For a possession which is not diminished by being shared with others, if it is possessed and not shared, is not yet possessed as it ought to be possessed. The Lord saith ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
414:Humility must accompany all our actions, must be with us everywhere; for as soon as we glory in our good works they are of no further value to our advancement in virtue. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
415:In You we do not fear that there will be no home to return to if we wander off. While we are away, You preserve our mansion with a patience that stretches into eternity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
416:What grace is meant to do is to help good people, not to escape their sufferings, but to bear them with a stout heart, with a fortitude that finds its strength in faith. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
417:Chapter 3.   That the Romans Did Not Show Their Usual Sagacity When They Trusted that They Would Be Benefited by the Gods Who Had Been Unable to Defend Troy.    And these ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
418:For the will cannot be forced into such iniquity by anything superior or equal to it, since that would be unjust; or by anything inferior to it, since that is impossible. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
419:Free curiosity has greater power to stimulate learning than rigorous coercion. Nevertheless, the free ranging flux of curiosity is channeled by discipline under Your Law. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
420:Tú me dirigías entonces con secretos movimientos de tu providencia y, poco a poco, ibas poniendo ante mis ojos mis funestos errores, para que los viera y los aborreciera. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
421:I fear my own self-deception, for my corrupt heart lies even to itself. I offer no defense against Your judgment, for if You, Lord, kept a record of sins, who could stand? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
422:Cicero, Hortensius, teaching that happiness is not found in physical pleasures of luxurious food, drink, and sex, but in a dedication of the mind to the discovery of truth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
423:Music, that is the science or the sense of proper modulation, is likewise given by God's generosity to mortals having rational souls in order to lead them to higher things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
424:... The soul which is led by God and His wisdom, rather than by bodily concupiscence, will certainly never consent to the desire aroused in its own flesh by another's lust. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
425:To whatever the soul of man turns, unless toward God, it cleaves to sorrow, even though the things outside God and outside itself to which it turns may be things of beauty. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
426:When consent takes the form of seeking to possess the things we wish, this is called desire. When consent takes the form of enjoying the things we wish, this is called joy. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
427:All the dancer's gestures are signs of things, and the dance is called rational, because it aptly signifies and displays something over and above the pleasure of the senses. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
428:Just as truly as the Confessions are the autobiography of St. Augustine, The City of God is the autobiography of the Church written by the most Catholic of her great saints. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
429:Since you cannot do good to all, you are to pay special attention to those who, by accidents of time, or place, or circumstance, are brought into closer connection with you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
430:The throne of wisdom is the soul of the righteous, that is, wisdom sits on the soul of the righteous as on her chair, as on her throne, and there judges whatever she judges. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
431:Thus, a good man, though a slave, is free; but a wicked man, though a king, is a slave. For he serves, not one man alone, but what is worse, as many masters as he has vices. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
432:He (Scipio of Rome) did not consider that republic flourishing whose walls stand, but whose morals are in ruins. -- City of God, Book 1, argument #34 on The Overthrow of Rome ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
433:Is truth then a nothing, simply because it is not spread out through space either finite or infinite?" Then from afar you cried to me, "By no means, for I am who I am. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
434:I write because I've made progress and I make progress because I write.
(i.e. I write as I learn and I learn as I write)

St. Augustine of Hippo
(354 - 430 A.D.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
435:Evidently there is difficulty, real difficulty, in learning a foreign language at all, as if it sprinkled all the sweet flavor of the Greek mythical stories with a foul taste. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
436:Fecisti nos ad te, et inquietum
est cor nostrum donec
resquiescat
in Te.

(You have made us for you, and our heart is in turmoil until it finds its rest in you) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
437:Radost koju daje svijet isprazna je. Očekujemo je s velikom željom, no kada dođe, ne zadržavamo je. Tuga onoga tko trpi nepravdu bolja je od radosti onoga koji čini bezakonje. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
438:What is going on in our minds, then, that we should be more highly delighted at finding cherished objects, or having them restored to us, than if we had always kept them safe? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
439:so strong is that bond of fellowship in married persons, that, although it be tied for the sake of begetting children, not even for the sake of begetting children is it loosed. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
440:He who lives according to God ought to cherish towards evil men a perfect hatred, so that he shall neither hate the man because of his vice nor love the vice because of the man. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
441:Ein Zeichen ist nämlich ein Ding, das bewirkt, dass außer seiner äußeren Erscheinung, die es den Sinnen einprägt, irgendetwas anderes aus ihm selbst im Nachdenken ausgelöst wird. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
442:How high a price we pay for the burden of habit! I am fitted for life here where I do not want to be, I want to live there but am unfit for it, and on both counts I am miserable. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
443:I see not how the man can have permission to marry another, in case he have left an adulteress, when a woman has not to be married to another, in case she have left an adulterer. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
444:I write because I've made progress and I make progress because I write.

(i.e. I write as I learn and I learn as I write)

St. Augustine of Hippo
(354 - 430 A.D.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
445:Of course, as everyone knows, neither my five books nor any five hundred books are sufficient to silence and pertinacity. It is the glory of vain men never to yield to the truth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
446:And how shall I call upon my God, my God and Lord, since, when I call for Him, I shall be calling Him to myself? and what room is there within me, whither my God can come into me? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
447:Let such a person rejoice even to ask the question, "What does this mean?" Yes, let him rejoice in that, and choose to find by not finding rather than by finding fail to find you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
448:Our city must remember that in the ranks of its enemies, lie hid fellow citizens to be, and that it is well to bear with them until we can reach them in their profession of faith. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
449:I write because I've made progress and I make progress because I write."

(i.e. I write as I learn and I learn as I write)

St. Augustine of Hippo
(354 - 430 A.D.) ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
450:La soberbia remeda a la excelencia, siendo así que sólo tú eres excelso y, la ambición busca los honores y la gloria, cuando sólo tú eres glorioso y merecedor de eternas alabanzas. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
451:Seek what ye seek; but it is not there where ye seek. Ye seek a blessed life in the land of death; it is not there. For how should there be a blessed life where life itself is not? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
452:But man did not so fall away94 as to become absolutely nothing; but being turned towards himself, his being became more contracted than it was when he clave to Him who supremely is. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
453:It is my faith that calls to you, Lord, the faith which you gave me and made to live in me through the merits of your Son, who became man, and through the ministry of your preacher. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
454:The bodies of irrational animals are bent toward the ground, whereas man was made to walk erect with his eyes on heaven, as though to remind him to keep his thoughts on things above. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
455:You can easily see what and endless, wearisome and fruitless task it would be if I were to refute all the unconsidered objections of people who pigheadly contradict everything I say. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
456:En lo que pecaba yo entonces era en buscar en mí mismo y en las demás criaturas, no en él, los deleites, grandezas y verdades, por lo que caía luego en dolores, confusiones y errores. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
457:It would have been more profitable to love the sun in the sky, which at least our eyes perceive truly, than those chimeras offered to a mind that had been led astray through its eyes. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
458:The good man, though a slave, is free; the wicked, though he reigns, is a slave, and not the slave of a single man, but - what is worse - the slave of as many masters as he has vices. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
459:What do you think you are doing by infesting the whole world? Because I do it with one puny boat, I am called a pirate; because you do it with a great fleet, you are called an emperor. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
460:Neither were they afraid of its being said to them, Why do you exhort us, and why do you rebuke us, if no good thing that we have is from us, and if our hearts are not in our own power? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
461:No en comilonas y embriagueces ,no en lechos y en liviandades, no en contiendas y emulaciones, sino revestíos de nuestro Señor Jesucristo y no cuidéis de la carne con demasiados deseos. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
462:If the things of this world delight you, praise God for them but turn your love away from them and give it to their Maker, so that in the things that please you you may not displease him. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
463:You never go away from us, yet we have difficulty in returning to You. Come, Lord, stir us up and call us back. Kindle and seize us. Be our fire and our sweetness. Let us love. Let us run. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
464:if we are wayfarers who want to return home, then we must see the world as a means of transportation (terestibus vel marinis vehiculis) and always remember to distinguish the means and ends. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
465:People go to admire lofty mountains, and huge breakers at sea, and crashing waterfalls, and vast stretches of ocean, and the dance of the stars, but they leave themselves behind out of sight. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
466:Porque esta misma pasión, que en la edad escolar tiene por objeto nueces, pelotas y pajaritos, en las edades posteriores, para prefectos y reyes, es ambición de oro, de tierras y de esclavos. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
467:When men cannot communicate their thoughts to each other, simply because of difference of language, all the similarity of their common human nature is of no avail to unite them in fellowship. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
468:Y si todas estas cosas que de Cristo se dicen fueran falsas, todo lo demás naufragaría en la mentira y no quedaría en los sagrados Libros ninguna esperanza de salvación para el género humano. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
469:For what am I to myself without Thee, but a guide to mine own downfall? Or what am I even at the best, but one sucking Thy milk, [268] and feeding upon Thee, the meat that perisheth not? [269] ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
470:The good Christian should beware of mathematicians. The danger already exists that mathematicians have made a covenant with the devil to darken the spirit and confine man in the bonds of Hell. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
471:Yet when it happens to me that the music moves me more than the subject of the song, I confess myself to commit a sin deserving punishment, and then I would prefer not to have heard the singer. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
472:If two friends ask you to judge a dispute, don't accept, because you will lose one friend; on the other hand, if two strangers come with the same request, accept because you will gain one friend. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
473:I loved not yet, yet I loved to love, and out of a deep-seated want, I hated myself for wanting not. I sought what I might love, in love with loving, and safety I hated, and a way without snares. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
474:El que no tiene mujer se preocupa de las cosas de Dios y de cómo agradarle; pero el que está unido en matrimonio se preocupa de las cosas del mundo y de cómo agradar a su mujer" (1Co 7, 28.32.33). ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
475:I heard Your voice from on high. "I am the food of the fully grown. Grow and you will feed on me. And you will not change Me into you, like the food of flesh eats. But you will be changed into Me. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
476:Quid est tempus? Si nemo me queret, scio; si aliqui explicare velim, nescio.

What then is time? If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks, I do not know. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
477:El bien que amáis proviene de él, pero sólo es bueno y suave en cuanto está en relación a él; pero justamente será amargo si, habiendo abandonado a Dios, injustamente se amare lo que de él procede. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
478:Oh, God, to know you is life. To serve You is freedom. To praise you is the soul's joy and delight. Guard me with the power of Your grace here and in all places. Now and at all times, forever. Amen. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
479:The garden of the Lord, brethren, includes – yes, it truly includes – includes not only the roses of martyrs but also the lilies of virgins, and the ivy of married people, and the violets of widows. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
480:What could be more hapless than a man controlled by his own creations? It is surely easier for a man to cease to be a man by worshiping man-made gods than for idols to become divine by being adored. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
481:If you would attain to what you are not yet, you must always be displeased by what you are. For where you are pleased with yourself there you have remained. Keep adding, keep walking, keep advancing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
482:There could be nothing more fortunate for human affairs than that by the mercy of God they who are endowed with true piety of life if they have the skill for ruling people should also have the power. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
483:For no wisdom is true wisdom if it does not direct all its prudence, fortitude, temperance, and justice towards that final state where God shall be all in all in an assured eternity and perfect peace. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
484:The good man is neither uplifted with the good things of time, nor broken by its ills; but the wicked man, because he is corrupted by this world's happiness, feels himself punished by its unhappiness. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
485:Though you hale my body to that place, and there set me, can you force me also to turn my mind or my eyes to those shows? I shall then be absent while present, and so shall overcome both you and them. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
486:It is not that we keep His commandments first and that then He loves but that He loves us and then we keep His commandments. This is that grace which is revealed to the humble but hidden from the proud. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
487:Time was also (as an infant) I knew no Latin; but this I learned without fear or suffering, by mere observation, amid the caresses of my nursery and jests of friends, smiling and sportively encouraging me. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
488:True inner righteousness does not judge according to custom but by the measure of the most perfect law of God Almighty by which the mores of various places and times were adapted to those places and times. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
489:Hence words are learnt; hence eloquence is to be attained, most necessary to persuade people to your way of thinking, and to unfold your opinions." So, in truth, we should never have understood these words, ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
490:How can the past and future be, when the past no longer is, and the future is not yet? As for the present, if it were always present and never moved on to become the past, it would not be time, but eternity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
491:Kötülüğün iyilikten yoksun kalmak olduğunu bilmiyordum. İyilikten yoksun kalmak hiçliğe götürür. Ben, maddi olandan ötesini göremeyen gözlerimle, hayallerin ötesini göremeyen aklımla bunu nasıl görebilirdim? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
492:Their irreligious pride makes them withdraw from you and eclipse your great light from reaching themselves. They can foresee a future eclipse of the sun, but do not perceive their own eclipse in the present. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
493:To sum up, I would not exist, my God, I would not exist at all, unless you existed in me. Or is it rather that I would not exist unless I existed in you, from whom, through whom, in whom, everything exists?*8 ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
494:After saying all that, what have we said, my God, my life, my holy sweetness? What does anyone who speaks of you really say? Yet woe betide those who fail to speak, while the chatterboxes go on saying nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
495:So anyone who thinks that he has understood the divine scriptures or any part of them, but cannot by his understanding build up this double love of God and neighbor, has not yet succeeded in understanding them. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
496:Sprawiedliwości i niewinności pragnę, pięknych i jasnych dla oczu czystych, ich pragnę, które im bardziej sycą, tym bardziej się ich pożąda. W nich jest spokój pewny, w nich jest życie, którego nic nie zakłóci. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
497:Tú enjugas con blandura sus lágrimas, para que lloren todavía más y en su llanto se gocen. Porque tú, Señor, no eres un hombre de carne y sangre; eres el creador que los hiciste y que los restauras y consuelas. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
498:Era yo miserable, como lo es toda alma prisionera del amor de las cosas temporales, que se siente despedazar cuando las pierde, sintiendo entonces su miseria, por la que es miserable aun antes de que las pierda. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
499:No man has a right to lead such a life of contemplation as to forget in his own ease the service due his neighbor; nor has any man a right to be so immersed in active life as to neglect the contemplation of God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
500:There are others whose concept of God, such as it is, ascribes to him the nature and moods of the human spirit, a mistake which ties their arguments about God to distorted and misleading rules of interpretation. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



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