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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [4]


Angiras
Sri_Aurobindo
Sri_Ramana_Maharshi
the_Temple_of_Sages

--- PRIMARY CLASS


Title

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [1]


2.24 - The Message of the Gita
Choiceless Awareness A Selection of Passages for the Study of the Teachings of J. Krishnamurti
God and SAGES
Hidden Messages in Water
Liber 2 - The Message of The Master Therion
passage
Sage
the Message
the Sage
the Temple of Sages
the Temple of Sages (notes)
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, Savitri (extended toc), the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


sage ::: n. 1. A man who is venerated for his profound wisdom. sage’s, sages, king-sages. adj. 2. Having or exhibiting profound wisdom and calm judgement.

sagebrush ::: n. --> A low irregular shrub (Artemisia tridentata), of the order Compositae, covering vast tracts of the dry alkaline regions of the American plains; -- called also sagebush, and wild sage.

sagely ::: adv. --> In a sage manner; wisely.

sagene ::: n. --> A Russian measure of length equal to about seven English feet.

sageness ::: n. --> The quality or state of being sage; wisdom; sagacity; prudence; gravity.

sagenite ::: n. --> Acicular rutile occurring in reticulated forms imbedded in quartz.

sagenitic ::: a. --> Resembling sagenite; -- applied to quartz when containing acicular crystals of other minerals, most commonly rutile, also tourmaline, actinolite, and the like.

sage ::: n. --> A suffruticose labiate plant (Salvia officinalis) with grayish green foliage, much used in flavoring meats, etc. The name is often extended to the whole genus, of which many species are cultivated for ornament, as the scarlet sage, and Mexican red and blue sage.
The sagebrush.
A wise man; a man of gravity and wisdom; especially, a man venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave philosopher.

SAGE
1. {Systems Administrators Guild}.
2. {Semi-Automatic Ground Environment}.
(2001-01-27)

sagebrush ::: n. --> A low irregular shrub (Artemisia tridentata), of the order Compositae, covering vast tracts of the dry alkaline regions of the American plains; -- called also sagebush, and wild sage.

sagely ::: adv. --> In a sage manner; wisely.

sagene ::: n. --> A Russian measure of length equal to about seven English feet.

sageness ::: n. --> The quality or state of being sage; wisdom; sagacity; prudence; gravity.

sagenite ::: n. --> Acicular rutile occurring in reticulated forms imbedded in quartz.

sagenitic ::: a. --> Resembling sagenite; -- applied to quartz when containing acicular crystals of other minerals, most commonly rutile, also tourmaline, actinolite, and the like.

sage ::: n. --> A suffruticose labiate plant (Salvia officinalis) with grayish green foliage, much used in flavoring meats, etc. The name is often extended to the whole genus, of which many species are cultivated for ornament, as the scarlet sage, and Mexican red and blue sage.
The sagebrush.
A wise man; a man of gravity and wisdom; especially, a man venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave philosopher.

sages that visited Heaven during their lifetime,

sage, Simeon ben Yohai, reputed author of The

SAGE ::: 1. (body, job) Systems Administrators Guild.2. (project) Semi-Automatic Ground Environment.(2001-01-27)

Sage ::: See hakam. ::: Saiqa ::: A section of the Palestinian Liberation Organization, founded in 1968, that was funded by Syria and supported Palestinian liberation alongside pan-Arab ideology that placed the Ba’athist Syrian party in power.

sage ::: n. 1. A man who is venerated for his profound wisdom. sage’s, sages, king-sages. adj. 2. Having or exhibiting profound wisdom and calm judgement.


--- QUOTES [142 / 142 - 500 / 15200] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   66 Sri Aurobindo
   14 The Mother
   10 Joseph Campbell
   6 Peter J Carroll
   3 Sri Ramakrishna
   3 Ken Wilber
   3 Aleister Crowley
   2 Tseu-tse
   2 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Lewis Carroll
   1 \“… we must not only cut asunder the snare of the mind and the senses
   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 Tolstoi
   1 Swami Vivekananda
   1 Stephen King
   1 Stephen Hawkings
   1 Sri Guru Granth Sahib
   1 Sri Chidananda
   1 Simone de Beauvoir
   1 Saadi
   1 Rudolf Steiner
   1 Robert Anton Wilson
   1 Rig Veda
   1 Rabindranath Tagore
   1 Nichiren
   1 Manly P Hall
   1 John Milton
   1 Isaac Asimov
   1 Hafiz
   1 George Gordon Byron
   1 George Carlin
   1 Georg C Lichtenberg
   1 Essential Integral
   1 Eliphas Levi
   1 Dr Alok Pandey
   1 Dogen Zenji
   1 Deepak Chopra
   1 Carl Jung
   1 Buddhist Canons in Pali
   1 Bhagavad Gita
   1 A E van Vogt

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   32 Bob Saget
   27 Angie Sage
   23 Laozi
   7 Riley Sager
   7 Anonymous
   6 Sage Francis
   6 Richelle Mead
   6 Alain Rene Lesage
   5 Terry Pratchett
   5 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   5 Lao Tzu
   4 Stephen King
   4 Rumi
   4 Mahatma Gandhi
   3 William Shakespeare
   3 Toba Beta
   3 Thich Nhat Hanh
   3 Otto von Bismarck
   3 Confucius
   2 Vicki Lesage
   2 Swami Vivekananda
   2 Ron Paul
   2 Roland Barthes
   2 Rick Riordan
   2 Ram Dass
   2 Publilius Syrus
   2 Penn Jillette
   2 Paracelsus
   2 Muhammad Ali Jinnah
   2 Markus Zusak
   2 Lord Byron
   2 Justin Cronin
   2 Joyce Meyer
   2 Howard Gossage
   2 Gabrielle Bernstein
   2 Claude M Bristol
   2 Charlotte Bront
   2 Asa Don Brown
   2 Albert Camus

1:Alone the sage can recognize the sage. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
2:Truly the sage is not other than God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
3:The Being that is one, sages speak of in many terms. ~ Rig Veda,
4:Is there a single man who can see what the Sage cannot even conceive? ~ Tseu-tse,
5:To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage. ~ Eliphas Levi,
6:The sage's rule of moral conduct has its principle in the hearts of all men. ~ Tseu-tse,
7:Every child comes with the message that God is not yet discouraged of man. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
8:The company of saints and sages is one of the chief agents of spiritual progress. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
9:True knowledge does not grow old, so have declared the sages of all times. ~ Buddhist Canons in Pali,
10:Never let life's hardships disturb you. No one can avoid problems, not even saints or sages. ~ Nichiren,
11:In the world we live in, one fool makes many fools, but one sage only a few sages. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
12:Mind is a passage, not a culmination. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.14 - The Supermind as Creator,
13:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all. ~ Aleister Crowley,
14:Our death is made a passage to new worlds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
15:Death is a passage, not the goal of our walk: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
16:to interpret every manifestation of existence as a direct message from the infinite Chaos to himself personally ~ Peter J Carroll,
17:The collective dream is the hypnosis of social conditioning. Only sages, psychotics & geniuses manage to break free. ~ Deepak Chopra,
18:The sage is never alone... he bears in himself the Lord of all things. My Blessings. ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother 21 September,
19:I believe that it is his message; all the rest are the preparations, but Savitri is the message. ~ The Mother, In 1963 to Satprem (MA 1963:86),
20:The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light. ~ Joseph Campbell,
21:A divine life in a divine body is the formula of the ideal that we envisage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 5.03 - The Divine Body,
22:But hail, thou Goddess, sage and holy, Hail, divinest melancholy, Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the Sense of human sight. ~ John Milton,
23:(Darshan Message) Sri Aurobindo's message is an immortal sunlight radiating over the future. 15 August 1972 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
24:Many-visaged is the cosmic Soul;A touch can alter the fixed front of Fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
25:Order is not inconsistent with liberty but rather the condition for the right use of liberty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga the Message,
26:There is the mystic realm whence leaps the powerWhose fire burns in the eyes of seer and sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
27:Imps with wry limbs and carved beast visages,Sprite-prompters goblin-wizened or faery-small, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
28:Even the saint and the sage continue to have difficulties and to be limited by their human nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Difficulties of Yoga,
29:The awakened sages call a person wise when all his undertakings are free from anxiety about results; all his selfish desires have been consumed in the fire of knowledge. ~ Bhagavad Gita,
30:The Divine Truth is greater than any religion or creed or scripture or idea or philosophy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Himself and the Ashram Passages from The Synthesis of Yoga,
31:These sages breathed for God’s delight in things.Assisting the slow entries of the gods,Sowing in young minds immortal thoughts they lived, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.04 - The Quest,
32:Ordinary men pronounce a sackful of discourses on religion, but do not put a grain into practice, while the sage speaks little, but his whole life is religion put in to action ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
33:The small man builds cages for everyone he knows While the sage, who has to duck his head when the moon is low, Keeps dropping keys all night long For the beautiful rowdy prisoners. ~ Hafiz,
34:But many-visaged is the cosmic Soul;A touch can alter the fixed front of Fate.A sudden turn can come, a road appear. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
35:It's difficult for me to feel that a solid page without the breakups of paragraphs can be interesting. I break mine up perhaps sooner than I should in terms of the usage of the English language. ~ A E van Vogt,
36:For millennia magicians, philosophers and scientists and various other explorers have sought The Map of reality. This map has grown exponentially larger with the passage of time. ~ Peter J Carroll, The Octavo ,
37:Thus is it even with the seer and sage;For still the human limits the divine:Out of our thoughts we must leap up to sight, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.11 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
38:Already God is near, the Truth is close:Because the dark atheist body knows him not,Must the sage deny the Light, the seer his soul? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
39:The Overmind has to be reached and brought down before the Supermind descent is at all possible-for the Overmind is the passage through which one passes from mind to Supermind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I 155,
40:Once more in the land of the saints and sages will burn up the fire of the ancient Yoga and the hearts of her people will be lifted up into the neighbourhood of the Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Swaraj,
41:Yet you must not cling to the words of the old sages either; they, too, may not be right. Even if you believe them, you should be alert so that, in the event that something superior comes along, you may follow that. ~ Dogen Zenji,
42:In a small fragile seed a great tree lurks,In a tiny gene a thinking being is shut;A little element in a little sperm,It grows and is a conqueror and a sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
43:Every man's true teacher is his own Higher Self, and when the life is brought under the control of reason, this Higher Self is released from bondage to appetites and impulses, and becomes Priest, Sage and Illuminator. ~ Manly P Hall,
44:Life-GodLife’s visage hides life’s real self from sight;Life’s secret sense is written within, above.The thought that gives it sense lives far beyond; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
45:In the passage of the lotus of the throatWhere speech must rise and the expressing mindAnd the heart’s impulse run towards word and act,A glad uplift and a new working came. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
46:One thing that comes out of myth is that at the bottom of the abyss comes the voice of salvation. The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light. ~ Joseph Campbell,
47:Doom is a passage for our inborn force,Our ordeal is the hidden spirit’s choice,Ananke is our being’s own decree. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Joy of Union; the Ordeal of the Foreknowledge of Death and the Heart’s Grief and Pain,
48:My life is the life of village and continent,I am earth’s agony and her throbs of bliss;I share all creatures’ sorrow and contentAnd feel the passage of every stab and kiss. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Cosmic Spirit,
49:No danger can perturb my spirit’s calm:My acts are Thine; I do Thy works and pass;Failure is cradled on Thy deathless arm,Victory is Thy passage mirrored in Fortune’s glass. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 1.18 - The Divine Worker,
50:Love men, love God. Fear not to love, O King,Fear not to enjoy;For Death’s a passage, grief a fancied thingFools to annoy.From self escape and find in love aloneA higher joy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.23 - The Rishi,
51:But for the god in their breasts unsatisfied, but for his spurringsSoon would the hero turn beast and the sage reel back to the savage;Man from his difficult heights would recoil and be mud in the earth-mud. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
52:Philosophy not only purifies the reason and predisposes it to the contact of the universal and the infinite, but tends to stabilise the nature and create the tranquillity of the sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.25 - The Higher and the Lower Knowledge,
53:Truth is wider, greater than her forms.A thousand icons they have made of herAnd find her in the idols they adore;But she remains herself and infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Comments on Specific Lines and Passages of the Poem,
54:The immobile lips, the great surreal wings,The visage masked by superconscient Sleep,The eyes with their closed lids that see all things,Appeared of the Architect who builds in trance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
55:In vague tremendous passages of DoomHe heard the goblin Voice that guides to slay,And faced the enchantments of the demon Sign,And traversed the ambush of the opponent Snake. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The World of Falsehood,
56:Such were a dream of some sage at night when he muses in fancy,Imaging freely a flawless world where none were afflicted,No man inferior, all could sublimely equal and brothersLive in a peace divine like the gods in their luminous regions. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
57:But for the god in their breasts unsatisfied, but for his spurringsSoon would the hero turn beast and the sage reel back to the savage;Man from his difficult heights would recoil and be mud in the earth-mud.This by pain we prevent; we compel his ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
58:As when the mantra sinks in Yoga’s ear,Its message enters stirring the blind brainAnd keeps in the dim ignorant cells its sound;The hearer understands a form of wordsAnd, musing on the index thought it holds,He strives to read it with the l ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.03 - The Call to the Quest,
59:the priest and the mage, the man of piety, the just man, the man of wisdom, the saint, the prophet, the Rishi, the Yogi, the seer, the spiritual sage and the mystic ... the saint, the devotee, the spiritual sage, the seer, the prophet, the servant of God, the soldier of the spirit ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
60:We are the javelins of Destiny, we are the children of Wotan,We are the human Titans, the supermen dreamed by the sage.A cross of the beast and demoniac with the godhead of power and will,We were born in humanity’s sunset, to the Night is our pil ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Children of Wotan,
61:The message of this lecture is that black holes ain't as black as they are painted. They are not the eternal prisons they were once thought. Things can get out of a black hole both on the outside and possibly to another universe. So if you feel you are in a black hole, don't give up - there's a way out. ~ Stephen Hawkings,
62:A person doing his true will is assisted by the momentum of the universe and seems possessed of amazing good luck. In beginning the great work of obtaining the knowledge and conversation, the magician vows to interpret every manifestation of existence as a direct message from the infinite Chaos to himself personally ~ Peter J Carroll,
63:Anyone who masters these techniques fully has achieved a tremendous power over himself more valuable than health, love, fame, or riches. He has set himself free from the effects of the world; nothing can touch him unless he wills it. As it has been said, the sage who knows how can live comfortably in hell. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
64:So many Siddhas and Buddhas, so many Yogic masters. So many goddesses of various kinds. So many demi-gods and demons, so many silent sages. So many oceans of jewels. So many ways of life, so many languages. So many dynasties of rulers. So many intuitive people, so many selfless servants. O Nanak, His limit has no limit! ~ Sri Guru Granth Sahib,
65:\“… we must not only cut asunder the snare of the mind and the senses, but flee also beyond the snare of the thinker, the snare of the theologian and the church-builder, the meshes of the Word and the bondage of the Idea\” [[p. 330](/cwsa/23/renunciation ~ \“… we must not only cut asunder the snare of the mind and the senses, but flee also beyond the snare of the thinker the snare of the theologian and the church-builder,
66:The great and secret message of the experiential mystics the world over is that, with the eye of contemplation, Spirit can be seen. With the eye of contemplation, the great Within radiantly unfolds. And in all cases, the eye with which you see God is the same eye with which God sees you: the eye of contemplation. ~ Ken Wilber, Marriage of Sense and Soul p. 174,
67:The passage from the lower to the higher is the aim of Yoga; and this passage may effect itself by the rejection of the lower and escape into the higher, - the ordinary view-point, - or by the transformation of the lower and its elevation to the higher Nature. it is this, rather, that must be the aim of an integral Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
68:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all. A message from the gods should be delivered at once. It is damnably blasphemous to talk about the autumn season and so on. How dare the author or publisher demand a price for doing his duty, the highest and most honorable to which a man can be called? ~ Aleister Crowley,
69:In order to live a happy life, man should understand what life is and what he can or cannot do. The best and wisest men in all nations have taught it to us from all times. All the doctrines of the sages meet in their foundation and it is this general sum of their doctrines, revealing the aim of human life and the conduct to be pursued, that constitutes real religion. ~ Tolstoi,
70:But imagine this same vital power of expression, with the inspiration coming from far above-the highest inspiration possible, when all the heavens open before us-then that becomes wonderful. There are certain passages of César Franck, certain passages of Beethoven, certain passages of Bach, there are pieces by others also which have this inspiration and power. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 ,
71:Message for 4. 5. 67 "Earth-life is the self-chosen habitation of a great Divinity and his aeonic will is to change it from a blind prison into his splendid mansion and high heaven-reaching temple." - Sri Aurobindo The Divinity mentioned by Sri Aurobindo is not a person but a condition that will be shared by all those who have prepared themselves to receive it. May 1967 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
72:But when you're in front of an audience and you make them laugh at a new idea, you're guiding the whole being for the moment. No one is ever more him/herself than when they really laugh. Their defenses are down. It's very Zen-like, that moment. They are completely open, completely themselves when that message hits the brain and the laugh begins. That's when new ideas can be implanted. If a new idea slips in at that moment, it has a chance to grow. ~ George Carlin,
73:In India the mother is the center of the family and our highest ideal. She is to us the representative of God, as God is the mother of the universe. It was a female sage who first found the unity of God, and laid down this doctrine in one of the first hy mns of the Vedas. Our God is both personal and absolute, the absolute is male, the personal, female. And thus it comes that we now say: 'The first manifestation of God is the hand that rocks the cradle'. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
74:MESSAGES FOR CENTRES AND ORGANISATIONS (Suggested programme for a study group) 1. Prayer (Sri Aurobindo, Mother - grant us your help in our endeavour to understand your teaching.) 2. Reading of Sri Aurobindo's book. 3. A moment of silence. 4. One question can be put by whoever wants to put a question on what has been read. 5. Answer to the question. 6. No general discussion. This is not the meeting of a group but simply a class for studying Sri Aurobindo's books. 31 October 1942 ~ The Mother,
75:If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps. ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,
76:Masturbation is not the happiest form of sexuality, but the most advisable for him who wants to be alone and think. I detect the aroma of this pleasant vice in most philosophers, and a happily married logicians is almost a contradiction in terms. So many sages have regarded Woman as temptress because fornication often leads to marriage, which usually leads to children, which always leads to a respectable job and pretending to believe the idiocies your neighbors believe. The hypocrisy of the sages has been to conceal their timid onanism and call it celibacy. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
77:Talk 15.A question was asked about the Upanishadic passage, "The Supreme Spirit is subtler than the subtlest and larger than the largest."M.: Even the structure of the atom has been found by the mind. Therefore the mind is subtler than the atom. That which is behind the mind, namely the individual soul, is subtler than the mind.Further, the Tamil saint Manickavachagar has said of the specks dancing in a beam of sunlight, that if each represents a universe, the whole sunlight will represent the Supreme Being. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi Sri Ramanasramam,
78:Essentially, Yoga is a generic name for the processes and the result of processes by which we transcend or shred off our present modes of being and rise to a new, a higher, a wider mode of consciousness which is not that of the ordinary animal and intellectual man. Yoga is the exchange of an egoistic for a universal or cosmic consciousness lifted towards or informed by the supra-cosmic, transcendent Unnameable who is the source and support of all things. Yoga is the passage of the human thinking animal towards the God-consciousness from which he has descended. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga ,
79:aspiration and dryness ::: Naturally, the more one-pointed the aspiration the swifter the progress. The difficulty comes when either the vital with its desires or the physical with its past habitual movements comes in - as they do with almost everyone. It is then that the dryness and difficulty of spontaneous aspiration come. This dryness is a well-known obstacle in all sadhana. But one has to persist and not be discouraged. If one keeps the will fixed even in these barren periods, they pass and after their passage a greater force of aspiration and experience becomes possible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
80:compensation for sacrificed discipline of the lesser for greater ::: ...a passage from a lesser satisfaction to a greater Ananda. There is only one thing painful in the beginning to a raw or turbid part of the surface nature; it is the indispensable discipline demanded, the denial necessary for the merging of the incomplete ego. But for that there can be a speedy and enormous compensation in the discovery of a real greater or ultimate completeness in others, in all things, in the cosmic oneness, in the freedom of the transcendent Self and Spirit, in the rapture of the touch of the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
81:The intermediate zone means simply a confused condition or passage in which one is getting out of the personal consciousness and opening into the cosmic (cosmic Mind, cosmic vital, cosmic physical, something perhaps of the cosmic higherMind) without having yet transcended the human mind levels. One is not in possession of or direct contact with the divine Truth on its own levels, but one can receive something from them, even from the Overmind, indirectly.Only, as one is still immersed in the cosmic Ignorance, all that comes from above can be mixed, perverted, taken hold of for their purposes by lower, even by hostile Powers. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Himself And The Ashram 118,
82:The Divine WorkerI face earth's happenings with an equal soul;In all are heard Thy steps: Thy unseen feetTread Destiny's pathways in my front. Life's wholeTremendous theorem is Thou complete.No danger can perturb my spirit's calm:My acts are Thine; I do Thy works and pass;Failure is cradled on Thy deathless arm,Victory is Thy passage mirrored in Fortune's glass.In this rude combat with the fate of manThy smile within my heart makes all my strength;Thy Force in me labours at its grandiose plan,Indifferent to the Time-snake's crawling length.No power can slay my soul; it lives in Thee.Thy presence is my immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems ,
83:But the vijnana or gnosis is not only truth but truth power, it is the very working of the infinite and divine nature; it is the divine knowledge one with the divine will in the force and delight of a spontaneous and luminous and inevitable self-fulfilment. By the gnosis, then, we change our human into a divine nature. But even the intuitive reason is not the gnosis; it is only an edge of light of the supermind finding its way by flashes of illumination into the mentality like lightnings in dim and cloudy places. Its inspirations, revelations, intuitions, self-luminous discernings are messages from a higher knowledge-plane that make their way opportunely into our lower level of consciousness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
84:The books I liked became a Bible from which I drew advice and support; I copied out long passages from them; I memorized new canticles and new litanies, psalms, proverbs, and prophecies, and I sanctified every incident in my life by the recital of these sacred texts. My emotions, my tears, and my hopes were no less sincere on account of that; the words and the cadences, the lines and the verses were not aids to make believe: but they rescued from silent oblivion all those intimate adventures of the spirit that I couldn't speak to anyone about; they created a kind of communion between myself and those twin souls which existed somewhere out of reach; instead of living out my small private existence, I was participating in a great spiritual epic. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
85:Life's meaningA mighty life-self with its inner powersSupports the dwarfish modicum we call life;It can graft upon our crawl two puissant wings. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Himself and the Ashram Birthday Messages for Disciples,
86:Maybe the evolutionary sequence really is from matter to body to mind to soul to spirit, each transcending and including, each with a greater depth and greater consciousness and wider embrace. And in the highest reaches of evolution, maybe, just maybe, an individual's consciousness does indeed touch infinity - a total embrace of the entire Kosmos - a Kosmic consciousness that is Spirit awakened to its own true nature. It is at least plausible. And tell me: is that story, sung by mystics and sages the world over, any crazier than the scientific materialism story, which is that the entire sequence is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing? Listen very carefully: just which of those two stories actually sounds totally insane? ~ Ken Wilber, A Brief History of Everything p. 38-39,
87:11. The Ultimate Boon:The gods and goddesses then are to be understood as embodiments and custodians of the elixir of Imperishable Being but not themselves the Ultimate in its primary state. What the hero seeks through his intercourse with them is therefore not finally themselves, but their grace, i.e., the power of their sustaining substance. This miraculous energy-substance and this alone is the Imperishable; the names and forms of the deities who everywhere embody, dispense, and represent it come and go. This is the miraculous energy of the thunderbolts of Zeus, Yahweh, and the Supreme Buddha, the fertility of the rain of Viracocha, the virtue announced by the bell rung in the Mass at the consecration, and the light of the ultimate illumination of the saint and sage. Its guardians dare release it only to the duly proven. ~ Joseph Campbell,
88:The student is told to set apart moments in his daily life in which to withdraw into himself, quietly and alone. He is not to occupy himself at such moments with the affairs of his own ego. This would result in the contrary of what is intended. He should rather let his experiences and the messages from the outer world re-echo within his own completely silent self. At such silent moments every flower, every animal, every action will unveil to him secrets undreamt of. And thus he will prepare himself to receive quite new impressions of the outer world through quite different eyes. The desire to enjoy impression after impression merely blunts the faculty of cognition; the latter, however, is nurtured and cultivated if the enjoyment once experienced is allowed to reveal its message. Thus the student must accustom himself not merely to let the enjoyment. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
89:A silence, an entry into a wide or even immense or infinite emptiness is part of the inner spiritual experience; of this silence and void the physical mind has a certain fear, the small superficially active thinking or vital mind a shrinking from it or dislike, - for it confuses the silence with mental and vital incapacity and the void with cessation or non-existence: but this silence is the silence of the spirit which is the condition of a greater knowledge, power and bliss, and this emptiness is the emptying of the cup of our natural being, a liberation of it from its turbid contents so that it may be filled with the wine of God; it is the passage not into non-existence but to a greater existence. Even when the being turns towards cessation, it is a cessation not in non-existence but into some vast ineffable of spiritual being or the plunge into the incommunicable superconscience of the Absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
90:Part 3 - Return12. Refusal of the Return:When the hero-quest has been accomplished, through penetration to the source, or through the grace of some male or female, human or animal, personification, the adventurer still must return with his life-transmuting trophy. The full round, the norm of the monomyth, requires that the hero shall now begin the labor of bringing the runes of wisdom, the Golden Fleece, or his sleeping princess, back into the kingdom of humanity, where the boon may redound to the renewing of the community, the nation, the planet or the ten thousand worlds. But the responsibility has been frequently refused. Even Gautama Buddha, after his triumph, doubted whether the message of realization could be communicated, and saints are reported to have died while in the supernal ecstasy. Numerous indeed are the heroes fabled to have taken up residence forever in the blessed isle of the unaging Goddess of Immortal Being. ~ Joseph Campbell,
91:Turn your thoughts now, and lift up your thoughts to a devout and joyous contemplation on sage Vyasa and Vasishtha, on Narda and Valmiki. Contemplate on the glorious Lord Buddha, Jesus the Christ, prophet Mohammed, the noble Zoroaster (Zarathushtra), Lord Mahavira, the holy Guru Nanak. Think of the great saints and sages of all ages, like Yajnavalkya, Dattatreya, Sulabha and Gargi, Anasooya and Sabari, Lord Gauranga, Mirabai, Saint Theresa and Francis of Assisi. Remember St. Augustine, Jallaludin Rumi, Kabir, Tukaram, Ramdas, Ramakrishna Paramhamsa, Vivekananda and Rama Tirtha. Adore in thy heart the sacred memory of Mahatma Gandhi, sage Ramana Maharishi, Aurobindo Ghosh, Gurudev Sivananda and Swami Ramdas. They verily are the inspirers of humanity towards a life of purity, goodness and godliness. Their lives, their lofty examples, their great teachings constitute the real wealth and greatest treasure of mankind today. ~ Sri Chidananda, Advices On Spiritual Living ,
92:4. Crossing the First Threshold:With the personifications of his destiny to guide and aid him, the hero goes forward in his adventure until he comes to the 'threshold guardian' at the entrance to the zone of magnified power. Such custodians bound the world in four directions-also up and down-standing for the limits of the hero's present sphere, or life horizon. Beyond them is darkness, the unknown and danger; just as beyond the parental watch is danger to the infant and beyond the protection of his society danger to the members of the tribe. The usual person is more than content, he is even proud, to remain within the indicated bounds, and popular belief gives him every reason to fear so much as the first step into the unexplored. The adventure is always and everywhere a passage beyond the veil of the known into the unknown; the powers that watch at the boundary are dangerous; to deal with them is risky; yet for anyone with competence and courage the danger fades. ~ Joseph Campbell,
93:Part 2 - Initiation6. The Road of Trials:Once having traversed the threshold, the hero moves in a dream landscape of curiously fluid, ambiguous forms, where he must survive a succession of trials. This is a favorite phase of the myth-adventure. It has produced a world literature of miraculous tests and ordeals. The hero is covertly aided by the advice, amulets, and secret agents of the supernatural helper whom he met before his entrance into this region. Or it may be that he here discovers for the first time that there is a benign power everywhere supporting him in his superhuman passage. The original departure into the land of trials represented only the beginning of the long and really perilous path of initiatory conquests and moments of illumination. Dragons have now to be slain and surprising barriers passed-again, again, and again. Meanwhile there will be a multitude of preliminary victories, unsustainable ecstasies and momentary glimpses of the wonderful land. ~ Joseph Campbell,
94:there is a special personal tie between you and me, between all who have turned to the teaching of Sri Aurobindo and myself, - and, it is well understood, distance does not count here, you may be in France, you may be at the other end of the world or in Pondicherry, this tie is always true and living. And each time there comes a call, each time there is a need for me to know so that I may send out a force, an inspiration, a protection or any other thing, a sort of message comes to me all of a sudden and I do the needful. These communications reach me evidently at any moment, and you must have seen me more than once stop suddenly in the middle of a sentence or work; it is because something comes to me, a communication and I concentrate. With those whom I have accepted as disciples, to whom I have said Yes, there is more than a tie, there is an emanation of me. This emanation warns me whenever it is necessary and tells me what is happening. Indeed I receive intimations constantly ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
95:Few poets can keep for a very long time a sustained level of the highest inspiration. The best poetry does not usually come by streams except in poets of a supreme greatness though there may be in others than the greatest long-continued wingings at a considerable height. The very best comes by intermittent drops, though sometimes three or four gleaming drops at a time. Even in the greatest poets, even in those with the most opulent flow of riches like Shakespeare, the very best is comparatively rare. All statements are subject to qualification. What Lawrence states1 is true in principle, but in practice most poets have to sustain the inspiration by industry. Milton in his later days used to write every day fifty lines; Virgil nine which he corrected and recorrected till it was within half way of what he wanted. In other words he used to write under any conditions and pull at his inspiration till it came. Usually the best lines, passages, etc. come like that. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Inspiration and Effort - II,
96:A person doing his true will is assisted by the momentum of the universe and seems possessed of amazing good luck. In beginning the great work of obtaining the knowledge and conversation, the magician vows 'to interpret every manifestation of existence as a direct message from the infinite Chaos to himself personally' To do this is to enter the magical world view in its totality. He takes complete responsibility for his present incarnation and must consider every experience, thing, or piece of information which assails him from any source, as a reflection of the way he is conducting his existence. The idea that things happen to one that may or may not be related to the way one acts is an illusion created by our shallow awareness. Keeping a close eye on the walls of the labyrinth, the conditions of his existence, the magician may then begin his invocation. The genius is not something added to oneself. Rather it is a stripping away of excess to reveal the god within. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null Liber LUX,
97:the supreme third period of greater divine equality ::: If we can pass through these two stages of the inner change without being arrested or fixed in either, we are admitted to a greater divine equality which is capable of a spiritual ardour and tranquil passion of delight, a rapturous, all-understanding and all-possessing equality of the perfected soul, an intense and even wideness and fullness of its being embracing all things. This is the supreme period and the passage to it is through the joy of a total self-giving to the Divine and to the universal Mother. For strength is then crowned by a happy mastery, peace deepens into bliss, the possession of the divine calm is uplifted and made the ground for the possession of the divine movement. But if this greater perfection is to arrive, the soul's impartial high-seatedness looking down from above on the flux of forms and personalities and movements and forces must be modified and change into a new sense of strong and calm submission and a powerful and intense surrender. ... ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.09 - Equality and the Annihilation of Ego,
98:If we regard the Powers of the Reality as so many Godheads, we can say that the Overmind releases a million Godheads into action, each empowered to create its own world, each world capable of relation, communication and interplay with the others.There are in the Veda different formulations of the nature of the Gods: it is said they are all one Existence to which the sages give different names; yet each God is worshipped as if he by himself is that Existence, one who is all the other Gods together or contains them in his being; and yet again each is a separate Deity acting sometimes in unison with companion deities, sometimes separately, sometimes even in apparent opposition to other Godheads of the same Existence. In the Supermind all this would be held together as a harmonised play of the one Existence; in the Overmind each of these three conditions could be a separate action or basis of action and have its own principle of development and consequences and yet each keep the power to combine with the others in a more composite harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Supermind Mind and the Overmind Maya,
99:To enlarge the sense-faculties without the knowledge that would give the old sense-values their right interpretation from the new standpoint might lead to serious disorders and incapacities, might unfit for practical life and for the orderly and disciplined use of the reason. Equally, an enlargement of our mental consciousness out of the experience of the egoistic dualities into an unregulated unity with some form of total consciousness might easily bring about a confusion and incapacity for the active life of humanity in the established order of the world's relativities. This, no doubt, is the root of the injunction imposed in the Gita on the man who has the knowledge not to disturb the life-basis and thought-basis of the ignorant; for, impelled by his example but unable to comprehend the principle of his action, they would lose their own system of values without arriving at a higher foundation. Such a disorder and incapacity may be accepted personally and are accepted by many great souls as a temporary passage or as the price to be paid for the entry into a wider existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
100:In Hathayoga the instrument is the body and life. All the power of the body is stilled, collected, purified, heightened, concentrated to its utmost limits or beyond any limits by Asana and other physical processes; the power of the life too is similarly purified, heightened, concentrated by Asana and Pranayama. This concentration of powers is then directed towards that physical centre in which the divine consciousness sits concealed in the human body. The power of Life, Nature-power, coiled up with all its secret forces asleep in the lowest nervous plexus of the earth-being,-for only so much escapes into waking action in our normal operations as is sufficient for the limited uses of human life,-rises awakened through centre after centre and awakens, too, in its ascent and passage the forces of each successive nodus of our being, the nervous life, the heart of emotion and ordinary mentality, the speech, sight, will, the higher knowledge, till through and above the brain it meets with and it becomes one with the divine consciousness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Self-Perfection,
101:But for the knowledge of the Self it is necessary to have the power of a complete intellectual passivity, the power of dismissing all thought, the power of the mind to think not at all which the Gita in one passage enjoins. This is a hard saying for the occidental mind to which thought is the highest thing and which will be apt to mistake the power of the mind not to think, its complete silence for the incapacity of thought. But this power of silence is a capacity and not an incapacity, a power and not a weakness. It is a profound and pregnant stillness. Only when the mind is thus entirely still, like clear, motionless and level water, in a perfect purity and peace of the whole being and the soul transcends thought, can the Self which exceeds and originates all activities and becomings, the Silence from which all words are born, the Absolute of which all relativities are partial reflections manifest itself in the pure essence of our being. In a complete silence only is the Silence heard; in a pure peace only is its Being revealed. Therefore to us the name of That is the Silence and the Peace. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.03 - The Purified Understanding,
102:3. Meeting the Mentor:For those who have not refused the call, the first encounter of the hero journey is with a protective figure (often a little old crone or old man) who provides the adventurer with amulets against the dragon forces he is about to pass. What such a figure represents is the benign, protecting power of destiny. The fantasy is a reassurance-promise that the peace of Paradise, which was known first within the mother womb, is not to be lost; that it supports the present and stands in the future as well as in the past (is omega as well as alpha); that though omnipotence may seem to be endangered by the threshold passages and life awakenings, protective power is always and ever present within or just behind the unfamiliar features of the world. One has only to know and trust, and the ageless guardians will appear. Having responded to his own call, and continuing to follow courageously as the consequences unfold, the hero finds all the forces of the unconscious at his side. Mother Nature herself supports the mighty task. And in so far as the hero's act coincides with that for which his society is ready, he seems to ride on the great rhythm of the historical process. ~ Joseph Campbell,
103:The Tower. Somewhere ahead, it waited for him - the nexus of Time, the nexus of Size. He began west again, his back set against the sunrise, heading toward the ocean, realizing that a great passage of his life had come and gone. 'I loved you Jake,' he said aloud. The stiffness wore out of his body and he began to walk more rapidly. By that evening he had come to the end of the land. He sat in a beach which stretched left and right forever, deserted. The waves beat endlessly against the shore, pounding and pounding. The setting sun painted the water in a wide strip of fool's gold.There the gunslinger sat, his face turned up into the fading light. He dreamed his dreams and watched as the stars came out; his purpose did not flag, nor did his heart falter; his hair, finer now and gray at the temples, blew around his head, and the sandalwood-inlaid guns of his father lay smooth and deadly against his hips, and he was lonely but did not find loneliness in any way a bad or ignoble thing. The dark came down and the world moved on. The gunslinger waited for the time of the drawing and dreamed his long dreams of the Dark Tower, to which he would someday come at dusk and approach, winding his horn, to do some unimaginable final battle. ~ Stephen King,
104:The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
105:Ordinarily, man is limited in all these parts of his being and he can grasp at first only so much of the divine truth as has some large correspondence to his own nature and its past development and associations. Therefore God meets us first in different limited affirmations of his divine qualities and nature; he presents himself to the seeker as an absolute of the things he can understand and to which his will and heart can respond; he discloses some name and aspect of his Godhead.This is what is called in Yoga the is.t.a-devata, the name and form elected by our nature for its worship. In order that the human being may embrace this Godhead with every part of himself, it is represented with a form that answers to its aspects and qualities and which becomes the living body of God to the adorer. These are those forms of Vishnu, Shiva, Krishna, Kali, Durga, Christ, Buddha, which the mind of man seizes on for adoration. Even the monotheist who worships a formless Godhead, yet gives to him some form of quality, some mental form or form of Nature by which he envisages and approaches him. But to be able to see a living form, a mental body, as it were, of the Divine gives to the approach a greater closeness and sweetness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Mystery of Love,
106:Many are God's forms by which he grows in man; They stamp his thoughts and deeds with divinity, Uplift the stature of the human clay Or slowly transmute it into heavens gold. He is the Good for which men fight and die, He is the war of Right with Titan wrong; He is Freedom rising deathless from her pyre; He is Valour guarding still the desperate pass Or lone and erect on the shattered barricade Or a sentinel in the dangerous echoing Night. He is the crown of the martyr burned in flame And the glad resignation of the saint And courage indifferent to the wounds of Time And the heros might wrestling with death and fate. He is Wisdom incarnate on a glorious throne And the calm autocracy of the sages rule. He is the high and solitary Thought Aloof above the ignorant multitude: He is the prophets voice, the sight of the seer. He is Beauty, nectar of the passionate soul, He is the Truth by which the spirit lives. He is the riches of the spiritual Vast Poured out in healing streams on indigent Life; He is Eternity lured from hour to hour, He is infinity in a little space: He is immortality in the arms of death. These powers I am and at my call they come. Thus slowly I lift mans soul nearer the Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
107:"Because I have called, and ye refused . . . I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh; when your fear cometh as desolation, and your destruction cometh as a whirlwind; when distress and anguish cometh upon you." "For the turning away of the simple shall slay them, and the prosperity of fools shall destroy them."Time Jesum transeuntem et non revertentem: "Dread the passage of Jesus, for he does not return."The myths and folk tales of the whole world make clear that the refusal is essentially a refusal to give up what one takes to be one's own interest. The future is regarded not in terms of an unremitting series of deaths and births, but as though one's present system of ideals, virtues, goals, and advantages were to be fixed and made secure. King Minos retained the divine bull, when the sacrifice would have signified submission to the will of the god of his society; for he preferred what he conceived to be his economic advantage. Thus he failed to advance into the liferole that he had assumed-and we have seen with what calamitous effect. The divinity itself became his terror; for, obviously, if one is oneself one's god, then God himself, the will of God, the power that would destroy one's egocentric system, becomes a monster. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces ,
108:Endure and you will triumph. Victory goes to the most enduring. And with the Grace and divine love nothing is impossible. My force and love are with you. At the end of the struggle there is Victory And so we find once more that the Ego-idea must be ruthlessly rooted out before Understanding can be attained The emptiness that you described in your letter yesterday was not a bad thing - it is this emptiness inward and outward that often in Yoga becomes the first step towards a new consciousness. Man's nature is like a cup of dirty water - the water has to be thrown out, the cup left clean and empty for the divine liquor to be poured into it. The difficulty is that the human physical consciousness feels it difficult to bear this emptiness - it is accustomed to be occupied by all sorts of little mental and vital movements which keep it interested and amused or even if in trouble and sorrow still active. The cessation of these things is hard to bear for it. It begins to feel dull and restless and eager for the old interests and movements. But by this restlessness it disturbs the quietude and brings back the things that had been thrown out. It is this that is creating the difficulty and the obstruction for the moment. If you can accept emptiness as a passage to the true consciousness and true movements, then it will be easier to get rid of the obstacle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - III ,
109:the fourth aid, time, kala ::: The sadhaka who has all these aids is sure of his goal. Even a fall will be for him only a means of rising and death a passage towards fulfilment. For once on this path, birth and death become only processes in the development of his being and the stages of his journey. Time is the remaining aid needed for the effectivity of the process. Time presents itself to human effort as an enemy or a friend, as a resistance, a medium or an instrument. But always it is really the instrument of the soul. Time is a field of circumstances and forces meeting and working out a resultant progression whose course it measures. To the ego it is a tyrant or a resistance, to the Divine an instrument. Therefore, while our effort is personal, Time appears as a resistance, for it presents to us all the obstruction of the forces that conflict with our own. When the divine working and the personal are combined in our consciousness, it appears as a medium and a condition. When the two become one, it appears as a servant and instrument. The ideal attitude of the sadhaka towards Time is to have an endless patience as if he had all eternity for his fulfilment and yet to develop the energy that shall realise now and with an ever-increasing mastery and pressure of rapidity till it reaches the miraculous instantaneousness of the supreme divine Transformation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.01 - The Four Aids,
110:5. Belly of the Whale:The idea that the passage of the magical threshold is a transit into a sphere of rebirth is symbolized in the worldwide womb image of the belly of the whale. The hero, instead of conquering or conciliating the power of the threshold, is swallowed into the unknown and would appear to have died. This popular motif gives emphasis to the lesson that the passage of the threshold is a form of self-annihilation. Instead of passing outward, beyond the confines of the visible world, the hero goes inward, to be born again. The disappearance corresponds to the passing of a worshipper into a temple-where he is to be quickened by the recollection of who and what he is, namely dust and ashes unless immortal. The temple interior, the belly of the whale, and the heavenly land beyond, above, and below the confines of the world, are one and the same. That is why the approaches and entrances to temples are flanked and defended by colossal gargoyles: dragons, lions, devil-slayers with drawn swords, resentful dwarfs, winged bulls. The devotee at the moment of entry into a temple undergoes a metamorphosis. Once inside he may be said to have died to time and returned to the World Womb, the World Navel, the Earthly Paradise. Allegorically, then, the passage into a temple and the hero-dive through the jaws of the whale are identical adventures, both denoting in picture language, the life-centering, life-renewing act. ~ Joseph Campbell,
111:The necessary and needful reaction from the collective unconscious expresses itself in archetypally formed ideas. The meeting with oneself is, at first, the meeting with one's own shadow. The shadow is a tight passage, a narrow door, whose painful constriction no one is spared who goes down to the deep well. But one must learn to know oneself in order to know who one is. For what comes after the door is, surprisingly enough, a boundless expanse full of unprecedented uncertainty, with apparently no one inside and no one outside, no above and no below, no here and no there, no mine and no thine, no good and no bad. It is a world of water, where all life floats in suspension; where the realm of the sympathetic system, the soul of everything living, begins; where I am indivisibly this and that; where I experience the other in myself and the other-than-myself experiences me.No, the collective unconscious is anything but an encapsulated personal system; it is sheer objectivity, as wide as the world and open to all the world. There I am the object of every subject, in complete reversal of my ordinary consciousness, where I am always the subject that has an object. There I am utterly one with the world, so much a part of it that I forget all too easily who I really am. ""Lost in oneself"" is a good way of describing this state. But this self is the world, if only a consciousness could see it. That is why we must know who we are. ~ Carl Jung, Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious ,
112:People think of education as something that they can finish. And what's more, when they finish, it's a rite of passage. You're finished with school. You're no more a child, and therefore anything that reminds you of school - reading books, having ideas, asking questions - that's kid's stuff. Now you're an adult, you don't do that sort of thing any more.You have everybody looking forward to no longer learning, and you make them ashamed afterward of going back to learning. If you have a system of education using computers, then anyone, any age, can learn by himself, can continue to be interested. If you enjoy learning, there's no reason why you should stop at a given age. People don't stop things they enjoy doing just because they reach a certain age.What's exciting is the actual process of broadening yourself, of knowing there's now a little extra facet of the universe you know about and can think about and can understand. It seems to me that when it's time to die, there would be a certain pleasure in thinking that you had utilized your life well, learned as much as you could, gathered in as much as possible of the universe, and enjoyed it. There's only this one universe and only this one lifetime to try to grasp it. And while it is inconceivable that anyone can grasp more than a tiny portion of it, at least you can do that much. What a tragedy just to pass through and get nothing out of it. ~ Isaac Asimov, Carl Freedman - Conversations with Isaac Asimov-University Press of Mississippi (2005).pdf ,
113:In the name of Him Who created and sustains the world, the Sage Who endowed tongue with speech.He attains no honor who turns the face from the doer of His mercy.The kings of the earth prostate themselves before Him in supplication.He seizes not in haste the disobedient, nor drives away the penitent with violence. The two worlds are as a drop of water in the ocean of His knowledge.He withholds not His bounty though His servants sin; upon the surface of the earth has He spread a feast, in which both friend and foe may share.Peerless He is, and His kingdom is eternal. Upon the head of one He placed a crown another he hurled from the throne to the ground.The fire of His friend He turned into a flower garden; through the water of the Nile He sended His foes to perdition.Behind the veil He sees all, and concealed our faults with His own goodness.He is near to them that are downcast, and accepts the prayers of them that lament.He knows of the things that exist not, of secrets that are untold.He causes the moon and the sun to revolve, and spreads water upon the earth.In the heart of a stone hath He placed a jewel; from nothing had He created all that is.Who can reveal the secret of His qualities; what eye can see the limits of His beauty?The bird of thought cannot soar to the height of His presence, nor the hand of understanding reach to the skirt of His praise.Think not, O Saadi, that one can walk in the road of purity except in the footsteps of Mohammed (Peace and Blessings be Upon Him) ~ Saadi, The Bustan of Sa'di ,
114:The mythological hero, setting forth from his common-day hut or castle, is lured, carried away, or else voluntarily proceeds, to the threshold of adventure. There he encounters a shadow presence that guards the passage. The hero may defeat or conciliate this power and go alive into the kingdom of the dark (brother-battle, dragon-battle; offering, charm), or be slain by the opponent and descend in death (dismemberment, crucifixion). Beyond the threshold, then, the hero journeys through a world of unfamiliar yet strangely intimate forces, some of which severely threaten him (tests), some of which give magical aid (helpers). When he arrives at the nadir of the mythological round, he undergoes a supreme ordeal and gains his reward. The triumph may be represented as the hero's sexual union with the goddess-mother of the world (sacred marriage), his recognition by the father-creator (father atonement), his own divinization (apotheosis), or again-if the powers have remained unfriendly to him-his theft of the boon he came to gain (bride-theft, fire-theft); intrinsically it is an expansion of consciousness and therewith of being (illumination, transfiguration, freedom). The final work is that of the return. If the powers have blessed the hero, he now sets forth under their protection (emissary); if not, he flees and is pursued (transformation flight, obstacle flight). At the return threshold the transcendental powers must remain behind; the hero re-emerges from the kingdom of dread (return, resurrection). The boon that he brings restores the world (elixir). ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces The Keys,
115:The Lord has veiled himself and his absolute wisdom and eternal consciousness in ignorant Nature-Force and suffers her to drive the individual being, with its complicity, as the ego; this lower action of Nature continues to prevail, often even in spite of man's half-lit imperfect efforts at a nobler motive and a purer self-knowledge. Our human effort at perfection fails, or progresses very incompletely, owing to the force of Nature's past actions in us, her past formations, her long-rooted associations; it turns towards a true and high-climbing success only when a greater Knowledge and Power than our own breaks through the lid of our ignorance and guides or takes up our personal will. For our human will is a misled and wandering ray that has parted from the supreme Puissance. The period of slow emergence out of this lower working into a higher light and purer force is the valley of the shadow of death for the striver after perfection; it is a dreadful passage full of trials, sufferings, sorrows, obscurations, stumblings, errors, pitfalls. To abridge and alleviate this ordeal or to penetrate it with the divine delight faith is necessary, an increasing surrender of the mind to the knowledge that imposes itself from within and, above all, a true aspiration and a right and unfaltering and sincere practice. "Practise unfalteringly," says the Gita, "with a heart free from despondency," the Yoga; for even though in the earlier stage of the path we drink deep of the bitter poison of internal discord and suffering, the last taste of this cup is the sweetness of the nectar of immortality and the honey-wine of an eternal Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.08 - The Supreme Will,
116:35 - Men are still in love with grief; when they see one who is too high for grief or joy, they curse him and cry, "O thou insensible!" Therefore Christ still hangs on the cross in Jerusalem.36 - Men are in love with sin; when they see one who is too high for vice or virtue, they curse him and cry, "O thou breaker of bonds, thou wicked and immoral one!" Therefore Sri Krishna does not live as yet in Brindavan.(5)- Sri AurobindoI would like to have an explanation of these two aphorisms.When Christ came upon earth, he brought a message of brotherhood, love and peace. But he had to die in pain, on the cross, so that his message might be heard. For men cherish suffering and hatred and want their God to suffer with them. They wanted this when Christ came and, in spite of his teaching and sacrifice, they still want it; and they are so attached to their pain that, symbolically, Christ is still bound to his cross, suffering perpetually for the salvation of men.As for Krishna, he came upon earth to bring freedom and delight. He came to announce to men, enslaved to Nature, to their passions and errors, that if they took refuge in the Supreme Lord they would be free from all bondage and sin. But men are very attached to their vices and virtues (for without vice there would be no virtue); they are in love with their sins and cannot tolerate anyone being free and above all error.That is why Krishna, although immortal, is not present at Brindavan in a body at this moment.3 June 1960(5 The village where Shri Krishna Spent His Childhood, and where He danced with Radha and other Gopis.) ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms volume-10,
117:IN OUR scrutiny of the seven principles of existence it was found that they are one in their essential and fundamental reality: for if even the matter of the most material universe is nothing but a status of being of Spirit made an object of sense, envisaged by the Spirit's own consciousness as the stuff of its forms, much more must the life-force that constitutes itself into form of Matter, and the mind-consciousness that throws itself out as Life, and the Supermind that develops Mind as one of its powers, be nothing but Spirit itself modified in apparent substance and in dynamism of action, not modified in real essence. All are powers of one Power of being and not other than that All-Existence, All-Consciousness, All-Will, All-Delight which is the true truth behind every appearance. And they are not only one in their reality, but also inseparable in the sevenfold variety of their action. They are the seven colours of the light of the divine consciousness, the seven rays of the Infinite, and by them the Spirit has filled in on the canvas of his self-existence conceptually extended, woven of the objective warp of Space and the subjective woof of Time, the myriad wonders of his self-creation great, simple, symmetrical in its primal laws and vast framings, infinitely curious and intricate in its variety of forms and actions and the complexities of relation and mutual effect of all upon each and each upon all. These are the seven Words of the ancient sages; by them have been created and in the light of their meaning are worked out and have to be interpreted the developed and developing harmonies of the world we know and the worlds behind of which we have only an indirect knowledge. The Light, the Sound is one; their action is sevenfold. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.07 - The Knowledge and the Ignorance,
118:If we accept the Vedic image of the Sun of Truth, - an image which in this experience becomes a reality, - we may compare the action of the Higher Mind to a composed and steady sunshine, the energy of the Illumined Mind beyond it to an outpouring of massive lightnings of flaming sun-stuff. Still beyond can be met a yet greater power of the Truth-Force, an intimate and exact Truth-vision, Truth-thought, Truth-sense, Truth-feeling, Truth-action, to which we can give in a special sense the name of Intuition; for though we have applied that word for want of a better to any supra-intellectual direct way of knowing, yet what we actually know as intuition is only one special movement of self-existent knowledge. This new range is its origin; it imparts to our intuitions something of its own distinct character and is very clearly an intermediary of a greater Truth-Light with which our mind cannot directly communicate. At the source of this Intuition we discover a superconscient cosmic Mind in direct contact with the Supramental Truth-Consciousness, an original intensity determinant of all movements below it and all mental energies, - not Mind as we know it, but an Overmind that covers as with the wide wings of some creative Oversoul this whole lower hemisphere of Knowledge-Ignorance, links it with that greater Truth-Consciousness while yet at the same time with its brilliant golden Lid it veils the face of the greater Truth from our sight, intervening with its flood of infinite possibilities as at once an obstacle and a passage in our seeking of the spiritual law of our existence, its highest aim, its secret Reality. This then is the occult link we were looking for; this is the Power that at once connects and divides the supreme Knowledge and the cosmic Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Supermind Mind and the Overmind Maya,
119:There is the one door in us that sometimes swings open upon the splendour of a truth beyond and, before it shuts again, allows a ray to touch us, - a luminous intimation which, if we have the strength and firmness, we may hold to in our faith and make a starting-point for another play of consciousness than that of the sense-mind, for the play of Intuition. For if we examine carefully, we shall find that Intuition is our first teacher. Intuition always stands veiled behind our mental operations. Intuition brings to man those brilliant messages from the Unknown which are the beginning of his higher knowledge. Reason only comes in afterwards to see what profit it can have of the shining harvest. Intuition gives us that idea of something behind and beyond all that we know and seem to be which pursues man always in contradiction of his lower reason and all his normal experience and impels him to formulate that formless perception in the more positive ideas of God, Immortality, Heaven and the rest by which we strive to express it to the mind. For Intuition is as strong as Nature herself from whose very soul it has sprung and cares nothing for the contradictions of reason or the denials of experience. It knows what is because it is, because itself it is of that and has come from that, and will not yield it to the judgment of what merely becomes and appears. What the Intuition tells us of, is not so much Existence as the Existent, for it proceeds from that one point of light in us which gives it its advantage, that sometimes opened door in our own self-awareness. Ancient Vedanta seized this message of the Intuition and formulated it in the three great declarations of the Upanishads, I am He, Thou art That, O Swetaketu, All this is the Brahman; this Self is the Brahman. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.08 - The Methods of Vedantic Knowledge,
120:Should not one be born with a great aspiration? No, aspiration is a thing to be developed, educated, like all activities of the being. One may be born with a very slight aspiration and develop it so much that it becomes very great. One may be born with a very small will and develop it and make it strong. It is a ridiculous idea to believe that things come to you like that, through a sort of grace, that if you are not given aspiration, you don't have it - this is not true. It is precisely upon this that Sri Aurobindo has insisted in his letter and in the passage I am going to read to you in a minute. He says you must choose, and the choice is constantly put before you and constantly you must choose, and if you do not choose, well, you will not be able to advance. You must choose; there is no "force like that" which chooses for you, or chance or luck or fate - this is not true. Your will is free, it is deliberately left free and you have to choose. It is you who decide whether to seek the Light or not, whether to be the servitor of the Truth or not - it is you. Or whether to have an aspiration or not, it is you who choose. And even when you are told, "Make your surrender total and the work will be done for you", it is quite all right, but to make your surrender total, every day and at every moment you must choose to make your surrender total, otherwise you will not do it, it will not get done by itself. It is you who must want to do it. When it is done, all goes well, when you have the Knowledge also, all goes well, and when you are identified with the Divine, all goes even better, but till then you must will, choose and decide. Don't go to sleep lazily, saying, "Oh! The work will be done for me, I have nothing to do but let myself glide along with the stream." Besides, it is not true, the work is not done by itself, because if the least little thing thwarts your little will, it says, "No, not that!..." Then? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951 ,
121:It must also be kept in mind that the supramental change is difficult, distant, an ultimate stage; it must be regarded as the end of a far-off vista; it cannot be and must not be turned into a first aim, a constantly envisaged goal or an immediate objective. For it can only come into the view of possibility after much arduous self-conquest and self-exceeding, at the end of many long and trying stages of a difficult self-evolution of the nature. One must first acquire an inner Yogic consciousness and replace by it our ordinary view of things, natural movements, motives of life; one must revolutionise the whole present build of our being. Next, we have to go still deeper, discover our veiled psychic entity and in its light and under its government psychicise our inner and outer parts, turn mind-nature, life-nature, body-nature and all our mental, vital, physical action and states and movements into a conscious instrumentation of the soul. Afterwards or concurrently we have to spiritualise the being in its entirety by a descent of a divine Light, Force, Purity, Knowledge, freedom and wideness. It is necessary to break down the limits of the personal mind, life and physicality, dissolve the ego, enter into the cosmic consciousness, realise the self, acquire a spiritualised and universalised mind and heart, life-force, physical consciousness. Then only the passage into the supramental consciousness begins to become possible, and even then there is a difficult ascent to make each stage of which is a separate arduous achievement. Yoga is a rapid and concentrated conscious evolution of the being, but however rapid, even though it may effect in a single life what in an instrumental Nature might take centuries and millenniums or many hundreds of lives, still all evolution must move by stages; even the greatest rapidity and concentration of the movement cannot swallow up all the stages or reverse natural process and bring the end near to the beginning. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.13 - The Supermind and the Yoga of Works,
122:the characteristics of Life, Mind and Spirit ::: The characteristic energy of bodily Life is not so much in progress as in persistence, not so much in individual self-enlargement as in self-repetition. There is, indeed, in physical Nature a progression from type to type, from the vegetable to the animal, from the animal to man; for even in inanimate Matter Mind is at work. But once a type is marked off physically, the chief immediate preoccupation of the terrestrial Mother seems to be to keep it in being by a constant reproduction. For Life always seeks immortality; but since individual form is impermanent and only the idea of a form is permanent in the consciousness that creates the universe, -for there it does not perish,- such constant reproduction is the only possible material immortality. Self-preservation, self-repetition, self-multiplication are necessarily, then, the predominant instincts of all material existence. The characteristic energy of pure Mind is change and the more it acquires elevation and organisation, the more this law of Mind assumes the aspect of a continual enlargement, improvement and better arrangement of its gains and so of a continual passage from a smaller and simpler to a larger and more complex perfection. For Mind, unlike bodily life, is infinite in its field, elastic in its expansion, easily variable in its formations. Change, then, self-enlargement and self-improvement are its proper instincts. Its faith is perfectibility, its watchword is progress. The characteristic law of Spirit is self-existent perfection and immutable infinity. It possesses always and in its own right the immortality which is the aim of Life and the perfection which is the goal of Mind. The attainment of the eternal and the realisation of that which is the same in all things and beyond all things, equally blissful in universe and outside it, untouched by the imperfections and limitations of the forms and activities in which it dwells, are the glory of the spiritual life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Introduction - The Conditions Of the Synthesis,
123:Sweet Mother, here it is written: "There is a Yoga-Shakti lying coiled or asleep..." How can it be awakened?I think it awakens quite naturally the moment one takes the resolution to do the yoga. If the resolution is sincere and one has an aspiration, it wakes up by itself. In fact, it is perhaps its awakening which gives the aspiration to do yoga. It is possible that it is a result of the Grace... or after some conversation or reading, something that has suddenly given you the idea and aspiration to know what yoga is and to practise it. Sometimes just a simple conversation with someone is enough or a passage one reads from a book; well, it awakens this Yoga-Shakti and it is this which makes you do your yoga. One is not aware of it at first - except that something has changed in our life, a new decision is taken, a turning. What is it, this Yoga-Shakti, Sweet Mother? It is the energy of progress. It is the energy which makes you do the yoga, precisely, makes you progress - consciously. It is a conscious energy. In fact, the Yoga-Shakti is the power to do yoga. Sweet Mother, isn't it more difficult to draw the divine forces from below? I think it is absolutely useless. Some people think that there are more reserves of energy - I have heard this very often: a great reserve of energy - in the earth, and that if they draw this energy into themselves they will be able to do things; but it is always mixed. The divine Presence is everywhere, that's well understood. And in fact, there is neither above nor below. What is called above and below, I think that is rather the expression of a degree of consciousness or a degree of materiality; there is the more unconscious and the less unconscious, there is what is subconscious and what is superconscious, and so we say above and below for the facility of speech. But in fact, the idea is to draw from the energies of the earth which, when you are standing up, are under your feet, that is, below in relation to you. But these energies are always mixed, and mostly they are terribly dark. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
124:It is not very easy for the customary mind of man, always attached to its past and present associations, to conceive of an existence still human, yet radically changed in what are now our fixed circumstances.We are in respect to our possible higher evolution much in the position of the original Ape of the Darwinian theory. It would have been impossible for that Ape leading his instinctive arboreal life in primeval forests to conceive that there would be one day an animal on the earth who would use a new faculty called reason upon the materials of his inner and outer existence, who would dominate by that power his instincts and habits, change the circumstances of his physical life, build for himself houses of stone, manipulate Nature's forces, sail the seas, ride the air, develop codes of conduct, evolve conscious methods for his mental and spiritual development. And if such a conception had been possible for the Ape-mind, it would still have been difficult for him to imagine that by any progress of Nature or long effort of Will and tendency he himself could develop into that animal. Man, because he has acquired reason and still more because he has indulged his power of imagination and intuition, is able to conceive an existence higher than his own and even to envisage his personal elevation beyond his present state into that existence. His idea of the supreme state is an absolute of all that is positive to his own concepts and desirable to his own instinctive aspiration,-Knowledge without its negative shadow of error, Bliss without its negation in experience of suffering, Power without its constant denial by incapacity, purity and plenitude of being without the opposing sense of defect and limitation. It is so that he conceives his gods; it is so that he constructs his heavens. But it is not so that his reason conceives of a possible earth and a possible humanity. His dream of God and Heaven is really a dream of his own perfection; but he finds the same difficulty in accepting its practical realisation here for his ultimate aim as would the ancestral Ape if called upon to believe in himself as the future Man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.07 - The Ego and the Dualities,
125:higher mind or late vision logic ::: Even more rare, found stably in less than 1% of the population and even more emergent is the turquoise altitude.Cognition at Turquoise is called late vision-logic or cross-paradigmatic and features the ability to connect meta-systems or paradigms, with other meta-systems. This is the realm of coordinating principles. Which are unified systems of systems of abstraction to other principles. ... Aurobindo indian sage and philosopher offers a more first-person account of turquoise which he called higher-mind, a unitarian sense of being with a powerful multiple dynamism capable of formation of a multitude of aspects of knowledge, ways of action, forms and significances of becoming of all of which a spontaneous inherient knowledge.Self-sense at turquoise is called Construct-aware and is the first stage of Cook-Greuter's extension of Loveigers work on ego-development. The Construct-aware stage sees individuals for the first time as exploring more and more complex thought-structures with awareness of the automatic nature of human map making and absurdities which unbridaled complexity and logical argumentation can lead. Individuals at this stage begin to see their ego as a central point of reference and therefore a limit to growth. They also struggle to balance unique self-expressions and their concurrent sense of importance, the imperical and intuitive knowledge that there is no fundamental subject-object separation and the budding awareness of self-identity as temporary which leads to a decreased ego-desire to create a stable self-identity. Turquoise individuals are keenly aware of the interplay between awareness, thought, action and effects. They seek personal and spiritual transformation and hold a complex matrix of self-identifications, the adequecy of which they increasingly call into question. Much of this already points to Turquoise values which embrace holistic and intuitive thinking and alignment to universal order in a conscious fashion.Faith at Turquoise is called Universalising and can generate faith compositions in which conceptions of Ultimate Reality start to include all beings. Individuals at Turquoise faith dedicate themselves to transformation of present reality in the direction of transcendent actuality. Both of these are preludes to the coming of Third Tier. ~ Essential Integral, L4.1-54 the Higher Mind,
126:The poet-seer sees differently, thinks in another way, voices himself in quite another manner than the philosopher or the prophet. The prophet announces the Truth as the Word, the Law or the command of the Eternal, he is the giver of the message; the poet shows us Truth in its power of beauty, in its symbol or image, or reveals it to us in the workings of Nature or in the workings of life, and when he has done that, his whole work is done; he need not be its explicit spokesman or its official messenger. The philosopher's business is to discriminate Truth and put its parts and aspects into intellectual relation with each other; the poet's is to seize and embody aspects of Truth in their living relations, or rather - for that is too philosophical a language - to see her features and, excited by the vision, create in the beauty of her image. No doubt, the prophet may have in him a poet who breaks out often into speech and surrounds with the vivid atmosphere of life the directness of his message; he may follow up his injunction "Take no thought for the morrow," by a revealing image of the beauty of the truth he enounces, in the life of Nature, in the figure of the lily, or link it to human life by apologue and parable. The philosopher may bring in the aid of colour and image to give some relief and hue to his dry light of reason and water his arid path of abstractions with some healing dew of poetry. But these are ornaments and not the substance of his work; and if the philosopher makes his thought substance of poetry, he ceases to be a philosophic thinker and becomes a poet-seer of Truth. Thus the more rigid metaphysicians are perhaps right in denying to Nietzsche the name of philosopher; for Nietzsche does not think, but always sees, turbidly or clearly, rightly or distortedly, but with the eye of the seer rather than with the brain of the thinker. On the other hand we may get great poetry which is full of a prophetic enthusiasm of utterance or is largely or even wholly philosophic in its matter; but this prophetic poetry gives us no direct message, only a mass of sublime inspirations of thought and image, and this philosophic poetry is poetry and lives as poetry only in so far as it departs from the method, the expression, the way of seeing proper to the philosophic mind. It must be vision pouring itself into thought-images and not thought trying to observe truth and distinguish its province and bounds and fences. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry ,
127:reading ::: 50 Philosophy Classics: List of Books Covered: 1. Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958) 2. Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics (4th century BC) 3. AJ Ayer - Language, Truth and Logic (1936) 4. Julian Baggini - The Ego Trick (2011) 5. Jean Baudrillard - Simulacra and Simulation (1981) 6. Simone de Beauvoir - The Second Sex (1952) 7. Jeremy Bentham - Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789) 8. Henri Bergson - Creative Evolution (1911) 9. David Bohm - Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980) 10. Noam Chomsky - Understanding Power (2002) 11. Cicero - On Duties (44 BC) 12. Confucius - Analects (5th century BC) 13. Rene Descartes - Meditations (1641) 14. Ralph Waldo Emerson - Fate (1860) 15. Epicurus - Letters (3rd century BC) 16. Michel Foucault - The Order of Things (1966) 17. Harry Frankfurt - On Bullshit (2005) 18. Sam Harris - Free Will (2012) 19. GWF Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit (1803) 20. Martin Heidegger - Being and Time (1927) 21. Heraclitus - Fragments (6th century) 22. David Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748) 23. William James - Pragmatism (1904) 24. Daniel Kahneman - Thinking: Fast and Slow (2011) 25. Immanuel Kant - Critique of Pure Reason (1781) 26. Soren Kierkegaard - Fear and Trembling (1843) 27. Saul Kripke - Naming and Necessity (1972) 28. Thomas Kuhn - The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962) 29. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Theodicy (1710) 30. John Locke - An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690) 31. Marshall McLuhan - The Medium is the Massage (1967) 32. Niccolo Machiavelli - The Prince (1532) 33. John Stuart Mill - On Liberty (1859) 34. Michel de Montaigne - Essays (1580) 35. Iris Murdoch - The Sovereignty of Good (1970) 36. Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil (1886) 37. Blaise Pascal - Pensees (1670) 38. Plato - The Republic (4th century BC) 39. Karl Popper - The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1934) 40. John Rawls - A Theory of Justice (1971) 41. Jean-Jacques Rousseau - The Social Contract (1762) 42. Bertrand Russell - The Conquest of Happiness (1920) 43. Michael Sandel - Justice (2009) 44. Jean Paul Sartre - Being and Nothingness (1943) 45. Arthur Schopenhauer - The World as Will and Representation (1818) 46. Peter Singer - The Life You Can Save (2009) 47. Baruch Spinoza - Ethics (1677) 48. Nassim Nicholas - Taleb The Black Swan (2007) 49. Ludwig Wittgenstein - Philosophical Investigations (1953) 50. Slavoj Zizek - Living In The End Times (2010) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Philosophy Classics ,
128:"O Death, thou lookst on an unfinished worldAssailed by thee and of its road unsure,Peopled by imperfect minds and ignorant lives,And sayest God is not and all is vain.How shall the child already be the man?Because he is infant, shall he never grow?Because he is ignorant, shall he never learn?In a small fragile seed a great tree lurks,In a tiny gene a thinking being is shut;A little element in a little sperm,It grows and is a conqueror and a sage.Then wilt thou spew out, Death, God's mystic truth,Deny the occult spiritual miracle?Still wilt thou say there is no spirit, no God?A mute material Nature wakes and sees;She has invented speech, unveiled a will.Something there waits beyond towards which she strives,Something surrounds her into which she grows:To uncover the spirit, to change back into God,To exceed herself is her transcendent task.In God concealed the world began to be,Tardily it travels towards manifest God:Our imperfection towards perfection toils,The body is the chrysalis of a soul:The infinite holds the finite in its arms,Time travels towards revealed eternity.A miracle structure of the eternal Mage,Matter its mystery hides from its own eyes,A scripture written out in cryptic signs,An occult document of the All-Wonderful's art.All here bears witness to his secret might,In all we feel his presence and his power.A blaze of his sovereign glory is the sun,A glory is the gold and glimmering moon,A glory is his dream of purple sky.A march of his greatness are the wheeling stars.His laughter of beauty breaks out in green trees,His moments of beauty triumph in a flower;The blue sea's chant, the rivulet's wandering voiceAre murmurs falling from the Eternal's harp.This world is God fulfilled in outwardness.His ways challenge our reason and our sense;By blind brute movements of an ignorant Force,By means we slight as small, obscure or base,A greatness founded upon little things,He has built a world in the unknowing Void.His forms he has massed from infinitesimal dust;His marvels are built from insignificant things.If mind is crippled, life untaught and crude,If brutal masks are there and evil acts,They are incidents of his vast and varied plot,His great and dangerous drama's needed steps;He makes with these and all his passion-play,A play and yet no play but the deep schemeOf a transcendent Wisdom finding waysTo meet her Lord in the shadow and the Night:Above her is the vigil of the stars;Watched by a solitary InfinitudeShe embodies in dumb Matter the Divine,In symbol minds and lives the Absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
129:EvilHasten towards the good, leave behind all evil thoughts, for to do good without enthusiasm is to have a mind which delights in evil.If one does an evil action, he should not persist in it, he should not delight in it. For full of suffering is the accumulation of evil.If one does a good action, he should persist in it and take delight in it. Full of happiness is the accumulation of good.As long as his evil action has not yet ripened, an evildoer may experience contentment. But when it ripens, the wrong-doer knows unhappiness.As long as his good action has not yet ripened, one who does good may experience unhappiness. But when it ripens, the good man knows happiness.Do not treat evil lightly, saying, "That will not touch me." A jar is filled drop by drop; even so the fool fills himself little by little with wickedness.Do not treat good lightly, saying, "That will not touch me." A jar is filled drop by drop; even so the sage fills himself little by little with goodness.The merchant who is carrying many precious goods and who has but few companions, avoids dangerous roads; and a man who loves his life is wary of poison. Even so should one act regarding evil.A hand that has no wound can carry poison with impunity; act likewise, for evil cannot touch the righteous man.If you offend one who is pure, innocent and defenceless, the insult will fall back on you, as if you threw dust against the wind.Some are reborn here on earth, evil-doers go to the worlds of Niraya,1 the just go to the heavenly worlds, but those who have freed themselves from all desire attain Nirvana.Neither in the skies, nor in the depths of the ocean, nor in the rocky caves, nowhere upon earth does there exist a place where a man can find refuge from his evil actions.Neither in the skies, nor in the depths of the ocean, nor in the rocky caves, nowhere upon earth does there exist a place where a man can hide from death.People have the habit of dealing lightly with thoughts that come. And the atmosphere is full of thoughts of all kinds which do not in fact belong to anybody in particular, which move perpetually from one person to another, very freely, much too freely, because there are very few people who can keep their thoughts under control.When you take up the Buddhist discipline to learn how to control your thoughts, you make very interesting discoveries. You try to observe your thoughts. Instead of letting them pass freely, sometimes even letting them enter your head and establish themselves in a quite inopportune way, you look at them, observe them and you realise with stupefaction that in the space of a few seconds there passes through the head a series of absolutely improbable thoughts that are altogether harmful....?Conversion of the aim of life from the ego to the Divine: instead of seeking one's own satisfaction, to have the service of the Divine as the aim of life.*What you must know is exactly the thing you want to do in life. The time needed to learn it does not matter at all. For those who wish to live according to Truth, there is always something to learn and some progress to make. 2 October 1969 ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 ,
130:HOW CAN I READ SAVITRI?An open reply by Dr Alok Pandey to a fellow devoteeA GIFT OF LOVE TO THE WORLDMost of all enjoy Savitri. It is Sri Aurobindo's gift of Love to the world. Read it from the heart with love and gratitude as companions and drown in its fiery bliss. That is the true understanding rather than one that comes by a constant churning of words in the head.WHENBest would be to fix a time that works for you. One can always take out some time for the reading, even if it be late at night when one is done with all the daily works. Of course, a certain receptivity is needed. If one is too tired or the reading becomes too mechanical as a ritual routine to be somehow finished it tends to be less effective, as with anything else. Hence the advice is to read in a quiet receptive state.THE PACEAs to the pace of reading it is best to slowly build up and keep it steady. To read a page or a passage daily is better than reading many pages one day and then few lines or none for days. This brings a certain discipline in the consciousness which makes one receptive. What it means is that one should fix up that one would read a few passages or a page or two daily, and then if an odd day one is enjoying and spontaneously wants to read more then one can go by the flow.COMPLETE OR SELECTIONS?It is best to read at least once from cover to cover. But if one is not feeling inclined for that do read some of the beautiful cantos and passages whose reference one can find in various places. This helps us familiarise with the epic and the style of poetry. Later one can go for the cover to cover reading.READING ALOUD, SILENTLY, OR WRITING DOWN?One can read it silently. Loud reading is needed only if one is unable to focus with silent reading. A mantra is more potent when read subtly. I am aware that some people recommend reading it aloud which is fine if that helps one better. A certain flexibility in these things is always good and rigid rules either ways are not helpful.One can also write some of the beautiful passages with which one feels suddenly connected. It is a help in the yoga since such a writing involves the pouring in of the consciousness of Savitri through the brain and nerves and the hand.Reflecting upon some of these magnificent lines and passages while one is engaged in one\s daily activities helps to create a background state for our inner being to get absorbed in Savitri more and more.HOW DO I UNDERSTAND THE MEANING? DO I NEED A DICTIONARY?It is helpful if a brief background about the Canto is known. This helps the mind top focus and also to keep in sync with the overall scene and sense of what is being read.But it is best not to keep referring to the dictionary while reading. Let the overall sense emerge. Specifics can be done during a detailed reading later and it may not be necessary at all. Besides the sense that Sri Aurobindo has given to many words may not be accurately conveyed by the standard dictionaries. A flexibility is required to understand the subtle suggestions hinted at by the Master-poet.In this sense Savitri is in the line of Vedic poetry using images that are at once profound as well as commonplace. That is the beauty of mystic poetry. These are things actually experienced and seen by Sri Aurobindo, and ultimately it is Their Grace that alone can reveal the intrinsic sense of this supreme revelation of the Supreme. ~ Dr Alok Pandey,
131:The Teachings of Some Modern Indian YogisRamana MaharshiAccording to Brunton's description of the sadhana he (Brunton) practised under the Maharshi's instructions,1 it is the Overself one has to seek within, but he describes the Overself in a way that is at once the Psychic Being, the Atman and the Ishwara. So it is a little difficult to know what is the exact reading.*The methods described in the account [of Ramana Maharshi's technique of self-realisation] are the well-established methods of Jnanayoga - (1) one-pointed concentration followed by thought-suspension, (2) the method of distinguishing or finding out the true self by separating it from mind, life, body (this I have seen described by him [Brunton] more at length in another book) and coming to the pure I behind; this also can disappear into the Impersonal Self. The usual result is a merging in the Atman or Brahman - which is what one would suppose is meant by the Overself, for it is that which is the real Overself. This Brahman or Atman is everywhere, all is in it, it is in all, but it is in all not as an individual being in each but is the same in all - as the Ether is in all. When the merging into the Overself is complete, there is no ego, no distinguishable I, or any formed separative person or personality. All is ekakara - an indivisible and undistinguishable Oneness either free from all formations or carrying all formations in it without being affected - for one can realise it in either way. There is a realisation in which all beings are moving in the one Self and this Self is there stable in all beings; there is another more complete and thoroughgoing in which not only is it so but all are vividly realised as the Self, the Brahman, the Divine. In the former, it is possible to dismiss all beings as creations of Maya, leaving the one Self alone as true - in the other it is easier to regard them as real manifestations of the Self, not as illusions. But one can also regard all beings as souls, independent realities in an eternal Nature dependent upon the One Divine. These are the characteristic realisations of the Overself familiar to the Vedanta. But on the other hand you say that this Overself is realised by the Maharshi as lodged in the heart-centre, and it is described by Brunton as something concealed which when it manifests appears as the real Thinker, source of all action, but now guiding thought and action in the Truth. Now the first description applies to the Purusha in the heart, described by the Gita as the Ishwara situated in the heart and by the Upanishads as the Purusha Antaratma; the second could apply also to the mental Purusha, manomayah. pran.asarı̄ra neta of the Upanishads, the mental Being or Purusha who leads the life and the body. So your question is one which on the data I cannot easily answer. His Overself may be a combination of all these experiences, without any distinction being made or thought necessary between the various aspects. There are a thousand ways of approaching and realising the Divine and each way has its own experiences which have their own truth and stand really on a basis, one in essence but complex in aspects, common to all, but not expressed in the same way by all. There is not much use in discussing these variations; the important thing is to follow one's own way well and thoroughly. In this Yoga, one can realise the psychic being as a portion of the Divine seated in the heart with the Divine supporting it there - this psychic being takes charge of the sadhana and turns the ......1 The correspondent sent to Sri Aurobindo two paragraphs from Paul Brunton's book A Message from Arunachala (London: Rider & Co., n.d. [1936], pp. 205 - 7). - Ed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
132:DarknessI had a dream, which was not all a dream.The bright sun was extinguish'd, and the starsDid wander darkling in the eternal space,Rayless, and pathless, and the icy earthSwung blind and blackening in the moonless air;Morn came and went-and came, and brought no day,And men forgot their passions in the dreadOf this their desolation; and all heartsWere chill'd into a selfish prayer for light:And they did live by watchfires-and the thrones,The palaces of crowned kings-the huts,The habitations of all things which dwell,Were burnt for beacons; cities were consum'd,And men were gather'd round their blazing homesTo look once more into each other's face;Happy were those who dwelt within the eyeOf the volcanos, and their mountain-torch:A fearful hope was all the world contain'd;Forests were set on fire-but hour by hourThey fell and faded-and the crackling trunksExtinguish'd with a crash-and all was black.The brows of men by the despairing lightWore an unearthly aspect, as by fitsThe flashes fell upon them; some lay downAnd hid their eyes and wept; and some did restTheir chins upon their clenched hands, and smil'd;And others hurried to and fro, and fedTheir funeral piles with fuel, and look'd upWith mad disquietude on the dull sky,The pall of a past world; and then againWith curses cast them down upon the dust,And gnash'd their teeth and howl'd: the wild birds shriek'dAnd, terrified, did flutter on the ground,And flap their useless wings; the wildest brutesCame tame and tremulous; and vipers crawl'dAnd twin'd themselves among the multitude,Hissing, but stingless-they were slain for food.And War, which for a moment was no more,Did glut himself again: a meal was boughtWith blood, and each sate sullenly apartGorging himself in gloom: no love was left;All earth was but one thought-and that was deathImmediate and inglorious; and the pangOf famine fed upon all entrails-menDied, and their bones were tombless as their flesh;The meagre by the meagre were devour'd,Even dogs assail'd their masters, all save one,And he was faithful to a corse, and keptThe birds and beasts and famish'd men at bay,Till hunger clung them, or the dropping deadLur'd their lank jaws; himself sought out no food,But with a piteous and perpetual moan,And a quick desolate cry, licking the handWhich answer'd not with a caress-he died.The crowd was famish'd by degrees; but twoOf an enormous city did survive,And they were enemies: they met besideThe dying embers of an altar-placeWhere had been heap'd a mass of holy thingsFor an unholy usage; they rak'd up,And shivering scrap'd with their cold skeleton handsThe feeble ashes, and their feeble breathBlew for a little life, and made a flameWhich was a mockery; then they lifted upTheir eyes as it grew lighter, and beheldEach other's aspects-saw, and shriek'd, and died-Even of their mutual hideousness they died,Unknowing who he was upon whose browFamine had written Fiend. The world was void,The populous and the powerful was a lump,Seasonless, herbless, treeless, manless, lifeless-A lump of death-a chaos of hard clay.The rivers, lakes and ocean all stood still,And nothing stirr'd within their silent depths;Ships sailorless lay rotting on the sea,And their masts fell down piecemeal: as they dropp'dThey slept on the abyss without a surge-The waves were dead; the tides were in their grave,The moon, their mistress, had expir'd before;The winds were wither'd in the stagnant air,And the clouds perish'd; Darkness had no needOf aid from them-She was the Universe. ~ George Gordon Byron,
133:The principle of Yoga is the turning of one or of all powers of our human existence into a means of reaching the divine Being. In an ordinary Yoga one main power of being or one group of its powers is made the means, vehicle, path. In a synthetic Yoga all powers will be combined and included in the transmuting instrumentation. In Hathayoga the instrument is the body and life. All the power of the body is stilled, collected, purified, heightened, concentrated to its utmost limits or beyond any limits by Asana and other physical processes; the power of the life too is similarly purified, heightened, concentrated by Asana and Pranayama. This concentration of powers is then directed towards that physical centre in which the divine consciousness sits concealed in the human body. The power of Life, Nature-power, coiled up with all its secret forces asleep in the lowest nervous plexus of the earth-being,-for only so much escapes into waking action in our normal operations as is sufficient for the limited uses of human life,-rises awakened through centre after centre and awakens, too, in its ascent and passage the forces of each successive nodus of our being, the nervous life, the heart of emotion and ordinary mentality, the speech, sight, will, the higher knowledge, till through and above the brain it meets with and it becomes one with the divine consciousness. In Rajayoga the chosen instrument is the mind. our ordinary mentality is first disciplined, purified and directed towards the divine Being, then by a summary process of Asana and Pranayama the physical force of our being is stilled and concentrated, the life-force released into a rhythmic movement capable of cessation and concentrated into a higher power of its upward action, the mind, supported and strengthened by this greater action and concentration of the body and life upon which it rests, is itself purified of all its unrest and emotion and its habitual thought-waves, liberated from distraction and dispersion, given its highest force of concentration, gathered up into a trance of absorption. Two objects, the one temporal, the other eternal,are gained by this discipline. Mind-power develops in another concentrated action abnormal capacities of knowledge, effective will, deep light of reception, powerful light of thought-radiation which are altogether beyond the narrow range of our normal mentality; it arrives at the Yogic or occult powers around which there has been woven so much quite dispensable and yet perhaps salutary mystery. But the one final end and the one all-important gain is that the mind, stilled and cast into a concentrated trance, can lose itself in the divine consciousness and the soul be made free to unite with the divine Being. The triple way takes for its chosen instruments the three main powers of the mental soul-life of the human being. Knowledge selects the reason and the mental vision and it makes them by purification, concentration and a certain discipline of a Goddirected seeking its means for the greatest knowledge and the greatest vision of all, God-knowledge and God-vision. Its aim is to see, know and be the Divine. Works, action selects for its instrument the will of the doer of works; it makes life an offering of sacrifice to the Godhead and by purification, concentration and a certain discipline of subjection to the divine Will a means for contact and increasing unity of the soul of man with the divine Master of the universe. Devotion selects the emotional and aesthetic powers of the soul and by turning them all Godward in a perfect purity, intensity, infinite passion of seeking makes them a means of God-possession in one or many relations of unity with the Divine Being. All aim in their own way at a union or unity of the human soul with the supreme Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Self-Perfection,
134:STAGE TWO: THE CHONYID The Chonyid is the period of the appearance of the peaceful and wrathful deities-that is to say, the subtle realm, the Sambhogakaya. When the Clear Light of the causal realm is resisted and contracted against, then that Reality is transformed into the primordial seed forms of the peaceful deities (ishtadevas of the subtle sphere), and these in turn, if resisted and denied, are transformed into the wrathful deities. The peaceful deities appear first: through seven successive substages, there appear various forms of the tathagatas, dakinis, and vidyadharas, all accompanied by the most dazzlingly brilliant colors and aweinspiring suprahuman sounds. One after another, the divine visions, lights, and subtle luminous sounds cascade through awareness. They are presented, given, to the individual openly, freely, fully, and completely: visions of God in almost painful intensity and brilliance. How the individual handles these divine visions and sounds (nada) is of the utmost significance, because each divine scenario is accompanied by a much less intense vision, by a region of relative dullness and blunted illuminations. These concomitant dull and blunted visions represent the first glimmerings of the world of samsara, of the six realms of egoic grasping, of the dim world of duality and fragmentation and primitive forms of low-level unity. According to the Thotrol. most individuals simply recoil in the face of these divine illuminations- they contract into less intense and more manageable forms of experience. Fleeing divine illumination, they glide towards the fragmented-and thus less intense-realm of duality and multiplicity. But it's not just that they recoil against divinity-it is that they are attracted to the lower realms, drawn to them, and find satisfaction in them. The Thotrol says they are actually "attracted to the impure lights." As we have put it, these lower realms are substitute gratifications. The individual thinks that they are just what he wants, these lower realms of denseness. But just because these realms are indeed dimmer and less intense, they eventually prove to be worlds without bliss, without illumination, shot through with pain and suffering. How ironic: as a substitute for God, individuals create and latch onto Hell, known as samsara, maya, dismay. In Christian theology it is said that the flames of Hell are God's love (Agape) denied. Thus the message is repeated over and over again in the Chonyid stage: abide in the lights of the Five Wisdoms and subtle tathagatas, look not at the duller lights of samsara. of the six realms, of safe illusions and egoic dullness. As but one example: Thereupon, because of the power of bad karma, the glorious blue light of the Wisdom of the Dharmadhatu will produce in thee fear and terror, and thou wilt wish to flee from it. Thou wilt begat a fondness for the dull white light of the devas [one of the lower realms]. At this stage, thou must not be awed by the divine blue light which will appear shining, dazzling, and glorious; and be not startled by it. That is the light of the Tathagata called the Light of the Wisdom of the Dharmadhatu. Be not fond of the dull white light of the devas. Be not attached to it; be not weak. If thou be attached to it, thou wilt wander into the abodes of the devas and be drawn into the whirl of the Six Lokas. The point is this: ''If thou are frightened by the pure radiances of Wisdom and attracted by the impure lights of the Six Lokas [lower realms], then thou wilt assume a body in any of the Six Lokas and suffer samsaric miseries; and thou wilt never be emancipated from the Ocean of Samsara, wherein thou wilt be whirled round and round and made to taste the sufferings thereof." But here is what is happening: in effect, we are seeing the primal and original form of the Atman project in its negative and contracting aspects. In this second stage (the Chonyid), there is already some sort of boundary in awareness, there is already some sort of subject-object duality superimposed upon the original Wholeness and Oneness of the Chikhai Dharmakaya. So now there is boundary-and wherever there is boundary, there is the Atman project. ~ Ken Wilber, The Atman Project 129,
135:AUGOEIDES: The magicians most important invocation is that of his Genius, Daemon, True Will, or Augoeides. This operation is traditionally known as attaining the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. It is sometimes known as the Magnum Opus or Great Work. The Augoeides may be defined as the most perfect vehicle of Kia on the plane of duality. As the avatar of Kia on earth, the Augoeides represents the true will, the raison detre of the magician, his purpose in existing. The discovery of ones true will or real nature may be difficult and fraught with danger, since a false identification leads to obsession and madness. The operation of obtaining the knowledge and conversation is usually a lengthy one. The magician is attempting a progressive metamorphosis, a complete overhaul of his entire existence. Yet he has to seek the blueprint for his reborn self as he goes along. Life is less the meaningless accident it seems. Kia has incarnated in these particular conditions of duality for some purpose. The inertia of previous existences propels Kia into new forms of manifestation. Each incarnation represents a task, or a puzzle to be solved, on the way to some greater form of completion. The key to this puzzle is in the phenomena of the plane of duality in which we find ourselves. We are, as it were, trapped in a labyrinth or maze. The only thing to do is move about and keep a close watch on the way the walls turn. In a completely chaotic universe such as this one, there are no accidents. Everything is signifcant. Move a single grain of sand on a distant shore and the entire future history of the world will eventually be changed. A person doing his true will is assisted by the momentum of the universe and seems possessed of amazing good luck. In beginning the great work of obtaining the knowledge and conversation, the magician vows to interpret every manifestation of existence as a direct message from the infinite Chaos to himself personally. To do this is to enter the magical world view in its totality. He takes complete responsibility for his present incarnation and must consider every experience, thing, or piece of information which assails him from any source, as a reflection of the way he is conducting his existence. The idea that things happen to one that may or may not be related to the way one acts is an illusion created by our shallow awareness. Keeping a close eye on the walls of the labyrinth, the conditions of his existence, the magician may then begin his invocation. The genius is not something added to oneself. Rather it is a stripping away of excess to reveal the god within. Directly on awakening, preferably at dawn, the initiate goes to the place of invocation. Figuring to himself as he goes that being born anew each day brings with it the chance of greater rebirth, first he banishes the temple of his mind by ritual or by some magical trance. Then he unveils some token or symbol or sigil which represents to him the Holy Guardian Angel. This symbol he will likely have to change during the great work as the inspiration begins to move him. Next he invokes an image of the Angel into his minds eye. It may be considered as a luminous duplicate of ones own form standing in front of or behind one, or simply as a ball of brilliant light above ones head. Then he formulates his aspirations in what manner he will, humbling himself in prayer or exalting himself in loud proclamation as his need be. The best form of this invocation is spoken spontaneously from the heart, and if halting at first, will prove itself in time. He is aiming to establish a set of ideas and images which correspond to the nature of his genius, and at the same time receive inspiration from that source. As the magician begins to manifest more of his true will, the Augoeides will reveal images, names, and spiritual principles by which it can be drawn into greater manifestation. Having communicated with the invoked form, the magician should draw it into himself and go forth to live in the way he hath willed. The ritual may be concluded with an aspiration to the wisdom of silence by a brief concentration on the sigil of the Augoeides, but never by banishing. Periodically more elaborate forms of ritual, using more powerful forms of gnosis, may be employed. At the end of the day, there should be an accounting and fresh resolution made. Though every day be a catalog of failure, there should be no sense of sin or guilt. Magic is the raising of the whole individual in perfect balance to the power of Infinity, and such feelings are symptomatic of imbalance. If any unnecessary or imbalanced scraps of ego become identified with the genius by mistake, then disaster awaits. The life force flows directly into these complexes and bloats them into grotesque monsters variously known as the demon Choronzon. Some magicians attempting to go too fast with this invocation have failed to banish this demon, and have gone spectacularly insane as a result. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
136:What are these operations? They are not mere psychological self-analysis and self-observation. Such analysis, such observation are, like the process of right thought, of immense value and practically indispensable. They may even, if rightly pursued, lead to a right thought of considerable power and effectivity. Like intellectual discrimination by the process of meditative thought they will have an effect of purification; they will lead to self-knowledge of a certain kind and to the setting right of the disorders of the soul and the heart and even of the disorders of the understanding. Self-knowledge of all kinds is on the straight path to the knowledge of the real Self. The Upanishad tells us that the Self-existent has so set the doors of the soul that they turn outwards and most men look outward into the appearances of things; only the rare soul that is ripe for a calm thought and steady wisdom turns its eye inward, sees the Self and attains to immortality. To this turning of the eye inward psychological self-observation and analysis is a great and effective introduction.We can look into the inward of ourselves more easily than we can look into the inward of things external to us because there, in things outside us, we are in the first place embarrassed by the form and secondly we have no natural previous experience of that in them which is other than their physical substance. A purified or tranquillised mind may reflect or a powerful concentration may discover God in the world, the Self in Nature even before it is realised in ourselves, but this is rare and difficult. (2) And it is only in ourselves that we can observe and know the process of the Self in its becoming and follow the process by which it draws back into self-being. Therefore the ancient counsel, know thyself, will always stand as the first word that directs us towards the knowledge. Still, psychological self-knowledge is only the experience of the modes of the Self, it is not the realisation of the Self in its pure being. The status of knowledge, then, which Yoga envisages is not merely an intellectual conception or clear discrimination of the truth, nor is it an enlightened psychological experience of the modes of our being. It is a "realisation", in the full sense of the word; it is the making real to ourselves and in ourselves of the Self, the transcendent and universal Divine, and it is the subsequent impossibility of viewing the modes of being except in the light of that Self and in their true aspect as its flux of becoming under the psychical and physical conditions of our world-existence. This realisation consists of three successive movements, internal vision, complete internal experience and identity. This internal vision, dr.s.t.i, the power so highly valued by the ancient sages, the power which made a man a Rishi or Kavi and no longer a mere thinker, is a sort of light in the soul by which things unseen become as evident and real to it-to the soul and not merely to the intellect-as do things seen to the physical eye. In the physical world there are always two forms of knowledge, the direct and the indirect, pratyaks.a, of that which is present to the eyes, and paroks.a, of that which is remote from and beyond our vision. When the object is beyond our vision, we are necessarily obliged to arrive at an idea of it by inference, imagination, analogy, by hearing the descriptions of others who have seen it or by studying pictorial or other representations of it if these are available. By putting together all these aids we can indeed arrive at a more or less adequate idea or suggestive image of the object, but we do not realise the thing itself; it is not yet to us the grasped reality, but only our conceptual representation of a reality. But once we have seen it with the eyes,-for no other sense is adequate,-we possess, we realise; it is there secure in our satisfied being, part of ourselves in knowledge. Precisely the same rule holds good of psychical things and of he Self. We may hear clear and luminous teachings about the Self from philosophers or teachers or from ancient writings; we may by thought, inference, imagination, analogy or by any other available means attempt to form a mental figure or conception of it; we may hold firmly that conception in our mind and fix it by an entire and exclusive concentration;3 but we have not yet realised it, we have not seen God. It is only when after long and persistent concentration or by other means the veil of the mind is rent or swept aside, only when a flood of light breaks over the awakened mentality, jyotirmaya brahman, and conception gives place to a knowledge-vision in which the Self is as present, real, concrete as a physical object to the physical eye, that we possess in knowledge; for we have seen. After that revelation, whatever fadings of the light, whatever periods of darkness may afflict the soul, it can never irretrievably lose what it has once held. The experience is inevitably renewed and must become more frequent till it is constant; when and how soon depends on the devotion and persistence with which we insist on the path and besiege by our will or our love the hidden Deity. (2) And it is only in ourselves that we can observe and know the 2 In one respect, however, it is easier, because in external things we are not so much hampered by the sense of the limited ego as in ourselves; one obstacle to the realisation of God is therefore removed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge,
137:SECTION 1. Books for Serious Study Liber CCXX. (Liber AL vel Legis.) The Book of the Law. This book is the foundation of the New Æon, and thus of the whole of our work. The Equinox. The standard Work of Reference in all occult matters. The Encyclopaedia of Initiation. Liber ABA (Book 4). A general account in elementary terms of magical and mystical powers. In four parts: (1) Mysticism (2) Magical (Elementary Theory) (3) Magick in Theory and Practice (this book) (4) The Law. Liber II. The Message of the Master Therion. Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner. Liber DCCCXXXVIII. The Law of Liberty. A further explanation of The Book of the Law in reference to certain ethical problems. Collected Works of A. Crowley. These works contain many mystical and magical secrets, both stated clearly in prose, and woven into the Robe of sublimest poesy. The Yi King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XVI], Oxford University Press.) The "Classic of Changes"; give the initiated Chinese system of Magick. The Tao Teh King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XXXIX].) Gives the initiated Chinese system of Mysticism. Tannhäuser, by A. Crowley. An allegorical drama concerning the Progress of the Soul; the Tannhäuser story slightly remodelled. The Upanishads. (S. B. E. Series [vols. I & XV.) The Classical Basis of Vedantism, the best-known form of Hindu Mysticism. The Bhagavad-gita. A dialogue in which Krishna, the Hindu "Christ", expounds a system of Attainment. The Voice of the Silence, by H.P. Blavatsky, with an elaborate commentary by Frater O.M. Frater O.M., 7°=48, is the most learned of all the Brethren of the Order; he has given eighteen years to the study of this masterpiece. Raja-Yoga, by Swami Vivekananda. An excellent elementary study of Hindu mysticism. His Bhakti-Yoga is also good. The Shiva Samhita. An account of various physical means of assisting the discipline of initiation. A famous Hindu treatise on certain physical practices. The Hathayoga Pradipika. Similar to the Shiva Samhita. The Aphorisms of Patanjali. A valuable collection of precepts pertaining to mystical attainment. The Sword of Song. A study of Christian theology and ethics, with a statement and solution of the deepest philosophical problems. Also contains the best account extant of Buddhism, compared with modern science. The Book of the Dead. A collection of Egyptian magical rituals. Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie, by Eliphas Levi. The best general textbook of magical theory and practice for beginners. Written in an easy popular style. The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. The best exoteric account of the Great Work, with careful instructions in procedure. This Book influenced and helped the Master Therion more than any other. The Goetia. The most intelligible of all the mediæval rituals of Evocation. Contains also the favourite Invocation of the Master Therion. Erdmann's History of Philosophy. A compendious account of philosophy from the earliest times. Most valuable as a general education of the mind. The Spiritual Guide of [Miguel de] Molinos. A simple manual of Christian Mysticism. The Star in the West. (Captain Fuller). An introduction to the study of the Works of Aleister Crowley. The Dhammapada. (S. B. E. Series [vol. X], Oxford University Press). The best of the Buddhist classics. The Questions of King Milinda. (S. B. E. Series [vols. XXXV & XXXVI].) Technical points of Buddhist dogma, illustrated bydialogues. Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicam Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ. A complete Dictionary of the Correspondences of all magical elements, reprinted with extensive additions, making it the only standard comprehensive book of reference ever published. It is to the language of Occultism what Webster or Murray is to the English language. Varieties of Religious Experience (William James). Valuable as showing the uniformity of mystical attainment. Kabbala Denudata, von Rosenroth: also The Kabbalah Unveiled, by S.L. Mathers. The text of the Qabalah, with commentary. A good elementary introduction to the subject. Konx Om Pax [by Aleister Crowley]. Four invaluable treatises and a preface on Mysticism and Magick. The Pistis Sophia [translated by G.R.S. Mead or Violet McDermot]. An admirable introduction to the study of Gnosticism. The Oracles of Zoroaster [Chaldæan Oracles]. An invaluable collection of precepts mystical and magical. The Dream of Scipio, by Cicero. Excellent for its Vision and its Philosophy. The Golden Verses of Pythagoras, by Fabre d'Olivet. An interesting study of the exoteric doctrines of this Master. The Divine Pymander, by Hermes Trismegistus. Invaluable as bearing on the Gnostic Philosophy. The Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians, reprint of Franz Hartmann. An invaluable compendium. Scrutinium Chymicum [Atalanta Fugiens]¸ by Michael Maier. One of the best treatises on alchemy. Science and the Infinite, by Sidney Klein. One of the best essays written in recent years. Two Essays on the Worship of Priapus [A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus &c. &c. &c.], by Richard Payne Knight [and Thomas Wright]. Invaluable to all students. The Golden Bough, by J.G. Frazer. The textbook of Folk Lore. Invaluable to all students. The Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine. Excellent, though elementary, as a corrective to superstition. Rivers of Life, by General Forlong. An invaluable textbook of old systems of initiation. Three Dialogues, by Bishop Berkeley. The Classic of Subjective Idealism. Essays of David Hume. The Classic of Academic Scepticism. First Principles by Herbert Spencer. The Classic of Agnosticism. Prolegomena [to any future Metaphysics], by Immanuel Kant. The best introduction to Metaphysics. The Canon [by William Stirling]. The best textbook of Applied Qabalah. The Fourth Dimension, by [Charles] H. Hinton. The best essay on the subject. The Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley. Masterpieces of philosophy, as of prose. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Appendix I: Literature Recommended to Aspirants,
138:Why do we forget our dreams? Because you do not dream always at the same place. It is not always the same part of your being that dreams and it is not at the same place that you dream. If you were in conscious, direct, continuous communication with all the parts of your being, you would remember all your dreams. But very few parts of the being are in communication. For example, you have a dream in the subtle physical, that is to say, quite close to the physical. Generally, these dreams occur in the early hours of the morning, that is between four and five o'clock, at the end of the sleep. If you do not make a sudden movement when you wake up, if you remain very quiet, very still and a little attentive - quietly attentive - and concentrated, you will remember them, for the communication between the subtle physical and the physical is established - very rarely is there no communication. Now, dreams are mostly forgotten because you have a dream while in a certain state and then pass into another. For instance, when you sleep, your body is asleep, your vital is asleep, but your mind is still active. So your mind begins to have dreams, that is, its activity is more or less coordinated, the imagination is very active and you see all kinds of things, take part in extraordinary happenings.... After some time, all that calms down and the mind also begins to doze. The vital that was resting wakes up; it comes out of the body, walks about, goes here and there, does all kinds of things, reacts, sometimes fights, and finally eats. It does all kinds of things. The vital is very adventurous. It watches. When it is heroic it rushes to save people who are in prison or to destroy enemies or it makes wonderful discoveries. But this pushes back the whole mental dream very far behind. It is rubbed off, forgotten: naturally you cannot remember it because the vital dream takes its place. But if you wake up suddenly at that moment, you remember it. There are people who have made the experiment, who have got up at certain fixed hours of the night and when they wake up suddenly, they do remember. You must not move brusquely, but awake in the natural course, then you remember. After a time, the vital having taken a good stroll, needs to rest also, and so it goes into repose and quietness, quite tired at the end of all kinds of adventures. Then something else wakes up. Let us suppose that it is the subtle physical that goes for a walk. It starts moving and begins wandering, seeing the rooms and... why, this thing that was there, but it has come here and that other thing which was in that room is now in this one, and so on. If you wake up without stirring, you remembeR But this has pushed away far to the back of the consciousness all the stories of the vital. They are forgotten and so you cannot recollect your dreams. But if at the time of waking up you are not in a hurry, you are not obliged to leave your bed, on the contrary you can remain there as long as you wish, you need not even open your eyes; you keep your head exactly where it was and you make yourself like a tranquil mirror within and concentrate there. You catch just a tiny end of the tail of your dream. You catch it and start pulling gently, without stirring in the least. You begin pulling quite gently, and then first one part comes, a little later another. You go backward; the last comes up first. Everything goes backward, slowly, and suddenly the whole dream reappears: "Ah, there! it was like that." Above all, do not jump up, do not stir; you repeat the dream to yourself several times - once, twice - until it becomes clear in all its details. Once that dream is settled, you continue not to stir, you try to go further in, and suddenly you catch the tail of something else. It is more distant, more vague, but you can still seize it. And here also you hang on, get hold of it and pull, and you see that everything changes and you enter another world; all of a sudden you have an extraordinary adventure - it is another dream. You follow the same process. You repeat the dream to yourself once, twice, until you are sure of it. You remain very quiet all the time. Then you begin to penetrate still more deeply into yourself, as though you were going in very far, very far; and again suddenly you see a vague form, you have a feeling, a sensation... like a current of air, a slight breeze, a little breath; and you say, "Well, well...." It takes a form, it becomes clear - and the third category comes. You must have a lot of time, a lot of patience, you must be very quiet in your mind and body, very quiet, and you can tell the story of your whole night from the end right up to the beginning. Even without doing this exercise which is very long and difficult, in order to recollect a dream, whether it be the last one or the one in the middle that has made a violent impression on your being, you must do what I have said when you wake up: take particular care not even to move your head on the pillow, remain absolutely still and let the dream return. Some people do not have a passage between one state and another, there is a little gap and so they leap from one to the other; there is no highway passing through all the states of being with no break of the consciousness. A small dark hole, and you do not remember. It is like a precipice across which one has to extend the consciousness. To build a bridge takes a very long time; it takes much longer than building a physical bridge.... Very few people want to and know how to do it. They may have had magnificent activities, they do not remember them or sometimes only the last, the nearest, the most physical activity, with an uncoordinated movement - dreams having no sense. But there are as many different kinds of nights and sleep as there are different days and activities. There are not many days that are alike, each day is different. The days are not the same, the nights are not the same. You and your friends are doing apparently the same thing, but for each one it is very different. And each one must have his own procedure. Why are two dreams never alike?Because all things are different. No two minutes are alike in the universe and it will be so till the end of the universe, no two minutes will ever be alike. And men obstinately want to make rules! One must do this and not that.... Well! we must let people please themselves. You could have put to me a very interesting question: "Why am I fourteen years old today?" Intelligent people will say: "It is because it is the fourteenth year since you were born." That is the answer of someone who believes himself to be very intelligent. But there is another reason. I shall tell this to you alone.... I have drowned you all sufficiently well! Now you must begin to learn swimming! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 36?,
139:The Supermind [Supramental consciousness] is in its very essence a truth-consciousness, a consciousness always free from the Ignorance which is the foundation of our present natural or evolutionary existence and from which nature in us is trying to arrive at self-knowledge and world-knowledge and a right consciousness and the right use of our existence in the universe. The Supermind, because it is a truth-consciousness, has this knowledge inherent in it and this power of true existence; its course is straight and can go direct to its aim, its field is wide and can even be made illimitable. This is because its very nature is knowledge: it has not to acquire knowledge but possesses it in its own right; its steps are not from nescience or ignorance into some imperfect light, but from truth to greater truth, from right perception to deeper perception, from intuition to intuition, from illumination to utter and boundless luminousness, from growing widenesses to the utter vasts and to very infinitude. On its summits it possesses the divine omniscience and omnipotence, but even in an evolutionary movement of its own graded self-manifestation by which it would eventually reveal its own highest heights, it must be in its very nature essentially free from ignorance and error: it starts from truth and light and moves always in truth and light. As its knowledge is always true, so too its will is always true; it does not fumble in its handling of things or stumble in its paces. In the Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Supermind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural imperfections and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Supermind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness. All the life and action and leading of the Supermind is guarded in its very nature from the falsehoods and uncertainties that are our lot; it moves in safety towards its perfection. Once the truth-consciousness was established here on its own sure foundation, the evolution of divine life would be a progress in felicity, a march through light to Ananda. Supermind is an eternal reality of the divine Being and the divine Nature. In its own plane it already and always exists and possesses its own essential law of being; it has not to be created or to emerge or evolve into existence out of involution in Matter or out of non-existence, as it might seem to the view of mind which itself seems to its own view to have so emerged from life and Matter or to have evolved out of an involution in life and Matter. The nature of Supermind is always the same, a being of knowledge, proceeding from truth to truth, creating or rather manifesting what has to be manifested by the power of a pre-existent knowledge, not by hazard but by a self-existent destiny in the being itself, a necessity of the thing in itself and therefore inevitable. Its -manifestation of the divine life will also be inevitable; its own life on its own plane is divine and, if Supermind descends upon the earth, it will bring necessarily the divine life with it and establish it here. Supermind is the grade of existence beyond mind, life and Matter and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power: if it acts, it is through these inferior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arrival of the descending Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life. It is indeed so that life and mind involved in Matter have realised themselves here; for only what is involved can evolve, otherwise there could be no emergence. The manifestation of a supramental truth-consciousness is therefore the capital reality that will make the divine life possible. It is when all the movements of thought, impulse and action are governed and directed by a self-existent and luminously automatic truth-consciousness and our whole nature comes to be constituted by it and made of its stuff that the life divine will be complete and absolute. Even as it is, in reality though not in the appearance of things, it is a secret self-existent knowledge and truth that is working to manifest itself in the creation here. The Divine is already there immanent within us, ourselves are that in our inmost reality and it is this reality that we have to manifest; it is that which constitutes the urge towards the divine living and makes necessary the creation of the life divine even in this material existence. A manifestation of the Supermind and its truth-consciousness is then inevitable; it must happen in this world sooner or lateR But it has two aspects, a descent from above, an ascent from below, a self-revelation of the Spirit, an evolution in Nature. The ascent is necessarily an effort, a working of Nature, an urge or nisus on her side to raise her lower parts by an evolutionary or revolutionary change, conversion or transformation into the divine reality and it may happen by a process and progress or by a rapid miracle. The descent or self-revelation of the Spirit is an act of the supreme Reality from above which makes the realisation possible and it can appear either as the divine aid which brings about the fulfilment of the progress and process or as the sanction of the miracle. Evolution, as we see it in this world, is a slow and difficult process and, indeed, needs usually ages to reach abiding results; but this is because it is in its nature an emergence from inconscient beginnings, a start from nescience and a working in the ignorance of natural beings by what seems to be an unconscious force. There can be, on the contrary, an evolution in the light and no longer in the darkness, in which the evolving being is a conscious participant and cooperator, and this is precisely what must take place here. Even in the effort and progress from the Ignorance to Knowledge this must be in part if not wholly the endeavour to be made on the heights of the nature, and it must be wholly that in the final movement towards the spiritual change, realisation, transformation. It must be still more so when there is a transition across the dividing line between the Ignorance and the Knowledge and the evolution is from knowledge to greater knowledge, from consciousness to greater consciousness, from being to greater being. There is then no longer any necessity for the slow pace of the ordinary evolution; there can be rapid conversion, quick transformation after transformation, what would seem to our normal present mind a succession of miracles. An evolution on the supramental levels could well be of that nature; it could be equally, if the being so chose, a more leisurely passage of one supramental state or condition of things to something beyond but still supramental, from level to divine level, a building up of divine gradations, a free growth to the supreme Supermind or beyond it to yet undreamed levels of being, consciousness and Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga 558,
140:The Supreme Discovery IF WE want to progress integrally, we must build within our conscious being a strong and pure mental synthesis which can serve us as a protection against temptations from outside, as a landmark to prevent us from going astray, as a beacon to light our way across the moving ocean of life. Each individual should build up this mental synthesis according to his own tendencies and affinities and aspirations. But if we want it to be truly living and luminous, it must be centred on the idea that is the intellectual representation symbolising That which is at the centre of our being, That which is our life and our light. This idea, expressed in sublime words, has been taught in various forms by all the great Instructors in all lands and all ages. The Self of each one and the great universal Self are one. Since all that is exists from all eternity in its essence and principle, why make a distinction between the being and its origin, between ourselves and what we place at the beginning? The ancient traditions rightly said: "Our origin and ourselves, our God and ourselves are one." And this oneness should not be understood merely as a more or less close and intimate relationship of union, but as a true identity. Thus, when a man who seeks the Divine attempts to reascend by degrees towards the inaccessible, he forgets that all his knowledge and all his intuition cannot take him one step forward in this infinite; neither does he know that what he wants to attain, what he believes to be so far from him, is within him. For how could he know anything of the origin until he becomes conscious of this origin in himself? It is by understanding himself, by learning to know himself, that he can make the supreme discovery and cry out in wonder like the patriarch in the Bible, "The house of God is here and I knew it not." That is why we must express that sublime thought, creatrix of the material worlds, and make known to all the word that fills the heavens and the earth, "I am in all things and all beings."When all shall know this, the promised day of great transfigurations will be at hand. When in each atom of Matter men shall recognise the indwelling thought of God, when in each living creature they shall perceive some hint of a gesture of God, when each man can see God in his brother, then dawn will break, dispelling the darkness, the falsehood, the ignorance, the error and suffering that weigh upon all Nature. For, "all Nature suffers and laments as she awaits the revelation of the Sons of God." This indeed is the central thought epitomising all others, the thought which should be ever present to our remembrance as the sun that illumines all life. That is why I remind you of it today. For if we follow our path bearing this thought in our hearts like the rarest jewel, the most precious treasure, if we allow it to do its work of illumination and transfiguration within us, we shall know that it lives in the centre of all beings and all things, and in it we shall feel the marvellous oneness of the universe. Then we shall understand the vanity and childishness of our meagre satisfactions, our foolish quarrels, our petty passions, our blind indignations. We shall see the dissolution of our little faults, the crumbling of the last entrenchments of our limited personality and our obtuse egoism. We shall feel ourselves being swept along by this sublime current of true spirituality which will deliver us from our narrow limits and bounds. The individual Self and the universal Self are one; in every world, in every being, in every thing, in every atom is the Divine Presence, and man's mission is to manifest it. In order to do that, he must become conscious of this Divine Presence within him. Some individuals must undergo a real apprenticeship in order to achieve this: their egoistic being is too all-absorbing, too rigid, too conservative, and their struggles against it are long and painful. Others, on the contrary, who are more impersonal, more plastic, more spiritualised, come easily into contact with the inexhaustible divine source of their being.But let us not forget that they too should devote themselves daily, constantly, to a methodical effort of adaptation and transformation, so that nothing within them may ever again obscure the radiance of that pure light. But how greatly the standpoint changes once we attain this deeper consciousness! How understanding widens, how compassion grows! On this a sage has said: "I would like each one of us to come to the point where he perceives the inner God who dwells even in the vilest of human beings; instead of condemning him we would say, 'Arise, O resplendent Being, thou who art ever pure, who knowest neither birth nor death; arise, Almighty One, and manifest thy nature.'" Let us live by this beautiful utterance and we shall see everything around us transformed as if by miracle. This is the attitude of true, conscious and discerning love, the love which knows how to see behind appearances, understand in spite of words, and which, amid all obstacles, is in constant communion with the depths. What value have our impulses and our desires, our anguish and our violence, our sufferings and our struggles, all these inner vicissitudes unduly dramatised by our unruly imagination - what value do they have before this great, this sublime and divine love bending over us from the innermost depths of our being, bearing with our weaknesses, rectifying our errors, healing our wounds, bathing our whole being with its regenerating streams? For the inner Godhead never imposes herself, she neither demands nor threatens; she offers and gives herself, conceals and forgets herself in the heart of all beings and things; she never accuses, she neither judges nor curses nor condemns, but works unceasingly to perfect without constraint, to mend without reproach, to encourage without impatience, to enrich each one with all the wealth he can receive; she is the mother whose love bears fruit and nourishes, guards and protects, counsels and consoles; because she understands everything, she can endure everything, excuse and pardon everything, hope and prepare for everything; bearing everything within herself, she owns nothing that does not belong to all, and because she reigns over all, she is the servant of all; that is why all, great and small, who want to be kings with her and gods in her, become, like her, not despots but servitors among their brethren. How beautiful is this humble role of servant, the role of all who have been revealers and heralds of the God who is within all, of the Divine Love that animates all things.... And until we can follow their example and become true servants even as they, let us allow ourselves to be penetrated and transformed by this Divine Love; let us offer Him, without reserve, this marvellous instrument, our physical organism. He shall make it yield its utmost on every plane of activity. To achieve this total self-consecration, all means are good, all methods have their value. The one thing needful is to persevere in our will to attain this goal. For then everything we study, every action we perform, every human being we meet, all come to bring us an indication, a help, a light to guide us on the path. Before I close, I shall add a few pages for those who have already made apparently fruitless efforts, for those who have encountered the pitfalls on the way and seen the measure of their weakness, for those who are in danger of losing their self-confidence and courage. These pages, intended to rekindle hope in the hearts of those who suffer, were written by a spiritual worker at a time when ordeals of every kind were sweeping down on him like purifying flames. You who are weary, downcast and bruised, you who fall, who think perhaps that you are defeated, hear the voice of a friend. He knows your sorrows, he has shared them, he has suffered like you from the ills of the earth; like you he has crossed many deserts under the burden of the day, he has known thirst and hunger, solitude and abandonment, and the cruellest of all wants, the destitution of the heart. Alas! he has known too the hours of doubt, the errors, the faults, the failings, every weakness. But he tells you: Courage! Hearken to the lesson that the rising sun brings to the earth with its first rays each morning. It is a lesson of hope, a message of solace. You who weep, who suffer and tremble, who dare not expect an end to your ills, an issue to your pangs, behold: there is no night without dawn and the day is about to break when darkness is thickest; there is no mist that the sun does not dispel, no cloud that it does not gild, no tear that it will not dry one day, no storm that is not followed by its shining triumphant bow; there is no snow that it does not melt, nor winter that it does not change into radiant spring. And for you too, there is no affliction which does not bring its measure of glory, no distress which cannot be transformed into joy, nor defeat into victory, nor downfall into higher ascension, nor solitude into radiating centre of life, nor discord into harmony - sometimes it is a misunderstanding between two minds that compels two hearts to open to mutual communion; lastly, there is no infinite weakness that cannot be changed into strength. And it is even in supreme weakness that almightiness chooses to reveal itself! Listen, my little child, you who today feel so broken, so fallen perhaps, who have nothing left, nothing to cover your misery and foster your pride: never before have you been so great! How close to the summits is he who awakens in the depths, for the deeper the abyss, the more the heights reveal themselves! Do you not know this, that the most sublime forces of the vasts seek to array themselves in the most opaque veils of Matter? Oh, the sublime nuptials of sovereign love with the obscurest plasticities, of the shadow's yearning with the most royal light! If ordeal or fault has cast you down, if you have sunk into the nether depths of suffering, do not grieve - for there indeed the divine love and the supreme blessing can reach you! Because you have passed through the crucible of purifying sorrows, the glorious ascents are yours. You are in the wilderness: then listen to the voices of the silence. The clamour of flattering words and outer applause has gladdened your ears, but the voices of the silence will gladden your soul and awaken within you the echo of the depths, the chant of divine harmonies! You are walking in the depths of night: then gather the priceless treasures of the night. In bright sunshine, the ways of intelligence are lit, but in the white luminosities of the night lie the hidden paths of perfection, the secret of spiritual riches. You are being stripped of everything: that is the way towards plenitude. When you have nothing left, everything will be given to you. Because for those who are sincere and true, from the worst always comes the best. Every grain that is sown in the earth produces a thousand. Every wing-beat of sorrow can be a soaring towards glory. And when the adversary pursues man relentlessly, everything he does to destroy him only makes him greater. Hear the story of the worlds, look: the great enemy seems to triumph. He casts the beings of light into the night, and the night is filled with stars. He rages against the cosmic working, he assails the integrity of the empire of the sphere, shatters its harmony, divides and subdivides it, scatters its dust to the four winds of infinity, and lo! the dust is changed into a golden seed, fertilising the infinite and peopling it with worlds which now gravitate around their eternal centre in the larger orbit of space - so that even division creates a richer and deeper unity, and by multiplying the surfaces of the material universe, enlarges the empire that it set out to destroy. Beautiful indeed was the song of the primordial sphere cradled in the bosom of immensity, but how much more beautiful and triumphant is the symphony of the constellations, the music of the spheres, the immense choir that fills the heavens with an eternal hymn of victory! Hear again: no state was ever more precarious than that of man when he was separated on earth from his divine origin. Above him stretched the hostile borders of the usurper, and at his horizon's gates watched jailers armed with flaming swords. Then, since he could climb no more to the source of life, the source arose within him; since he could no more receive the light from above, the light shone forth at the very centre of his being; since he could commune no more with the transcendent love, that love offered itself in a holocaust and chose each terrestrial being, each human self as its dwelling-place and sanctuary. That is how, in this despised and desolate but fruitful and blessed Matter, each atom contains a divine thought, each being carries within him the Divine Inhabitant. And if no being in all the universe is as frail as man, neither is any as divine as he! In truth, in truth, in humiliation lies the cradle of glory! 28 April 1912 ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago The Supreme Discovery,
141:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step. But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort. Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection. You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, WIKI am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: WIKI have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages. In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything. It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM. My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga. All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind. These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness. And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed. And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen. My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal. Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967 ~ The Mother, Sweet Mother The Mother to Mona Sarkar,
142:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passageOmnes eodem cogimur, omniumVersatur urna serius ociusSors exitura et nos in aeternumExilium impositura cymbae.Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vainUpon the axis of its pain,Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!'Farewell, farewell! but this I tellTo thee, thou Wedding-Guest!He prayeth well, who loveth wellBoth man and bird and beast.He prayeth best, who loveth bestAll things both great and small;For the dear God who loveth us,He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Everyone I love I pay. ~ Bob Saget,
2:sausages. Behind ~ Deanna Raybourn,
3: Paysage Fauve
~ Émile Nelligan,
4:Don't go to the circus. ~ Angie Sage,
5: Les Paysages
~ Anna de Noailles,
6:right-of-passage. I ~ Shayne Silvers,
7:The message behind the words ~ Rumi,
8:The sage knows himself. ~ Lao-Tse-35,
9:I'm a fucking final girl ~ Riley Sager,
10:My Life is My Message ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
11:Problems are messages. ~ Shakti Gawain,
12:My life is my message. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
13:Theodophilus Fortitude Fry ~ Angie Sage,
14:The sage acts by doing nothing. ~ Laozi,
15: Mon Ami, Le Paysage
~ Emile Verhaeren,
16:Plain as a pike-staff. ~ Alain Rene Lesage,
17:My message is all about peace. ~ Puff Daddy,
18:Your life is your message. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
19:Mass(age) is the message. ~ Jean Baudrillard,
20:Valuable people are undervalued. ~ Bob Saget,
21:The medium is the message. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
22:Books are the best messages and gifts. ~ Disha,
23:Some dead people said smart stuff. ~ Bob Saget,
24:Favouritism governed kissage, ~ Rudyard Kipling,
25:I love my mom! You can too for $12! ~ Bob Saget,
26:Let your life be your message. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
27:Our own life has to be our message. ~ Nhat Hanh,
28:the truth is often a mixed message ~ Dan Savage,
29:Message number 311920 Zulu. In the ~ Mark Berent,
30:Usage is the best language teacher. ~ Quintilian,
31:Always be sexy. I salute that message. ~ Ted Cruz,
32:I have no agenda, nothing to control. ~ Bob Saget,
33:The median isn't the message. ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
34:Watch and wait, boy. Watch and wait. ~ Angie Sage,
35:I can't envisage stopping writing. ~ Antony Beevor,
36:I knew a Sage once. Trashy little thing. ~ Rebecca,
37:The sage puts herself last and is first. ~ Lao Tzu,
38:Dandra Draa killed my father. - Kaznim ~ Angie Sage,
39:Evil tongues never want a whet. ~ Alain Rene Lesage,
40:I become a chameleon for wherever I am. ~ Bob Saget,
41:Jokes about German sausage are the wurst. ~ Unknown,
42:Music without a message is just sound ~ Jake Miller,
43:...now be quiet, I'm going to be sick. ~ Angie Sage,
44:Prosperity often presages adversity. ~ Hosea Ballou,
45:The bisy larke, messager of day. ~ Geoffrey Chaucer,
46:The Tao of the sage is work without effort. ~ Laozi,
47:If you have a lemon; make lemonade. ~ Howard Gossage,
48:I have no great message to the world. ~ Orson Welles,
49:Jokes about German sausage are the Wurst ~ Anonymous,
50:Oi! Can't a poor Boggart have no peace? ~ Angie Sage,
51:Sometimes the only way out is through. ~ Riley Sager,
52:The fake laughter is an implied message. ~ Toba Beta,
53:The jester is brother to the sage. ~ Arthur Koestler,
54:The medium obscured the message. ~ Christopher Moore,
55:The message of Mark’s gospel is captured ~ Anonymous,
56:There's always a message in my comedy. ~ Paul Mooney,
57:The sage's Way is to act and not to contend. ~ Laozi,
58:You can't ever get too much of Paris. ~ Vicki Lesage,
59:I don't think good films have messages. ~ Julia Leigh,
60:Ohelpuhebteenkát! - Stanley, tegen Jenna ~ Angie Sage,
61:Our own life has to be our message. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
62:The messenger is the message.” Of ~ Robert B Cialdini,
63:You never quiet the love message. Never. ~ Val Kilmer,
64:Hera sent her the same message—Free me. ~ Rick Riordan,
65:I listen with love to my body's messages. ~ Louise Hay,
66:I will not be back after these messages ~ Merv Griffin,
67:Kirshna's message is eternal - fight! ~ Frederick Lenz,
68:passages. Goodreads Improvements Goodreads ~ Anonymous,
69:Sorry about your sausage dog. ~ Alexander McCall Smith,
70:Stern is the visage of necessity. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
71:the metamessage yields heart meaning. ~ Deborah Tannen,
72:Things always look better in the morning. ~ Angie Sage,
73:A little belief in something always helps. ~ Angie Sage,
74:Don't waive your rights with your flags. ~ Sage Francis,
75:Each material has its own message. ~ Frank Lloyd Wright,
76:Even the idiot may have a message for us ~ Henry Miller,
77:Have God make a message out of your mess. ~ Joyce Meyer,
78:his son in Paris and left a message with ~ Louise Penny,
79:I only unwind at facials and massages. ~ Freema Agyeman,
80:"Our own life has to be our message." ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
81:Pain is a message asking for our help. ~ Gerald Epstein,
82:The passage of time makes wizards of us all. ~ Rob Reid,
83:The sage wears coarse clothes, concealing jade. ~ Laozi,
84:When you have a good time there is no time. ~ Bob Saget,
85:Alone the sage can recognize the sage. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
86:Each moment contains a hundred messages from God. ~ Rumi,
87:I'd wear his corsage to an orgy, any day! ~ Kresley Cole,
88:it. A message was written in purple ink: ~ John Sandford,
89:I think the message of peace is for everyone. ~ Jude Law,
90:I try not to look for messages in films. ~ Robert Duvall,
91:Life was simple when you were a Shield Bug. ~ Angie Sage,
92:operations for Clocktower Jakarta, massaged ~ A G Riddle,
93:The message of great art is to disturb. ~ Elayne Boosler,
94:The Young Army was crazy. Marcia was Magyk. ~ Angie Sage,
95:Cletus’s famous sausage is famous.” Cletus’s ~ Penny Reid,
96:Films with a message just make me laugh. ~ Claude Chabrol,
97:Meditation is massage for the mind. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
98:My message is, if you need help, ask for it. ~ Scott Hall,
99:Nothing worse than a piece of dried out fish. ~ Bob Saget,
100:The Way of the Sage is to act but not to compete. ~ Laozi,
101:When sages commend excess, Desire is sick. ~ Mason Cooley,
102:At the end of the day it's the end of the day. ~ Bob Saget,
103:Kindness isn't just a virtue, its a necessity. ~ Bob Saget,
104:Speak softly, I'm getting my massage. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
105:Text messages are dying a funny kind of death. ~ Anonymous,
106:Truth is one, the sages speak of it by many names. ~ CLAMP,
107:Undoubtedly we become what we envisage. ~ Claude M Bristol,
108:Flowers are like visible messages from God. ~ Marie Corelli,
109:Intuition is a heart message minus the static. ~ Sue Thoele,
110:Life is a message scribbled in the dark. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
111:Nothing here below should trouble the sage. ~ Bhagavad Gita,
112:Send message to the future by writing it today! ~ Toba Beta,
113:the Osage were not alone in their profligacy. ~ David Grann,
114:the passage of time itself a kind of marvel ~ Justin Cronin,
115:This life is but the passage of a day, ~ Christina Rossetti,
116:Truly the sage is not other than God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
117:Undoubtedly, we become what we envisage. ~ Claude M Bristol,
118:Does Chester get to put a corsage on his shovel? ~ Anonymous,
119:Donald Trump is able to get his message out. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
120:Don't fear the pain, fear the message behind it. ~ M N Forgy,
121:Ill usage makes the sweetest of us vicious. ~ Winston Graham,
122:I’m not the messenger at all. I’m the message.   ~ Anonymous,
123:"Never stop. Never settle." I believe in this message. ~ Nas,
124:There are a sort of men, whose visages ~ William Shakespeare,
125:The sage avoids extremity, excess, and extravagance. ~ Laozi,
126:When you get the message, hang up the phone. ~ Timothy Leary,
127:Words matter. Especially ones with four letters. ~ Bob Saget,
128:A Passage to India. It is my favourite movie. ~ Maurice Jarre,
129:He (the Sage) does not show off, therefore he shines. ~ Laozi,
130:I'm not the messenger at all. I'm the message. ~ Markus Zusak,
131:Language usage always has a political context. ~ Jackson Katz,
132:Oft morning-dreams presage approaching fate; ~ Michael Bruce,
133:Old age and the passage of time teach all things. ~ Sophocles,
134:The sage is not a savant nor the savant a sage. ~ Lao-Tse. 44,
135:You can send a clear message to the establishment ~ Rand Paul,
136:Death is the least civilized rite of passage. ~ Louise Erdrich,
137:Every happening is a lesson, a message. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
138:How dare I claim to be a sage or a benevolent man? ~ Confucius,
139:If Allah wants to send me a message, ~ Michael Muhammad Knight,
140:I love a massage. I'd go every day if I could. ~ Jason Bateman,
141:My painting carries with it the message of pain. ~ Frida Kahlo,
142:No one gets a free ride. Except maybe bus drivers. ~ Bob Saget,
143:Sleep. It's like giving yourself a massage. ~ Bethenny Frankel,
144:The messenger is not as important as the message. ~ Frank Iero,
145:They would all be sorry... particularly the duck. ~ Angie Sage,
146:this passage and escaped via the cafeteria or ~ David Baldacci,
147:You can do anything you like, it's all fiction. ~ John Gossage,
148:A message is not delivered until it is understood. ~ Robin Hobb,
149:Doubt is not below knowledge, but above it. ~ Alain Rene Lesage,
150:Gott ist, wenn ich das sagen darf, sehr skrupellos. ~ C S Lewis,
151:Guards can do what they want. Message. Received. ~ Dakota Krout,
152:If You Want to Send a Message, Try Western Union. ~ Frank Capra,
153:I'm cycling to take cancer message worldwide. ~ Lance Armstrong,
154:It’s not about the typo, it’s about the message. ~ Stephen King,
155:I wouldn't hurt a flea. I'd finger a spider though. ~ Bob Saget,
156:Note even Moroi give licenses to infants, Sage, ~ Richelle Mead,
157:Note even Moroi give licenses to infants, Sage. ~ Richelle Mead,
158:The Being that is one, sages speak of in many terms. ~ Rig Veda,
159:The rich get richer until the poor get educated. ~ Sage Francis,
160:The sage attends to the belly, and not to what he sees. ~ Laozi,
161:The way a message is delivered, IS the message. ~ Bryant McGill,
162:They will merely know what is in my messages. ~ Terry Pratchett,
163:Tweets and text messages killed the long novel. ~ Andrew Barger,
164:...yelling doesn't make a thing any more possible. ~ Angie Sage,
165:I hate when people ask me to: "Massage the data". ~ Ronald Coase,
166:Messages are for the sender, not for the receiver. ~ Joseph Fink,
167:There are no I's in we but there are two i's in Wii. ~ Bob Saget,
168:The sage governs by emptying senses and filling bellies. ~ Laozi,
169:The sage is not ill, because he sees illness as illness. ~ Laozi,
170:The worse the passage the more welcome the port. ~ Thomas Fuller,
171:This is a really lame exchange of hidden messages. ~ Jeff Strand,
172:What are the messages that you are entertaining? ~ Asa Don Brown,
173:A sage is the instructor of a hundred ages. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
174:But otherwise, music is about a beat and a message. ~ Casey Kasem,
175:I'm not the messenger at all.
I'm the message. ~ Markus Zusak,
176:Lately I been drinking like there's a message in a bottle ~ Drake,
177:My message is simple: take control of your life ~ Charles Barkley,
178:Nous finissons par avoir le visage de nos vérités. ~ Albert Camus,
179:Shouting something didn't make it any more possible. ~ Angie Sage,
180:The mere passage of time makes us all exiles. ~ Joyce Carol Oates,
181:The sage is happy everywhere, the whole earth is his. ~ Confucius,
182:Things go away to return, brightened for the passage ~ A R Ammons,
183:Through silence only the good messages go unheard. ~ Brian Patten,
184:You can't just rattle it off like a demented parrot. ~ Angie Sage,
185:Find a way to get a full-body massage every day. ~ S Jay Olshansky,
186:I'm an imperfect messenger, but the message is perfect. ~ Ron Paul,
187:Let us lend ear to the sages who point out to us the way. ~ Seneca,
188:No, I won’t go to hell, but I’ll take a message. ~ Alyssa Rose Ivy,
189:Small opportunities often presage great enterprises. ~ Demosthenes,
190:The sage embraces the one, and is an example to the world. ~ Laozi,
191:The secret of life is enjoying the passage of time. ~ James Taylor,
192:Think of the man who first tried German sausage. ~ Jerome K Jerome,
193:... waiting for the spell to end, as all spells must. ~ Angie Sage,
194:You get mixed messages because I have mixed feelings. ~ Sarah Kane,
195:Doctor, do you think it could have been the sausage? ~ Paul Claudel,
196:I am an Instrument of Nature..Love is my message. ~ Michael Jackson,
197:If you don't wake up every day happy, change something. ~ Bob Saget,
198:I'm here to take our message straight to the people. ~ Donald Trump,
199:I send messages to the White House continuously ~ Mario Diaz Balart,
200:Ladies, apologies, but isn't 'vintage' just used stuff? ~ Bob Saget,
201:Man is a messenger who forgot the message. ~ Abraham Joshua Heschel,
202:Memories carry thoughts through the passage of time. ~ Truth Devour,
203:The meat in the sausage has got to be Conservative. ~ Boris Johnson,
204:The next message you need is always right where you are. ~ Ram Dass,
205:There’s safety in numbers, yes, but also uncertainty. ~ Riley Sager,
206:Trust the messages coming from your heart and intuition. ~ Ram Dass,
207:Wise men say, only fools rush in. Wise men are so slow. ~ Bob Saget,
208:Could have sworn her breastses was sending me messages. ~ Kanye West,
209:I am the drum on which God is beating out his message. ~ Joan of Arc,
210:I bear messages which will make both your ears tingle. ~ Bram Stoker,
211:I dont want no mail. Send me a Facebook message. ~ Theophilus London,
212:I have no plan except to take care of the people I love. ~ Bob Saget,
213:It is always important to look beyond a pleasant visage. ~ Garth Nix,
214:Message me if...Message me if you know how rockets fly. ~ Weike Wang,
215:Pride and conceit were the original sins of man. ~ Alain Rene Lesage,
216:Relationships are the core message of ecology. ~ Frances Moore Lappe,
217:The message is simple: love and conserve our wildlife. ~ Steve Irwin,
218:The photographic image is a message without a code. ~ Roland Barthes,
219:The sage shuns excess, shuns grandiosity, shuns arrogance. ~ Lao Tzu,
220:the Veda for the priests, the Vedanta for the sages. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
221:Truth is one, the sages speak of it by many names. ~ Joseph Campbell,
222:Where the whole world is awake, the sage sleeps. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
223:You think this is a corsage? How adorably human of you. ~ A G Howard,
224:All art does but consist in the removal of surplusage. ~ Walter Pater,
225:All drugs are poisons the benefit depends on the dosage. ~ Paracelsus,
226:A sage is skilled at helping people without excluding anyone. ~ Laozi,
227:Hij werd nu wie hij in werkelijkheid was. Septimus Heap. ~ Angie Sage,
228:I didn't go in to make friends or not make friends. ~ Michelle Visage,
229:If you build software, every error message is marketing ~ Jason Fried,
230:If you're looking for messages, try Western Union. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
231:I know not every song has to be a powerful message. ~ Kacey Musgraves,
232:I went to a massage parlor, it was self service. ~ Rodney Dangerfield,
233:Our message of the day is service does not need a title. ~ Carl Lewis,
234:People do what they do to each other and they feed on it. ~ Bob Saget,
235:Pride is all very well, but a sausage is a sausage, ~ Terry Pratchett,
236:Pride is all very well, but a sausage is a sausage. ~ Terry Pratchett,
237:Synchronicity is God sending us messages anonymously. ~ Deepak Chopra,
238:The greatness of a man is only measured by his urologist. ~ Bob Saget,
239:The message is clear: even if you start small, start now. ~ Anonymous,
240:The message sent is not always the message received. ~ Virginia Satir,
241:Therefore the sages got their knowledge without travelling; ~ Lao Tzu,
242:The sage is one with the world, and lives in harmony with it. ~ Laozi,
243:Weil es so viel zu sagen gab, sagten alle drei nichts. ~ John Grisham,
244:When I want to reward myself I get a relaxing massage. ~ Eva Longoria,
245:Aunt Zelda always said: the thought is the seed for deed. ~ Angie Sage,
246:Cultivate poverty like a garden herb, like sage. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
247:Get down. Shut Up. And Listen," ~ Angie SageJenna Heap ~ Angie Sage,
248:I’d lick him all over and massage his butt if he asked. ~ Joanna Wylde,
249:I’m not afraid of dying. Pieces of me die all the time. ~ Sage Francis,
250:Oh wait, scratch that. That would be très embarrassing. ~ Vicki Lesage,
251:Really, Sage? A date?” I sighed. “Yes, Adrian. A date. ~ Richelle Mead,
252:Stay consistent with your message and who you are. ~ Wilmer Valderrama,
253:Things have a habit of working out, you know. Eventually. ~ Angie Sage,
254:Unless ideas are massaged into reality they evaporate. ~ George Nelson,
255:A book is not a secret messsage.”
“Some books are. ~ Mark Beauregard,
256:Blush not to submit to a sage who knows more than thyself. ~ Democritus,
257:Every evil screams only one message: 'I am good.' ~ Alexander Schmemann,
258:It’s Kahlua, Sage. Packed with sugar and coffee flavor. ~ Richelle Mead,
259:messages from friends weighed far less than dark thoughts, ~ Hugh Howey,
260:Nobody can tell me what I can or can't do, except they can. ~ Bob Saget,
261:Spit Fyre practised a recently acquired skill - he winked. ~ Angie Sage,
262:The message is accidentally lost in the hurricane chaos, ~ Terri Osburn,
263:The photographic image... is a message without a code. ~ Roland Barthes,
264:together—him giving me a corsage at the Prom, taking me ~ Melissa Brown,
265:Zweifel töten mehr träume wie das versagen jemals könnte. ~ Suzy Kassem,
266:despite the passage of time, it wasn’t getting any better. ~ Brent Weeks,
267:It's okay to get stoned, as long as its not by other people. ~ Bob Saget,
268:Je ne lis que pour moi; je n'aime que ce qui est à mon usage. ~ Voltaire,
269:Messages that fail to fascinate will become irrelevant. ~ Sally Hogshead,
270:Mrs. Boyd resembled a house roughed up by too many storms. ~ Riley Sager,
271:Sometimes I feel that 'Footloose' is the rite of passage. ~ Craig Brewer,
272:The freedom message brings us together, it doesn't divide us. ~ Ron Paul,
273:Tu dein Bestes und dein Schlimmstes, wie die Manni sagen. ~ Stephen King,
274:What message is needed when heart speaks to heart? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
275:When you get the message, it's time to hang up the phone. ~ Alan W Watts,
276:You don't need to be the good guy to get a good message out. ~ LL Cool J,
277:Ask a sage, he will explain.
Ask a fool, he will complain. ~ Toba Beta,
278:Grim-visaged war hath smoothed his wrinkled front; ~ William Shakespeare,
279:Let a fool hold his tongue and he will pass for a sage. ~ Publilius Syrus,
280:Meine Wurst!” Better your sausage than your life, man! ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
281:Message matters. Message matters almost as much as actions. ~ Ron Suskind,
282:My message is the practice of compassion, love and kindness. ~ Dalai Lama,
283:The message of individual liberty and peace is contagious. ~ Vince Vaughn,
284:Time’s passage was a mystery, but it was a normal mystery. ~ Stephen King,
285:When you're famous, you're always famous. It doesn't go away. ~ Bob Saget,
286:A flatterer can risk everything with great personages. ~ Alain Rene Lesage,
287:Atransition is exactly that—a passage to something new. A ~ Michelle Obama,
288:Books are not about messages. I write to understand my soul ~ Paulo Coelho,
289:Celebration is my religion. Love is my message.Silence is my truth. ~ Osho,
290:Essa vida é uma viagem
pena eu estar
só de passagem ~ Paulo Leminski,
291:Fantasies and wishes carry their own significant messages. ~ Sherry Turkle,
292:I don't know how to speak to everybody, only to somebody. ~ Howard Gossage,
293:I do want to give out a positive message and be successful. ~ Prince Royce,
294:In the beginning, sometimes I left messages in the street. ~ David Markson,
295:¨In the dark you can't see no THING but no THING can see you. ~ Angie Sage,
296:Invisible Man. A Passage to India. The Magnificent Ambersons. ~ E Lockhart,
297:It is you who must make the effort; the sages can only teach. ~ Dhammapada,
298:Life is just a lie with an 'F' in it, and death is definite ~ Sage Francis,
299:Love and sausage are alike. Can never have enough of either. ~ Dean Koontz,
300:Miracle Message #26: I can think my way out of fear. ~ Gabrielle Bernstein,
301:My confidence wavers between being genuine and being insecure. ~ Bob Saget,
302:Oh it's a pebble... But it's a really nice pebble Dad thanks. ~ Angie Sage,
303:Only prisoners were ever granted easy passage into a prison. ~ Scott Lynch,
304:Passage between worlds. Then the gunfire. Then the killing. ~ Stephen King,
305:The Infinite Way is not a message, it is an experience. ~ Joel S Goldsmith,
306:Their constant attacks meant I never had to doubt my message. ~ Hank Green,
307:The message of the bicycle: Simplicity is a blessing! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
308:After I'd preached a message on Sunday night, I'd print it up. ~ Tim LaHaye,
309:Calling each other faggots behind the keys of a message board. ~ Macklemore,
310:Messages can't be intercepted if they aren't sent, can they? ~ Erwin Rommel,
311:Messages communicated through numbers seldom stick with people ~ W Chan Kim,
312:My answering machine had five messages. I felt popular. ~ Marshall Thornton,
313:Our eternal message of hope is that dawn will come. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
314:Sage,” Adrian declared. “These hands don’t do manual labor. ~ Richelle Mead,
315:The learned man's life itself shines as the message for mankind. ~ Sai Baba,
316:The medium is not the message - the message is the message. ~ Penn Jillette,
317:A message from a flower: "Do not pick me. I want to live". ~ Akiane Kramarik,
318:Because he (the Sage) demands no honor, he will never be dishonored. ~ Laozi,
319:Behind every great man in prison is another great man in prison. ~ Bob Saget,
320:Every door is another passage, another boundary we have to go beyond. ~ Rumi,
321:Gospel artists are messengers; they are vessels of a message. ~ Boris Kodjoe,
322:I don't like to drink alone 'cause there's nobody to fight with. ~ Bob Saget,
323:If you want to preach a revolutionary message, wear a suit. ~ Nelson Mandela,
324:In her past were sweet passages, in her future rosy hopes. ~ Charlotte Bront,
325:I sent Shay, Peris, and everyone else the same message... ~ Scott Westerfeld,
326:Message of the Legalists: without law, power lost its shape. ~ Robert Coover,
327:Most people argue over who's right, not about what the truth is. ~ Bob Saget,
328:My message to you all is hope, courage and confidence. ~ Muhammad Ali Jinnah,
329:one in 10 text messages involves a lie of some kind. . . . ~ Jeffrey Pfeffer,
330:Sometimes the universe tries very hard to send you a message. ~ Sally Koslow,
331:The great message of atheism is that “chance” has causal power. ~ R C Sproul,
332:The sage regards things as difficult, and thereby avoids difficulty. ~ Laozi,
333:Beauty Lures the Stranger More Easily into Danger -Septimus Heap ~ Angie Sage,
334:(...) chaque visage est un miracle, unique et inimitable. ~ Tahar Ben Jelloun,
335:How’s your sausage?” he asked, holding up his own. She nodded. ~ Dannika Dark,
336:I'm not the kind of director who aims to send a message out. ~ Park Chan wook,
337:I want to send a message that we value our Muslim communities. ~ Keir Starmer,
338:My rite of passage into my brave new world, life on the road. ~ Kenny Loggins,
339:Recognition is famously a passage from ignorance to knowledge. ~ Amitav Ghosh,
340:A book should be made like a watch and sold like a sausage. ~ Oliverio Girondo,
341:Anyone wishing to study medicine must master the art of massage. ~ Hippocrates,
342:Bologna is celebrated for producing popes, painters, and sausage. ~ Lord Byron,
343:Conversion, constant conversion, is the message of the Gospel. ~ Megan McKenna,
344:Digo de mim para mim: um dia a paisagem há-de atravessar-me. ~ Pascal Quignard,
345:every act is not necessarily a message about the relationship. ~ Irvin D Yalom,
346:History has many cunning passages, contrived corridors and issues. ~ T S Eliot,
347:I look around me, and, lo! on every visage a black veil! ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne,
348:It is sheer folly when all is gone to lose even one's passage money. ~ Juvenal,
349:It is the message, not the man, which is important to the Sufis. ~ Idries Shah,
350:I want to give some positive messages and to empower some people. ~ Chaka Khan,
351:Poisonous toadstools don’t change their spots,” said Ron sagely. ~ J K Rowling,
352:Spread love and continue life. Keep creating life, that's my message! ~ Sizzla,
353:That was messages without meaning: telepathy without brains. ~ Terry Pratchett,
354:The message of the resurrection is that this world matters! ~ Timothy J Keller,
355:The sage increases his wisdom by all that he can gather from others. ~ Fenelon,
356:The world can’t save itself. That’s the message of Christmas. ~ Timothy Keller,
357:This is my last message to you: in sorrow, seek happiness. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
358:When Jesus departed, he left no one behind who was the message. ~ Daniel Quinn,
359:A company shouldn't take value from people's private messages. ~ Marc Rotenberg,
360:Apertures, passages from one world to another. Man's escape hatches. ~ P K Page,
361:He is a despicable sage whose wisdom does not profit himself. ~ Publilius Syrus,
362:Hope is as painful as anything else, in the right dosage. “Millie, ~ Lyla Payne,
363:It may take many voices for people to hear the same message. ~ Rasheed Ogunlaru,
364:My message is not wholly understood; only poets understand it. ~ Miguel Serrano,
365:Pain is a message, and you can choose to ignore that message. ~ James Patterson,
366:Pride is all very well, but a sausage is a sausage,” he said. ~ Terry Pratchett,
367:The clothes we wear send a message about how the world perceives us. ~ Tim Gunn,
368:They say, Keep your enemies closer. But what if you live with them? ~ Bob Saget,
369:This is my last message to you: in sorrow, seek happiness. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
370:A Navajo message could never be faked and could always be trusted. ~ Simon Singh,
371:entailment of the family estates, but envisaged for himself ~ Louis de Berni res,
372:Even the world view that there is no meaning is a message. ~ Francis A Schaeffer,
373:I am street hip-hop brother. That's my biggest message with that one. ~ Styles P,
374:I mean, I'm in the business of storytelling, not message making. ~ John le Carre,
375:Is there a single man who can see what the Sage cannot even conceive? ~ Tseu-tse,
376:I swear...I'll deliver the message for the love of my country. ~ Kristen Britain,
377:I wonder," Marcia said. "If you would consider being my apprentice? ~ Angie Sage,
378:My message to you all is of hope, courage, and confidence. ~ Muhammad Ali Jinnah,
379:provides a handy and interesting passage to the Holocaust memorial ~ Rick Steves,
380:Question like a child, reason like an adult, and write like a sage. ~ Criss Jami,
381:Qui vit sans folie n'est pas si sage qu'il croit. ~ Fran ois de La Rochefoucauld,
382:Read Blake or go to hell, that's my message to the modern world. ~ Northrop Frye,
383:sausage, cheese grits, scrambled eggs, toast, and orange juice ~ Stephanie James,
384:Simon's eye has turned to dust," Septimus said.
"What?" - Marcia ~ Angie Sage,
385:That was last week’s messages? Eight thousand?” “You can catch up, ~ Dave Eggers,
386:The message coming back at all of us is: live without closure. ~ Terence McKenna,
387:The message could not be any clearer; God provides, and we choose. ~ Joyce Meyer,
388:The only way to get a serious message across is through comedy ~ Woody Harrelson,
389:The sage does not 'know' the Self, because he is the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
390:The sage does not ‘know’ the Self, because he is the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
391:The sage never strives for the great, and thereby the great is achieved. ~ Laozi,
392:Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, ~ Lewis Carroll,
393:And we are not mountaintop sages who can live by consuming mist. ~ Mineko Iwasaki,
394:As moonlight unto sunlight is that desert sage to other greens. ~ Wallace Stegner,
395:Because he (the Sage) opposes no one, no one in the world can oppose him. ~ Laozi,
396:But where the ignorant are asleep, there the sage keeps awake ~ Swami Vivekananda,
397:Diräkti Ussage si meh öppis für Lüt, wo wenig Fröid am Ustuusch hei. ~ Pedro Lenz,
398:first strategy was known to the sages as the Ritual of Solitude. ~ Robin S Sharma,
399:Gardening imparts an organic perspective on the passage of time. ~ William Cowper,
400:I am at length joined to Bologna, where I am settled like a sausage. ~ Lord Byron,
401:If I ever die, I want it to be cause I got hit by a car saving a kid. ~ Bob Saget,
402:Love is done when Loves begun, Sages say, But have Sages known? ~ Emily Dickinson,
403:Once you turn something into something, its universal usage is over. ~ Carl Andre,
404:Sage.” He laughed. “I’m into anything, so long as you’re with me. ~ Richelle Mead,
405:The difference between a good medicine and a poison is the dosage. ~ Laura Huxley,
406:The most important thing about recovery is to pass the message on. ~ Maurice Gibb,
407:The sage does not attempt anything very big, and thus achieves greatness. ~ Laozi,
408:The squirrel in my yard really knows his way around the neighborhood. ~ Bob Saget,
409:To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage. ~ Eliphas Levi,
410:We are better off not knowing how sausages and laws are made. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
411:What Heaven detests, who knows why? Even the sage considers it difficult. ~ Laozi,
412:Whereto serves mercy But to confront the visage of offense? ~ William Shakespeare,
413:A movie is really provocation. It's not a message, it's not a statement. ~ Ang Lee,
414:Ancient sages have written: what you cannot break, you do not own. ~ Max Gladstone,
415:A text message has no soul, no matter how many commas you shift. ~ Vikki Wakefield,
416:Children are the living messages we send to a time we will not see. ~ Neil Postman,
417:Don't send me a text message. I seldom respond to them. Use poetry. ~ Jos N Harris,
418:Door of passage to the other side, the soul frees itself in stride. ~ Jim Morrison,
419:For the sage
Heaven and Earth join
in bestowing the greatest gifts ~ Lao Tzu,
420:I don't like typing messages on my phone. Some people get used to it. ~ Bill Gates,
421:I miss Irish milk. Probably not as much as Superquinn sausages. ~ Tristan MacManus,
422:Intrapersonal communication is a reflection of our daily messages. ~ Asa Don Brown,
423:Open the door, baby girl. Your message came through loud and clear. ~ Meghan March,
424:Rely on the message of the teacher, not on his personality; Rely ~ Sogyal Rinpoche,
425:Sage Deinem Hauptmann, er kann mich im Arsche lecken. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
426:Sententious sage! so it is: but I swear by my household gods not ~ Charlotte Bront,
427:The passage is through, not over, not by, not around but through. ~ Cherrie Moraga,
428:The sage does not strive to be great. Thereby he can accomplish the great. ~ Laozi,
429:The simpler the message, the broader the meaning, in many respects. ~ Paul Rodgers,
430:Time is change; we measure its passage by how much things alter. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
431:We are all human and I want to relate that message to all people. ~ Bootsy Collins,
432:We’ve graduated to group messages, and boy oh boy, they’ve included me. ~ S E Hall,
433:What is there more precious than a sage? He sets peace between all men. ~ Tsu-king,
434:What strange places our lives can carry us to, what dark passages. ~ Justin Cronin,
435:You learn who your friends are when you find out who will lie for you. ~ Bob Saget,
436:Your calling my name is My reply. Your longing for Me is My message to you. ~ Rumi,
437:You will no longer pick this sage that flavors your whole life. ~ Naomi Shihab Nye,
438:He is the same old sausage, fizzing and sputtering in his own grease. ~ Henry James,
439:How many of you text message? It's a great way of not communicating. ~ Greg Giraldo,
440:I'm not trying to convey a message, I'm just trying to tell a story. ~ Emily Giffin,
441:Judge not by the form of the messenger, but the form of the message. ~ Richard Bach,
442:Laws are like sausages. It's better not to see them being made. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
443:Life is one passage and then you keep moving into another state. ~ Hiroshi Sugimoto,
444:My message is a peaceful one and I hope that the idea will spread. ~ Paul McCartney,
445:Nature's message is clear: we can't keep doing what we're doing now. ~ Kevin Spacey,
446:So long as they make efforts they will not be sages (jnanis). ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
447:You are leaving me messages, but I haven't gotten the message yet. ~ David Levithan,
448:You reach out your hand, but you're all alone, in those time passages. ~ Al Stewart,
449:A mighty good sausage stuffer was spoiled when the man became a poet. ~ Eugene Field,
450:Beauty Lures the Stranger More Easily into Danger

-Septimus Heap ~ Angie Sage,
451:Don’t ignore pain; appreciate its message: You need to change now! ~ Shannon L Alder,
452:I don't want my readers slowed down by long passages of narrative. ~ Janet Evanovich,
453:I'm not a Christian, but I think the Christian message is a good one. ~ Annie Lennox,
454:I still have nightmares about holding German sausages over my head. ~ Peter Molyneux,
455:It may be said that his wit shines at the expense of his memory. ~ Alain Rene Lesage,
456:Laws are like sausages, it is better not to see them being made. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
457:Lies in meinen Augen, was ich dir nicht alles sagen kann. ~ Gotthold Ephraim Lessing,
458:L'utilité du vivre n'est pas en l'espace: elle est en l'usage. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
459:Miracle Message #1: Happiness is a choice I make. #MiraclesNow ~ Gabrielle Bernstein,
460:Nico explained as concisely as possible. Messages sent through dreams ~ Rick Riordan,
461:Nowhere and in no situation is the sage dissatisfied with his condition. ~ Confucius,
462:Richart found and it appears the dosage of the drug they deliver has ~ Dianne Duvall,
463:Some would be sages if they did not believe they were so already. ~ Baltasar Gracian,
464:The message I hope to have sent is just the example of being yourself. ~ Frank Gehry,
465:"The sage shuns excess, shuns grandiosity, shuns arrogance." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching,
466:this wonderful passage through the woods had to be painted with love ~ Hermann Hesse,
467:We are magnifying the messenger and consequently minimizing the message. ~ A W Tozer,
468:What makes bad writers so annoying is their good passages. ~ Natalie Clifford Barney,
469:Whether wine is a nourishment, medicine or poison is a matter of dosage ~ Paracelsus,
470:You can speak well if your tongue can deliver the message of your heart. ~ John Ford,
471:Although he travels all day, the sage never loses sight of his luggage carts. ~ Laozi,
472:A thank-you can be just as meaningful as a soulful ten-page message. ~ Drew Barrymore,
473:Bob Saget is the dirtiest comic who's ever lived. Nobody touches him. ~ Penn Jillette,
474:But somehow we screamed louder, ran faster, fought harder. We survived. ~ Riley Sager,
475:Each reader has to find her or his own message within a book. ~ Laurie Halse Anderson,
476:He (the sage) wants all things to follow their own nature, but dares not act. ~ Laozi,
477:I am more willing to come out when I get my message from my commander. ~ David Koresh,
478:If you give your mess to the Messiah, He can turn it into a message. ~ Lysa TerKeurst,
479:If you have a sharp bold economic message, you can unite everybody. ~ Charles Schumer,
480:I send my words to you over the ether net like a message in a bottle... ~ John Geddes,
481:Je ne suis pas son confident, je suis son spectateur. C'est plus sage. ~ Albert Camus,
482:My future is quite literally a blank canvas, waiting for me to fill it. ~ Riley Sager,
483:Never put off your massage until tomorrow if you can get it today. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
484:Perhaps with age came a more sedate appreciation of the passage of time. ~ Tim Lebbon,
485:The sage never strives for greatness, and can therefore accomplish greatness. ~ Laozi,
486:The secret in life is enjoying the passage of time. —RICHIE HAVENS ~ Elizabeth Lesser,
487:The space itself, your home, naturally has a message and intention. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
488:Trust has to be earned, and should come only after the passage of time. ~ Arthur Ashe,
489:When a boy writes off the world it's done with sloppy misspelled words ~ Sage Francis,
490:150.97768 WEST 164 At first, I think they might be coordinates on a map. ~ Riley Sager,
491:Ain't nothin' an ol' man can do but bring me a message from a young one. ~ Moms Mabley,
492:De Heaps waren leuk, vond Lucy; en veel boeiender dan haar eigen familie. ~ Angie Sage,
493:Donald Trump was appealing to a lot of people with his populist message. ~ Trevor Noah,
494:Earnestness can go wrong in hip hop. On this album, it goes very right. ~ Sage Francis,
495:Everything changes with time’s passage. Only change itself is constant. ~ Terry Brooks,
496:Hvad nytter intelligens, hvis den ikke ledsages af forståelse? ~ J n Kalman Stef nsson,
497:I don't film messages. I let the post office take care of those. ~ Bernardo Bertolucci,
498:If 'what doesn't kill you makes you stronger,' how do you explain zombies? ~ Bob Saget,
499:I spy, with my little eye, something that starts with ... G."
"Sausages. ~ Adam Rex,
500:I've stayed true to my music and I sing heartfelt songs with a message. ~ Donell Jones,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



100

   56 Occultism
   41 Yoga
   26 Philosophy
   18 Integral Yoga
   7 Kabbalah
   7 Hinduism
   4 Christianity
   2 Buddhism


   84 Sri Aurobindo
   51 Aleister Crowley
   20 Sri Ramakrishna
   19 Swami Vivekananda
   19 Swami Krishnananda
   16 Aldous Huxley
   13 Satprem
   12 The Mother
   10 Carl Jung
   8 Friedrich Nietzsche
   6 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   5 Jorge Luis Borges
   3 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   2 Saint Teresa of Avila
   2 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   2 Patanjali
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Lewis Carroll
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 H. P. Lovecraft
   2 Bokar Rinpoche


   41 Magick Without Tears
   40 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   39 The Life Divine
   39 Savitri
   27 Essays On The Gita
   23 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   19 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   17 The Divine Comedy
   16 The Perennial Philosophy
   16 Liber ABA
   14 The Secret Of The Veda
   13 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   13 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   11 Letters On Yoga I
   10 Talks
   10 Bhakti-Yoga
   10 Aion
   8 Words Of Long Ago
   8 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   8 Isha Upanishad
   8 Essays Divine And Human
   8 Collected Poems
   7 Twilight of the Idols
   7 Raja-Yoga
   7 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 Letters On Yoga III
   6 Letters On Yoga II
   6 Kena and Other Upanishads
   6 General Principles of Kabbalah
   5 Words Of The Mother II
   5 Walden
   5 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   5 Agenda Vol 1
   4 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   3 Words Of The Mother III
   3 The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma
   3 The Red Book Liber Novus
   3 Theosophy
   3 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   3 The Lotus Sutra
   3 The Integral Yoga
   3 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   3 The Blue Cliff Records
   3 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   3 Amrita Gita
   2 The Problems of Philosophy
   2 The Bible
   2 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Selected Fictions
   2 Poetics
   2 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   2 Liber Null
   2 Dark Night of the Soul
   2 Book of Certitude
   2 Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin
   2 Alice in Wonderland
   2 Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2E


00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri, #Sweet Mother - Harmonies of Light, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic mesSage Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967
  

0.01_-_Introduction, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  This fabulous discovery is the whole story of the AGENDA. What is the pasSage? How is the path to the new species hewed open? ... Then suddenly, there, on the other side of this old millennial habit - a habit, nothing more than a habit! - of being like a man endowed with time and space and disease: an entire geometry, perfectly implacable and 'scientific' and medical; on the other side ... none of that at all! An illusion, a fantastic medical and scientific and genetic illusion:
   death does not exist, time does not exist, disease does not exist, nor do 'scar' and 'far' - another way of being IN A BODY. For so many millions of years we have lived in a habit and put our own thoughts of the world and of Matter into equations. No more laws! Matter is FREE. It can create a little lizard, a chipmunk or a parrot - but it has created enough parrots. Now it is SOMETHING

0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  And when the preliminary conditions are satisfied, when the great endeavour has found its base, what will be the nature of that farther possibility which the activities of the intellectual life must serve? If Mind is indeed Nature's highest term, then the entire development of the rational and imaginative intellect and the harmonious satisfaction of the emotions and sensibilities must be to themselves sufficient. But if, on the contrary, man is more than a reasoning and emotional animal, if beyond that which is being evolved, there is something that has to be evolved, then it may well be that the fullness of the mental life, the suppleness, flexibility and wide capacity of the intellect, the ordered richness of emotion and sensibility may be only a pasSage towards the development of a higher life and of more powerful faculties which are yet to manifest and to take possession of the lower instrument, just as mind itself has so taken possession of the body that the physical being no longer lives only for its own satisfaction but provides the foundation and the materials for a superior activity.
  

0.02_-_Topographical_Note, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  It was only in 1958 that we began having the first tape-recorded conversations, which, properly speaking, constitute Mother's Agenda. But even then, many of these conversations were lost or only partly noted down. Or else we considered that our own words should not figure in these notes and we carefully omitted all our questions - which was absurd. At that time, no one - neither Mother, nor ourself - knew that this was 'the Agenda' and that we were out to explore the 'Great PasSage.'
  Only gradually did we become aware of the true nature of these meetings. Furthermore, we were constantly on the road, so much so that there are sizable gaps in the text. In fact, for seven years,

0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The characteristic energy of pure Mind is change, and the more our mentality acquires elevation and organisation, the more this law of Mind assumes the aspect of a continual enlargement, improvement and better arrangement of its gains and so of a continual pasSage from a smaller and simpler to a larger and more complex perfection. For Mind, unlike bodily life, is infinite in its field, elastic in its expansion, easily variable in its formations. Change, then, self-enlargement and selfimprovement are its proper instincts. Mind too moves in cycles, but these are ever-enlarging spirals. Its faith is perfectibility, its watchword is progress.
  

0.04_-_1951-1954, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  I knew you would ask me this question because it is indeed the most interesting thing in the whole pasSage - so my answer is ready, along with my answer to another question. But first let me read you this one. You asked, 'What is this Personality and when will She come?' Here is my answer (Mother reads):
  'She has come, bringing with Her a splendor of power and love, an intensity of divine joy heretofore unknown to the Earth. The physical atmosphere has been completely changed by her descent, permeated with new and marvelous possibilities.

0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But, for practical purposes, there is a real distinction. The lower
  Nature, that which we know and are and must remain so long as the faith in us is not changed, acts through limitation and division, is of the nature of Ignorance and culminates in the life of the ego; but the higher Nature, that to which we aspire, acts by unification and transcendence of limitation, is of the nature of Knowledge and culminates in the life divine. The pasSage from the lower to the higher is the aim of Yoga; and this pasSage
  

0.06_-_1956, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  April 23, 1956
  Mother takes a pasSage from Prayers and Meditations of September 23, 1914:
  The

0.06_-_INTRODUCTION, #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  respect to its passivity. 1
  This 'fourth part' is the Dark Night. Of it the Saint writes in a pasSage which
  follows that just quoted:
  --
  quite so appealingly human; for, though he is human even in his loftiest and
  sublimest pasSages, this intermingling of philosophy with mystical theology makes
  him seem particularly so. These treatises are a wonderful illustration of the

0.07_-_1957, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  You told me one day that I could be 'useful' to you. Then, by chance, I came across this pasSage from Sri Aurobindo the other day: 'Everyone has in him something divine, something his own, a chance of perfection and strength in however small a sphere which God offers him to take or refuse.'
  Could you tell me, as a favor, what this particular thing is in me which may be useful to you and serve you? If I could only know what my real work is in this world ... All the conflicting impulses in me stem from my being like an unemployed force, like a being whose place has not yet been determined.
  --
  
  But besides all this, there is a special personal bond of affection between you and me, between all who have turned towards Sri Aurobindo's teaching and me - and of course, distance does not count; you may be in France, at the other end of the world, or in Pondicherry, but this bond remains just as real and as living. Each time there is a call, each time I need to know something to send out a force, an inspiration, a protection or whatever else, a sort of mesSage suddenly comes to me, and I do what is needed. Obviously, these communications come to me at any moment whatsoever, and you may have seen me more than once suddenly stop in the middle of a sentence or some work: it means something, some communication is coming, so I concentrate.
  

01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Intervening in a mindless universe,
  Its mesSage crept through the reluctant hush
  Calling the adventure of consciousness and joy
  --
  Iridescent with the glory of the Unseen,
  A mesSage from the unknown immortal Light
  Ablaze upon creation's quivering edge,
  --
  Then, thoughtful, went to her immortal work.
  Earth felt the Imperishable's pasSage close:
  The waking ear of Nature heard her steps
  --
  So now dissolved in bright accustomed air.
  The mesSage ceased and waned the messenger.
  The single Call, the uncompanioned Power,
  --
  Visited her heart like a sweet alien note.
  Time's mesSage of brief light was not for her.
  In her there was the anguish of the gods

01.02_-_The_Issue, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    Empowered to force the door denied and closed
    Smote from Death's viSage its dumb absolute
    And burst the bounds of consciousness and Time.

01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  In the Witness's occult rooms with mind-built walls
  On hidden interiors, lurking pasSages
  Opened the windows of the inner sight.
  --
  The immobile lips, the great surreal wings,
  The viSage masked by superconscient Sleep,
  The eyes with their closed lids that see all things,

01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Divine and do His work or His will and I am satisfied, even if the use of Power entails suffering also." It is possible to shun bliss as a thing too tremendous or ecstatic and ask only or rather for peace, for liberation, for Nirvana. You speak of self-fulfilment,
  - one may regard the Supreme not as the Divine but as one's highest Self and seek fulfilment of one's being in that highest Self; but one need not enviSage it as a self of bliss, ecstasy, Ananda - one may enviSage it as a self of freedom, vastness, knowledge, tranquillity, strength, calm, perfection - perhaps too calm for a ripple of anything so disturbing as joy to enter. So even if it is for something to be gained that one approaches the Divine, it is not a fact that one can approach Him or seek union only for the sake of Ananda and nothing else.
  

01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All we have learned appears a doubtful guess,
  The achievement done a pasSage or a phase
  Whose farther end is hidden from our sight,
  --
  A conjecture leaning upon doubtful proofs,
  A mesSage misunderstood, a thought confused
  Missing its aim is all that it can speak

01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    Mounting to their climax in an endless Calm,
    Paces of the many-viSaged Wonderful,
    Predestined stadia of the evolving Way,
  --
    A hierarchy of climbing harmonies
    Peopled with voices and with viSages
    Aspired in a crescendo of the Gods

02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Thought, intellect, the logical reason came to be regarded more and more as the highest means and even the highest end; in philosophy, Thought is the be-all and the end-all. It is by intellectual thinking and speculation that the truth is to be discovered; even spiritual experience has been summoned to pass the tests of the intellect, if it is to be held valid - just the reverse of the
  Indian position. Even those who see that mental Thought must be overpassed and admit a supramental "Other", do not seem to escape from the feeling that it must be through mental Thought, sublimating and transmuting itself, that this other Truth must be reached and made to take the place of the mental limitation and ignorance. And again Western thought has ceased to be dynamic; it has sought after a theory of things, not after realisation. It was still dynamic amongst the ancient Greeks, but for moral and aesthetic rather than spiritual ends. Later on, it became yet more purely intellectual and academic; it became intellectual speculation only without any practical ways and means for the attainment of the Truth by spiritual experiment, spiritual discovery, a spiritual transformation. If there were not this difference, there would be no reason for seekers like yourself to turn to the East for guidance; for in the purely intellectual field, the Western thinkers are as competent as any Eastern Sage.
  
  It is the spiritual way, the road that leads beyond the intellectual levels, the pasSage from the outer being to the inmost Self, which has been lost by the over-intellectuality of the mind of Europe.
  

02.01_-_The_World-Stair, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    The voices of a thousand realms of Life
    Missioned to him her mighty mesSages.
      The heaven-hints that invade our earthly lives,

02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And bright dews drip from the Immortal's sky.
  A pasSage for the Powers that move our days,
  Occult behind this grosser Nature's walls,
  --
  Even in this prison-house of outer form,
  A brilliant pasSage for the infallible Flame
  Is driven through gross walls of nerve and brain,

02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The graceless squalor of her beast desires,
  The staring viSage of her ignorance,
  The naked body of her poverty.
  --
  To sate awhile dwarf lusts and brief desires,
  In a death-closed pasSage saw life's start and end
  As though a blind alley were creation's sign,

02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  As if immanent in the shadows started up
  Imps with wry limbs and carved beast viSages,
  Sprite-prompters goblin-wizened or faery-small,
  --
  In a doubtful light, by error seize on Truth
  And slowly part the viSage and the veil.
  Or else, forlorn of faith in mind and sense,
  --
  Capture the mystic Morse whose measured lilt
  Transmits the mesSages of the cosmic Force.
  A whisper falls into life's inner ear
  --
  A mystic motive drives the stars and suns.
  In this pasSage from a deaf unknowing Force
  To struggling consciousness and transient breath

02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Helps the live tissue to think, the closed sense to feel,
  Flashes through the frail nerves poignant mesSages,
  In a heart of flesh miraculously loves,
  --
  Life's meanings fled from the pursuing eye.
  Life's viSage hides life's real self from sight;
  Life's secret sense is written within, above.
  --
  And victory's star still lights our desperate road;
  Our death is made a pasSage to new worlds.
  This to Life's music gives its anthem swell.
  --
  It cannot end, its end is Life supreme.
  Death is a pasSage, not the goal of our walk:
  Some ancient deep impulsion labours on:
  --
  The advent for which all creation waits,
  The beautiful viSage of Eternity
  That shall appear upon the roads of Time.

02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    As from a womb obscure he saw emerge
    The body and viSage of a dark Unseen
    Hidden behind the fair outsides of life.
  --
    And brought a glad relief disarming strength,
    It served as a smiling pasSage to worse fate.
    There was no truce and no safe place to rest;
  --
    Their inborn nature's wry monstrosity.
    Often, a familiar viSage studying
    Joyfully encountered at some dangerous turn,
  --
    An empty page on which all that willed could write
    Stark monstrous mesSages without control.
    A travelling dot on downward roads of Dusk

02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Above was a chill deaf eternity.
  In vague tremendous pasSages of Doom
  He heard the goblin Voice that guides to slay,
  --
  And the mystic volume of the Book of Bliss
  And the mesSage of the superconscient Fire.
  Then life beat pure in the corporeal frame;

02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Ever undoing the web that it has spun.
  A twilight Sage whose shadow seems to him self,
  Moving from minute to brief minute lives;
  --
  Its skill endorsing Matter's right to think
  Cut sentient pasSages for the mind of flesh
  And found a means for Nescience to know.
  --
  A candidate for a higher suzerainty,
  A pasSage she cut through from Night to Light,
  And searched for an ungrasped Omniscience.
  --
  If God within could find no greater plan.
  But many-viSaged is the cosmic Soul;
  A touch can alter the fixed front of Fate.
  --
  Its highest, widest seeing was a half-search,
  Its mightiest acts a pasSage or a stage.
  For not by Reason was creation made
  --
  She sees, not understanding what she has seen,
  Through the locked viSages of finite things
  The myriad aspects of infinity.

02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Escapes on every side into some vast
  That is a pasSage to infinity.
  It moves eternal in the spirit's field,
  --
  A might looks out, an estranged felicity.
  In glamorous pasSages of half-veiled light
  Wandering, a brilliant shadow of itself,
  --
  Intercessors with a luminous Unseen,
  They capt in the long pasSage to the world
  The imperatives of the creator Self
  --
  We share not her immortal liberty.
  Thus is it even with the seer and Sage;
  For still the human limits the divine:

02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Flowers goldening our earth of red desire.
  All the high gods who hid their viSages
  From the soiled passionate ritual of our hopes,

02.14_-_The_World-Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Pointing at him from some near hidden depth,
  As if a mesSage from the world's deep soul,
  An intimation of a lurking joy
  --
  Feels now the closeness of a waiting love,
  Into a pasSage dim and tremulous
  That clasped him in from day and night's pursuit,

02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Eternities called to eternities
  Sending their speechless mesSage still remote.
  Arisen from the marvel of the depths

03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Imaged itself in a surprising beam
  And built a golden pasSage to his heart
  Touching through him all longing sentient things.

03.03_-_The_Inner_Being_and_the_Outer_Being, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  They [the environmental consciousness and the subconscient] are two quite different things. What is stored in the subconscient
  - impressions, memories, rise up from there into the conscious parts. In the environmental things are not stored up and fixed, although they move about there. It is full of mobility, a field of vibration or pasSage of forces.
  

04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All objects were to her shapes of living selves
  And she perceived a mesSage from her kin
  In each awakening touch of outward things.

04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Admitted by the cowled receiving scribe
  Traversed the echoing pasSages of his brain
  And left its stamp on the recording cells.
  --
  And feel the breaking walls of mortal mind
  And hear the mesSage which left life's heart dumb
  And look through Nature with sun-gazing lids
  --
  In vain is the unending line of seers,
  The Sages ponder in unsubstantial light,
  The poets lend their voice to outward dreams,
  --
  Missalled in aureate virginity,
  What mesSage of heavenly strength and bliss in thee
  Is written with the Eternal's sun-white script,
  --
  As when the mantra sinks in Yoga's ear,
  Its mesSage enters stirring the blind brain
  And keeps in the dim ignorant cells its sound;

04.04_-_The_Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The breadth, the summit were their natural home.
  The strong king-Sages from their labour done,
  Freed from the warrior tension of their task,
  --
  In wide equality's impartial joy,
  These Sages breathed for God's delight in things.
  Assisting the slow entries of the gods,

05.02_-_Satyavan, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  A viSage was there, noble and great and calm,
  As if encircled by a halo of thought,

05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  God's watch-fires burning in the ignorant Night,
  And saw upon her mighty viSage fall
  A ray prophetic of the Eternal's sun.
  
  I sat with the forest Sages in their trance:
  There poured awakening streams of diamond light,
  --
  It knows that thou art he my spirit has sought
  Amidst earth's thronging viSages and forms
  Across the golden spaces of my life."

06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Crossing a wide expanse of brilliant peace
  Narad the heavenly Sage from Paradise
  Came chanting through the large and lustrous air.
  --
  As darts a lightning streak, a glory fell
  Nearing until the rapt eyes of the Sage
  Looked out from luminous cloud and, strangely limned,
  --
  
  There welcomed him the Sage and thoughtful king,
  At his side a creature beautiful, passionate, wise,
  --
  He answered covert thought with guarded speech:
  "O deathless Sage who knowest all things here,
  If I could read by the ray of my own wish
  --
  Yet conquers the eternal Good at last."
  Then might the Sage have spoken, but the king
  In haste broke out and stayed the dangerous word:
  --
  To know is best, however hard to bear."
  Then cried the Sage piercing the mother's heart,
  Forcing to steel the will of Savitri,

06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  In the malignant hollows of the world,
  In its subconscient cavern-pasSages
  Ambushed they lie waiting their hour to leap,
  --
  A power opposed to the eternal will
  Diverts the mesSages of the infallible Word,
  Contorts the contours of the cosmic plan:
  --
  
  In the dreadful pasSages, the fatal paths,
  Invulnerable his soul, his heart unslain,
  --
  O mortal, bear this great world's law of pain,
  In thy hard pasSage through a suffering world
  Lean for thy soul's support on Heaven's strength,
  --
  Against invisible opponent Powers,
  A pasSage from Matter into timeless self.
  Adventurer through blind unforeseeing Time,

07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  This is the mystic truth our ignorance hides:
  Doom is a pasSage for our inborn force,
  Our ordeal is the hidden spirit's choice,
  --
  
  Her quiet viSage still and sweet and calm,
  Her graceful daily acts were now a mask;
  --
  Imprint thyself for every nerve to keep
  That thrills to thee the mesSage of my heart.
  

07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Into the body's many-storeyed rooms
  Endless crowd down the dream-god's mesSages.
  
  --
  Admit the thousand queries and the calls
  And the mesSages of communicating minds
  And the heavy business of unnumbered lives
  --
  The mystery of dark and fallen worlds,
  The dread viSages of the adversary Kings.
  
  --
  All they have touched or seen they make their own,
  In Nature's basement lodge, mind's pasSages fill,
  Disrupt thought's links and musing sequences,
  --
  Hardly we escape from what we once had been:
  In the dim gleam of habit's pasSages,
  In the subconscient's darkling corridors

07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  In a narrow pasSage, the subconscient's gate,
  She breathed with difficulty and pain and strove
  --
  She crossed through spaces of a secret self
  And trod in pasSages of inner Time.
  
  --
  A favourite of Heaven and Nature live."
  But to the too satisfied and confident Sage
  Savitri replied casting into his world

07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  He is Wisdom incarnate on a glorious throne
  And the calm autocracy of the Sage's rule.
  

07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Spoke the succinct and inexhaustible
  Hieratic mesSage of the climbing planes.
  
  --
  Whence it shoots the arrows of its sight and will,
  In the pasSage of the lotus of the throat
  Where speech must rise and the expressing mind

07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  It seemed to cry to her without thought or word
  The mesSage of its dark eternity
  And the awful meaning of its silences:
  --
  And heard in the crowded thoroughfares of mind
  The unceasing tread and pasSage of her thoughts.
  
  --
  Put on a body and assume a voice,
  Their pasSage seen, their mesSage heard and known,
  Their birthplace and their natal mark revealed,
  --
  This seeming exit or closed end of all
  Could be a blind tenebrous pasSage screened from sight,
  Her state the eclipsing shell of a darkened sun

07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Something unknown, unreached, inscrutable
  Sent down the mesSages of its bodiless Light,
  Cast lightning flashes of a thought not ours
  --
  
  Or, listening to the Sages of the woods,
  In question and in answer broke from her

08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Only the needed utterance pasSage found:
  All else she pressed back into her anguished heart
  --
  
  He sang high snatches of a Sage's chant
  

09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The rock-gate's heavy walls were left behind;
  As if through pasSages of receding time
  Present and past into the Timeless lapsed;

1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The ancient Sages and masters, both of the East and the West, have deeply pondered over this question, and one of the most magnificent proclamations of a solution to these problems is found in the Veda. Among the many aspects of this solution that are presented before us by these mighty revelations, I can quote one which to my mind appears to be a final solution at least, I have taken it as a solution to all my problems - which comes in the Rig Veda, the Yajur Veda, the Sama Veda and the Atharva Veda. In all the four Vedas it occurs: tam eva viditv atimtyum eti nnya panth vidyate ayanya. This is a great proclamation. What is the meaning of this proclamation? There is no way of escape from this problem, says this mantra, other than knowing 'That'. This is a very simple aphoristic precept that is before us: Knowing 'That' is the solution, and we have no other solution. Now, knowing 'That' what is this 'That'.
  

10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The Avatars have lived and died in vain,
  Vain was the Sage's thought, the prophet's voice;
  

10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A little element in a little sperm,
  It grows and is a conqueror and a Sage.
  
  --
  There is the mystic realm whence leaps the power
  Whose fire burns in the eyes of seer and Sage;
  A lightning flash of visionary sight,
  --
  And Death and Ignorance govern the mortal world
  And Nature's viSage wears a greyer hue.
  
  --
  Delight, God's sweetest sign and Beauty's twin,
  Dreaded by aspiring saint and austere Sage,
  Is shunned, a dangerous and ambiguous cheat,
  --
  Who have travelled through Existence to its end,
  Sages exploring the world-ocean's vasts,
  Have found extinction the sole harbour safe.

10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Emptied of their mission and their strength to save,
  The mesSages of the evangelist gods,
  Voices of prophets, scripts of vanishing creeds.
  --
  Because the dark atheist body knows him not,
  Must the Sage deny the Light, the seer his soul?
  I am not bound by thought or sense or shape;
  --
  And feel a breath around of mightier air,
  Receive a vaster being's mesSages
  And bathe in its immense intuitive Ray.

1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  We have a wrong notion about everything, including our own self. And with this wrong notion we go headlong into such a serious practice as is meditation because, just as a small sand particle getting stuck in the eye causes us annoyance, so too a little mistake in the beginning will loom large and become a serious obstacle in the end a factor which can be studied from the history of institutions and the lives of saints, Sages and sadhakas. These small mistakes look like normal things, and not serious obstacles, because they do not stand against us. They appear to be unconcerned externals; but there is no such thing as an unconcerned external. Every external is connected with us, and the very fact of our perception of it will be enough reason why it can take action, for or against us, one day or the other.
  

1.009_-_Perception_and_Reality, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  In the previous chapter we were discussing a very important subject which every student of yoga should remember: how the two types of perception, about which Sage Patanjali tells us some very important aspects, tell upon not only our personal and social life, but upon our efforts towards spiritual perfection. The determinate aspects of psychological experience were touched upon briefly as consisting principally of self-affirmation or egoism, which projects itself as love and hatred. Also, we had occasion to go a little deep into the mystery of love and hatred as to why they arise at all. Generally this is the type of life that the individual lives in the world, getting identified with these psychological processes to such an extent that one cannot know that one is so involved.
  
  --
  
  While the physical scientist thinks that the atom has really split into a millionfold parts, the Sages tell us that really it has not split itself like that it is only an appearance. Really there is no split, because if it has really split, we cannot go back into the original, just as curd cannot be converted into milk once it has become curd since the change is irreversible. But that is not the case here. If that had happened, there would be no urge of the part to go back to the whole. If we really have been cut off, then it is finished; the matter is over. Why are we urging back to unite ourselves with the whole? That means a real split has not taken place. A kind of mysterious bifurcation has taken place.
  
  --
  
  So, it would not be judicious on the part of any individual to vehemently assert that the physical perceptions of the world are all-in-all. The materialist's conception is, therefore, not correct, because this conception arises on account of a miscalculated attitude towards everything. This is the reason why, in the practice of yoga, expert guidance is called for, because we are dealing with matters that are super-intellectual, super-rational. Here our own understanding is not of much use, nor are books of any use, because we are treading on dangerous ground which the mind has not seen and cannot contemplate. We are all a wonder, says the scripture. This is a mystery, a wonder. It is a wonder because it is not capable of intellectually being analysed. The scripture proclaims that the subject is a great mystery, a great wonder and marvel; and one who teaches it is also a marvel, and the one who receives this knowledge, who understands it the disciple is also a wonder, indeed, because though the broadcasting station is powerful, the receiver-set also must be equally powerful to receive the mesSage. The bamboo stick will not receive the mesSage of the BBC. So the disciple is also a wonder to receive this mysterious knowledge, as the teacher himself is a wonder; and the subject is a marvel by itself.
  
  --
  
  The reason behind our feeling a solidity, concreteness, hardness, etc. of an object and a shape perceived by the eyes, is because the condition of the senses which perceive and that of the mind behind the senses are on the same level as the constitution of the object. That is why we can see this world and not the heavens, for example. We cannot say that heavens do not exist; but why do we not see them? Because the constitution of the objects of the heaven is subtler than, less dense than, the constitution of our present individuality the two are not commensurate with each other. Or, to give a more concrete example, why don't we hear the music when the radio is not switched on? Somebody must be singing at the radio station now, but our ears are unable to hear; they can't hear anything because the constitution, the structure, the frequency, the wavelength of the electrical mesSage that is sent by the broadcasting station is subtler than the constitution and the structure of the eardrum. It is not possible for the eardrum to catch it because it is gross. But if you talk, I can hear, because the sound that you make by talking is of the same level or degree of density as the capacity of the eardrum. I can hear your sound, but not the sounds of radio waves, music, or the mesSage, because of the dissimilarity of the structure of frequency, wavelength or density of structure.
  

1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  exponents of the Perennial Philosophy those who knew them have generally given
  the name of saint or prophet, Sage or enlightened one. And it is mainly to
  these, because there is good reason for supposing that they knew what they were
  --
  derives its authority from an authority other than itself. This book, then, is an
  anthology, with explanatory comments, of pasSages drawn from the Shruti and Smriti
  of many times and places. Unfortunately, familiarity with traditionally hallowed
  --
  very nature of things be achieved except by those equipped with the moral
  astrolabe of Gods mysteries. If one is not oneself a Sage or saint, the best thing
  one can do, in the field of metaphysics, is to study the works of those who were, and

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Gaddhar had never seen anything like this at Kmrpukur among the simple and pious villagers. The sdhus and wandering monks whom he had served in his boyhood had revealed to him an altogether different India. He had been impressed by their devotion and purity, their self-control and renunciation. He had learnt from them and from his own intuition that the ideal of life as taught by the ancient Sages of India was the realization of God.
  
  When Rmkumr reprimanded Gaddhar for neglecting a "bread-winning education", the inner voice of the boy reminded him that the legacy of his ancestors - the legacy of Rm, Krishna, Buddha, Sankara, Rmnuja, Chaitanya - was not worldly security but the Knowledge of God. And these noble Sages were the true representatives of Hindu society. Each of them was seated, as it were, on the crest of the wave that followed each successive trough in the tumultuous course of Indian national life. All demonstrated that the life current of India is spirituality. This truth was revealed to Gaddhar through that inner vision which scans past and future in one sweep, unobstructed by the barriers of time and space. But he was unaware of the history of the profound change that had taken place in the land of his birth during the previous one hundred years.
  
  --
  
  Vaishnavas had come during the period of his Vaishnava sdhana, and Tntriks when he practised the disciplines of Tantra. Vedntists began to arrive after the departure of Totpuri. In the room of Sri Ramakrishna, who was then in bed with dysentery, the Vedntists engaged in scriptural discussions, and, forgetting his own physical suffering, he solved their doubts by referring directly to his own experiences. Many of the visitors were genuine spiritual souls, the unseen pillars of Hinduism, and their spiritual lives were quickened in no small measure by the Sage of Dakshinewar. Sri Ramakrishna in turn learnt from them anecdotes concerning the ways and the conduct of holy men, which he subsequently narrated to his devotees and disciples. At his request Mathur provided him with large stores of foodstuffs, clothes, and so forth, for distribution among the wandering monks.
  
  --
  
  In 1878 a schism divided Keshab's Samj. Some of his influential followers accused him of infringing the Brhmo principles by marrying his daughter to a wealthy man before she had attained the marriageable age approved by the Samj. This group seceded and established the Sdhran Brhmo Samj, Keshab remaining the leader of the Navavidhn. Keshab now began to be drawn more and more toward the Christ ideal, though under the influence of Sri Ramakrishna his devotion to the Divine Mother also deepened. His mental oscillation between Christ and the Divine Mother of Hinduism found no position of rest. In Bengl and some other parts of India the Brhmo movement took the form of Unitarian Christianity, scoffed at Hindu rituals, and preached a crusade against image worship. Influenced by Western culture, it declared the supremacy of reason, advocated the ideals of the French Revolution, abolished the caste-system among, its own members, stood for the emancipation of women, agitate for the abolition of early marriage, sanctioned the remarriage of widows, and encouraged various educational and social-reform movements. The immediate effect of the Brhmo movement in Bengl was the checking of the proselytising activities of the Christian missionaries. It also raised Indian culture in the estimation of its English masters. But it was an intellectual and eclectic religious ferment born of the necessity of the time. Unlike Hinduism, it was not founded on the deep inner experiences of Sages and prophets. Its influence was confined to a comparatively few educated men and women of the country, and the vast masses of the Hindus remained outside it. It sounded monotonously only one of the notes in the rich gamut of the Eternal Religion of the Hindus.
  
  --
  
  Mahendranth Gupta, known as "M.", arrived at Dakshinewar in February 1882. He belonged to the Brhmo Samj and was headmaster of the Vidysgar High School at ymbazr, Calcutta. At the very first sight the Master recognized him as one of his "marked" disciples. Mahendra recorded in his diary Sri Ramakrishna's conversations with his devotees. These are the first directly recorded words, in the spiritual history of the world, of a man recognized as belonging in the class of Buddha and Christ. The present volume is a translation of this diary. Mahendra was instrumental, through his personal contacts, in spreading the Master's mesSage among many young and aspiring souls.
  
  --
  
  To spread his mesSage to the four corners of the earth Sri Ramakrishna needed a strong instrument. With his frail body and delicate limbs he could not make great journeys across wide spaces. And such an instrument was found in Narendranth Dutta, his beloved Naren, later known to the world as Swmi Viveknanda. Even before meeting Narendranth, the Master had seen him in a vision as a Sage, immersed in the meditation of the Absolute, who at Sri Ramakrishna's request had agreed to take human birth to assist him in his work.
  
  --
  
  They were alone. Addressing Narendra most tenderly, as if he were a friend of long acquaintance, the Master said: "Ah! You have come very late. Why have you been so unkind as to make me wait all these days? My ears are tired of hearing the futile words of worldly men. Oh, how I have longed to pour my spirit into the heart of someone fitted to receive my mesSage!" He talked thus, sobbing all the time. Then, standing before Narendra with folded hands, he addressed him as Nryana, born on earth to remove the misery of humanity. Grasping Narendra's hand, he asked him to come again, alone, and very soon. Narendra was startled. "What is this I have come to see?" he said to himself. "He must be stark mad. Why, I am the son of Viswanth Dutta. How dare he speak this way to me?"
  
  --
  
  But during his third visit Narendra fared no better. This time, at the Master's touch, he lost consciousness entirely. While he was still in that state, Sri Ramakrishna questioned him concerning his spiritual antecedents and whereabouts, his mission in this world, and the duration of his mortal life. The answers confirmed what the Master himself had known and inferred. Among other things, he came to know that Narendra was a Sage who had already attained perfection, and that the day he learnt his real nature he would give up his body in yoga, by an act of will.
  
  --
  
  Two more young men, Srad Prasanna and Tulasi, complete the small band of the Master's disciples later to embrace the life of the wandering monk. With the exception of the elder Gopl, all of them were in their teens or slightly over. They came from middle-class Bengli families, and most of them were students in school or college. Their parents and relatives had enviSaged for them bright worldly careers. They came to Sri Ramakrishna with pure bodies, vigorous minds, and uncontaminated souls. All were born with unusual spiritual attributes. Sri Ramakrishna accepted them, even at first sight, as his children, relatives, friends, and companions. His magic touch unfolded them. And later each according to his measure reflected the life of the Master, becoming a torch-bearer of his mesSage across land and sea.
  
  --
  
  These young men, under the watchful eyes of the Master and the leadership of Narendra, became the Antaranga Bhakts, the devotees of Sri Ramakrishna's inner circle. They were privileged to witness many manifestations of the Master's divine powers. Narendra received instructions regarding the propagation of his mesSage after his death.
  
  --
  
  On January 1, 1886, he felt better and came down to the garden for a little stroll. It was about three o'clock in the afternoon. Some thirty lay disciples were in the hall or sitting about under the trees. Sri Ramakrishna said to Girish, "Well, Girish, what have you seen in me, that you proclaim me before everybody as an Incarnation of God?" Girish was not the man to be taken by surprise. He knelt before the Master and said with folded hands, "What can an insignificant person like myself say about the One whose glory even Sages like Vysa and Vlmiki could not adequately measure?" The Master was profoundly moved. He said: "What more shall I say? I bless you all. Be illumined!" He fell into a spiritual mood. Hearing these words the devotees, one and all, became overwhelmed with emotion. They rushed to him and fell at his feet. He touched them all, and each received an appropriate benediction. Each of them, at the touch of the Master, experienced ineffable bliss. Some laughed, some wept, some sat down to meditate, some began to pray. Some saw light, some had visions of their Chosen Ideals, and some felt within their bodies the rush of spiritual power.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  They therefore have the value of almost stenographic records. In Appendix A are given several conversations which took place in the absence of M., but of which he received a first-hand record from persons concerned. The conversations will bring before the reader's mind an intimate picture of the Master's eventful life from March 1882 to April 24, 1886, only a few months before his passing away. During this period he came in contact chiefly with English-educated Benglis; from among them he selected his disciples and the bearers of his mesSage, and with them he shared his rich spiritual experiences.
  
  --
  
  In the spiritual firmament Sri Ramakrishna is a waxing crescent. Within one hundred years of his birth and fifty years of his death his mesSage has spread across land and sea. Romain Rolland has described him as the fulfilment of the spiritual aspirations of the three hundred millions of Hindus for the last two thousand years. Mahatma Gandhi has written: "His life enables us to see God face to face. . . . Ramakrishna was a living embodiment of godliness." He is being recognized as a compeer of Krishna, Buddha, and Christ.
  
  The life and teachings of Sri Ramakrishna have redirected the thoughts of the denationalized Hindus to the spiritual ideals of their forefathers. During the latter part of the nineteenth century his was the time-honoured role of the Saviour of the Eternal Religion of the Hindus. His teachings played an important part in liberalizing the minds of orthodox pundits and hermits. Even now he is the silent force that is moulding the spiritual destiny of India. His great disciple, Swami Vivekananda, was the first Hindu missionary to preach the mesSage of Indian culture to the enlightened minds of Europe and America. The full consequence of Swami Viveknand work is still in the womb of the future.
  
  --
  
  He was an educationist all his life both in a spiritual and in a secular sense. After he passed out of College, he took up work as headmaster in a number of schools in succession Narail High School, City School, Ripon College School, Metropolitan School, Aryan School, Oriental School, Oriental Seminary and Model School. The causes of his migration from school to school were that he could not get on with some of the managements on grounds of principles and that often his spiritual mood drew him away to places of pilgrimage for long periods. He worked with some of the most noted public men of the time like Iswar Chandra Vidysgar and Surendranath Banerjee. The latter appointed him as a professor in the City and Ripon Colleges where he taught subjects like English, philosophy, history and economics. In his later days he took over the Morton School, and he spent his time in the staircase room of the third floor of it, administering the school and preaching the mesSage of the Master. He was much respected in educational circles where he was usually referred to as Rector Mahashay. A teacher who had worked under him writes thus in warm appreciation of his teaching methods: "Only when I worked with him in school could I appreciate what a great educationist he was. He would come down to the level of his students when teaching, though he himself was so learned, so talented. Ordinarily teachers confine their instruction to what is given in books without much thought as to whether the student can accept it or not. But M., would first of all gauge how much the student could take in and by what means. He would employ aids to teaching like maps, pictures and diagrams, so that his students could learn by seeing. Thirty years ago (from 1953) when the question of imparting education through the medium of the mother tongue was being discussed, M. had already employed Bengali as the medium of instruction in the Morton School." (M The Apostle and the Evangelist by Swami Nityatmananda Part I. P. 15.)
  
  --
  
  An appropriate allusion indeed! Bhagavata, the great scripture that has given the word of Sri Krishna to mankind, was composed by the Sage Vysa under similar circumstances. When caught up in a mood of depression like that of M, Vysa was advised by the Sage Nrada that he would gain peace of mind only qn composing a work exclusively devoted to the depiction of the Lord's glorious attributes and His teachings on Knowledge and Devotion, and the result was that the world got from Vysa the invaluable gift of the Bhagavata Purana depicting the life and teachings of Sri Krishna.
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna was a teacher for both the Orders of mankind, Sannysins and householders. His own life offered an ideal example for both, and he left behind disciples who followed the highest traditions he had set in respect of both these ways of life. M., along with Nag Mahashay, exemplified how a householder can rise to the highest level of Sagehood. M. was married to Nikunja Devi, a distant relative of Keshab Chander Sen, even when he was reading at College, and he had four children, two sons and two daughters. The responsibility of the family, no doubt, made him dependent on his professional income, but the great devotee that he was, he never compromised with ideals and principles for this reason. Once when he was working as the headmaster in a school managed by the great Vidysgar, the results of the school at the public examination happened to be rather poor, and Vidysgar attributed it to M's preoccupation with the Master and his consequent failure to attend adequately to the school work. M. at once resigned his post without any thought of the morrow. Within a fortnight the family was in poverty, and M. was one day pacing up and down the verandah of his house, musing how he would feed his children the next day. Just then a man came with a letter addressed to 'Mahendra Babu', and on opening it, M. found that it was a letter from his friend Sri Surendra Nath Banerjee, asking whether he would like to take up a professorship in the Ripon College. In this way three or four times he gave up the job that gave him the wherewithal to support the family, either for upholding principles or for practising spiritual Sadhanas in holy places, without any consideration of the possible dire worldly consequences; but he was always able to get over these difficulties somehow, and the interests of his family never suffered. In spite of his disregard for worldly goods, he was, towards the latter part of his life, in a fairly flourishing condition as the proprietor of the Morton School which he developed into a noted educational institution in the city. The Lord has said in the Bhagavad Git that in the case of those who think of nothing except Him, He Himself would take up all their material and spiritual responsibilities. M. was an example of the truth of the Lord's promise.
  
  --
  
  The life of Sdhan and holy association that he started on at the feet of the Master, he continued all through his life. He has for this reason been most appropriately described as a Grihastha-Sannysi (householder-Sannysin). Though he was forbidden by the Master to become a Sannysin, his reverence for the Sannysa ideal was whole-hearted and was without any reservation. So after Sri Ramakrishna's passing away, while several of the Master's householder devotees considered the young Sannysin disciples of the Master as inexperienced and inconsequential, M. stood by them with the firm faith that the Master's life and mesSage were going to be perpetuated only through them. Swami Vivekananda wrote from America in a letter to the inmates of the Math: "When Sri Thkur (Master) left the body, every one gave us up as a few unripe urchins. But M. and a few others did not leave us in the lurch. We cannot repay our debt to them." (Swami Raghavananda's article on M. in Prabuddha Bharata vol. XXX P. 442.)
  
  --
  
  In 1905 he retired from the active life of a Professor and devoted his remaining twenty-seven years exclusively to the preaching of the life and mesSage of the Great Master. He bought the Morton Institution from its original proprietors and shifted it to a commodious four-storeyed house at 50 Amherst Street, where it flourished under his management as one of the most efficient educational institutions in Calcutta. He generally occupied a staircase room at the top of it, cooking his own meal which consisted only of milk and rice without variation, and attended to all his personal needs himself. His dress also was the simplest possible. It was his conviction that limitation of personal wants to the minimum is an important aid to holy living. About one hour in the morning he would spend in inspecting the classes of the school, and then retire to his staircase room to pour over his diary and live in the divine atmosphere of the earthly days of the Great Master, unless devotees and admirers had already gathered in his room seeking his holy company.
  
  --
  
  Though a very well versed scholar in the Upanishads, Git and the philosophies of the East and the West, all his discussions and teachings found their culmination in the life and the mesSage of Sri Ramakrishna, in which he found the real explanation and illustration of all the scriptures. Both consciously and unconsciously, he was the teacher of the Kathmrita the nectarine words of the Great Master.
  

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  We have set forth the details of obligatory prayer in another Tablet. Blessed is he who observeth that whereunto he hath been bidden by Him Who ruleth over all mankind. In the Prayer for the Dead six specific pasSages have been sent down by God, the Revealer of Verses. Let one who is able to read recite that which hath been revealed to precede these pasSages; and as for him who is unable, God hath relieved him of this requirement. He, of a truth, is the Mighty, the Pardoner.
  
  --
  
  We have commanded you to pray and fast from the beginning of maturity; this is ordained by God, your Lord and the Lord of your forefathers. He hath exempted from this those who are weak from illness or age, as a bounty from His Presence, and He is the Forgiving, the Generous. God hath granted you leave to prostrate yourselves on any surface that is clean, for We have removed in this regard the limitation that had been laid down in the Book; God, indeed, hath knowledge of that whereof ye know naught. Let him that findeth no water for ablution repeat five times the words "In the Name of God, the Most Pure, the Most Pure", and then proceed to his devotions. Such is the command of the Lord of all worlds. In regions where the days and nights grow long, let times of prayer be gauged by clocks and other instruments that mark the pasSage of the hours. He, verily, is the Expounder, the Wise.
  
  --
  
  Whoso wisheth to make use of vessels of silver and gold is at liberty to do so. Take heed lest, when partaking of food, ye plunge your hands into the contents of bowls and platters. Adopt ye such uSages as are most in keeping with refinement. He, verily, desireth to see in you the manners of the inmates of Paradise in His mighty and most sublime Kingdom. Hold ye fast unto refinement under all conditions, that your eyes may be preserved from beholding what is repugnant both to your own selves and to the dwellers of Paradise. Should anyone depart therefrom, his deed shall at that moment be rendered vain; yet should he have good reason, God will excuse him. He, in truth, is the Gracious, the Most Bountiful.
  
  --
  
  The Lord hath granted leave to whosoever desireth it that he be instructed in the divers tongues of the world that he may deliver the MesSage of the Cause of God throughout the East and throughout the West, that he make mention of Him amidst the kindreds and peoples of the world in such wise that hearts may revive and the mouldering bone be quickened.
  
  --
  
  O people of the Bayan! Fear ye the Most Merciful and consider what He hath revealed in another pasSage. He said: "The Qiblih is indeed He Whom God will make manifest; whenever He moveth, it moveth, until He shall come to rest." Thus was it set down by the Supreme Ordainer when He desired to make mention of this Most Great Beauty. Meditate on this, O people, and be not of them that wander distraught in the wilderness of error. If ye reject Him at the bidding of your idle fancies, where then is the Qiblih to which ye will turn, O assemblage of the heedless? Ponder ye this verse, and judge equitably before God, that haply ye may glean the pearls of mysteries from the ocean that surgeth in My Name, the All-Glorious, the Most High.
  
  --
  
  And now consider what hath been revealed in yet another pasSage, that perchance ye may forsake your own concepts and set your faces towards God, the Lord of being. He+F1 hath said: "It is unlawful to enter into marriage save with a believer in the Bayan. Should only one party to a marriage embrace this Cause, his or her possessions will become unlawful to the other, until such time as the latter hath converted. This law, +F1 The Bab however, will only take effect after the exaltation of the Cause of Him Whom We shall manifest in truth, or of that which hath already been made manifest in justice. Ere this, ye are at liberty to enter into wedlock as ye wish, that haply by this means ye may exalt the Cause of God." Thus hath the Nightingale sung with sweet melody upon the celestial bough, in praise of its Lord, the All-Merciful. Well is it with them that hearken.
  

1.00_-_PREFACE, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  The age of adventures is over. Even if we reach the seventh galaxy,
  we will go there helmeted and mechanized, and it will not change a thing for us; we will find ourselves exactly as we are now: helpless children in the face of death, living beings who are not too sure how they live, why they are alive, or where they are going. On the earth, as we know, the times of Cortez and Pizarro are over; one and the same pervasive Mechanism stifles us: the trap is closing inexorably. But, as always, it turns out that our bleakest adversities are also our most promising opportunities, and that the dark pasSage is only a pasSage leading to a greater light. Hence, with our backs against the wall, we are facing the last territory left for us to explore, the ultimate adventure: ourselves.
  Indeed, there are plenty of simple and obvious signs. This decade's [the 60's] most important phenomenon is not the trip to the moon, but the "trips" on drugs, the student restlessness throughout the world, and the great hippie migration. But where could they possibly go? There is no more room on the teeming beaches, no more room on the crowded roads, no more room in the ever-expanding anthills of our cities. We have to find a way out elsewhere.

1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  The Mohammedan insists that God is, and did really send Gabriel with mesSages for Mohammed: but all others contradict him. And from the nature of the case proof is impossible.
  

1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Philosophy
    1. Medieval manuscripts were numbered by folios instead of pages. The front side of the folio is the recto (the right-hand page of an open book), and the back is the verso (the left-hand of an open book). In Liber Primus, Jung followed this practice. He reverted to contemporary pagination in Liber Secundus. All citations for photos refer back to the page in the Red Books German Caligraphy Edition.
    2. In 1921, Jung cited the first three verses of this pasSage (from Luther's Bible), noting: "The birth of the Savior, the development of the redeeming symbol, takes place where one does not expect it, and from precisely where a solution is most improbable" (Psychological Types, CW 6, 439).
    3. In 1921, Jung cited this pasSage, noting: "The nature of the redeeming symbol is that of a child, that is the childlikeness or presuppositionlessness of the attitude belongs to the symbol and its function. This 'childlike' attitude necessarily brings with it another guiding principle in place of self-will and rational intentions, whose 'godlikeness' is synonymous with 'superiority.' Since it is of an irrational nature, the guiding principle appears in a miraculous form. Isaiah expresses his connection very well (9:5) ... These honorific titles reproduce the essential qualities of the redeeming symbol. The criterion of 'godlike' effect is the irresistible power of the unconscious impulses" (psychological Types, cw 6, 442-43).
    4. In 1955/56, Jung noted that the union of the opposites of the destructive and constructive powers of the unconscious paralleled the Messianic state of fulfillment depicted in this pasSage (Mysterium Coniunctionis, CW 14, 258).
    5. In Goethe's Faust, Faust says to Wagner: What you call the spirit of the times / is fundamentally the gentleman's own mind, / in which the times are reflected (Faust I, lines 577-79).
    6. The Draft continues: then one whom I did not know, but who evidently had such knowledge, said to me: What a strange task you have! You must disclose your innermost and lowermost. /This I resisted since I hated nothing more than that which seemed to me unchaste and insolent (p. I).
    7. In Transformations and Symbols of the Libido (1912), Jung interpreted God as a symbol of the libido (CW B, III). In his subsequent work, Jung laid great emphasis on the distinction between the God image and the metaphysical existence of God (cf pasSages added to the revised retitled
    1952 edition, Symbols ofTraniformation, CW 5, 95).
    8. The terms hinubergehen (going across), Obergang (going-across), Untergang (down-going), and
    Brucke (bridge) feature in Nietzsche's Zrathustra in relation to the pasSage from man to the
    Obermensch (superman). For example, "What is great in man is that he is a a bridge and not a goal: what can be loved in man is that he is a going-across and a down-going. / I love those who do not know how to live except their lives be a down-going, for they are those who are going over" (tr. R. Hollingdale [Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1984], p. 44, tr. mod; words are as underlined in Jung's copy).
  --
    28. The Draft continues: One should not turn people into sheep, but sheep into people. The spirit of the depth demands this, who is beyond present and past. Speak and write for those who want to listen and read. But do not run after men, so that you do not soil the dignity of humanity-- it is a rare good. A sad demise in dignity is better than an undignified healing. Whoever wants to be a doctor of the soul sees people as being sick. He offends human dignity. It is presumptuous to say that man is sick. Whoever wants to be the soul's shepherd treats people like sheep. He violates human dignity. It is insolent to say that people are like sheep. Who gives you the right to say that man is sick and a sheep? Give him human dignity so he may find his ascendancy or downfall, his way (p. II)
    29. The Draft continues: This is all, my dear friends, that I can tell you about the grounds and aims of my mesSage, which I am burdened with like the patient donkey with a heavy load. He is glad to put it down (p. 12).
  
  --
  41. In 1912, Jung had written, "It is a common error to judge longing in terms of the quality of the object... Nature is only beautiful on account of the longing and love accorded to it by man. The aesthetic attributes emanating therefrom apply first and foremost to the libido, which alone accounts for the beauty of nature" (Transformations and Symbols of the Libido, CW B, 147).
  42. In Psychological Types, Jung articulated this primacy of the image through his notion of esse in anima (CW 6, 66ff, 7IIff). In her diary notes, Cary Baynes commented on this pasSage: What struck me especially was what you said about the Bild [image] being half the world. That is the thing that makes humanity so dull. They have missed understanding that thing. The world, that is the thing that holds them rapt. Das Bild, they have never seriously considered unless they have been poets (February 8,1924, CFB).
  43. The Draft continues: He who strives only for things will sink into poverty as outer wealth increases, and his soul will be afflicted by protracted illness (p. 17).
  44. The Draft continues: This parable about re-finding the soul, my friends, is meant to show you that you have only seen me as half a man, since my soul had lost me. I am certain that you did not notice this; because how many are with their souls today? Yet without the soul, there is no path that leads beyond these times (p. 17). In her diary notes Cary Baynes commented on this pasSage: February 8th [1924]. I came to your conversation with your soul. All that you say is said in the right way and is sincere. It is no cry of the young man awakening into life but that of the mature man who has lived fully and richly in ways of the world and yet knows almost abruptly one night, say, that he has missed the essence. The vision came at the height of your power, when you could have gone on just as you were with perfect worldly success. I do not know how you were strong enough to give it heed. I am really for everything you say and understand it. Everyone who has lost the connection with his soul or has known how to give it life ought to have a chance to see this book. Every word so far lives for me and strengthens me just where I feel weak, but as you say the world is very far away from it in mood today. That does not matter too much, a book can swing even a whole world if it is written in fire and blood (CFB).
  

1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  A political manoeuvre is adopted by the mind by the manufacture of certain mechanisms psychologically, which are usually called by psychologists as defence mechanisms. These defence mechanisms are very peculiar structures like bulldozers and tanks which we have in armies and public works which the mind manufactures for its stability, security, sustenance and permanent establishment in the world of diversities. These defence mechanisms are terrible machineries which the mind manufactures and keeps secret, unknown to people, like secret weapons which one may wield, not allowing them to come to the knowledge of other people. If everyone knows what weapons we have got, then they won't be effective, because others also may manufacture the same weapons. So we keep our weapons very secret and use them only when they are necessary, in warfare or on a battlefield. Everyone has these weapons, and they are not made of material objects. They are psychological apparatuses which the mind always keeps ready at hand, whenever there is any kind of threat to the psychological security or individual happiness. The adepts who have made deep study of this subject are the psychoanalysts in the Western world and the teachers of yoga in the East, particularly Sage Patanjali; and certain other texts like the Upanishads have made a study of the subtle devices that the mind employs for the purpose of its individual security and permanent satisfaction.
  

1.01_-_Asana, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  There will be no further difficulty in the practice. One will get into one's Asana with almost the same feeling as that with which a tired man gets into a hot bath; and while he is in that position, the body may be trusted to send him no mesSage that might disturb his mind.
  

1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE, #Alice in Wonderland, #Lewis Carroll, #Fiction
  Down, down, down! Would the fall never come to an end? There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking to herself. "Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!" (Dinah was the cat.) "I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah, my dear, I wish you were down here with me!" Alice felt that she was dozing off, when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.
  Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up in a moment. She looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long pasSage and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost. Away went Alice like the wind and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, "Oh, my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!" She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen.
  She found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof. There were doors all 'round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.
  Suddenly she came upon a little table, all made of solid glass. There was nothing on it but a tiny golden key, and Alice's first idea was that this might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but, at any rate, it would not open any of them. However, on the second time 'round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high. She tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight, it fitted!
  Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small pasSage, not much larger than a rat-hole; she knelt down and looked along the pasSage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through the doorway. "Oh," said Alice, "how I wish I could shut up like a telescope!
  I think I could, if I only knew how to begin."

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  I have always endeavored to acquire strict business habits; they are indispensable to every man. If your trade is with the Celestial Empire, then some small counting house on the coast, in some Salem harbor, will be fixture enough. You will export such articles as the country affords, purely native products, much ice and pine timber and a little granite, always in native bottoms. These will be good ventures. To oversee all the details yourself in person; to be at once pilot and captain, and owner and underwriter; to buy and sell and keep the accounts; to read every letter received, and write or read every letter sent; to superintend the discharge of imports night and day; to be upon many parts of the coast almost at the same time;often the richest freight will be discharged upon a Jersey shore;to be your own telegraph, unweariedly sweeping the horizon, speaking all passing vessels bound coastwise; to keep up a steady despatch of commodities, for the supply of such a distant and exorbitant market; to keep yourself informed of the state of the markets, prospects of war and peace every where, and anticipate the tendencies of trade and civilization,taking advantage of the results of all exploring expeditions, using new pasSages and all improvements in navigation;charts to be studied, the position of reefs and new lights and buoys to be ascertained, and ever, and ever, the logarithmic tables to be corrected, for by the error of some calculator the vessel often splits upon a rock that should have reached a friendly pier,there is the untold fate of La Perouse;universal science to be kept pace with, studying the lives of all great discoverers and navigators, great adventurers and merchants, from Hanno and the Phnicians down to our day; in fine, account of stock to be taken from time to time, to know how you stand. It is a labor to task the faculties of a man,such problems of profit and loss, of interest, of tare and tret, and gauging of all kinds in it, as demand a universal knowledge.
  
  --
  
  By the middle of April, for I made no haste in my work, but rather made the most of it, my house was framed and ready for the raising. I had already bought the shanty of James Collins, an Irishman who worked on the Fitchburg Railroad, for boards. James Collins shanty was considered an uncommonly fine one. When I called to see it he was not at home. I walked about the outside, at first unobserved from within, the window was so deep and high. It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap. The roof was the soundest part, though a good deal warped and made brittle by the sun. Door-sill there was none, but a perennial pasSage for the hens under the door board. Mrs. C. came to the door and asked me to view it from the inside. The hens were driven in by my approach. It was dark, and had a dirt floor for the most part, dank, clammy, and aguish, only here a board and there a board which would not bear removal. She lighted a lamp to show me the inside of the roof and the walls, and also that the board floor extended under the bed, warning me not to step into the cellar, a sort of dust hole two feet deep. In her own words, they were good boards overhead, good boards all around, and a good window,of two whole squares originally, only the cat had passed out that way lately. There was a stove, a bed, and a place to sit, an infant in the house where it was born, a silk parasol, gilt-framed looking-glass, and a patent new coffee mill nailed to an oak sapling, all told. The bargain was soon concluded, for James had in the meanwhile returned. I to pay four dollars and twenty-five cents to-night, he to vacate at five to-morrow morning, selling to nobody else meanwhile: I to take possession at six. It were well, he said, to be there early, and anticipate certain indistinct but wholly unjust claims on the score of ground rent and fuel. This he assured me was the only encumbrance. At six I passed him and his family on the road. One large bundle held their all,bed, coffee-mill, looking-glass, hens,all but the cat, she took to the woods and became a wild cat, and, as I learned afterward, trod in a trap set for woodchucks, and so became a dead cat at last.
  
  --
  
  As with our colleges, so with a hundred modern improvements; there is an illusion about them; there is not always a positive advance. The devil goes on exacting compound interest to the last for his early share and numerous succeeding investments in them. Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end, an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at; as railroads lead to Boston or New York. We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate. Either is in such a predicament as the man who was earnest to be introduced to a distinguished deaf woman, but when he was presented, and one end of her ear trumpet was put into his hand, had nothing to say. As if the main object were to talk fast and not to talk sensibly. We are eager to tunnel under the Atlantic and bring the old world some weeks nearer to the new; but perchance the first news that will leak through into the broad, flapping American ear will be that the Princess Adelaide has the whooping cough. After all, the man whose horse trots a mile in a minute does not carry the most important mesSages; he is not an evangelist, nor does he come round eating locusts and wild honey. I doubt if Flying Childers ever carried a peck of corn to mill.
  
  --
  
  For more than five years I maintained myself thus solely by the labor of my hands, and I found, that by working about six weeks in a year, I could meet all the expenses of living. The whole of my winters, as well as most of my summers, I had free and clear for study. I have thoroughly tried school-keeping, and found that my expenses were in proportion, or rather out of proportion, to my income, for I was obliged to dress and train, not to say think and believe, accordingly, and I lost my time into the bargain. As I did not teach for the good of my fellow-men, but simply for a livelihood, this was a failure. I have tried trade; but I found that it would take ten years to get under way in that, and that then I should probably be on my way to the devil. I was actually afraid that I might by that time be doing what is called a good business. When formerly I was looking about to see what I could do for a living, some sad experience in conforming to the wishes of friends being fresh in my mind to tax my ingenuity, I thought often and seriously of picking huckleberries; that surely I could do, and its small profits might suffice,for my greatest skill has been to want but little,so little capital it required, so little distraction from my wonted moods, I foolishly thought. While my acquaintances went unhesitatingly into trade or the professions, I contemplated this occupation as most like theirs; ranging the hills all summer to pick the berries which came in my way, and thereafter carelessly dispose of them; so, to keep the flocks of Admetus. I also dreamed that I might gather the wild herbs, or carry evergreens to such villagers as loved to be reminded of the woods, even to the city, by hay-cart loads. But I have since learned that trade curses everything it handles; and though you trade in mesSages from heaven, the whole curse of trade attaches to the business.
  

1.01_-_Foreward, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  of wisdom, a great mass of inspired poetry, the work of
  Rishis, seers and Sages, who received in their illumined minds
  rather than mentally constructed a great universal, eternal and
  --
  verses of power, not of an ordinary but of a divine inspiration
  and source. The name given to these Sages was Kavi, which
  afterwards came to mean any poet, but at the time had the sense
  --
  than a tradition, it is an actual fact of history.
  But even if an element of high spiritual knowledge, or pasSages full of high ideas were found in the hymns, it might be
  supposed that those are perhaps only a small factor, while the
  --
  
  But where is this body of esoteric meaning in the Veda? It is only discoverable if we give a constant and straightforward meaning to the words and formulas employed by the Rishis, especially to the key-words which bear as keystones the whole structure of their doctrine. One such word is the great word, Ritam, Truth; Truth was the central object of the seeking of the mystics, a spiritual or inner Truth, a truth of ourselves, a truth of things, a truth of the world and of the gods, a truth behind all we are and all that things are. In the ritualistic interpretation this master word of the Vedic knowledge has been interpreted in all kinds of senses according to the convenience or fancy of the interpreter, "truth", "sacrifice", "water", "one who has gone", even "food", not to speak of a number of other meanings; if we do that, there can be no certitude in our dealings with the Veda. But let us consistently give it the same master sense and a strange but clear result emerges. If we apply the same treatment to other standing terms of the Veda, if we give them their ordinary, natural and straightforward meaning and give it constantly and consistently, not monkeying about with their sense or turning them into purely ritualistic expressions, if we allow to certain important words, such as sravas, kratu, the psychological meaning of which they are capable and which they undoubtedly bear in certain pasSages as when the Veda describes Agni as kratur hr.di, then this result becomes all the more clear, extended, pervasive. If in addition we follow the indications which abound, sometimes the explicit statement of the Rishis about the inner sense of their symbols, interpret in the same sense the significant legends and figures on which they constantly return, the conquest over Vritra and the battle with the Vritras, his powers, the recovery of the Sun, the Waters, the Cows, from the Panis or other Dasyus, the whole Rig Veda reveals itself as a body of doctrine and practice, esoteric, occult, spiritual, such as might have been given by the mystics in any ancient country but which actually survives for us only in theVeda. It is there deliberately hidden by a veil, but the veil is not so thick as we first imagine; we have only to use our eyes and the veil vanishes; the body of the Word, the Truth stands out before us.
  
  Many of the lines, many whole hymns even of the Veda bear on their face a mystic meaning; they are evidently an occult form of speech, have an inner meaning. When the seer speaks of Agni as "the luminous guardian of the Truth shining out in his own home", or of Mitra and Varuna or other gods as "in touch with the Truth and making the Truth grow" or as "born in the Truth", these are words of a mystic poet, who is thinking of that inner Truth behind things of which the early Sages were the seekers.
  
  --
  and Light and Knowledge; this meaning which comes out in
  some pasSages can be consistently applied everywhere yielding
  a coherent sense. The word ghr.ta means ghee or clarified butter
  --
  ghr.ta could also mean light, from the root ghr. to shine, and
  it is used in this sense in many pasSages. Thus the horses of
  Indra, the Lord of Heaven, are described as dripping with light,
  --
  ghr.tacm, the luminous thought or understanding occur. There
  is a curious pasSage in one of the hymns translated in this book
  calling on Fire as priest of the sacrifice to flood the offering with
  --
  all planes of the being. The Rishis, it must be remembered, were
  seers as well as Sages, they were men of vision who saw things in
  their meditation in images, often symbolic images which might
  --
  form, might predict or give an occult body to it: so it would
  1 Sayana, though in several pasSages he takes ghrta in the sense of light, renders it
  .
  --
  the primitive poet might well believe that rain was the perspiration of Indra's horses.
  2 This is Sayana's rendering of the pasSage and rises directly from the words.
  
  --
  - as an element of the wealth for which they pray to the Gods,
  but here too an esoteric sense can be seen, for in certain pasSages
  the son born to us is clearly an image of some inner birth: Agni
  --
  knowledge of their forerunners. "There is a Truth covered by a
  Truth," runs the Vedic pasSage, "where they unyoke the horses
  of the Sun; the ten hundreds stood together, there was That
  --
  keeping the central symbol of the Sun but without any secrecy in
  the sense. Thus runs the pasSage in the Upanishad, "The face of
  the Truth is covered with a golden lid. O Pushan, that remove for
  --
  to the Sun "to marshal and mass his rays" so that the supreme
  form may be seen. The Sun in both the pasSages, as constantly
  in the Veda and frequently in the Upanishad, is the Godhead
  --
  ketu means very ordinarily "ray" but it also bears the meaning of intellect, judgment or an intellectual perception. If we
  compare the pasSages in the Veda in which it occurs we can
  come to the conclusion that it meant a ray of perception or
  --
  translations who might otherwise be at a loss, this foreword has
  been written and some pasSages from the unpublished "Doctrine
  of the Mystics" have been included.20 The text of the Veda has
  --
  sense, but varied the translation according to the needs of the
  pasSage. Often I have been unable to find an adequate English
  word which will convey the full connotation or colour of the
  --
  be conjectured or else different renderings are equally possible.
  In many pasSages I have had to leave a provisional rendering;
  it was intended to keep the final decision on the point until the

1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
  
  The student is told to set apart moments in his daily life in which to withdraw into himself, quietly and alone. He is not to occupy himself at such moments with the affairs of his own ego. This would result in the contrary of what is intended. He should rather let his experiences and the mesSages from the outer world re-echo within his own completely silent self. At such silent moments every flower, every animal, every action will unveil to him secrets undreamt of. And thus he will prepare himself to receive quite new impressions of the outer world through quite different eyes. The desire to enjoy impression after impression merely blunts the faculty of cognition; the latter, however, is nurtured and cultivated if the enjoyment once experienced is allowed to reveal its mesSage. Thus the student must accustom himself not merely to let the enjoyment
   p. 16

1.01_-_Introduction, #The Lotus Sutra, #Anonymous, #Various
  Are all to be seen from here.
  The buddhas, the Sage Lord (Narendrasih),
  Who teach the subtle and supreme sutra
  --
  The Buddha fathered eight princes.
  Having seen the Great Sage
  Renounce household life,
  --
  Was called Dpakara,
  And, as the leader of all the Sages,
  

1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Our object, then, in studying the Gita will not be a scholastic or academical scrutiny of its thought, nor to place its philosophy in the history of metaphysical speculation, nor shall we deal with it in the manner of the analytical dialectician. We approach it for help and light and our aim must be to distinguish its essential and living mesSage, that in it on which humanity has to seize for its perfection and its highest spiritual welfare.
  

1.01_-_Prayer, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  Bhakti has been the one constant theme of our Sages. Apart from the special writers on Bhakti, such as Shndilya or Narada, the great commentators on the Vysa-Sutras, evidently advocates of knowledge (Jnna), have also something very suggestive to say about love. Even when the commentator is anxious to explain many, if not all, of the texts so as to make them import a sort of dry knowledge, the Sutras, in the chapter on worship especially, do not lend themselves to be easily manipulated in that fashion.
  
  --
  
  "Meditation again is a constant remembrance (of the thing meditated upon) flowing like an unbroken stream of oil poured out from one vessel to another. When this kind of remembering has been attained (in relation to God) all bandages break. Thus it is spoken of in the scriptures regarding constant remembering as a means to liberation. This remembering again is of the same form as seeing, because it is of the same meaning as in the pasSage, 'When He who is far and near is seen, the bonds of the heart are broken, all doubts vanish, and all effects of work disappear' He who is near can be seen, but he who is far can only be remembered. Nevertheless the scripture says that he have to see Him who is near as well as Him who, is far, thereby indicating to us that the above kind of remembering is as good as seeing. This remembrance when exalted assumes the same form as seeing. . . . Worship is constant remembering as may be seen from the essential texts of scriptures. Knowing, which is the same as repeated worship, has been described as constant remembering. . . . Thus the memory, which has attained to the height of what is as good as direct perception, is spoken of in the Shruti as a means of liberation. 'This Atman is not to be reached through various sciences, nor by intellect, nor by much study of the Vedas. Whomsoever this Atman desires, by him is the Atman attained, unto him this Atman discovers Himself.' Here, after saying that mere hearing, thinking and meditating are not the means of attaining this Atman, it is said, 'Whom this Atman desires, by him the Atman is attained.' The extremely beloved is desired; by whomsoever this Atman is extremely beloved, he becomes the most beloved of the Atman. So that this beloved may attain the Atman, the Lord Himself helps. For it has been said by the Lord: 'Those who are constantly attached to Me and worship Me with love I give that direction to their will by which they come to Me.' Therefore it is said that, to whomsoever this remembering, which is of the same form as direct perception, is very dear, because it is dear to the Object of such memory perception, he is desired by the Supreme Atman, by him the Supreme Atman is attained. This constant remembrance is denoted by the word Bhakti." So says Bhagavn Rmnuja in his commentary on the Sutra Athto Brahma-jijns (Hence follows a dissertation on Brahman.).
  

1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  brain, and the less the needle of the Prana has made these
  pasSages, the more conservative will be the brain, the more it
  will struggle against new thoughts. The more thoughtful the

1.01_-_Soul_and_God, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Philosophy
  
  The Draft continues: My friends, as you can see, mercy is granted to the developed, not the childish. I thank my God for this mesSage. Do not let the teachings of Christianity deceive you!
  Its teachings are good for the most mature minds of bygone time. Today, it serves immature minds. Christianity no longer promises us grace, and yet we still need mercy. That which I tell you is the way of what is to come, my way to mercy (p. 27). i.e., Christ. C.G. Jung, Transformation symbolism in the mass (1942, CW II).

1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  The philosophy of the Upanishads reappears, developed and enriched, in the Bhagavad-Gita and was finally systematized, in the ninth century of our era, by Shankara. Shankaras teaching (simultaneously theoretical and practical, as is that of all true exponents of the Perennial Philosophy) is summarized in his versified treatise, Viveka-Chudarnani (The Crest-Jewel of Wisdom). All the following pasSages are taken from this conveniently brief and untechnical work.
  
  --
  
  The truth of Brahman may be understood intellectually. But (even in those who so understand) the desire for personal separateness is deep-rooted and powerful, for it exists from beginningless time. It creates the notion, I am the actor, I am he who experiences. This notion is the cause of bondage to conditional existence, birth and death. It can be removed only by the earnest effort to live constantly in union with Brahman. By the Sages, the eradication of this notion and the craving for personal separateness is called Liberation.
  

1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  rings up the curtain, always, on a mystery of transfigurationa
  rite, or moment, of spiritual pasSage, which, when complete,
  amounts to a dying and a birth. The familiar life horizon has
  --
  last horizons of the created world, the same archetypal images
  are activated, symbolizing danger, reassurance, trial, pasSage,
  and the strange holiness of the mysteries of birth.

1.01_-_The_Castle, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  As I looked around, I felt a curious sensation, or, rather, two distinct sensations, which mingled in my mind, still upset and somewhat unstable in my weariness. I seemed to be at a sumptuous court, which no one would have expected to find in such a rustic and out-of-the-way castle; and its wealth was evident not only in the costly furnishings and the graven vessels, but also in the calm and ease which reigned among those at the table, all handsome of person and clothed with elaborate elegance. But, at the same time, I remarked a feeling of random, of disorder, if not actually of license, as if this were not a lordly dwelling but an inn of pasSage, where people unknown to one another live together for one night and where, in that enforced promiscuity, all feel a relaxation of the rules by which they live in their own surroundings, and-as one resigns oneself to less comfortable ways of life-so one also indulges in freer, unfamiliar behavior. In fact, the two contradictory impressions could nevertheless refer to a single object: whether the castle, for years visited only as a stopping place, had gradually degenerated into an inn, and the lord and his lady had found themselves reduced to the roles of host and hostess, though still going through the motions of their aristocratic hospitality; or whether a tavern, such as one often sees in the vicinity of castles, to give drink to soldiers and horsemen, had invaded-the castle being long abandoned-the ancient, noble halls to install its benches and hogsheads there, and the pomp of those rooms-as well as the coming and going of illustrious customers-had conferred on the inn an unforeseen dignity, sufficient to put ideas in the heads of the host and hostess, who finally came to believe themselves the rulers of a brilliant court.
  

1.01_-_The_Dark_Forest._The_Hill_of_Difficulty._The_Panther,_the_Lion,_and_the_Wolf._Virgil., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  Behold the beast, for which I have turned back;
  Do thou protect me from her, famous Sage,
  For she doth make my veins and pulses tremble."

1.01_-_The_Divine_and_The_Universe, #Words Of The Mother III, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Part One
  Letters, MesSages and
  Other Short Written Statements

1.01_-_The_First_Steps, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  A god and a demon went to learn about the Self from a great Sage. They studied with him for a long time. At last the Sage told them, "You yourselves are the Being you are seeking." Both of them thought that their bodies were the Self. They went back to their people quite satisfied and said, "We have learned everything that was to be learned; eat, drink, and be merry; we are the Self; there is nothing beyond us." The nature of the demon was ignorant, clouded; so he never inquired any further, but was perfectly contented with the idea that he was God, that by the Self was meant the body. The god had a purer nature. He at first committed the mistake of thinking: I, this body, am Brahman: so keep it strong and in health, and well dressed, and give it all sorts of enjoyments. But, in a few days, he found out that that could not be the meaning of the Sage, their master; there must be something higher. So he came back and said, "Sir, did you teach me that this body was the Self? If so, I see all bodies die; the Self cannot die." The Sage said, "Find it out; thou art That." Then the god thought that the vital forces which work the body were what the Sage meant. But after a time, he found that if he ate, these vital forces remained strong, but, if he starved, they became weak. The god then went back to the Sage and said, "Sir, do you mean that the vital forces are the Self?" The Sage said, "Find out for yourself; thou art That." The god returned home once more, thinking that it was the mind, perhaps, that was the Self. But in a short while he saw that thoughts were so various, now good, again bad; the mind was too changeable to be the Self. He went back to the Sage and said, "Sir, I do not think that the mind is the Self; did you mean that?" "No," replied the Sage, "thou art That; find out for yourself." The god went home, and at last found that he was the Self, beyond all thought, one without birth or death, whom the sword cannot pierce or the fire burn, whom the air cannot dry or the water melt, the beginningless and endless, the immovable, the intangible, the omniscient, the omnipotent Being; that It was neither the body nor the mind, but beyond them all. So he was satisfied; but the poor demon did not get the truth, owing to his fondness for the body.
  

1.01_-_The_Four_Aids, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  

KALA


  36:The Sadhaka who has all these aids is sure of his goal. Even a fall will be for him only a means of rising and death a pasSage towards fulfilment. For once on his path, birth and death become only processes in the development of his being and the stages of his journey.
  

1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  1:THE EARLIEST preoccupation of man in his awakened thoughts and, as it seems, his inevitable and ultimate preoccupation, - for it survives the longest periods of scepticism and returns after every banishment, - is also the highest which his thought can enviSage. It manifests itself in the divination of Godhead, the impulse towards perfection, the search after pure Truth and unmixed Bliss, the sense of a secret immortality. The ancient dawns of human knowledge have left us their witness to this constant aspiration; today we see a humanity satiated but not satisfied by victorious analysis of the externalities of Nature preparing to return to its primeval longings. The earliest formula of Wisdom promises to be its last, - God, Light, Freedom, Immortality.
  

1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  We believe on the other hand that India is destined to work out her own independent life and civilisation, to stand in the forefront of the world and solve the political, social, economical and moral problems which Europe has failed to solve, yet the pursuit of whose solution and the feverish pasSage in that pursuit from experiment to experiment, from failure to failure she calls her progress. Our means must be as great as our ends and the strength to discover and use the means so as to attain the end can only be found by seeking the eternal source of strength in ourselves.
  

1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  Sharing these premises, Hakuin launched vehement attacks on what he considered the mistaken understanding purveyed by such architects of Confucian orthodoxy as Hayashi Razan (see chapter
  12). Hakuin's ideas on the subject may be summed up fairly well in the calligraphic works he prepared and distributed in large numbers to people. These works consisted of one large character, filiality or parent, followed by the inscription, "There is no more valuable act of filiality than to save one's father and mother from the sad fate of an unfortunate rebirth in the next life"-exactly the sentiments Hakuin had expressed to Sukefusa as a young monk. a It was considered extremely unfilial to injure or disfigure the body of one's (male) children. This was especially heinous in the case of an eldest son, who, according to the canons of filial piety, is venerated because of his superior birth, age, and gender. b Although not all of these references can be traced, most of them are found in Tales of the TwentyFour Paragons of Filial Virtue (Ehr-shih-ssu hsiao), a popular Confucian text of the Yuan dynasty that was reprinted and widely read in Edo Japan. c A legendary Sage ruler of ancient China. According to Mencius, when ministers came to him with good advice, Yu always received it with deep gratitude.
  

1.01_-_What_is_Magick?, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
    (Illustration: It is my Will to inform the World of certain facts within my knowledge. I therefore take "magical weapons," pen, ink, and paper; I write "incantations" these sentences in the "magical language" i.e. that which is understood by people I wish to instruct. I call forth "spirits" such as printers, publishers, booksellers, and so forth, and constrain them to convey my mesSage to those people. The composition and distribution is thus an act of
  

1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  Basing themselves on this scriptural proclamation, exponents tell us that there is a distinction between what they call Ishvara srishti and jiva srishti the creation of God and the creation of the individual. There are two kinds of creation. Ikshanadi-praveshanta srishtir ishana kalpita; jagradadi-vimokshantah samsaro jiva-kalpitah - says the Panchadasi, in a famous pasSage. The meaning of pasSage has reference to the Aittareya Upanishad and such other relevant pasSages in other Upanishads, and makes out that God willed to be many, and manifested Himself as this vast creation, projected individualities, and entered the individual by an immanence of His own nature. This is another way of describing the traditional process of creation through divine manifestations usually known as Ishvara, Hiranyagarbha and Virat all of which are precedent to individual manifestations, and prior to the existence of human beings. But there is also what is known as 'individual's creation'. A lot of detail about it is given in the Panchadasi, especially in its fourth chapter called Dvaita Vivek how duality-consciousness arose at all, and how perceptions can bind us, though they need not necessarily bind us.
  

1.02.3.1_-_The_Lord, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  opposition comes in fact by the separation of what in the ancient
  Vedanta was viewed as one, - as we see in this pasSage.
  Brahman is His own subject and His own object, whether

1.02.3.2_-_Knowledge_and_Ignorance, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  integrality and does not follow eagerly after one consciousness rather than another, is no more attached to Vidya than
  to Avidya. This was the knowledge of the ancient Sages who
  were dhra, steadfast in the gaze of their thought, not drawn

1.02.4.1_-_The_Worlds_-_Surya, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  HEAVEN AND HELL
  The enjoyment of beatitude in a heaven beyond is also not the supreme consummation. But Vedantic thought did not enviSage rebirth as an immediate entry after death into a new body; the mental being in man is not so rigidly bound to the vital and physical, - on the contrary, the latter are ordinarily dissolved together after death, and there must therefore be, before the soul is attracted back towards terrestrial existence, an interval in which it assimilates its terrestrial experiences in order to be able to constitute a new vital and physical being upon earth. During this interval it must dwell in states or worlds beyond and these may be favourable or unfavourable to its future development. They are favourable in proportion as the light of the Supreme Truth of which Surya is a symbol enters into them, but states of intermediate ignorance or darkness are harmful to the soul in its progress. Those enter into them, as has been affirmed in the third verse, who do hurt to themselves by shutting themselves to the light or distorting the natural course of their development. The Vedantic heavens are states of light and the soul's expansion; darkness, self-obscuration and self-distortion are the nature of the Hells which it has to shun.
  

1.024_-_Affiliation_With_Larger_Wholes, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  Among the many recipes that Sage Patanjali prescribes in his system of yoga for the control of the mind, a masterstroke is given in a single aphorism as a prescription for every type of mental modification when he says, tatpratiedhrtham ekatattv abhysa (I.32): The practice of one reality checks the movement of the mind. It means that the movement of the mind is due to its weddedness to various realities, and not to one reality. Ekatattva is one truth, one being, one substance, one reality anything that is single and comprehensive. The practice of one reality is the ultimate remedy for all psychological modifications. But, as far as the human mind is concerned, there is no such thing as one reality. The human mind sees many realities and, therefore, it has manifold approaches to the various forms of reality which it sees in the world.
  

1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  In the practice of one reality, ekatattva abhyasah, mentioned by Sage Patanjali in one of his sutras for the purpose of restraining the modifications of the mind, there are, again, grades of approach. The one reality is not necessarily the Absolute Reality, though that is the aim, ultimately. As was mentioned previously, a reality, for the purpose of practice, is that condition which can fulfil a particular need of a specific state of mind under a given condition. So until the Absolute Reality is reached, all other realities are relative realities. Every reality, as far as we are concerned empirically, is relative subject to transcendence. Nevertheless, it is a reality to us, which only goes to prove that we are also only relative realities. We, as individuals, are not absolute realities and, therefore, we are satisfied with what is relative. We are not in daily contact with the Absolute; what we are in contact with is a relative reality. And inasmuch as the subject experiencing and the object experienced are on the same level or degree of reality, it goes without saying that the empirical subjects that we all are come under relative reality, and not the Absolute Reality.
  
  --
  
  It has been said that all great things are mysteries. They are not calculated effects produced logically by imagined causes, but are mysteries, which is another way of saying that all of this is unthinkable by the human mind. Knowledge somehow arises. One fine morning we get up and find that we are fired with a love for God. What has happened to us? Why is it that we suddenly we say, "Oh, today I am something different." Why we are something different today? From where has this inspiration come? Nobody knows what has happened. If we read the lives of great masters, Sages and saints, we will find that they were all suddenly fired with a longing which they could not explain, and no one can explain ordinarily. That knowledge, that aspiration, that love of God has not come from books. It has not come from any imaginable source. It has simply come that is all. How? Nobody knows.
  

1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The other point is that this practice will not bring results in only a few days. Sa tu drghakla nairantarya satkra sevita dhabhmi (I.14), says Patanjali. In many cases the result will not follow at all, due to obstructing prarabdhas. There were great seekers, sadhakas, who used to perform japa purascharana, the chanting of a mantra, for years and years together, with the hope of having the vision of the deity. But they had no vision of the deity. We hear of the story of the purascharanas performed by Sage Vidyaranya of yore, Yogi Sri Madhusudana Saraswati and others, but they had no vision. The reason mentioned is that they had obstructing prarabdhas.
  

1.02.9_-_Conclusion_and_Summary, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Monistic standpoint and its large solution of the difficulty is one
  of the most interesting pasSages of Vedantic literature. It is the
  sole Upanishad which offered almost insuperable difficulties to

1.02_-_Karma_Yoga, #Amrita Gita, #Swami Sivananda Saraswati, #Hinduism
  
  6. Share what you have with others. Serve the saints and Sages.
  
  --
  
  29. Sanchita is destroyed by Brahma-Jnana. You will have to enjoy the Prarabdha. Agami has no binding force as there is no agency or egoism in the Sage.
  

1.02_-_Outline_of_Practice, #The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, #Bodhidharma, #Buddhism
  back to reality, who meditate on walls,2 the absence of self and
  other, the oneness of mortal and Sage, and who remain unmoved
  even by scriptures are in complete and unspoken agreement with

1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  is not the building, but the people, that make a church, and
  that is what we always forget. That is why Sages and holy
  persons, who have so much of this Sattva quality, are

1.02_-_Skillful_Means, #The Lotus Sutra, #Anonymous, #Various
  Of the devas, humans, and other beings,
  The Great Sage Lord has illuminated
  The highest meaning

1.02_-_Taras_Tantra, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  
  The Yogini' s MesSage
  Tara appea red again to Atisha in a dream and

1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Not only in the Gita, but in other pasSages of the Mahabharata we meet with Krishna declaring emphatically the necessity of action, but it is here that he reveals its secret and the divinity behind our works.
  

1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  That ascension has already been effected by the Ancients, the human forefathers, and the spirits of these great Ancestors still assist their offspring; for the new dawns repeat the old and lean forward in light to join the dawns of the future. Kanwa, Kutsa, Atri, Kakshiwan, Gotama, Shunahshepa have become types of certain spiritual victories which tend to be constantly repeated in the experience of humanity. The seven Sages, the Angirasas, are waiting still and always, ready to chant the word, to rend the cavern, to find the lost herds, to recover the hidden Sun. Thus the soul is a battlefield full of helpers and hurters, friends and enemies. All this lives, teems, is personal, is conscious, is active.
  

1.02_-_The_Necessity_of_Magick_for_All, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  Let me sum up, very succinctly; as usual, my enthusiasm has lured me into embroidering my Sage discourse with Poets' Imagery!
  

1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  In the fourth Pda of the fourth chapter of his Sutras, after stating the almost infinite power and knowledge which will come to the liberated soul after the attainment of Moksha, Vysa makes the remark, in an aphorism, that none, however, will get the power of creating, ruling, and dissolving the universe, because that belongs to God alone. In explaining the Sutra it is easy for the dualistic commentators to show how it is ever impossible for a subordinate soul, Jiva, to have the infinite power and total independence of God. The thorough dualistic commentator Madhvchrya deals with this pasSage in his usual summary method by quoting a verse from the Varha Purna.
  
  --
  
  We shall now try to understand what the great representative of the Advaita School has to say on the point. We shall see how the Advaita system maintains all the hopes and aspirations of the dualist intact, and at the same time propounds its own solution of the problem in consonance with the high destiny of divine humanity. Those who aspire to retain their individual mind even after liberation and to remain distinct will have ample opportunity of realising their aspirations and enjoying the blessing of the qualified Brahman. These are they who have been spoken of in the Bhgavata Purna thus: "O king, such are the, glorious qualities of the Lord that the Sages whose only pleasure is in the Self, and from whom all fetters have fallen off, even they love the Omnipresent with the love that is for love's sake." These are they who are spoken of by the Snkhyas as getting merged in nature in this cycle, so that, after attaining perfection, they may come out in the next as lords of world-systems. But none of these ever becomes equal to God (Ishvara). Those who attain to that state where there is neither creation, nor created, nor creator, where there is neither knower, nor knowable, nor knowledge, where there is neither I, nor thou, nor he, where there is neither subject, nor object, nor relation, "there, who is seen by whom?" such persons have gone beyond everything to "where words cannot go nor mind", gone to that which the Shrutis declare as "Not this, not this"; but for those who cannot, or will not reach this state, there will inevitably remain the triune vision of the one undifferentiated Brahman as nature, soul, and the interpenetrating sustainer of both Ishvara. So, when Prahlda forgot himself, he found neither the universe nor its cause; all was to him one Infinite, undifferentiated by name and form; but as soon as he remembered that he was Prahlada, there was the universe before him and with it the Lord of the universe "the Repository of an infinite number of blessed qualities". So it was with the blessed Gopis. So long as they had lost sense of their own personal identity and individuality, they were all Krishnas, and when they began again to think of Him as the One to be worshipped, then they were Gopis again, and immediately Bhakti, then, can be directed towards Brahman, only in His personal aspect.
  

1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  we do so? "In any case there must be some sickness here," we make
  reply. These great Sages of all periods should first be examined more
  closely! Is it possible that they were, everyone of them, a little
  --
  
  This irreverent belief that the great Sages were decadent types, first
  occurred to me precisely in regard to that case concerning which both
  --
  more and more clearly, did not in the least prove that they were right
  in the matter on which they agreed. It proved rather that these Sages
  themselves must have been alike in some physiological particular, in
  --
  set against his wisdom--a lack of wisdom. What? Is it possible that all
  these great Sages were not only decadents, but that they were not even
  wise? Let me however return to the problem of Socrates.
  --
  of everything. That which needs to be proved cannot be worth much.
  Wherever authority still belongs to good uSage, wherever men do not
  prove but command, the dialectician is regarded as a sort of clown.
  --
  criminals,--the criminal from strength, and the criminal from weakness.
  This pasSage alludes to the latter, Aphorism 45, p. 103, alludes to the
  former.--TR.

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