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class:Title

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [2] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
Angiras
the_Temple_of_Sages
SEE ALSO


AUTH
Sri_Aurobindo
Sri_Ramana_Maharshi

BOOKS
Advanced_Integral
Bhagavata_Purana
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
Choiceless_Awareness__A_Selection_of_Passages_for_the_Study_of_the_Teachings_of_J._Krishnamurti
City_of_God
Cybernetics,_or_Control_and_Communication_in_the_Animal_and_the_Machine
DND_DM_Guide_5E
Enchiridion_text
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Essays_In_Philosophy_And_Yoga
Essays_On_The_Gita
Evolution_II
Faust
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Guru_Bhakti_Yoga
Heart_of_Matter
Hidden_Messages_in_Water
Hymn_of_the_Universe
Infinite_Library
Know_Yourself
Let_Me_Explain
Letters_On_Poetry_And_Art
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Life_without_Death
Mantras_Of_The_Mother
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Education
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_02
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_03
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_04
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1929-1931
Questions_And_Answers_1957-1958
Savitri
Sri_Aurobindo_or_the_Adventure_of_Consciousness
The_Act_of_Creation
the_Book
The_Book_of_Miracle
The_Book_of_Secrets__Keys_to_Love_and_Meditation
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Comedy
The_Divine_Companion
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Externalization_of_the_Hierarchy
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Life_Divine
The_Most_Holy_Book
The_Mothers_Agenda
The_Odyssey
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Tarot_of_Paul_Christian
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Thought_Power
Toward_the_Future
Twilight_of_the_Idols
Vishnu_Purana
Walden,_and_On_The_Duty_Of_Civil_Disobedience
Words_Of_The_Mother_II
Words_Of_The_Mother_III

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
02.02_-_The_Message_of_the_Atomic_Bomb
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1957-10-09_-_As_many_universes_as_individuals_-_Passage_to_the_higher_hemisphere
1958-01-01_-_The_collaboration_of_material_Nature_-_Miracles_visible_to_a_deep_vision_of_things_-_Explanation_of_New_Year_Message
1.at_-_If_thou_wouldst_hear_the_Nameless_(from_The_Ancient_Sage)
1.fua_-_The_Dullard_Sage
1.hs_-_Heres_A_Message_for_the_Faithful
1.jr_-_You_Personify_Gods_Message
1.okym_-_25_-_Why,_all_the_Saints_and_Sages_who_discussd
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Passage_Of_The_Apennines
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_XL_-_A_Message_Came
1.wb_-_Of_the_Sleep_of_Ulro!_and_of_the_passage_through
1.wby_-_The_Seven_Sages
1.whitman_-_Of_The_Visage_Of_Things
1.whitman_-_Passage_To_India
1.ww_-_Michael_Angelo_In_Reply_To_The_Passage_Upon_His_Staute_Of_Sleeping_Night
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
3.06_-_The_Sage
5.01_-_Message
SB_1.1_-_Questions_by_the_Sages

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0_0.01_-_Introduction
00.01_-_The_Approach_to_Mysticism
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
0_0.02_-_Topographical_Note
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
00.04_-_The_Beautiful_in_the_Upanishads
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00a_-_Introduction
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.01_-_I_-_Sri_Aurobindos_personality,_his_outer_retirement_-_outside_contacts_after_1910_-_spiritual_personalities-_Vibhutis_and_Avatars_-__transformtion_of_human_personality
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature
0.03_-_III_-_The_Evening_Sittings
0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life
0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems
0.06_-_INTRODUCTION
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.01_-_A_Yoga_of_the_Art_of_Life
01.01_-_The_New_Humanity
01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn
01.02_-_Natures_Own_Yoga
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine
01.04_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Gita
01.04_-_The_Intuition_of_the_Age
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_Rabindranath_Tagore:_A_Great_Poet,_a_Great_Man
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.06_-_Vivekananda
01.08_-_Walter_Hilton:_The_Scale_of_Perfection
01.09_-_The_Parting_of_the_Way
01.09_-_William_Blake:_The_Marriage_of_Heaven_and_Hell
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.10_-_Nicholas_Berdyaev:_God_Made_Human
01.10_-_Principle_and_Personality
01.11_-_Aldous_Huxley:_The_Perennial_Philosophy
01.11_-_The_Basis_of_Unity
01.12_-_Goethe
01.12_-_Three_Degrees_of_Social_Organisation
01.13_-_T._S._Eliot:_Four_Quartets
01.14_-_Nicholas_Roerich
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.13_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0_1954-08-25_-_what_is_this_personality?_and_when_will_she_come?
0_1956-04-23
0_1957-01-18
0_1958-01-01
0_1958-05-10
0_1958-06-06_-_Supramental_Ship
0_1958-10-17
0_1958-11-08
0_1958-11-11
0_1958-12-28
0_1958_12_-_Floor_1,_young_girl,_we_shall_kill_the_young_princess_-_black_tent
0_1959-01-06
0_1959-01-14
0_1959-01-21
0_1959-01-31
0_1959-06-07
0_1959-11-25
0_1960-04-13
0_1960-04-14
0_1960-07-23_-_The_Flood_and_the_race_-_turning_back_to_guide_and_save_amongst_the_torrents_-_sadhana_vs_tamas_and_destruction_-_power_of_giving_and_offering_-_Japa,_7_lakhs,_140000_per_day,_1_crore_takes_20_years
0_1960-10-02a
0_1960-10-02b
0_1960-10-11
0_1960-11-12
0_1960-12-13
0_1960-12-31
0_1961-01-12
0_1961-01-22
0_1961-02-04
0_1961-03-04
0_1961-03-17
0_1961-04-08
0_1961-04-25
0_1961-06-02
0_1961-06-24
0_1961-07-07
0_1961-07-15
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-07-26
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-08-02
0_1961-08-05
0_1961-09-16
0_1961-10-02
0_1961-10-15
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-06
0_1961-11-07
0_1961-12-16
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-01-09
0_1962-01-21
0_1962-01-24
0_1962-01-27
0_1962-02-06
0_1962-02-27
0_1962-03-06
0_1962-04-13
0_1962-05-08
0_1962-05-22
0_1962-06-02
0_1962-06-30
0_1962-07-07
0_1962-07-14
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-08-04
0_1962-08-08
0_1962-08-11
0_1962-08-14
0_1962-09-05
0_1962-09-15
0_1962-09-18
0_1962-09-22
0_1962-09-26
0_1962-10-27
0_1962-10-30
0_1962-11-07
0_1962-11-14
0_1962-11-17
0_1962-11-20
0_1962-11-23
0_1962-12-22
0_1962-12-25
0_1962-12-28
0_1963-01-12
0_1963-01-18
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-15
0_1963-02-19
0_1963-02-21
0_1963-03-13
0_1963-03-16
0_1963-03-23
0_1963-03-27
0_1963-05-03
0_1963-05-11
0_1963-05-25
0_1963-05-29
0_1963-06-03
0_1963-06-15
0_1963-06-22
0_1963-07-03
0_1963-07-10
0_1963-07-31
0_1963-08-10
0_1963-08-17
0_1963-08-24
0_1963-08-28
0_1963-09-18
0_1963-09-21
0_1963-09-28
0_1963-10-30
0_1963-12-07_-_supramental_ship
0_1963-12-31
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-01-08
0_1964-01-15
0_1964-01-18
0_1964-01-31
0_1964-02-05
0_1964-02-22
0_1964-02-26
0_1964-04-04
0_1964-04-14
0_1964-07-22
0_1964-08-11
0_1964-08-15
0_1964-08-26
0_1964-08-29
0_1964-09-12
0_1964-09-30
0_1964-10-14
0_1964-10-24b
0_1964-11-12
0_1964-11-28
0_1964-12-02
0_1964-12-07
0_1965-01-12
0_1965-02-24
0_1965-03-06
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-03-24
0_1965-04-17
0_1965-04-21
0_1965-05-08
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-05
0_1965-07-17
0_1965-07-21
0_1965-08-04
0_1965-08-07
0_1965-08-15
0_1965-08-25
0_1965-09-08
0_1965-09-15a
0_1965-09-18
0_1965-09-22
0_1965-09-25
0_1965-09-29
0_1965-10-10
0_1965-11-03
0_1965-11-10
0_1965-11-23
0_1965-11-27
0_1965-12-01
0_1965-12-15
0_1966-01-14
0_1966-01-31
0_1966-02-11
0_1966-03-02
0_1966-03-26
0_1966-03-30
0_1966-04-20
0_1966-04-24
0_1966-05-07
0_1966-05-18
0_1966-06-11
0_1966-08-03
0_1966-08-10
0_1966-08-13
0_1966-08-15
0_1966-08-17
0_1966-09-17
0_1966-09-30
0_1966-10-12
0_1966-11-09
0_1966-11-19
0_1966-12-07
0_1966-12-21
0_1966-12-31
0_1967-01-18
0_1967-02-18
0_1967-02-21
0_1967-03-22
0_1967-04-05
0_1967-04-24
0_1967-05-03
0_1967-05-06
0_1967-05-26
0_1967-05-27
0_1967-06-03
0_1967-06-07
0_1967-07-08
0_1967-07-15
0_1967-07-22
0_1967-08-12
0_1967-08-15
0_1967-08-19
0_1967-08-26
0_1967-09-03
0_1967-09-16
0_1967-09-20
0_1967-09-30
0_1967-10-04
0_1967-10-30
0_1967-11-08
0_1967-11-10
0_1967-12-16
0_1967-12-20
0_1967-12-30
0_1968-01-01
0_1968-01-10
0_1968-01-12
0_1968-01-17
0_1968-02-28
0_1968-03-02
0_1968-03-13
0_1968-03-27
0_1968-04-10
0_1968-04-13
0_1968-04-24
0_1968-07-03
0_1968-07-06
0_1968-07-17
0_1968-08-07
0_1968-10-30
0_1968-11-06
0_1968-12-11
0_1968-12-14
0_1969-01-15
0_1969-01-29
0_1969-02-08
0_1969-02-22
0_1969-02-26
0_1969-03-19
0_1969-03-26
0_1969-04-02
0_1969-04-09
0_1969-04-16
0_1969-04-23
0_1969-04-26
0_1969-06-25
0_1969-07-23
0_1969-07-26
0_1969-07-30
0_1969-08-06
0_1969-08-09
0_1969-08-23
0_1969-09-20
0_1969-09-24
0_1969-10-08
0_1969-10-11
0_1969-10-18
0_1969-10-22
0_1969-11-01
0_1969-11-22
0_1969-12-10
0_1969-12-24
0_1970-01-01
0_1970-01-07
0_1970-01-10
0_1970-01-17
0_1970-03-28
0_1970-04-11
0_1970-06-06
0_1970-07-11
0_1970-08-01
0_1970-09-05
0_1970-10-07
0_1970-10-28
0_1970-11-05
0_1970-11-28
0_1971-01-16
0_1971-01-17
0_1971-01-30
0_1971-02-03
0_1971-02-13
0_1971-02-21
0_1971-04-01
0_1971-04-07
0_1971-04-17
0_1971-05-01
0_1971-05-05
0_1971-05-08
0_1971-06-09
0_1971-06-16
0_1971-07-14
0_1971-07-17
0_1971-07-21
0_1971-07-31
0_1971-08-04
0_1971-08-Undated
0_1971-10-16
0_1971-10-20
0_1971-11-24
0_1971-11-27
0_1971-12-04
0_1971-12-22
0_1972-01-01
0_1972-01-02
0_1972-01-05
0_1972-01-15
0_1972-01-30
0_1972-02-02
0_1972-02-08
0_1972-02-09
0_1972-02-16
0_1972-02-23
0_1972-02-26
0_1972-03-08
0_1972-03-10
0_1972-03-29a
0_1972-03-29b
0_1972-04-02a
0_1972-04-05
0_1972-04-08
0_1972-04-26
0_1972-07-15
0_1972-10-07
0_1972-11-11
0_1972-12-20
0_1972-12-27
0_1973-01-01
0_1973-01-17
0_1973-01-20
0_1973-04-11
0_1973-04-14
02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth
02.01_-_Our_Ideal
02.01_-_The_World-Stair
02.01_-_The_World_War
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.02_-_The_Message_of_the_Atomic_Bomb
02.03_-_An_Aspect_of_Emergent_Evolution
02.03_-_National_and_International
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.05_-_Federated_Humanity
02.05_-_Robert_Graves
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_Boris_Pasternak
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_George_Seftris
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.08_-_Jules_Supervielle
02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness
02.10_-_Independence_and_its_Sanction
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_New_World-Conditions
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.12_-_Mysticism_in_Bengali_Poetry
02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal
02.12_-_The_Ideals_of_Human_Unity
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
02.13_-_Rabindranath_and_Sri_Aurobindo
02.14_-_Appendix
02.14_-_The_World-Soul
02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.01_-_The_New_Year_Initiation
03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother
03.02_-_The_Philosopher_as_an_Artist_and_Philosophy_as_an_Art
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.03_-_Modernism_-_An_Oriental_Interpretation
03.03_-_The_Inner_Being_and_the_Outer_Being
03.04_-_The_Other_Aspect_of_European_Culture
03.04_-_Towardsa_New_Ideology
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.06_-_The_Pact_and_its_Sanction
03.07_-_Brahmacharya
03.07_-_Some_Thoughts_on_the_Unthinkable
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.09_-_Art_and_Katharsis
03.09_-_Buddhism_and_Hinduism
03.10_-_Hamlet:_A_Crisis_of_the_Evolving_Soul
03.10_-_Sincerity
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.11_-_True_Humility
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
03.12_-_The_Spirit_of_Tapasya
03.13_-_Human_Destiny
03.14_-_From_the_Known_to_the_Unknown?
03.15_-_Towards_the_Future
03.16_-_The_Tragic_Spirit_in_Nature
03.17_-_The_Souls_Odyssey
04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame
04.01_-_The_Divine_Man
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.02_-_Human_Progress
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.04_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.06_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.09_-_To_the_Heights-I_(Mahasarswati)
04.09_-_Values_Higher_and_Lower
04.10_-_To_the_Heights-X
05.01_-_Man_and_the_Gods
05.02_-_Gods_Labour
05.02_-_Satyavan
05.03_-_Of_Desire_and_Atonement
05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.05_-_Man_the_Prototype
05.05_-_Of_Some_Supreme_Mysteries
05.06_-_Physics_or_philosophy
05.07_-_Man_and_Superman
05.08_-_True_Charity
05.09_-_The_Changed_Scientific_Outlook
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
05.13_-_Darshana_and_Philosophy
05.14_-_The_Sanctity_of_the_Individual
05.15_-_Sartrian_Freedom
05.21_-_Being_or_Becoming_and_Having
05.28_-_God_Protects
05.32_-_Yoga_as_Pragmatic_Power
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
06.16_-_A_Page_of_Occult_History
06.21_-_The_Personal_and_the_Impersonal
06.24_-_When_Imperfection_is_Greater_Than_Perfection
06.26_-_The_Wonder_of_It_All
06.27_-_To_Learn_and_to_Understand
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.05_-_This_Mystery_of_Existence
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness
08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest
08.06_-_A_Sign_and_a_Symbol
08.33_-_Opening_to_the_Divine
09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness
09.05_-_The_Story_of_Love
09.06_-_How_Can_Time_Be_a_Friend?
09.07_-_How_to_Become_Indifferent_to_Criticism?
09.16_-_Goal_of_Evolution
09.18_-_The_Mother_on_Herself
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_Lord_of_Time
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice
1.009_-_Perception_and_Reality
1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00d_-_Introduction
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00_-_Introduction_to_Alchemy_of_Happiness
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE
1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks
1.00_-_PROLOGUE_IN_HEAVEN
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_Asana
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE
1.01_-_Economy
1.01f_-_Introduction
1.01_-_Foreward
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_Introduction
1.01_-_Maitreya_inquires_of_his_teacher_(Parashara)
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_first_meeting,_December_1918
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_NIGHT
1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.01_-_Prayer
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure
1.01_-_The_Castle
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_Dark_Forest._The_Hill_of_Difficulty._The_Panther,_the_Lion,_and_the_Wolf._Virgil.
1.01_-_The_Divine_and_The_Universe
1.01_-_The_First_Steps
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration
1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
10.20_-_Short_Notes_-_3-_Emptying_and_Replenishment
1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World
1.02.3.1_-_The_Lord
1.02.3.2_-_Knowledge_and_Ignorance
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
1.02.4.1_-_The_Worlds_-_Surya
1.024_-_Affiliation_With_Larger_Wholes
10.24_-_Savitri
1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame
1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication
10.28_-_Love_and_Love
1.02.9_-_Conclusion_and_Summary
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES
1.02_-_Karma_Yoga
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_ON_THE_TEACHERS_OF_VIRTUE
1.02_-_Outline_of_Practice
1.02_-_Prayer_of_Parashara_to_Vishnu
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Skillful_Means
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_Age_of_Individualism_and_Reason
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher
1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics
1.02_-_The_Great_Process
1.02_-_The_Necessity_of_Magick_for_All
1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara
1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES
1.02_-_THE_QUATERNIO_AND_THE_MEDIATING_ROLE_OF_MERCURIUS
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_The_Vision_of_the_Past
1.02_-_THE_WITHIN_OF_THINGS
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
1.032_-_Our_Concept_of_God
10.32_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Five_Elements
10.33_-_On_Discipline
1.035_-_The_Recitation_of_Mantra
10.36_-_Cling_to_Truth
1.036_-_The_Rise_of_Obstacles_in_Yoga_Practice
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Master_Ma_is_Unwell
1.03_-_Measure_of_time,_Moments_of_Kashthas,_etc.
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita
1.03_-_Spiritual_Realisation,_The_aim_of_Bhakti-Yoga
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_The_Gate_of_Hell._The_Inefficient_or_Indifferent._Pope_Celestine_V._The_Shores_of_Acheron._Charon._The
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_THE_ORPHAN,_THE_WIDOW,_AND_THE_MOON
1.03_-_The_Psychic_Prana
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_The_Two_Negations_2_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Ascetic
1.03_-_The_Uncreated
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_Body,_Soul_and_Spirit
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Feedback_and_Oscillation
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_HOW_THE_.TRUE_WORLD._ULTIMATELY_BECAME_A_FABLE
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Narayana_appearance,_in_the_beginning_of_the_Kalpa,_as_the_Varaha_(boar)
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_ON_THE_DESPISERS_OF_THE_BODY
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_Sounds
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Control_of_Psychic_Prana
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_First_Circle,_Limbo__Virtuous_Pagans_and_the_Unbaptized._The_Four_Poets,_Homer,_Horace,_Ovid,_and_Lucan._The_Noble_Castle_of_Philosophy.
1.04_-_The_Fork_in_the_Road
1.04_-_The_Future_of_Man
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Qabalah__The_Best_Training_for_Memory
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_Wake-Up_Sermon
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.057_-_The_Four_Manifestations_of_Ignorance
1.05_-_Adam_Kadmon
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.05_-_Dharana
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_MORALITY_AS_THE_ENEMY_OF_NATURE
1.05_-_Ritam
1.05_-_Solitude
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_The_Belly_of_the_Whale
1.05_-_The_Creative_Principle
1.05_-_The_Destiny_of_the_Individual
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_THE_MASTER_AND_KESHAB
1.05_-_The_New_Consciousness
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_Vishnu_as_Brahma_creates_the_world
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Work_and_Teaching
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_A_Summary_of_my_Phenomenological_View_of_the_World
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_BOOK_THE_SIXTH
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_Man_in_the_Universe
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_Origin_of_the_four_castes
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.06_-_Quieting_the_Vital
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Breaking_of_the_Limits
1.06_-_The_Desire_to_be
1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1
1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.075_-_Self-Control,_Study_and_Devotion_to_God
1.07_-_A_MAD_TEA-PARTY
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha
1.07_-_Jnana_Yoga
1.07_-_Note_on_the_word_Go
1.07_-_On_Dreams
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_Raja-Yoga_in_Brief
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_The_Ego_and_the_Dualities
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_The_Fourth_Circle__The_Avaricious_and_the_Prodigal._Plutus._Fortune_and_her_Wheel._The_Fifth_Circle__The_Irascible_and_the_Sullen._Styx.
1.07_-_THE_GREAT_EVENT_FORESHADOWED_-_THE_PLANETIZATION_OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_The_Literal_Qabalah_(continued)
1.07_-_The_Mantra_-_OM_-_Word_and_Wisdom
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Process_of_Evolution
1.07_-_The_Prophecies_of_Nostradamus
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_2
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.081_-_The_Application_of_Pratyahara
1.089_-_The_Levels_of_Concentration
1.08_-_Adhyatma_Yoga
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Civilisation_and_Barbarism
1.08_-_Departmental_Kings_of_Nature
1.08_-_Origin_of_Rudra:_his_becoming_eight_Rudras
1.08_-_Phlegyas._Philippo_Argenti._The_Gate_of_the_City_of_Dis.
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_SPIRITUAL_REPERCUSSIONS_OF_THE_ATOM_BOMB
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_Summary
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Methods_of_Vedantic_Knowledge
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Discovery
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.08_-_The_Synthesis_of_Movement
1.08_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_3
1.08_-_Wherein_is_expounded_the_first_line_of_the_first_stanza,_and_a_beginning_is_made_of_the_explanation_of_this_dark_night
1.08_-_Worship_of_Substitutes_and_Images
1.097_-_Sublimation_of_Object-Consciousness
1.099_-_The_Entry_of_the_Eternal_into_the_Individual
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_Equality_and_the_Annihilation_of_Ego
1.09_-_Legend_of_Lakshmi
1.09_-_Man_-_About_the_Body
1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_The_Absolute_Manifestation
1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol
1.09_-_The_Chosen_Ideal
1.09_-_The_Greater_Self
1.09_-_The_Secret_Chiefs
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
11.03_-_Cosmonautics
11.04_-_The_Triple_Cord
11.05_-_The_Ladder_of_Unconsciousness
1.1.05_-_The_Siddhis
11.06_-_The_Mounting_Fire
1.107_-_The_Bestowal_of_a_Divine_Gift
11.07_-_The_Labours_of_the_Gods:_The_five_Purifications
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_Farinata_and_Cavalcante_de'_Cavalcanti._Discourse_on_the_Knowledge_of_the_Damned.
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Harmony
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_The_descendants_of_the_daughters_of_Daksa_married_to_the_Rsis
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Image_of_the_Oceans_and_the_Rivers
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_The_Methods_and_the_Means
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Scolex_School
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
1.1.1.01_-_Three_Elements_of_Poetic_Creation
1.1.1.03_-_Creative_Power_and_the_Human_Instrument
1.1.1.04_-_Joy_of_Poetic_Creation
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Problem
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Legend_of_Dhruva,_the_son_of_Uttanapada
1.11_-_Oneness
1.11_-_ON_THE_NEW_IDOL
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.11_-_The_Seven_Rivers
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.11_-_Woolly_Pomposities_of_the_Pious_Teacher
1.11_-_Works_and_Sacrifice
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution
1.12_-_Dhruva_commences_a_course_of_religious_austerities
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.1.2_-_Intellect_and_the_Intellectual
1.12_-_The_Astral_Plane
1.12_-_The_Divine_Work
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Herds_of_the_Dawn
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Minotaur._The_Seventh_Circle__The_Violent._The_River_Phlegethon._The_Violent_against_their_Neighbours._The_Centaurs._Tyrants.
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_And_Then?
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Dawn_and_the_Truth
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.13_-_Knowledge,_Error,_and_Probably_Opinion
1.13_-_Posterity_of_Dhruva
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT
1.13_-_System_of_the_O.T.O.
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_The_Kings_of_Rome_and_Alba
1.13_-_The_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_The_Supermind_and_the_Yoga_of_Works
1.13_-_The_Wood_of_Thorns._The_Harpies._The_Violent_against_themselves._Suicides._Pier_della_Vigna._Lano_and_Jacopo_da_Sant'_Andrea.
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_Bibliography
1.14_-_Descendants_of_Prithu
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_Noise
1.14_-_The_Book_of_Magic_Formulae
1.14_-_The_Limits_of_Philosophical_Knowledge
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.14_-_The_Sand_Waste_and_the_Rain_of_Fire._The_Violent_against_God._Capaneus._The_Statue_of_Time,_and_the_Four_Infernal_Rivers.
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.14_-_The_Supermind_as_Creator
1.14_-_The_Victory_Over_Death
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_Conclusion
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.15_-_The_Supramental_Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_Transformed_Being
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.16_-_Guidoguerra,_Aldobrandi,_and_Rusticucci._Cataract_of_the_River_of_Blood.
1.16_-_Inquiries_of_Maitreya_respecting_the_history_of_Prahlada
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_MARTHAS_GARDEN
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_The_Triple_Status_of_Supermind
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_AT_THE_FOUNTAIN
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_Religion_as_the_Law_of_Life
1.17_-_The_Burden_of_Royalty
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.17_-_The_Divine_Soul
1.17_-_The_Seven-Headed_Thought,_Swar_and_the_Dashagwas
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_Hiranyakasipu's_reiterated_attempts_to_destroy_his_son
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_Mind_and_Supermind
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.18_-_The_Eighth_Circle,_Malebolge__The_Fraudulent_and_the_Malicious._The_First_Bolgia__Seducers_and_Panders._Venedico_Caccianimico._Jason._The_Second_Bolgia__Flatterers._Allessio_Interminelli._Thais.
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.18_-_The_Human_Fathers
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.19_-_Dialogue_between_Prahlada_and_his_father
1.19_-_Equality
1.19_-_Life
1.19_-_NIGHT
1.19_-_The_Curve_of_the_Rational_Age
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.19_-_The_Practice_of_Magical_Evocation
1.19_-_The_Third_Bolgia__Simoniacs._Pope_Nicholas_III._Dante's_Reproof_of_corrupt_Prelates.
1.19_-_The_Victory_of_the_Fathers
1.200-1.224_Talks
12.01_-_The_Return_to_Earth
12.01_-_This_Great_Earth_Our_Mother
1.2.05_-_Aspiration
12.05_-_The_World_Tragedy
1.2.07_-_Surrender
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
1.20_-_On_bodily_vigil_and_how_to_use_it_to_attain_spiritual_vigil_and_how_to_practise_it.
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven
1.2.1.11_-_Mystic_Poetry_and_Spiritual_Poetry
1.21_-_Families_of_the_Daityas
1.21_-_FROM_THE_PRE-HUMAN_TO_THE_ULTRA-HUMAN,_THE_PHASES_OF_A_LIVING_PLANET
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_The_Spiritual_Aim_and_Life
1.21_-_WALPURGIS-NIGHT
1.22__-_Dominion_over_different_provinces_of_creation_assigned_to_different_beings
1.22_-_OBERON_AND_TITANIA's_GOLDEN_WEDDING
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_(Poetic_Diction_continued.)_How_Poetry_combines_elevation_of_language_with_perspicuity.
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man
1.2.3_-_The_Power_of_Expression_and_Yoga
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Necromancy_and_Spiritism
1.24_-_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.24_-_The_Seventh_Bolgia_-_Thieves._Vanni_Fucci._Serpents.
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_Critical_Objections_brought_against_Poetry,_and_the_principles_on_which_they_are_to_be_answered.
1.25_-_Fascinations,_Invisibility,_Levitation,_Transmutations,_Kinks_in_Time
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.26_-_FESTIVAL_AT_ADHARS_HOUSE
1.26_-_Mental_Processes_-_Two_Only_are_Possible
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_The_Eighth_Bolgia__Evil_Counsellors._Ulysses_and_Diomed._Ulysses'_Last_Voyage.
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_Guido_da_Montefeltro._His_deception_by_Pope_Boniface_VIII.
1.28_-_Need_to_Define_God,_Self,_etc.
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.28_-_Supermind,_Mind_and_the_Overmind_Maya
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.2_-_Katha_Upanishads
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
13.03_-_A_Programme_for_the_Second_Century_of_the_Divine_Manifestation
1.3.03_-_Quiet_and_Calm
1.3.05_-_Silence
13.06_-_The_Passing_of_Satyavan
1.30_-_Other_Falsifiers_or_Forgers._Gianni_Schicchi,_Myrrha,_Adam_of_Brescia,_Potiphar's_Wife,_and_Sinon_of_Troy.
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.32_-_The_Ninth_Circle__Traitors._The_Frozen_Lake_of_Cocytus._First_Division,_Caina__Traitors_to_their_Kindred._Camicion_de'_Pazzi._Second_Division,_Antenora__Traitors_to_their_Country._Dante_questions_Bocca_degli
1.32_-_The_Ritual_of_Adonis
1.33_-_The_Golden_Mean
1.34_-_The_Tao_1
1.35_-_The_Tao_2
1.36_-_Human_Representatives_of_Attis
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.37_-_Describes_the_excellence_of_this_prayer_called_the_Paternoster,_and_the_many_ways_in_which_we_shall_find_consolation_in_it.
1.38_-_Woman_-_Her_Magical_Formula
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.3_-_Mundaka_Upanishads
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
14.02_-_Occult_Experiences
14.03_-_Janaka_and_Yajnavalkya
14.06_-_Liberty,_Self-Control_and_Friendship
14.07_-_A_Review_of_Our_Ashram_Life
1.439
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.45_-_The_Corn-Mother_and_the_Corn-Maiden_in_Northern_Europe
1.45_-_Unserious_Conduct_of_a_Pupil
1.46_-_Selfishness
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.48_-_Morals_of_AL_-_Hard_to_Accept,_and_Why_nevertheless_we_Must_Concur
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
15.03_-_A_Canadian_Question
15.05_-_Twin_Prayers
15.07_-_Souls_Freedom
15.09_-_One_Day_More
1.50_-_A.C._and_the_Masters;_Why_they_Chose_him,_etc.
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Family_-_Public_Enemy_No._1
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.54_-_Types_of_Animal_Sacrament
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.56_-_Marriage_-_Property_-_War_-_Politics
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
16.02_-_Mater_Dolorosa
16.03_-_Mater_Gloriosa
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.64_-_The_Burning_of_Human_Beings_in_the_Fires
1.65_-_Balder_and_the_Mistletoe
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.66_-_Vampires
1.67_-_Faith
1.67_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Custom
1.68_-_The_Golden_Bough
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
17.01_-_Hymn_to_Dawn
1.70_-_Morality_1
1.73_-_Monsters,_Niggers,_Jews,_etc.
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
1.81_-_Method_of_Training
19.06_-_The_Wise
19.10_-_Punishment
19.11_-_Old_Age
1914_05_09p
1914_08_08p
1916_12_20p
19.17_-_On_Anger
19.19_-_Of_the_Just
19.20_-_The_Path
19.26_-_The_Brahmin
1929-06-16_-_Illness_and_Yoga_-_Subtle_body_(nervous_envelope)_-_Fear_and_illness
1950-12-28_-_Correct_judgment.
1951-01-15_-_Sincerity_-_inner_discernment_-_inner_light._Evil_and_imbalance._Consciousness_and_instruments.
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-24_-_Psychic_being_and_entity_-_dimensions_-_in_the_atom_-_Death_-_exteriorisation_-_unconsciousness_-_Past_lives_-_progress_upon_earth_-_choice_of_birth_-_Consecration_to_divine_Work_-_psychic_memories_-_Individualisation_-_progress
1951-03-05_-_Disasters-_the_forces_of_Nature_-_Story_of_the_charity_Bazar_-_Liberation_and_law_-_Dealing_with_the_mind_and_vital-_methods
1951-03-17_-_The_universe-_eternally_new,_same_-_Pralaya_Traditions_-_Light_and_thought_-_new_consciousness,_forces_-_The_expanding_universe_-_inexpressible_experiences_-_Ashram_surcharged_with_Light_-_new_force_-_vibrating_atmospheres
1951-03-19_-_Mental_worlds_and_their_beings_-_Understanding_in_silence_-_Psychic_world-_its_characteristics_-_True_experiences_and_mental_formations_-_twelve_senses
1951-03-31_-_Physical_ailment_and_mental_disorder_-_Curing_an_illness_spiritually_-_Receptivity_of_the_body_-_The_subtle-physical-_illness_accidents_-_Curing_sunstroke_and_other_disorders
1951-04-09_-_Modern_Art_-_Trend_of_art_in_Europe_in_the_twentieth_century_-_Effect_of_the_Wars_-_descent_of_vital_worlds_-_Formation_of_character_-_If_there_is_another_war
1951-04-14_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Idea_of_sacrifice_-_Bahaism_-_martyrdom_-_Sleep-_forgetfulness,_exteriorisation,_etc_-_Dreams_and_visions-_explanations_-_Exteriorisation-_incidents_about_cats
1951-04-21_-_Sri_Aurobindos_letter_on_conditions_for_doing_yoga_-_Aspiration,_tapasya,_surrender_-_The_lower_vital_-_old_habits_-_obsession_-_Sri_Aurobindo_on_choice_and_the_double_life_-_The_old_fiasco_-_inner_realisation_and_outer_change
1951-05-11_-_Mahakali_and_Kali_-_Avatar_and_Vibhuti_-_Sachchidananda_behind_all_states_of_being_-_The_power_of_will_-_receiving_the_Divine_Will
1953-04-22
1953-05-06
1953-05-27
1953-06-17
1953-07-29
1953-08-19
1953-08-26
1953-10-21
1953-11-04
1953-11-25
1953-12-30
1954-03-24_-_Dreams_and_the_condition_of_the_stomach_-_Tobacco_and_alcohol_-_Nervousness_-_The_centres_and_the_Kundalini_-_Control_of_the_senses
1954-04-07_-_Communication_without_words_-_Uneven_progress_-_Words_and_the_Word
1954-06-02_-_Learning_how_to_live_-_Work,_studies_and_sadhana_-_Waste_of_the_Energy_and_Consciousness
1954-06-23_-_Meat-eating_-_Story_of_Mothers_vegetable_garden_-_Faithfulness_-_Conscious_sleep
1954-07-07_-_The_inner_warrior_-_Grace_and_the_Falsehood_-_Opening_from_below_-_Surrender_and_inertia_-_Exclusive_receptivity_-_Grace_and_receptivity
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-08-25_-_Ananda_aspect_of_the_Mother_-_Changing_conditions_in_the_Ashram_-_Ascetic_discipline_-_Mothers_body
1954-10-20_-_Stand_back_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Seeing_images_in_meditation_-_Berlioz_-Music_-_Mothers_organ_music_-_Destiny
1955-03-30_-_Yoga-shakti_-_Energies_of_the_earth,_higher_and_lower_-_Illness,_curing_by_yogic_means_-_The_true_self_and_the_psychic_-_Solving_difficulties_by_different_methods
1955-06-15_-_Dynamic_realisation,_transformation_-_The_negative_and_positive_side_of_experience_-_The_image_of_the_dry_coconut_fruit_-_Purusha,_Prakriti,_the_Divine_Mother_-_The_Truth-Creation_-_Pralaya_-_We_are_in_a_transitional_period
1956-01-04_-_Integral_idea_of_the_Divine_-_All_things_attracted_by_the_Divine_-_Bad_things_not_in_place_-_Integral_yoga_-_Moving_idea-force,_ideas_-_Consequences_of_manifestation_-_Work_of_Spirit_via_Nature_-_Change_consciousness,_change_world
1956-01-11_-_Desire_and_self-deception_-_Giving_all_one_is_and_has_-_Sincerity,_more_powerful_than_will_-_Joy_of_progress_Definition_of_youth
1956-01-18_-_Two_sides_of_individual_work_-_Cheerfulness_-_chosen_vessel_of_the_Divine_-_Aspiration,_consciousness,_of_plants,_of_children_-_Being_chosen_by_the_Divine_-_True_hierarchy_-_Perfect_relation_with_the_Divine_-_India_free_in_1915
1956-02-15_-_Nature_and_the_Master_of_Nature_-_Conscious_intelligence_-_Theory_of_the_Gita,_not_the_whole_truth_-_Surrender_to_the_Lord_-_Change_of_nature
1956-03-14_-_Dynamic_meditation_-_Do_all_as_an_offering_to_the_Divine_-_Significance_of_23.4.56._-_If_twelve_men_of_goodwill_call_the_Divine
1956-05-02_-_Threefold_union_-_Manifestation_of_the_Supramental_-_Profiting_from_the_Divine_-_Recognition_of_the_Supramental_Force_-_Ascent,_descent,_manifestation
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
1956-06-20_-_Hearts_mystic_light,_intuition_-_Psychic_being,_contact_-_Secular_ethics_-_True_role_of_mind_-_Realise_the_Divine_by_love_-_Depression,_pleasure,_joy_-_Heart_mixture_-_To_follow_the_soul_-_Physical_process_-_remember_the_Mother
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-08-22_-_The_heaven_of_the_liberated_mind_-_Trance_or_samadhi_-_Occult_discipline_for_leaving_consecutive_bodies_-_To_be_greater_than_ones_experience_-_Total_self-giving_to_the_Grace_-_The_truth_of_the_being_-_Unique_relation_with_the_Supreme
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1956-09-05_-_Material_life,_seeing_in_the_right_way_-_Effect_of_the_Supermind_on_the_earth_-_Emergence_of_the_Supermind_-_Falling_back_into_the_same_mistaken_ways
1956-10-10_-_The_supramental_race__in_a_few_centuries_-_Condition_for_new_realisation_-_Everyone_must_follow_his_own_path_-_Progress,_no_two_paths_alike
1956-10-24_-_Taking_a_new_body_-_Different_cases_of_incarnation_-_Departure_of_soul_from_body
1956-12-05_-_Even_and_objectless_ecstasy_-_Transform_the_animal_-_Individual_personality_and_world-personality_-_Characteristic_features_of_a_world-personality_-_Expressing_a_universal_state_of_consciousness_-_Food_and_sleep_-_Ordered_intuition
1957-01-02_-_Can_one_go_out_of_time_and_space?_-_Not_a_crucified_but_a_glorified_body_-_Individual_effort_and_the_new_force
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-01-16_-_Seeking_something_without_knowing_it_-_Why_are_we_here?
1957-03-06_-_Freedom,_servitude_and_love
1957-04-10_-_Sports_and_yoga_-_Organising_ones_life
1957-05-08_-_Vital_excitement,_reason,_instinct
1957-05-29_-_Progressive_transformation
1957-06-05_-_Questions_and_silence_-_Methods_of_meditation
1957-06-12_-_Fasting_and_spiritual_progress
1957-06-26_-_Birth_through_direct_transmutation_-_Man_and_woman_-_Judging_others_-_divine_Presence_in_all_-_New_birth
1957-07-10_-_A_new_world_is_born_-_Overmind_creation_dissolved
1957-09-11_-_Vital_chemistry,_attraction_and_repulsion
1957-10-02_-_The_Mind_of_Light_-_Statues_of_the_Buddha_-_Burden_of_the_past
1957-10-09_-_As_many_universes_as_individuals_-_Passage_to_the_higher_hemisphere
1957-10-23_-_The_central_motive_of_terrestrial_existence_-_Evolution
1958-01-01_-_The_collaboration_of_material_Nature_-_Miracles_visible_to_a_deep_vision_of_things_-_Explanation_of_New_Year_Message
1958-01-22_-_Intellectual_theories_-_Expressing_a_living_and_real_Truth
1958-02-05_-_The_great_voyage_of_the_Supreme_-_Freedom_and_determinism
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958-09-24_-_Living_the_truth_-_Words_and_experience
1958-10-01_-_The_ideal_of_moral_perfection
1958-11-05_-_Knowing_how_to_be_silent
1958-11-12_-_The_aim_of_the_Supreme_-_Trust_in_the_Grace
1958-11-26_-_The_role_of_the_Spirit_-_New_birth
1960_06_03
1960_06_29
1960_07_06
1962_02_27
1963_08_11?_-_94
1964_02_05_-_98
1965_01_12
1969_12_18
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_Adela
1.ac_-_At_Sea
1.ac_-_Colophon
1.ac_-_The_Priestess_of_Panormita
1.anon_-_But_little_better
1.anon_-_Others_have_told_me
1.anon_-_Song_of_Creation
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_IV
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_TabletIX
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_VII
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_X
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_XI_The_Story_of_the_Flood
1.anon_-_The_Seven_Evil_Spirits
1.ap_-_The_Universal_Prayer
1.at_-_If_thou_wouldst_hear_the_Nameless_(from_The_Ancient_Sage)
1f.lovecraft_-_Ashes
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_From_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_H.P._Lovecrafts
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Nyarlathotep
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_Polaris
1f.lovecraft_-_Sweet_Ermengarde
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Book
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Festival
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Green_Meadow
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Loved_Dead
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Picture_in_the_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Secret_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Street
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Transition_of_Juan_Romero
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.fs_-_Fortune_And_Wisdom
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Complaint_Of_Ceres
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fua_-_The_Dullard_Sage
1.hcyc_-_62_-_When_we_see_truly,_there_is_nothing_at_all_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_It_is_clearly_seen_(from_The_Song_of_Enlightenment)
1.hs_-_Heres_A_Message_for_the_Faithful
1.hs_-_It_Is_Time_to_Wake_Up!
1.hs_-_O_Cup_Bearer
1.ia_-_He_Saw_The_Lightning_In_The_East
1.jk_-_A_Party_Of_Lovers
1.jk_-_A_Prophecy_-_To_George_Keats_In_America
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Fragment._Welcome_Joy,_And_Welcome_Sorrow
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_King_Stephen
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Highlands_After_A_Visit_To_Burnss_Country
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Indolence
1.jk_-_Ode_To_A_Nightingale
1.jk_-_On_Hearing_The_Bag-Pipe_And_Seeing_The_Stranger_Played_At_Inverary
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_IV
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_V
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_As_From_The_Darkening_Gloom_A_Silver_Dove
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Why_Did_I_Laugh_Tonight?
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Upon_The_Top_Of_Ben_Nevis
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XI._On_First_Looking_Into_Chapmans_Homer
1.jk_-_Sonnet_X._To_One_Who_Has_Been_Long_In_City_Pent
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanza._Written_At_The_Close_Of_Canto_II,_Book_V,_Of_The_Faerie_Queene
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_To_George_Felton_Mathew
1.jk_-_To_Hope
1.jk_-_What_The_Thrush_Said._Lines_From_A_Letter_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Written_In_The_Cottage_Where_Burns_Was_Born
1.jlb_-_The_Golem
1.jlb_-_The_Labyrinth
1.jr_-_You_Personify_Gods_Message
1.jwvg_-_The_Sea-Voyage
1.kbr_-_I_Burst_Into_Laughter
1.kbr_-_I_burst_into_laughter
1.kbr_-_My_Body_And_My_Mind
1.lb_-_A_Song_Of_Changgan
1.lb_-_A_Vindication
1.lb_-_Bringing_in_the_Wine
1.lb_-_Chiang_Chin_Chiu
1.lb_-_Hard_Journey
1.lb_-_Poem_by_The_Bridge_at_Ten-Shin
1.lb_-_Three_Poems_on_Wine
1.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1.lovecraft_-_Fact_And_Fancy
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_Theodore_Roosevelt
1.lovecraft_-_The_Poe-ets_Nightmare
1.lovecraft_-_Waste_Paper-_A_Poem_Of_Profound_Insignificance
1.okym_-_25_-_Why,_all_the_Saints_and_Sages_who_discussd
1.okym_-_64_-_Said_one_--_Folks_of_a_surly_Tapster_tell
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Fragment,_Or_The_Triumph_Of_Conscience
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_HERE_I_sit_with_my_paper
1.pbs_-_Hymn_to_Intellectual_Beauty
1.pbs_-_Letter_To_Maria_Gisborne
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_Among_The_Euganean_Hills
1.pbs_-_Mariannes_Dream
1.pbs_-_Mont_Blanc_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Vale_of_Chamouni
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_Ozymandias
1.pbs_-_Passage_Of_The_Apennines
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_III.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VII.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Stanzas_Written_in_Dejection,_Near_Naples
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_Ugolino
1.poe_-_Elizabeth
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_The_Conversation_Of_Eiros_And_Charmion
1.rajh_-_The_Word_Most_Precious
1.rb_-_A_Grammarian's_Funeral_Shortly_After_The_Revival_Of_Learning
1.rb_-_An_Epistle_Containing_the_Strange_Medical_Experience_of_Kar
1.rb_-_Before
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_Caliban_upon_Setebos_or,_Natural_Theology_in_the_Island
1.rb_-_Childe_Roland_To_The_Dark_Tower_Came
1.rb_-_Garden_Francies
1.rb_-_In_A_Gondola
1.rb_-_Master_Hugues_Of_Saxe-Gotha
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_III_-_Evening
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_II_-_Noon
1.rb_-_Protus
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_Waring
1.rmpsd_-_Who_in_this_world
1.rmr_-_Dedication_To_M...
1.rmr_-_Elegy_I
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_Lamp_Of_Love
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_XIX_-_It_Is_Written_In_The_Book
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_XL_-_A_Message_Came
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_XLIV_-_Where_Is_Heaven
1.rt_-_Passing_Breeze
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_71_-_80
1.rt_-_The_Portrait
1.rt_-_Urvashi
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_Saadi
1.rwe_-_The_Adirondacs
1.rwe_-_The_Rhodora_-_On_Being_Asked,_Whence_Is_The_Flower?
1.rwe_-_The_River_Note
1.rwe_-_The_World-Soul
1.rwe_-_To_J.W.
1.rwe_-_Voluntaries
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.snk_-_Endless_is_my_Wealth
1.snk_-_The_Shattering_of_Illusion_(Moha_Mudgaram_from_The_Crest_Jewel_of_Discrimination)
1.srmd_-_Every_man_who_knows_his_secret
1.srm_-_The_Marital_Garland_of_Letters
1.srm_-_The_Song_of_the_Poppadum
1.tc_-_Success_and_failure?_No_known_address
1.tm_-_A_Messenger_from_the_Horizon
1.wb_-_Of_the_Sleep_of_Ulro!_and_of_the_passage_through
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_A_Woman_Young_And_Old
1.wby_-_Blood_And_The_Moon
1.wby_-_Consolation
1.wby_-_Coole_Park_1929
1.wby_-_In_Memory_Of_Eva_Gore-Booth_And_Con_Markiewicz
1.wby_-_Mohini_Chatterjee
1.wby_-_Quarrel_In_Old_Age
1.wby_-_Sailing_to_Byzantium
1.wby_-_The_Gift_Of_Harun_Al-Rashid
1.wby_-_The_Seven_Sages
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_Under_Ben_Bulben
1.whitman_-_A_Broadway_Pageant
1.whitman_-_American_Feuillage
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.whitman_-_Crossing_Brooklyn_Ferry
1.whitman_-_Facing_West_From_Californias_Shores
1.whitman_-_Great_Are_The_Myths
1.whitman_-_Now_List_To_My_Mornings_Romanza
1.whitman_-_Of_The_Visage_Of_Things
1.whitman_-_Passage_To_India
1.whitman_-_Prayer_Of_Columbus
1.whitman_-_Salut_Au_Monde
1.whitman_-_So_Long
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_VIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXXVI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Open_Road
1.whitman_-_Spontaneous_Me
1.whitman_-_There_Was_A_Child_Went_Forth
1.whitman_-_These_Carols
1.whitman_-_These,_I,_Singing_In_Spring
1.whitman_-_The_Sleepers
1.whitman_-_The_Sobbing_Of_The_Bells
1.whitman_-_Think_Of_The_Soul
1.whitman_-_This_Compost
1.whitman_-_To_One_Shortly_To_Die
1.whitman_-_When_Lilacs_Last_in_the_Dooryard_Bloomd
1.ww_-_2-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_8_-_The_little_one_sleeps_in_its_cradle
1.ww_-_Address_To_My_Infant_Daughter
1.ww_-_A_Fact,_And_An_Imagination,_Or,_Canute_And_Alfred,_On_The_Seashore
1.ww_-_A_Morning_Exercise
1.ww_-_Artegal_And_Elidure
1.ww_-_A_Whirl-Blast_From_Behind_The_Hill
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourteenth_[conclusion]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Twelfth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_]
1.ww_-_Epitaphs_Translated_From_Chiabrera
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_Guilt_And_Sorrow,_Or,_Incidents_Upon_Salisbury_Plain
1.ww_-_I_Know_an_Aged_Man_Constrained_to_Dwell
1.ww_-_I_Travelled_among_Unknown_Men
1.ww_-_Laodamia
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland
1.ww_-_Michael_Angelo_In_Reply_To_The_Passage_Upon_His_Staute_Of_Sleeping_Night
1.ww_-_Ode
1.ww_-_Power_Of_Music
1.ww_-_The_Complaint_Of_A_Forsaken_Indian_Woman
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IX-_Book_Eighth-_The_Parsonage
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Idle_Shepherd_Boys
1.ww_-_The_Oak_And_The_Broom
1.ww_-_The_Prelude,_Book_1-_Childhood_And_School-Time
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_The_Stars_Are_Mansions_Built_By_Nature's_Hand
1.ww_-_The_Tables_Turned
1.ww_-_The_Vaudois
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_First
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Fourth
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Third
1.ww_-_The_Wishing_Gate_Destroyed
1.ww_-_To_Dora
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_(John_Dyer)
1.ww_-_To_The_Small_Celandine
1.ww_-_Who_Fancied_What_A_Pretty_Sight
1.ww_-_Written_Upon_A_Blank_Leaf_In_The_Complete_Angler.
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_Isha_Upanishad__All_that_is_world_in_the_Universe
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_On_the_Concept_of_the_Archetype
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE_AND_THE_POINT
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.01_-_The_Two_Natures
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Evolutionary_Creation_and_the_Expectation_of_a_Revelation
2.02_-_Indra,_Giver_of_Light
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_The_Circle
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_THE_SCINTILLA
2.02_-_The_Status_of_Knowledge
2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.03_-_The_Naturalness_of_Bhakti-Yoga_and_its_Central_Secret
2.03_-_The_Purified_Understanding
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.04_-_Agni,_the_Illumined_Will
2.04_-_Concentration
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.05_-_Universal_Love_and_how_it_leads_to_Self-Surrender
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.06_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Disciplines_of_Knowledge
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_The_Cup
2.07_-_The_Knowledge_and_the_Ignorance
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Triangle_of_Love
2.07_-_The_Upanishad_in_Aphorism
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_Memory,_Self-Consciousness_and_the_Ignorance
2.08_-_The_Branches_of_The_Archetypal_Man
2.08_-_The_Release_from_the_Heart_and_the_Mind
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
2.1.01_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Sadhana
2.1.02_-_Combining_Work,_Meditation_and_Bhakti
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.02_-_Nature_The_World-Manifestation
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.11_-_The_Guru
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.11_-_The_Shattering_And_Fall_of_The_Primordial_Kings
2.11_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_The_Double_Aspect
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.12_-_The_Realisation_of_Sachchidananda
2.12_-_The_Robe
2.12_-_The_Way_and_the_Bhakta
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.1.3.2_-_Study
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.1.4.1_-_Teachers
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_On_Movements
2.1.4_-_The_Lower_Vital_Being
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.14_-_The_Passive_and_the_Active_Brahman
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.15_-_Reality_and_the_Integral_Knowledge
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.1.7.05_-_On_the_Inspiration_and_Writing_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.07_-_On_the_Verse_and_Structure_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.18_-_The_Evolutionary_Process_-_Ascent_and_Integration
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.19_-_The_Planes_of_Our_Existence
2.2.01_-_The_Outer_Being_and_the_Inner_Being
2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness
2.2.02_-_Becoming_Conscious_in_Work
2.20_-_ON_REDEMPTION
2.20_-_The_Lower_Triple_Purusha
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_The_Ladder_of_Self-transcendence
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.2.1_-_The_Prusna_Upanishads
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.2.2.01_-_The_Author_of_the_Bhagavad_Gita
2.22_-_1941-1943
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_Vijnana_or_Gnosis
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.2.3_-_The_Aitereya_Upanishad
2.23_-_The_Conditions_of_Attainment_to_the_Gnosis
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.24_-_Back_to_Back__Face_to_Face__and_The_Process_of_Sawing_Through
2.24_-_Gnosis_and_Ananda
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
2.25_-_Mercies_and_Judgements_of_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Higher_and_the_Lower_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.26_-_The_First_and_Second_Unions
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.2.9.02_-_Plato
2.2.9.04_-_Plotinus
2.3.01_-_Concentration_and_Meditation
2.3.02_-_The_Supermind_or_Supramental
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.03_-_The_Mother's_Presence
2.3.03_-_The_Overmind
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.08_-_The_Physical_Consciousness
2.30_-_The_Uniting_of_the_Names_45_and_52
2.3.1.01_-_Three_Essentials_for_Writing_Poetry
2.3.1_-_Svetasvatara_Upanishad
2.4.01_-_Divine_Love,_Psychic_Love_and_Human_Love
24.01_-_Narads_Visit_to_King_Aswapathy
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
24.02_-_Notes_on_Savitri_I
24.05_-_Vision_of_Dante
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
26.09_-_Le_Periple_d_Or_(Pome_dans_par_Yvonne_Artaud)
29.04_-_Mothers_Playground
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Introduction
30.12_-_The_Obscene_and_the_Ugly_-_Form_and_Essence
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.02_-_Aspiration
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Nature_And_Composition_Of_The_Mind
3.02_-_SOL
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Formulae_of_the_Elemental_Weapons
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_Faith_and_the_Divine_Grace
3.03_-_On_Thought_-_II
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Mind_
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.04_-_The_Flowers
3.04_-_The_Formula_of_ALHIM
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.06_-_The_Delight_of_the_Divine
3.06_-_The_Sage
3.07_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Soul
3.08_-_Purification
3.08_-_The_Mystery_of_Love
3.09_-_Evil
3.09_-_THE_RETURN_HOME
3.0_-_THE_ETERNAL_RECURRENCE
3.1.01_-_Distinctive_Features_of_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
3.1.04_-_Transformation_in_the_Integral_Yoga
31.05_-_Vivekananda
31.06_-_Jagadish_Chandra_Bose
3.1.08_-_To_the_Sea
3.10_-_Of_the_Gestures
3.10_-_Punishment
31.10_-_East_and_West
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.23_-_The_Rishi
3.1.24_-_In_the_Moonlight
3.12_-_ON_OLD_AND_NEW_TABLETS
3.1.3_-_Difficulties_of_the_Physical_Being
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.16_-_THE_SEVEN_SEALS_OR_THE_YES_AND_AMEN_SONG
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.2.01_-_On_Ideals
3.2.01_-_The_Newness_of_the_Integral_Yoga
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
3.2.02_-_Yoga_and_Skill_in_Works
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
3.2.03_-_Jainism_and_Buddhism
3.2.04_-_Sankhya_and_Yoga
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.05_-_Our_Ideal
3.2.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Bhagavad_Gita
3.2.06_-_The_Adwaita_of_Shankaracharya
32.06_-_The_Novel_Alchemy
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
3.2.09_-_The_Teachings_of_Some_Modern_Indian_Yogis
3.2.10_-_Christianity_and_Theosophy
32.12_-_The_Evolutionary_Imperative
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
3.3.01_-_The_Superman
33.04_-_Deoghar
33.05_-_Muraripukur_-_II
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.10_-_Pondicherry_I
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.12_-_Pondicherry_Cyclone
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
3.3.1_-_Agni,_the_Divine_Will-Force
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.4.01_-_Evolution
3.4.02_-_The_Inconscient
3.4.03_-_Materialism
3.4.1.01_-_Poetry_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.05_-_Fiction-Writing_and_Sadhana
3.4.1_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3-5_Full_Circle
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.08_-_A_Commentary_on_the_First_Six_Suktas_of_Rigveda
36.09_-_THE_SIT_SUKTA
37.03_-_Satyakama_And_Upakoshala
37.04_-_The_Story_Of_Rishi_Yajnavalkya
37.06_-_Indra_-_Virochana_and_Prajapati
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
3.7.1.02_-_The_Reincarnating_Soul
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.1.09_-_Karma_and_Freedom
3.7.1.10_-_Karma,_Will_and_Consequence
3.7.1.12_-_Karma_and_Justice
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
3.8.1.05_-_Occult_Knowledge_and_the_Hindu_Scriptures
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_Conclusion_-_My_intellectual_position
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_The_Principle_of_the_Integral_Yoga
4.02_-_Autobiographical_Evidence
4.02_-_GOLD_AND_SPIRIT
4.02_-_Humanity_in_Progress
4.02_-_The_Integral_Perfection
4.03_-_Prayer_of_Quiet
4.03_-_Prayer_to_the_Ever-greater_Christ
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_Some_Vital_Functions
4.04_-_THE_LEECH
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.05_-_THE_DARK_SIDE_OF_THE_KING
4.05_-_The_Passion_Of_Love
4.06_-_THE_KING_AS_ANTHROPOS
4.07_-_THE_RELATION_OF_THE_KING-SYMBOL_TO_CONSCIOUSNESS
4.08_-_THE_RELIGIOUS_PROBLEM_OF_THE_KINGS_RENEWAL
4.09_-_REGINA
4.09_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Nature
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
4.10_-_The_Elements_of_Perfection
4.1.1.04_-_Foundations_of_the_Sadhana
4.1.1_-_The_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.11_-_The_Perfection_of_Equality
4.12_-_THE_LAST_SUPPER
4.12_-_The_Way_of_Equality
4.15_-_Soul-Force_and_the_Fourfold_Personality
4.17_-_The_Action_of_the_Divine_Shakti
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti
4.18_-_THE_ASS_FESTIVAL
4.19_-_THE_DRUNKEN_SONG
4.1_-_Jnana
4.20_-_The_Intuitive_Mind
4.2.1_-_The_Right_Attitude_towards_Difficulties
4.22_-_The_supramental_Thought_and_Knowledge
4.23_-_The_supramental_Instruments_--_Thought-process
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.2.4_-_Time_and_CHange_of_the_Nature
4.2.5.03_-_The_Psychic_and_Spiritual_Movements
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.2_-_Karma
4.3.2.09_-_Overmind_Experiences_and_the_Supermind
4.3.3_-_Dealing_with_Hostile_Attacks
4.3.4_-_Accidents,_Possession,_Madness
4.4.1.07_-_Experiences_of_Ascent_and_Descent
4.4.3.04_-_The_Order_of_Descent_into_the_Being
4.4.6.01_-_Sensations_in_the_Inner_Centres
5.01_-_ADAM_AS_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.01_-_Message
5.01_-_On_the_Mysteries_of_the_Ascent_towards_God
5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body
5.02_-_THE_STATUE
5.03_-_ADAM_AS_THE_FIRST_ADEPT
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.04_-_Formation_Of_The_World
5.04_-_Supermind_and_the_Life_Divine
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.05_-_Origins_Of_Vegetable_And_Animal_Life
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.05_-_THE_OLD_ADAM
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.07_-_ROTUNDUM,_HEAD,_AND_BRAIN
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.08_-_Supermind_and_Mind_of_Light
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.5_-_The_Book_of_Achilles
5.1.01.6_-_The_Book_of_the_Chieftains
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.01.9_-_Book_IX
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.1.03_-_The_Hostile_Forces_and_Hostile_Beings
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.2.02_-_Aryan_Origins_-_The_Elementary_Roots_of_Language
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5.4.02_-_Occult_Powers_or_Siddhis
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.03_-_Extraordinary_And_Paradoxical_Telluric_Phenomena
6.06_-_SELF-KNOWLEDGE
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.09_-_THE_THIRD_STAGE_-_THE_UNUS_MUNDUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.01_-_The_Soul_(the_Psychic)
7.02_-_Courage
7.05_-_Patience_and_Perseverance
7.08_-_Sincerity
7.11_-_Building_and_Destroying
7.12_-_The_Giver
7.15_-_The_Family
7.5.56_-_Omnipresence
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Apology
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
A_Secret_Miracle
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
Book_1_-_The_Council_of_the_Gods
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
Chapter_III_-_WHEREIN_IS_RELATED_THE_DROLL_WAY_IN_WHICH_DON_QUIXOTE_HAD_HIMSELF_DUBBED_A_KNIGHT
Chapter_II_-_WHICH_TREATS_OF_THE_FIRST_SALLY_THE_INGENIOUS_DON_QUIXOTE_MADE_FROM_HOME
Chapter_I_-_WHICH_TREATS_OF_THE_CHARACTER_AND_PURSUITS_OF_THE_FAMOUS_GENTLEMAN_DON_QUIXOTE_OF_LA_MANCHA
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_X
Cratylus
Diamond_Sutra_1
DM_2_-_How_to_Meditate
DS2
DS4
Emma_Zunz
ENNEAD_01.01_-_The_Organism_and_the_Self.
ENNEAD_01.02_-_Concerning_Virtue.
ENNEAD_01.03_-_Of_Dialectic,_or_the_Means_of_Raising_the_Soul_to_the_Intelligible_World.
ENNEAD_01.04_-_Whether_Animals_May_Be_Termed_Happy.
ENNEAD_01.09a_-_Of_Suicide.
ENNEAD_02.03_-_Whether_Astrology_is_of_any_Value.
ENNEAD_02.08_-_Of_Sight,_or_of_Why_Distant_Objects_Seem_Small.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.01_-_Concerning_Fate.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Things.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_Of_the_Hypostases_that_Mediate_Knowledge,_and_of_the_Superior_Principle.
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_05.09_-_Of_Intelligence,_Ideas_and_Essence.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_Is_Everywhere_Present_As_a_Whole.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Ex_Oblivione
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gods_Script
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
IS_-_Chapter_1
Jaap_Sahib_Text_(Guru_Gobind_Singh)
Kafka_and_His_Precursors
Liber
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.04_-_LIBERATION
LUX.05_-_AUGOEIDES
Meno
Partial_Magic_in_the_Quixote
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_07_03
r1912_12_05
r1913_02_02
r1913_11_14
r1914_01_15
r1914_03_24
r1914_06_15
r1914_06_25
r1914_07_02
r1914_08_16
r1914_10_07
r1914_11_13
r1914_11_30
r1915_01_15
r1917_03_06
r1917_08_20
r1918_02_15
r1918_06_14
r1919_06_29
r1919_07_06
r1919_07_10
r1919_07_19
r1919_07_29
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
SB_1.1_-_Questions_by_the_Sages
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablet_1_-
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_001-025
Talks_026-050
Talks_051-075
Talks_076-099
Talks_100-125
Talks_125-150
Talks_176-200
Talks_225-239
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Joshua
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_(short_story)
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_First_Letter_of_John
The_Five,_Ranks_of_The_Apparent_and_the_Real
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Gold_Bug
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Great_Sense
The_Immortal
The_Last_Question
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_Mirror_of_Enigmas
The_Monadology
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Poems_of_Cold_Mountain
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Theologians
The_Waiting
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

Title
SIMILAR TITLES
Choiceless Awareness A Selection of Passages for the Study of the Teachings of J. Krishnamurti
God and SAGES
Hidden Messages in Water
Liber 2 - The Message of The Master Therion
passage
Sage
the Message
the Sage
the Temple of Sages
the Temple of Sages (notes)

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Sage ::: See hakam. ::: Saiqa ::: A section of the Palestinian Liberation Organization, founded in 1968, that was funded by Syria and supported Palestinian liberation alongside pan-Arab ideology that placed the Ba’athist Syrian party in power.

SAGE ::: 1. (body, job) Systems Administrators Guild.2. (project) Semi-Automatic Ground Environment.(2001-01-27)

SAGE 1. "body, job" {Systems Administrators Guild}. 2. "project" {Semi-Automatic Ground Environment}. (2001-01-27)

sagebrush ::: n. --> A low irregular shrub (Artemisia tridentata), of the order Compositae, covering vast tracts of the dry alkaline regions of the American plains; -- called also sagebush, and wild sage.

sagely ::: adv. --> In a sage manner; wisely.

sage ::: n. 1. A man who is venerated for his profound wisdom. sage"s, sages, king-sages. adj. 2. Having or exhibiting profound wisdom and calm judgement.

sage ::: n. --> A suffruticose labiate plant (Salvia officinalis) with grayish green foliage, much used in flavoring meats, etc. The name is often extended to the whole genus, of which many species are cultivated for ornament, as the scarlet sage, and Mexican red and blue sage.
The sagebrush.
A wise man; a man of gravity and wisdom; especially, a man venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave philosopher.


sagene ::: n. --> A Russian measure of length equal to about seven English feet.

sageness ::: n. --> The quality or state of being sage; wisdom; sagacity; prudence; gravity.

sagenite ::: n. --> Acicular rutile occurring in reticulated forms imbedded in quartz.

sagenitic ::: a. --> Resembling sagenite; -- applied to quartz when containing acicular crystals of other minerals, most commonly rutile, also tourmaline, actinolite, and the like.

sage, Simeon ben Yohai, reputed author of The

sages that visited Heaven during their lifetime,


TERMS ANYWHERE

aard-wolf ::: n. --> A carnivorous quadruped (Proteles Lalandii), of South Africa, resembling the fox and hyena. See Proteles. html{color:

abusage ::: n. --> Abuse.

abusion ::: v. t. --> Evil or corrupt usage; abuse; wrong; reproach; deception; cheat.

abusive ::: a. --> Wrongly used; perverted; misapplied.
Given to misusing; also, full of abuses.
Practicing abuse; prone to ill treat by coarse, insulting words or by other ill usage; as, an abusive author; an abusive fellow.
Containing abuse, or serving as the instrument of abuse; vituperative; reproachful; scurrilous.
Tending to deceive; fraudulent; cheating.


access ::: 1. The ability, right, or permission to approach, enter, speak with, or use; admittance. 2. A way or means of approach; an entrance, channel, passage, or doorway.

access ::: n. --> A coming to, or near approach; admittance; admission; accessibility; as, to gain access to a prince.
The means, place, or way by which a thing may be approached; passage way; as, the access is by a neck of land.
Admission to sexual intercourse.
Increase by something added; addition; as, an access of territory. [In this sense accession is more generally used.]
An onset, attack, or fit of disease.


achillean ::: a. --> Resembling Achilles, the hero of the Iliad; invincible. html{color:

adagio ::: a. & adv. --> Slow; slowly, leisurely, and gracefully. When repeated, adagio, adagio, it directs the movement to be very slow. ::: n. --> A piece of music in adagio time; a slow movement; as, an adagio of Haydn. html{color:

addendum ::: n. --> A thing to be added; an appendix or addition. html{color:

adder ::: n. --> One who, or that which, adds; esp., a machine for adding numbers.
A serpent.
A small venomous serpent of the genus Vipera. The common European adder is the Vipera (/ Pelias) berus. The puff adders of Africa are species of Clotho.
In America, the term is commonly applied to several harmless snakes, as the milk adder, puffing adder, etc. html{color:


adding ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Add html{color:

adduce ::: v. t. --> To bring forward or offer, as an argument, passage, or consideration which bears on a statement or case; to cite; to allege.

adit ::: n. --> An entrance or passage. Specifically: The nearly horizontal opening by which a mine is entered, or by which water and ores are carried away; -- called also drift and tunnel.
Admission; approach; access.


admires ::: 1. Regards with pleased surprise, or with wonder mingled with esteem, approbation, or affection; and in modern usage, gazed on with pleasure. admired, admiring. adj. 2. Regarded with admiration; wondered at; contemplated with wonder mingled with esteem, etc.

advent ::: any important or epoch-making arrival. In modern usage applied poetically or grandiloquently to any arrival. advent"s, advents.

affectionate ::: a. --> Having affection or warm regard; loving; fond; as, an affectionate brother.
Kindly inclined; zealous.
Proceeding from affection; indicating love; tender; as, the affectionate care of a parent; affectionate countenance, message, language.
Strongly inclined; -- with to.


aiblins ::: adv. --> Alt. of Ablins html{color:

aimless ::: a. --> Without aim or purpose; as, an aimless life. html{color:

air pipe ::: --> A pipe for the passage of air; esp. a ventilating pipe.

air sac ::: --> One of the spaces in different parts of the bodies of birds, which are filled with air and connected with the air passages of the lungs; an air cell.

air shaft ::: --> A passage, usually vertical, for admitting fresh air into a mine or a tunnel.

aisle ::: n. --> A lateral division of a building, separated from the middle part, called the nave, by a row of columns or piers, which support the roof or an upper wall containing windows, called the clearstory wall.
Improperly used also for the have; -- as in the phrases, a church with three aisles, the middle aisle.
Also (perhaps from confusion with alley), a passage into which the pews of a church open.


alectoromancy ::: n. --> See Alectryomancy. html{color:

alength ::: adv. --> At full length; lengthwise. html{color:

allegorize ::: v. t. --> To form or turn into allegory; as, to allegorize the history of a people.
To treat as allegorical; to understand in an allegorical sense; as, when a passage in a writer may understood literally or figuratively, he who gives it a figurative sense is said to allegorize it.
To use allegory.


alley ::: a passage between buildings; hence, a narrow street, a lane; usually only wide enough for foot-passengers. blind alley*: one that is closed at the end, so as to be no thoroughfare; a cul de sac*.

alley ::: n. --> A narrow passage; especially a walk or passage in a garden or park, bordered by rows of trees or bushes; a bordered way.
A narrow passage or way in a city, as distinct from a public street.
A passageway between rows of pews in a church.
Any passage having the entrance represented as wider than the exit, so as to give the appearance of length.
The space between two rows of compositors&


alleyway ::: n. --> An alley. html{color:

allow ::: v. t. --> To praise; to approve of; hence, to sanction.
To like; to be suited or pleased with.
To sanction; to invest; to intrust.
To grant, give, admit, accord, afford, or yield; to let one have; as, to allow a servant his liberty; to allow a free passage; to allow one day for rest.
To own or acknowledge; to accept as true; to concede; to accede to an opinion; as, to allow a right; to allow a claim; to allow


all-possessed ::: a. --> Controlled by an evil spirit or by evil passions; wild. html{color:

all saints ::: --> Alt. of All Saints&

alure ::: n. --> A walk or passage; -- applied to passages of various kinds.

Amal: “I am not aware of any special element in the usage ‘for ever’ as two words instead of one. I believe that in English it is usually two words as in Byron’s”Fare thee well and if for ever / Still for ever fare thee well.”

Amal: “I believe the reference is to the outward-gazing ‘physical’ mind and its triple activity as described in the passage.”

Amal: “If nothing existed except the Gods there would be no mediating passage for the spirit awaking in matter and moving towards the higher regions and reaching the glory of the Oversoul after much labour and gradual process.”

Amal: “Since there is in the passage a reference to the rocking of the cosmic Child, the being who does this is the Divine Mother. The cosmic child is obviously the cosmos in which all the planes exist.”

Amal: “The line occurs in a passage describing a region of illusive realities. In this region everything strives towards form but never quite achieves it.

Amal: “The pointer in the passage is to an excessive growth of falsehood before the Divine manifests—a period of great ignorance which will end with a sudden surprising revelation.”

ambassage ::: n. --> Same as Embassage.

amzel ::: n. --> The European ring ousel (Turdus torquatus). html{color:

a native English form of the adverb may, now only in formal or poetic usage.

a native English form of the verb, to flutter, now only in formal and poetic usage.

a native English form of the verb, to hope, now only in formal and poetic usage.

a native English form of the verb, to know, now only in formal and poetic usage.

a native English form of the verb, to vaunt, now only in formal and poetic usage.

anecdote ::: n. --> Unpublished narratives.
A particular or detached incident or fact of an interesting nature; a biographical incident or fragment; a single passage of private life.


anelectrotonus ::: n. --> The condition of decreased irritability of a nerve in the region of the positive electrode or anode on the passage of a current of electricity through it.

annotation ::: n. --> A note, added by way of comment, or explanation; -- usually in the plural; as, annotations on ancient authors, or on a word or a passage.

annul ::: a. --> To reduce to nothing; to obliterate.
To make void or of no effect; to nullify; to abolish; to do away with; -- used appropriately of laws, decrees, edicts, decisions of courts, or other established rules, permanent usages, and the like, which are made void by component authority.


anthem ::: n. --> Formerly, a hymn sung in alternate parts, in present usage, a selection from the Psalms, or other parts of the Scriptures or the liturgy, set to sacred music.
A song or hymn of praise. ::: v. t. --> To celebrate with anthems.


anthology ::: n. --> A discourse on flowers.
A collection of flowers; a garland.
A collection of flowers of literature, that is, beautiful passages from authors; a collection of poems or epigrams; -- particularly applied to a collection of ancient Greek epigrams.
A service book containing a selection of pieces for the festival services.


anthomania ::: n. --> A extravagant fondness for flowers. html{color:

antilogy ::: n. --> A contradiction between any words or passages in an author.

aperture ::: n. --> The act of opening.
An opening; an open space; a gap, cleft, or chasm; a passage perforated; a hole; as, an aperture in a wall.
The diameter of the exposed part of the object glass of a telescope or other optical instrument; as, a telescope of four-inch aperture.


"A philosophy of change?(1) But what is change? In ordinary parlance change means passage from one condition to another and that would seem to imply passage from one status to another status. The shoot changes into a tree, passes from the status of shoot to the status of tree and there it stops; man passes from the status of young man to the status of old man and the only farther change possible to him is death or dissolution of his status. So it would seem that change is not something isolated which is the sole original and eternal reality, but it is something dependent on status, and if status were non-existent, change also could not exist. For we have to ask, when you speak of change as alone real, change of what, from what, to what? Without this ‘what" change could not be. ::: —Change is evidently the change of some form or state of existence from one condition to another condition.” Essays Divine and Human

“A philosophy of change?(1) But what is change? In ordinary parlance change means passage from one condition to another and that would seem to imply passage from one status to another status. The shoot changes into a tree, passes from the status of shoot to the status of tree and there it stops; man passes from the status of young man to the status of old man and the only farther change possible to him is death or dissolution of his status. So it would seem that change is not something isolated which is the sole original and eternal reality, but it is something dependent on status, and if status were non-existent, change also could not exist. For we have to ask, when you speak of change as alone real, change of what, from what, to what? Without this ‘what’ change could not be.

appendant ::: v. t. --> Hanging; annexed; adjunct; concomitant; as, a seal appendant to a paper.
Appended by prescription, that is, a personal usage for a considerable time; -- said of a thing of inheritance belonging to another inheritance which is superior or more worthy; as, an advowson, common, etc. , which may be appendant to a manor, common of fishing to a freehold, a seat in church to a house.


approach ::: v. 1. To come near or nearer to; draw near. 2. To come near to a person: i.e. into personal relations; into his presence or audience; or fig. within the range of his notice or attention. 3. To come near in quality, character, time, or condition; to be nearly equal. approaches, approached, approaching.* *n. 4. Any means of access or way of passage, avenue. 5. The act of drawing near. approaches.**

Apsaras ::: Sri Aurobindo: “The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

apsaras ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

Apsaras ::: “The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

aqueduct ::: n. --> A conductor, conduit, or artificial channel for conveying water, especially one for supplying large cities with water.
A canal or passage; as, the aqueduct of Sylvius, a channel connecting the third and fourth ventricles of the brain.


arcade ::: n. --> A series of arches with the columns or piers which support them, the spandrels above, and other necessary appurtenances; sometimes open, serving as an entrance or to give light; sometimes closed at the back (as in the cut) and forming a decorative feature.
A long, arched building or gallery.
An arched or covered passageway or avenue.


archway ::: n. --> A way or passage under an arch.

arctation ::: n. --> Constriction or contraction of some natural passage, as in constipation from inflammation.

aristotelic ::: a. --> Pertaining to Aristotle or to his philosophy. html{color:

arrive ::: v. i. --> To come to the shore or bank. In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; -- followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from.
To reach a point by progressive motion; to gain or compass an object by effort, practice, study, inquiry, reasoning, or experiment.
To come; said of time; as, the time arrived.


artemisia ::: n. --> A genus of plants including the plants called mugwort, southernwood, and wormwood. Of these A. absinthium, or common wormwood, is well known, and A. tridentata is the sage brush of the Rocky Mountain region.

arterialization ::: n. --> The process of converting venous blood into arterial blood during its passage through the lungs, oxygen being absorbed and carbonic acid evolved; -- called also aeration and hematosis.

art ::: v. archaic** A second person singular present indicative of be, now only poet., not in modern usage. All other references are to art as the quality, production, expression, or realm, according to aesthetic principles, of what is beautiful, appealing, or of more than ordinary significance. Also, the class of objects subject to aesthetic criteria. art"s, arts, art-parades.

asquint ::: adv. --> With the eye directed to one side; not in the straight line of vision; obliquely; awry, so as to see distortedly; as, to look asquint. html{color:

assail ::: v. t. --> To attack with violence, or in a vehement and hostile manner; to assault; to molest; as, to assail a man with blows; to assail a city with artillery.
To encounter or meet purposely with the view of mastering, as an obstacle, difficulty, or the like.
To attack morally, or with a view to produce changes in the feelings, character, conduct, existing usages, institutions; to attack by words, hostile influence, etc.; as, to assail one with


asterisk ::: n. --> The figure of a star, thus, /, used in printing and writing as a reference to a passage or note in the margin, to supply the omission of letters or words, or to mark a word or phrase as having a special character.

asterism ::: n. --> A constellation.
A small cluster of stars.
An asterisk, or mark of reference.
Three asterisks placed in this manner, /, to direct attention to a particular passage.
An optical property of some crystals which exhibit a star-shaped by reflected light, as star sapphire, or by transmitted light, as some mica.


"As the eyes of the sage are opened to the light, so is his ear unsealed to receive the vibrations of the Infinite; from all the regions of the Truth there comes thrilling into him its Word which becomes the form of his thoughts.” Essays on the Gita

“As the eyes of the sage are opened to the light, so is his ear unsealed to receive the vibrations of the Infinite; from all the regions of the Truth there comes thrilling into him its Word which becomes the form of his thoughts.” Essays on the Gita

astyllen ::: n. --> A small dam to prevent free passage of water in an adit or level.

atresia ::: n. --> Absence or closure of a natural passage or channel of the body; imperforation.

attain ::: 1. To gain as an objective; achieve; reach, arrive at; accomplish. 2. To arrive at, as by virtue of persistence or the passage of time; To reach in the course of development. attained.

augury ::: n. --> The art or practice of foretelling events by observing the actions of birds, etc.; divination.
An omen; prediction; prognostication; indication of the future; presage.
A rite, ceremony, or observation of an augur.


authorize ::: v. t. --> To clothe with authority, warrant, or legal power; to give a right to act; to empower; as, to authorize commissioners to settle a boundary.
To make legal; to give legal sanction to; to legalize; as, to authorize a marriage.
To establish by authority, as by usage or public opinion; to sanction; as, idioms authorized by usage.
To sanction or confirm by the authority of some one;


avenue ::: n. --> A way or opening for entrance into a place; a passage by which a place may by reached; a way of approach or of exit.
The principal walk or approach to a house which is withdrawn from the road, especially, such approach bordered on each side by trees; any broad passageway thus bordered.
A broad street; as, the Fifth Avenue in New York.


bacharach ::: n. --> Alt. of Backarack html{color:

ballista ::: n. --> An ancient military engine, in the form of a crossbow, used for hurling large missiles. html{color:

ban ::: n. --> A public proclamation or edict; a public order or notice, mandatory or prohibitory; a summons by public proclamation.
A calling together of the king&


barkentine ::: n. --> A threemasted vessel, having the foremast square-rigged, and the others schooner-rigged. [Spelled also barquentine, barkantine, etc.] See Illust. in Append. html{color:

barpost ::: n. --> A post sunk in the ground to receive the bars closing a passage into a field.

barricade ::: a structure hastily set up across a route of access to obstruct the passage of an enemy.

barricade ::: n. --> A fortification, made in haste, of trees, earth, palisades, wagons, or anything that will obstruct the progress or attack of an enemy. It is usually an obstruction formed in streets to block an enemy&

barrier ::: 1. Anything built or serving to bar passage. 2. Anything that restrains or obstructs progress, access. 3. A limit or boundary of any kind. barriers, barrier-breakers.

barriered ::: closed off; blocked, obstructing passage. Also fig.

barrier ::: n. --> A carpentry obstruction, stockade, or other obstacle made in a passage in order to stop an enemy.
A fortress or fortified town, on the frontier of a country, commanding an avenue of approach.
A fence or railing to mark the limits of a place, or to keep back a crowd.
An any obstruction; anything which hinders approach or attack.


barway ::: n. --> A passage into a field or yard, closed by bars made to take out of the posts.

based ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Base ::: a. --> Having a base, or having as a base; supported; as, broad-based. ::: n. html{color:

basylous ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or having the nature of, a basyle; electro-positive; basic; -- opposed to chlorous. html{color:

battered ::: damaged especially by blows or hard usage.

batter ::: v. t. --> To beat with successive blows; to beat repeatedly and with violence, so as to bruise, shatter, or demolish; as, to batter a wall or rampart.
To wear or impair as if by beating or by hard usage.
To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.
A semi-liquid mixture of several ingredients, as, flour, eggs, milk, etc., beaten together and used in cookery.


bean trefoil ::: --> A leguminous shrub of southern Europe, with trifoliate leaves (Anagyris foetida). html{color:

beganst ::: a native English form of the verb, to begin, now only in formal and poetic usage.

beggable ::: a. --> Capable of being begged. html{color:

Belphegor ::: Amal: “This name of a star brought in by Sri Aurobindo with powerful effect has practically no place in popular astronomy and figured rarely in past literary usage. In Syrian theology, Belphegor was a deity who symbolised the Sun. The Israelites also paid homage to him sometimes.” Sri Aurobindo—The Poet

bibliomancy ::: n. --> A kind of divination, performed by selecting passages of Scripture at hazard, and drawing from them indications concerning future events.

bindst ::: a native English form of the verb, to bind, now only in formal and poetic usage.

birching ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Birch html{color:

bis ::: adv. --> Twice; -- a word showing that something is, or is to be, repeated; as a passage of music, or an item in accounts.

bish ::: n. --> Same as Bikh. html{color:

black-a-vised ::: a. --> Dark-visaged; swart.

black pudding ::: --> A kind of sausage made of blood, suet, etc., thickened with meal.

blind ::: adj. 1. Unable to see; lacking the sense of sight; sightless. Also fig. 2. Unwilling or unable to perceive or understand. 3. Lacking all consciousness or awareness. 4. Not having or based on reason or intelligence; absolute and unquestioning. 5. Not characterized or determined by reason or control. 6. Purposeless; fortuitous, random. 7. Undiscriminating; heedless; reckless. 8. Enveloped in darkness; dark, dim, obscure. 9. Dense enough to form a screen. 10. Covered or concealed from sight; hidden from immediate view. 11. Having no openings or passages for light; (a window or door) walled up. blindest, half-blind. v. 12. To deprive of sight permanently or temporarily. 13. To make sightless momentarily; dazzle. blinded.* n. 14. A blind person, esp. as pl., those who are blind. 15. Fig.* Any thing or action intended to conceal one"s real intention; a pretence, a pretext; subterfuge.

blindly ::: adv. --> Without sight, discernment, or understanding; without thought, investigation, knowledge, or purpose of one&

blockade ::: 1. The isolating, closing off, or surrounding of a place. 2. Any obstruction of passage or progress.

blockade ::: v. t. --> The shutting up of a place by troops or ships, with the purpose of preventing ingress or egress, or the reception of supplies; as, the blockade of the ports of an enemy.
An obstruction to passage. ::: v. t. --> To shut up, as a town or fortress, by investing it


boat ::: n. --> A small open vessel, or water craft, usually moved by cars or paddles, but often by a sail.
Hence, any vessel; usually with some epithet descriptive of its use or mode of propulsion; as, pilot boat, packet boat, passage boat, advice boat, etc. The term is sometimes applied to steam vessels, even of the largest class; as, the Cunard boats.
A vehicle, utensil, or dish, somewhat resembling a boat in shape; as, a stone boat; a gravy boat.


bode ::: v. t. --> To indicate by signs, as future events; to be the omen of; to portend to presage; to foreshow.
A messenger; a herald. ::: v. i. --> To foreshow something; to augur.


bodock ::: n. --> The Osage orange.

boilingly ::: adv. --> With boiling or ebullition. html{color:

bologna ::: n. --> A city of Italy which has given its name to various objects.
A Bologna sausage.


booking clerk ::: --> A clerk who registers passengers, baggage, etc., for conveyance, as by railway or steamship, or who sells passage tickets at a booking office.

booking office ::: --> An office where passengers, baggage, etc., are registered for conveyance, as by railway or steamship.
An office where passage tickets are sold.


bookmark ::: n. --> Something placed in a book to guide in finding a particular page or passage; also, a label in a book to designate the owner; a bookplate.

bossage ::: n. --> A stone in a building, left rough and projecting, to be afterward carved into shape.
Rustic work, consisting of stones which seem to advance beyond the level of the building, by reason of indentures or channels left in the joinings.


botanomancy ::: n. --> An ancient species of divination by means of plants, esp. sage and fig leaves.

botargo ::: n. --> A sort of cake or sausage, made of the salted roes of the mullet, much used on the coast of the Mediterranean as an incentive to drink.

botuliform ::: a. --> Having the shape of a sausage.

boyism ::: n. --> Boyhood.
The nature of a boy; childishness. html{color:


brassage ::: n. --> A sum formerly levied to pay the expense of coinage; -- now called seigniorage.

brass-visaged ::: a. --> Impudent; bold.

brevet ::: n. --> A warrant from the government, granting a privilege, title, or dignity. [French usage].
A commission giving an officer higher rank than that for which he receives pay; an honorary promotion of an officer. ::: v. t. --> To confer rank upon by brevet.


bridge ::: n. 1. A structure spanning and providing passage over a gap or barrier, such as a river or roadway. bridges, bridge-like. v. 2. To build or provide a bridge over something; span. Also fig. 3. To join by or as if by a bridge; link, connect. bridged, bridging.

bridge ::: n. --> A structure, usually of wood, stone, brick, or iron, erected over a river or other water course, or over a chasm, railroad, etc., to make a passageway from one bank to the other.
Anything supported at the ends, which serves to keep some other thing from resting upon the object spanned, as in engraving, watchmaking, etc., or which forms a platform or staging over which something passes or is conveyed.
The small arch or bar at right angles to the strings of a


brigge ::: n. --> A bridge. html{color:

bringst ::: a native English form of the verb, to bring, now only in formal and poetic usage.

buchu ::: n. --> A South African shrub (Barosma) with small leaves that are dotted with oil glands; also, the leaves themselves, which are used in medicine for diseases of the urinary organs, etc. Several species furnish the leaves. html{color:

buddhism ::: n. --> The religion based upon the doctrine originally taught by the Hindoo sage Gautama Siddartha, surnamed Buddha, "the awakened or enlightened," in the sixth century b. c., and adopted as a religion by the greater part of the inhabitants of Central and Eastern Asia and the Indian Islands. Buddha&

bulky ::: a. --> Of great bulk or dimensions; of great size; large; thick; massive; as, bulky volumes. html{color:

bull-necked ::: a. --> Having a short and thick neck like that of a bull. html{color:

bunodonts ::: n. pl. --> A division of the herbivorous mammals including the hogs and hippopotami; -- so called because the teeth are tuberculated. html{color:

but ::: adv. & conj. --> Except with; unless with; without.
Except; besides; save.
Excepting or excluding the fact that; save that; were it not that; unless; -- elliptical, for but that.
Otherwise than that; that not; -- commonly, after a negative, with that.
Only; solely; merely.
On the contrary; on the other hand; only; yet; html{color:


"But the timeless self-knowledge of this Eternal is beyond mind; it is a supramental knowledge superconscient to us and only to be acquired by the stilling or transcending of the temporal activity of our conscious mind, by an entry into Silence or a passage through Silence into the consciousness of eternity.” The Life Divine*

“But the timeless self-knowledge of this Eternal is beyond mind; it is a supramental knowledge superconscient to us and only to be acquired by the stilling or transcending of the temporal activity of our conscious mind, by an entry into Silence or a passage through Silence into the consciousness of eternity.” The Life Divine

by-passage ::: n. --> A passage different from the usual one; a byway.

by-pass ::: n. --> A by-passage, for a pipe, or other channel, to divert circulation from the usual course.

cablegram ::: n. --> A message sent by a submarine telegraphic cable.

calculus ::: n. --> Any solid concretion, formed in any part of the body, but most frequent in the organs that act as reservoirs, and in the passages connected with them; as, biliary calculi; urinary calculi, etc.
A method of computation; any process of reasoning by the use of symbols; any branch of mathematics that may involve calculation.


calledst ::: a native English form of the verb, to call, now only in formal and poetic usage.

callest ::: a native English form of the verb, to call, now only in formal and poetic usage.

callst ::: a native English form of the verb, to call, now only in formal and poetic usage.

camest ::: a native English form of the verb, to come, now only in formal and poetic usage.

cam"st ::: a native English contracted form of the verb, to come, now only in formal and poetic usage.

camwood ::: n. --> See Barwood. html{color:

cannulated ::: a. --> Hollow; affording a passage through its interior length for wire, thread, etc.; as, a cannulated (suture) needle.

canst ::: a native English form of the adverb can, now only in formal or poetic usage.

cantabile ::: a. --> In a melodious, flowing style; in a singing style, as opposed to bravura, recitativo, or parlando. ::: n. --> A piece or passage, whether vocal or instrumental, peculiarly adapted to singing; -- sometimes called cantilena.

canticle ::: n. --> A song; esp. a little song or hymn.
The Song of Songs or Song of Solomon, one of the books of the Old Testament.
A canto or division of a poem
A psalm, hymn, or passage from the Bible, arranged for chanting in church service.


caponiere ::: n. --> A work made across or in the ditch, to protect it from the enemy, or to serve as a covered passageway.

capt ::: Tehmi: “This passage is about the Kings of Thought. They come as the crown or overlie the imperatives. They go higher than the imperatives.”

casus ::: n. --> An event; an occurrence; an occasion; a combination of circumstances; a case; an act of God. See the Note under Accident. html{color:

cataract ::: n. --> A great fall of water over a precipice; a large waterfall.
An opacity of the crystalline lens, or of its capsule, which prevents the passage of the rays of light and impairs or destroys the sight.
A kind of hydraulic brake for regulating the action of pumping engines and other machines; -- sometimes called dashpot.


catelectrotonus ::: n. --> The condition of increased irritability of a nerve in the region of the cathode or negative electrode, on the passage of a current of electricity through it.

catharsis ::: n. --> A natural or artificial purgation of any passage, as of the mouth, bowels, etc.

catnip ::: n. --> Alt. of Catmint html{color:

causey ::: n. --> A way or road raised above the natural level of the ground, serving as a dry passage over wet or marshy ground.

cave ::: 1. A hollow or natural passage under or into the earth, especially one with an opening to the surface. 2. A hollow in the side of a hill or cliff, or underground of any kind; a cavity. Cave, caves, death-cave, deep-caved, cave-heart.

cavern ::: a large underground chamber, as in a cave. caverns, cavern-passages.

"Certainly, ideals are not the ultimate Reality, for that is too high and vast for any ideal to envisage; they are aspects of it thrown out in the world-consciousness as a basis for the workings of the world-power. But they are primary, the actual workings secondary. They are nearer to the Reality and therefore always more real, forcible and complete than the facts which are their partial reflection.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

“Certainly, ideals are not the ultimate Reality, for that is too high and vast for any ideal to envisage; they are aspects of it thrown out in the world-consciousness as a basis for the workings of the world-power. But they are primary, the actual workings secondary. They are nearer to the Reality and therefore always more real, forcible and complete than the facts which are their partial reflection.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

Certainly, ideals are not the ultimate Reality, for that is too high and vast for any ideal to envisage; they are aspects of it thrown out in the world-consciousness as a basis for the workings of the world-power. But they are primary, the actual workings secondary. They are nearer to the Reality and therefore always more real, forcible and complete than the facts which are their partial reflection. Reflections themselves of the Real, they again are reflected in the more concrete workings of our existence. The Supramental Manifestation

Chakras, messages, intuitions, openings of the inner powers, etc.

challenge ::: n. --> An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons.
The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign.
A claim or demand.
The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game.


channel ::: n. --> The hollow bed where a stream of water runs or may run.
The deeper part of a river, harbor, strait, etc., where the main current flows, or which affords the best and safest passage for vessels.
A strait, or narrow sea, between two portions of lands; as, the British Channel.
That through which anything passes; means of passing, conveying, or transmitting; as, the news was conveyed to us by


charger ::: n. --> One who, or that which charges.
An instrument for measuring or inserting a charge.
A large dish.
A horse for battle or parade. html{color:


charge ::: v. t. --> To lay on or impose, as a load, tax, or burden; to load; to fill.
To lay on or impose, as a task, duty, or trust; to command, instruct, or exhort with authority; to enjoin; to urge earnestly; as, to charge a jury; to charge the clergy of a diocese; to charge an agent.
To lay on, impose, or make subject to or liable for.
To fix or demand as a price; as, he charges two dollars html{color:


charlatanry ::: n. --> Undue pretensions to skill; quackery; wheedling; empiricism. html{color:

chef ::: n. --> A chief of head person.
The head cook of large establishment, as a club, a family, etc.
Same as Chief. html{color:


cheval-de-frise ::: n. --> A piece of timber or an iron barrel traversed with iron-pointed spikes or spears, five or six feet long, used to defend a passage, stop a breach, or impede the advance of cavalry, etc.

chiminage ::: n. --> A toll for passage through a forest.

chivalry ::: n. --> A body or order of cavaliers or knights serving on horseback; illustrious warriors, collectively; cavalry.
The dignity or system of knighthood; the spirit, usages, or manners of knighthood; the practice of knight-errantry.
The qualifications or character of knights, as valor, dexterity in arms, courtesy, etc.
A tenure of lands by knight&


choke ::: v. t. --> To render unable to breathe by filling, pressing upon, or squeezing the windpipe; to stifle; to suffocate; to strangle.
To obstruct by filling up or clogging any passage; to block up.
To hinder or check, as growth, expansion, progress, etc.; to stifle.
To affect with a sense of strangulation by passion or strong feeling.


choosest ::: a native English form of the verb, to choose, now only in formal and poetic usage.

chrestomathy ::: n. --> A selection of passages, with notes, etc., to be used in acquiring a language; as, a Hebrew chrestomathy.

chrisom ::: n. --> A white cloth, anointed with chrism, or a white mantle thrown over a child when baptized or christened.
A child which died within a month after its baptism; -- so called from the chrisom cloth which was used as a shroud for it. html{color:


chuckling ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Chuckle html{color:

chyme ::: n. --> The pulpy mass of semi-digested food in the small intestines just after its passage from the stomach. It is separated in the intestines into chyle and excrement. See Chyle.

cilia ::: n. pl. --> The eyelashes.
Small, generally microscopic, vibrating appendages lining certain organs, as the air passages of the higher animals, and in the lower animals often covering also the whole or a part of the exterior. They are also found on some vegetable organisms. In the Infusoria, and many larval forms, they are locomotive organs.
Hairlike processes, commonly marginal and forming a fringe like the eyelash.


\cil of sleep — very largely indeed these two elements get mixed up together. For in fact a large part of our consciousness in sleep docs not sink into this subconscious slate ; it passes beyond the veil into other planes of being which arc connected with our own inner planes, planes of supraphj'sical existence, w'orlds of a larger life, mind or psychic which arc there behind and whose influences come to us without our knowledge. Occasionally we get a dream from these planes, something more than a dream, — a dream experience which is a record direct or symbolic of what happens to us or around us there. As the inner consciousness grows by sadhana, these dream experiences increase In number, dearness, coherence, accuracy and after some growth of experi- ence and consciousness, we can, if we observe, come to under- stand them and their significance to our loner life. Even we can by training become so coosetous as to follow our own passage, usually veiled to our arvarencss and memory, through many realms and the process of the return to the waking state. At a certain pitch of this inner wakefulness this kind of sleep, a sleep experience, can replace the ordinary subconscious slumber.

citation ::: n. --> An official summons or notice given to a person to appear; the paper containing such summons or notice.
The act of citing a passage from a book, or from another person, in his own words; also, the passage or words quoted; quotation.
Enumeration; mention; as, a citation of facts.
A reference to decided cases, or books of authority, to prove a point in law.


cite ::: v. t. --> To call upon officially or authoritatively to appear, as before a court; to summon.
To urge; to enjoin.
To quote; to repeat, as a passage from a book, or the words of another.
To refer to or specify, as for support, proof, illustration, or confirmation.
To bespeak; to indicate.


Citta-suddhi (purification of the mental or moral habits form- ed in the citta) was preached by the yogins as a first movement towards realisation and they got by it the saintliness of the saint and the quietude of the sage but the transformation of the nature of which w« speak Is something more than that, and this trans- formation does not come by contemplation alone.

claimest ::: a native English form of the verb, to claim, now only in formal and poetic usage.

claimst ::: a native English form of the verb, to claim, now only in formal and poetic usage.

clary ::: v. i. --> To make a loud or shrill noise. ::: n. --> A plant (Salvia sclarea) of the Sage family, used in flavoring soups.

climbst ::: a native English form of the verb, to climb, now only in formal and poetic usage.

cloister ::: v. t. --> An inclosed place.
A covered passage or ambulatory on one side of a court;
the series of such passages on the different sides of any court, esp. that of a monastery or a college.
A monastic establishment; a place for retirement from the world for religious duties.
To confine in, or as in, a cloister; to seclude from


code ::: 1. A system of symbols, letters, or words given certain arbitrary meanings, used for transmitting messages requiring secrecy or brevity. 2. A systematic collection of regulations and rules of procedure or conduct. codes.

codetta ::: n. --> A short passage connecting two sections, but not forming part of either; a short coda.

collectanea ::: v. t. --> Passages selected from various authors, usually for purposes of instruction; miscellany; anthology.

collector ::: n. --> One who collects things which are separate; esp., one who makes a business or practice of collecting works of art, objects in natural history, etc.; as, a collector of coins.
A compiler of books; one who collects scattered passages and puts them together in one book.
An officer appointed and commissioned to collect and receive customs, duties, taxes, or toll.
One authorized to collect debts.


colliquation ::: n. --> A melting together; the act of melting; fusion.
A processive wasting or melting away of the solid parts of the animal system with copious excretions of liquids by one or more passages.


colorature ::: n. --> Vocal music colored, as it were, by florid ornaments, runs, or rapid passages.

colstaff ::: n. --> A staff by means of which a burden is borne by two persons on their shoulders. html{color:

comest ::: a native English form of the verb, to come, now only in formal and poetic usage.

commendation ::: n. --> The act of commending; praise; favorable representation in words; recommendation.
That which is the ground of approbation or praise.
A message of affection or respect; compliments; greeting.


comment ::: v. i. --> To make remarks, observations, or criticism; especially, to write notes on the works of an author, with a view to illustrate his meaning, or to explain particular passages; to write annotations; -- often followed by on or upon. ::: v. t. --> To comment on.

communication ::: n. --> The act or fact of communicating; as, communication of smallpox; communication of a secret.
Intercourse by words, letters, or messages; interchange of thoughts or opinions, by conference or other means; conference; correspondence.
Association; company.
Means of communicating; means of passing from place to place; a connecting passage; connection.


complainst ::: a native English form of the verb, to complain, now only in formal and poetic usage.

com"st ::: a native English contracted form of the verb, to come, now only in formal and poetic usage.

conduit ::: n. --> A pipe, canal, channel, or passage for conveying water or fluid.
A structure forming a reservoir for water.
A narrow passage for private communication.


conformity ::: n. --> Correspondence in form, manner, or character; resemblance; agreement; congruity; -- followed by to, with, or between.
Compliance with the usages of the Established Church.


constipate ::: v. t. --> To crowd or cram into a narrow compass; to press together or condense.
To stop (a channel) by filling it, and preventing passage through it; as, to constipate the capillary vessels.
To render costive; to cause constipation in.


consuetude ::: n. --> Custom, habit; usage.

context ::: 1. The part of a text or statement that surrounds a particular word or passage and determines its meaning. 2. The set of circumstances or facts that surround a particular event, situation, etc.

contour ::: n. --> The outline of a figure or body, or the line or lines representing such an outline; the line that bounds; periphery.
The outline of a horizontal section of the ground, or of works of fortification. html{color:


conventional ::: a. --> Formed by agreement or compact; stipulated.
Growing out of, or depending on, custom or tacit agreement; sanctioned by general concurrence or usage; formal.
Based upon tradition, whether religious and historical or of artistic rules.
Abstracted; removed from close representation of nature by the deliberate selection of what is to be represented and what is to be rejected; as, a conventional flower; a conventional


conventionalism ::: n. --> That which is received or established by convention or arbitrary agreement; that which is in accordance with the fashion, tradition, or usage.
The principles or practice of conventionalizing. See Conventionalize, v. t.


conventionality ::: n. --> The state of being conventional; adherence to social formalities or usages; that which is established by conventional use; one of the customary usages of social life.

conventionalizw ::: v. t. --> To make conventional; to bring under the influence of, or cause to conform to, conventional rules; to establish by usage.
To represent by selecting the important features and those which are expressible in the medium employed, and omitting the others.
To represent according to an established principle, whether religious or traditional, or based upon certain


convention ::: v. i. --> The act of coming together; the state of being together; union; coalition.
General agreement or concurrence; arbitrary custom; usage; conventionality.
A meeting or an assembly of persons, esp. of delegates or representatives, to accomplish some specific object, -- civil, social, political, or ecclesiastical.
An extraordinary assembly of the parkiament or


cornicular ::: n. --> A secretary or clerk. html{color:

corridor ::: a hallway or passage connecting parts of a building. corridors.

corridor ::: n. --> A gallery or passageway leading to several apartments of a house.
The covered way lying round the whole compass of the fortifications of a place.


corsage ::: n. --> The waist or bodice of a lady&

cosmic mind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Nevertheless, the fact of this intervention from above, the fact that behind all our original thinking or authentic perception of things there is a veiled, a half-veiled or a swift unveiled intuitive element is enough to establish a connection between mind and what is above it; it opens a passage of communication and of entry into the superior spirit-ranges. There is also the reaching out of mind to exceed the personal ego limitation, to see things in a certain impersonality and universality. Impersonality is the first character of cosmic self; universality, non-limitation by the single or limiting point of view, is the character of cosmic perception and knowledge: this tendency is therefore a widening, however rudimentary, of these restricted mind areas towards cosmicity, towards a quality which is the very character of the higher mental planes, — towards that superconscient cosmic Mind which, we have suggested, must in the nature of things be the original mind-action of which ours is only a derivative and inferior process.” *The Life Divine

"If we accept the Vedic image of the Sun of Truth, . . . we may compare the action of the Higher Mind to a composed and steady sunshine, the energy of the Illumined Mind beyond it to an outpouring of massive lightnings of flaming sun-stuff. Still beyond can be met a yet greater power of the Truth-Force, an intimate and exact Truth-vision, Truth-thought, Truth-sense, Truth-feeling, Truth-action, to which we can give in a special sense the name of Intuition; . . . At the source of this Intuition we discover a superconscient cosmic Mind in direct contact with the supramental Truth-Consciousness, an original intensity determinant of all movements below it and all mental energies, — not Mind as we know it, but an Overmind that covers as with the wide wings of some creative Oversoul this whole lower hemisphere of Knowledge-Ignorance, links it with that greater Truth-Consciousness while yet at the same time with its brilliant golden Lid it veils the face of the greater Truth from our sight, intervening with its flood of infinite possibilities as at once an obstacle and a passage in our seeking of the spiritual law of our existence, its highest aim, its secret Reality.” The Life Divine

"There is one cosmic Mind, one cosmic Life, one cosmic Body. All the attempt of man to arrive at universal sympathy, universal love and the understanding and knowledge of the inner soul of other existences is an attempt to beat thin, breach and eventually break down by the power of the enlarging mind and heart the walls of the ego and arrive nearer to a cosmic oneness.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

"[The results of the opening to the cosmic Mind:] One is aware of the cosmic Mind and the mental forces that move there and how they work on one"s mind and that of others and one is able to deal with one"s own mind with a greater knowledge and effective power. There are many other results, but this is the fundamental one.” Letters on Yoga

"The cosmic consciousness has many levels — the cosmic physical, the cosmic vital, the cosmic Mind, and above the higher planes of cosmic Mind there is the Intuition and above that the overmind and still above that the supermind where the Transcendental begins. In order to live in the Intuition plane (not merely to receive intuitions), one has to live in the cosmic consciousness because there the cosmic and individual run into each other as it were, and the mental separation between them is already broken down, so nobody can reach there who is still in the separative ego.” Letters on Yoga*


cough ::: v. i. --> To expel air, or obstructing or irritating matter, from the lungs or air passages, in a noisy and violent manner.
A sudden, noisy, and violent expulsion of air from the chest, caused by irritation in the air passages, or by the reflex action of nervous or gastric disorder, etc.
The more or less frequent repetition of coughing, constituting a symptom of disease.


couldst ::: a native English form of the adverb could, now only in formal or poetic usage.

coupon ::: n. --> A certificate of interest due, printed at the bottom of transferable bonds (state, railroad, etc.), given for a term of years, designed to be cut off and presented for payment when the interest is due; an interest warrant.
A section of a ticket, showing the holder to be entitled to some specified accomodation or service, as to a passage over a designated line of travel, a particular seat in a theater, or the like.


coupure ::: n. --> A passage cut through the glacis to facilitate sallies by the besieged.

course ::: 1. A direction or route taken or to be taken. 2. The path, route, or channel along which anything moves. 3. Advance or progression in a particular direction; forward or onward movement. 4. The continuous passage or progress through time or a succession of stages. chariot-course.

course ::: n. --> The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.
The ground or path traversed; track; way.
Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance.
Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes


covinous ::: a. --> Deceitful; collusive; fraudulent; dishonest. html{color:

cowpea ::: n. --> The seed of one or more leguminous plants of the genus Dolichos; also, the plant itself. Many varieties are cultivated in the southern part of the United States. html{color:

crank ::: n. --> A bent portion of an axle, or shaft, or an arm keyed at right angles to the end of a shaft, by which motion is imparted to or received from it; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion. See Bell crank.
Any bend, turn, or winding, as of a passage.
A twist or turn in speech; a conceit consisting in a change of the form or meaning of a word.
A twist or turn of the mind; caprice; whim; crotchet; also,


cran ::: n. --> Alt. of Crane html{color:

crazy ::: a. --> Characterized by weakness or feebleness; decrepit; broken; falling to decay; shaky; unsafe.
Broken, weakened, or dissordered in intellect; shattered; demented; deranged.
Inordinately desirous; foolishly eager. html{color:


crescendo ::: music. A gradual increase, especially in the volume or intensity of sound in a passage.

criedst ::: a native English form of the verb, to cry, now only in formal and poetic usage.

criest ::: a native English form of the verb, to cry, now only in formal and poetic usage.

croup ::: n. --> The hinder part or buttocks of certain quadrupeds, especially of a horse; hence, the place behind the saddle.
An inflammatory affection of the larynx or trachea, accompanied by a hoarse, ringing cough and stridulous, difficult breathing; esp., such an affection when associated with the development of a false membrane in the air passages (also called membranous croup). See False croup, under False, and Diphtheria.


crouton ::: n. --> Bread cut in various forms, and fried lightly in butter or oil, to garnish hashes, etc. html{color:

CROWN. ::: The place of passage between the body-conscious- ness with all it contains of mind and life and the higher being above the body. It is there that the two consciousnesses begin to meet.

cucking stool ::: --> A kind of chair formerly used for punishing scolds, and also dishonest tradesmen, by fastening them in it, usually in front of their doors, to be pelted and hooted at by the mob, but sometimes to be taken to the water and ducked; -- called also a castigatory, a tumbrel, and a trebuchet; and often, but not so correctly, a ducking stool. html{color:

cul-de-sac ::: n. --> A passage with only one outlet, as a street closed at one end; a blind alley; hence, a trap.
a position in which an army finds itself with no way of exit but to the front.
Any bag-shaped or tubular cavity, vessel, or organ, open only at one end.


culmination ::: n. --> The attainment of the highest point of altitude reached by a heavently body; passage across the meridian; transit.
Attainment or arrival at the highest pitch of glory, power, etc.


cultus ::: n. sing. & pl. --> Established or accepted religious rites or usages of worship; state of religious development. Cf. Cult, 2.

custom ::: 1. A habitual practice of a person or a group. 2. A common tradition or usage so long established that it has the force or validity of law. custom"s.

deas ::: n. --> See Dais. html{color:

deathbird ::: n. --> Tengmalm&

death ::: “For the spiritual seeker death is only a passage from one form of life to another, and none is dead but only departed.” Letters on Yoga

DEATH. ::: For the spiritual seeker death is only a passage from one form of life to another, and none is dead but only departed.

death ::: Sri Aurobindo: "For the spiritual seeker death is only a passage from one form of life to another, and none is dead but only departed.” *Letters on Yoga

deathwatch ::: n. --> A small beetle (Anobium tessellatum and other allied species). By forcibly striking its head against woodwork it makes a ticking sound, which is a call of the sexes to each other, but has been imagined by superstitious people to presage death.
A small wingless insect, of the family Psocidae, which makes a similar but fainter sound; -- called also deathtick.
The guard set over a criminal before his execution.


deep-waisted ::: a. --> Having a deep waist, as when, in a ship, the poop and forecastle are much elevated above the deck. html{color:

dendritic ::: a. --> Alt. of Dendritical html{color:

deobstruct ::: v. t. --> To remove obstructions or impediments in; to clear from anything that hinders the passage of fluids; as, to deobstruct the pores or lacteals.

deoppilate ::: v. t. --> To free from obstructions; to clear a passage through.

deoppilation ::: n. --> Removal of whatever stops up the passages.

descent ::: 1. The act or an instance of descending. 2. A downward incline or passage; a slope. Descent.

desirest ::: a native English form of the verb, to desire, now only in formal and poetic usage.

desponsage ::: n. --> Betrothal.

development ::: n. --> The act of developing or disclosing that which is unknown; a gradual unfolding process by which anything is developed, as a plan or method, or an image upon a photographic plate; gradual advancement or growth through a series of progressive changes; also, the result of developing, or a developed state.
The series of changes which animal and vegetable organisms undergo in their passage from the embryonic state to maturity, from a lower to a higher state of organization.


devi ::: n. --> ; fem. of Deva. A goddess. html{color:

diapedesis ::: n. --> The passage of the corpuscular elements of the blood from the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues, without rupture of the walls of the blood vessels.

di- ::: --> A prefix, signifying twofold, double, twice
denoting two atoms, radicals, groups, or equivalents, as the case may be. See Bi-, 2.
A prefix denoting through; also, between, apart, asunder, across. Before a vowel dia-becomes di-; as, diactinic; dielectric, etc. html{color:


diathermic ::: a. --> Affording a free passage to heat; as, diathermic substances.

digest ::: v. t. --> To distribute or arrange methodically; to work over and classify; to reduce to portions for ready use or application; as, to digest the laws, etc.
To separate (the food) in its passage through the alimentary canal into the nutritive and nonnutritive elements; to prepare, by the action of the digestive juices, for conversion into blood; to convert into chyme.
To think over and arrange methodically in the mind; to


dilapidated ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Dilapidate ::: a. --> Decayed; fallen into partial ruin; injured by bad usage or neglect.

diphtheria ::: n. --> A very dangerous contagious disease in which the air passages, and especially the throat, become coated with a false membrane, produced by the solidification of an inflammatory exudation. Cf. Group.

diplanar ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to two planes. html{color:

dipped ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Dip html{color:

disageeing ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Disagree

dispatch ::: v. t. --> To dispose of speedily, as business; to execute quickly; to make a speedy end of; to finish; to perform.
To rid; to free.
To get rid of by sending off; to send away hastily.
To send off or away; -- particularly applied to sending off messengers, messages, letters, etc., on special business, and implying haste.
To send out of the world; to put to death.


dispersive ::: a. --> Tending to disperse. html{color:

disusage ::: n. --> Gradual cessation of use or custom; neglect of use; disuse.

diswont ::: v. t. --> To deprive of wonted usage; to disaccustom.

divination ::: n. --> The act of divining; a foreseeing or foretelling of future events; the pretended art discovering secret or future by preternatural means.
An indication of what is future or secret; augury omen; conjectural presage; prediction.


doest ::: a native English form of the verb, to do, now only in formal and poetic usage.

doffing ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Doff html{color:

dog-eared ::: a. --> Having the corners of the leaves turned down and soiled by careless or long-continued usage; -- said of a book.

door ::: n. --> An opening in the wall of a house or of an apartment, by which to go in and out; an entrance way.
The frame or barrier of boards, or other material, usually turning on hinges, by which an entrance way into a house or apartment is closed and opened.
Passage; means of approach or access.
An entrance way, but taken in the sense of the house or apartment to which it leads.


doorway ::: n. --> The passage of a door; entrance way into a house or a room.

douter ::: n. --> An extinguisher for candles. html{color:

dout ::: v. t. --> To put out. html{color:

dove plant ::: --> A Central American orchid (Peristeria elata), having a flower stem five or six feet high, with numerous globose white fragrant flowers. The column in the center of the flower resembles a dove; -- called also Holy Spirit plant. html{color:

dragomans ::: pl. --> of Dragoman html{color:

drank ::: imp. --> of Drink.
of Drink ::: n. --> Wild oats, or darnel grass. See Drake a plant. html{color:


dreamst ::: a native English form of the verb, to dream, now only in formal and poetic usage.

driveway ::: n. --> A passage or way along or through which a carriage may be driven.

drov"st ::: a native English contracted form of the verb to drive, now only in formal and poetic usage.

DRY PERIOD. ::: There is a long stage of preparation neces- sary in order to arrive at the moer psychologic^ condition in which the doors of experience can open and one can walk from vista to vista — though even then new gates may present them- selves and refuse to open until all is ready. This period can be dry and desert-like unless one has the ardour of self-introspec- tion and self-conquest and finds every step of the effort and struggle interesting or unless one has or gets the secret of trust and self-giving which secs the hand of the Divine in every step of the path and even in the difficulty the grace or the guidance.

Such interval periods come to all and cannot be avoided.

The main thing is to meet them with quietude and not become restless, depressed or despondent. A constant fire can be there only when a certain stage has been reached, that is when one is always inside consciously living in the psychic being, but for that all this preparation of the mind, vital, physical is necessary.

For this fire belongs to the psychic and one cannot command it always merely by the mind's effort. The psychic has to be fully liberated and that is what the Force is working to make fully possible.

The difficulty comes when either the vital with its desires or the physical with its past habitual movements comes in — as they do with almost everyone. It is then that the dryness and difficulty of spontaneous aspiration come. This dryness is a well- known obstacle in all sadhana. But one has to persist and not be discouraged. If one keep? the will fixed even in these barren periods, they pass and after their passage a greater force of aspiration and experience becomes possible.

Dryness comes usually when the vital dislikes a movement or' condition or the refusal of its desires and starts non-co-operation.

But sometimes it is a condition that has to be crossed through, e.g. the neutral or dry quietude which sometimes comes when the ordinary movements have been thrown out but nothing positive has yet come to take their place, i.e, peace, joy, a higher know- ledge or force or action.


duality ::: n. --> The quality or condition of being two or twofold; dual character or usage.

duchess ::: n. --> The wife or widow of a duke; also, a lady who has the sovereignty of a duchy in her own right. html{color:

duchy ::: n. --> The territory or dominions of a duke; a dukedom. html{color:

dumb ::: Amal: “Sri Aurobindo uses the word ‘dumb’ in the sense of mute but never of stupid or lacking in intelligence. I think the latter usage is more slang than literature.”

dziggetai ::: n. --> The kiang, a wild horse or wild ass of Thibet (Asinus hemionus). E () The fifth letter of the English alphabet. html{color:

EAR. ::: The passage of communion between the inner mind

eatst ::: a native English form of the verb, to eat, now only in formal and poetic usage.

ecclesiasticism ::: n. --> Strong attachment to ecclesiastical usages, forms, etc.

eclogue ::: n. --> A pastoral poem, in which shepherds are introduced conversing with each other; a bucolic; an idyl; as, the Ecloques of Virgil, from which the modern usage of the word has been established.

Ecstasy ::: “It has been held that ecstasy is a lower and transient passage, the peace of the Supreme is the supreme realisation, the consummate abiding experience. This may be true on the spiritual-mind plane: there the first ecstasy felt is indeed a spiritual rapture, but it can be and is very usually mingled with a supreme happiness of the vital parts taken up by the Spirit; there is an exaltation, exultation, excitement, a highest intensity of the joy of the heart and the pure inner soul-sensation that can be a splendid passage or an uplifting force but is not the ultimate permanent foundation. But in the highest ascents of the spiritual bliss there is not this vehement exaltation and excitement; there is instead an illimitable intensity of participation in an eternal ecstasy which is founded on the eternal Existence and therefore on a beatific tranquillity of eternal peace. Peace and ecstasy cease to be different and become one. The Supermind, reconciling and fusing all differences as well as all contradictions, brings out this unity; a wide calm and a deep delight of all-existence are among its first steps of self-realisation, but this calm and this delight rise together, as one state, into an increasing intensity and culminate in the eternal ecstasy, the bliss that is the Infinite.” The Life Divine

ecumenical ::: a. --> General; universal; in ecclesiastical usage, that which concerns the whole church; as, an ecumenical council.

electro-magnetic ::: a. --> Of, Pertaining to, or produced by, magnetism which is developed by the passage of an electric current.

electro-motion ::: n. --> The motion of electricity or its passage from one metal to another in a voltaic circuit; mechanical action produced by means of electricity.

electro-telegraphy ::: n. --> The art or science of constructing or using the electric telegraph; the transmission of messages by means of the electric telegraph.

elmen ::: a. --> Belonging to elms. html{color:

elohistic ::: a. --> Relating to Elohim as a name of God; -- said of passages in the Old Testament.

elohist ::: n. --> The writer, or one of the writers, of the passages of the Old Testament, notably those of Elohim instead of Jehovah, as the name of the Supreme Being; -- distinguished from Jehovist.

embassage ::: n. --> An embassy.
Message; errand.


embassy ::: n. --> The public function of an ambassador; the charge or business intrusted to an ambassador or to envoys; a public message to; foreign court concerning state affairs; hence, any solemn message.
The person or persons sent as ambassadors or envoys; the ambassador and his suite; envoys.
The residence or office of an ambassador.


emiction ::: n. --> The voiding of urine.
What is voided by the urinary passages; urine.


endostome ::: n. --> The foramen or passage through the inner integument of an ovule.
And endostoma.


enfilade ::: n. --> A line or straight passage, or the position of that which lies in a straight line.
A firing in the direction of the length of a trench, or a line of parapet or troops, etc.; a raking fire. ::: v. t. --> To pierce, scour, or rake with shot in the direction


enforce ::: v. t. --> To put force upon; to force; to constrain; to compel; as, to enforce obedience to commands.
To make or gain by force; to obtain by force; as, to enforce a passage.
To put in motion or action by violence; to drive.
To give force to; to strengthen; to invigorate; to urge with energy; as, to enforce arguments or requests.
To put in force; to cause to take effect; to give


entozoon ::: n. --> One of the Entozoa. html{color:

entrance ::: n. --> The act of entering or going into; ingress; as, the entrance of a person into a house or an apartment; hence, the act of taking possession, as of property, or of office; as, the entrance of an heir upon his inheritance, or of a magistrate into office.
Liberty, power, or permission to enter; as, to give entrance to friends.
The passage, door, or gate, for entering.
The entering upon; the beginning, or that with which the


entree ::: n. --> A coming in, or entrance; hence, freedom of access; permission or right to enter; as, to have the entree of a house.
In French usage, a dish served at the beginning of dinner to give zest to the appetite; in English usage, a side dish, served with a joint, or between the courses, as a cutlet, scalloped oysters, etc.


entry ::: n. --> The act of entering or passing into or upon; entrance; ingress; hence, beginnings or first attempts; as, the entry of a person into a house or city; the entry of a river into the sea; the entry of air into the blood; an entry upon an undertaking.
The act of making or entering a record; a setting down in writing the particulars, as of a transaction; as, an entry of a sale; also, that which is entered; an item.
That by which entrance is made; a passage leading into a


envisaged ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Envisage

envisagement ::: n. --> The act of envisaging.

envisage ::: v. t. --> To look in the face of; to apprehend; to regard.

envisaging ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Envisage

episcopalianism ::: n. --> The doctrine and usages of Episcopalians; episcopacy.

errand ::: n. --> A special business intrusted to a messenger; something to be told or done by one sent somewhere for the purpose; often, a verbal message; a commission; as, the servant was sent on an errand; to do an errand. Also, one&

esophagotomy ::: n. --> The operation of making an incision into the esophagus, for the purpose of removing any foreign substance that obstructs the passage.

espousage ::: n. --> Espousal.

estafette ::: n. --> A courier who conveys messages to another courier; a military courier sent from one part of an army to another.

estuary ::: n. --> A place where water boils up; a spring that wells forth.
A passage, as the mouth of a river or lake, where the tide meets the current; an arm of the sea; a frith. ::: a. --> Belonging to, or formed in, an estuary; as, estuary strata.


euphroe ::: n. --> A block or long slat of wood, perforated for the passage of the crowfoot, or cords by which an awning is held up.

europeanize ::: v. t. --> To cause to become like the Europeans in manners or character; to habituate or accustom to European usages.

evacuation ::: n. --> The act of emptying, clearing of the contents, or discharging.
Withdrawal of troops from a town, fortress, etc.
Voidance of any matter by the natural passages of the body or by an artificial opening; defecation; also, a diminution of the fluids of an animal body by cathartics, venesection, or other means.
That which is evacuated or discharged; especially, a discharge by stool or other natural means.


evangelistary ::: n. --> A selection of passages from the Gospels, as a lesson in divine service.

excerpts ::: passages or segments taken from a longer work.

excerpt ::: v. t. --> To select; to extract; to cite; to quote. ::: n. --> An extract; a passage selected or copied from a book or record.

exosmose ::: n. --> The passage of gases, vapors, or liquids thought membranes or porous media from within outward, in the phenomena of osmose; -- opposed to endosmose. See Osmose.

explanation ::: n. --> The act of explaining, expounding, or interpreting; the act of clearing from obscurity and making intelligible; as, the explanation of a passage in Scripture, or of a contract or treaty.
That which explains or makes clear; as, a satisfactory explanation.
The meaning attributed to anything by one who explains it; definition; interpretation; sense.
A mutual exposition of terms, meaning, or motives,


exposition ::: n. --> The act of exposing or laying open; a setting out or displaying to public view.
The act of expounding or of laying open the sense or meaning of an author, or a passage; explanation; interpretation; the sense put upon a passage; a law, or the like, by an interpreter; hence, a work containing explanations or interpretations; a commentary.
Situation or position with reference to direction of view or accessibility to influence of sun, wind, etc.; exposure; as, an


expressage ::: n. --> The charge for carrying a parcel by express.

extraction ::: n. --> The act of extracting, or drawing out; as, the extraction of a tooth, of a bone or an arrow from the body, of a stump from earth, of a passage from a book, of an essence or tincture.
Derivation from a stock or family; lineage; descent; birth; the stock from which one has descended.
That which is extracted; extract; essence.


eyght ::: n. --> An island. See Eyot. html{color:

eyot ::: n. --> A little island in a river or lake. See Ait. html{color:

fairway ::: n. --> The navigable part of a river, bay, etc., through which vessels enter or depart; the part of a harbor or channel ehich is kept open and unobstructed for the passage of vessels.

familiar visage. Sri Aurobindo [in reference to the following lines]:

fashion ::: n. --> The make or form of anything; the style, shape, appearance, or mode of structure; pattern, model; as, the fashion of the ark, of a coat, of a house, of an altar, etc.; workmanship; execution.
The prevailing mode or style, especially of dress; custom or conventional usage in respect of dress, behavior, etiquette, etc.; particularly, the mode or style usual among persons of good breeding; as, to dress, dance, sing, ride, etc., in the fashion.


fauces ::: n.pl. --> The narrow passage from the mouth to the pharynx, situated between the soft palate and the base of the tongue; -- called also the isthmus of the fauces. On either side of the passage two membranous folds, called the pillars of the fauces, inclose the tonsils.
The throat of a calyx, corolla, etc.
That portion of the interior of a spiral shell which can be seen by looking into the aperture.


feathered ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Feather ::: a. --> Clothed, covered, or fitted with (or as with) feathers or wings; as, a feathered animal; a feathered arrow.
Furnished with anything featherlike; ornamented; fringed; as, land feathered with trees. html{color:


feather ::: n. --> One of the peculiar dermal appendages, of several kinds, belonging to birds, as contour feathers, quills, and down.
Kind; nature; species; -- from the proverbial phrase, "Birds of a feather," that is, of the same species.
The fringe of long hair on the legs of the setter and some other dogs.
A tuft of peculiar, long, frizzly hair on a horse.
One of the fins or wings on the shaft of an arrow. html{color:


feat ::: n. --> An act; a deed; an exploit.
A striking act of strength, skill, or cunning; a trick; as, feats of horsemanship, or of dexterity.
Dexterous in movements or service; skillful; neat; nice; pretty. ::: v. t. html{color:


fecundity ::: n. --> The quality or power of producing fruit; fruitfulness; especially (Biol.), the quality in female organisms of reproducing rapidly and in great numbers.
The power of germinating; as in seeds.
The power of bringing forth in abundance; fertility; richness of invention; as, the fecundity of God&


ferriage ::: n. --> The price or fare to be paid for passage at a ferry.

feudalism ::: n. --> The feudal system; a system by which the holding of estates in land is made dependent upon an obligation to render military service to the kind or feudal superior; feudal principles and usages.

findst ::: a native English form of the verb, to find, now only in formal and poetic usage.

fish ::: n. --> A counter, used in various games.
A name loosely applied in popular usage to many animals of diverse characteristics, living in the water.
An oviparous, vertebrate animal usually having fins and a covering scales or plates. It breathes by means of gills, and lives almost entirely in the water. See Pisces.
The twelfth sign of the zodiac; Pisces.
The flesh of fish, used as food.


fist ::: n. --> The hand with the fingers doubled into the palm; the closed hand, especially as clinched tightly for the purpose of striking a blow.
The talons of a bird of prey.
the index mark [/], used to direct special attention to the passage which follows. ::: v. t.


fleest ::: a native English form of the verb, to flee, now only in formal and poetic usage.

flut"st ::: a native English contracted form of the verb to flute, now only in formal and poetic usage.

"For if we examine carefully, we shall find that Intuition is our first teacher. Intuition always stands veiled behind our mental operations. Intuition brings to man those brilliant messages from the Unknown which are the beginning of his higher knowledge.” The Life Divine*

“For if we examine carefully, we shall find that Intuition is our first teacher. Intuition always stands veiled behind our mental operations. Intuition brings to man those brilliant messages from the Unknown which are the beginning of his higher knowledge.” The Life Divine

funnel ::: a shaft, flue, or stack for ventilation or the passage of smoke, especially the smokestack of a ship or locomotive.

galleries ::: long narrow passages sometimes serving as a means of access to other parts of a house; corridors.

givest ::: a native English form of the verb, to give, now only in formal and poetic usage.

glossary ::: a list of terms in a special subject, field, or area of usage, with accompanying definitions; a partial dictionary.

gnawest ::: a native English form of the verb, to gnaw, now only in formal and poetic usage.

grandiose ::: Amal: “I believe that ‘grandiose’ was a frequent usage in the 19th century and stresses being ‘grand’.”

GURU. ::: One who has realised the Truth and himself possesses and is able to communicate the light, the experience, a guide who is strong enough to take by the hand and carry over difficult passages as well as to instruct and point out the way.

hadst ::: a native English form of the verb to have, now only in formal or poetic usage.

hearest ::: a native English form of the verb, to hear, now only in formal and poetic usage.

“Hell and heaven are often imaginary states of the soul or rather of the vital which it constructs about it after its passing. What is meant by hell is a painful passage through the vital or lingering there, as for instance, in many cases of suicide where one remains surrounded by the forces of suffering and turmoil created by this unnatural and violent exit. There are, of course, also worlds of mind and vital worlds which are penetrated with joyful or dark experiences. One may pass through these as the result of things formed in the nature which create the necessary affinities, but the idea of reward or retribution is a crude and vulgar conception which is a mere popular error.” Letters on Yoga

HELL AND HEAVEN. ::: They arc often imaginary states of the soul or rather of the vital which it constructs about It after its passing. What is meant by hell is a painful passage through the vital or lingering there, as for instance, in many cases of suicide where one remains surrounded by the forces of suffering and turmoil created by this unnatural and violent exit. There are, of course, also worlds of mind and vital worlds which are penetrated with Joyful or dark experiences. One may pass through these as the result of things formed in the nature which create the necessary affimties, but the Idea of reward or retri- bution is a crude and vulgar conception which is a mere popular error.

hell ::: “What is meant by hell is a painful passage through the vital or lingering there, as for instance, in many cases of suicide where one remains surrounded by the forces of suffering and turmoil created by this unnatural and violent exit.” Letters on Yoga

“If we accept the Vedic image of the Sun of Truth, . . . we may compare the action of the Higher Mind to a composed and steady sunshine, the energy of the Illumined Mind beyond it to an outpouring of massive lightnings of flaming sun-stuff. Still beyond can be met a yet greater power of the Truth-Force, an intimate and exact Truth-vision, Truth-thought, Truth-sense, Truth-feeling, Truth-action, to which we can give in a special sense the name of Intuition; . . . At the source of this Intuition we discover a superconscient cosmic Mind in direct contact with the supramental Truth-Consciousness, an original intensity determinant of all movements below it and all mental energies,—not Mind as we know it, but an Overmind that covers as with the wide wings of some creative Oversoul this whole lower hemisphere of Knowledge-Ignorance, links it with that greater Truth-Consciousness while yet at the same time with its brilliant golden Lid it veils the face of the greater Truth from our sight, intervening with its flood of infinite possibilities as at once an obstacle and a passage in our seeking of the spiritual law of our existence, its highest aim, its secret Reality.” The Life Divine

If we regard the Powers of the Reality as so many Godheads, we can say that the Overmind releases a million Godheads into action, each empowered to create its own world, each world capable of relation, communication and interplay with the others. There are in the Veda different formulations of the nature of the Gods: it is said they are all one Existence to which the sages give different names; yet each God is worshipped as if he by himself is that Existence, one who is all the other Gods together or contains them in his being; and yet again each is a separate Deity acting sometimes in unison with companion deities, sometimes separately, sometimes even in apparent opposition to other Godheads of the same Existence. In the Supermind all this would be held together as a harmonised play of the one Existence; in the Overmind each of these three conditions could be a separate action or basis of action and have its own principle of development and consequences and yet each keep the power to combine with the others in a more composite harmony. As with the One Existence, so with its Consciousness and Force. The One Consciousness is separated into many independent forms of consciousness and knowledge; each follows out its own line of truth which it has to realise. The one total and many-sided Real-Idea is split up into its many sides; each becomes an independent Idea-Force with the power to realise itself. The one Consciousness-Force is liberated into its million forces, and each of these forces has the right to fulfil itself or to assume, if needed, a hegemony and take up for its own utility the other forces. So too the Delight of Existence is loosed out into all manner of delights and each can carry in itself its independent fullness or sovereign extreme. Overmind thus gives to the One Existence-Consciousness-Bliss the character of a teeming of infinite possibilities which can be developed into a multitude of worlds or thrown together into one world in which the endlessly variable…

In its nature and law the Overmind is a delegate of the Supermind Consciousness, its delegate to the Ignorance. Or we might speak of it as a protective double, a screen of dissimilar similarity through which Supermind can act indirectly on an Ignorance whose darkness could not bear or receive the direct impact of a supreme Light. Even, it is by the projection of this luminous Overmind corona that the diffusion of a diminished light in the Ignorance and the throwing of that contrary shadow which swallows up in itself all light, the Inconscience, became at all possible. For Supermind transmits to Overmind all its realities, but leaves it to formulate them in a movement and according to an awareness of things which is still a vision of Truth and yet at the same time a first parent of the Ignorance. A line divides Supermind and Overmind which permits a free transmission, allows the lower Power to derive from the higher Power all it holds or sees, but automatically compels a transitional change in the passage. The integrality of the Supermind keeps always the essential truth of things, the total truth and the truth of its individual self-determinations clearly knit together; it maintains in them an inseparable unity and between them a close interpenetration and a free and full consciousness of each other: but in Overmind this integrality is no longer there. And yet the Overmind is well aware of the essential Truth of things; it embraces the totality; it uses the individual self-determinations without being limited by them: but although it knows their oneness, can realise it in a spiritual cognition, yet its dynamic movement, even while relying on that for its security, is not directly determined by it. Overmind Energy proceeds through an illimitable capacity of separation and combination of the powers and aspects of the integral and indivisible all-comprehending Unity. It takes each Aspect or Power and gives to it an independent action in which it acquires a full separate importance and is able to work out, we might say, its own world of creation. Purusha and Prakriti, Conscious Soul and executive Force of Nature, are in the supramental harmony a two-aspected single truth, being and dynamis of the Reality; there can be no disequilibrium or predominance of one over the other. In Overmind we have the origin of the cleavage, the trenchant distinction made by the philosophy of the Sankhyas in which they appear as two independent entities, Prakriti able to dominate Purusha and cloud its freedom and power, reducing it to a witness and recipient of her forms and actions, Purusha able to return to its separate existence and abide in a free self-sovereignty by rejection of her original overclouding material principle. So with the other aspects or powers of the Divine Reality, One and Many, Divine Personality and Divine Impersonality, and the rest; each is still an aspect and power of the one Reality, but each is empowered to act as an independent entity in the whole, arrive at the fullness of the possibilities of its separate expression and develop the dynamic consequences of that separateness. At the same time in Overmind this separateness is still founded on the basis of an implicit underlying unity; all possibilities of combination and relation between the separated Powers and Aspects, all interchanges and mutualities of their energies are freely organised and their actuality always possible.

::: "In our yoga the Nirvana is the beginning of the higher Truth, as it is the passage from the Ignorance to the higher Truth. The Ignorance has to be extinguished in order that the Truth may manifest.” Letters on Yoga*

“In our yoga the Nirvana is the beginning of the higher Truth, as it is the passage from the Ignorance to the higher Truth. The Ignorance has to be extinguished in order that the Truth may manifest.” Letters on Yoga

intercept ::: 1. To take, seize, or halt (someone or something on the way from one place to another); cut off from an intended destination. 2. To stop or check (passage, travel, etc.). 3. To stop or interrupt the course, progress, or transmission of. intercepts, intercepting, interceptor.

intermediate zone ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The intermediate zone means simply a confused condition or passage in which one is getting out of the personal consciousness and opening into the cosmic (cosmic Mind, cosmic vital, cosmic physical, something perhaps of the cosmic higher Mind) without having yet transcended the human mind levels. One is not in possession of or direct contact with the divine Truth on its own levels , but one can receive something from them, even from the overmind, indirectly. Only, as one is still immersed in the cosmic Ignorance, all that comes from above can be mixed, perverted, taken hold of for their purposes by lower, even by hostile Powers. ::: It is not necessary for everyone to struggle through the intermediate zone. If one has purified oneself, if there is no abnormal vanity, egoism, ambition or other strong misleading element, or if one is vigilant and on one"s guard, or if the psychic is in front, one can either pass rapidly and directly or with a minimum of trouble into the higher zones of consciousness where one is in direct contact with the Divine Truth.

Jhumur: “This passage always makes me think of Sri Aurobindo who is really revealing and working out these modes.”

journey ::: n. 1. A travelling from one place to another; trip or voyage. 2. Fig. Passage or progress from one stage to another. journey"s. v. 4. To make a journey; travel. journeys, journeyed, journeying.* *n. journeying, journeyings. adj. journeying.**

Journey ::: The passage from one consciousness to another ; a movement in life or a progress in sadhana.

keepest ::: a native English form of the verb, to keep, now only in formal and poetic usage.

king ::: 1. A male sovereign. 2. One that is supreme or preeminent in a particular group, category, or sphere. 3. Fig. One who or that which is preeminent in a particular category or group or field. king"s, kings, Kings, king-children, king-sages.

knowest ::: a native English form of the verb, to know, now only in formal and poetic usage.

labyrinth ::: An intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one’s way; a maze. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

labyrinth ::: an intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one"s way; a maze. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

lane ::: 1. A narrow way or passage between walls, hedges, or fences. 2. A narrow passage, course, or track. lanes.

leadst ::: a native English form of the verb, to lead, now only in formal and poetic usage.

lead ::: v. 1. To go in advance; act as a guide; show the way. 2. To guide in direction, course, action, opinion, etc. 3. Of a way, road, etc.: To serve as a passage for, conduct (a person) to or into a place; hence, to have a specified goal or direction. 4. To pass or go through; live. 5. To result in; tend toward (often followed by to). 6. To indicate, as a clue, guide or indication of a route way, course. leads, leading, leadst.* n. 7. Anything or anyone who guides or directs by leading; going in front. ::: (Note: See also *sounding leads.)

ledst ::: the past tense of the native English form of the verb, to lead, now only in formal and poetic usage.

lendst ::: a native English form of the verb, to lend, now only in formal and poetic usage.

livest ::: a native English form of the verb, to live, now only in formal and poetic usage.

liv"st ::: a native English contracted form of the verb to live, now only in formal and poetic usage.

lookst ::: a native English form of the verb, to look, now only in formal and poetic usage.

loosenest ::: a native English form of the verb, to loosen, now only in formal and poetic usage.

lovd"st ::: a native English contracted form of the verb to love, now only in formal and poetic usage.

lovest ::: a native English form of the verb, to love, now only in formal and poetic usage.

lov"st ::: a native English contracted form of the verb to love, now only in formal and poetic usage.

Madhav: “Ambassadors, because they bring a message from the unseen empire of God.” The Book of the Divine Mother

makest ::: a native English form of the verb, to make, now only in formal and poetic usage.

masseuse ::: a woman who gives massages professionally.

menial ::: pertaining to domestic servants. In current usage, lowly and sometimes degrading; servile.

mightst ::: a native English form of the adverb might, now only in formal or poetic usage.

mockst ::: a native English form of the verb, to mock, now only in formal and poetic usage.

mournst ::: a native English form of the verb, to mourn, now only in formal and poetic usage.

mov"st ::: a native English contracted form of the verb to move, now only in formal and poetic usage.

Name ::: “Name in its deeper sense is not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound, a knowable name, Nomen. Nomen in this sense, we might say, is Numen; the secret Names of the Gods are their power, quality, character of being caught up by the consciousness and made conceivable. The Infinite is nameless, but in that namelessness all possible names, Numens of the gods, the names and forms of all realities, are already envisaged and prefigured, because they are there latent and inherent in the All-Existence.” The Life Divine

name ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Name in its deeper sense is not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound, a knowable name, Nomen. Nomen in this sense, we might say, is Numen; the secret Names of the Gods are their power, quality, character of being caught up by the consciousness and made conceivable. The Infinite is nameless, but in that namelessness all possible names, Numens of the gods, the names and forms of all realities, are already envisaged and prefigured, because they are there latent and inherent in the All-Existence.” The Life Divine

“Nevertheless, the fact of this intervention from above, the fact that behind all our original thinking or authentic perception of things there is a veiled, a half-veiled or a swift unveiled intuitive element is enough to establish a connection between mind and what is above it; it opens a passage of communication and of entry into the superior spirit-ranges. There is also the reaching out of mind to exceed the personal ego limitation, to see things in a certain impersonality and universality. Impersonality is the first character of cosmic self; universality, non-limitation by the single or limiting point of view, is the character of cosmic perception and knowledge: this tendency is therefore a widening, however rudimentary, of these restricted mind areas towards cosmicity, towards a quality which is the very character of the higher mental planes,—towards that superconscient cosmic Mind which, we have suggested, must in the nature of things be the original mind-action of which ours is only a derivative and inferior process.” The Life Divine

Nirvana is a liberated condition of the being, not a world ; it is a withdrawal from the worlds and the manifestation. In our yoga the Nirvana is the beginning of the higher Truth, as it is the passage from the Ignorance to the higher Truth.

Nolini: “Griffin-Golden Hawk + Winged Lion—The piercing eye of soaring aspiration + Upsurging energy of the pure vital—Remember Vishnu’s Garuda + Durga’s lion—With these twin powers you cross safely the borderland between the lower and the upper hemisphere—the twilight world (Night and Day)—Griffin is the guardian God of this passage—dvarapalaka. Mother India—Nolini’s reply to a question from Huta.

nonnal present mind, a succession of miracles. An evolution on the supramental levels could wcO 6e of that nature ; it could be equally, if the being so chose, a more leisurely passage of one supramental state or condition of things to something beyond but still Supramental from level to divine level, a building up of divine gradations, a free growth to the supreme Supermind or beyond it to yet undreamed levels of being, consciousness and

Often, a familiar visage studying.

*One dealt with her who meets the burdened great. ::: Q. "Who is ‘One" here? Is it Love, the godhead mentioned before? If not, does this ‘dubious godhead with his torch of pain" correspond to the ‘image white and high of godlike pain" spoken of a little earlier? Or is it time whose ‘snare" occurs in the last line of the preceding passage?”

On the other hand the passage through the higher zones — higher Mind, illumined Mind, Intuition, overmind is obligatory — they are the true Intermediaries between the present consciousness and the supermind.” Letters on Yoga

On the other hand the passage through the higher zones—higher Mind, illumined Mind, Intuition, overmind is obligatory—they are the true Intermediaries between the present consciousness and the supermind.” Letters on Yoga

O sages standing in God’s holy fire

passage ::: 1. A movement from one place to another, as by going by, through, over, or across; transit or migration. 2. Fig. The process of passing from one condition or stage to another; transition. 3. An opening or entrance into, through, or out of something. 4. A path, channel, or duct through, over, or along which something may pass. 5. A hall or corridor; passageway. passages, cavern-passages.

pass ::: v. 1. To move on or ahead; proceed. 2. To move by. 3. To go or get through (something), lit. and fig. **4. To go across or over (a stream, threshold, etc.); cross. 5. To cross, traverse, in reference to times, stages, states, conditions, processes, actions, experiences, etc. 6. To be transferred from one to another; circulate. 7. To come to or toward, then go beyond. 8. To come to an end. 9. To cease to exist. 10. To convey, transfer, or transmit; deliver (often followed by on). 11. To be accepted as or believed to be. 12. To sanction or approve. passes, passed, passing. n. 13. A way, such as a narrow gap between mountains, that affords passage around, over, or through a barrier. passes. ::: pass by. To let go without notice, action, remark, etc.; leave unconsidered; disregard; overlook.

pegst ::: a native English form of the verb, to peg, now only in formal and poetic usage. To mark with pegs (pins of wood); esp. to mark the boundaries of (a piece of ground, a claim for mining or gold-digging, etc.) with pegs placed at the corners. Also fig. in the sense of marking one"s position, claim, etc.

pellucid ::: admitting the passage of light; transparent or translucent.

prefigured ::: suggested, indicated, or represented beforehand by a form or model; presaged or foreshadowed.

Q.”Who is ‘One’ here? Is it Love, the godhead mentioned before? If not, does this ‘dubious godhead with his torch of pain’ correspond to the ‘image white and high of godlike pain’ spoken of a little earlier? Or is it time whose ‘snare’ occurs in the last line of the preceding passage?”

reasonest ::: a native English form of the verb, to reason, now only in formal and poetic usage.

roamst ::: a native English form of the verb, to roam, now only in formal and poetic usage.

sage ::: n. 1. A man who is venerated for his profound wisdom. sage"s, sages, king-sages. adj. 2. Having or exhibiting profound wisdom and calm judgement.

sayest ::: a native English form of the verb, to say, now only in formal and poetic usage.

sayst ::: a native English form of the verb, to say, now only in formal and poetic usage.

seekst ::: a native English form of the verb, to seek, now only in formal and poetic usage. seek"st.

seemst ::: a native English form of the verb, to seem, now only in formal and poetic usage.

seer ::: 1. A person gifted with profound spiritual insight or knowledge; a wise person or sage who possesses intuitive powers or one to whom divine revelations are made in visions. 2. One who sees; an observer. **Seer, seers, seer-evenings, seer-summit, seer-vision"s.

seest ::: a native English form of the verb, to see, now only in formal and poetic usage.

self-knowledge ::: knowing of oneself, without help from another.
Sri Aurobindo: The possibility of a cosmic consciousness in humanity is coming slowly to be admitted in modern Psychology, like the possibility of more elastic instruments of knowledge, although still classified, even when its value and power are admitted, as a hallucination. In the psychology of the East it has always been recognised as a reality and the aim of our subjective progress. The essence of the passage over to this goal is the exceeding of the limits imposed on us by the ego-sense and at least a partaking, at most an identification with the self-knowledge which broods secret in all life and in all that seems to us inanimate. *The Life Divine
"Therefore the only final goal possible is the emergence of the infinite consciousness in the individual; it is his recovery of the truth of himself by self-knowledge and by self-realisation, the truth of the Infinite in being, the Infinite in consciousness, the Infinite in delight repossessed as his own Self and Reality of which the finite is only a mask and an instrument for various expression.” The Life Divine
"The Truth-Consciousness is everywhere present in the universe as an ordering self-knowledge by which the One manifests the harmonies of its infinite potential multiplicity.” The Life Divine


sendesta ::: a native English form of the verb, to send, now only in formal and poetic usage.

shaft ::: 1. A ray or beam of light. **2. A vertical or slightly inclined well-like passageway. shafts.**

shalt ::: second person singular of shall, now only in formal and poetic usage.

shutst ::: a native English form of the verb, to shut, now only in formal and poetic usage.

"Silence means freedom from thoughts and vital movements —- when the whole consciousness is quite still.” The Mother - Flowers and Their Messages, Glossary Of Philosophical And Psychological Terms.

“Silence means freedom from thoughts and vital movements—when the whole consciousness is quite still.” The Mother—Flowers and Their Messages, Glossary Of Philosophical And Psychological Terms.

snatches ::: 1. Brief spells of effort, activity or experience. 2. Short passages, a few words, of a song, etc.; small portions, a few bars, of a melody or tune.

soundst ::: a native English form of the verb, to sound, now only in formal and poetic usage.

speakest ::: a native English form of the verb, to speak, now only in formal and poetic usage.

speakst ::: a native English form of the verb, to speak, now only in formal and poetic usage.

Sri Aurobindo: "Hell and heaven are often imaginary states of the soul or rather of the vital which it constructs about it after its passing. What is meant by hell is a painful passage through the vital or lingering there, as for instance, in many cases of suicide where one remains surrounded by the forces of suffering and turmoil created by this unnatural and violent exit. There are, of course, also worlds of mind and vital worlds which are penetrated with joyful or dark experiences. One may pass through these as the result of things formed in the nature which create the necessary affinities, but the idea of reward or retribution is a crude and vulgar conception which is a mere popular error.” Letters on Yoga

"Sri Aurobindo: "It has been held that ecstasy is a lower and transient passage, the peace of the Supreme is the supreme realisation, the consummate abiding experience. This may be true on the spiritual-mind plane: there the first ecstasy felt is indeed a spiritual rapture, but it can be and is very usually mingled with a supreme happiness of the vital parts taken up by the Spirit; there is an exaltation, exultation, excitement, a highest intensity of the joy of the heart and the pure inner soul-sensation that can be a splendid passage or an uplifting force but is not the ultimate permanent foundation. But in the highest ascents of the spiritual bliss there is not this vehement exaltation and excitement; there is instead an illimitable intensity of participation in an eternal ecstasy which is founded on the eternal Existence and therefore on a beatific tranquillity of eternal peace. Peace and ecstasy cease to be different and become one. The Supermind, reconciling and fusing all differences as well as all contradictions, brings out this unity; a wide calm and a deep delight of all-existence are among its first steps of self-realisation, but this calm and this delight rise together, as one state, into an increasing intensity and culminate in the eternal ecstasy, the bliss that is the Infinite.” The Life Divine

*Sri Aurobindo: "The Mask is mentioned not twice but four times in this opening passage and it is purposely done to keep up the central connection of the idea running through the whole. The ambassadors wear this grey Mask, so your criticism cannot stand since there is no separate mask coming as part of a new idea but a very pointed return to the principal note indicating the identity of the influence throughout. It is not a random recurrence but a purposeful touch carrying a psychological meaning.” — 1948 Letters on Savitri*

Sri Aurobindo: "What is meant by hell is a painful passage through the vital or lingering there, as for instance, in many cases of suicide where one remains surrounded by the forces of suffering and turmoil created by this unnatural and violent exit.” *Letters on Yoga

standest ::: a native English form of the verb, to stand, now only in formal and poetic usage.

::: *"Stevenson has a striking passage in "Kidnapped” where the hero notes that his fear is felt primarily not in the heart but the stomach.” Letters on Yoga

“Stevenson has a striking passage in”Kidnapped” where the hero notes that his fear is felt primarily not in the heart but the stomach.” Letters on Yoga

storeys ::: floors or levels in a building (in modern usage, stories).

strain ::: n. 1. A passage of melody, music, or songs as rendered or heard. 2. Kind, type or sort. strains. v. 3. To force to extreme effort, exert to the utmost (one"s limbs, organs, powers). 4. To make an extreme or excessive effort at or after some object of attainment. 5. Fig. To purify or refine by filtration. strains, strained, straining.

strait ::: a narrow passage of water connecting two large bodies of water. straits.

summoned ::: 1. Called for the presence of, as by command, message, or signal; called. 2. Called into action; roused; called forth (often followed by up). summons, summoning.

summons ::: an authoritative command, message, or signal by which someone or something is called.

suntracks ::: A word coined by Sri Aurobindo. Lines of travel, passage, or motion; the actual courses or routes followed (which need not be any beaten or visible path, or leave any traces, as the paths of ships, birds in the air, comets, etc.).

suntracks ::: a word coined by Sri Aurobindo. Lines of travel, passage, or motion; the actual courses or routes followed (which need not be any beaten or visible path, or leave any traces, as the paths of ships, birds in the air, comets, etc.).

SUPERMIND (DESCENT). The process is a, spiritual evolutionary process, concentrated into a brief period. As we envisage it, it must manifest m a few first and then spread, but is not likely to overpower the earth in a moment.

tempst ::: a native English form of the verb, to tempt, now only in formal and poetic usage.

That is itot the transformation I envisage.

The Apsaras then are the divine Hetairae of Paradise, beautiful singers and actresses whose beauty and art relieve the arduous and world-long struggle of the Gods against the forces that tend towards disruption by the Titans who would restore Matter to its original atomic condition or of dissolution by the sages and hermits who would make phenomena dissolve prematurely into the One who is above phenomena. They rose from the Ocean, says Valmiki, seeking who should choose them as brides, but neither the Gods nor the Titans accepted them, therefore are they said to be common or universal. The Harmony of Virtue

"The Avatar does not come as a thaumaturgic magician, but as the divine leader of humanity and the exemplar of a divine humanity. Even human sorrow and physical suffering he must assume and use so as to show, first, how that suffering may be a means of redemption, — as did Christ, — secondly, to show how, having been assumed by the divine soul in the human nature, it can also be overcome in the same nature, — as did Buddha. The rationalist who would have cried to Christ, ‘If thou art the Son of God, come down from the cross," or points out sagely that the Avatar was not divine because he died and died too by disease, — as a dog dieth, — knows not what he is saying: for he has missed the root of the whole matter. Even, the Avatar of sorrow and suffering must come before there can be the Avatar of divine joy; the human limitation must be assumed in order to show how it can be overcome; and the way and the extent of the overcoming, whether internal only or external also, depends upon the stage of the human advance; it must not be done by a non-human miracle.” Essays on the Gita

“The Avatar does not come as a thaumaturgic magician, but as the divine leader of humanity and the exemplar of a divine humanity. Even human sorrow and physical suffering he must assume and use so as to show, first, how that suffering may be a means of redemption,—as did Christ,—secondly, to show how, having been assumed by the divine soul in the human nature, it can also be overcome in the same nature,—as did Buddha. The rationalist who would have cried to Christ, ‘If thou art the Son of God, come down from the cross,’ or points out sagely that the Avatar was not divine because he died and died too by disease,—as a dog dieth,—knows not what he is saying: for he has missed the root of the whole matter. Even, the Avatar of sorrow and suffering must come before there can be the Avatar of divine joy; the human limitation must be assumed in order to show how it can be overcome; and the way and the extent of the overcoming, whether internal only or external also, depends upon the stage of the human advance; it must not be done by a non-human miracle.” Essays on the Gita

:::   "The ear is the passage of communion between the inner mind centre and the thought-forces or thought-waves of the universal Nature.” *Letters on Yoga

“The ear is the passage of communion between the inner mind centre and the thought-forces or thought-waves of the universal Nature.” Letters on Yoga

“The intermediate zone means simply a confused condition or passage in which one is getting out of the personal consciousness and opening into the cosmic (cosmic Mind, cosmic vital, cosmic physical, something perhaps of the cosmic higher Mind) without having yet transcended the human mind levels. One is not in possession of or direct contact with the divine Truth on its own levels , but one can receive something from them, even from the overmind, indirectly. Only, as one is still immersed in the cosmic Ignorance, all that comes from above can be mixed, perverted, taken hold of for their purposes by lower, even by hostile Powers.

the linguistic usage that is grammatical and natural to native speakers of a language.

"The message of the Gita is the gospel of the Divinity in man who by force of an increasing union unfolds himself out of the veil of the lower Nature, reveals to the human soul his cosmic spirit, reveals his absolute transcendences, reveals himself in man and in all beings. The potential outcome here of this union, this divine Yoga, man growing towards the Godhead, the Godhead manifest in the human soul and to the inner human vision, is our liberation from limited ego and our elevation to the higher nature of a divine humanity.” Essays on the Gita ::: *Divinity"s.

“The message of the Gita is the gospel of the Divinity in man who by force of an increasing union unfolds himself out of the veil of the lower Nature, reveals to the human soul his cosmic spirit, reveals his absolute transcendences, reveals himself in man and in all beings. The potential outcome here of this union, this divine Yoga, man growing towards the Godhead, the Godhead manifest in the human soul and to the inner human vision, is our liberation from limited ego and our elevation to the higher nature of a divine humanity.” Essays on the Gita

The possibility of a cosmic consciousness in humanity is coming slowly to be admitted in modern Psychology, like the possibility of more elastic instruments of knowledge, although still classified, even when its value and power are admitted, as a hallucination. In the psychology of the East it has always been recognised as a reality and the aim of our subjective progress. The essence of the passage over to this goal is the exceeding of the limits imposed on us by the ego-sense and at least a partaking, at most an identification with the self-knowledge which broods secret in all life and in all that seems to us inanimate. The Life Divine

". . . the proper function of the thought-mind is to observe, understand, judge with a dispassionate delight in knowledge and open itself to messages and illuminations playing upon all that it observes and upon all that is yet hidden from it but must progressively be revealed, messages and illuminations that secretly flash down to us from the divine Oracle concealed in light above our mentality whether they seem to descend through the intuitive mind or arise from the seeing heart.” The Synthesis of Yoga*

“… the proper function of the thought-mind is to observe, understand, judge with a dispassionate delight in knowledge and open itself to messages and illuminations playing upon all that it observes and upon all that is yet hidden from it but must progressively be revealed, messages and illuminations that secretly flash down to us from the divine Oracle concealed in light above our mentality whether they seem to descend through the intuitive mind or arise from the seeing heart.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"The real source of knowledge is the Lord in the heart; ‘I am seated in the heart of every man and from me is knowledge," says the Gita; the Scripture is only a verbal form of that inner Veda, of that self-luminous Reality, it is sabdabrahma: the mantra, says the Veda, has risen from the heart, from the secret place where is the seat of the truth, sadanâd rtasya, guhâyâm. That origin is its sanction; but still the infinite Truth is greater than its word. Nor shall you say of any Scripture that it alone is all-sufficient and no other truth can be admitted, as the Vedavadins said of the Veda, nânyad astîti vâdinah. This is a saving and liberating word which must be applied to all the Scriptures of the world. Take all the Scriptures that are or have been, Bible and Koran and the books of the Chinese, Veda and Upanishads and Purana and Tantra and Shastra and the Gita itself and the sayings of thinkers and sages, prophets and Avatars, still you shall not say that there is nothing else or that the truth your intellect cannot find there is not true because you cannot find it there. That is the limited thought of the sectarian or the composite thought of the eclectic religionist, not the untrammelled truth-seeking of the free and illumined mind and God-experienced soul. Heard or unheard before, that always is the truth which is seen by the heart of man in its illumined depths or heard within from the Master of all knowledge, the knower of the eternal Veda.” Essays on the Gita*

“The real source of knowledge is the Lord in the heart; ‘I am seated in the heart of every man and from me is knowledge,’ says the Gita; the Scripture is only a verbal form of that inner Veda, of that self-luminous Reality, it is sabdabrahma: the mantra, says the Veda, has risen from the heart, from the secret place where is the seat of the truth, sadanâd rtasya, guhâyâm. That origin is its sanction; but still the infinite Truth is greater than its word. Nor shall you say of any Scripture that it alone is all-sufficient and no other truth can be admitted, as the Vedavadins said of the Veda, nânyad astîti vâdinah. This is a saving and liberating word which must be applied to all the Scriptures of the world. Take all the Scriptures that are or have been, Bible and Koran and the books of the Chinese, Veda and Upanishads and Purana and Tantra and Shastra and the Gita itself and the sayings of thinkers and sages, prophets and Avatars, still you shall not say that there is nothing else or that the truth your intellect cannot find there is not true because you cannot find it there. That is the limited thought of the sectarian or the composite thought of the eclectic religionist, not the untrammelled truth-seeking of the free and illumined mind and God-experienced soul. Heard or unheard before, that always is the truth which is seen by the heart of man in its illumined depths or heard within from the Master of all knowledge, the knower of the eternal Veda.” Essays on the Gita

“The real source of knowledge is the Lord in the heart; ‘I am seated in the heart of every man and from me is knowledge,’ says the Gita; the Scripture is only a verbal form of that inner Veda, of that self-luminous Reality, it is sabdabrahma: the mantra, says the Veda, has risen from the heart, from the secret place where is the seat of the truth, sadanâdrtasya, guhâyâm. That origin is its sanction; but still the infinite Truth is greater than its word. Nor shall you say of any Scripture that it alone is all-sufficient and no other truth can be admitted, as the Vedavadins said of the Veda, nânyadastîtivâdinah. This is a saving and liberating word which must be applied to all the Scriptures of the world. Take all the Scriptures that are or have been, Bible and Koran and the books of the Chinese, Veda and Upanishads and Purana and Tantra and Shastra and the Gita itself and the sayings of thinkers and sages, prophets and Avatars, still you shall not say that there is nothing else or that the truth your intellect cannot find there is not true because you cannot find it there. That is the limited thought of the sectarian or the composite thought of the eclectic religionist, not the untrammelled truth-seeking of the free and illumined mind and God-experienced soul. Heard or unheard before, that always is the truth which is seen by the heartof man in its illumined depths or heard within from the Master of all knowledge, the knower of the eternal Veda.” Essays on the Gita

"The true essence of sacrifice is not self-immolation, it is self-giving; its object not self-effacement, but self-fulfilment; its method not self-mortification, but a greater life, not self-mutilation, but a transformation of our natural human parts into divine members, not self-torture, but a passage from a lesser satisfaction to a greater Ananda.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“The true essence of sacrifice is not self-immolation, it is self-giving; its object not self-effacement, but self-fulfilment; its method not self-mortification, but a greater life, not self-mutilation, but a transformation of our natural human parts into divine members, not self-torture, but a passage from a lesser satisfaction to a greater Ananda.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"The universe is certainly or has been up to now in appearance a rough and wasteful game with the dice of chance loaded in favour of the Powers of darkness, the Lords of obscurity, falsehood, death and suffering. But we have to take it as it is and find out — if we reject the way out of the old sages — the way to conquer. Spiritual experience shows that there is behind it all a wide terrain of equality, peace, calm, freedom, and it is only by getting into it that we can have the eye that sees and hope to gain the power that conquers.” Letters on Yoga

“The universe is certainly or has been up to now in appearance a rough and wasteful game with the dice of chance loaded in favour of the Powers of darkness, the Lords of obscurity, falsehood, death and suffering. But we have to take it as it is and find out—if we reject the way out of the old sages—the way to conquer. Spiritual experience shows that there is behind it all a wide terrain of equality, peace, calm, freedom, and it is only by getting into it that we can have the eye that sees and hope to gain the power that conquers.” Letters on Yoga

thinkst ::: a native English form of the verb, to think, now only in formal and poetic usage.

::: **"This sraddhâ — the English word faith is inadequate to express it — is in reality an influence from the supreme Spirit and its light a message from our supramental being which is calling the lower nature to rise out of its petty present to a great self-becoming and self-exceeding.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“This sraddhâ—the English word faith is inadequate to express it—is in reality an influence from the supreme Spirit and its light a message from our supramental being which is calling the lower nature to rise out of its petty present to a great self-becoming and self-exceeding.” The Synthesis of Yoga

thoroughfares ::: places of passage from one location to another especially roads.

thread ::: n. 1. A fine cord of flax, cotton, or other fibrous material spun out to considerable length, especially when composed of two or more filaments twisted together. 2. Any fine line, stream, mark, or piece. 3. Fig. Likened to a thread in passing (one"s way) through or over (something). 4. Something having the fineness or slenderness of a filament, as a thin continuous stream of liquid, a fine line of colour, etc. threads. *v. 5. To make one"s way, as through a passage or between obstacles. 6. To pass (thread, film, magnetic tape, etc.) through (something. Also fig. 7. To pervade. *threaded, threading.

torturest ::: a native English form of the verb, to torture, now only in formal and poetic usage.

touchest ::: a native English form of the verb, to touch, now only in formal and poetic usage.

transition ::: passage from one form, state, or condition, to another. transition-line.

transparency ::: 1. The quality of being clear and allowing the free passage of light. 2. Something such as an object, etc. that allows light to pass through it; transparent. transparencies.

trickst ::: a native English form of the verb, to trick, now only in formal and poetic usage.

tunnel ::: an underground or underwater passage. tunnel"s, tunnels.

Two things render that culmination more facile than it would otherwise be. Overmind in the descent towards material creation has originated modifications of itself,—Intuition especially with its penetrative lightning flashes of truth lighting up local points and stretches of country in our consciousness,—which can bring the concealed truth of things nearer to our comprehension, and, by opening ourselves more widely first in the inner being and then as a result in the outer surface self also to the messages of these higher ranges of consciousness, by growing into them, we can become ourselves also intuitive and overmental beings, not limited by the intellect and sense, but capable of a more universal comprehension and a direct touch of truth in its very self and body. In fact flashes of enlightenment from these higher ranges already come to us, but this intervention is mostly fragmentary, casual or partial; we have still to begin to enlarge ourselves into their likeness and organise in us the greater Truth activities of which we are potentially capable. But, secondly, Overmind, Intuition, even Supermind not only must be, as we have seen, principles inherent and involved in the Inconscience from which we arise in the evolution and inevitably destined to evolve, but are secretly present, occult actively with flashes of intuitive emergence in the cosmic activity of Mind, Life and Matter. It is true that their action is concealed and, even when they emerge, it is modified by the medium, material, vital, mental in which they work and not easily recognisable. Supermind cannot manifest itself as the Creator Power in the universe from the beginning, for if it did, the Ignorance and Inconscience would be impossible or else the slow evolution necessary would change into a rapid transformation scene. Yet at every step of the material energy we can see the stamp of inevitability given by a supramental creator, in all the development of life and mind the play of the lines of possibility and their combination which is the stamp of Overmind intervention. As Life and Mind have been released in Matter, so too must in their time these greater powers of the concealed Godhead emerge from the involution and their supreme Light descend into us from above. …

veilst ::: a native English form of the verb, to veil, now only in formal and poetic usage.

vestibules ::: passages, halls, or antechambers between the outer door and the interior parts of a house or building.

visage ::: 1. The face, usually with reference to features, expression, etc.; countenance. 2. Aspect; appearance. visages.

-visaged ::: having a face or visage as specified. many-visaged.

visage ::: familiar visage. Sri Aurobindo [in reference to the following lines]:

way ::: 1. A road, path, or highway affording passage from one place to another. Also fig. 2. Any line of passage or progression, esp. in a particular direction. 3. A direction or vicinity. 4. A course of life, action, or experience. 5. A prescribed course of life or conduct; also in pl. 6. A method, plan, or means for attaining a goal. 7. A method, plan, or means for attaining a goal. 8. Space for passing or advancing. 9. Characteristic or habitual manner. 10. Distance. ways, earth-ways, half-way, world-ways, Angel of the Way, evolving Way, heavenly Way, middle Way, shining upward Way, terrestrial Way, the Way.

—we may compare the action of the Higher Mind to a composed and steady sunshine, the energy of the Illumined Mind beyond it to an outpouring of massive lightnings of flaming sun-stuff. Still beyond can be met a yet greater power of the Truth-Force, an intimate and exact Truth-vision, Truth-thought, Truth-sense, Truth-feeling, Truth-action, to which we can give in a special sense the name of Intuition; for though we have applied that word for want of a better to any supra-intellectual direct way of knowing, yet what we actually know as intuition is only one special movement of self-existent knowledge. This new range is its origin; it imparts to our intuitions something of its own distinct character and is very clearly an intermediary of a greater Truth-Light with which our mind cannot directly communicate. At the source of this Intuition we discover a superconscient cosmic Mind in direct contact with the supramental Truth-Consciousness, an original intensity determinant of all movements below it and all mental energies,—not Mind as we know it, but an Overmind that covers as with the wide wings of some creative Oversoul this whole lower hemisphere of Knowledge-Ignorance, links it with that greater Truth-Consciousness while yet at the same time with its brilliant golden Lid it veils the face of the greater Truth from our sight, intervening with its flood of infinite possibilities as at once an obstacle and a passage in our seeking of the spiritual law of our existence, its highest aim, its secret Reality. This then is the occult link we were looking for; this is the Power that at once connects and divides the supreme Knowledge and the cosmic Ignorance….



QUOTES [104 / 104 - 1454 / 1454]


KEYS (10k)

   10 Sri Aurobindo
   8 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   8 Sri Ramakrishna
   5 Dhammapada
   5 Confucius
   4 Tseu-tse
   3 The Mother
   2 Udanavarga
   2 Seneca
   2 Rig Veda
   2 Ramakrishna
   2 Peter J Carroll
   2 Katha Upanishad
   2 Buddhist Canons in Pali
   2 Bhagavad Gita
   2 Anonymous
   2 Angelus Silesius
   1 Zen Proverb
   1 Wei Wu Wei
   1 Vishnu Purana
   1 Vasishtha
   1 Upanishad
   1 Tsu-king
   1 Tseng Tee
   1 Tolstoi
   1 Thích Nhất Hạnh
   1 Tertullian
   1 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   1 Robert Burton
   1 Rabindranath Tagore
   1 Psalms. IX30
   1 Moses Maimonides
   1 Metta Sutta
   1 Manu
   1 Ma havagga
   1 Mahaparinibbana Sutta
   1 Lao-Tse. 44
   1 Lao-Tse-35
   1 Lao-Tse
   1 Kung Tingan [no info found on 'Kung Tingan']. Quote occurs in several places on web. One is:
   1 Kena Upanishad
   1 Joseph Campbell
   1 John Milton
   1 Iris Murdoch
   1 Georg C Lichtenberg
   1 Fo-sho-hing-tsan-king
   1 Fenelon
   1 Eliphas Levi
   1 Democritus
   1 Deepak Chopra
   1 Buson
   1 Angelius Silesius
   1 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   1 Paracelsus
   1 Nichiren
   1 Hafiz
   1 Aleister Crowley
   1 A E van Vogt

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   60 Bob Saget
   48 Angie Sage
   32 Laozi
   29 Richelle Mead
   23 Anonymous
   16 Riley Sager
   16 Lao Tzu
   12 Otto von Bismarck
   11 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   11 Mehmet Murat ildan
   10 Mahatma Gandhi
   9 Stephen King
   9 Alain Rene Lesage
   8 Terry Pratchett
   7 William Shakespeare
   7 Sage Francis
   7 Rumi
   6 Swami Vivekananda
   6 Paulo Coelho
   5 Sri Aurobindo

1:Is there a single man who can see what the Sage cannot even conceive? ~ Tseu-tse,
2:To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage.
   ~ Eliphas Levi,
3:Alone the sage can recognize the sage. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
4:The sage's rule of moral conduct has its principle in the hearts of all men. ~ Tseu-tse,
5:The sage knows himself. ~ Lao-Tse-35, the Eternal Wisdom
6:Truly the sage is not other than God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
7:Alone the sage can recognize the sage. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
8:In the world we live in, one fool makes many fools, but one sage only a few sages. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
9:The saint is a man who disciplines his ego. The sage is a man who rids himself of his ego." ~ Wei Wu Wei,
10:Nothing here below should trouble the sage. ~ Bhagavad Gita, the Eternal Wisdom
11:The sage is not a savant nor the savant a sage. ~ Lao-Tse. 44, the Eternal Wisdom
12:The sage does not 'know' the Self, because he is the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
13:The sage is happy everywhere, the whole earth is his. ~ Confucius, the Eternal Wisdom
14:Blush not to submit to a sage who knows more than thyself. ~ Democritus, the Eternal Wisdom
15:When an ordinary man attains knowledge he is a sage; when a sage attains understanding, he is an ordinary man." ~ Zen Proverb,
16:The sage increases his wisdom by all that he can gather from others. ~ Fenelon, the Eternal Wisdom
17:Is there a single man who can see what the Sage cannot even conceive? ~ Tseu-tse, the Eternal Wisdom
18:What is there more precious than a sage? He sets peace between all men. ~ Tsu-king, the Eternal Wisdom
19:Nowhere and in no situation is the sage dissatisfied with his condition. ~ Confucius, the Eternal Wisdom
20:O sage, very high raise thyself, even to the most high dwelling of Truth. ~ Ma havagga, the Eternal Wisdom
21:Since the sage has no creed of his own, he never engages in [useless] discussions. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
22:It may be given to the householder to see God. It was the case with Janaka, the great sage. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
23:The sage's rule of moral conduct has its principle in the hearts of all men. ~ Tseu-tse, the Eternal Wisdom
24:The sage is never alone...he bears in himself the Lord of all things. ~ Angelius Silesius, the Eternal Wisdom
25:The mind of the Enlightened Sage (jnani) never exists apart from Brahman, the Absolute. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
26:If you do not meet a sage following the same road as yourself, then walk alone. ~ Dhammapada, the Eternal Wisdom
27:It may be given even to the householder to see God. It was the case with Janaka, the great sage. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
28:But hail, thou Goddess, sage and holy, Hail, divinest melancholy, Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the Sense of human sight.
   ~ John Milton,
29:The sage having perceived God by the spiritual union casts from him grief and joy. ~ Katha Upanishad, the Eternal Wisdom
30:The sage regards the heart of every man in the millions of the crowd and sees only one heart. ~ Tseng Tee, the Eternal Wisdom
31:The sage having seen the Self in everything, when he leaves this world, becomes immortal. ~ Kena Upanishad, the Eternal Wisdom
32:The sage is never alone... he bears in himself the Lord of all things. My Blessings.
   ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother, 21 September,
33:There is no goal to be reached. There is nothing to be attained. You are the Self. You exist always." ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, (1879 - 1950) a Hindu sage, Wikipedia.,
34:Let the sage unifying all his attentive regard see in the divine Spirit all things visible and invisible. ~ Manu, the Eternal Wisdom
35:The sage's quest is for himself, the quest of the-ignorant for other than himself. ~ Confucius, "Lun-Yu," II 15.20, the Eternal Wisdom
36:The sage does not talk, the talented ones talk. And the stupid ones argue." ~ Kung Tingan [no info found on 'Kung Tingan']. Quote occurs in several places on web. One is:,
37:Death and decrepitude are inherent in the world. The sage who knows the nature of things, does not grieve. ~ Metta Sutta, the Eternal Wisdom
38:The sage does not die any more, for he is already dead, dead to all vanity, dead to all that is not God. ~ Angelus Silesius, the Eternal Wisdom
39:By zeal, by vigilance, by peace of soul the sage can make himself as an island which the waves cannot over flow. ~ Dhammapada, the Eternal Wisdom
40:Even the saint and the sage continue to have difficulties and to be limited by their human nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, The Difficulties of Yoga,
41:Even as the high mountain-chains remain immobile in the midst of the tempest, so the true sage remains unshaken amidst praise and blame. ~ Dhammapada, the Eternal Wisdom
42:There is the mystic realm whence leaps the power
Whose fire burns in the eyes of seer and sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
43:The truth is neither one nor two. It is as it is." ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, (1879 -1950) Indian sage and jivanmukta, (liberated being), Wikipedia See: https://bit.ly/3dbo2Dt,
44:Man, wouldst thou be a sage, wouldst thou know thyself and know God? First thou shouldst extinguish in thyself the desire of the world. ~ Angelus Silesius, the Eternal Wisdom
45:Regard incessantly this body as the bespangled chariot of a king; it gladdens the simpleton but not the wise, dazzles the fool but not the sage. ~ Udanavarga, the Eternal Wisdom
46:The sage should be figured in the image of a robust athlete whom long exercise has hardened, one who can baffle the efforts of the most obstinate enemy. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
47:The sage is always at peace; thus his mentality is equally in equilibrium and at ease. His mind is simple and pure, his soul is not subject to lassitude. ~ Lao-Tse, the Eternal Wisdom
48:The self is master of the self; what other master can it have? The sage who has made himself master of himself, rends his bonds and breaks his chains. ~ Udanavarga, the Eternal Wisdom
49:The small man builds cages for everyone he knows
   While the sage, who has to duck his head when the moon is low,
   Keeps dropping keys all night long
   For the beautiful rowdy prisoners. ~ Hafiz,
50:By virile activity, by vigilant effort, by empire over himself, by moderation, the sage can make himself an island which the floods shall not inundate. ~ Dhammapada, the Eternal Wisdom
51:Thus the sage, always equal, awaits the comm and of destiny, while the vulgar throw themselves into a thousand dangers in a search for happiness at any price. ~ Confucius, the Eternal Wisdom
52:Having studied books, the sage uniquely consecrated to knowledge and wisdom, should leave books completely aside as a man who wants the rice abandons the husk. ~ Upanishad, the Eternal Wisdom
53:Non-action is unceasing activity. The sage is characterized by eternal and intense activity. His stillness is like the apparent stillness of a fast rotating gyroscope. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
54:Ordinary men pronounce a sackful of discourses on religion, but do not put a grain into practice, while the sage speaks little, but his whole life is religion put in to action ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
55:But what a force is that of the sage who can live at peace with men without having the mobility of water and remain in the midst of them firm and incorruptible ! ~ Confucius, the Eternal Wisdom
56:I salute It, this supreme Deity, which is beyond the senses, which mind and speech cannot define and which can be discerned only by the mind of the true sage. ~ Vishnu Purana, the Eternal Wisdom
57:You speak of paths as if you were somewhere and the Self somewhere else and you had to go and attain it. But in fact the Self is here and now and you are it always." ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, (1879-1950), a Hindu sage, Wikipedia.,
58:As the rivers flow into the ocean and lose their name and form, the sage losing name and form disappears into the supreme Spirit and himself becomes that Spirit. ~ Mundaka Upanishad, the Eternal Wisdom
59:Every man's true teacher is his own Higher Self, and when the life is brought under the control of reason, this Higher Self is released from bondage to appetites and impulses, and becomes Priest, Sage and Illuminator.
   ~ Manly P Hall,
60:... Excellent men shall be steeped in poverty, the people will become inhospitable to their guests, the voice of the parasite shall be more agreeable to them than the melody of the harp touched by the sage's finger. ~ Saint Columbcille,
61:Your duty is to be; and not to be this or that." ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, (1879-1950), Hindu sage, recommended self-enquiry as the principal means to remove ignorance and abide in Self-awareness, Wikipedia.,
62:The superior man perseveres in the middle path. Even though he remains unknown and the world esteems him not, he feels no regret. The sage alone is capable of such an action. ~ Tsang-Yung, the Eternal Wisdom
63:Where all the religions meet is the realization in no mystical sense, but in the most worldly and everyday sense that GOD IS EVERYTHING, AND EVERYTHING IS GOD…" ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, (1879-1950) was a Hindu sage of world fame, Wikipedia.,
64:Ordinary men pronounce a sackful of discourses on religion, but do not put a grain into practice, while the sage speaks little, but his whole life is religion put in to action ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
65:He who goes from this world without knowing that Imperishable is poor in soul, but he who goes from this world having known that Imperishable, he is the sage. ~ Brihadaranyaka Upanishad III. 8. 10, the Eternal Wisdom
66:Thus is it even with the seer and sage;
For still the human limits the divine:
Out of our thoughts we must leap up to sight, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
67:Already God is near, the Truth is close:
Because the dark atheist body knows him not,
Must the sage deny the Light, the seer his soul? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
68:Hearken to the word of the sage with the ear of the soul, even when his conduct has no similitude to his teachings. Men should listen to good counsel even though it be written on a wall. ~ Sadi; Sulistan, the Eternal Wisdom
69:Now get thou this, and then you shall be happy....The fact is, desire is a bottomless pit which can never fill up, or like the all-consuming fire which burns the fiercer, the more we feed it..." ~ Lakshmana Sarma, (1879-1965) Indian sage. https://bit.ly/33R3bTr,
70:The Self is neither within or without." ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, (1879-1950), a Hindu sage. Since the 1930s his teachings have been popularized in the West, resulting in his worldwide recognition as an enlightened being, Wikipedia.,
71:It is ridiculous to say either 'I have not realized the Self'; or 'I have realized the Self'; are there two selves, for one to be the object of the other's realization?" ~ "The Collected Works of Ramana Maharshi,", (1972, 1997). An Indian sage, (1879 - 1950), Wikipedia.,
72:Just as a pot dissolves into clay, a wave into water, or a bracelt into gold, so also the phenomenal universe which has arisen in me will also dissolve into Me." ~ From the "Ashtavakra Gita.", ((c. 500-400 BC), dialogue between the sage Ashtavakra & King Janaka, Wikipedia.,
73:In a small fragile seed a great tree lurks,
In a tiny gene a thinking being is shut;
A little element in a little sperm,
It grows and is a conqueror and a sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
74:Knowledge, the knower and that which is known, as the triad, do not really exist in reality. I am that stainless Consciousness in which this triad appears through ignorance." ~ From the "Ashtavakra Gita.", (c. 500-400 BC), dialogue between the sage Ashtavakra & King Janaka, Wik.,
75:When the sage has recognised impermanence, subjection to grief and unreality of substance as the three characteristic qualities of this world, how can his heart own attachment to the things of this world? ~ Fo-shu-hing-tsan-king, the Eternal Wisdom
76:Philosophy not only purifies the reason and predisposes it to the contact of the universal and the infinite, but tends to stabilise the nature and create the tranquillity of the sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Higher and the Lower Knowledge,
77:The sage here surpasses God. God fears nothing by the benefit of his nature; the sage fears nothing, but by the sole strength of his spirit. This indeed is great, to have the weakness of a mortal and yet the fearlessness of a god. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
78:The 'I' casts off the illusion of 'I' and yet remains as 'I'. Such is the paradox of Self-Realization." ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, (1879-950), Hindu sage, recommended self-enquiry as the principal means to remove ignorance and abide in Self-awareness, Wikipedia.,
79:But for the god in their breasts unsatisfied, but for his spurrings
Soon would the hero turn beast and the sage reel back to the savage;
Man from his difficult heights would recoil and be mud in the earth-mud. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
80:Nothing is more evident to the sage than the things hidden in the secrecy of his consciousness, nothing more manifest than the subtle causes of his actions. Therefore the superior man watches attentively over the secret inspirations of his conscience. ~ Tsu-Tse: Tsung-yung, the Eternal Wisdom
81:Anyone who masters these techniques fully has achieved a tremendous power over himself more valuable than health, love, fame, or riches. He has set himself free from the effects of the world; nothing can touch him unless he wills it. As it has been said, the sage who knows how can live comfortably in hell.
   ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null,
82:I looked into my own heart and I saw reflected there in its entirety the vast world with all its passions,-pride, hope, fear and the conflagration of the desires. So gazing I understood the word of the ancient sage, "Man is a mirror in which there appears the image of the world." ~ Ryonen, the Eternal Wisdom
83:the priest and the mage, the man of piety, the just man, the man of wisdom, the saint, the prophet, the Rishi, the Yogi, the seer, the spiritual sage and the mystic ... the saint, the devotee, the spiritual sage, the seer, the prophet, the servant of God, the soldier of the spirit
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine,
84:Such were a dream of some sage at night when he muses in fancy,
Imaging freely a flawless world where none were afflicted,
No man inferior, all could sublimely equal and brothers
Live in a peace divine like the gods in their luminous regions. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
85:But for the god in their breasts unsatisfied, but for his spurrings
Soon would the hero turn beast and the sage reel back to the savage;
Man from his difficult heights would recoil and be mud in the earth-mud.
This by pain we prevent; we compel his ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
86:The senses and the mind seek to convince thee, sova in are they, that they are the end of all things. The senses and the mind are only instruments and play things. Behind the feelings and the thoughts, my brother; there dwells a more puissant master, an unknown sage; it is called the Self. ~ Nietzsche Zarathustra, the Eternal Wisdom
87:We are the javelins of Destiny, we are the children of Wotan,
We are the human Titans, the supermen dreamed by the sage.
A cross of the beast and demoniac with the godhead of power and will,
We were born in humanity's sunset, to the Night is our pil ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Children of Wotan,
88:When water is calm, it reflects objects like a mirror. This tranquillity, this perfect level is the model for the sage. If water is transparent when it is in perfect repose, much more so is the intellectual essence. The heart of the sage in perfect repose is the mirror of heaven and of earth and of all existences. ~ Tsuang tse, the Eternal Wisdom
89:When water is still, it reflects objects like a mirror. This stillness, this perfect level is the model of the sage. If water is translucent when it is in perfect rest, much more so must it be with the intellectual essence. The heart of the sage in perfect repose is the mirror of earth and heaven and all existences. ~ Chwang-tse-, the Eternal Wisdom
90:The eighth-century sage Salih of Qaswin said to his students,“Keep knocking on the door of Allah & never stop,for by His mercy,Allah will eventually open His door for those who sincerely seek Him.”The mystic Rabia Al-Adawiyya overheard this statement as she was walking by the mosque and said, “Oh Salih, who said Allah’s door is closed to begin with?” ~ Rabia al-Adawiyya,
91:A sage was asked, "What is the most important work? who is the man the most important in life ?" The sage replied, The most important work is to love all men, because that is the life-work of each man. The most important man is the one with whom you have to do at this moment, because you can never know whether you will have to do with another. ~ Tolstoi, the Eternal Wisdom
92:The thought of the ego occupies only the man of unsound understanding, the sage recognises that it has no foundation; he examines the world rationally and concludes that all formations of existence are vain and hasten towards dissolution; alone the Law remains eternal. When man by his efforts has acquired this knowledge he contemplates the truth. ~ Fo-sho-hing-tsan-kiag, the Eternal Wisdom
93:The superior man or the sage loves all beings that live, but has not for them the sentiments of humanity which he has for men. He has for men sentiments of humanity, but he does not love them with the love which he has for his father and mother. He loves his father and mother with filial love and he has for men sentiments of humanity. He has for men sentiments of humanity and he loves all beings that live. ~ Meug Tac, the Eternal Wisdom
94:In India the mother is the center of the family and our highest ideal. She is to us the representative of God, as God is the mother of the universe. It was a female sage who first found the unity of God, and laid down this doctrine in one of the first hy mns of the Vedas. Our God is both personal and absolute, the absolute is male, the personal, female. And thus it comes that we now say: 'The first manifestation of God is the hand that rocks the cradle'. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
95:By what is man impelled to act sin, though not willing it, as if brought to it by force? It is desire it is wrath born of the principle of passion, a mighty and devouring and evil thing; know this for the enemy. Eternal enemy of the sage, in the form of desire it obscures his knowledge and is an insatiable fire. The senses are supreme in the body, above the senses is the mind, higher than the mind is the understanding and higher than the understanding the spiritual Self. Know then that which is higher than the understanding, by the self control thyself and slay this difficult enemy, desire. ~ Bhagavad Gita III. 36. 37. 39. 42. 43, the Eternal Wisdom
96:11. The Ultimate Boon:The gods and goddesses then are to be understood as embodiments and custodians of the elixir of Imperishable Being but not themselves the Ultimate in its primary state. What the hero seeks through his intercourse with them is therefore not finally themselves, but their grace, i.e., the power of their sustaining substance. This miraculous energy-substance and this alone is the Imperishable; the names and forms of the deities who everywhere embody, dispense, and represent it come and go. This is the miraculous energy of the thunderbolts of Zeus, Yahweh, and the Supreme Buddha, the fertility of the rain of Viracocha, the virtue announced by the bell rung in the Mass at the consecration, and the light of the ultimate illumination of the saint and sage. Its guardians dare release it only to the duly proven. ~ Joseph Campbell,
97:Turn your thoughts now, and lift up your thoughts to a devout and joyous contemplation on sage Vyasa and Vasishtha, on Narda and Valmiki. Contemplate on the glorious Lord Buddha, Jesus the Christ, prophet Mohammed, the noble Zoroaster (Zarathushtra), Lord Mahavira, the holy Guru Nanak. Think of the great saints and sages of all ages, like Yajnavalkya, Dattatreya, Sulabha and Gargi, Anasooya and Sabari, Lord Gauranga, Mirabai, Saint Theresa and Francis of Assisi. Remember St. Augustine, Jallaludin Rumi, Kabir, Tukaram, Ramdas, Ramakrishna Paramhamsa, Vivekananda and Rama Tirtha. Adore in thy heart the sacred memory of Mahatma Gandhi, sage Ramana Maharishi, Aurobindo Ghosh, Gurudev Sivananda and Swami Ramdas. They verily are the inspirers of humanity towards a life of purity, goodness and godliness. Their lives, their lofty examples, their great teachings constitute the real wealth and greatest treasure of mankind today.
   ~ Sri Chidananda, Advices On Spiritual Living,
98:The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
99:In the name of Him Who created and sustains the world, the Sage Who endowed tongue with speech.
He attains no honor who turns the face from the doer of His mercy.
The kings of the earth prostate themselves before Him in supplication.
He seizes not in haste the disobedient, nor drives away the penitent with violence. The two worlds are as a drop of water in the ocean of His knowledge.
He withholds not His bounty though His servants sin; upon the surface of the earth has He spread a feast, in which both friend and foe may share.
Peerless He is, and His kingdom is eternal. Upon the head of one He placed a crown another he hurled from the throne to the ground.
The fire of His friend He turned into a flower garden; through the water of the Nile He sended His foes to perdition.
Behind the veil He sees all, and concealed our faults with His own goodness.

He is near to them that are downcast, and accepts the prayers of them that lament.
He knows of the things that exist not, of secrets that are untold.
He causes the moon and the sun to revolve, and spreads water upon the earth.
In the heart of a stone hath He placed a jewel; from nothing had He created all that is.
Who can reveal the secret of His qualities; what eye can see the limits of His beauty?
The bird of thought cannot soar to the height of His presence, nor the hand of understanding reach to the skirt of His praise.
Think not, O Saadi, that one can walk in the road of purity except in the footsteps of Mohammed (Peace and Blessings be Upon Him)
~ Saadi, The Bustan of Sa'di,
100:The most outward psychological form of these things is the mould or trend of the nature towards certain dominant tendencies, capacities, characteristics, form of active power, quality of the mind and inner life, cultural personality or type. The turn is often towards the predominance of the intellectual element and the capacities which make for the seeking and finding of knowledge and an intellectual creation or formativeness and a preoccupation with ideas and the study of ideas or of life and the information and development of the reflective intelligence. According to the grade of the development there is produced successively the make and character of the man of active, open, inquiring intelligence, then the intellectual and, last, the thinker, sage, great mind of knowledge. The soul-powers which make their appearance by a considerable development of this temperament, personality, soul-type, are a mind of light more and more open to all ideas and knowledge and incomings of Truth; a hunger and passion for knowledge, for its growth in ourselves, for its communication to others, for its reign in the world, the reign of reason and right and truth and justice and, on a higher level of the harmony of our greater being, the reign of the spirit and its universal unity and light and love; a power of this light in the mind and will which makes all the life subject to reason and its right and truth or to the spirit and spiritual right and truth and subdues the lower members to their greater law; a poise in the temperament turned from the first to patience, steady musing and calm, to reflection, to meditation, which dominates and quiets the turmoil of the will and passions and makes for high thinking and pure living, founds the self-governed sattwic mind, grows into a more and more mild, lofty, impersonalised and universalised personality. This is the ideal character and soul-power of the Brahmana, the priest of knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, 4:15 - Soul-Force and the Fourfold Personality
101:higher mind or late vision logic ::: Even more rare, found stably in less than 1% of the population and even more emergent is the turquoise altitude.

Cognition at Turquoise is called late vision-logic or cross-paradigmatic and features the ability to connect meta-systems or paradigms, with other meta-systems. This is the realm of coordinating principles. Which are unified systems of systems of abstraction to other principles. ... Aurobindo indian sage and philosopher offers a more first-person account of turquoise which he called higher-mind, a unitarian sense of being with a powerful multiple dynamism capable of formation of a multitude of aspects of knowledge, ways of action, forms and significances of becoming of all of which a spontaneous inherient knowledge.

Self-sense at turquoise is called Construct-aware and is the first stage of Cook-Greuter's extension of Loveigers work on ego-development. The Construct-aware stage sees individuals for the first time as exploring more and more complex thought-structures with awareness of the automatic nature of human map making and absurdities which unbridaled complexity and logical argumentation can lead. Individuals at this stage begin to see their ego as a central point of reference and therefore a limit to growth. They also struggle to balance unique self-expressions and their concurrent sense of importance, the imperical and intuitive knowledge that there is no fundamental subject-object separation and the budding awareness of self-identity as temporary which leads to a decreased ego-desire to create a stable self-identity. Turquoise individuals are keenly aware of the interplay between awareness, thought, action and effects. They seek personal and spiritual transformation and hold a complex matrix of self-identifications, the adequecy of which they increasingly call into question. Much of this already points to Turquoise values which embrace holistic and intuitive thinking and alignment to universal order in a conscious fashion.

Faith at Turquoise is called Universalising and can generate faith compositions in which conceptions of Ultimate Reality start to include all beings. Individuals at Turquoise faith dedicate themselves to transformation of present reality in the direction of transcendent actuality. Both of these are preludes to the coming of Third Tier. ~ Essential Integral, L4.1-54, Higher Mind,
102:O Death, thou lookst on an unfinished world
Assailed by thee and of its road unsure,
Peopled by imperfect minds and ignorant lives,
And sayest God is not and all is vain.
How shall the child already be the man?
Because he is infant, shall he never grow?
Because he is ignorant, shall he never learn?
In a small fragile seed a great tree lurks,
In a tiny gene a thinking being is shut;
A little element in a little sperm,
It grows and is a conqueror and a sage.
Then wilt thou spew out, Death, God's mystic truth,
Deny the occult spiritual miracle?
Still wilt thou say there is no spirit, no God?
A mute material Nature wakes and sees;
She has invented speech, unveiled a will.
Something there waits beyond towards which she strives,
Something surrounds her into which she grows:
To uncover the spirit, to change back into God,
To exceed herself is her transcendent task.
In God concealed the world began to be,
Tardily it travels towards manifest God:
Our imperfection towards perfection toils,
The body is the chrysalis of a soul:
The infinite holds the finite in its arms,
Time travels towards revealed eternity.
A miracle structure of the eternal Mage,
Matter its mystery hides from its own eyes,
A scripture written out in cryptic signs,
An occult document of the All-Wonderful's art.
All here bears witness to his secret might,
In all we feel his presence and his power.
A blaze of his sovereign glory is the sun,
A glory is the gold and glimmering moon,
A glory is his dream of purple sky.
A march of his greatness are the wheeling stars.
His laughter of beauty breaks out in green trees,
His moments of beauty triumph in a flower;
The blue sea's chant, the rivulet's wandering voice
Are murmurs falling from the Eternal's harp.
This world is God fulfilled in outwardness.
His ways challenge our reason and our sense;
By blind brute movements of an ignorant Force,
By means we slight as small, obscure or base,
A greatness founded upon little things,
He has built a world in the unknowing Void.
His forms he has massed from infinitesimal dust;
His marvels are built from insignificant things.
If mind is crippled, life untaught and crude,
If brutal masks are there and evil acts,
They are incidents of his vast and varied plot,
His great and dangerous drama's needed steps;
He makes with these and all his passion-play,
A play and yet no play but the deep scheme
Of a transcendent Wisdom finding ways
To meet her Lord in the shadow and the Night:
Above her is the vigil of the stars;
Watched by a solitary Infinitude
She embodies in dumb Matter the Divine,
In symbol minds and lives the Absolute.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
103:Evil
Hasten towards the good, leave behind all evil thoughts, for to do good without enthusiasm is to have a mind which delights in evil.

If one does an evil action, he should not persist in it, he should not delight in it. For full of suffering is the accumulation of evil.

If one does a good action, he should persist in it and take delight in it. Full of happiness is the accumulation of good.

As long as his evil action has not yet ripened, an evildoer may experience contentment. But when it ripens, the wrong-doer knows unhappiness.

As long as his good action has not yet ripened, one who does good may experience unhappiness. But when it ripens, the good man knows happiness.

Do not treat evil lightly, saying, "That will not touch me." A jar is filled drop by drop; even so the fool fills himself little by little with wickedness.

Do not treat good lightly, saying, "That will not touch me." A jar is filled drop by drop; even so the sage fills himself little by little with goodness.

The merchant who is carrying many precious goods and who has but few companions, avoids dangerous roads; and a man who loves his life is wary of poison. Even so should one act regarding evil.

A hand that has no wound can carry poison with impunity; act likewise, for evil cannot touch the righteous man.

If you offend one who is pure, innocent and defenceless, the insult will fall back on you, as if you threw dust against the wind.

Some are reborn here on earth, evil-doers go to the worlds of Niraya,1 the just go to the heavenly worlds, but those who have freed themselves from all desire attain Nirvana.

Neither in the skies, nor in the depths of the ocean, nor in the rocky caves, nowhere upon earth does there exist a place where a man can find refuge from his evil actions.

Neither in the skies, nor in the depths of the ocean, nor in the rocky caves, nowhere upon earth does there exist a place where a man can hide from death.

People have the habit of dealing lightly with thoughts that come. And the atmosphere is full of thoughts of all kinds which do not in fact belong to anybody in particular, which move perpetually from one person to another, very freely, much too freely, because there are very few people who can keep their thoughts under control.

When you take up the Buddhist discipline to learn how to control your thoughts, you make very interesting discoveries. You try to observe your thoughts. Instead of letting them pass freely, sometimes even letting them enter your head and establish themselves in a quite inopportune way, you look at them, observe them and you realise with stupefaction that in the space of a few seconds there passes through the head a series of absolutely improbable thoughts that are altogether harmful.
...?
Conversion of the aim of life from the ego to the Divine: instead of seeking one's own satisfaction, to have the service of the Divine as the aim of life.
*
What you must know is exactly the thing you want to do in life. The time needed to learn it does not matter at all. For those who wish to live according to Truth, there is always something to learn and some progress to make. 2 October 1969 ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
104:The Supreme Discovery
   IF WE want to progress integrally, we must build within our conscious being a strong and pure mental synthesis which can serve us as a protection against temptations from outside, as a landmark to prevent us from going astray, as a beacon to light our way across the moving ocean of life.
   Each individual should build up this mental synthesis according to his own tendencies and affinities and aspirations. But if we want it to be truly living and luminous, it must be centred on the idea that is the intellectual representation symbolising That which is at the centre of our being, That which is our life and our light.
   This idea, expressed in sublime words, has been taught in various forms by all the great Instructors in all lands and all ages.
   The Self of each one and the great universal Self are one. Since all that is exists from all eternity in its essence and principle, why make a distinction between the being and its origin, between ourselves and what we place at the beginning?
   The ancient traditions rightly said:
   "Our origin and ourselves, our God and ourselves are one."
   And this oneness should not be understood merely as a more or less close and intimate relationship of union, but as a true identity.
   Thus, when a man who seeks the Divine attempts to reascend by degrees towards the inaccessible, he forgets that all his knowledge and all his intuition cannot take him one step forward in this infinite; neither does he know that what he wants to attain, what he believes to be so far from him, is within him.
   For how could he know anything of the origin until he becomes conscious of this origin in himself?
   It is by understanding himself, by learning to know himself, that he can make the supreme discovery and cry out in wonder like the patriarch in the Bible, "The house of God is here and I knew it not."
   That is why we must express that sublime thought, creatrix of the material worlds, and make known to all the word that fills the heavens and the earth, "I am in all things and all beings."When all shall know this, the promised day of great transfigurations will be at hand. When in each atom of Matter men shall recognise the indwelling thought of God, when in each living creature they shall perceive some hint of a gesture of God, when each man can see God in his brother, then dawn will break, dispelling the darkness, the falsehood, the ignorance, the error and suffering that weigh upon all Nature. For, "all Nature suffers and laments as she awaits the revelation of the Sons of God."
   This indeed is the central thought epitomising all others, the thought which should be ever present to our remembrance as the sun that illumines all life.
   That is why I remind you of it today. For if we follow our path bearing this thought in our hearts like the rarest jewel, the most precious treasure, if we allow it to do its work of illumination and transfiguration within us, we shall know that it lives in the centre of all beings and all things, and in it we shall feel the marvellous oneness of the universe.
   Then we shall understand the vanity and childishness of our meagre satisfactions, our foolish quarrels, our petty passions, our blind indignations. We shall see the dissolution of our little faults, the crumbling of the last entrenchments of our limited personality and our obtuse egoism. We shall feel ourselves being swept along by this sublime current of true spirituality which will deliver us from our narrow limits and bounds.
   The individual Self and the universal Self are one; in every world, in every being, in every thing, in every atom is the Divine Presence, and man's mission is to manifest it.
   In order to do that, he must become conscious of this Divine Presence within him. Some individuals must undergo a real apprenticeship in order to achieve this: their egoistic being is too all-absorbing, too rigid, too conservative, and their struggles against it are long and painful. Others, on the contrary, who are more impersonal, more plastic, more spiritualised, come easily into contact with the inexhaustible divine source of their being.But let us not forget that they too should devote themselves daily, constantly, to a methodical effort of adaptation and transformation, so that nothing within them may ever again obscure the radiance of that pure light.
   But how greatly the standpoint changes once we attain this deeper consciousness! How understanding widens, how compassion grows!
   On this a sage has said:
   "I would like each one of us to come to the point where he perceives the inner God who dwells even in the vilest of human beings; instead of condemning him we would say, 'Arise, O resplendent Being, thou who art ever pure, who knowest neither birth nor death; arise, Almighty One, and manifest thy nature.'"
   Let us live by this beautiful utterance and we shall see everything around us transformed as if by miracle.
   This is the attitude of true, conscious and discerning love, the love which knows how to see behind appearances, understand in spite of words, and which, amid all obstacles, is in constant communion with the depths.
   What value have our impulses and our desires, our anguish and our violence, our sufferings and our struggles, all these inner vicissitudes unduly dramatised by our unruly imagination - what value do they have before this great, this sublime and divine love bending over us from the innermost depths of our being, bearing with our weaknesses, rectifying our errors, healing our wounds, bathing our whole being with its regenerating streams?
   For the inner Godhead never imposes herself, she neither demands nor threatens; she offers and gives herself, conceals and forgets herself in the heart of all beings and things; she never accuses, she neither judges nor curses nor condemns, but works unceasingly to perfect without constraint, to mend without reproach, to encourage without impatience, to enrich each one with all the wealth he can receive; she is the mother whose love bears fruit and nourishes, guards and protects, counsels and consoles; because she understands everything, she can endure everything, excuse and pardon everything, hope and prepare for everything; bearing everything within herself, she owns nothing that does not belong to all, and because she reigns over all, she is the servant of all; that is why all, great and small, who want to be kings with her and gods in her, become, like her, not despots but servitors among their brethren.
   How beautiful is this humble role of servant, the role of all who have been revealers and heralds of the God who is within all, of the Divine Love that animates all things....
   And until we can follow their example and become true servants even as they, let us allow ourselves to be penetrated and transformed by this Divine Love; let us offer Him, without reserve, this marvellous instrument, our physical organism. He shall make it yield its utmost on every plane of activity.
   To achieve this total self-consecration, all means are good, all methods have their value. The one thing needful is to persevere in our will to attain this goal. For then everything we study, every action we perform, every human being we meet, all come to bring us an indication, a help, a light to guide us on the path.
   Before I close, I shall add a few pages for those who have already made apparently fruitless efforts, for those who have encountered the pitfalls on the way and seen the measure of their weakness, for those who are in danger of losing their self-confidence and courage. These pages, intended to rekindle hope in the hearts of those who suffer, were written by a spiritual worker at a time when ordeals of every kind were sweeping down on him like purifying flames.
   You who are weary, downcast and bruised, you who fall, who think perhaps that you are defeated, hear the voice of a friend. He knows your sorrows, he has shared them, he has suffered like you from the ills of the earth; like you he has crossed many deserts under the burden of the day, he has known thirst and hunger, solitude and abandonment, and the cruellest of all wants, the destitution of the heart. Alas! he has known too the hours of doubt, the errors, the faults, the failings, every weakness.
   But he tells you: Courage! Hearken to the lesson that the rising sun brings to the earth with its first rays each morning. It is a lesson of hope, a message of solace.
   You who weep, who suffer and tremble, who dare not expect an end to your ills, an issue to your pangs, behold: there is no night without dawn and the day is about to break when darkness is thickest; there is no mist that the sun does not dispel, no cloud that it does not gild, no tear that it will not dry one day, no storm that is not followed by its shining triumphant bow; there is no snow that it does not melt, nor winter that it does not change into radiant spring.
   And for you too, there is no affliction which does not bring its measure of glory, no distress which cannot be transformed into joy, nor defeat into victory, nor downfall into higher ascension, nor solitude into radiating centre of life, nor discord into harmony - sometimes it is a misunderstanding between two minds that compels two hearts to open to mutual communion; lastly, there is no infinite weakness that cannot be changed into strength. And it is even in supreme weakness that almightiness chooses to reveal itself!
   Listen, my little child, you who today feel so broken, so fallen perhaps, who have nothing left, nothing to cover your misery and foster your pride: never before have you been so great! How close to the summits is he who awakens in the depths, for the deeper the abyss, the more the heights reveal themselves!
   Do you not know this, that the most sublime forces of the vasts seek to array themselves in the most opaque veils of Matter? Oh, the sublime nuptials of sovereign love with the obscurest plasticities, of the shadow's yearning with the most royal light!
   If ordeal or fault has cast you down, if you have sunk into the nether depths of suffering, do not grieve - for there indeed the divine love and the supreme blessing can reach you! Because you have passed through the crucible of purifying sorrows, the glorious ascents are yours.
   You are in the wilderness: then listen to the voices of the silence. The clamour of flattering words and outer applause has gladdened your ears, but the voices of the silence will gladden your soul and awaken within you the echo of the depths, the chant of divine harmonies!
   You are walking in the depths of night: then gather the priceless treasures of the night. In bright sunshine, the ways of intelligence are lit, but in the white luminosities of the night lie the hidden paths of perfection, the secret of spiritual riches.
   You are being stripped of everything: that is the way towards plenitude. When you have nothing left, everything will be given to you. Because for those who are sincere and true, from the worst always comes the best.
   Every grain that is sown in the earth produces a thousand. Every wing-beat of sorrow can be a soaring towards glory.
   And when the adversary pursues man relentlessly, everything he does to destroy him only makes him greater.
   Hear the story of the worlds, look: the great enemy seems to triumph. He casts the beings of light into the night, and the night is filled with stars. He rages against the cosmic working, he assails the integrity of the empire of the sphere, shatters its harmony, divides and subdivides it, scatters its dust to the four winds of infinity, and lo! the dust is changed into a golden seed, fertilising the infinite and peopling it with worlds which now gravitate around their eternal centre in the larger orbit of space - so that even division creates a richer and deeper unity, and by multiplying the surfaces of the material universe, enlarges the empire that it set out to destroy.
   Beautiful indeed was the song of the primordial sphere cradled in the bosom of immensity, but how much more beautiful and triumphant is the symphony of the constellations, the music of the spheres, the immense choir that fills the heavens with an eternal hymn of victory!
   Hear again: no state was ever more precarious than that of man when he was separated on earth from his divine origin. Above him stretched the hostile borders of the usurper, and at his horizon's gates watched jailers armed with flaming swords. Then, since he could climb no more to the source of life, the source arose within him; since he could no more receive the light from above, the light shone forth at the very centre of his being; since he could commune no more with the transcendent love, that love offered itself in a holocaust and chose each terrestrial being, each human self as its dwelling-place and sanctuary.
   That is how, in this despised and desolate but fruitful and blessed Matter, each atom contains a divine thought, each being carries within him the Divine Inhabitant. And if no being in all the universe is as frail as man, neither is any as divine as he!
   In truth, in truth, in humiliation lies the cradle of glory! 28 April 1912 ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago, The Supreme Discovery,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:A sage steers by the bright light of confusion and doubt. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
2:The torch of doubt and chaos, this is what the sage steers by. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
3:Vain was the chief's, the sage's pride! They had no poet, and they died ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
4:When the sage points at the moon, all that the idiot sees is the finger. ~ anthony-de-mello, @wisdomtrove
5:Even virtue followed beyond reason's rule May stamp the just man knave, the sage a fool. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
6:Whatever poet, orator, or sage may say of it, old age is still old age. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
7:The Artist," an ancient sage had once said, "is always sitting on the doorsteps of the rich. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
8:If one is not oneself a sage or saint, the best thing one can do is to study the words of those who were. ~ aldous-huxley, @wisdomtrove
9:Every being is Narayana. Man or animal, sage or knave, nay, the whole universe, is Narayana, the Supreme Spirit. ~ sri-ramakrishna, @wisdomtrove
10:One cannot apologize for something fundamental, and a child feels and knows this as well and as deeply as any sage. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
11:Thus, when the Sage who abides as Brahman, which is Pure Being, obtains his disembodied absolute state, he is never again reborn. ~ adi-shankara, @wisdomtrove
12:Learned we may be with another man's learning: we can only be wise with wisdom of our own: [I hate a sage who is not wise for himself] ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
13:The sage never tries to store things up. The more he does for others, the more he has. The more he gives to others, the greater his abundance. ~ lao-tzu, @wisdomtrove
14:He who is not sage and wise, humane and just, cannot use secret agent.s. And he who is not delicate and subtle cannot get the truth out of them. ~ sun-tzu, @wisdomtrove
15:The career of a sage is of two kinds: He is either honoured by all in the world, Like a flower waving its head, Or else he disappears into the silent forest. ~ lao-tzu, @wisdomtrove
16:The sage embraces things. Ordinary men discriminate amongst them and parade their discriminations before others. So I say; those who discriminate, fail to see. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
17:I have observed that not the man who hopes when others despair, but the man who despairs when others hope, is admired by a large class of persons as a sage. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
18:The superior man accords with the course of the Mean. Though he may be all unknown, unregarded by the world, he feels no regret - It is only the sage who is able for this. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
19:If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
20:The wisdom in the story of the most educated and powerful person is often not greater than the wisdom in the story of a child, and the life of a child can teach us as much as the life of a sage. ~ rachel-naomi-remen, @wisdomtrove
21:One's life is an act with no actor, and thus it has always been recognized that the insane man that has lost his mind is a parody of the sage who has transcended his ego. If one is paranoid, the other is metanoid. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
22:Isn't it a pleasure to study and practice what you have learned? Isn't it also great when friends visit from distant places? If one remains not annoyed when he is not understood by people around him, isn't he a sage? ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
23:Water becomes clear and transparent when in a quiescent stage. How much the more wonderful will be the mind of a sage when poised in quiescence! It is the mirror of heaven and earth, reflecting the ten thousand things. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
24:The Portal of God is nonexistence. All things sprang from nonexistence. Existence could not make existence existence. It must have proceeded from nonexistence, and nonexistence and nothing are one. Herein is the abiding place of the sage. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
25:The way which the superior man pursues, reaches wide and far, and yet is secret. Common men and women, however ignorant, may intermeddle with the knowledge of it; yet in its utmost reaches, there is that which even the sage does not know. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
26:The saying goes, &
27:The sage has the sun and moon by his side and the universe under his arm. He blends everything into a harmonious whole. . . . He blends the disparities of ten thousand years into one complete purity. All things are blended like this and mutually involve each other. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
28:All to whom want is terrible, upon whatever principle, ought to think themselves obliged to learn the sage maxims of our parsimonious ancestors, and attain the salutary arts of contracting expense; for without economy none can be rich, and with it few can be poor. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
29:We possess our body by chance and we are already pleased with it. If our physical bodies went through ten thousand transformations without end, how incomparable would this joy be! Therefore the sage roams freely in the realm in which nothing can escape, but all endures. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
30:I want to start two institutions, one in Madras and one in Calcutta, to carry out my plan; and that plan briefly is to bring the Vedantic ideals into the everyday practical life of the saint or the sinner, of the sage or the ignoramus, of the Brahmin or the Pariah. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
31:The integral sage, the nondual sage, is here to show us otherwise. Known generally as "Tantric," these sages insist on transcending life by living it. They insist on finding release by engagement, finding nirvana in the midst of samsara, finding total liberation by complete immersion. ~ ken-wilber, @wisdomtrove
32:The Taoist sage Lao Tzu explained that ‘in the pursuit of learning we come to know more and more’. But if we want to awaken, we need to ‘know less and less until things simply are as they are’. We need to let go of all our beliefs about life, which obscure the wordless reality of what-is. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
33:Heaven cannot but be high. Earth cannot but be broad. The sun and moon cannot but revolve. All creation cannot but flourish. To do so is their TAO. But it is not from extensive study that this may be known, nor by dialectical skill that his may be made clear. The true sage will have none of these. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
34:Even to the sage who's doing Sahaja Samadhi, the great guru, I'd say: "Hey buddy, you know, I like the robes and everything, but remember, you're only touching infinity. And if you claim to be doing more, I think you're pretty much in the senses and the body and the mind because infinity is endless." ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
35:The non-action of the wise man is not inaction. It is not studied. It is not shaken by anything. The sage is quiet because he is not moved, not because he wills to be quiet. . . . Joy does all things without concern. For emptiness, stillness, tranquillity, tastelessness, silence, and non-action are the root of all things. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
36:The love of a Sage for his fellows likewise finds expression amongst mankind. Were he not told sop, he would not know that he loved his fellows. But whether he knows it or whether he does not know it, whether he hears it or whether he does not hear it, his love for his is without end, and mankind cease not to repose therein. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
37:When a pot is broken the space that was in it becomes one with space; so too when the limitation caused by the body and its adjuncts is removed the Sage, realized during life, shines as Brahman, becoming absorbed in Brahman he already was, like milk in milk, water in water, or oil in oil, and is radiant as the One Supreme Self. ~ adi-shankara, @wisdomtrove
38:The fundamental motif at the heart of many ancient myths is that the primal oneness of being is manifesting as the multiplicity of life, so that it can come to know itself. As the Gnostic sage Simon Magus says in ‘The Great Announcement’: There is one power… begetting itself, increasing itself, seeking itself, finding itself… One root of the All. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
39:Every one is struggling for freedom-from the atom to the star. The ignorant man is satisfied if he can get freedom within a certain limit-if he can get rid of the bondage of hunger or of being thirsty. But that sage feels that there is a stronger bondage which has to be thrown off. He would not consider the freedom of the Red Indian as freedom at all. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
40:When Newton saw an apple fall, he found In that slight startle from his contemplation- &
41:I have now come to a stage of realization in which I see that God is walking in every human form and manifesting Himself alike through the sage and the sinner, the virtuous and the vicious. Therefore when I meet different people I say to myself, God in the form of the saint, God in the form of the sinner, God in the form of the righteous, God in the form of the unrighteous. ~ sri-ramakrishna, @wisdomtrove
42:Rama, the ancient idol of the heroic ages, the embodiment of truth, of morality, the ideal son, the ideal husband, and above all, the ideal king, this Rama has been presented before us by the great sage Valmiki. No language can be purer, none chaster, none more beautiful, and at the same time simpler, than the language in which the great poet has depicted the life of Rama. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
43:Experience has repeatedly confirmed that well-known maxim of Bacon's that &
44:How great is the path proper to the Sage! Like overflowing water, it sends forth and nourishes all things, and rises up to the height of heaven. All-complete is its  greatness! It embraces the three hundred rules of ceremony, and the three thousand rules of demeanor. It waits for the proper man, and then it is trodden. Hence it is  said, &
45:The reason why rivers and seas receive the homage of a hundred mountain streams is that they keep below them. Thus they are able to reign over all the mountain streams. So the sage, wishing to be above men, putteth himself below them; wishing to be before them, he putteth himself behind them. Thus, though his place be above men, they do not feel his weight; though his place be before them, they do not count it an injury. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
46:As regards the quietude of the sage, he is not quiet because quietness is said to be good. He is quiet because the multitude of things cannot disturb his quietude. When water is still, one's beard and eyelashes are reflected in it. A skilled carpenter uses it in a level to obtain a measurement. If still water is so clear, how much more are the mental faculties! The mind of the sage is the mirror of heaven and earth in which all things are reflected. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
47:In India the mother is the center of the family and our highest ideal. She is to us the representative of God, as God is the mother of the universe. It was a female sage who first found the unity of God, and laid down this doctrine in one of the first hy mns of the Vedas. Our God is both personal and absolute, the absolute is male, the personal, female. And thus it comes that we now say: &
48:. . . the fools of this world prefer to look for sages far away. They don't believe that the wisdom of their own mind is the sage . . . the sutras say, "Mind is the teaching." But people of no understanding don't believe in their own mind or that by understanding this teaching they can become a sage. They prefer to look for distant knowledge and long for things in space, buddha-images, light, incense, and colors. They fall prey to falsehood and lose their minds to insanity. ~ bodhidharma, @wisdomtrove
49:Individuality in universality is the plan of creation. Each cell has its part in bringing about consciousness. Man is individual and at the same time universal. It is while realising our individual nature that we realise even our national and universal nature. Each is an infinite circle whose centre is everywhere and circumference nowhere. By practice one can feel universal Selfhood which is the essence of Hinduism. He who sees in every being his own Self is a Pandita (sage). ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
50:Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had a world where everybody said, &
51:If a man approaches a fact in the world around him with a judgment arising from his previous experiences, he shuts himself off by this judgment from the quiet, complete effect which this fact can have on him. The learner must be able each moment to make himself a perfectly empty vessel into which the new world flows. Knowledge is received only in those moments in which every judgment, every criticism coming from ourselves, is silent. For example, when we meet a person, the question is not at all whether we are wiser than he. Even the most unreasoning child has something to reveal to the greatest sage. And if he approach the child with his prejudgment, be it ever so wise, he pushes his wisdom like a dulled glass in front of what the child ought to reveal to him. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
52:Humanity is an organism, inherently rejecting all that is deleterious, that is, wrong, and absorbing after trial what is beneficial, that is, right. If so disposed, the Architect of the Universe, we must assume, might have made the world and man perfect, free from evil and from pain, as angels in heaven are thought to be; but although this was not done, man has been given the power of advancement rather than of retrogression. The Old and New Testaments remain, like other sacred writings of other lands, of value as records of the past and for such good lessons as they inculcate. Like the ancient writers of the Bible our thoughts should rest upon this life and our duties here. "To perform the duties of this world well, troubling not about another, is the prime wisdom," says Confucius, great sage and teacher. The next world and its duties we shall consider when we are placed in it. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Don't go to the circus. ~ Angie Sage,
2:The sage knows himself. ~ Lao-Tse-35,
3:Theodophilus Fortitude Fry ~ Angie Sage,
4:The sage acts by doing nothing. ~ Laozi,
5:Watch and wait, boy. Watch and wait. ~ Angie Sage,
6:I knew a Sage once. Trashy little thing. ~ Rebecca,
7:The sage puts herself last and is first. ~ Lao Tzu,
8:Dandra Draa killed my father. - Kaznim ~ Angie Sage,
9:...now be quiet, I'm going to be sick. ~ Angie Sage,
10:The Tao of the sage is work without effort. ~ Laozi,
11:Oi! Can't a poor Boggart have no peace? ~ Angie Sage,
12:The jester is brother to the sage. ~ Arthur Koestler,
13:The sage's Way is to act and not to contend. ~ Laozi,
14:Ohelpuhebteenkát! - Stanley, tegen Jenna ~ Angie Sage,
15:Things always look better in the morning. ~ Angie Sage,
16:A little belief in something always helps. ~ Angie Sage,
17:Don't waive your rights with your flags. ~ Sage Francis,
18:The sage wears coarse clothes, concealing jade. ~ Laozi,
19:Alone the sage can recognize the sage. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
20:Life was simple when you were a Shield Bug. ~ Angie Sage,
21:The Young Army was crazy. Marcia was Magyk. ~ Angie Sage,
22:Alone the sage can recognize the sage. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
23:The Way of the Sage is to act but not to compete. ~ Laozi,
24:Nothing here below should trouble the sage. ~ Bhagavad Gita,
25:Truly the sage is not other than God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
26:The sage avoids extremity, excess, and extravagance. ~ Laozi,
27:Truly the sage is not other than God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
28:He (the Sage) does not show off, therefore he shines. ~ Laozi,
29:The sage is not a savant nor the savant a sage. ~ Lao-Tse. 44,
30:How dare I claim to be a sage or a benevolent man? ~ Confucius,
31:They would all be sorry... particularly the duck. ~ Angie Sage,
32:Note even Moroi give licenses to infants, Sage, ~ Richelle Mead,
33:Note even Moroi give licenses to infants, Sage. ~ Richelle Mead,
34:The rich get richer until the poor get educated. ~ Sage Francis,
35:The sage attends to the belly, and not to what he sees. ~ Laozi,
36:...yelling doesn't make a thing any more possible. ~ Angie Sage,
37:The sage governs by emptying senses and filling bellies. ~ Laozi,
38:The sage is not ill, because he sees illness as illness. ~ Laozi,
39:A sage is the instructor of a hundred ages. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
40:Shouting something didn't make it any more possible. ~ Angie Sage,
41:The sage is happy everywhere, the whole earth is his. ~ Confucius,
42:You can't just rattle it off like a demented parrot. ~ Angie Sage,
43:The sage embraces the one, and is an example to the world. ~ Laozi,
44:... waiting for the spell to end, as all spells must. ~ Angie Sage,
45:The sage shuns excess, shuns grandiosity, shuns arrogance. ~ Lao Tzu,
46:Where the whole world is awake, the sage sleeps. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
47:A sage is skilled at helping people without excluding anyone. ~ Laozi,
48:Hij werd nu wie hij in werkelijkheid was. Septimus Heap. ~ Angie Sage,
49:The sage is one with the world, and lives in harmony with it. ~ Laozi,
50:Aunt Zelda always said: the thought is the seed for deed. ~ Angie Sage,
51:Cultivate poverty like a garden herb, like sage. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
52:Get down. Shut Up. And Listen," ~ Angie SageJenna Heap ~ Angie Sage,
53:I’m not afraid of dying. Pieces of me die all the time. ~ Sage Francis,
54:Really, Sage? A date?” I sighed. “Yes, Adrian. A date. ~ Richelle Mead,
55:Things have a habit of working out, you know. Eventually. ~ Angie Sage,
56:Blush not to submit to a sage who knows more than thyself. ~ Democritus,
57:It’s Kahlua, Sage. Packed with sugar and coffee flavor. ~ Richelle Mead,
58:Spit Fyre practised a recently acquired skill - he winked. ~ Angie Sage,
59:Ask a sage, he will explain.
Ask a fool, he will complain. ~ Toba Beta,
60:Let a fool hold his tongue and he will pass for a sage. ~ Publilius Syrus,
61:¨In the dark you can't see no THING but no THING can see you. ~ Angie Sage,
62:Life is just a lie with an 'F' in it, and death is definite ~ Sage Francis,
63:Oh it's a pebble... But it's a really nice pebble Dad thanks. ~ Angie Sage,
64:Sage,” Adrian declared. “These hands don’t do manual labor. ~ Richelle Mead,
65:Because he (the Sage) demands no honor, he will never be dishonored. ~ Laozi,
66:The sage regards things as difficult, and thereby avoids difficulty. ~ Laozi,
67:Beauty Lures the Stranger More Easily into Danger -Septimus Heap ~ Angie Sage,
68:The sage increases his wisdom by all that he can gather from others. ~ Fenelon,
69:He is a despicable sage whose wisdom does not profit himself. ~ Publilius Syrus,
70:Is there a single man who can see what the Sage cannot even conceive? ~ Tseu-tse,
71:I wonder," Marcia said. "If you would consider being my apprentice? ~ Angie Sage,
72:Question like a child, reason like an adult, and write like a sage. ~ Criss Jami,
73:Qui vit sans folie n'est pas si sage qu'il croit. ~ Fran ois de La Rochefoucauld,
74:Simon's eye has turned to dust," Septimus said.
"What?" - Marcia ~ Angie Sage,
75:The sage does not 'know' the Self, because he is the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
76:The sage does not ‘know’ the Self, because he is the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
77:The sage never strives for the great, and thereby the great is achieved. ~ Laozi,
78:As moonlight unto sunlight is that desert sage to other greens. ~ Wallace Stegner,
79:Because he (the Sage) opposes no one, no one in the world can oppose him. ~ Laozi,
80:But where the ignorant are asleep, there the sage keeps awake ~ Swami Vivekananda,
81:Is there a single man who can see what the Sage cannot even conceive? ~ Tseu-tse,
82:Sage.” He laughed. “I’m into anything, so long as you’re with me. ~ Richelle Mead,
83:The sage does not attempt anything very big, and thus achieves greatness. ~ Laozi,
84:To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage. ~ Eliphas Levi,
85:What Heaven detests, who knows why? Even the sage considers it difficult. ~ Laozi,
86:For the sage
Heaven and Earth join
in bestowing the greatest gifts ~ Lao Tzu,
87:Sage Deinem Hauptmann, er kann mich im Arsche lecken. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
88:Sententious sage! so it is: but I swear by my household gods not ~ Charlotte Bront,
89:The sage does not strive to be great. Thereby he can accomplish the great. ~ Laozi,
90:What is there more precious than a sage? He sets peace between all men. ~ Tsu-king,
91:You will no longer pick this sage that flavors your whole life. ~ Naomi Shihab Nye,
92:Beauty Lures the Stranger More Easily into Danger

-Septimus Heap ~ Angie Sage,
93:Nowhere and in no situation is the sage dissatisfied with his condition. ~ Confucius,
94:"The sage shuns excess, shuns grandiosity, shuns arrogance." ~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching,
95:To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage.
   ~ Eliphas Levi,
96:Although he travels all day, the sage never loses sight of his luggage carts. ~ Laozi,
97:He (the sage) wants all things to follow their own nature, but dares not act. ~ Laozi,
98:Je ne suis pas son confident, je suis son spectateur. C'est plus sage. ~ Albert Camus,
99:The sage never strives for greatness, and can therefore accomplish greatness. ~ Laozi,
100:When a boy writes off the world it's done with sloppy misspelled words ~ Sage Francis,
101:De Heaps waren leuk, vond Lucy; en veel boeiender dan haar eigen familie. ~ Angie Sage,
102:Earnestness can go wrong in hip hop. On this album, it goes very right. ~ Sage Francis,
103:O sage, very high raise thyself, even to the most high dwelling of Truth. ~ Ma havagga,
104:The sage has no concern for himself, but makes the concerns of others his own. ~ Laozi,
105:Who knows more about male weakness: you or me? Use my knowledge, Sage. ~ Richelle Mead,
106:Hence the sage puts away excessive effort, extravagance, and easy indulgence. ~ Lao Tzu,
107:Oh my God, I thought. I’m rooming with the Sydney Sage of re-education. ~ Richelle Mead,
108:Oh my God, I thought. I'm rooming with the sydney Sage of re-education. ~ Richelle Mead,
109:The sage's rule of moral conduct has its principle in the hearts of all men. ~ Tseu-tse,
110:Whose lines are mottoes of the heart,Whose truths electrify the sage. ~ Thomas Campbell,
111:The sage's rule of moral conduct has its principle in the hearts of all men. ~ Tseu-tse,
112:Once she was safely in the Unstable Potions and Partikular Poisons cupboard, ~ Angie Sage,
113:The sage is never alone...he bears in himself the Lord of all things. ~ Angelius Silesius,
114:Un prince qui n'est pas sage par lui-même ne peut être bien conseillé ~ Niccol Machiavelli,
115:He can go to a boardroom meeting . . . he's very proper now." - Sydney Sage ~ Richelle Mead,
116:The sage honors his part of the settlement, but does not exact his due from others. ~ Laozi,
117:When the sage points at the moon, all that the idiot sees is the finger. ~ Anthony de Mello,
118:You’re killing me here, Sage!” “I’m not doing anything.” “Exactly my point. ~ Richelle Mead,
119:Cool',” said Adrian. “'Wind.’ I see what you did there, Sage. Pretty clever. ~ Richelle Mead,
120:Easy there, Sage. I’m no gun-toting crazy guy. Crazy, yes. But not the rest. ~ Richelle Mead,
121:If you do not meet a sage following the same road as yourself, then walk alone. ~ Dhammapada,
122:Lieve help,' mopperde Marcia. Ze gaf de draak nog een duw. 'Gá nou, lui mormel! ~ Angie Sage,
123:Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile ~ Homer,
124:you may need to sit in a hermetically sealed space where not a peep penetrates. ~ Sage Cohen,
125:The sage, while clad in homespun, conceals on his person a priceless piece of jade. ~ Lao Tzu,
126:You could give us a hand instead of staring into space like a constipated camel. ~ Angie Sage,
127:Marcia's fine," said his older self. "And that is all you want to know right now. ~ Angie Sage,
128:The sage knows without traveling, perceives without looking, completes without acting. ~ Laozi,
129:The vast sage desert undulates with almost imperceptible tides like the oceans. ~ Frank Waters,
130:When the Fyre inside is kindled and when the Time Is Right, anything is possible. ~ Angie Sage,
131:A fool is wiser in his own house than a sage is in another man's house. ~ William Graham Sumner,
132:In my childhood I led the life of a sage, when I grew up I started climbing trees ~ Philip Roth,
133:the sage dresses plainly, even though his interior is filled with precious gems. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
134:The sage has no invariable mind of his own; he makes the mind of the people his mind. ~ Lao Tzu,
135:SAGE. A wise and Holy man who died a long time ago. No one modern qualifies. ~ Diana Wynne Jones,
136:The Sage has no thinking mind and therefore there are no ‘others’ for him. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
137:Even virtue followed beyond reason's rule May stamp the just man knave, the sage a fool. ~ Horace,
138:I felt nerdy until the day I earned an impressed “Where did you learn that, Sage? ~ Richelle Mead,
139:Que ta vision soit à chaque instant nouvelle. Le sage est celui qui s'étonne de tout. ~ Andr Gide,
140:The devil only exists because of your belief in him; same goes for that other guy. ~ Sage Francis,
141:You’re killing me here, Sage!”
“I’m not doing anything.”
“Exactly my point. ~ Richelle Mead,
142:I know sage, wormwood, and hyssop, but I can't smell character unless it stinks. ~ Edward Dahlberg,
143:Anybody who says that love is a hindrance on the path of self-realization is not a sage. ~ Rajneesh,
144:Bitte sage mir, welchen Weg ich gehen soll.
Das hängt davon ab, wohin du willst. ~ Lewis Carroll,
145:Der Umgangston ist recht »modern« - von Anfang an sage ich zu meinen Eltern du. ~ Tomas Transtr mer,
146:Een draak draagt de Prinses in zijn armen en jij vergéét dat? - Marcia, tegen Septimus ~ Angie Sage,
147:Cython was forked from Pyrex in 2007 by developers of the Sage computer algebra package, ~ Anonymous,
148:Rose was a sensitive Apprentice who was aware - some said far too aware - of the Darke. ~ Angie Sage,
149:The sage having perceived God by the spiritual union casts from him grief and joy. ~ Katha Upanishad,
150:Whatever poet, orator, or sage may say of it, old age is still old age. ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
151:Work? Come on, Sage. Go buy a bikini and enjoy the pool while you’re hanging around. ~ Richelle Mead,
152:Let thine occupations be few, saith the sage, if thou wouldst lead a tranquil life. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
153:The mind of the Enlightened Sage never exists apart from Brahman, the Absolute. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
154:This is the sage who always works for work’s sake without caring for the results. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
155:Crazy as a cuttlefish
Nasty as a RAT
Put her in a pie dish
Give her to the CAT! ~ Angie Sage,
156:The sage does not act and therefore does not fail, does not seize and therefore does not lose. ~ Laozi,
157:For I, who hold sage Homer's rule the best, Welcome the coming, speed the going guest. ~ Alexander Pope,
158:Sage, aren't you guys supposed to have uniforms? This looks like what you usually wear. ~ Richelle Mead,
159:The sage knows himself, but does not parade. He cherishes himself, but does not praise himself. ~ Laozi,
160:The Saint is a man who disciplines his ego. The Sage is a man who rids himself of his ego. ~ Wei Wu Wei,
161:A mother's sorrow is more true, honorable, and beautiful than the detachment of the sage. ~ Edward Abbey,
162:In the world we live in, one fool makes many fools, but one sage only a few sages. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
163:Since the sage has no creed of his own, he never engages in [useless] discussions. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
164:The sage says that all that is under heaven incurs the same law and the same fate. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
165:Who are you?" I asked. "You know who I am," he replied. "I'm yours." ~Clea / Sage, pg. 105 ~ Hilary Duff,
166:I don't consider myself any great sage of fashion or style, whatever people may want to think. ~ Jude Law,
167:In the world we live in, one fool makes many fools, but one sage only a few sages. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
168:It is nice to be nice," said Kamala with a sage nod "And it is also nice to eat people. ~ Roshani Chokshi,
169:The man who smokes, thinks like a sage and acts like a Samaritan. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton 1st Baron Lytton,
170:There's no way the new chimney will fall down, Lu. Not with you in charge. It wouldn't dare. ~ Angie Sage,
171:The sage gives more than he takes;
how can he do this?
because he has the richness of Tao ~ Lao Tzu,
172:The sage regards the heart of every man in the millions of the crowd and sees only one heart. ~ Tseng Tee,
173:When a beginner knows what he needs, he proves more intelligent than an absent-minded sage ~ Paulo Coelho,
174:It is nice to be nice," said Kamala with a sage nod. "And it is also nice to eat people. ~ Roshani Chokshi,
175:The first cause worked automatically like a somnambulist, and not reflectively like a sage. ~ Thomas Hardy,
176:The sage having seen the Self in everything, when he leaves this world, becomes immortal. ~ Kena Upanishad,
177:The self-defence class was a mixed bunch, chosen because each had once been in mortal danger. ~ Angie Sage,
178:Nice blouse, Sage,” Adrian told me, deadpan. “It really brings out the khaki in your pants. ~ Richelle Mead,
179:All things are a-flowing,' sage Heraclitus says, but a tawdry cheapness shall outlast all days. ~ Ezra Pound,
180:Aunt Zelda had written her note on special paper that she had made from pressed cabbage leaves. ~ Angie Sage,
181:I really like Septimus Heap. he is my favorite guy in the story. I should make you all read it. ~ Angie Sage,
182:That, Jim Knee, is what comes from showing off," said Septimus, sounding uncannily like Marcia. ~ Angie Sage,
183:Tidak juga," ujar Marcia dengan misterius. "Segala sesuatu biasanya berjalan dengan sendirinya. ~ Angie Sage,
184:I don't want to lose my Apprentice. More than that, Septimus, I don't want to lose you. - Marcia ~ Angie Sage,
185:oh, meine Güte! Ich dachte, ich weiß, was ich sagen wollte, aber ich sage es sehr schlecht. ~ Shirley Jackson,
186:People turn their eyes and ears to him (the sage), and the sage cares for them like his own children. ~ Laozi,
187:That’s all we are.
Sage and Mars.
Mars and Sage.
The everything in between the nothing. ~ K Webster,
188:The flame is not as bright to itself as it is to those it illuminates: so too the sage. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
189:The mind of the Enlightened Sage (jnani) never exists apart from Brahman, the Absolute. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
190:But each time you use spirit, you're more likely to go crazy.” “Already crazy about you, Sage. ~ Richelle Mead,
191:But each time you use spirit, you’re more likely to go crazy.” “Already crazy about you, Sage. ~ Richelle Mead,
192:You are going to have to scream. Can you do that?"
Lucy's eyes lit up. "Oh, yes. I can scream. ~ Angie Sage,
193:As a solid mass of rock
Is not moved by the wind,
So a sage is unmoved
By praise or blame. ~ Anonymous,
194:The Artist," an ancient sage had once said, "is always sitting on the doorsteps of the rich. ~ Charles Bukowski,
195:The sage has one advantage: he is immortal. If this is not his century, many others will be. ~ Baltasar Gracian,
196:You’re a terrible liar, Sage, but I’m still touched you’d attempt it for my sake. A for effort. ~ Richelle Mead,
197:As a solid mass of rock Is not moved by the wind, So a sage is not moved by praise and blame. ~ Joseph Goldstein,
198:Let the sage unifying all his attentive regard see in the divine Spirit all things visible and invisible. ~ Manu,
199:Maybe we’re not doing it, but believe me, Sage, there are plenty of other ways to pass the time. ~ Richelle Mead,
200:But each time you use spirit, you're more likely to go crazy.”
“Already crazy about you, Sage. ~ Richelle Mead,
201:Therefore the sage holds in his embrace the one thing (of humility), and manifests it to all the world. ~ Lao Tzu,
202:The Sage sees the world
as an expansion of his own self
So what need has he to accumulate things? ~ Lao Tzu,
203:Ich sage euch: man muß noch Chaos in sich haben, um einen tanzenden Stern gebären zu können. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
204:The sage belongs to the same obsolete repertory as the virtuous maiden and the enlightened monarch. ~ Mason Cooley,
205:The sage's quest is for himself, the quest of the-ignorant for other than himself. ~ Confucius, “Lun-Yu,” II 15.20,
206:Where all are selfish, the sage is no better than the fool, and only rather more dangerous. ~ James Anthony Froude,
207:Who are you?" I asked.
"You know who I am," he replied. "I'm yours."
~Clea / Sage, pg. 105 ~ Hilary Duff,
208:You’re a terrible liar, Sage, but I’m still touched you’d attempt it for my
sake. A for effort. ~ Richelle Mead,
209:Character no longer is shaped by only two earnest, fumbling experts. Now all the world's a sage. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
210:Religion is 'twixt God and my own soul, Nor saint, nor sage, can boundless thought control. ~ Judith Sargent Murray,
211:Well, I suggest you sleep on it," said Aunt Zelda sensibly. "Things always look better in the morning. ~ Angie Sage,
212:'Keep your head down at school.' Those are sage words from my dad. They kept me in check for years. ~ Dhani Harrison,
213:Take it,’ hisses DomDaniel. ‘But I will be back for it. I will be back with the seventh of the seventh. ~ Angie Sage,
214:When the uncarved wood is split, its parts are put to use. When the sage is put to use, he becomes the head. ~ Laozi,
215:Wrong? I don’t know, Sage. Honestly, that was the most right thing that’s happened to me in a while. ~ Richelle Mead,
216:If a stock is high enough to be sold, it is high enough to be sold short," was another Sage maxim. ~ Kenneth L Fisher,
217:The sage is not sorry for those that are living nor for those that die” (note 4). [Krishna says:] ~ Swami Vivekananda,
218:The wise man, the sage, is hostile to the new. Disabused, he abdicates: that is his form of protest. ~ Emile M Cioran,
219:My sister, Jenna,” Nicko said to Tod with a smile. “Very undignified behavior for a Queen, if you ask me. ~ Angie Sage,
220:The gardener's rule applies to youth and age: When young 'sow wild oats'; but when old, grow sage. ~ Henry James Byron,
221:The sage has in the world an appearance of indecision, and keeps his mind in a state of indifference to all. ~ Lao Tzu,
222:The Sage was asked to define good manners? to which he replied, To bear patiently the rude ones. ~ Solomon Ibn Gabirol,
223:even so the sage can draw all his sense-organs inside,” (Ibid. 58.) and nothing can force them out. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
224:Therefore a sage has said, 'I will do nothing (of purpose), and the people will be transformed of themselves; ~ Lao Tzu,
225:Therefore the sage seeks to satisfy (the craving of) the belly, and not the (insatiable longing of the) eyes. ~ Lao Tzu,
226:Death and decrepitude are inherent in the world. The sage who knows the nature of things, does not grieve. ~ Metta Sutta,
227:He that can live alone resembles the brute beast in nothing, the sage in much, and God in everything. ~ Baltasar Gracian,
228:My dear, this is no ordinary somebody. It is the great sage Durvasas, the irascible. See how he strides away! ~ K lid sa,
229:Soon fifty-six Shield Bugs were lined up, crouching like coiled springs on the gunnels of the chicken boat. ~ Angie Sage,
230:Whatever statesman or sage will effect reforms upon a gigantic or godlike scale must begin with the young. ~ Horace Mann,
231:What's purple mean?" Adrian put his hand on the door. "Gotta go, Sage. Dont want to keep Dorothy waiting ~ Richelle Mead,
232:If one is not oneself a sage or saint, the best thing one can do is to study the words of those who were. ~ Aldous Huxley,
233:I mean, what is the point of being a damsel in distress if your knight goes off and just does his own thing? ~ Angie Sage,
234:On the metaphysical front, the burning of sage is unsucessful. House reeks of doom, and now sage too. ~ Suzanne Finnamore,
235:The idea of writer as sage is pretty much dead today. I would certainly feel very uncomfortable in the role. ~ J M Coetzee,
236:The true sage is not he who sees, but he who, seeing the furthest, has the deepest love for mankind. ~ Maurice Maeterlinck,
237:When an ordinary man attains knowledge, he is a sage; when a sage attains understanding, he is an ordinary man ~ Anonymous,
238:He (the sage) is good to those who are good. He is also good to those who are not good. That is the virtue of good. ~ Laozi,
239:Therefore the sage, while he never does what is great, is able on that account to accomplish the greatest things. ~ Lao Tzu,
240:The sage acts without taking credit. He accomplishes without dwelling on it. He does not want to display his worth. ~ Laozi,
241:The sage does not die any more, for he is already dead, dead to all vanity, dead to all that is not God. ~ Angelus Silesius,
242:What's purple mean?"
Adrian put his hand on the door. "Gotta go, Sage. Dont want to keep Dorothy waiting ~ Richelle Mead,
243:Celeste sighed heavily and shook her head. “I do believe that men can be the dumbest of God’s creatures.” Sage ~ Emily March,
244:I need to Amazon Prime some sage and perform an ancient cleansing ritual under a full moon in the center of town. ~ R S Grey,
245:Sage advice? If you're drunk, stay away from the phone. You can't get the answering machine message back. ~ Janeane Garofalo,
246:Therefore the sage manages affairs without doing anything, and conveys his instructions without the use of speech. ~ Lao Tzu,
247:When we think of the past, we forget the fools and remember the sage. We reverse the process for our own time. ~ George Boas,
248:Petroc Trelawney looked as pleased as a pebble can look, which was pretty much the same as he had looked before. ~ Angie Sage,
249:By zeal, by vigilance, by peace of soul the sage can make himself as an island which the waves cannot over flow. ~ Dhammapada,
250:..Sage is convinced one extraneous calorie will make her go from super skinny to just regular skinny. Tragedy. ~ Richelle Mead,
251:He that can live alone resembles the brute beast in nothing, the sage in much and God in everything. cxxxviii ~ Baltasar Graci n,
252:The pure mind is itself Brahman; it therefore follows that Brahman is not other than the mind of the sage. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
253:As ExtraOrdinary Wizard I am supposed to be mean," Septimus replied with a smile. "It's part of the job description. ~ Angie Sage,
254:Marcia," said Milo. "That was Jenna. I know my child."
"And I know mine," said Marcia. "I mean - I know Septimus. ~ Angie Sage,
255:..Sage is convinced one extraneous calorie will make her go from super skinny to just
regular skinny. Tragedy. ~ Richelle Mead,
256:The sage desires no desire, does not value rare treasures, learns without learning, recovers what people have left behind. ~ Laozi,
257:Marcia listened to the comments and wondered why people thought that wearing ExtraOrdinary Wizard robes made her deaf. ~ Angie Sage,
258:One cannot apologize for something fundamental, and a child feels and knows this as well and as deeply as any sage. ~ Hermann Hesse,
259:Fortune may raise up or abuse the ordinary mortal, but the sage and the soldier should have minds beyond her control. ~ Walter Scott,
260:The sage is sharp but does not cut, pointed but does not pierce, forthright but does not offend, bright but does not dazzle. ~ Laozi,
261:Thus we might not know we have a sage at the table, for he will remain silent while the “experts” prattle on and on. ~ John Eldredge,
262:We are happier in many ways when we are old than when we were young. The young sow wild oats. The old grow sage. ~ Winston Churchill,
263:at least two of those present tonight were wearing Granny Weatherwax’s famous goose-grease-and-sage chest liniment. ~ Terry Pratchett,
264:The sage never seems to know his own merits, for only by not noticing them can you call others' attention to them. ~ Baltasar Gracian,
265:Ich sage nichts. Ich halte nicht viel von Bindungen außerhalb der Familie. Kein Band gleicht dem zwischen zwei Schwestern. ~ Ally Condie,
266:la sagesse ne se communique pas. La sagesse qu'un sage cherche à communiquer a toujours un air de folie.
(Siddhartha) ~ Hermann Hesse,
267:Any desert land that will grow big sage will produce more fortunes thatn most gold mines -- if you can only get the water. ~ Peter B Kyne,
268:As the Eastern saying, by the sage Hilali, has it, 'one person who understands is worth a hundred who merely obey a custom. ~ Idries Shah,
269:The sage is never alone... he bears in himself the Lord of all things. My Blessings.
   ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother, 21 September,
270:The sage sees only the Self. The person sees lots of persons. One sees from wholeness, one sees from fragmentation. Both are you. ~ Mooji,
271:Barney," she said, "would you like to help me look for a stupid giant banana?"
Barney grinned. "Ooh, yes please," he said. ~ Angie Sage,
272:I lay back down, fitting myself into the curve of his body, pulling his arms around me, protecting me, keeping me sage. ~ Elizabeth Haynes,
273:But Love is the final reality; and anyone who does not understand this, be he writer or sage, is a man flawed in wisdom. ~ Sheldon Vanauken,
274:It is written by the Sage that you, yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection. ~ Janet Evanovich,
275:Marcia said you had to go and have fun?" Rose looked astonished.
"Yep. That's what she said."
"Crumbs."
"Yes, I know. ~ Angie Sage,
276:Heaven and earth are ruthless, and treat the various creatures as straw dogs; the sage is ruthless, and treats others as straw dogs. ~ Laozi,
277:Oi!" came a yell from a steward. "Getoffthecourse!" On race day, respect for the Queen came second to the sanctity of the track. ~ Angie Sage,
278:One who never anticipates deceit or expects duplicity, and yet is the first to recognize such things – is that not a sage indeed? ~ Confucius,
279:Man is timid and apologetic; he is no longer upright; he dares not say "I think," "I am," but quotes some saint or sage. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
280:As the bee collects nectar and departs without injuring the flower, or its color or fragrance, so let the sage dwell on earth. ~ Gautama Buddha,
281:If the sage wants to stand above people, he must speak to them from below. If he wants to lead people, he must follow them from behind. ~ Laozi,
282:My Apprentice is a PathFinder," Septimus said. "I am beginning to realise that means she can go pretty much anywhere she wants to. ~ Angie Sage,
283:We don't use our titles when we are among people who understand Magyk. - Septimus
Unless they are being very annoying. - Marcia ~ Angie Sage,
284:As the behavioral sage Daniel Kahneman has written: “[W]e can be blind to the obvious, and we are also blind to our blindness. ~ Steven D Levitt,
285:Ich bilde schon lange keine Meinungen mehr. Ich sage Dinge, weil sie besser klingen als andere, die ich ebenfalls hätte sagen können. ~ Juli Zeh,
286:I’m not sure I’m cut out for this wise-advice business. Maybe I should wear a fake white beard to convince myself I am a sage. ~ Cassandra Clare,
287:In the village, a sage should go about
Like a bee, which, not harming
Flower, colour or scent,
Flies off with the nectar. ~ Anonymous,
288:Isn’t it obvious, Sage? No, of course it isn’t. I did it so I’d have a reason to be around you — one I knew you couldn’t refuse. ~ Richelle Mead,
289:Really?” I asked when they were gone. “Did you have to say that?” “I speak my mind, Sage. Don’t you believe in telling the truth? ~ Richelle Mead,
290:Learned we may be with another man's learning: we can only be wise with wisdom of our own: [I hate a sage who is not wise for himself] ~ Euripides,
291:The cleft in her back hooves smelled far more strongly of pronghorn—that tangy mix of herbivore and sage—than did her front hooves. ~ Ted Kerasote,
292:If there’s any way you can set things up so you’re not distracted by the sounds around you when it’s time to write, that is the ideal. ~ Sage Cohen,
293:The Sage expects no recognition for what he does; he achieves merit but does not take it to himself; he does not wish to display his worth. ~ Laozi,
294:With those who are kind
the sage is kind
With those who are not kind
the sage is also kind
because the way of Tao is kindness ~ Lao Tzu,
295:Sage went supperless to bed, and tossed and writhed all night upon a shuck mattress that was full of attentive and interested corncobs. ~ Mark Twain,
296:The inner is the foundation of the outer. The still is master of the restless. The Sage travels all day yet never leaves his inner treasure. ~ Laozi,
297:Ask any honest sage if they were an expert at something the first time they tried it, and they’ll giggle and probably give you a caramel. ~ Jon Acuff,
298:Craindre la mort, Athéniens, ce n'est autre chose que se croire sage sans l'être, car c'est croire connaître ce que l'on ne connaît point. ~ Socrates,
299:Even as the high mountain-chains remain immobile in the midst of the tempest, so the true sage remains unshaken amidst praise and blame. ~ Dhammapada,
300:Just as the bee takes the nectar and leaves without damaging the color or scent of the flowers, so should the sage act in a village. ~ Gautama Buddha,
301:Thus, the Sage uses various rights and wrongs to harmonize with others and yet remains at rest in the middle of Heaven the Potter’s Wheel. ~ Zhuangzi,
302:Titchy little snapperwhippers like you should not be higgling around with an old sage and onions who is hundreds of years more than you. ~ Roald Dahl,
303:But hail, thou Goddess, sage and holy, Hail, divinest melancholy, Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the Sense of human sight.
   ~ John Milton,
304:The only good place for a sage grouse to be listed is on the menu of a French bistro. It does not deserve federal protection, period. ~ Jason Chaffetz,
305:Years hence, perhaps, may dawn an age, More fortunate, alas! than we, Which without hardness will be sage, And gay without frivolity. ~ Matthew Arnold,
306:A sage traveling all day
is never far from the supplies in his cart,
and however spectacular the views
he remains calm and composed. ~ Lao Tzu,
307:Don't give up, Sage, and don't give in to him. Please. A lot of us are watching you, and we need to see that it's possible to win. ~ Jennifer A Nielsen,
308:so even though all the senses bring in sensations from nature, the ocean-like heart of the sage knows no disturbance, knows no fear ~ Swami Vivekananda,
309:A sharp clip-crop of iron-shod hoofs deadened and died away, and clouds of yellow dust drifted from under the cottonwoods out over the sage. ~ Zane Grey,
310:You go looking, you gonna see more than you planned for and probably get charged twenty bucks,” he opined with a sage nod and sly wink. ~ Scott Burtness,
311:He shook his head in mock sympathy. "I tell you, Sage. Sometimes I think I am the one who needs to take out the restraining order on you. ~ Richelle Mead,
312:Maxie knew he must have been very bad to deserve this. He wondered what it was he had done.
And why he hadn’t enjoyed it more at the time ~ Angie Sage,
313:...The sage, traveling all day, Does not lose sight of his baggage. Though there are beautiful things to be seen, He remains unattached and calm. ~ Laozi,
314:You could give us a hand instead of staring into space like a constipated camel," Terry Tarsal rudley broke into Marcia's spinning thoughts. ~ Angie Sage,
315:Das ist es ja, was ich immer sage: wir sind feige. Wir denken nur an das, was mit uns geschehen wird, nie an das, was den andern geschieht. ~ Hans Fallada,
316:He who is not sage and wise, humane and just, cannot use secret agent.s. And he who is not delicate and subtle cannot get the truth out of them. ~ Sun Tzu,
317:He who regards many things easy will find many difficulties. Therefore the sage regards things difficult, and consequently never has difficulties. ~ Laozi,
318:I was no longer the storm-tossed heroine lost in her lover’s arms. I was Sydney Sage, Alchemist and caretaker, and I was back in business. ~ Richelle Mead,
319:Man, wouldst thou be a sage, wouldst thou know thyself and know God? First thou shouldst extinguish in thyself the desire of the world. ~ Angelus Silesius,
320:There is the mystic realm whence leaps the power
Whose fire burns in the eyes of seer and sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
321:Ah, gentle dames! it gars me greet To think how monie counsels sweet, How monie lengthened sage advices, The husband frae the wife despises. ~ Robert Burns,
322:Alas! I have nor hope nor health, Nor peace within nor calm around, Nor that content surpassing wealth The sage in meditation found. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
323:Because I am your great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-Grandmother. But ~ Angie Sage,
324:Many words are not proof of the wise man, because the sage only talk when it's needed, and the words are measured and corresponding with the need. ~ Thales,
325:Therefore the sage knows (these things) of himself, but does not parade (his knowledge); loves, but does not (appear to set a) value on, himself. ~ Lao Tzu,
326:A spoon cannot taste of the food it carries. Likewise, a foolish man cannot understand the wise man´s wisdom even if he associates with a sage. ~ Dalai Lama,
327:In antiquity the sage kings recognized that men's nature is bad and that their tendencies were not being corrected and their lawlessness controlled. ~ Xunzi,
328:The inner is foundation of the outer
The still is master of the restless

The Sage travels all day
yet never leaves his inner treasure ~ Lao Tzu,
329:Therefore the sage, in the exercise of his government, empties their minds, fills their bellies, weakens their wills, and strengthens their bones. ~ Lao Tzu,
330:What about you, Sage? I know we don't have to worry about you violating the dress code. Did you have fun at your Alchemist spa this weekend? ~ Richelle Mead,
331:A sage is a former fool who has become tired of himself.

A foolish sage is one who forgets this.

Remember, or come full circle. ~ Vera Nazarian,
332:As a water bead on a lotus leaf, as water on a red lily, does not adhere, so the sage does not adhere to the seen, the heard, or the sensed. ~ Gautama Buddha,
333:A thief thinks everybody is a thief and a sage thinks everybody is a sage. It all depends on you: if you become God the whole existence becomes godly. ~ Osho,
334:Regard incessantly this body as the bespangled chariot of a king; it gladdens the simpleton but not the wise, dazzles the fool but not the sage. ~ Udanavarga,
335:We either make ourselves miserable," said the Brazilian sage Carlos Castaneda, "or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same. ~ Steve Chandler,
336:Rose once told me "If your eyes weren't open, you wouldn't know the difference between dreaming and waking."
Adrian Ivashkov to Sydney Sage ~ Richelle Mead,
337:Sage made me complete. He made me happy. He was as much a part of me as my own body. How could anyone lose that and still exist?" - Clea Raymond ~ Hilary Duff,
338:The sage seeks freedom from desire. He does not collect precious things. He learns not to hold on to ideas. He brings men back to what they have lost. ~ Laozi,
339:Whether you’re conducting phone interviews or simply need to hear yourself think, privacy is an extremely important variable in the writing life. ~ Sage Cohen,
340:With those who are sincere
the sage is sincere
With those who are insincere
the sage is also sincere
because the way of Tao is sincerity ~ Lao Tzu,
341:As a bee without harming the flower, its colour or scent, flies away, collecting only the honey, even so should the sage wander in the village. ~ Gautama Buddha,
342:Don’t keep saying ‘huh’, Silas. It makes you sound so crotchety.” “Well, maybe I am crotchety. And I’ll keep saying ‘huh’ if I want to, Sarah. Huh. ~ Angie Sage,
343:Educating yourself not to leave traces is a moment-by-momcnt war against yourself, solely to prove that you could, if you chose, become a sage…. ~ Emil M Cioran,
344:Robert calmly, like an Oriental sage himself, treated the situation as if it were a koan, a riddle to be entered until its very assumptions shifted. ~ Mark Nepo,
345:Where is it written that houses must be beige? Any dun colored house would look better if painted pineapple, cream, ochre, or even a smart sage. ~ Frances Mayes,
346:But perhaps the best part of all was that I, Sydney Katherine Sage, guilty of constantly analyzing the world around me, well, I stopped thinking. ~ Richelle Mead,
347:Erick: "I think I may grow to hate you before this is over."
Jaron/Sage: "But you don't already and that's got to be some sort of record. ~ Jennifer A Nielsen,
348:The sage should be figured in the image of a robust athlete whom long exercise has hardened, one who can baffle the efforts of the most obstinate enemy. ~ Seneca,
349:Honey, this is a small, small town, and you just took Sage Mayson off the market. Permanently. Everyone—and I mean everyone—knows about it. ~ Aurora Rose Reynolds,
350:Il est bien plus difficile de se juger soi-même que de juger autrui . Si tu réussis à bien te juger, c'est que tu es un véritable sage. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
351:Even the saint and the sage continue to have difficulties and to be limited by their human nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, The Difficulties of Yoga,
352:A Magnificent Banquet, being
A Thanksgiving for the Safe Return
Of our Beloved Daughter,
Princess Esmeralda.

Bring your own plates. ~ Angie Sage,
353:I had an honest, ordered, respectable and unexciting life to look forward to. I had sown my wild oats and it was time to grow sage. Or so I imagined. ~ Stephen Fry,
354:Sydney Katherine Sage,” he said, his green eyes full of love and earnestness. “Would you do a brooding, deadbeat Moroi the honor of being his wife? ~ Richelle Mead,
355:The sage is always at peace; thus his mentality is equally in equilibrium and at ease. His mind is simple and pure, his soul is not subject to lassitude. ~ Lao-Tse,
356:The self is master of the self; what other master can it have? The sage who has made himself master of himself, rends his bonds and breaks his chains. ~ Udanavarga,
357:Time may restore us in his course Goethe's sage mind and Byron's force: But where will Europe's latter hour Again find Wordsworth's healing power? ~ Matthew Arnold,
358:By virile activity, by vigilant effort, by empire over himself, by moderation, the sage can make himself an island which the floods shall not inundate. ~ Dhammapada,
359:The career of a sage is of two kinds: He is either honored by all in the world, Like a flower waving its head, Or else he disappears into the silent forest. ~ Laozi,
360:Marcia looked a little guilty. "Well, I promised your mother when she came to see me that there would be no, er... arguments."

"Wow." - Septimus ~ Angie Sage,
361:When the sage stands above people, they are not oppressed. When he leads people, they are not obstructed. The world will exalt him and not grow tired of him. ~ Laozi,
362:followers of Tao meld the way of the warrior and the sage. They want the courage and preparedness of the fighter, the luminous perception of the wise. ~ Ming Dao Deng,
363:That’s all that matters, Sage-Ivashkov. Well, that and me having to put the smackdown on Castile if he doesn’t finally get his act together with Jill. ~ Richelle Mead,
364:This [Ghost Ranch] is my kind of world. The kind of things one sees in cities . . . well, you know, it's better to look out the window at the sage. ~ Georgia O Keeffe,
365:Behind thy thoughts and feelings, my brother, there is a mighty lord, an unknown sage—it is called Self; it dwelleth in thy body, it is thy body. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
366:Mi padre decía que una persona puede ser culta y estúpida al mismo tiempo, y que un hombre sabio puede no haber recibido educación ninguna" - Sage ~ Jennifer A Nielsen,
367:The sage does not hoard, and thereby bestows. The more he lives for others, the greater his life. The more he gives to others, the greater his abundance. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
368:Behind your thoughts and feelings, my brother, there is a mighty lord, an unknown sage- it is called Self; it dwells in your body, it is your body. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
369:Thus the sage, always equal, awaits the command of destiny, while the vulgar throw themselves into a thousand dangers in a search for happiness at any price. ~ Confucius,
370:You can therefore think the thoughts of every sage, every artist, every financier, every captain of industry who ever existed, for thoughts never die. ~ Charles F Haanel,
371:and very probably he had long since come to the sage and sensible conclusion that a man's religion is one thing, and this practical world quite another. ~ Herman Melville,
372:Living in a sweet, fluid state of ignorance about all things and about oneself is the only way of life guaranteed to suit and bring comfort to the sage. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
373:The phrasing annoyed Sage. As long as she was pretty and in a good mood, her husband would love her? People needed love most when they weren't at their best. ~ Erin Beaty,
374:The sage smiled. Sometimes a smile was little more than a sliver of teeth. And sometimes a smile was a knife cutting the world in two: before and after. ~ Roshani Chokshi,
375:To know oneself means, among other things, to know oneself qua non-sage: that is, not as a sophos, but as a philo-sophos, someone on the way toward wisdom. ~ Pierre Hadot,
376:Having studied books, the sage uniquely consecrated to knowledge and wisdom, should leave books completely aside as a man who wants the rice abandons the husk. ~ Upanishad,
377:The Stoic Sage, or wise man, needs nothing but uses everything well; the fool believes himself to “need” countless things, but he uses them all badly. ~ Donald J Robertson,
378:Did you just use juxtaposition in a sentence?" "Yes, Sage" he said patiently. "We use it all the time with art, ... That, and I know how to use a dictionary ~ Richelle Mead,
379:Montaigne is the sworn enemy of all responsibility. He strives to dodge decisions. Solitary sage in a time of mass fanaticism, he seeks seclusion and flight. ~ Stefan Zweig,
380:Behind thy thoughts and feelings, my brother, there is a mighty lord, an unknown sage—it is called Self; it dwelleth in thy body, it is thy body. There ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
381:But what a force is that of the sage who can live at peace with men without having the mobility of water and remain in the midst of them firm and incorruptible ! ~ Confucius,
382:I salute It, this supreme Deity, which is beyond the senses, which mind and speech cannot define and which can be discerned only by the mind of the true sage. ~ Vishnu Purana,
383:The sage as astronomer.—As long as you still feel the stars as something 'above you', you have not yet acquired the gaze of a man of deep understanding. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
384:I have observed that not the man who hopes when others despair, but the man who despairs when others hope, is admired by a large class of persons as a sage. ~ John Stuart Mill,
385:People who don’t write may not be able to imagine that you really and truly want to be in the closet with the door shut for three hours without talking to anyone. ~ Sage Cohen,
386:That creature's staying?' It figured. Her daughter-in-law transforming into an animal? No problem. Having to take care of a cat? Crisis. (Sydney Sage-Ivashkov) ~ Richelle Mead,
387:Did you just use juxtaposition in a sentence?"
"Yes, Sage" he said patiently. "We use it all the time with art, ... That, and I know how to use a dictionary ~ Richelle Mead,
388:How often when they find a sage
As sweet as Socrates or Plato
They hand him hemlock for his wage
Or bake him like a sweet potato!-Taking the Longer View ~ Don Marquis,
389:It's the kind of sage wisdom coming from a guy who was 25 at the time, but already had 20 years of experience. Kurt Russell is a wonderful actor and a great guy. ~ Tim Matheson,
390:You’re a solid person, Sage. You’re easy on the eyes, if a little skinny, and your ability to memorize useless information is going to totally hook in some guy. ~ Richelle Mead,
391:If someone had asked who could stage the best intervention with a crazy woman who had formerly been an undead monster, Sydney Sage would have been my last guess. ~ Richelle Mead,
392:Let me tell you something that I learned from my youth, from a sage called the Road Runner. You can walk off a cliff and the air will hold you. Only, don't look down. ~ Erin Bow,
393:A crab!" yelled Lucy. "He can be a crab!"
Jim Knee gave Lucy a withering stare - a crab was little better than a turtle.
Septimus looked at Lucy in admiration. ~ Angie Sage,
394:A sage Portuguese sailor who had told him, years before 'To be prosperous and happy in life, Henry, it is simple. Pick one woman, pick it well, and surrender. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
395:Marcia,' zei hij heel ernstig. 'Er is iets wat je goed moet begrijpen. Níémand is bij machte een Leerling terug te halen van de Queeste.'
'Kletskoek', zei Marcia. ~ Angie Sage,
396:Ich sage nicht, daß es stimmt. Ich sage nur, daß es in einigen Ecken der Welt Dinge gibt, die einen Mann in den Wahnsinn treiben können, wenn er sie vor sich sieht. ~ Stephen King,
397:Marcia was aghast. "He has shoes like mine? Well, that does it, we'll have to get rid of him." She smiled at Tod. "Only one of us can wear these shoes. And that is me. ~ Angie Sage,
398:My idea of the modern Stoic sage is someone who transforms fear into prudence, pain into information, mistakes into initiation, and desire into undertaking. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
399:The humble sage, by virtue of true knowledge, sees with equal vision a learned and gentle brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog, and a dog-eater. ~ A C Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhup da,
400:As the rivers flow into the ocean and lose their name and form, the sage losing name and form disappears into the supreme Spirit and himself becomes that Spirit. ~ Mundaka Upanishad,
401:the combination of sage and sea salt dispels the negativity of a particular place, while sweetgrass encourages positivity to settle in once the negativity has dispersed. ~ Anonymous,
402:Don’t do that? This is your sage advice?”
“Yeah.” He burped and blew it out the side of his mouth. “Sorry, the burritos we had for lunch are kinda comin’ back on me. ~ Mary Calmes,
403:Het is Snorri maar, met de NachtUllr.'
Septimus begreep er niets van, maar als Jenna niet bang was van een grommende panter, zou hij zich er ook niets van aantrekken. ~ Angie Sage,
404:In the words of a Persian sage: love is a disease no one wants to get rid of. Those who catch it never try to get better, and those who suffer do not wish to be cured. ~ Paulo Coelho,
405:Therefore the sage puts his own person last, and yet it is found in the foremost place; he treats his person as if it were foreign to him, and yet that person is preserved. ~ Lao Tzu,
406:Boss has bloomin' gone," he said. Then, suddenly noticing Tod, he said, "Begging your pardon, Apprentice. What I mean to say is that unfortunately, Madam Marcia has left. ~ Angie Sage,
407:The superior man accords with the course of the Mean. Though he may be all unknown, unregarded by the world, he feels no regret - It is only the sage who is able for this. ~ Confucius,
408:Things," Aunt Zelda reminded everyone on the bridge, "are not always as they seem. Remember, the moon always shows the truth How we see it, is up to us to us, not the moon ~ Angie Sage,
409:Speaking of Sonya...I was thinking of something earlier. Something Wolfe said." "Why, Adrian. Were you paying attention after all?" "Don't start,Sage," he warned.(p 211) ~ Richelle Mead,
410:The sage wears clothes of coarse cloth but carries jewels in his bosom; He knows himself but does not display himself; He loves himself but does not hold himself in high esteem. ~ Laozi,
411:The sisters' acquaintance Madam Nell Kimball recalled the sage advice of her aunt Letty, a retired courtesan: “Every girl, if only she knew it, is sitting on her fortune. ~ Karen Abbott,
412:It gave Boy 412 the impression that Aunt Zelda had walked into a large patchwork tent and had just, that very minute, poked her head out of the top to see what was going on. ~ Angie Sage,
413:The bar was packed and I couldn’t make them out, except some guy with an annoying, distinctive laugh.” Lewis offers a sage nod. “Let me guess, braying donkey meets croupy pig? ~ Anonymous,
414:The superior man perseveres in the middle path. Even though he remains unknown and the world esteems him not, he feels no regret. The sage alone is capable of such an action. ~ Tsang-Yung,
415:Be different-if you don't have the facts and knowledge required, simply listen. When word gets around that you can listen when others tend to talk, you will be treated as a sage. ~ Ed Koch,
416:If the way of the sage is true, that we are all dreaming our world into being, then it has to apply not only to our private, personal universe but to the world at large. ~ Alberto Villoldo,
417:Non-action is unceasing activity. The sage is characterized by eternal and intense activity. His stillness is like the apparent stillness of a fast rotating gyroscope. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
418:The dragon reared her head, breathing in the storm and loving every minute of it. It was the start of a voyage, and a storm at the beginning of a voyage was always a good omen. ~ Angie Sage,
419:The small man builds cages for everyone he knows While the sage, who has to duck his head when the moon is low, Keeps dropping keys all night long For the beautiful rowdy prisoners. ~ Hafez,
420:Und sage mir um alles in der Welt, warum stirbt er nicht? Er hat sich doch verpflichtet, in drei Wochen zu sterben, und nun hat er hier noch angefangen, dick zu werden! ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
421:Aunt Zelda," Jenna said gently. "You know there should be three bowls in the bag? Do you know where the other one is?"
Aunt Zelda sighed. "The Marsh Python ate it," she said. ~ Angie Sage,
422:the chocolate raisins tasted somewhat fishy, but Lucy didn't care-chocolate was chocolate. She changed her mind however, when she realized that the raisins were tiny fish heads. ~ Angie Sage,
423:The sage is still not because he takes stillness to be good and therefore is still. The ten thousand things are insufficient to distract his mind - that is the reason he is still. ~ Zhuangzi,
424:Marcia verwachtte Silas terug met haar Beschermring.
Jenna en Nicko verwachtten een bericht van Silas.
Maxie verwachtte zijn ontbijt.
Jongen 412 verwachtte moeilijkheden. ~ Angie Sage,
425:The icing on the cake was that tomorrow he (Silas) and Sarah had a perfectly acceptable excuse to leave this cold, nut-strewn, shrew-infested treehouse and return to civilisation. ~ Angie Sage,
426:The sage does not accumulate (for himself). The more that he expends for others, the more does he possess of his own; the more that he gives to others, the more does he have himself. ~ Lao Tzu,
427:The years play a sort of alchemical trick, transmuting one’s mutterings to a state of respectability. Give advice at forty and you’re a nag. Give it at seventy and you’re a sage. ~ Scott Lynch,
428:We do not attend to the advice of the sage and experienced because we think they are old, forgetting that they once were young and placed in the same situations as ourselves. ~ William Hazlitt,
429:Blue to get ready Green to go Yellow to guide you through the snow Orange to warn you that over you’ll go Then red will be the final glow Now seek the black, there’s no going back. ~ Angie Sage,
430:Ordinary men pronounce a sackful of discourses on religion, but do not put a grain into practice, while the sage speaks little, but his whole life is religion put in to action ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
431:Ordinary men pronounce a sackful of discourses on religion, but do not put a grain into practice, while the sage speaks little, but his whole life is religion put in to action ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
432:prosperity does not elevate the sage and adversity does not depress him. For he has always made the effort to rely as much as possible on himself and to derive all delight from himself. ~ Seneca,
433:He who goes from this world without knowing that Imperishable is poor in soul, but he who goes from this world having known that Imperishable, he is the sage. ~ Brihadaranyaka Upanishad III. 8. 10,
434:She'd even violated the only sensible rule of dieting she'd ever run across, the sage advice of the Muppets Miss Piggy, who recommended never eating anything bigger than your head. ~ Susan Donovan,
435:The small man builds cages for everyone he knows
   While the sage, who has to duck his head when the moon is low,
   Keeps dropping keys all night long
   For the beautiful rowdy prisoners. ~ Hafiz,
436:I don’t know, Sage. You threw yourself in the line of pepper spray for me. You must like me just a little bit.” “I— I figured it’d be a shame to ruin your pretty face,” I stammered. ~ Richelle Mead,
437:It is easier to bear the worries of wandering than to find peace in your hometown, where only the sage can live in a happy house surrounded by trite troubles and daily distractions. ~ Hermann Hesse,
438:My god, Sage. Your eyes. How have I never noticed them? When you stand in the light. They're amazing... like molten gold. I could paint those... They're beautiful. You're beautiful. ~ Richelle Mead,
439:She'd even violated the only sensible rule of dieting she'd ever run across, the sage advice of the Muppets' Miss Piggy, who recommended never eating anything bigger than your head. ~ Susan Donovan,
440:He swallows, his Adam’s apple bobbing on his thick neck and I briefly imagine what it’s like to bite him there, just a small nibble or two. I bet he tastes like sage and testosterone. ~ Karina Halle,
441:Loomis waved a hand and a squiggly trail of smoke followed like a magic wand. Loomis had a captivating subtlety and charm and was capable of more tricks than a sage in Pharaoh's court. ~ Luke Taylor,
442:Sage Miller opened the bathroom door and stepped out into the dimly lit bedroom wearing heels and nothing else. If Trent's smile was any indication, she'd chosen the right "outfit. ~ Savannah Stuart,
443:The sage does not hoard. The more he helps others, the more he benefits himself, Having bestowed all he has on others, he has yet more; having given all he has to others, he is richer still. ~ Laozi,
444:Goeie genade!' riep tante Zelda, 'wat heb je daar nou?'
'Haal dat ding van me af!' schreeuwde Septimus...
Jenna zat doodstil en staarde verbijsterd naar een net uitgekomen draakje. ~ Angie Sage,
445:Speaking of Sonya...I was thinking of something earlier. Something Wolfe said."

"Why, Adrian. Were you paying attention after all?"

"Don't start,Sage," he warned.(p 211) ~ Richelle Mead,
446:Quiconque est authentiquement heureux ou sage le demeure dans chaque situation. Il apporte cette qualité avec lui partout où il va. La sagesse et le contentement font partie de sa nature. ~ Guy Finley,
447:You are the man with the Magyk stone, aren't you? You always go out into the Time you came in?... Please, oh please, I beg of you," she said. "Take me Out." - Princess Driffa, to Septimus ~ Angie Sage,
448:De eend was boos. Ze keerde tante Zelda heel opzettelijk de rug toe en streek haar veren glad. Tante Zelda bukte zich en aaide haar. 'Ik wil jullie voorstellen aan mijn kat, Bert,' zei ze. ~ Angie Sage,
449:Nee, Nick, het is Ongezien, ongehoord, geen gefluister, niet een woord. En je moet het je ook voorstellen. Het heeft geen zin die spreuk af te raffelen als een demente papegaai. - Septimus ~ Angie Sage,
450:Septimus fu cât pe ce să zică ,,și rămânem aici pe viață", dar se opri. Își aduse aminte ce îi spusese Mătușa Zelda, și anume că, după ce le-ai rostit, lucrurile se împlinesc mai repede... ~ Angie Sage,
451:Virtuous people always let go.
They don't prattle about pleasures and desires.
Touched by happiness and then by suffering,
The sage shows no sign of being elated or depressed. ~ Gautama Buddha,
452:Therefore a sage has said, 'I will do nothing (of purpose), and the people will be transformed of themselves; I will be fond of keeping still, and the people will of themselves become correct. ~ Lao Tzu,
453:What would Cassi say?" Dandra muttered to herself. "Letting the girl stay up so late?" She sighed. The honest answer was that Cassi, a free spirit, would have been perfectly happy about it. ~ Angie Sage,
454:Hearken to the word of the sage with the ear of the soul, even when his conduct has no similitude to his teachings. Men should listen to good counsel even though it be written on a wall. ~ Sadi; Sulistan,
455:Military weapons are the means used by the Sage to punish violence and cruelty, to give peace to troublous times, to remove difficulties and dangers, and to succor those who are in peril. Every ~ Sun Tzu,
456:Thus is it even with the seer and sage;
For still the human limits the divine:
Out of our thoughts we must leap up to sight, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
457:If you’re in trouble, I swear I will never stop until I get to you,” he called softly.
Sage could’ve pretended she was already gone, but she couldn’t leave without answering.
“I know. ~ Erin Beaty,
458:Unkind people spread malicious tales, and well-intentioned people also censure; but in either case the tranquil sage remains unconcerned. Nowhere is there to be found a disconcerted sage. ~ Gautama Buddha,
459:William Burnham (1824-87), U.S. Supreme Court associate justice 1880-87. A judge on the circuit court, he was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Hayes. wood sage n. another term for ~ Erin McKean,
460:Already God is near, the Truth is close:
Because the dark atheist body knows him not,
Must the sage deny the Light, the seer his soul? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
461:It takes more to make one sage today than it did to make the seven of Greece. And you need more resources to deal with a single person these days than with an entire nation in times past. ~ Baltasar Gracian,
462:A new friend is always a miracle, but at thirty-three years old, such a bird of paradise rising in the sage-brush was an avatar. One friend in a lifetime is much; two are many; three are hardly ~ Henry Adams,
463:Are you in a suit?' I managed at last, my voice choking up. 'You didn’t have to dress up for me.'

'Quiet, Sage,' he said. 'I’ll make the hilarious one-liners during this daring rescue. ~ Richelle Mead,
464:If you love someone and they don't love you back, wait for them. If they still don't love you after waiting, they aren't really worth your time. Darn, why did I waste all that time waiting then? ~ Sage Cohen,
465:Maar Brandneus negeerde Jannit. Hij vond het verveld als mensen met hun armen zwaaiden en dingen riepen als: 'Hierheen, híérheen! O, alle gaffelschoeners nog aan toe, wat doet dat beest nu weer? ~ Angie Sage,
466:Blue to get ready
Green to go
Yellow to guide you through the snow
Orange to warn you that over you’ll go
Then red will be the final glow
Now seek the black, there’s no going back. ~ Angie Sage,
467:Can you come over to Amberwood? I need you to help me break curfew and escape my dorm."
There were a few moments of silence. "Sage, I've been waiting two months to hear you say those words. ~ Richelle Mead,
468:So, you see, Sage, in essence, it’s almost like dating without the silly get-to-know-you process. Some of our girls have been here for years and have been with the same client for the entire time. ~ Anonymous,
469:The sage produces without possessing, acts without expectations, and accomplishes without abiding in her accomplishments. It is precisely because she does not abide in them that they never leave her. ~ Lao Tzu,
470:Roux flung a handful of dried shavings on to the embers of his fire; the scent was sharp and immediate, lemon grass and lavender, sage and applewood and pine, like the campfires of my childhood. ~ Joanne Harris,
471:every individual can make himself happy. External goods are of trivial importance and without much influence in either direction: prosperity does not elevate the sage and adversity does not depress him. ~ Seneca,
472:Organizations must create a culture in which it is acceptable that everyone has more to do than he or she can do, and in which it is sage to renegotiate agreements about what everyone is not doing. ~ David Allen,
473:all that greedy or self-absorbed. Sage’s father, cruel as he was, only wanted his son back. Tammi just wanted a sister. I wanted a “normal” girlfriend. And Sage—all she wanted was to be herself. I ~ Brian Katcher,
474:a man--venerable, with a white beard, or on a cross, or as a baby, or a sage seated in the full lotus position. Are these not limiting incarnations, temporary housings, of the great energy process? ~ Timothy Leary,
475:Therefore the sage desires what (other men) do not desire, and does not prize things difficult to get; he learns what (other men) do not learn, and turns back to what the multitude of men have passed by. ~ Lao Tzu,
476:Stay wise with this Sage and Savvy Advice."Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself." ~ Rumi#wisdom #sageandsavvymarketing #sageandsavvyadvice #rumi #change,
477:-Hago esto todo el tiempo. Es un hechizo sencillo. Sin sorpresas.
-Tal vez- dije renuente-. Pero cada vez que usas el espíritu, es más probable que te vuelvas loco.
-Ya estoy loco por ti, Sage. ~ Richelle Mead,
478:Hey, Frenchie!” Sage poked his head out the door, the sun hitting the brown of his hair to reveal hidden strands of red. “Did you bring any baguettes?”

“Why don’t you go season something, Herb? ~ Nalini Singh,
479:Sage?" Adrian lightly touched my arm, and I jumped at the feel of his fingertips against my skin. "You okay?" "I don't know," I said softly. "I just thought of something crazy." "Welcome to my world. ~ Richelle Mead,
480:Sage was right behind her and when she passed by Creed's chair he reached out and touched her arm.
She stopped and looked down at him quizzically.
"You sure look pretty this morning," he said. ~ Carolyn Brown,
481:The wisdom in the story of the most educated and powerful person is often not greater than the wisdom in the story of a child, and the life of a child can teach us as much as the life of a sage. ~ Rachel Naomi Remen,
482:A new friend is always a miracle, but at thirty-three years old, such a bird of paradise rising in the sage-brush was an avatar. One friend in a lifetime is much; two are many; three are hardly possible. ~ Henry Adams,
483:It is the diversity of life that renders thinking difficult. Many a beginning philosopher has been on the point of grasping the problem of suffering, but what sage can cope with that of happiness? At ~ Thornton Wilder,
484:On his bold visage middle age Had slightly press'd its signet sage, Yet had not quench'd the open truth And fiery vehemence of youth: Forward and frolic glee was there, The will to do, the soul to dare. ~ Walter Scott,
485:Und was das Ende des Universums betrifft … lasst es kommen, wie es will, sage ich, in Eis, Feuer oder Nacht. Was hat das Universum jemals für mich getan, dass ich mich um sein Wohlergehen sorgen sollte? ~ Stephen King,
486:Flurries early, pristine and pearly. Winter's come calling! Can we endure so premature a falling? Some may find this trend distressing- others bend to say a blessing over sage and onion dressing. ~ Old Farmer s Almanac,
487:He wanted to know how they prayed to God in El Dorado. "We do not pray to him at all," said the reverend sage. "We have nothing to ask of him. He has given us all we want, and we give him thanks continually. ~ Voltaire,
488:But hail thou Goddess sage and holy, Hail, divinest Melancholy, Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the sense of human sight, And therefore to our weaker view O'erlaid with black, staid Wisdom's hue. ~ John Milton,
489:Look upon him who shows you your faults as a revealer of treasure: seek his company who checks and chides you, the sage who is wise in reproof: it fares well and not ill with him who seeks such company. ~ Gautama Buddha,
490:Anytime a sage displays humanness—in regard to money, food, sex, relationships—we are shocked, shocked, because we are planning to escape life altogether, not live it, and the sage who lives life offends us. ~ Ken Wilber,
491:There are two kinds of victory in this world,’ said the storyteller-sage, ‘Vijaya and Jaya. Vijaya is material victory, where there is a loser. Jaya is spiritual victory, where there are no losers. In ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
492:A pedant who beheld Solon weeping for the death of a son said to him, ‘Why do you weep thus, if weeping avails nothing?’ And the sage answered him, ‘Precisely for that reason—because it does not avail. ~ Miguel de Unamuno,
493:As incompetent in life as in death, I loathe myself and in this loathing I dream of another life, another death. And for having sought to be a sage such as never was, I am only a madman among the mad . . . ~ Emil M Cioran,
494:Et en fin de compte, comme le dit un sage persan, l’amour est une maladie dont personne ne veut se délivrer. Celui qui en est atteint ne cherche pas à se rétablir, et celui qui souffre ne désire pas guérir. ~ Paulo Coelho,
495:He was not used to the smell of dragon breath, which is best described as a combination of the stench of burning rubber and the stink of old socks, with overtones of a hamster cage in dire need of a cleaning. ~ Angie Sage,
496:Sage?" Adrian lightly touched my arm, and I jumped at the feel of his fingertips against my skin. "You okay?"
"I don't know," I said softly. "I just thought of something crazy."
"Welcome to my world. ~ Richelle Mead,
497:Sage: "Conner's held you down for so long, you've forgotten what it's like to breathe free air."

Imogen: "And you've given your life to his control forever. You'll never breathe free air again. ~ Jennifer A Nielsen,
498:The sky was an unspoiled blue. I breathed the fragrant sage and the homey smell from wood fires. Our problems seemed distant, and I wondered if it would be a crime if we played hooky from saving the world. ~ Mario Acevedo,
499:That, dillop brain, is what getting close to the Darke does. It makes you think only of yourself. It takes you away from people you care about. And now you don't have anyone to talk to and it serves you right. ~ Angie Sage,
500:The great sage Thales once put the general matter succinctly "Oh master," he was asked, "what is the most difficult thing to do?" "To know thyself", he replied. "And the easiest?" "To give advice to others. ~ Robert Trivers,
501:There is no credulity more blind, no ignorance more childish, that that of the sage who tries to measure “heaven and earth and the things under the earth”, with the small two-foot rule of his own brains. The ~ Alastair Gunn,
502:... He told the green woman to open the bad-word door and he would go and get the bad-word Apprentice himself, seeing as everyone else around him was so bad-word useless. Especially bad-word witches ... - Kaznim ~ Angie Sage,
503:Composer, sculptor, painter, poet, prophet, sage, these are the makers of the after-world, the architects of heaven. The world is beautiful because they have lived; without them, labouring humanity would perish. ~ James Allen,
504:In a small fragile seed a great tree lurks,
In a tiny gene a thinking being is shut;
A little element in a little sperm,
It grows and is a conqueror and a sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
505:Why would you do that? Why would you act like you didn't know how to drive?"
"Isn't it obvious, Sage? No, of course it isn't. I did it so I'd have a reason to be around you - one I knew you couldn't refuse ~ Richelle Mead,
506:One's life is an act with no actor, and thus it has always been recognized that the insane man that has lost his mind is a parody of the sage who has transcended his ego. If one is paranoid, the other is metanoid. ~ Alan Watts,
507:Star and Ariel looked at each other, aghast. The coven was about to burn two kids from the Castle. What would the Queen have to say about that? It would be goodbye to their free food at Wizard Sandwiches for sure. ~ Angie Sage,
508:Advice,” chuckled Doña Vorchenza. “The years play a sort of alchemical trick, transmuting one’s mutterings to a state of respectability. Give advice at forty and you’re a nag. Give it at seventy and you’re a sage. ~ Scott Lynch,
509:Composer, sculptor, painter, poet, prophet, sage, these are the makers of the after-world, the architects of
heaven. The world is beautiful because they have lived; without them, laboring humanity would perish. ~ James Allen,
510:Does any woman ever count the grains of her harvest and say: Good enough? Or does one always think of what more one might have laid in, had the labor been harder, the ambition more vast, the choices more sage? ~ Geraldine Brooks,
511:...I can say you’re okay for an irreverent party boy with occasional moments of brilliance.”
“Brilliant? You think I’m brilliant?”
He threw his hands skyward. “You hear that, world? Sage says I’m brilliant. ~ Richelle Mead,
512:Isn't it a pleasure to study and practice what you have learned? Isn't it also great when friends visit from distant places? If one remains not annoyed when he is not understood by people around him, isn't he a sage? ~ Confucius,
513:One's life is an act with no actor, and thus it has always been recognized that the insane man that has lost his mind is a parody of the sage who has transcended his ego. If one is paranoid, the other is metanoid. ~ Alan W Watts,
514:When the sage has recognised impermanence, subjection to grief and unreality of substance as the three characteristic qualities of this world, how can his heart own attachment to the things of this world? ~ Fo-shu-hing-tsan-king,
515:One who is not disturbed in mind even amidst the threefold miseries or elated when there is happiness, and who is free from attachment, fear and anger, is called a sage of steady mind. PURPORT ~ A C Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhup da,
516:Aside from their companionship, I’d brought Sage and Sky as ambassadors, hoping they would attract attention and open the door to conversations with strangers. In a moment, they fulfilled their diplomatic function. ~ Philip Caputo,
517:...I can say you’re okay for an irreverent party boy with occasional moments of brilliance.”
“Brilliant? You think I’m brilliant?”
He threw his hands skyward. “You hear
that, world? Sage says I’m brilliant. ~ Richelle Mead,
518:‘Everything is evanescent, everything is changeful’— knowing this, the sage gives up both pleasure and pain and becomes a witness of this panorama (the universe) without attaching himself to anything. (VIII. 344) ~ Swami Vivekananda,
519:Sage," he said. "What are you wearing?" I sighed and stared down at the dress. "I know. It's red. Don't start. I'm tired of hearing about it." "Funny," he said. "I don't think I could ever get tired of looking at it. ~ Richelle Mead,
520:Advice," Doña Vorchenza chuckled. "Advice. The years play a sort of alchemical trick, transmuting one's mutterings to a state of respectability. Give advice at forty and you're a nag. Give it at seventy and you're a sage. ~ Scott Lynch,
521:Advice,' Doña Vorchenza chuckled. 'Advice. The years play a sort of alchemical trick, transmuting one's mutterings to a state of respectability. Give advice at forty and you're a nag. Give it at seventy and you're a sage. ~ Scott Lynch,
522:Every man's true teacher is his own Higher Self, and when the life is brought under the control of reason, this Higher Self is released from bondage to appetites and impulses, and becomes Priest, Sage and Illuminator.
   ~ Manly P Hall,
523:I selected a simple but graceful gown with a sage-colored organza overdress and a seed-pearl choker, hoping that I had chosen well, and I swept my hair up with long, pearl-dotted pins from a small ivory box on the vanity. ~ Karen Essex,
524:Behind your thoughts and feelings, my brother, there is a mighty lord, an unknown sage - his name is self; he dwells in your body, he is your body.

There is more reason in your body than in your best wisdom. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
525:Callistanas aren’t so bad either,” I said, looking down at my satchel. “That ‘pain in the ass’ screeching saved me from a face full of acid.”
Adrian put his hand to his heart in mock horror. “Sage, did you just swear? ~ Richelle Mead,
526:Can you come over to Amberwood? I need you to help me break curfew and escape my dorm.” There were a few moments of silence. “Sage, I’ve been waiting two months to hear you say those words. You want me to bring a ladder? ~ Richelle Mead,
527:Tu te jugeras donc toi-même, lui répondit le roi. C'est le plus difficile. Il est bien plus difficile de se juger soi-même que de juger autrui. Si tu réussis à bien te juger, c'est que tu es un véritable sage. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
528:Behind your thoughts and feelings, my brother, there stands a mighty ruler. an unknown sage - whose name is self. In yourt body he dwells; he is your body. There is more reason in your body than in your best wisdom. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
529:We don't have to circle the world in order to find beauty and fulfilment. After all, most of living has to happen in the mind. And, to quote one anonymous sage from my trivet, "The world is only the size of each man's head. ~ Ruskin Bond,
530:Majestic though in ruin: sage he stood
With Atlantean shoulders fit to bear
The weight of mightiest Monarchies his look
Drew audience and attention still as Night
Or Summers Noon-tide air while thus he spake. ~ John Milton,
531:Sage," he said. "What are you wearing?"
I sighed and stared down at the dress. "I know. It's red. Don't start. I'm tired of hearing about it."
"Funny," he said. "I don't think I could ever get tired of looking at it. ~ Richelle Mead,
532:Use your head, Sep. Loads of wolverines. Hanging around waiting for super. Gtting excited. eating mint blasts. so what do you think they do?' it must be here. they can't have eaten that... i dunno, Nik, what do they do?' POO. ~ Angie Sage,
533:Can you come over to Amberwood? I need you to help me break curfew and escape my dorm.”
There were a few moments of silence. “Sage, I’ve been waiting two months to hear you say those words. You want me to bring a ladder? ~ Richelle Mead,
534:Heaven and Earth last for ever. Why do Heaven and Earth last for ever? They are unborn, so ever living. The sage stays behind, thus he is ahead. He is detached, thus at one with all. Through selfless action, he attains fulfillment. ~ Laozi,
535:The sage here surpasses God. God fears nothing by the benefit of his nature; the sage fears nothing, but by the sole strength of his spirit. This indeed is great, to have the weakness of a mortal and yet the fearlessness of a god. ~ Seneca,
536:The Stoic makes no differentiation between a small act of kindness by a simple person and a great act of virtue from a learned sage. Virtue is virtue, and in both cases the result is happiness for the one who is virtuous. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
537:Almost all our evils arise from being unable to stay in our rooms,” said another sage, Pascal.

(“Yanılmıyorsam Pascal, ‘neredeyse tüm mutsuzluklarımız odamızda kalmayı bilememiş olmamızdan geliyor başımıza’ der”) ~ Charles Baudelaire,
538:Pleased to meet you." Sage said, offering his hand. "The pleasure is all mine," Rayna Purred. "Unless ofcourse, it's all Clea's which is even better." Sage smiled and might have even blushed a bit, which was highly entertaining. ~ Hilary Duff,
539:Septimus! Oh, Septimus!" Marcia hurled herself toward Septimus and enveloped him in her cloak. "You're alive. I thought… I thought you were dead. I thought you'd fallen…"
"Me too," said Septimus, holding on to Marcia. "Me too. ~ Angie Sage,
540:Plumes of white, pink, and purple blossoms offset the one hundred shades of green our little city is known for this time of year: lime, celery, and avocado, butter lettuce and kale, Granny Smith apple and broccoli and sage. ~ Jennie Shortridge,
541:Septimus longed for a glimpse of Marcia. He wanted to see her face at the window, to know that she was all right... He longed to tell her that there was still hope. "Hold on as long as you can. Don't give up. Please don't give up. ~ Angie Sage,
542:The old Chinese sage Chuang-tzu, for example, said: Once I dreamed I was a butterfly, and now I no longer know whether I am Chuang-tzu, who dreamed I was a butterfly, or whether I am a butterfly dreaming that I am Chuang-tzu. ~ Jostein Gaarder,
543:Trouble rather the tiger in his lair than the sage among his books. For to you kingdoms and their armies are things mighty and enduring, but to him they are but toys of the moment, to be overturned with the flick of a finger. ~ Gordon R Dickson,
544:Use your head, Sep. Loads of wolverines. Hanging around waiting for super. Gtting excited. eating mint blasts. so what do you think they do?'
it must be here. they can't have eaten that... i dunno, Nik, what do they do?'
POO. ~ Angie Sage,
545:Pleased to meet you." Sage said, offering his hand. "The pleasure is all mine," Rayna Purred. "Unless ofcourse, it's all Clea's which is even better."
Sage smiled and might have even blushed a bit, which was highly entertaining. ~ Hilary Duff,
546:Sinners live in a sort of hell, and saints imagine themselves in a sort of heaven. And the sage? - for him it is moksha, for him it is the absolute freedom. He is freed from all duality. The secret key, and the only key, is awareness. ~ Rajneesh,
547:Power lived everywhere, beneath cactus thorns, secreted in sparkles of dew, and hidden in the flecks of moonlight that silvered the sage. By calling upon that Power, Singers could pull clouds together and awaken the soaring ~ Kathleen O Neal Gear,
548:at first when the rain fell from the sky so wide and deep it smelled like sage, my favorite smell I went up on the plateau to watch it come to see the gifts it always brought but this rain changed from blue to black and left nothing. ~ Ally Condie,
549:The small man            builds cages for everyone he knows,            while the sage,            . . . . . . .            keeps dropping keys all night long            for the beautiful rowdy prisoners.            —HAFIZ ~ Kathleen Dowling Singh,
550:The Wise  (Minstrel or Sage,) out of their books are clay;  But in their books, as from their graves they rise.  Angels—that, side by side, upon our way,  Walk with and warn us! ~ Edward Bulwer-Lytton, The Souls of Books, Stanza 3, line 9.,
551:The sage does not hoard. The more he helps others, the more he benefits himself, The more he gives to others, the more he gets himself. The Way of Heaven does one good but never does one harm. The Way of the sage is to act but not to compete. ~ Laozi,
552:PRIMAL TEARS is a novel of tremendous power. Passionate and erotic, at times tenderly lyrical, it confronts head-on, without flinching, brutal environmental and feminist politics. Its protagonist, Sage, is unique, magical, and haunting. ~ Kate Wilhelm,
553:I'm stopping you," Lucy said, catching him and grabbing his arm. "You are not going to do anything so stupid… Look Septimus, you're clever. Even I know what those purple stripes on your sleeves mean, so - like Wolf Boy said - use your head. ~ Angie Sage,
554:There was a peal of laughter from the girls. Then, before anyone could say a word, the line was seen to move a fraction. A bite at last! The sage yanked in for all he was worth. The rod crashed into a protruding rock and broke clean in two. ~ Cao Xueqin,
555:There was once a Hindu sage, who sat down on the banks of the Ganges and thought for seventy years about the millennium. Just as he arrived at the solution and was putting it into verse, a mosquito stung him and he forgot it again at once. ~ Don Marquis,
556:When some of my friends called me crazy for getting engaged so young, Candace offered sage advice: “Don’t listen to them. If you are happy that’s all that matters. Val and I have done it for years and we’re really happy. You can be, too. ~ Jodie Sweetin,
557:Merrin felt disappointed in his scent bottle. Just to make sure it really did smell so bad, he put the bottle right up to his left nostril and sniffed hard - and the jinnee was sucked up his nose. It was not a good moment for either of them. ~ Angie Sage,
558:Of course they didn't give us this much, Sage. But I had to make sure I nailed my first assignment. Takes a lot of tries before you hit perfection." He paused to reconsider that. "Well, except for my parents. They got it on the first try. ~ Richelle Mead,
559:The Sage desires only one thing, virtue, and he is cautious about only one thing, vice. He is the same in every circumstance because what is most important lies within him, and not with external events, which are constantly changing. ~ Donald J Robertson,
560:He drew himself up as though proud to be asked the question. “Young lady, I am the greatest janitor in all existence. I am the son of a janitor, last in a long line of janitors that stretch all the way back to the Sage of Brooms...and beyond! ~ Will Wight,
561:In the new media age, everybody is a historian, or a scientist, or a preacher, or a sage. And if everyone is an expert, then nobody is, and the worst thing you can be in a society where everybody is an expert is, well, an actual expert. ~ Charles P Pierce,
562:Without going outside, you may know the whole world, without looking through the window, you may see the ways of heaven. The farther you go, the less you know. Thus the sage knows without traveling; he sees without looking; he works without doing. ~ Laozi,
563:An ancient sage held that in different ages, humans held the senses in different ratios, according to the media by which they communicated and expressed themselves. Hence before writing, the ear was the royal sense. After writing, the eye. ~ Karl Schroeder,
564:But for the god in their breasts unsatisfied, but for his spurrings
Soon would the hero turn beast and the sage reel back to the savage;
Man from his difficult heights would recoil and be mud in the earth-mud. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
565:For as the nonsense of the madman is a babble of words for its own fascination, the nonsense of nature and of the sage is the perception that the ultimate meaningless of the world contains the same hidden joy as its transience and emptiness. ~ Alan W Watts,
566:Hamilton’s first act in Philadelphia paid homage to Franklin. The sage had opposed salaries for executive-branch officers, hoping such a measure would produce civic-minded leaders, not government officials feeding at the public trough. Others ~ Ron Chernow,
567:The Hindu sage Ramakrishna once said that the mind is like fabric; it takes the color of the dye it’s soaked in. Soak the mind in a quiet, relaxing environment and it will become quiet and relaxed. Soak it in floods of Facebook and, well.… ~ Jay Michaelson,
568:Ich schäme mich nicht, wenn ich sage, das Taschentuch war der einzige Mensch, der sich im Lager um mich kümmerte. Ich bin mir sicher, auch heute noch. Manchmal kriegen die Dinge eine Zartheit, eine monströse, die man von ihnen nicht erwartet. ~ Herta M ller,
569:There was a peal of laughter from the girls. Then, before anyone could say a word, the line was seen to move a fraction. A bite at last! The sage yanked in for all he was worth. The rod crashed into a protruding rock and broke clean in two. The ~ Cao Xueqin,
570:The “sage of love” within me (acquired from who knew what egregious experience) was crowing about Füsun’s misstep: By speaking too sincerely, she had lost. From this reaction I deduced that my jealous worries and obsessions would soon subside. ~ Orhan Pamuk,
571:I hope you’re wearing that little camisole, the sage-y gray one that’s satin. It’s hot. You’re hot in it. And if I was straight and you made me pizza and I came over and you were wearing that top, I’d jump you…” he paused, “before the pizza. ~ Kristen Ashley,
572:What's a flange?" asked Marcia.
A what?"
A flange. It says here attatch piece Y to the long, upright D, taking care to align holes P and Q with the corrosponding holes N and O in the left-hand flange. I can't see a wrethed flange anywhere. ~ Angie Sage,
573:Philosophy not only purifies the reason and predisposes it to the contact of the universal and the infinite, but tends to stabilise the nature and create the tranquillity of the sage. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Higher and the Lower Knowledge,
574:Why is the sea king of a hundred streams? Because it lies below them... If the sage would guide the people, he must serve with humility. If he would lead them, he must follow behind. In this way when the sage rules, the people will not feel oppressed. ~ Laozi,
575:Look, Sage. I don't know much about chemistry or computer hacking or photosynthery, but this is something I've got a lot of experience with." I think he mean photosynthesis, but I didn't correct him. "Use my knowledge. Don't let it go to waste. ~ Richelle Mead,
576:The Last Noel by Jean Hager, A Holly, Jolly Murder by Joan Hess, Midnight Clear by Kathy Hogan Trocheck, Mistletoe from Purple Sage by Barbara Burnett Smith, Ransome for a Holiday by Fred Hunter and We Wish You a Merry Murder by Valerie Wolzien. ~ Carolyn G Hart,
577:A poet is a poet, whether he rides in a Ford or on a donkey; a sage is a sage, whether he plays golf in New Jersey or bathes in the Ganges, or prays in the desert; and a fool is a fool, whether he be a maharaja or a president of a post-war republic. ~ Ameen Rihani,
578:Dropping keys

The small man
Builds cages for everyone
He
Knows.

While the Sage,
Who has to duck his head
When the moon is low,
Keeps dropping keys all night long
For the
Beautiful
Rowdy
Prisoners. ~ Daniel Ladinsky,
579:Like what you see, Angel? He says
I step to the fence. Hook my hands into the links, next to his. I lean in close. He's got tiny white lines around his eyes from squintin. Or maybe smilin. He smells of warm dust an sage.
You ain't my type, I says ~ Moira Young,
580:He’ll process the check.” Sage was still silent, blinking at TJ. “You’ll get the hang of it. I promise. And that platinum card I gave you? Gerry pays that bill too. But you have to take it into a store and buy something before he can pay it. Maybe a bed ~ Joanne Rock,
581:Is it ever thus, at the end of things? Does any woman ever count the grains of her harvest and say: Good enough? Or does one always think of what more one might have laid in, had the labor been harder, the ambition more vast, the choices more sage? ~ Geraldine Brooks,
582:Master, you are wonderful!” A student, taking his leave, gazed ardently at the patriarchal sage. “You have renounced riches and comforts to seek God and teach us wisdom!” It was well-known that Bhaduri Mahasaya had forsaken great family wealth ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
583:Trouble rather the tiger in his lair than the sage amongst his books. For to you Kingdoms and their armies are things mighty and enduring, but to him they are but toys of the moment, to be overturned by the flicking of a finger … LESSONS: Anonymous ~ Gordon R Dickson,
584:What king has he not taught state, as Talma taught Napoleon? What maiden has not found him finer than her delicacy? What lover has he not outloved? What sage has he not outseen? What gentleman has he not instructed in the rudeness of his behavior? ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
585:at first when the rain fell
from the sky so wide and deep
it smelled like sage, my favorite smell
I went up on the plateau to watch it come
to see the gifts it always brought
but this rain changed from blue to black
and left
nothing. ~ Ally Condie,
586:I don't suppose you offered to help?" "Sage," Adrian declared. "These hands don't do manual labor." He knocked another ball into a hole. "You want to play?" "What? With you?" "No, with Clarence." He sighed at my dumbfounded look. "Yes, of course with me. ~ Richelle Mead,
587:Let go of your self-pity and your rage, noble sage. Let the knots of your mind unbind until aham gives way to atma. Only then will you be able to restore your hermitage and bring back joy to your world,’ said Ram with the demeanour of a king. Gautama ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
588:How much more reasonable is it to say with the sage Plato, that the perfect happiness of a state consists in the subjects obeying their prince, the prince obeying the laws, and the laws being equitable and always directed to the good of the public? ~ Jean Jacques Rousseau,
589:It was like learning life lessons from your big brother or your crazy uncle. How to handle yourself in a bar fight: “Hit first. Hit hard. And be ready to move.” How to behave around women: “Date strippers. Don’t marry strippers.” Some of the advice was sage. ~ Rorke Denver,
590:Nothing is more evident to the sage than the things hidden in the secrecy of his consciousness, nothing more manifest than the subtle causes of his actions. Therefore the superior man watches attentively over the secret inspirations of his conscience. ~ Tsu-Tse: Tsung-yung,
591:Marissa's head appeared at the window. "Okay, this is a bit yucky," she said, "but it has to be done." She poked her head back through the window and kissed Jenna. Jenna leaped back in surprise. "Told you it was lucky." Marissa grinned. "But you're a witch now. ~ Angie Sage,
592:The Ravenel temper,” Pandora said with a sage nod, and whispered theatrically, “we have it too.”
“Our older sister Helen is the only one who doesn’t,” Cassandra added.
“Nothing provokes her,” Pandora said. “We’ve tried ever so often, but it never works. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
593:And then: 'Here comes your baby. Sois sage. Sois chic.' He moved slightly away and began talking to the boy next to him. And here my baby came indeed, through all that sunlight, his face flushed and his hair flying, his eyes, unbelievably, like morning stars. ~ James Baldwin,
594:The soul-stirring image of death is no bugbear to the sage, and is looked on without despair by the pious. It teaches the former to live, and it strengthens the hopes of the latter in salvation in the midst of distress. Death is new life to both. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
595:Truly they who know still know nothing if the strength of love be not theirs; for the true sage is not he who sees, but he who, seeing the furthest, has the deepest love for mankind. He who sees without loving is only straining his eyes in the darkness. ~ Maurice Maeterlinck,
596:It was wonderful country that faced him, cedar, piñon and sage, colored hills and flats, walls of yellow rock stretch away, and dim purple mountains all around. If his keen eyes did not deceive him there was a bunch of wild horses grazing on top of the first hill. ~ Zane Grey,
597:Sorry, Sage. Last I checked, you aren’t an expert in social matters..." "At least I take action. You? You let the world go by without you. You have no spine. You don’t fight back." “You don’t know the first thing about me, Adrian Ivashkov. I fight back plenty. ~ Richelle Mead,
598:We have work to do. Plans to make. Magyk to mend. Together."
Septimus blinked a sudden blurriness from his eyes. "I've missed you," he said.
"Well, I'm sure you'll soon get fed up with me," Marcia retorted, finding that her eyes had gone a little fuzzy too. ~ Angie Sage,
599:Bhagavad Gita, “The Song Of God.” It is a philosophical dialogue, written by some illumined sage of the time (and attributed to the legendary sage, Vyasa), which offers the most comprehensive and definitive expression of the Samkhya philosophy ever written. ~ Swami Abhayananda,
600:This job is all about appearances, Sage. We only hire individuals who take pride in themselves, who can present themselves in a certain manner, while at the same time representing us in such a way that reflects class and allure… a certain degree of unattainability. ~ Anonymous,
601:Oh dear," said Sarah anxiously, "I do wish he wouldn't do these silly things." I'm sure we all wish that, Sarah," said Marcia sternly. "But unfortunately he has progressed rather further than the silly stage. Evil-minded-scheming stage is more what I would call it. ~ Angie Sage,
602:Rachael Sage is a marvelous young artist- and I am a fan!! 'Haunted by You' has a beauty that shines through her lyrics and melodies-- poignant, tender and tough. These are stories from the heart that will lift you up and carry you to places you had never dreamed. ~ Judy Collins,
603:Sage, you’re the only ray of sunshine in my world and I’d die before I give that up.”
I feel his words in my gut and they bring tears to my eyes. I lace my fingers between his and squeeze his hand.
“Then we’ll find a way to be together because I can’t lose you. ~ K Webster,
604:So sometimes things are ahead and sometimes they are behind; Sometimes breathing is hard, sometimes it comes easily; Sometimes there is strength and sometimes weakness; Sometimes one is up and sometimes down. Therefore the sage avoids extremes, excesses, and complacency. ~ Laozi,
605:In its conception the literature prize belongs to days when a writer could still be thought of as, by virtue of his or her occupation, a sage, someone with no institutional affiliations who could offer an authoritative word on our times as well as on our moral life. ~ J M Coetzee,
606:Most of all, it was the wild music that impressed Matt. It did the same thing that playing the piano had done when he was frightened and lonely. It took him into another world where only beauty existed and where he was sage from hatred and disappointment and death. ~ Nancy Farmer,
607:Not long ago I heard a Navy chaplain refer to the sage advice of the Apostle to put first things first...If we are to heed the admonition to put first things first...one of the main essentials which lies at the very beginning of civilization is that of security. ~ Calvin Coolidge,
608:Once a sage asked why scholars always flock to the doors of the rich, whilst the rich are not inclined to call at the doors of scholars. ‘The scholars‘ he answered , ‘are well aware of the use of money, but the rich are ignorant of the nobility of science.’ ~ Abu Rayhan al Biruni,
609:To realize that our knowledge is ignorance, This is a noble insight. To regard our ignorance as knowledge, This is mental sickness. Only when we are sick of the sickness Shall we cease to be sick. The Sage is not sick, being sick of sickness; This is the secret of health. ~ Laozi,
610:All to whom want is terrible, upon whatever principle, ought to think themselves obliged to learn the sage maxims of our parsimonious ancestors, and attain the salutary arts of contracting expense; for without economy none can be rich, and with it few can be poor. ~ Samuel Johnson,
611:Goodness & love are as real as their terrible opposites, and, in truth, far more real, though I say this mindful of the enormous evils... But love is the final reality; and anyone who does not understand this, be he writer or sage, is a man flawed of wisdom. ~ Sheldon Vanauken,
612:Oh dear," said Sarah anxiously, "I do wish he wouldn't do these silly things."
I'm sure we all wish that, Sarah," said Marcia sternly. "But unfortunately he has progressed rather further than the silly stage. Evil-minded-scheming stage is more what I would call it. ~ Angie Sage,
613:Really, Sage? A date?” I sighed. “Yes, Adrian. A date.” “A real date. Not, like, doing homework together,” he added. “I mean like where you go out to a movie or something. And a movie that’s not part of a school assignment. Or about something boring.” “A real date. ~ Richelle Mead,
614:What he did wrong. He doesn't deserve your love. But he does deserve your forgiveness, because otherwise he will grow like a weed in your heart until it's choked and overrun. The only person who suffers, when you squirrel away all that hate, is you.”
-Mary to Sage ~ Jodi Picoult,
615:Really, Sage? A date?"
I sighed. "Yes, Adrian. A date."
"A real date. Not, like, doing homework together," he added. "I mean like where you go out to a movie or something. And a movie that's not part of an assignment. Or about something boring."
"A real date. ~ Richelle Mead,
616:I want to start two institutions, one in Madras and one in Calcutta, to carry out my plan; and that plan briefly is to bring the Vedantic ideals into the everyday practical life of the saint or the sinner, of the sage or the ignoramus, of the Brahmin or the Pariah. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
617:It would be tedious to attempt a phonetic reproduction of Mr. Sage's utterances. Enough to say that they were genteel to a fantastic degree. "Aye thot Aye heeard somewon teeking may neem in veen," may give some idea of his rendering of the above sentence. Let it go at that. ~ Anonymous,
618:Twas the saying of an ancient sage that humour was the only test of gravity, and gravity of humour. For a subject which would not bear raillery was suspicious; and a jest which would not bear a serious examination was certainly false wit. ~ Anthony Ashley Cooper 1st Earl of Shaftesbury,
619:There is another story of a Chinese sage who was asked, “How shall we escape the heat?”—meaning, of course, the heat of suffering. He answered, “Go right into the middle of the fire.” “But how, then, shall we escape the scorching flame?” “No further pain will trouble you! ~ Alan W Watts,
620:Been having a fight with your blankets, Septimus?" A familiar voice echoed down the chimney. "Looks like you lost," the voice continued with a chuckle. "Not wise to take on a pair of blankets, lad. One, maybe, but two blankets always gang up on you. Vicious things, blankets. ~ Angie Sage,
621:He was very impressed - and touched - by what he found. He realised that, during the dark winter evenings by the fire, when he had often talked about his time in the Young Army, Marcia had not only listened to his descriptions of the night exercises, she had remembered them. ~ Angie Sage,
622:She placed a hand on my cheek and softly kissed the other one, then whispered, “Remember this moment, then, Sage, when someone of my status offered a kindness to someone of yours. Because next time we meet, if Darius is dead, I will no longer be anyone of importance. ~ Jennifer A Nielsen,
623:I looked into my own heart and I saw reflected there in its entirety the vast world with all its passions,—pride, hope, fear and the conflagration of the desires. So gazing I understood the word of the ancient sage, “Man is a mirror in which there appears the image of the world.” ~ Ryonen,
624:Marcellus," said Julius, sounding somewhat unenthusiastic. "Um, how are you?"
Marcellus smiled. "Alive," he said tersely… Julius, you snake. It has taken me nearly five hundred years to figure this out, but now at last I know what caused the Great Alchemie Disaster... you! ~ Angie Sage,
625:I don't suppose you offered to help?"

"Sage," Adrian declared. "These hands don't do manual labor." He knocked another ball into a hole. "You want to play?"

"What? With you?"

"No, with Clarence." He sighed at my dumbfounded look. "Yes, of course with me. ~ Richelle Mead,
626:Midday already. As if it isn't enough that I have to put up with a meddling Alchemist - any minute now there will be a meddling Princess at my door declaiming from that wretched book with its tiddly-squiddly type, which is the bane of every ExtraOrdinary Wizard's life. - Marcia ~ Angie Sage,
627:The sage said, "The best thing is not to hate anyone, only to love. That is the only way out of it. As soon as you have forgiven those whom you hate, you have gotten rid of them. Then you have no reason to hate them; you just forget. spiritual Dimensions of Psychology." ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
628:Whereas the ordinary person embraces pleasure, the sage enchains it; whereas the ordinary person thinks pleasure is the highest good, the sage doesn’t think it is even a good; and whereas the ordinary person does everything for the sake of pleasure, the sage does nothing. ~ William B Irvine,
629:Such were a dream of some sage at night when he muses in fancy,
Imaging freely a flawless world where none were afflicted,
No man inferior, all could sublimely equal and brothers
Live in a peace divine like the gods in their luminous regions. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
630:Wat ik bedoel,' zei Marcia in een poging het uit te leggen, 'is dat ik nog nooit eerder iemand heb gevonden die ook maar een sprankje Magiek had, maar jij hebt het... Wat denk je, wil je mijn Leerling worden?... Ik verzoek je om erover na te denken,' zei Marcia op zachtere toon. ~ Angie Sage,
631:What are the occupations of the sage? He resigns himself to seeing, to eating, etc…., he accepts in spite of himself this “wound with nine openings,” which is what the Bhagavad-Gita calls the body.―Wisdom? To undergo with dignity the humiliation inflicted upon us by our holes. ~ Emil M Cioran,
632:Ah Ratty, what good times we'll have," said Mad Jack. "Just you and me, Ratty. We'll go cuttin' them reeds together, and if you're good we'll go to the circus when it comes to town and see the clowns. I love them clowns, Ratty. We'll have a good life together. Yes we will. Oh yes. ~ Angie Sage,
633:Cultivate poverty like a garden herb, like sage. Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. Turn the old; return to them. Things do not change; we change. Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. God will see that you do not want society. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
634:Even so long after sunset, the sky in the west was touched with feather-strokes of crimson and black. The wind was blowing from the east, which meant that even in the middle of the city you could breathe in desert: sand and grit, cactus and coyotes, the burning scent of sage. ~ Cassandra Clare,
635:In addition to the smells of mince and pumpkin pies, the Sage and onions of turkey stuffing, another aroma floated in the air, the very essence of Santa Claus.
Years later, when I was grown up, I still remembered that marvelous fragrance and recognized it as Scotch whisky. ~ Lloyd Alexander,
636:Nobody,” Sage reads, “who looks at a shard of flint lying beneath a rock ledge, or who finds a splintered log by the side of the road would ever find magic in their solitude. But in the right circumstances, if you bring them together, you can start a fire that consumes the world. ~ Jodi Picoult,
637:Prepare for the difficult while it is still easy. Deal with the big while it is still small. Difficult undertakings have always started with what easy. Great undertakings always started with what is small. Therefore the sage never strives for the great,And thereby the great is achieved. ~ Laozi,
638:From the Young Army Fact List:
Fact One: No early morning roll call:
GOOD.
Fact Two: Much better food. GOOD.
Fact Three: Aunt Zelda nice: GOOD.
Fact Four: Princess-girl friendly: GOOD.
Fact Five: Have Magyk ring: GOOD.
Fact Six: Extraordinary Wizard Cross: BAD. ~ Angie Sage,
639:Sorry, Sage. Last I checked, you aren’t an expert in
social matters..."

"At least I take action. You? You let the world go by
without you. You have no spine. You don’t fight back."

“You don’t know the first thing about me, Adrian Ivashkov. I fight back plenty. ~ Richelle Mead,
640:Thank you very much, Miss Badger," she said. "I appreciate your honesty. I realise this may have put you in a difficult position here, but I trust you will not have any trouble." Marcia glared at Jillie Djinn. "However, if you do, there is always a place for you at the Wizard Tower. ~ Angie Sage,
641:But for the god in their breasts unsatisfied, but for his spurrings
Soon would the hero turn beast and the sage reel back to the savage;
Man from his difficult heights would recoil and be mud in the earth-mud.
This by pain we prevent; we compel his ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
642:Oh yeah, you’re a regular sage. Shouldn’t you be sitting on a mountain somewhere cultivating a long white beard waiting for knowledge seekers to come to you?”
“Have I mentioned that sarcasm has the potential to be detrimental to the natural beauty of your face?” he countered. ~ Jacquelyn Frank,
643:Really, Sage? A date?”
I sighed. “Yes, Adrian. A date.”
“A real date. Not, like, doing homework together,” he added.
“I mean like where you go out to a movie or something. And a
movie that’s not part of a school assignment. Or about something boring.”
“A real date. ~ Richelle Mead,
644:The integral sage, the nondual sage, is here to show us otherwise. Known generally as "Tantric," these sages insist on transcending life by living it. They insist on finding release by engagement, finding nirvana in the midst of samsara, finding total liberation by complete immersion. ~ Ken Wilber,
645:Shutting out all external objects, fixing the vision between the eyebrows, making even the inward and outward breaths, the sage who has controlled the senses, mind and understanding, who is intent upon liberation, who has cast away desire, fear and anger, he is ever freed. ~ Krishna Dwaipayana Vyasa,
646:The artist thing is just natural. If that comes out, the music, the songs, I need some actual time which I dedicate to it. But I don't have to sit down eight hours a day in order to get out what I need to create. That is just always bubbeling inside and than evetually it just comes out. ~ Sage Francis,
647:FRIED CHICKPEAS Drain canned chickpeas and thoroughly pat dry. Fry in hot oil (they may splatter) with unpeeled cloves of garlic and sage leaves until the chickpeas are crispy and the garlic is golden. Blot on paper towels, then toss with cayenne and paprika. Serve at room temperature. ~ Jason Matthews,
648:The family circle has widened. The worldpool of information fathered by the electric media--movies, Telstar, flight--far surpassesany possible influence mom and dad can now bring to bear. Character no longer is shaped by only two earnest, fumbling experts. Now all the world's a sage. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
649:If anything is endemic to Wyoming it is wind. This big room of space is swept out daily, leaving a bone yard of fossils, agates, and carcasses in every stage of decay. Though it was water that initially shaped the state, wind is the meticulous gardener, raising dust and pruning the sage. ~ Gretel Ehrlich,
650:the scientific and learned societies, and he never was known to take part in the sage deliberations of the Royal Institution or the London Institution, the Artisan’s Association, or the Institution of Arts and Sciences. He belonged, in fact, to none of the numerous societies which swarm in the ~ Anonymous,
651:Much as the sage may affect to despise the opinion of the world, there are few who would not rather expose their lives a hundred times than be condemned to live on, in society, but not of it - a by-word of reproach to all who know their history, and a mark for scorn to point his finger at. ~ Charles Mackay,
652:The ancient sages said, ‘He who is angry—it is the same as if he worshiped idols.’ They also said, ‘One who yields to anger—if he is a sage, his wisdom departs from him; if he is a prophet, his prophetic gift departs from him.’ Those of an irate disposition—their life is not worth living. ~ Rodger Kamenetz,
653:I’m a man.” Koll’s shoulders sagged. “When did that happen?” “It just happens.” “I wish I knew what it meant, being a man.” “Guess it means something different for each one of us. The gods know I’m no sage, but if I’ve realized anything, it’s that life isn’t about making something perfect. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
654:Wieder stieg ich und wieder
in den Brunnen, holde Sage von einst,
höre fern deine goldenen Lieder,
wie du lachst, wie du träumst, wie du leise weinst.
Mahnend aus der Tiefe
flüstert das Zauberwort;
mir ist, ich sei trunken und schliefe,
und du riefest ich fort und fort.. ~ Hermann Hesse,
655:The five colours will blind a man’s sight. The five sounds will deaden a mans hearing. The five tastes will spoil a man’s palate. Chasing and hunting will drive a man wild. Things hard to get will do harm to a man’s conduct. Therefore the sage makes provision for the stomach and not for the eye. ~ Alan W Watts,
656:Du, dem ich's nicht sage, daß ich bei Nacht weinend liege, dessen Wesen mich müde macht wie eine Wiege. Du, der mir nicht sagt, wenn er wacht meinetwillen: wie, wenn wir diese Pracht ohne zu stillen in uns ertrügen? Sieh Dir die Liebenden an, wenn erst das Bekennen begann, wie bald sie lügen. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
657:The senses and the mind seek to convince thee, sova in are they, that they are the end of all things. The senses and the mind are only instruments and play things. Behind the feelings and the thoughts, my brother; there dwells a more puissant master, an unknown sage; it is called the Self. ~ Nietzsche Zarathustra,
658:For precious secrets in reference to beer, am I likewise beholden to him, involving warning against the beer of a certain establishment, by reason of its having turned sour through failure in point of demand: though my young sage is not of opinion that similar deterioration has befallen the ale.  ~ Charles Dickens,
659:We are the javelins of Destiny, we are the children of Wotan,
We are the human Titans, the supermen dreamed by the sage.
A cross of the beast and demoniac with the godhead of power and will,
We were born in humanity’s sunset, to the Night is our pil ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Children of Wotan,
660:It was if the charming theatrical curtain had dropped away and I saw him for the first time as he really was: not the benign old sage, the indulgent and protective good-parent of my dreams, but ambiguous, a moral neutral, whose beguiling trappings concealed a being watchful, capricious, and heartless. ~ Donna Tartt,
661:Sage shakes her head. “Surely there were some Germans who were better than others, some who didn’t want to go along with what Hitler said. If you can’t see them as individuals—if you can’t forgive the ones who ask for it—doesn’t that make you just as bad as any Nazi?”“No,” I admit. “It makes me human. ~ Jodi Picoult,
662:the priest and the mage, the man of piety, the just man, the man of wisdom, the saint, the prophet, the Rishi, the Yogi, the seer, the spiritual sage and the mystic ... the saint, the devotee, the spiritual sage, the seer, the prophet, the servant of God, the soldier of the spirit
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine,
663:The Torah sage ... does not encroach upon another's occupation, nor does he ever cause someone discomfort. The rule is that he should be among the pursued and not the pursuers, among those who accept humiliation but not among those who humiliate others.~ Maimonides, in The Ethical Writings of Maimonides (Dover:1975),
664:I gave him a nervous smile and said “Say more.” Another favorite rumble tool. Asking someone to “say more” often leads to profoundly deeper and more productive rumbling. Context and details matter. Peel the onion. Stephen Covey’s sage advice still stands: “Seek first to understand, then to be understood. ~ Bren Brown,
665:Even to the sage who's doing Sahaja Samadhi, the great guru, I'd say: "Hey buddy, you know, I like the robes and everything, but remember, you're only touching infinity. And if you claim to be doing more, I think you're pretty much in the senses and the body and the mind because infinity is endless." ~ Frederick Lenz,
666:Evil, which is our companion all our days, is not to be treated as a foe. It is wrong to cocker vice, but we grow narrow and pithless if we are furtive about it, for this is at best a pretense, and the sage knows good and evil are kindred. The worst of men harm others, and the best injure themselves. ~ Edward Dahlberg,
667:Where do you live, Kaznim?"
"In the star tent beside the Moon Pool, beneath the long dune."
Marwick looked puzzled. "So, where's that?" he asked.
"Um. In the desert," said Kaznim. "The Desert of the Singing Sands."
"OK... and whereabouts is that."
Kaznim shook her head. "I ... I don't know. ~ Angie Sage,
668:He hesitated a moment and gave a decisive nod. Then, to my complete and utter astonishment, he got down on his knees before me and clasped my hands in his. “Sydney Katherine Sage,” he said, his green eyes full of love and earnestness. “Would you do a brooding, deadbeat Moroi the honor of being his wife? ~ Richelle Mead,
669:Toute possibilité de lâcheté devient une magnifique espérance à qui s’y connaît. C’est mon avis. Il ne faut jamais se montrer difficile sur le moyen de se sauver de l’étripade, ni perdre son temps non plus à rechercher les raisons d’une persécution dont on est l’objet. Y échapper suffit au sage ~ Louis Ferdinand C line,
670:A sage once said, ‘How shall I open my heart, oh friend? It is forbidden for me to speak. I am about to die for lack of a kindred soul to understand my misery. Simply by looking in her eyes I find the beloved of my heart. But rare is such a soul who swims in ecstatic bliss on the high tide of heavenly love. ~ Trevor Hall,
671:My character is different from all of the Elves you've met before, in that she's really young. And I keep telling journalists this because I've really focused on that in my performance. I'm trying to distinguish her from all of these incredibly sage and wise Elves that have lived for thousands of years. ~ Evangeline Lilly,
672:Oh, would you look at this, now,” she said, pointing at a hole in her sage-green velvet couch. Never mind the brain and hair on it, she could clean those off with a stiff brush. And never mind the point-blank gunshot to the face she’d absorbed. It was the bullet hole in her couch that pissed her off. ~ Christopher Buehlman,
673:The family circle has widened. The worldpool of information fathered by electric media—movies, Telstar, flight—far surpasses any possible influence mom and dad can now bring to bear. Character no longer is shaped by only two earnest, fumbling experts. Now all the world’s a sage. ~ Marshall McLuhan, The Medium is the Massage,
674:Sage would survive. I'd survive. We were better off apart. Painful and quick, just like ripping off a Band-Aid. Well, more like gouging a piece of shrapnel out of my stomach, pouring a bottle of gin into the wound, lighting it on fire, and sewing my guts up with a dirty bootlace. But the concept was the same. ~ Brian Katcher,
675:That was Sydney Sage," said Lissa. "I thought they were all in West Virginia. Why isn't she with Rose?" "That," said Abe darkly, "is an excellent question." "Because they were apparently kidnapping Jill Mastrano in Detroit," said Christian. "Which is weird. But not the craziest thing I can think of Rose doing. ~ Richelle Mead,
676:They just go on and on. The most extraordinary one is this one I found on a gossip site: Becky “drank cocktails” before row, bartender reports I mean, for God’s sake. What does that have to do with anything? They might as well write LOIS AND SAGE VISITED BATHROOM ON DAY OF ROW. They probably will write that. ~ Sophie Kinsella,
677:Okay,” she drew out. “Let me rephrase that. Did you sleep with Sage yet?”

I blushed furiously.

She smacked my leg and exclaimed, “I knew it! I could smell it on you.”

“You can smell it on me?”

She grinned. “When I was hugging you, yeah. Your chest smelled like cologne and man tongue. ~ Karina Halle,
678:To a suffering person, a night is an epoch. To a reveler, a night passes like a moment. In a dream, a moment is no different from an epoch. But to the sage, whose consciousness has overcome all limitations, there is no day or night. As one turns away from the notion of “I” and “the world,” one finds liberation. ~ Deepak Chopra,
679:When water is calm, it reflects objects like a mirror. This tranquillity, this perfect level is the model for the sage. If water is transparent when it is in perfect repose, much more so is the intellectual essence. The heart of the sage in perfect repose is the mirror of heaven and of earth and of all existences. ~ Tsuang tse,
680:He pressed his face into the fabric and breathed in slowly through his mouth and nose, hoping for the faintest smoke and mountain sage and salty sweet stink of Jack but there was no real scent, only the memory of it, the imagined power of Brokeback Mountain of which nothing was left but what he held in his hands. ~ Annie Proulx,
681:In general, old-fashioned cottage garden perennials are the ones to go for, particularly garden herbs – lupins, hollyhocks, scabious, lavender, chives, sage, thyme and rosemary and so on. Most are easy to grow and low maintenance, so they are well suited to busy modern lifestyles – gardening for wildlife is easy. ~ Dave Goulson,
682:Our prayers should be for blessings in general, for God knows best what is good for us.'" Moira smiled as she quoted the ancient sage, then shrugged. "It made sense to me. After that, I started laying my problems and needs before God and asking for grace and guidance and whatever other virtues he thought I needed. ~ Irene Hannon,
683:The sage knows he or she cannot leave all these commitments behind to pursue a life of solitary virtue. For we are called on by God to live in the world, not escape from it; in society not seclusion; to strive to create a balance among the conflicting pressures on us, not to focus on some while neglecting the others. ~ Anonymous,
684:Thus they are able to reign over all the mountain streams. So the sage, wishing to be above men, putteth himself below them; wishing to be before them, he putteth himself behind them. Thus, though his place be above men, they do not feel his weight; though his place be before them, they do not count it an injury. ~ Dale Carnegie,
685:Up until that moment, I'd been at the earliest stage of love, when you feel it will turn you into the person you want to be. Now, his gentle voice and sage advice took me to a later stage: I felt I needed to pretend to be a better person than I was so he'd keep loving me. This was hard because it made me hate him. ~ Melissa Bank,
686:Quand un bon vin meuble mon estomac Je suis plus savant que Balzac —Plus sage que Pibrac; Mon brass seul faisant l’attaque De la nation Coseaque, La mettroit au sac; De Charon je passerois le lac En dormant dans son bac, J’irois au fier Eac, Sans que mon coeur fit tic ni tac, Premmer du tabac. —French Vaudeville ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
687:When water is still, it reflects objects like a mirror. This stillness, this perfect level is the model of the sage. If water is translucent when it is in perfect rest, much more so must it be with the intellectual essence. The heart of the sage in perfect repose is the mirror of earth and heaven and all existences. ~ Chwang-tse—,
688:Dr Syngmann: Gott ist der Gott der Juden, sage ich! Deswegen sollst du ihn in Ruhe lassen, John. Was du gestohlen hast, wird niemals deins. Die Juden könne diese Gottesliebe verklagen und sie ins Zuchthaus bringen nach der Berner Konvention, die für Diebstahl von Patenten und Ideen schwere Strafen androht. ~ Halld r Kiljan Laxness,
689:Philosophy calls for plain living, but not for penance; and we may perfectly well be plain and neat at the same time. This is the mean of which I approve; our life should observe a happy medium between the ways of a sage and the ways of the world at large; all men should admire it, but they should understand it also. "Well ~ Seneca,
690:That was Sydney Sage," said Lissa. "I thought they were all in West Virginia. Why isn't she with Rose?"
"That," said Abe darkly, "is an excellent question."
"Because they were apparently kidnapping Jill Mastrano in Detroit," said Christian. "Which is weird. But not the craziest thing I can think of Rose doing. ~ Richelle Mead,
691:Therefore the sage desires what (other men) do not desire, and does not prize things difficult to get; he learns what (other men) do not learn, and turns back to what the multitude of men have passed by.
Thus he helps the natural development of all things, and does not dare to act (with an ulterior purpose of his own). ~ Lao Tzu,
692:If the God of revelation is most appropriately worshipped in the temple of religion, the God of nature may be equally honored in the temple of science. Even from its lofty minarets the philosopher may summon the faithful to prayer, and the priest and sage exchange altars without the compromise of faith or knowledge. ~ David Brewster,
693:When an alluring woman comes in at the door," warningly traced the austere Kien-fi on the margin of his well-known essay, "discretion may be found up the chimney". It is incredible that beneath this ever-timely reminder an obscure disciple should have added the words: "The wiser the sage, the more profound the folly. ~ Ernest Bramah,
694:All too willingly man sees himself as the centre of the universe, as something not belonging to the rest of nature but standing apart as a different and higher being. Many people cling to this error and remain deaf to the wisest command ever given by a sage, the famous "Know thyself" inscribed in the temple of Delphi. ~ Konrad Lorenz,
695:Hey, Sydney. I thought I saw your car out there." He glanced around. "Is, uh, Jill with you?" "Not today." I said. New insight struck me as I recalled that Lee attended school in Los Angeles. "Lee, have you ever dated a human girl at your school?" Adrian arched an eyebrow. "Are you asking him out, Sage?" I scowled. "No! ~ Richelle Mead,
696:It was a great sage of Islam, ibn Khaldun (1332–1406), who saw that as a society becomes affluent it becomes more individualistic. It loses what he called its asabiyah, its social cohesion. It then becomes prey to the ‘desert dwellers’, those who shun the luxuries of the city and are prepared for self-sacrifice in war. ~ Jonathan Sacks,
697:Music issuing like fire from the hidden chromosphere of pain, spore and madrepore fructifying the earth, navels vomiting their bright spawn of anguish... He is a bright sage, a dancing sear who, with a sweep of the brush, removes the ugly scaffold to which the body of man is chained by the incontrovertible facts of life. ~ Henry Miller,
698:She had married him because she felt sage, because she'd had enough pain to last her a lifetime, and because although he had many faults, faults she was aware of before she married him, she knew he wouldn't hurt her.
She knew because there was no passion, and the only time she had felt passion, it had come with a price. ~ Jane Green,
699:Up until that moment, I'd been at the earliest stage of love, when you feel it will turn you into the better person you want to be. Now, his gentle voice and sage advice took me to a later stage: I felt I needed to pretend to be a better person than I was so he'd keep loving me. This was hard because it made me hate him. ~ Melissa Bank,
700:Il ne faut jamais oublié quand un malheur vous frappe, qu'il peut très bien vous épargner un ennui pire encore; ou que, quand vous commettez une lourde erreur, cela peut très bien vous servir mieux que la décision la plus sage. La vie est un tout, la chance est un tout, et on ne peut séparer aucun élément du reste. ~ Winston S Churchill,
701:Outside, it feels like there is less standing between the Creator and us. There is a lingering visceral connection we can hear and see and smell, reminders of the bond between Creator and creation, like the mountain sage crushed up in the pocket of the sweatshirt I was wearing on a short, muddy hike the other day. “In ~ Cathleen Falsani,
702:Someday you will die. Because you are embodied through and through, at that point you will cease to exist. You will not meet death, because, as the sage says, "Where death is I am not; where I am death is not, so we never meet." When you die there will no longer be any self that is you. Use your self while you have it. ~ Owen J Flanagan,
703:A crimson fire that vanquishes the stars;A pungent odor from the dusty sage;A sudden stirring of the huddled herds;A breaking of the distant table-landsThrough purple mists ascending, and the flareOf water ditches silver in the light;A swift, bright lance hurled low across the world;A sudden sickness for the hills of home. ~ Willa Cather,
704:If Socrates leaves his house today he will find the sage seated on his doorstep. If Judas go forth tonight it is to Judas his steps will tend.’ Every life is many days, day after day. We walk through ourselves, meeting robbers, ghosts, giants, old men, young men, wives, widows, brothers-in-law. But always meeting ourselves. ~ James Joyce,
705:Man is timid and apologetic. He is no longer upright. He dares not say “I think”, “I am” but quotes some saint or sage. He is ashamed before the blade of grass or the blowing rose. These roses under my window make no reference to former roses or to better ones; they are for what they are, they exist with God to-day. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
706:Anyone who masters these techniques fully has achieved a tremendous power over himself more valuable than health, love, fame, or riches. He has set himself free from the effects of the world; nothing can touch him unless he wills it. As it has been said, the sage who knows how can live comfortably in hell.
   ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null,
707:Historian Richard Slotkin has shown how the myth of Indian savagery was required to justify the subjugation of the tribes so that their prairie kingdoms could be seized by the Americans crossing the frontier after 1843. But that image, faithfully passed down by purple-sage novels and Hollywood westerns, is wildly inaccurate. ~ Rinker Buck,
708:The Master made it his task to destroy systematically every doctrine, every belief, every concept of the divine, for these things, which were originally intended as pointers, were now being taken as descriptions. He loved to quote the Eastern saying "When the sage points to the moon, all that the idiot sees is the finger. ~ Anthony de Mello,
709:Comptroller," Sally began hurriedly in an oddly strangled voice. "I bring you this Wonder for the Coronation. We, the family Mullin, are honored to be the Keepers of the Coronations Biscuit Tin and as is our bounded duty since Time Began, we now resent this to thee, Oh, Comptroller, for its sacred duty. Safe Journey." - To Sarah ~ Angie Sage,
710:My God, Sage. Your eyes. How have I never noticed them?" That uncomfortable feeling was spreading over me again. "What about them?" "The color," he breathed. "When you stand in the light. They're amazing... like molten gold. I could paint those..." He reached toward me but then pulled back. "They're beautiful. You're beautiful. ~ Richelle Mead,
711:Sage doesn’t chase away spirits,” Iris continued, “but it does mask their scent. Spirits carry an ozone scent, and demons smell like sulfur or rotten eggs. A person might not even consciously register the smell, but they’ll sense it on some level. It’s that awareness that the spirit can use as a doorway to return to the environment. ~ J D Horn,
712:Those who sage as they age view aging not as a hardship but, rather, as a precious gift filled with promise and replete with possibilities. We may age graciously into simplicity and love, allowing the power from our sense of well-being to permeate the atmosphere around us, or we may vault into older age revved up and in high gear. ~ Sue Thoele,
713:When Zeno, who did not believe in slavery, was beating his slave for some offense, the slave pleaded, in mitigation, that by his master's philosophy he had been destined from all eternity to commit this fault; to which Zeno replied, with the calm of a sage, that on the same philosophy he, Zeno, had been destined to beat him for it. ~ Will Durant,
714:When Zeno, who did not believe in slavery, was beating his slave for some offense, the slave pleaded, in mitigation, that by his master’s philosophy he had been destined from all eternity to commit this fault; to which Zeno replied, with the calm of a sage, that on the same philosophy he, Zeno, had been destined to beat him for it. ~ Will Durant,
715:/Farsi Every man who knows his secret becomes a secret, hidden from the skies. The sage says Ahmad rose to the heavens; Sarmad says the heavens rose in him! [2652.jpg] -- from The Longing in Between: Sacred Poetry from Around the World (A Poetry Chaikhana Anthology), Edited by Ivan M. Granger

~ Sarmad, Every man who knows his secret
,
716:The sage does not become trapped in semantics, does not mistake map for territory, but rather "opens things up to the light of Heaven" by flowing with the words, by playing with the words. Once attuned to this flow, the sage need make no special effort to "illumine," for language does it by itself, spontaneously. Language spills over. ~ Hakim Bey,
717:There is a sort of busy worm,
That will the fairest book deform.
Their tasteless tooth will tear and taint
The poet, patriot, sage or saint,
Nor sparing wit nor learning.
Now, if you’d know the reason why,
The best of reasons I’ll supply:
’Tis bread to the poor vermin.
J. Doraston, quoted by W. Blades ~ Cornelia Funke,
718:Adrian took a few steps toward me. "Not bad, Sage. I think you just scared old man Mazur."
I felt a smile of my own begin to form. "I don't know about that, but it felt kind of good."
"You should back talk people more often," he said. We grinned at each other, and as he regarded me fondly, I felt that same queasy feeling return. ~ Richelle Mead,
719:Once when he [Demonax, a supposed Cynic sage] came upon two uncouth philosophers inquiring and wrangling with one another--one of them putting absurd questions, the other answering perfectly irrelevantly--he said "Don't you think, my friends, that one of these guys is milking a he-goat and the other putting a sieve underneath it? ~ Lucian of Samosata,
720:People are timid and apologetic; they are no longer upright; they dare not say "I think," "I am," but quote some saint or sage. They are ashamed before the blade of grass or the blowing rose. These roses under my window make no reference to former roses or to better ones; they are for what they are; they exist with God to-day. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
721:The universe is everlasting. The reason that the universe is everlasting is that it does not live for itself. Therefore it lasts. Therefore the sage puts himself behind, and finds himself in front, regards his person as outside himself, and his person is preserved. Is it not because he does not live for himself that he realizes himself? ~ Alan W Watts,
722:A sage was asked, “What is the most important work? who is the man the most important in life ?” The sage replied, The most important work is to love all men, because that is the life-work of each man. The most important man is the one with whom you have to do at this moment, because you can never know whether you will have to do with another. ~ Tolstoi,
723:during his four-day vision quest, the Indian built a sweat lodge of willow and hides, fasted, cleansed himself with sage and cedar, and endured the heat of the fire until his spirit was released to soar over a field of snakes. His ordeal ended when a vision of his mother appeared and told him to go back home because he had forgotten his pipe. ~ Wade Davis,
724:Hey, Sydney. I thought I saw your car out there." He glanced around. "Is, uh, Jill with you?"

"Not today." I said. New insight struck me as I recalled that Lee attended school in Los Angeles. "Lee, have you ever dated a human girl at your school?"

Adrian arched an eyebrow. "Are you asking him out, Sage?"

I scowled. "No! ~ Richelle Mead,
725:Hast du manchmal Angst?", fragt er. "Ich meine nicht Angst vor einer Prüfung. Oder dem Erzieher. Sondern so richtig Angst. So Angst vor dem Leben. Weißt du?" Troy schluckt. Er beugt sich nach vorn.
"Leben ist Angst haben", sage ich. Mir wird unangenehm. Eigentlich habe ich noch nie darüber nachgedacht. Aber ich glaube, es stimmt. ~ Benjamin Lebert,
726:My God, Sage. Your eyes. How have I never noticed them?"

That uncomfortable feeling was spreading over me again. "What about them?"

"The color," he breathed. "When you stand in the light. They're amazing... like molten gold. I could paint those..." He reached toward me but then pulled back. "They're beautiful. You're beautiful. ~ Richelle Mead,
727:The fundamental motif at the heart of many ancient myths is that the primal oneness of being is manifesting as the multiplicity of life, so that it can come to know itself. As the Gnostic sage Simon Magus says in ‘The Great Announcement’: There is one power… begetting itself, increasing itself, seeking itself, finding itself… One root of the All. ~ Tim Freke,
728:The Master made it his task to destroy systematically every
doctrine, every belief, every concept of the divine, for these
things, which were originally intended as pointers, were now
being taken as descriptions.

He loved to quote the Eastern saying "When the sage points
to the moon, all that the idiot sees is the finger. ~ Anthony de Mello,
729:Réussir sa vie ? Il y a bien longtemps que le sage ne s’en préoccupe plus ! Vivre lui suffit, dans son insuffisance essentielle. Montaigne encore : « Je veux qu’on agisse, et qu’on allonge les offices de la vie tant qu’on peut, et que la mort me trouve plantant mes choux, mais nonchalant d’elle, et encore plus de mon jardin imparfait2845 ~ Andr Comte Sponville,
730:In a 2006 speech then-senator Barack Obama gave to a group of college students, he offered these sage words about success: “Focusing your life solely on making a buck shows a certain poverty of ambition. It asks too little of yourself. Because it’s only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you realize your true potential. ~ T D Jakes,
731:The ordinary people will consider it lack of simplicity to harmonize all the changes throughout ten thousand years. With a tired body and a frightened mind, they toil to avoid this and to take that. The sage alone has no prejudice. He therefore proceeds with utter simplicity and becomes one with transformation and always roams in the realm of unity. ~ Guo Xiang,
732:Because, according to the sage Solomon, wisdom does not enter into a soul that seeks after evil, and knowledge without conscienceis the ruin of the soul, it behooves you to serve, love and fear God and to put all your thoughts and hope in him, and by faith founded in charity, be joined to him, such that you never be separated from him by sin. ~ Francois Rabelais,
733:Gringe shook his head. He'd found the last ExtraOrdinary Wizard difficult at times, but she was nothing like this one. This one was crazy. What did he think he was doing, taking three kids and two of his daft brothers dressed like wolverines into the Forest at night?...
'Get out of the blasted way, you nurdles! The bloomin' bridge is comin' down! ~ Angie Sage,
734:When Newton saw an apple fall, he found In that slight startle from his contemplation- 'Tis said (for I'll not answer above ground For any sage's creed or calculation)- A mode of proving that the earth turn'd round In a most natural whirl, called 'gravitation'; And this is the sole mortal who could grapple, Since Adam, with a fall, or with an apple. ~ Lord Byron,
735:How now in the contemplative evening of his days, the pious Bildad reconciled these things in the reminiscence, I do not know; but it did not seem to concern him much, and very probably he had long since come to the sage and sensible conclusion that a man's religion is one thing, and this practical world quite another. This world pays dividends. ~ Herman Melville,
736:L'éphémère est une divinité polymorphe ainsi que son nom. Sur ces trois pieds qui sonnent comme une légende peuplée d'yeux de farfadets, mon ami Robert Desnos, ce singulier sage moderne, qui a des navires étranges dans chaque pli de sa cervelle, s'est longuement penché, cherchant par l'échelle de soie philologique le sens de ce mot fertile mirages. ~ Louis Aragon,
737:There are two kinds of victory in this world,’ said the storyteller-sage, ‘Vijaya and Jaya. Vijaya is material victory, where there is a loser. Jaya is spiritual victory, where there are no losers. In Kuru-kshetra there was Vijaya but not Jaya. But when Yudhishtira overcame his rage and forgave the Kauravas unconditionally, there was Jaya. That ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
738:Ich sage dir, mein Schatz, wenn meine Sinne gar nicht mehr halten wollen, so lindert all den Tumult der Anblick eines solchen Geschöpfs, das in glücklicher Gelassenheit den engen Kreis seines Daseins, hingeht, von einem Tage zum andern sich durchhilft, die Blätter abfallen sieht und nichts dabei denkt, als dass der Winter kommt" (S. 13) ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
739:strange to the scientific and learned societies, and he never was known to take part in the sage deliberations of the Royal Institution or the London Institution, the Artisan’s Association, or the Institution of Arts and Sciences. He belonged, in fact, to none of the numerous societies which swarm in the English capital, from the Harmonic to that of the ~ Anonymous,
740:Do you know the Bhagavad Gita?” “No, sir, not really; though my eyes and mind have run through its pages many times.” “Thousands have replied to me differently!” The great sage smiled at Master in blessing. “If one busies himself with an outer display of scriptural wealth, what time is left for silent inward diving after the priceless pearls? ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
741:For the fact is that
neither the grammarian nor any other person of skill ever makes a mistake
in so far as he is what his name implies; they none of them err unless
their skill fails them, and then they cease to be skilled artists. No
artist or sage or ruler errs at the time when he is what his name implies;
though he is commonly said to err. ~ Plato,
742:In Summer there were white and damask roses, and the smell of thyme and musk. In Spring there were green gooseberries and throstles [thrush], and the flowers they call ceninen [daffodils]. And leeks and cabbages also grew in that garden; and between long straight alleys, and apple-trained espaliers, there were beds of strawberries, and mint, and sage. ~ Beatrix Potter,
743:I am of this place. Family is a place, and my family s located here, those who are living and those who have passed. I am am settled in the scent of sage, Mount Moran's reflection at Oxbow Bend is more than a mirror of memories; it is the joy found in river otters, a reminder that there are places in the world we can return for peace unchanged. ~ Terry Tempest Williams,
744:Knowledge without devotion will be like a misfire. Therefore, says the Gita, ‘Have devotion, and knowledge will follow.’ This devotion is not mere lip worship, it is a wrestling with death. Hence, the Gita’s assessment of the devotee’s quality is similar to that of the sage. 17. Thus the devotion required by the Gita is no soft-hearted effusiveness. It ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
745:The thought of the ego occupies only the man of unsound understanding, the sage recognises that it has no foundation; he examines the world rationally and concludes that all formations of existence are vain and hasten towards dissolution; alone the Law remains eternal. When man by his efforts has acquired this knowledge he contemplates the truth. ~ Fo-sho-hing-tsan-kiag,
746:Every one is struggling for freedom-from the atom to the star. The ignorant man is satisfied if he can get freedom within a certain limit-if he can get rid of the bondage of hunger or of being thirsty. But that sage feels that there is a stronger bondage which has to be thrown off. He would not consider the freedom of the Red Indian as freedom at all. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
747:Hey, how come you told those
girls your name was Jet?”
“Standard practice if you don’t want chicks to find you later, Sage. Besides, I figured I was protecting our operation
here.”
“Yeah, but why Jet? Why not . . . I
don’t know . . . Travis or John?”
Adrian gave me a look that said I was
wasting his time. “Because Jet sounds
badass. ~ Richelle Mead,
748:the Stoic Sage is notoriously paradoxical. He is the sort of person whom we can call truly rich even when he owns nothing, he is the only truly free man even when imprisoned by a tyrant, he is the only true friend even when persecuted as an enemy, he remains Happy and lives a blessed life even if subjected to the sum total of all external misfortunes. ~ Donald J Robertson,
749:And yet, once again, you’re the one who finds romantic subtext in everything I say.”
“I do not. You know that’s not what I meant.”
He shook his head in mock sympathy. “I tell you, Sage. Sometimes I think I’m the one who needs to take out the restraining order on you.”
“Adrian!”
But he was already out the door, knowing laughter echoing behind him. ~ Richelle Mead,
750:Cerys watched her open the door and struggle to squeeze inside.
"Zelda?" Cerys called.
"Yes?" puffed Aunt Zelda, poking her head out of the cupboard with some difficulty.
"It is possible to eat an Enlarging Spell without realising it, do you suppose?"
Aunt Zelda looked puzzled. "I shouldn't think so," she said. "Why?"
"No reason. I just wondered. ~ Angie Sage,
751:Philosophy
The sulky sage scarce condescends to see
This pretty world of sun and grass and leaves;
To him 'tis all illusion--only he
Is real amid the visions he perceives.
No sage am I, and yet, by Love's decree,
To me the world's a masque of shadows too,
And I a shadow also--since to me
The only real thing in life is--you.
~ Edith Nesbit,
752:We live in a Jesus haunted culture that is Biblically illiterate, and so unfortunately at this point in time, almost anything can pass for knowledge of the historical Jesus from notions that he was a a Cynic sage to ideas that he was a Gnostic guru to fantasies that he didn't exist, to Dan Browne's Jesus of hysterical (rather than historical) fiction. ~ Ben Witherington III,
753:Hey, how come you told those
girls your name was Jet?”
“Standard practice if you don’t want
chicks to find you later, Sage. Besides, I figured I was protecting our operation
here.”
“Yeah, but why Jet? Why not . . . I
don’t know . . . Travis or John?”
Adrian gave me a look that said I was
wasting his time. “Because Jet sounds
badass. ~ Richelle Mead,
754:I have on my office wall a wise and useful reminder by Anne Morrow Lindbergh concerning one of the realities of life. She wrote, "My life cannot implement in action the demands of all the people to whom my heart responds." That's good counsel for us all, not as an excuse to forgo duty, but as a sage point about pace and the need for quality in relationships. ~ Neal A Maxwell,
755:Tant que je vive, mon cueur ne changera
Pour nulle vivante, tant soit elle bonne ou sage
Forte et puissante, riche de hault lignaige
Mon chois est fait, aultrene se fera
***
Long as I live, my heart will never vary
For no one else, however fair or good
Brave, resolute, or rich, of gentle blood
My choice is made, and I will have no other. ~ Dorothy Dunnett,
756:Therefore the Sage embraces Unity, and is a model for all under Heaven. He is free from self-display, therefore he shines forth; from self-assertion, therefore he is distinguished; from self-glorification, therefore he has merit; from self-exaltation, therefore he rises superior to all. Inasmuch as he does not strive, there is no one in the world who can strive with him. ~ Laozi,
757:The rest of the house had a casual California boho-beach vibe, with its distressed wood floors, ivory furniture, and gauzy curtains, but the bedroom was very Zen. Decorated in a cool palette of sage greens and charcoal grays, with a floor-to-ceiling window along one wall that looked over a tiny tranquility garden of stones and succulents, it was my little oasis. ~ J T Geissinger,
758:...you look the truth in the face - not the truth that has fangs and fur but the hard truth about yourself, that you're just as dangerous as the beings the rest of the people fear but you can't afford to be as honest about it. You can't tell those people that you'll make deals with what they fear in order to keep them sage from the monsters who look just like them. ~ Anne Bishop,
759:I miss our own quiet country road. I miss the unmarked settler graves you found along it, that summer that we went bone-hunting. You were the one who could find the dead where the ground hid them under its skin. You are a better witch than I was. I admit it. I miss the way you smelled of witchcraft. Soot on your fingertips, sage and hyssop, sweet dock and cedar tips. ~ Kathe Koja,
760:In Tuzla, erzählt sie, gebe es Kinder, die noch nie eine Portion Pommes frites gesehen haben. Hach, denke ich, so viel Elend auf der Welt.
"Und Sie", frage ich, "schon mal eine Portion Pilav gesehen?"
Sie stutzt. "What’s Pilav?" "Fastfood"‚ sage ich. "Landestypisch."
Das habe ich von der Menütafel an der Wand in ihrem Rücken abgelesen. Sie wechselt das Thema. ~ Juli Zeh,
761:In New Mexico, he always awoke a young man, not until he arose and began to shave did he realize that he was growing older. His first consciousness was a sense of the light dry wind blowing in through the windows, with the fragrance of hot sun and sage-brush and sweet clover; a wind that made one's body feel light and one's heart cry 'To-day, to-day,' like a child's. ~ Willa Cather,
762:You are born in a human form, and you find joy in it. Yet there are ten thousand other forms endlessly transforming that are equally good, and the joy in these is untold. The sage dwells among those things, which can never be lost, and so he lives forever. He willingly accepts early death, old age, the beginning and the end, and serves as an example for everyone.63 ~ Arnold Mindell,
763:Ich erfinde keine Geschichten. Ich schreibe eine andere Sorte Geschichten. Ich schreibe so wahrhaftig wie der Mann mit seinen Fingern, wenn ich nur alles behalten und sagen kann; aber ich bin nicht auf seiner Seite. Ich bin auf einer anderen Seite. Ich sage die Wahrheit, aber aus einer anderen Sicht. Ich bin diejenige, der er es angetan hat. Der Köder spricht, Süßer. ~ Andrea Dworkin,
764:You think that I'm so manipulative and scheming, Miss Sage? It's all for them. For my loved ones first. My people second. And yes, I suppose I'm in the mix there too, but don't think for an instant I wouldn't sacrifice myself if it could save someone I love. And don't think for an instant that I wouldn't do terrible, unspeakable things if it could save someone I love. ~ Richelle Mead,
765:We are born under circumstances that would be favourable if we did not abandon them. It was nature's intention that there should be no need of great equipment for a good life: every individual can make himself happy. External goods are of trivial importance and without much influence in either direction: prosperity does not elevate the sage and adversity does not depress him. ~ Seneca,
766:Speaking of that dress,” he added, “I still haven’t seen it.”
I laughed softly. “You couldn’t handle it.” He raised an eyebrow at that. “Is that a challenge, Sage? I can handle a lot.”
“Not if our history is any indication. Each time I wear some moderately attractive dress, you lose it.” “That’s not exactly true,” he said. “I lose it no matter what you’re wearing. ~ Richelle Mead,
767:Therefore the Sage, wishing to be above the people, must by his words put himself below them; wishing to be before the people, he must put himself behind them. In this way, though he has his place above them, the people do not feel his weight; though he has his place before them, they do not feel it as an injury. Therefore all mankind delight to exalt him, and weary of him not. ~ Laozi,
768:Well, this is a nice surprise," he said. He looked us over. Jill had changed into her normal clothes during her isolation today, but I still had on the Amberwood blouse and skirt. "Sage, aren't you guys supposed to have uniforms? This looks like what you usually wear."
"Cute," I said, suppressing an eye roll.
Adrian gave me a mock bow. "Careful. You almost smiled. ~ Richelle Mead,
769:They were, doubtless, good men, just and sage. But, out of the whole human family, it would not have been easy to select the same number of wise and virtuous persons, who should be less capable of sitting in judgment on an erring woman's heart, and disentangling its mesh of good and evil, than the sages of rigid aspect towards whom Hester Prynne now turned her face. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne,
770:He lay back unfazed, in a confidence unknown to me. “The Holy Spirit,” he whispered with the patience of a sage, “gives us time to make fools of ourselves, so we will long to see with Jesus’s eyes.” He imitated a blind person suddenly seeing. His words reminded me of George MacDonald’s. “This is how we learn. As we do, we see people, even the Romans, with new eyes.” “But ~ C Baxter Kruger,
771:Sage shifted beneath me. I put one of my hands back into his thick hair and left it there, pretending I needed to hold him. It took all my willpower not to start playing with it.

“I guess you don’t do this very often,” I told him, my voice cracking slightly.

I couldn’t see his face but I could feel him smile. “No. Usually my head’s turned the other way around. ~ Karina Halle,
772:Wait.” Stefan’s voice was hard suddenly. Bonnie and Elena turned back and froze, embracing each other, trembling. “What is your—your father—going to do to you when he finds out that you allowed this?”

"He will not kill me,” Sage said brusquely, the wild tone back in his voice. “He may even find it as amusant as I do, and we will be sharing a belly laugh tomorrow. ~ L J Smith,
773:Krishnamurti, a great Indian sage, once said: “You can take a piece of wood that you brought back from your garden, and each day present it with a flower. At the end of a month you will adore it, and the idea of not giving it an offering will be a sin.” In other words, everything that you are used to, once done long enough, starts to seem natural, even though it might not be. ~ Julien Smith,
774:De harige spin staarde Septimus onheilspellend aan. Hij had Septimus zeker eerder gezien. Vier keer om precies te zijn, dacht de spin kwaad, vier keer was hij opgeraapt, in een potje gestopt en buitengezet...
'Soms, Jen,' zei Septimus toen hij weer terugkwam bij de marmeren trap, 'denk ik dat die spinnen weer regelrecht naar de Bibliotheek wandelen. Vandaag herkende ik er een. ~ Angie Sage,
775:I have now come to a stage of realization in which I see that God is walking in every human form and manifesting Himself alike through the sage and the sinner, the virtuous and the vicious. Therefore when I meet different people I say to myself, “God in the form of the saint, God in the form of the sinner, God in the form of the righteous, God in the form of the unrighteous. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
776:PROSCIUTTO- AND SAGE-WRAPPED DATES (Serves 6)   INGREDIENTS 24 fresh sage leaves 12 dates, halved, pits removed 1 pack prosciutto, each slice sliced lengthways down the middle 2 Tablespoons maple syrup   Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place a sage leaf on each date half, wrap with prosciutto, place flat side down on a baking sheet. Bake 10 minutes. Brush with maple syrup and serve. ~ Jane Green,
777:Rama, the ancient idol of the heroic ages, the embodiment of truth, of morality, the ideal son, the ideal husband, and above all, the ideal king, this Rama has been presented before us by the great sage Valmiki. No language can be purer, none chaster, none more beautiful, and at the same time simpler, than the language in which the great poet has depicted the life of Rama. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
778:True friendship is worth more than can be measured,
a quality forever to be treasured.
True friends will staunchly stand beside each other,
as loyally brother shieldeth brother,
remaining firm in spite of war and strife,
in poverty or sickness, throughout life.
True friendship doth endure while comrades age
from boy to youth, from warrior to sage. ~ Cecilia Dart Thornton,
779:There reigned a king of name revered, To country and to town endeared, Great Daśaratha, good and sage, Well read in Scripture's holy page: [pg 013] Upon his kingdom's weal intent, Mighty and brave and provident; The pride of old Ikshváku's seed For lofty thought and righteous deed. Peer of the saints, for virtues famed, For foes subdued and passions tamed: A rival in his wealth untold ~ Valmiki,
780:We just stood there for a few seconds. Back when we were friends, we'd have already been laughing and joking. Now things were tense and awkward. There was no way I could ever be relaxed around this person again. To me, Sage would never be just Sage. She'd be Sage-the-boy-who-pretended-to-be-a-girl-and-who-I-kissed-that-one-time. No friendship could survive with that many hyphens. ~ Brian Katcher,
781:Rousseau (I’ll note with your permission)
Could not conceive how solemn Grimm
Dared clean his nails in front of him,
The madcap sage and rhetorician.
Champion of rights and liberty,
In this case judged wrong-headedly.
One still can be a man of action
And mind the beauty of one’s nails:
Why fight the age’s predilection?
Custom’s a despot and prevails. ~ Alexander Pushkin,
782:English version by W. S. Merwin & J. Moussaieff Mason The sage king Janaka stands on a hill watching his city in flames "Endless is my wealth," he says "I have nothing at all, and thus when this city of Mithila crumbles, red embers, white ashes all monuments of men destroyed, nothing of mine is burned." "I have nothing at all, and endless is my wealth."

~ Shankara, Endless is my Wealth
,
783:A bald eagle perched in a dead tree, watching us. The landscape was bold. Not only was the property on the North Platte River but the river ran through it, taking an east-west turn for a few miles in its course. The land was a section, 640 acres, a square mile of riparian shrubs and cottonwood, some wetland areas during June high water, sage flats and a lot of weedy overgrazed pasture (46). ~ Annie Proulx,
784:I’d say that most of these [poems in Jason Mashak's book SALTY AS A LIP] are just straightforward enough, but not entirely explainable or attributable to a single cause/effect, which makes them the kind of poems I want to read many times… “Salty as a lip” is my favorite. It’s so alive: strange and human / earthy and raw. Mysterious but grounded. Mashak has manifested paradox, it seems. Bravo! ~ Sage Cohen,
785:The Sage of Toronto... spent several decades marveling at the numerous freedoms created by a "global village" instantly and effortlessly accessible to all. Villages, unlike towns, have always been ruled by conformism, isolation, petty surveillance, boredom and repetitive malicious gossip about the same families. Which is a precise enough description of the global spectacle's present vulgarity. ~ Guy Debord,
786:You're one to talk, Sage." He pointed an accusing finger. "At least I take action. You? You let the world go by without you. You stand there while that asshole Keith treats you like crap and just smile and nod. You have no spine. You don't fight back. Even old Abe seems to push you around. Was Rose right that he's got something on you? Or is he just someone else you won't fight back against? ~ Richelle Mead,
787:Lissa looked taken aback, but Jared Sage—my father-in-law now, I realized―showed nothing but contempt. 'This is ridiculous. Humans and Moroi can't be married. That's your way, as well as ours. This isn’t a real marriage.'

'Not according to the state of Nevada,' I said cheerfully. 'We’ve got the paperwork to prove it. Get us a laptop, and we can all look at the wedding pictures together. ~ Richelle Mead,
788:Septimus look at Jenna, his green eyes serious, “It’s a luxury Jen,” he said.

“What do you mean?”

Septimus stared at the scraped and bloody snow at his feet. It took him some moments to reply.
“I mean…” he began slowly. “I mean that if you go through life and never face a situation where, in order for your to survive, someone else has to die, then you’re lucky. That’s what I mean. ~ Angie Sage,
789:It was John Kenneth Galbraith, the hyperliterate economic sage, who coined the phrase “conventional wisdom.” He did not consider it a compliment. “We associate truth with convenience,” he wrote, “with what most closely accords with self-interest and personal well-being or promises best to avoid awkward effort or unwelcome dislocation of life. We also find highly acceptable what contributes most ~ Steven D Levitt,
790:To the untutored sage, the concentration of population was the prolific mother of all evils, moral no less than physical. He argued that food is good, while surfeit kills; that love is good, but lust destroys; and not less dreaded than the pestilence following upon crowded and unsanitary dwellings was the loss of spiritual power inseparable from too close contact with one's fellow-men. ~ Charles Alexander Eastman,
791:I hate when instruction books, blogs or well-meaning friends tell you “just get over it!” or “just write!”   Like that didn’t occur to you. Like all it would take is someone pointing out that say, you should just stop doing that thing you’ve been doing all your life.   “You mean I should just sit down and write? My God, that’s brilliant! Why have I not thought of this before? Thank you, oh sage guru! ~ Cathy Yardley,
792:The fates are cruel,” Bheeshma whispered, “and they’ve been crueler than usual to you. But the sins you committed in ignorance are not your fault.”

“I’ll still have to pay for them,” Karna said. “Isn’t that how karma works? Look at what happened to Pandu, who killed a sage by accident, thinking him to be a wild deer. He had to bear the consequences of it for the rest of his life. ~ Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni,
793:the Exchequer, or the Queen’s Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts. He certainly was not a manufacturer; nor was he a merchant or a gentleman farmer. His name was strange to the scientific and learned societies, and he never was known to take part in the sage deliberations of the Royal Institution or the London Institution, the Artisan’s Association, or the Institution of Arts and Sciences. He belonged, in ~ Anonymous,
794:The superior man or the sage loves all beings that live, but has not for them the sentiments of humanity which he has for men. He has for men sentiments of humanity, but he does not love them with the love which he has for his father and mother. He loves his father and mother with filial love and he has for men sentiments of humanity. He has for men sentiments of humanity and he loves all beings that live. ~ Meug Tac,
795:The earth itself assures us it is a living entity. Deep below surface one can hear its slow pulse, feel its vibrant rhythm. The great breathing mountains expand and contract. The vast sage desert undulates with almost imperceptible tides like the oceans. From the very beginning, throughout all its cataclysmic upthrusts and deep sea submergences, the planet Earth seems to have maintained an ordered rhythm. ~ Frank Waters,
796:The gentle wisdom of Ram as he goes into exile is what transforms him from an ordinary hero into a divine being. He does not see himself as the victim. It is significant, however, that when Sita is later banished into the forest, the authors of the epic do not grant her the same gentle wisdom. They prefer visualizing her as victim, not sage. The gender bias continues even in the most modern writings. ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
797:Then the sun broke above the crest of the hills and the entire countryside looked soaked in blood, the arroyos deep in shadow, the cones of dead volcanoes stark and biscuit-colored against the sky. I could smell pinion trees, wet sage, woodsmoke, cattle in the pastures, and creek water that had melted from snow. I could smell the way the country probably was when it was only a dream in the mind of God. ~ James Lee Burke,
798:How?" I demanded. "How could you have screwed this one up?" "When I got in, they said the manager was on the phone and would be a few minutes. So, I sat down and ordered a drink." This time, I did lean my forehead against the steering wheel. "What did you order?" "A martini." "A martini." I lifted my head. "You ordered a martini before a job interview." "It's a bar, Sage. I figured they'd be cool with it. ~ Richelle Mead,
799:Septimus was suddenly horribly afraid that the Antidote would not work. He glanced nervously at Marcia, who whispered, "It will work, Septimus. You must believe in it."
Physik isn't like Magyk," said Septimus unhappily. "It doesn't matter whether you expect it to work or not. Either it does or it doesn't."
"I doubt that very much," said Marcia. "A little belief in something always helps. ~ Angie Sage,
800:Aber vor Gericht gehen, das kann ich nicht, sage ich. Man müßte da jeden Tag vor Gericht gehen und wegen allem und jedem vor Gericht gehen und schließlich die ganzen Kräfte, die man hat, mit Gerichtsbarkeiten verschwenden, ein Mensch könne sich leicht sein ganzes Leben lang nur in Prozessen erschöpfen, die zu führen er immer Anlaß habe. Im Grunde müßte jeder mit jedem andauernd Prozesse führen, sage ich. ~ Thomas Bernhard,
801:Experience has repeatedly confirmed that well-known maxim of Bacon's that 'a little philosophy inclineth a man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.' At the same time, when Bacon penned that sage epigram... he forgot to add that the God to whom depth in philosophy brings back men's minds is far from being the same from whom a little philosophy estranges them. ~ George Santayana,
802:Rice and peas fit into that category of dishes where two ordinary foods, combined together, ignite a pleasure far beyond the capacity of either of its parts alone. Like rhubarb and strawberries, apple pie and cheese, roast pork and sage, the two tastes and textures meld together into the sort of subtle transcendental oneness that we once fantasized would be our experience when we finally found the ideal mate. ~ John Thorne,
803:Dad told Uncle Seth not to screw things up,” she informed me as we washed our hands. “He said even if Uncle Seth is famous, him getting a woman like you defies belief.” I laughed and smoothed down the skirt of my dress. “I don’t know about that. I don’t think your dad gives your uncle enough credit." Brandy gave me a sage look, worthy of someone much older. “Uncle Seth spent last Valentine’s Day at a library. ~ Richelle Mead,
804:You can create substances with other naturally grown substances and you can synthesize beautiful bouquets of flowers without spending an arm and a leg, using the citrus fruits, which are much more affordable than flowers, because you need so many flowers to create the essences. In this country [USA], there is not a traditional science of making it. The Native Americans never did it. They bundled the sage. ~ Horst Rechelbacher,
805:Kai and I head back into the kitchen, where the platters and trays are set up. Grilled vegetable skewers with a lemon dressing. Beef tenderloin, roasted medium rare, sliced thin, with a grainy mustard sauce. Orzo salad with spinach, red onion, and feta. Filled cucumbers and pickled carrots. White beans with sage. Saffron risotto with artichokes and chicken. Mini pavlovas and poached pears and poppy-seed cookies. ~ Stacey Ballis,
806:Trying to control the world?
I see you won't succeed.

The world is a spiritual vessel
And cannot be controlled.

Those who control, fail.
Those who grasp, lose.

Some go forth, some are led,
Some weep, some blow flutes
Some become strong, some superfluous,
Some oppress, some destroyed.

Therefore the Sage,
Casts off extremes,
Casts off excess,
Casts off extravagance. ~ Lao Tzu,
807:Lou recovered some foie gras, duck confit, and assorted veggies and herbs. As she grabbed the items, a menu started bubbling to the surface: foie gras ravioli with a cherry-sage cream sauce, crispy goat cheese medallions on mixed greens with a simple vinaigrette, pan-fried duck confit, and duck-fat-roasted new potatoes with more of the cherry-sage cream sauce. For dessert, a chocolate souffle with coconut crisps. ~ Amy E Reichert,
808:Scholarly translations of the Tao Te Ching as a manual for rulers use a vocabulary that emphasizes the uniqueness of the Taoist “sage,” his masculinity, his authority. This language is perpetuated, and degraded, in most popular versions. I wanted a Book of the Way accessible to a present-day, unwise, unpowerful, and perhaps unmale reader, not seeking esoteric secrets, but listening for a voice that speaks to the soul. ~ Anonymous,
809:In completing your civilization, the causes changed, but you maintained the custom: no longer did you sacrifice victims to gods athirst for human blood, but to laws, which you deem sage because you found in them a specious reason to indulge your former habits, together with the semblance of a justice which was, at bottom, nothing other than the desire to preserve those horrid practices which you could not abjure. ~ Marquis de Sade,
810:How great is the path proper to the Sage! Like overflowing water, it sends forth and nourishes all things, and rises up to the height of heaven. All-complete is its greatness! It embraces the three hundred rules of ceremony, and the three thousand rules of demeanor. It waits for the proper man, and then it is trodden. Hence it is said, 'Only by perfect virtue can the perfect path, in all its courses, be made a fact.' ~ Confucius,
811:In ancient times, women who had ceased their monthly flow were believed to hold their life-giving powers within themselves, like the dark moon. They were thought to be creating something powerful with their retained womb blood—pregnant with wisdom instead of new life. Valued and honored in their communities, these sage women had skills and powers no younger woman could possess. Like Hekate, they were crones, crowned ~ Kris Waldherr,
812:Just FYI," I told Phin, "he was flirting with you."
She looked at me, then at Mark's departing form. "Oh. That explains a lot. I'm good at a lot of things, but flirting isn't one of them. Especially with someone I find extremely attractive."
"Here's a tip... Don't overthink it. It's more of an instinct than an intellect thing."
"Right," she said. "Pheromones."
With a sage nod, she followed Mark. ~ Rosemary Clement Moore,
813:Le Poete
... Pour lui
L'ombre du cabinet en délices abonde.
S'il fuit les graves riens, noble ennui du beau monde,
Ou si, chez la beauté qui l'admit en secret,
Las de parler, enfin il demeure muet,
Il regagne à grands pas son asile et l'étude:
Il y trouve la paix, la douce solitude,
Ses livres, et sa plume au bec noir et malin,
Et la sage folie, et le rire à l'oeil fin.
~ Andre Marie de Chenier,
814:For some time there was a widely held notion (zealously fostered by the daily press) to the effect that the 'thinking ocean' of Solaris was a gigantic brain, prodigiously well-developed and several million years in advance of our own civilization, a sort of 'cosmic yogi', a sage, a symbol of omniscience, which had long ago understood the vanity of all action and for this reason had retreated into an unbreakable silence. ~ Stanis aw Lem,
815:For some time there was a widely held notion (zealously fostered by the daily press) to the effect that the 'thinking ocean' of Solaris was a gigantic brain, prodigiously well-developed and several million years in advance of our own civilization, a sort of 'cosmic yogi', a sage, a symbol of omniscience, which had long ago understood the vanity of all action and for this reason had retreated into an unbreakable silence. ~ Stanislaw Lem,
816:How?" I demanded. "How could you have screwed this one up?"
"When I got in, they said the manager was on the phone and would be a few minutes. So, I sat down and ordered a drink."
This time, I did lean my forehead against the steering wheel. "What did you order?"
"A martini."
"A martini." I lifted my head. "You ordered a martini before a job interview."
"It's a bar, Sage. I figured they'd be cool with it. ~ Richelle Mead,
817:Richard didn’t blink. He answered immediately like a wise, kind sage. Here’s what he said: It’s all about finding and hiring people smarter than you, getting them to join your business and giving them good work, then getting out of the way and trusting them. You have to get out of the way so you can focus on the bigger vision. That’s important, but here is the main thing: You must make them see their work as a mission. ~ Vishen Lakhiani,
818:The reason why rivers and seas receive the homage of a hundred mountain streams is that they keep below them. Thus they are able to reign over all the mountain streams. So the sage, wishing to be above men, putteth himself below them, wishing to be before them, he putteth himself behind them. Thus, though his place be above men, they do not feel his weight; though his place be before them, they do not count it an injury. ~ Dale Carnegie,
819:The reason why rivers and seas receive the homage of a hundred mountain streams is that they keep below them. Thus they are able to reign over all the mountain streams. So the sage, wishing to be above men, putteth himself below them; wishing to be before them, he putteth himself behind them. Thus, though his place be above men, they do not feel his weight; though his place be before them, they do not count it an injury. ~ Dale Carnegie,
820:The Sage
The cat is eating the roses:
that's the way he is.
Don't stop him, don't stop
the world going round,
that's the way things are.
The third of May
was misty; fourth of May
who knows. Sweep
the rose-meat up, throw the bits
out in the rain.
He never eats
every crumb, says
the hearts are bitter.
That's the way he is, he knows
the world and the weather.
~ Denise Levertov,
821:Dad told Uncle Seth not to screw things up,” she informed me as we washed our hands. “He said even if Uncle Seth is famous, him getting a woman like you defies belief.”

I laughed and smoothed down the skirt of my dress. “I don’t know about that. I don’t think your dad gives your uncle enough credit."

Brandy gave me a sage look, worthy of someone much older. “Uncle Seth spent last Valentine’s Day at a library. ~ Richelle Mead,
822:The sage said, ‘It is the name of Ram that ensured the bridge of stones to Lanka did not crack under the weight of the monkeys. Likewise, it is the name of Krishna that ensures this bridge of arrows withstands Hanuman’s weight. Strength alone is not enough in this world; divine grace is needed. Krishna is Ram and both are Hari or Vishnu. Never forget that. Without Krishna you are nothing. You are Nara and he is Narayana. ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
823:Little girls have large maternal instincts, and they take the Feast of Hungry Ghosts very seriously, and they were making their rounds with small lanterns made from candles inside rolled lotus and sage leaves. I could feel ghosts all around us, moving toward the warmth of the sweet singing voices: You are not alone, the girls sang, you are not forgotten, we care and understand, our own lives are but a candle flame from yours. ~ Barry Hughart,
824:Necessities for all manner of healing in the herb garden: Hyssop, Wormwood, Rue, Coriander, Pasqueflower, Rosemary, St John’s Wort, Costmary, Lady’s Mantle, Lady’s Bedstraw, Angelica, Heartsease, Lily of the Valley, Marigold, Milk Thistle, Thyme, Sweet Woodruff. To these I plan to add, as time permits: Wood Betony, Comfrey, Coltsfoot, Cowslip, Hawthorn, Lavender, Lemon Balm, Meadowsweet, Sage, Valerian, Yarrow and Winter Savory. ~ Rhys Bowen,
825:Excuse me, Princess.” For a moment, my heart leaped at the soft, deep voice. The voice that could either be Rowan’s or Ash’s, they sounded so much alike. Bracing myself, I turned, but it wasn’t Ash standing there. Thankfully, it wasn’t Rowan, either. It was the other brother, the oldest of the three. Sage. Dammit, he’s gorgeous also. What was with this family, that all the sons were so freaking handsome it hurt to look at them? ~ Julie Kagawa,
826:Jij hebt een verbazingwekkende Magieke kracht. Dat zei ik je al eerder. Misschien geloof je me nu.' Ze glimlachte... 'Dus is je antwoord nog steeds nee?'
'Wat voor antwoord?' vroeg Jongen 412.
'Op de vraag of je mijn Leerling wilt worden. Ben je van mening veranderd door wat ik je heb verteld? Wil je mijn leerling worden? Alsjeblieft?'...
Jongen 412 glimlachte. 'Ja,' zei hij. 'Ik wil graag je Leerling worden. Heel graag. ~ Angie Sage,
827:Knock On The Door
Knock on the door, and you shall have an answer!
Open the heavy walls to set me free,
And blow a horn to call me into the sunlight,
And startled then what a strange thing you shall see!
Nuns, murderers, and drunkards, saints and sinners,
Lover and dancing girl and sage and clown
Will laugh upon you, and you will find me nowhere…
I am a room, a house, a street, a town.
~ Conrad Potter Aiken,
828:Warren Buffett, the “Sage of Omaha” whose shrewd investments have made him one of the world’s richest men, has a stake in the marijuana industry via Cubic Designs, a company that provides mezzanine floor-space for warehouses. Cubic Designs dropped flyers off at 1,000 marijuana dispensaries, urging them to “double your growing space,” with a picture of metal flooring loaded with cannabis plants. The Sage himself made no comment. ~ Tom Wainwright,
829:Except for a couple of hours in the morning which I passed in the company of a sage I stayed in bed without food only a few mouthfuls of water “you are a fine looking old man” I said to myself in the mirror “and what is more you have the correct attitude You don’t care if it ends or if it goes on And as for the women and the music there will be plenty of that in Paradise” Then I went to the Mosque of Memory to express my gratitude ~ Leonard Cohen,
830:Bowing my head, I dipped my nose into the bouquet I'd assembled. There was flax, and forget-me-not, and hazel. There were white roses and pink ones, helenium and periwinkle, primrose, and lots and lots of bellflower. Between the tightly wrapped stems I'd packed velvety moss, barely visible, and I had sprinkled the bouquet with the purple and white petals of Grant's Mexican sage. The bouquet was enormous, and not nearly enough. ~ Vanessa Diffenbaugh,
831:Humor is an important quality that makes one cheerful in all walks of life. To cultivate this quality is very important. When the poison was given to Socrates, he was very humorous and made a few jokes. When the cup of hemlock was given to him he said, “Can I share a bit of it with the gods?” Then he smiled and said, “Poison has no power to kill a sage, for a sage lives in reality, and reality is eternal.” He smiled and took the poison. ~ Swami Rama,
832:After breakfast, Kat would go around to the neighbors with her mother, carrying a basket of bread. During the week, they'd make inquiries to see who needed their help. They baked yarrow bread for those with broken hearts, sorrel bread for neglected children, stephanotis bread for couples who were fighting, pear blossom bread for anyone grieving, laurel bread for those needing financial help, and a simple sage bread for everyone else. ~ Menna van Praag,
833:Ich konnte noch nicht einmal Zeuge sein, erinnerte mich nicht an die Namen von Menschen und Orten, nur an Dunkel, an Geräusche und Bewegungen. Erst später verstand ich, dass ebendieses Rohmaterial die Essenz der Literatur war, dass man aus ihm eine innere Geschichte, eine Art Legende formen konnte. Ich sage “innere”, den damals wurden Chroniken hoch geachtet, als enthielten sie die Wahrheit. Der innere Ausdruck war noch nicht geboren. ~ Aharon Appelfeld,
834:[Taos is] a high, wise, sage-covered plain. In the evening, with the sun at your back, it looks like an ocean, like water. The color up there is different . . . the blue-green of the sage and mountains, the wildflowers in bloom. It's a different kind of color from any I'd ever seen---there's nothing like that in north Texas or even in Colorado. And it's not just the color that attracted me either The world is so wide up there, so big. ~ Georgia O Keeffe,
835:Tucker snorts. "Sage is a fighter, it spreads over the land like wildfire, sucking up all the water, the nutrients in the earth, until everything else dies. It's a hearty little plant, that I'll give it. But it's gray and ugly and ticks love to hide in it. You ever seen a tick?" He glances over at me. The look on my face must be pretty appalled because suddenly he gives and uncomfortable cough and says quietly, "Sage does have a nice smell. ~ Cynthia Hand,
836:I Am A King
I am a King,
Or an Emperor rather,
I wear crown-imperial
And prince's-feather;
Golden-rod is the sceptre
I wield and wag,
And a broad purple flag-flower
Waves for my flag.
Elder the pithy
With old-man and sage,
These are my councillors
Green in old age;
Lord-and-ladies in silence
Stand round me and wait,
While gay ragged-robin
Makes bows at my gate.
~ Christina Georgina Rossetti,
837:Mein Junge, Sie sind wahrscheinlich noch zu jung, um Weisheiten anderer schon zu beherzigen, aber ich sage es Ihnen trotzdem: Liebe ist ein Feind.« Er nickte bedächtig. »Ja. Die Dichter interpretieren die Liebe immer wieder falsch, einige sogar absichtlich. Die Liebe ist ein Schlächter. Liebe ist nicht blind. Die Liebe ist ein außerordentlich scharfsichtiger Kannibale. Die Liebe ist gefräßig wie eine Heuschrecke, immer hungrig, niemals satt.« ~ Stephen King,
838:count on that. The Sword Sage was their priority. The Starlotus bud would help him break through to Copper almost immediately, and he had to remind himself more than a dozen times that it would be foolish to eat it now. The ancestral orus fruit had taken him days to digest, and the Starlotus should take even longer. The last thing he needed was something in his own core distracting him when he might need to fight. Even so, he longed to swallow at ~ Will Wight,
839:Have you ever rightly considered what the mere ability to read means? That it is the key which admits us to the whole world of thought and fancy and imagination? to the company of saint and sage, of the wisest and the wittiest at their wisest and wittiest moment? That it enables us to see with the keenest eyes, hear with the finest ears, and listen to the sweetest voices of all time? More than that, it annihilates time and space for us. ~ James Russell Lowell,
840:I think that in all descriptions of the good life here on earth we must assume a certain basis of animal vitality and animal instinct; without this, life becomes tame and uninteresting. Civilization should be something added to this, not substituted for it; the ascetic saint and the detached sage fail in this respect to be complete human beings. A small number of them may enrich a community; but a world composed of them would die of boredom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
841:The self-generating power of the soul is man’s true and final secret, by virtue of which he is made in the likeness of God the creator and distinguished from all other living things. These images, ideas, values, and potentialities of the treasure hidden in the unconscious are brought to birth and realized by the hero in his various guises—savior and man of action, seer and sage, founder and artist, inventor and discoverer, scientist and leader. ~ Erich Neumann,
842:A seeker searched for years to know the secret of achievement and success in human life. One night in a dream a sage appeared bearing the answer to the secret.   The sage said simply: "Stretch out your hand and reach what you can."   "No, it can't be that simple," the seeker said.   And the sage said softly, "You are right, it is something harder. It is this: Stretch out your hand and reach what you cannot."   Now that's vision. ~ Joan D Chittister,
843:The sage has no mind of his own.
He is aware of the needs of others.

I am good to people who are good.
I am also good to people who are not good.
Because Virtue is goodness.
I have faith in people who are faithful.
I also have faith in people who are not faithful.
Because Virtue is faithfulness.

The sage is shy and humble – to the world he seems confusing.
Others look to him and listen.
He behaves like a little child. ~ Lao Tzu,
844:Do not believe what you have heard Do not believe in tradition because it is handed down many generations Do not believe in anything that has been spoken of many times Do not believe because the written statements come from some old sage Do not believe in conjecture Do not believe in authority, or teachers, or elders But after careful observation and analysis, when it agrees with reason and it will benefit one and all, then accept it and live by it. ~ Gautama Buddha,
845:It is really most absurd to wish to turn this scene of misery into a pleasure spot and set ourselves the goal of achieving pleasures and joys instead of freedom from pain, as so many do. Those who, with too gloomy a gaze, regard this world as a kind of hell and, accordingly, are only concerned with procuring a fireproof room in it, are much less mistaken. The fool runs after the pleasures of life and sees himself cheated; the sage avoids evils. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
846:From her pocket Karamander took a vial of black liquid labelled: "Headbanger. Maximum strength." With a long pipette she dropped the liquid into Oraton-Marr's mouth, then she held his nose closed until he swallowed it... "He is asleep. He will sleep for seven days. And when he wakes he will have the worst headache imaginable. I have something that will cure it if he wishes to ask me. But he will have to come to me in person and ask very, very nicely indeed. ~ Angie Sage,
847:Do not pursue the past. Do not lose yourself in the future. The past no longer is. The future has not yet come. Looking deeply at life as it is. In the very here and now, the practitioner dwells in stability and freedom. We must be diligent today. To wait until tomorrow is too late. Death comes unexpectedly. How can we bargain with it? The sage calls a person who knows how to dwell in mindfulness night and day, 'one who knows the better way to live alone.' ~ Gautama Buddha,
848:For it is a mad world and it will get madder if we allow the minorities, be they dwarf or giant, orangutan or dolphin, nuclear-head or water-conservationist, pro-computerologist or Neo-Luddite, simpleton or sage, to interfere with aesthetics. The real world is the playing ground for each and every group, to make or unmake laws. But the tip of the nose of my books or stories or poems is where their rights end and my territorial imperatives begin, run and rule. ~ Ray Bradbury,
849:In India the mother is the center of the family and our highest ideal. She is to us the representative of God, as God is the mother of the universe. It was a female sage who first found the unity of God, and laid down this doctrine in one of the first hy mns of the Vedas. Our God is both personal and absolute, the absolute is male, the personal, female. And thus it comes that we now say: 'The first manifestation of God is the hand that rocks the cradle'. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
850:For it is a mad world and it will get madder if we allow the minorities, be they dwarf or giant, orangutan or dolphin, nuclear-head or water-conversationalist, pro-computerologist or Neo-Luddite, simpleton or sage, to interfere with aesthetics. The real world is the playing ground for each and every group, to make or unmake laws. But the tip of the nose of my book or stories or poems is where their rights end and my territorial imperatives begin, run and rule. ~ Ray Bradbury,
851:In India the mother is the center of the family and our highest ideal. She is to us the representative of God, as God is the mother of the universe. It was a female sage who first found the unity of God, and laid down this doctrine in one of the first hy mns of the Vedas. Our God is both personal and absolute, the absolute is male, the personal, female. And thus it comes that we now say: 'The first manifestation of God is the hand that rocks the cradle'. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
852:Arthur Mcewen
Posterity with all its eyes
Will come and view him where he lies.
Then, turning from the scene away
With a concerted shrug, will say:
'H'm, Scarabaeus Sisyphus
What interest has that to us?
We can't admire at all, at all,
A tumble-bug without its ball.'
And then a sage will rise and say:
'Good friends, you err-turn back, I pray:
This freak that you unwisely shun
Is bug and ball rolled into one.'
~ Ambrose Bierce,
853:The Wise Man believes profoundly in silence - the sign of a perfect equilibrium. Silence is the absolute poise or balance of body, mind and spirit. The man who preserves his selfhood ever calm and unshaken by the storms of existence - not a leaf, as it were, astire on the tree, not a ripple upon the surface of the shinning pool-his, in the mind of the unlettered sage, is the ideal attitude and conduct of life. Silence is the cornerstone of character. ~ Charles Alexander Eastman,
854:The wise man believes profoundly in silence, the sign of a perfect equilibrium. Silence is the absolute poise or balance of body, mind, and spirit. The man who preserves his selfhood ever calm and unshaken by the storms of existence - not a leaf, as it were, astir on the tree, not a ripple upon the surface of the shinning pool - his, in the mind of the unlettered sage, is the ideal attitude and conduct of life. Silence is the cornerstone of character. ~ Charles Alexander Eastman,
855:When the British ploy to pressure the Shah into fast action on the dismissal of Mossadeq did not work, officials from Whitehall consulted Ann Lambton, by then a professor of Persian Studies in London and a sage on British foreign policy in Iran. Her advice was clear, categorical, and drastic: find a way to remove Mossadeq from power forcefully. He is a demagogue, she said, and the only way Britain would retain its influence in Iran would be through his removal. She ~ Abbas Milani,
856:Inside, the box was divided into tiered chambers, each with a lacquered lid, and these held a selection of ground and whole spices: sage, turmeric, cumin, ginger, mustard, cinnamon, asafetida, mace, cayenne, and cloves. I felt like an emperor receiving the treasures of a new country. The odor rising from the box was like a clambering vine wrapping itself thickly around my head, musky with the deep minerals of the earth and dusting my shoulders with a rainbow of pollen. ~ Eli Brown,
857:The end product of biblical Christianity is a person—not a book, not a building, not a set of principles or a system of ethics—but one person in two natures (divine/human) with four ministries (prophet/priest/king/sage) and four biographies (the Gospels). But those four biographies don’t tell the whole story. Every bit of Scripture is part of the same great story of that one person and that one story’s plotline of creation, revelation, redemption, and consummation. ~ Leonard Sweet,
858:But I can say you’re okay for an irreverent party boy with occasional moments of brilliance.”
“Brilliant? You think I’m brilliant?” He threw his hands skyward. “You hear that, world? Sage says I’m brilliant.”
“That’s not what I said!”
...
“Come on, Sage. You understand how my mind works. You said I was brilliant, remember?”
Eddie glanced at me in surprise. “You did?”
“No! I never said that.” Adrian’s smile was infuriating. “Stop telling people that. ~ Richelle Mead,
859:San Simeon Hill Zebras
Drifters, if they could be.
Sometimes, when they think
no one is watching,
they near the barbed wire.
Hooves and hooves and hooves.
A silent choir, a mass
of muscle-held cellmates.
Their heads are full of high grass
and long shadows. They dream
of lowland lions grifting gazelle.
Behold the moiré bolting
of the chain-gang jumpsuits
—dust and dust and dust—
safe in their target-striped caps!
~ C.J. Sage,
860:The Grave Of The Grammarian Lysias
Very close to you, as you enter on the right, in the Beirut
library, we buried the sage Lysias,
the grammarian. The spot is beautifully right.
We placed him near those things of his that he perhaps
remembers even there -- scholia, texts, grammars,
scriptures, numerous commentaries in tomes on hellenisms.
This way, his grave will also be seen and honored
by us, when we pass among the books.
~ Constantine P. Cavafy,
861:Volgens de traditie,' vervolgde ze, 'biedt de Tovenaar, in ruil voor de zeven jaar en een dag van zijn leven die de Leerling de Tovenaar schenkt, de Leerling iets aan.' Marcia wendde zich tot Jongen 412...
'Wat zou je graag van me willen hebben?' vroeg Marcia. 'Vraag me alles wat je wilt. Ik zal mijn best doen het je te geven... Alles wat je maar wilt,' zei Marcia zacht. 'Absoluut alles wat je wilt.'
Jongen 412 slikte. 'Ik wil graag weten wie ik ben,' zei hij zacht. ~ Angie Sage,
862:. . . the fools of this world prefer to look for sages far away. They don't believe that the wisdom of their own mind is the sage . . . the sutras say, "Mind is the teaching." But people of no understanding don't believe in their own mind or that by understanding this teaching they can become a sage. They prefer to look for distant knowledge and long for things in space, buddha-images, light, incense, and colors. They fall prey to falsehood and lose their minds to insanity. ~ Bodhidharma,
863:To be honest, I thought it was similar to animal husbandry."
Sally's tone turned dry. "Sometimes, my lady I'm afraid it isn't that different."
Pippa paused, considering the ords. "Is that so?"
"Men are uncomplicated, generally," Sally said, all too sage. "They're beasts when they want to be."
"Brute ones!"
"Ah, so you understand."
Pippa tilted her head to one side. "I've read about them."
Sally nodded. "Erotic texts?"
"The book of Common Prayer.... ~ Sarah MacLean,
864:Alexander Rostov was neither scientist nor sage; but at the age of sixty-four he was wise enough to know that life does not proceed by leaps and bounds. It unfolds. At any given moment, it is the manifestation of a thousand transitions. Our faculties wax and wane, our experiences accumulate and our opinions evolve--if not glacially, then at least gradually. Such that the events of an average day are as likely to transform who we are as a pinch of pepper is to transform a stew. ~ Amor Towles,
865:Alexander Rostov was neither scientist nor sage; but at the age of sixty-four he was wise enough to know that life does not proceed by leaps and bounds. It unfolds. At any given moment, it is the manifestation of a thousand transitions. Our faculties wax and wane, our experiences accumulate, and our opinions evolve—if not glacially, then at least gradually. Such that the events of an average day are as likely to transform who we are as a pinch of pepper is to transform a stew. ~ Amor Towles,
866:It was a famous Stoic ‘paradox’ that the Sage is believed to be absolutely free, even when imprisoned or exiled by a powerful tyrant. This was often put to the test because ancient philosophers were quite frequently imprisoned, exiled or even executed! The freedom of the truly wise man consists in following his own rational nature, by doing what is within his control in accord with wisdom and virtue. His mind is like a blazing fire, which consumes anything cast into it. ~ Donald J Robertson,
867:Ze werden verwelkomd door een snerpende gil. Marcia sprong op van haar plaats aan de tafel in de Geheime Kamer en liet een dik boek met voorspellingsformules op haar voet vallen...
'Septimus!' krijste Marcia. Ze schopte de voorspellingsformules een eind weg en stoof naar de Spiegel. 'O, Septimus, Septimus!' Zodra hij uit de Spiegel tevoorschijn stapte sloeg ze haar armen om hem heen en zwierde hem in de rondte, tot zijn grote verbijstering, want Marcia deed niet aan knuffelen. ~ Angie Sage,
868:the legend of Adapa. He called up that tale now to examine it in his mind. The story went that Adapa had been a sage of Eridu, city of the god Enki. He had been taken into heaven and offered the bread and water of immortality by Anu. But he turned them down because his patron deity, Enki, had advised him against it, claiming they were the bread and water of death. So Adapa missed out on the opportunity of immortality. He was clothed with new garments and returned to Eridu to die. ~ Brian Godawa,
869:We are born under circumstances that would be favorable if we did not abandon them. It was nature's intention that there should be no need of great equipment for a good life: every individual can make himself happy. External goods are of trivial importance and without much influence in either direction: prosperity does not elevate the sage and adversity does not depress him. For he has always made the effort to rely as much as possible on himself and to derive all delight from himself. ~ Seneca,
870:Individuality in universality is the plan of creation. Each cell has its part in bringing about consciousness. Man is individual and at the same time universal. It is while realising our individual nature that we realise even our national and universal nature. Each is an infinite circle whose centre is everywhere and circumference nowhere. By practice one can feel universal Selfhood which is the essence of Hinduism. He who sees in every being his own Self is a Pandita (sage). ~ Swami Vivekananda,
871:Every one of us is a mystic. We may or may not realize it, we may not even like it. But whether we know it or not, whether we accept it or not, mystical experience is always there, inviting us on a journey of ultimate discovery. We have been given the gift of life in this perplexing world to become who we ultimately are: creatures of boundless love, caring compassion, and wisdom. Existence is a summons to the eternal journey of the sage - the sage we all are, if only we could see. ~ Wayne Teasdale,
872:(…) la partie irrationnelle de l’âme sera comme un homme qui vit près d’un sage ; il profite de ce voisinage, et ou bien il devient semblable à lui, ou bien il aurait honte d’oser faire ce que l’homme de bien ne veut pas qu’il fasse. Donc pas de conflit ; il suffit que la raison soit là ; la partie inférieure de l’âme la respecte et, si elle est agitée d’un mouvement violent, c’est elle-même qui s’irrite de ne pas rester en repos quand son maître est là, et qui se reproche sa faiblesse. ~ Plotinus,
873:One night," Ky says, "doesn't seem like much to ask."
I don't speak. He moves closer and I feel his cheek against mine and breathe in the scent of sage and pine, of old dust and fresh water and of him.
"For one night, can we just think of each other? Not the Society or the Rising or even our families?"
"No," I say.
"No what?" He tangles one of his hands in my hair, the other draws me closer still.
"No, I don't think we can," I say. "And no, it isn't too much to ask. ~ Ally Condie,
874:Her grandmother's cooking area was small- a tiny sink, no dishwasher, a bit of a counter- but out of it came tortellini filled with meat and nutmeg and covered in butter and sage, soft pillows of gnocchi, roasted chickens that sent the smell of lemon and rosemary slipping through the back roads of the small town, bread that gave a visiting grandchild a reason to unto the kitchen on cold mornings and nestle next to the fireplace, a hunk of warm, newly baked breakfast in each hand. ~ Erica Bauermeister,
875:You have to breathe," Sage was shouting in Damon's ear. "Take a breath, as if you were going to speak, but then hold onto it, as if raising your Power.Think about your insides. Get those lungs working!"
The words confused Elena.
"There!" cried Sage. "You see?"
"But it only lasts an instant. Then I need to do it again."
"But, yes, that is the point!"
"I tell you I'm dying and you laugh at me?" a disheveled Damon shouted. "I'm blind, deaf, my senses are haywire-and you laugh! ~ L J Smith,
876:A little attention however to the nature of the human mind evinces that the entertainments of fiction are useful as well as pleasant. That they are pleasant when well written, every person feels who reads. But wherein is its utility, asks the reverend sage, big with the notion that nothing can be useful but the learned lumber of Greek and Roman reading with which his head is stored? I answer, every thing is useful which contributes to fix us in the principles and practice of virtue. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
877:the sage Lenny Millstein, who not only was an excellent basketball man but an excellent person as well, who knew how to handle fourteen-year-old boys because he understood that fourteen was the worst possible age on the calendar of human life, and therefore all fourteen-year-olds were confused and fractured beings, not one of them a child anymore and not one of them an adult, none quite right in the head or at home in his unfinished body, and in the furnace of that claustrophobic arena of ~ Paul Auster,
878:Adrian: Not even Moroi give licenses to infants, Sage.
Sydney: Don’t dodge this. You know what I mean. You’ve known how to drive stick for years. Why? Why would you do that? Why would you act like you didn’t know how to drive?
Adrian: Isn’t it obvious, Sage? No, of course it isn’t. I did it so I’d have a reason to be around you – one I knew you couldn’t refuse.
Sydney: But … why? Why would you want to do that?
Adrian: Why? Because it was the closest I could get to doing this. ~ Richelle Mead,
879:The two Ednas were nothing alike. They were as different as Methuselah and Enoch. Mother Edna was kind, sweet, supportive, and submissive. Sixteen-year old Edna was spunky, feisty, independent, and stubborn. Methuselah’s differences with his father haunted him wherever he turned. The living quarters they occupied were humble compared with other palace servants or royalty. According to Enoch, a wisdom sage was not concerned about the things of this world, but about truth, justice, and heaven. ~ Brian Godawa,
880:Les gens sereins, sages, heureux et prospères voient leur vie et les événements sous un angle différent. Un homme sage ne peut se laisser duper ni induire en erreur. Les "mauvaises nouvelles" n'ont pas d'emprise sur une femme sincèrement heureuse. Une personne prospère ne se laisse pas affoler par une nouvelle télédiffusée ou par une manchette sensationnelle du journal. Ces personnes sont habitées de façon permanente par une sagesse, un contentement et une richesse intérieurs et non extérieurs. ~ Guy Finley,
881:[The career a young man should choose should be] one that is most consonant with our dignity, one that is based on ideas of whose truth we are wholly convinced, one that offers us largest scope in working for humanity and approaching that general goal towards which each profession offers only one of the means: the goal of perfection ... If he works only for himself he can become a famous scholar, a great sage, an excellent imaginative writer [ Dichter ], but never a perfected, a truly great man. ~ Karl Marx,
882:You know, Sage, Jesus didn't tell us to forgive everyone. He said turn the other cheek, but only if you the one who was hit. Even the Lord's Prayer says it loud and clear: Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. Not others. What Jesus challenges us to do is to let go of the wrong done to you personally, not the wrong done to someone else. But most Christians incorrectly assume that this means that being a good christian means forgiving all sins, and the sinners. ~ Jodi Picoult,
883:The book known as Journey to the West is about the universal Way that has been handed on by word of mouth from sage to sage, and verified by each of them. Qiu Chuji (丘處機), Taoist name Changchun Zi (長春子), the originator of the Journey to the West cycle, dared to say what the ancients did not dare to say, revealing the celestial mechanism. In Journey to the West is to be found the method for transforming life and death, the way to escape nature. This is the most extraordinary Taoist book of all time. ~ Liu Yiming,
884:His own self-understanding did not include thinking and speaking of himself as the Son of God whose historical intention or purpose was to die for the sins of the world, and his message was not about believing in him. Rather, he was a spirit person, subversive sage, social prophet, and movement founder who invited his followers and hearers into a transforming relationship with the same Spirit that he himself knew, and into a community whose social vision was shaped by the core value of compassion. ~ Marcus J Borg,
885:It's your storm, and the future of us all depends on you now. So who are you? Sage, an orphan boy who cares only for himself? Or the undisciplined, rebellious prince your father sent away? Life has tested your resilience and strength and willpower, and you have succeeded in ways nobody ever thought possible. But the storm has never been worse, and it will either destroy you, or define you. When everything is taken from you, can you still stand before us as Jaron, the Ascendant King of Carthya? ~ Jennifer A Nielsen,
886:Eventually there comes the day of reckoning and awakening, and then we shall know that it was all a great dream. Only fools think that they are now awake and that they really know what is going on, playing the prince and then playing the servant. What fools! The Master and you are both living in a dream. When I say a dream, I am also dreaming. This very saying is a deception. If after ten thousand years we could once meet a truly great sage, one who understands, it would seem as if it had only been a morning. ~ Zhuangzi,
887:For the Stoics, however, the near impossibility of becoming a sage is not a problem. They talk about sages primarily so they will have a model to guide them in their practice of Stoicism. The sage is a target for them to aim at, even though they will probably fail to hit it. The sage, in other words, is to Stoicism as Buddha is to Buddhism. Most Buddhists can never hope to become as enlightened as Buddha, but nevertheless, reflecting on Buddha's perfection can help them gain a degree of enlightenment. ~ William B Irvine,
888:Dusk settled down into this neck of the great valley. Coyotes barked out in the open. From the heights pealed down the mournful blood-curdling, yet beautiful, bay of a wolf. The rosy afterglow of sunset lingered a long time. The place was shut in, closed about by brushy steeps, redolent of sage. A tiny stream of swift water sang faintly down over rocks. And before darkness had time to enfold hollow and slope and horizon, the moon slid up to defeat the encroaching night and blanch the hills with silvery light. ~ Zane Grey,
889:Whether one believes that the faith he spawned is the world's only true religion or a preposterous fable, Joseph emerges from the fog of time as one of the most remarkable figures ever to have breathed American air. "Whatever his lapses," Harold Bloom argues in The American Religion, "Smith was an authentic religious genius, unique in our national history.... In proportion to his importance and his complexity, he remains the least-studied personage, of an undiminished vitality, in our entire national sage. ~ Jon Krakauer,
890:TRÄNEN UNBEKANNTER DICHTER Wir lagen beieinander, und sie sah, Wie Tränen, kleinen Perlen gleich, mir aus Den Augen rannen, und sie sprach zu mir: „Freund, ich verstehe, daß dir Tränen kommen, Wenn wir uns fern sind. Aber sage mir, Warum du jetzt weinst?“ Ich entgegnete: „Wenn wir uns fern sind, wein ich vor Verlangen, Bei dir zu sein; doch wenn ich bei dir bin, So kommen Tränen mir bei dem Gedanken, Daß wir uns trennen müssen.“ Mitleidvoll Sah sie mich lange an und trocknete Die Tränen mir mit liebevoller Hand. ~ Anonymous,
891:I'm sorry. I love you, but it's an enormous conflict of interest."

Her head snaps up, "You love me?"

"What?" MY face is suddenly on fire. "I never said that."

"You did. I heard it."

"I said I'd love to."

"No," Sage says, a grin splitting her face. "You didn't."

Did I? I'm so tired I don't know what the hell is coming out of my mouth. Which probably means that I don't have the faculties to cover up what I really feel for Sage Singer, with an intensity that terrifies me. ~ Jodi Picoult,
892:Sage!" he called. "You have got to see this."
Eddie and I reached the next green and stared in astonishment. Then I burst out laughing.
We had reached Dracula's Castle. (...)
I couldn't stop laughing. Adrian and Eddie looked at me as though they'd never seen me before.
"I don't think I've ever heard her laugh," Eddie told him.
"Certainly not the reaction I was expecting," mused Adrian. "I'd been counting on abject terror, judging from past Alchemist behaviour. I didn't think you liked vampires. ~ Richelle Mead,
893:Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had a world where everybody said, 'We don't know?' The fact is that you're surrounded -God and you don't see God, because you KNOW ABOUT God. The final barrier to the vision of God is your God concept. You miss God because you think you know. The highest knowledge of God is to know God as unknowable. All revelations, however divine, are never any more than a finger pointing at the moon. As we say in the East, 'When the sage points to the moon, all the idiot sees is the finger'. ~ Anthony de Mello,
894:I walk out into the hall and remember when Ma chose the paint. Mountain Sage out here, Irish Oatmeal in their bedroom, the master bathroom in Ice Blue Gloss. She gave me the samples from the paint store and I cut them out in little identical squares, playing the game of remembering which was which, knowing every color by its name.
The carpets on the second floor are soft under my bare feet. The next room down is Amanda's, a pale buttery yellow called Chardonnay on the walls, boxes of shoes still under the bed. ~ Jael McHenry,
895:Scholarly translations of the Tao Te Ching as a manual for rulers use a vocabulary that emphasizes the uniqueness of the Taoist “sage,” his masculinity, his authority. This language is perpetuated, and degraded, in most popular versions. I wanted a Book of the Way accessible to a present-day, unwise, unpowerful, and perhaps unmale reader, not seeking esoteric secrets, but listening for a voice that speaks to the soul. I would like that reader to see why people have loved the book for twenty-five hundred years. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
896:Thanks for looking out for her, Sage. You're okay. For a human." I almost laughed. "Thanks." "You can say it too, you know." I walked over to Latte and paused. "Say what?" "That I'm okay...for a vampire," he explained. I shook my head, still smiling. "You'll have a hard time getting any Alchemist to admit that. But I can say you're okay for an irreverent party boy with occasional moments of brilliance." "Brilliant? You think I'm brilliant?" He threw his hands skyward. "You hear that, world? Sage says I'm brilliant. ~ Richelle Mead,
897:The desert scents were heady and intoxicating. Sage and juniper and creosote. Pungent, sharp and whispery. The desert sand itself seemed to have a scent all its own, too. Something ancient that hinted at death, at life, of survival and of distant memories. This place, so close to civilization, yet so far removed, too, smelled as it had for eons, for millenniums. The sand, I knew, was sprinkled with the bones of the dead. Dead vermin, dead coyotes, dead anything and everything that ever ventured into these bleak hills. I ~ J R Rain,
898:Emptiness is the track on which the centered person moves," said a Tibetan sage six hundred years ago, and the book where I found this edict followed it with an explanation of the word "track" in Tibetan: shul, "a mark that remains after that which made it has passed by - a footprint for example. In other contexts, shul is used to describe the scarred hollow in the ground where a house once stood, the channel worn through rock where a river runs in flood, the indentation in the grass where an animal slept last night. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
899:When a man goes into deep sleep, he enters a plane beneath consciousness. He works the body all the time, he breathes, he moves the body, perhaps, in his sleep, without any accompanying feeling of ego; he is unconscious, and when he returns from his sleep, he is the same man who went into it. The sum total of the knowledge which he had before he went into the sleep remains the same; it does not increase at all. No enlightenment comes. But when a man goes into Samadhi, if he goes into it a fool, he comes out a sage. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
900:Everyone has that one line they swear they'll never cross, the one thing they say they'll never do. Not something serious like I'll never kill anyone or I'll never invade Russia in the winter. Usually, it's something less earth-shattering.
I'll never cheat on her.
I'll never work at a job I hate.
I'll never give up on my dreams.
We draw the line. Maybe we even believe it. That's why it's so hard when we break that promise we make to ourselves.
Sage Hendricks was my line. ~ Brian Katcher,
901:You're no grenadier. Grenadiers are big, stalwart souls, the first into battle, or so I've been told."
He raised his eyebrow at her, unsure if he was being insulted.
"No," she concluded, "you must have been captain of the light infantry company. The quick-witted ones, the sharpshooters."
"How ever did you guess?"
"I know these things," she said with a sage look, then turned and walked on, entirely pleased with herself.
Lucien gazed after her with a smile on his face. God help him, he was utterly charmed. ~ Gaelen Foley,
902:Les hiboux

Sous les ifs noirs qui les abritent,
Les hiboux se tiennent rangés,
Ainsi que des dieux étrangers,
Dardant leur oeil rouge. Ils méditent.

Sans remuer ils se tiendront
Jusqu'à l'heure mélancolique
Où, poussant le soleil oblique,
Les ténèbres s'établiront.

Leur attitude au sage enseigne
Qu'il faut en ce monde qu'il craigne
Le tumulte et le mouvement,

L'homme ivre d'une ombre qui passe
Porte toujours le châtiment
D'avoir voulu changer de place. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
903:And someday there will be a great awakening when we know that this is all a great dream. Yet the stupid believe they are awake, busily and brightly assuming they understand things, calling this man ruler, that one herdsman—how dense! Confucius and you both are dreaming! And when I say you are dreaming, I am dreaming, too. Words like these will be labeled the Supreme Swindle. Yet after ten thousand generations, a great sage may appear who will know their meaning, and it will still be as though he appeared with astonishing speed. ~ Zhuangzi,
904:animal rescue and sanctuary?” “The very one.” I smile because I’m thrilled to have my dream job. He smiles back. “I know Sage. She’s with a friend of mine.” “You know Lee?” Where Sage is petite and ethereal, her boyfriend, Lee, is a South African rugby player with movie star good looks. “We’ve played rugby together. He takes it a lot more seriously than I do. He could’ve played pro.” “Not you?” Jesse is tall and broad enough to play a full contact sport. Not touching the idea of full contact with him with a ski pole. Nope. ~ Daisy Prescott,
905:birch – hope butterflies – change, transformation, inner growth cypress – mourning daisies – innocence, purity dragonflies – ancestors fireflies – life, sexuality hummingbirds – hope and beauty, the sun in disguise, infinity in the flight of their wings phoenix – rebirth poppies – remembrance raven – in some cultures death, in some cultures a bringer of light associated with Creation rose (red) – romantic love rose (yellow) – friendship sage – powerful cleansing sweetgrass – a grandmother medicine sycamore – hidden treasure ~ Cynthia Sharp,
906:He turned his head toward me and froze. I had never seen him so still—or so
quiet. His shock was so thorough and intense that he actually dropped his
cigarette.
Adrian slowly sat up, eyes wide. He slid off the hood and didn’t seem to leave
any marks. Obviously, I’d have to check it later. “Sage,” he said. “What are you
wearing?”
I sighed and stared down at the dress. “I know. It’s red. Don’t start. I’m tired
of hearing about it.”
“Funny,” he said. “I don’t think I could ever get tired of looking at it. ~ Richelle Mead,
907:IF we desire European civilization to be a raid and a rescue, we shall insist rather that souls are in real peril than that their peril is ultimately unreal. And if we wish to exalt the outcast and the crucified, we shall rather wish to think that a veritable God was crucified, rather than a mere sage or hero. Above all, if we wish to protect the poor we shall be in favour of fixed rules and clear dogmas. The rules of a club are occasionally in favour of the poor member. The drift of a club is always in favour of the rich one. ~ G K Chesterton,
908:And what are you that, missing you,
I should be kept awake
As many nights as there are days
With weeping for your sake?

And what are you that, missing you,
As many days as crawl
I should be listening to the wind
And looking at the wall?

I know a man that’s a braver man
And twenty men as kind,
And what are you, that you should be
The one man in my mind?

Yet women’s ways are witless ways,
As any sage will tell,—
And what am I, that I should love
So wisely and so well? ~ Edna St Vincent Millay,
909:As she drank, she closed her eyes and tried to imagine she was drinking her grandmother's porridge. What she wouldn't give for a hot bowl of fish congee, sprinkled with green scallions and topped with a dollop of sesame oil! She'd even have willingly downed one of her mother's herbal soups; Fa Li used to make red sage soup almost every day when Mulan was growing up. How she'd hated the smell and pungent taste. She used to pick out the chopped pieces of the root and chew on the sweet wolfberries instead.
She missed home so much. ~ Elizabeth Lim,
910:This might seem kind of weird... but I mean, I wouldn't mind asking Jill out."
Adrian was on that before I could even think of a response. "What, do you mean like on a date? You son of a bitch! She's only fifteen." You never would of guessed he'd been talking about easy Moroi girls only moments before.
"Adrian," I said. "I'm guessing Lee's definition of a date is a little different than yours."
"Sorry, Sage. You've got to trust me when it comes to dating definitions. Last I checked, you aren't an expert in social matters. ~ Richelle Mead,
911:What point of morals, of manners, of economy, of philosophy, of religion, of taste, of the conduct of life, has he not settled? What mystery has he not signified his knowledge of? What office, or function, or district of man's work, has he not remembered? What king has he not taught state, as Talma taught Napoleon? What maiden has not found him finer than her delicacy? What lover has he not outloved? What sage has he not outseen? What gentleman has he not instructed in the rudeness of his behavior? ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, Representative Men (1850),
912:Eternity.—Thy name Or glad, or fearful, we pronounce, as thoughts Wandering in darkness shape thee. Thou strange being, Which art and must be, yet which contradict'st All sense, all reasoning,—thou, who never wast Less than thyself, and who still art thyself Entire, though the deep draught which Time has taken Equals thy present store—No line can reach To thy unfathomed depths. The reasoning sage Who can dissect a sunbeam, count the stars, And measure distant worlds, is here a child, And, humbled, drops his calculating pen. ~ Anna Letitia Barbauld,
913:So erst the Sage [Pythagoras] with scientific truth In Grecian temples taught the attentive youth; With ceaseless change how restless atoms pass From life to life, a transmigrating mass; How the same organs, which to-day compose The poisonous henbane, or the fragrant rose, May with to-morrow's sun new forms compile, Frown in the Hero, in the Beauty smile. Whence drew the enlighten'd Sage the moral plan, That man should ever be the friend of man; Should eye with tenderness all living forms, His brother-emmets, and his sister-worms. ~ Erasmus Darwin,
914:Twenty-five centuries ago, Lao-tse, a Chinese sage, said some thing that readers of this book might use today: " The reason why rivers and seas receive the homage of a hundred mountain streams is that they keep below them. Thus they are able to reign over all the mountain streams. So the sage, wishing to be above men, putteth himself below them; wishing to be before them, he putteth himself behind them. Thus, though his place be above men, they do not feel his weight; though his place be before them, they do not count it an injury. ~ Dale Carnegie,
915:Will it be said that the judgment of a male of two years old, is more sage than that of a female's of the same age? I believe the reverse is generally observed to be true. But from that period what partiality! how is the one exalted, and the other depressed, by the contrary modes of education which are adopted! the one is taught to aspire, and the other is early confined and limited. As their years increase, the sister must be wholly domesticated, while the brother is led by the hand through all the flowery paths of science. ~ Judith Sargent Murray,
916:IF we desire European civilization to be a raid and a rescue, we shall insist rather that souls are in real peril than that their peril is ultimately unreal. And if we wish to exalt the outcast and the crucified, we shall rather wish to think that a veritable God was crucified, rather than a mere sage or hero. Above all, if we wish to protect the poor we shall be in favour of fixed rules and clear dogmas. The rules of a club are occasionally in favour of the poor member. The drift of a club is always in favour of the rich one. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
917:On The Aphorism
'L'Amitié est l'Amour sans ailes.'
FRIENDSHIP, as some sage poet sings,
Is chasten'd Love, depriv'd of wings,
Without all wish or power to wander;
Less volatile, but not less tender:
Yet says the proverbs­'Sly and slow
'Love creeps, even where he cannot go;'
To clip his pinions then is vain,
His old propensities remain;
And she, who years beyond fifteen,
Has counted twenty, may have seen
How rarely unplum'd Love will stay;
He flies not­but he coolly walks away.
~ Charlotte Smith,
918:Thanks for looking out for her, Sage. You're okay. For a human."
I almost laughed. "Thanks."
"You can say it too, you know."
I walked over to Latte and paused. "Say what?"
"That I'm okay...for a vampire," he explained.
I shook my head, still smiling. "You'll have a hard time getting any Alchemist to admit that. But I can say you're okay for an irreverent party boy with occasional moments of brilliance."
"Brilliant? You think I'm brilliant?" He threw his hands skyward. "You hear that, world? Sage says I'm brilliant. ~ Richelle Mead,
919:Golden Bells
When I was almost forty
I had a daughter whose name was Golden Bells.
Now it is just a year since she was born;
She is learning to sit and cannot yet talk.
Ashamed—to find that I have not a sage’s heart:
Henceforward I am tied to things outside myself:
My only reward—the pleasure I am getting now.
If I am spared the grief of her dying young,
Then I shall have the trouble of getting her married.
My plan for retiring and going back to the hills
Must now be postponed for fifteen years!
~ Bai Juyi,
920:Military weapons are the means used by the Sage to punish violence and cruelty, to give peace to troublous times, to remove difficulties and dangers, and to succor those who are in peril. Every animal with blood in its veins and horns on its head will fight when it is attacked. How much more so will man, who carries in his breast the faculties of love and hatred, joy and anger! When he is pleased, a feeling of affection springs up within him; when angry, his poisoned sting is brought into play. That is the natural law which governs his being ~ Sima Qian,
921:Mind dissolves only when you don't choose. And when there is no mind, you are for the first time in your crystal clarity, for the first time in your original freshness. For the first time your real face is encountered. Mind is not there - the divider. Now existence appears as one. Mind has dropped; the barrier between you and existence is no more. Now you can look at existence with no mind. This is how a sage is born. With the mind - the world. With no mind - freedom, MOKSHA, KAIVALYA, NIRVANA. Cessation of the mind is cessation of the world. ~ Rajneesh,
922:You'll have a hard time getting any Alchemist to admit that. But I can say you're okay for an irreverent party boy with occasional moments of brilliance."

"Brilliant? You think I'm Brilliant?" He threw his hands skyward. "You hear that world? Sage says I'm brilliant."

"That's not what I said!"

He dropped the cigarette and stamped it out, giving me a devil-may-care grin. "Thanks for the ego boost. I'm going to go and tell Clarence and Lee all about your high opinion."

"Hey, I didn't-"

But he was already gone. ~ Richelle Mead,
923:I'd seen Sage bleed. I'd made Sage bleed. Not that it hurt him any; he healed so quickly...In smaller doses it has incredible healing powers. Ben's voice rang out in my head. I remembered he said that earlier, about...the Elixir of Life.The crackpot, completely bogus, absolutely insane Elixir of Life.Did it actually exist? Had Sage had some? Enough to keep him alive, young, and speed-healing for the last five hundred years?And if so, had he used that time to find one woman, again and again in different incarnations, to love her...or destroy her? ~ Hilary Duff,
924:Jordan leaned on the counter. He felt a little like a bartender in a TV show, dispensing sage advice. "What do you owe her?"

"Life," Isabelle said.

Jordan blinked. This was a little beyond his bartending and advice-offering skills. "She saved your life?"

"She saved Jace's life. She could have had anything from the Angel Raziel, and she saved my brother. I've only ever trusted a few people in my life. Really trusted. My mother, Alec, Jace, and Max. I lost one of them already. Clary's the only reason I didn't lose another. ~ Cassandra Clare,
925:How Many Seconds In A Minute?
How many seconds in a minute?
Sixty, and no more in it.
How many minutes in an hour?
Sixty for sun and shower.
How many hours in a day?
Twenty-four for work and play.
How many days in a week?
Seven both to hear and speak.
How many weeks in a month?
Four, as the swift moon runneth.
How many months in a year?
Twelve the almanack makes clear.
How many years in an age?
One hundred says the sage.
How many ages in time?
No one knows the rhyme.
~ Christina Georgina Rossetti,
926:The sage Shantideva, in the Bodhicaryavatara, in talking about the subject of suffering, offered a famous analogy for how we try to alleviate our suffering. He’s said that if you walk on the earth and it’s hurting your feet, you might want to cover all the earth with hides of leather, so that you’d never have to suffer from the pain of the ground. But where could such an amount of leather be found? Rather, you could simply wrap a bit of leather around your feet, and then it’s as if the whole world is covered with leather and you’re always protected. ~ Pema Ch dr n,
927:In the ancient Book of History, upon which Confucius himself based his philosophy, it is said...

The people must be cherished,
The people must not be oppressed,
The people are the root of the country.
If the root is firm, the country is tranquil.

And you remember, she continued, that, when asked which was most important to a state, food, weapons or the trust of the people, the sage replied that weapons could be given up, and even food be sacrificed, but the state itself would be destroyed if the people had no confidence in it. ~ Pearl S Buck,
928:Supprime donc en toi toute aversion pour ce qui ne dépend pas de nous et, cette aversion, reporte-la sur ce qui dépend de nous et n’est pas en accord avec la nature. Quant au désir, pour le moment, supprime-le complètement. Car si tu désires une chose qui ne dépend pas de nous, tu ne pourras qu’échouer, sans compter que tu te mettras dans l’impossibilité d’atteindre ce qui est à notre portée et qu’il est plus sage de désirer. Borne-toi à suivre tes impulsions, tes répulsions, mais fais-le avec légèreté, de façon non systématique et sans effort excessif. ~ Epictetus,
929:Federico hurries me on to the next glory. Under the ashes of last evening’s fire in a hearth wide and deep as a small room, he’d set fat white beans to braise in bulbous-bottomed wine bottles, most of them remnants from his grandfather’s winemaking days, he says. He’d mixed the beans with water, sage, garlic and rosemary, sea salt, just-cracked pepper and a dose of extra virgin oil. He’d stopped the bottles with pieces of wet flannel so the steam would hiss away without exploding the glass and left the beans to cook all night long. Fagioli al fiasco ~ Marlena de Blasi,
930:Examining the Homeric epics from the perspective of when and by whom they were composed, Vico refutes generations of interpreters who had assumed that because Homer was revered for his great epics he must also have been a wise sage like Plato, Socrates, or Bacon. Instead Vico demonstrates that in its wildness and willfulness Homer’s mind was poetic, and his poetry barbaric, not wise or philosophic, that is, full of illogical fantasy, gods who were anything but godlike, and men like Achilles and Patrocles, who were most uncourtly and extremely petulant. ~ Erich Auerbach,
931:I knew I sounded hysterical, and Adrian’s calmness only drove that home. “I think I have an idea,” he said. “An idea that’ll get us some hardcore protection … but I don’t know how you’ll feel about it.”

“I’m open to anything,” I assured him.

He hesitated a moment and gave a decisive nod. Then, to my complete and utter astonishment, he got down on his knees before me and clasped my hands in his. “Sydney Katherine Sage,” he said, his green eyes full of love and earnestness. “Would you do a brooding, deadbeat Moroi the honor of being his wife? ~ Richelle Mead,
932:The best way to get quiet, other than the combination of extensive therapy, Prozac, and a lobotomy, is first to notice that the station is on. KFKD [K-Fucked] is on every single morning when I sit down at my desk. So I sit for a moment and then say a small prayer--please help me get out of the way so I can write what wants to be written. Sometimes ritual quiets the racket. Try it. Any number of things may work for you--an altar, for instance, or votive candles, sage smudges, small-animal sacrifices, especially now that the Supreme Court has legalized them. ~ Anne Lamott,
933:Wisdom
This I say, and this I know:
Love has seen the last of me.
Love's a trodden lane to woe,
Love's a path to misery.
This I know, and knew before,
This I tell you, of my years:
Hide your heart, and lock your door.
Hell's afloat in lovers' tears.
Give your heart, and toss and moan;
What a pretty fool you look!
I am sage, who sit alone;
Here's my wool, and here's my book.
Look! A lad's a-waiting there,
Tall he is and bold, and gay.
What the devil do I care
What I know, and what I say?
~ Dorothy Parker,
934:Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, (born circa 1818 – February 20, 1895) was an American abolitionist, women's suffragist, editor, orator, author, statesman and reformer. Called "The Sage of Anacostia" and "The Lion of Anacostia", Douglass is one of the most prominent figures in African-American and United States history. He was a firm believer in the equality of all people, whether black, female, Native American, or recent immigrant. He was fond of saying, "I would unite with anybody to do right and with nobody to do wrong. ~ Frederick Douglass,
935:Enoch, as sage counselor to the priest-king, was required to command a wide breadth of knowledge. He had trained in the sciences of both heavens and earth. He was shaman, diviner, scribe, and poet all in one. But it seemed to him that the most important office he held was as bard, the carrier of the culture’s stories. All the laws, governance, religious beliefs and values of a people flowed downstream from the culture embodied in the songs and epics of the poet. Hearts and souls are moved by story and he who controls the cultural narrative controls the people. ~ Brian Godawa,
936:I’m concerned about the pastor who is a chief executive instead of a contemplative sage. The pastor is called to a contemplative life of prayer and study of the word (Acts 6:4 cf. Ephesians 4:11-16). From that life his ministry flows to the church. The pastor was never called to be a rock-star communicator or bench-mark business leader. He was called to model redemption and shepherd the flock of God (1 Peter 5:1-4 cf. Acts 20:28). Perhaps pastors should consider putting away their John Maxwell and Nelson Searcy books and picking up the Bible and the church fathers. ~ Anonymous,
937:The Philosopher
And what are you that, wanting you,
I should be kept awake
As many nights as there are days
With weeping for your sake?
And what are you that, missing you,
As many days as crawl
I should be listening to the wind
And looking at the wall?
I know a man that's a braver man
And twenty men as kind,
And what are you, that you should be
The one man in my mind?
Yet women's ways are witless ways,
As any sage will tell,—
And what am I, that I should love
So wisely and so well?
~ Edna St. Vincent Millay,
938:Suttree surfaced from these fevered deeps to hear a maudlin voice chant latin by his bedside, what medieval ghost come to usurp his fallen corporeality. An oiled thumball redolent of lime and sage pondered his shuttered lids.Miserere mei, Deus ...His ears anointed, his lips ... omnis maligna discordia ... Bechrismed with scented oils he lay boneless in a cold euphoria. Japheth when you left your father's house the birds had flown. You were not prepared for such weathers. You'd spoke too lightly of the winter in your father's heart. We saw you in the streets. Sad. ~ Cormac McCarthy,
939:I don't suppose that she gave you the job based on looks alone?" Adrian had been staring off but now flashed me a big smile. "Why, Sage, you sweet talker." "That's not what I meant! What happened?" He shrugged. "I told the truth." "Adrian!" "I'm serious. She asked me what my greatest strength was. I said getting along with people." "That's not bad." I admitted. "Then she asked what my greatest weakness was. And I said, 'Where should I start?'" "Adrian!" "Stop saying my name like that. I told her the truth. By the time I was on the fourth one, she told me I could go. ~ Richelle Mead,
940:Words
Words are deeds. The words we hear
May revolutionize or rear
A mighty state. The words we read
May be a spiritual deed
Excelling any fleshly one,
As much as the celestial sun
Transcends a bonfire, made to throw
A light upon some raree-show.
A simple proverb tagged with rhyme
May colour half the course of time;
The pregnant saying of a sage
May influence every coming age;
A song in its effects may be
More glorious than Thermopylae,
And many a lay that schoolboys scan
A nobler feat than Inkerman.
~ Charles Harpur,
941:This is why G. I. Gurdjieff, that marvelous rascal-sage, wrote in his All and Everything:         The sole means now for the saving of the beings of the planet Earth would be to implant again into their presences a new organ … of such properties that every one of these unfortunates during the process of existence should constantly sense and be cognizant of the inevitability of his own death as well as the death of everyone upon whom his eyes or attention rests.         Only such a sensation and such a cognizance can now destroy the egoism completely crystallized in them. ~ Alan W Watts,
942:the problem of being a scribe and a sage. Sometimes, education and learning became a flood that darkens the mind with confusion rather than a sun that enlightens it with truth. Enoch hoped one day Elohim would clear that up for him, since he was now his servant. Enoch had also wondered what it would be like to live forever. Was it transformation of the body? Was it perpetual regeneration? And what was it like to be in communion with Elohim so perfectly as to not need the dreams and visions that Enoch had become dependent upon for his own sense of real presence of the deity? ~ Brian Godawa,
943:City of Vassillian a party of five sage princes with four horses. The princes, who are of course brave, noble and wise, travel widely in distant lands, fight giant ogres, pursue exotic philosophies, take tea with weird gods and rescue beautiful monsters from ravening princesses before finally announcing that they have achieved enlightenment and that their wanderings are therefore accomplished. The second, and much longer, part of each song would then tell of all their bickerings about which one of them is going to have to walk back. All this lay in the planet’s remote past. ~ Douglas Adams,
944:She sees the real man behind the façade of smiles and jokes and my big mouth.
Heartache, loneliness, and guilt look back at her.
She doesn’t shy away though.
No, Sage with the glittering gray-green eyes steps closer. Her cheeks are pink and her ears are red. Embarrassed and shy, but determined. That small glint in her stare, coupled with the way she lifts her chin slightly, pulls me the rest of the way from my dark, clouded mood and tethers me to her light.
I caught a shooting star.
… She’s soaring through the darkness and I’ve grabbed hold. I don’t want to let go. ~ K Webster,
945:If the Purana written by Vyasa were still existing, then it would be honoured as a “Sruti”. In the absence of this Purana and the one written by Lomaharshana, the eighteen Puranas that still exist cannot all be given the same place of honour; among them, the Vishnu and the Bhagwata Purana composed by accomplished yogis are definitely more precious and we must recognise that the Markandeya Purana written by a sage devoted to spiritual pursuits is more profound in Knowledge than either the Shiva or the Agni Purana. ~ Sri Aurobindo, in "Sri Aurobindo Writings in Bengali Translated into English".,
946:This is the one time in this book this book that I felt Mustang acted like himself. His thoughts were so "Mustang". A frown furrowed Jenna's brow. "Oh, come on. What possible harm could it do?" "Darlin', I couldn't even begin to list all the harm her meeting you could do." He pictured that cozy introduction. Sage, this is Slade and his girlfriend, Jenna. She's the woman we shared for a week in Tulsa. You should read her book. It tells all about it, right down to the old double P. Yeah, right. He might as well add on, Oh, and by the way, that the name of the porno I starred in to. ~ Cat Johnson,
947:fagioli al fiasco sotto la cenere.” She handed him a bowl of what looked like white paste. He didn’t understand the Italian words in her dialect, except that “fagioli” was beans, and this did not look like beans—more like oatmeal. He didn’t think he’d ever seen an oat when he was in Florence, and certainly nobody ate oatmeal for breakfast. “What is this?” he asked. “It is made of white beans cooked in water and then cooked again with olive oil, rosemary, sage, and garlic in the coals of the fire all night. We put it in a Chianti bottle and cook it slowly in the embers. Then we mash ~ Rhys Bowen,
948:I remembered those frantic seconds when I’d thought all I loved and knew, all that was Sydney Sage, would be lost from this world. My battered friends and I had just had a brush with death, dancing with this evil. We’d destroyed it, but it was terrifying how touch and go it all had been. At any moment, the Strigoi could have gained the advantage and killed one or all of us. Life and death were inextricably bound together, and we wavered between them. But we’d triumphed over death tonight. We were alive, and the world was beautiful. Life was beautiful, and I refused to waste mine. ~ Richelle Mead,
949:You know the difference between right and wrong,' he repeated finally. 'Man, why did you need Initiation—by the Golden Dawn, or by anybody else? You are a genius, a sage, a giant among men. You have solved the problem which philosophers have been debating since antiquity—the mystery about which no two nations or tribes have ever agreed, and no two men or women have ever agreed, and no intelligent person has ever agreed totally with himself from one day to the next. You know the difference between right and wrong. I am overawed. I swoon. I figuratively kiss your feet. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
950:The invisible bubble containing them rushed forward, and Lindon’s body shuddered with the instinct to protect itself, but Suriel spoke as though reciting a poem. “There are a million Paths in this world, Lindon, but any sage will tell you they can all be reduced to one. Improve yourself.” Lindon was still somewhat worried about offending this visitor from another world, but he dared to say, “That doesn’t sound like enough.” The mountain rushed closer as they descended into its shadow. “It’s been my path for longer than you would believe. Do you think anyone dares to attack my homeland? ~ Will Wight,
951:The flexible are preserved unbroken. The bent become straight. The empty are filled. The exhausted become renewed. The poor are enriched. The rich are confounded. Therefore the sage embraces the one. Because he doesn't display himself, people can see his light. Because he has nothing to prove, people can trust his words. Because he doesn't know who he is, people recognize themselves in him. Because he has no goal in mind, everything he does succeeds. The old saying that the flexible are preserved unbroken is surely right! If you have truely attained wholeness, everything will flock to you. ~ Lao Tzu,
952:In the distance, I could see Skanda sitting on a pavilion wreathed in lotus blossoms and flanked with serving girls. He was, as I had guessed, fat. And in his golden jacket, he indeed looked like a toad.
“Ah, I remember him,” muttered Kamala.
“He’s my half-brother.”
“Nasty, nasty.”
“I know.”
“Would you like me to eat him?”
“Definitely not,” I said, a little too quickly. I patted Kamala’s neck. “But I appreciate your offer. It was almost nice.”
“It is nice to be nice,” said Kamala with a sage nod. “And it is also nice to eat people,” she added as an afterthought. ~ Roshani Chokshi,
953:that her best friend, Gabe Poirier, is a bad idea. He’s a walking, talking cliché. The Adonis quarterback with the bulging biceps and harem of fangirls trailing behind him on campus like a stench you can’t get rid of. Sadly, that’s also the reason she can’t stay away from him. Well, that and the fact that they’re roommates. Jolie is already straddling the line between friendship and more when Sage comes to her with an offer she cannot refuse: be his fake girlfriend and live for free for the rest of the semester. She tells herself that she can handle it. He’s just the boy she saved ten years ~ L J Shen,
954:Cold leek and potato soup. Little pastry boats filled with minced chicken or fish in a white sauce. A large green salad, a tomato and spring onion salad, a cold roast of beef with horseradish or port wine jelly to taste, cold roasted chickens with sage and onion stuffing, with a variety of crisp cold vegetables, each with their proper sauces. Fruit salad. A marmalade-filled roulade with slices of sugared oranges and crème Chantilly which was even now rolling in its damp tea towel as though there were no such things as culinary accidents in the world. Cheeses and fruits and coffee or tea. ~ Kerry Greenwood,
955:I don't suppose that she gave you the job based on looks alone?"
Adrian had been staring off but now flashed me a big smile. "Why, Sage, you sweet talker."
"That's not what I meant! What happened?"
He shrugged. "I told the truth."
"Adrian!"
"I'm serious. She asked me what my greatest strength was. I said getting along with people."
"That's not bad." I admitted.
"Then she asked what my greatest weakness was. And I said, 'Where should I start?'"
"Adrian!"
"Stop saying my name like that. I told her the truth. By the time I was on the fourth one, she told me I could go. ~ Richelle Mead,
956:It was only possible to define or comprehend something when there was duality. A person can see, taste, or smell something that is separate and apart from him- or herself. But when “the whole [brahman] has become a person’s very self [atman], then who is there for him to see and by what means? Who is there for me to think of and by what means?”14 It was impossible to perceive the perceiver within oneself. So you could only say neti . . . neti (“not this”). The sage affirmed the existence of the atman while at the same time denying that it bore any similarity to anything known by the senses. ~ Karen Armstrong,
957:Music is more powerful than reason in the soul. That is also why Plato made music the very first step in his long educational curriculum: good music was to create the harmony of soul that would be a ripe field for the higher harmony of reason to take root in later. And that is also why he said that the decay of the ideal state would begin with a decay in music. In fact, one of your obscure modern scholars has shown that social and political revolutions have usually been preceded by musical revolutions, and why another sage said, 'Let me write the songs of a nation and I care not who writes its laws. ~ Peter Kreeft,
958:As Robert Rabbin stated: Here it is, my opinion: existence, creation, the cosmos, whatever the hell you want to call this incomprehensible mystery in which we live and of which we are a part, this thing is so huge, so vast, so complex and multi-dimensional that no one, no one, not even the latest guru du jour, not any scientist, saint, or sage, not any writer or artist, not any one who ever lived at any time in any place — no one knows nor can say the whole truth of the whole thing. They can only say, Hey, I’ve got my hand on one cell of this enormo-gigan-tic beast of being and it feels like such and so.9 ~ Sera Beak,
959:Cul-De Sac
“DEAR Dove, both Love and Life command we wed,”
Spoke I. She smiled and shook her sage young head,
And mused, and gravely said: “Before we met,
Life had ruled straight our page, and rules it yet.
Though Love be come to light that even Way,
What else has changed? The filial tasks of day,
Your day and mine, cannot be put aside
That selfish Love alone be glorified.
Did daily duty done not keep us blest
Our infinite love were infinite unrest.
Our separate earnings still our Aged need—
Spare me, dear love, you shake me when you plead.”
~ Edward William Thomson,
960:The matron whom we find so often arguing with Rabbi José observed one day to that sage, 'My god is surely greater than yours. When your God appeared to Moses in the bush, Moses merely covered his face, whilst when my god (the serpent) made its appearance he could not stand his ground at all, but had to run away out of fear.' 'Not so, 'returned the Rabbi, 'for in order to be out of the power of your god it sufficed for Moses to step a few paces back, but whither could he have fled from the presence of Him who filleth the earth?' ~ Exodus Rabbah 3, Tales and Maxims from the Midrash by Rev. Samuel Rapaport, (1907), p. 92,
961:By now, Gregor had recovered. "Sage? Devlin, forgive my accusation, but you are a fool. Don't you know who this is?"
Devlin didn't appear to forgive the accusation. With a sneer on his face, he folded his arms and said, "Enlighten me."
Gregor looked at me and frowned. "He can perform the Avenian accent as well as his own Carthyan tongue. And although he has a reputation for being able to steal the white off snow if he chooses to, this boy is far from being a mere thief. Devlin, you are facing the boy who has haunted the pirates for the past four years. This is Jaron, the lost prince of Carthya. ~ Jennifer A Nielsen,
962:Guy's only thought was to help her. It wasn't until he'd shoved aside the curtain and held her very wet, very naked body against him that he realized what he'd done.
Her sage green eyes were wide as she stared at him. For long moments, they simply looked at each other.
"I heard you cry out."
"My... my ankle," she said after clearing her throat. "I put too much pressure on it."
"A bath would have been better." He was valiantly trying to keep his gaze on her face, but it was difficult with her pert breasts against him and her bare ass beneath his hand as he held her up.
"Probably," she whispered. ~ Donna Grant,
963:The whole roaring crowd was gathered in the long room to give my boar's head fulsome applause when it was carried aloft on a platter. And my goodness, those old folk's eyes were as round as marbles when they saw the tables piled as high as Balthazar's Feast. Plum pottage, minced pies, roast beef, turkey with sage and red wine sauce- and that were just the first course. I was mostly pleased with the second course, for alongside the tongues, brawn, collared eels, ducks and mutton I'd put some pretty snowballs made of apples iced in white sugar, all taken from a dish in Lady Maria's hand in 'The Cook's Jewel. ~ Martine Bailey,
964:The third flaw is underconfidence, though it will seem to you like modesty or humility. You have learned so many flaws in your own nature, some of them impossible to fix, that you may think that the rule of wisdom is to confess your own inability. You may question yourself, without resolution or testing to determine the self-answers. You may refuse to decide, pending further evidence, when a quick decision is necessary. You may take advice you should not take. Jaded cynicism and sage despair are less fashionable than once they were, but you may still be tempted by them. Or you may simply - lose momentum. ~ Eliezer Yudkowsky,
965:The Sage

A person of wisdom should be truthful, without arrogance, without deceit, not slanderous and
not hateful. The wise person should go beyond the evil of greed and miserliness.
To have your mind set on calmness, you must take power over sleepiness, drowsiness and
lethargy. There is no place for laziness and no recourse to pride.
Do not be led into lying, do not be attached to forms. You must see through all pride and fare
along without violence.
Do not get excited by what is old, do not be contented with what is new. Do not grieve for
what is lost or be controlled by desire. ~ Gautama Buddha,
966:Just as the bird leaves no trace, no record of its flight upon the void, so human desire can gain nothing out of life. But to realize this is at once to become the sage, since the greatest wisdom lies on the other side, immediately on the other side, of the greatest despair. It is, of course, something more than despair—a joy, a sense of creative life and power, I might even say a security and certainty, beyond any imagining. But this is a way of feeling which the will and the imagination are as unable to bring about as to make one’s bones grow or decrease the speed of the pulse. They must happen by themselves. ~ Alan W Watts,
967:By what is man impelled to act sin, though not willing it, as if brought to it by force? It is desire it is wrath born of the principle of passion, a mighty and devouring and evil thing; know this for the enemy. Eternal enemy of the sage, in the form of desire it obscures his knowledge and is an insatiable fire. The senses are supreme in the body, above the senses is the mind, higher than the mind is the understanding and higher than the understanding the spiritual Self. Know then that which is higher than the understanding, by the self control thyself and slay this difficult enemy, desire. ~ Bhagavad Gita III. 36. 37. 39. 42. 43,
968:The Dead Sea Scrolls of Qumran  evidence a preoccupation with demonology that includes reference to this very Isaianic passage. In The Songs of the Sage, we read an exorcism incantation,   “And I, the Instructor, proclaim His glorious splendor so as to frighten and to terrify all the spirits of the destroying angels, spirits of the bastards, demons, Lilith, howlers, and [desert dwellers…] and those which fall upon men without warning to lead them astray[18]   Note the reference to “spirits of the bastards,” a euphemism for demons as the spirits of dead Nephilim who were not born of human fathers, but of angels.[19] ~ Brian Godawa,
969:Why?” breathed Boy 412. “Why me?”

“You have astonishing Magykal power. I told you before. Maybe now you’ll believe me.” She smiled.

“I—I thought the power came from the ring.”

“No. It comes from you. Don’t forget, the Dragon Boat recognized you even without the ring. She knew. Remember, it was last worn by Hotep-Ra, the first ExtraOrdinary Wizard. It’s been waiting a long time to find someone like him.”

“But that’s because it’s been stuck in a secret tunnel for hundreds of years.”

“Not necessarily,” said Marcia mysteriously. “Things have a habit of working out, you know. Eventually. ~ Angie Sage,
970:Socrates, Plato, Jesus, Buddha and countless other mystics, in countless cultures, have preached the same thing -- that we all exist amid a blur of uncertainty. That one can never know complete truth about physical reality via our senses alone. Much is made of the differences between their systems... Socrates teaching reason, Buddha urging meditation, and Jesus prescribing faith. But what they all had in common was far more important. Each of those sage-prophets worried that the power of human egotism tends to make us lie to ourselves, leading to error, hypocrisy, and all too often, the rationalization of evil actions. ~ David Brin,
971:Deep hearts, sage minds, take life as God has made it; it is a long trial, an incomprehensible preparation for an unknown destiny. This destiny, the true one, begins for a man with the first step inside the tomb. Then something appears to him, and he begins to distinguish the definitive. The definitive, meditate upon that word. The living perceive the infinite; the definitive permits itself to be seen only by the dead. In the meanwhile, love and suffer, hope and contemplate. Woe, alas! to him who shall have loved only bodies, forms, appearances! Death will deprive him of all. Try to love souls, you will find them again. ~ Victor Hugo,
972:It’s over. God is no longer with us.” And as though he regretted having uttered such words so coldly, so dryly, he added in his broken voice, “I know. No one has the right to say things like that. I know that very well. Man is too insignificant, too limited, to even try to comprehend God’s mysterious ways. But what can someone like myself do? I’m neither a sage nor a just man. I am not a saint. I’m a simple creature of flesh and bone. I suffer hell in my soul and my flesh. I also have eyes and I see what is being done here. Where is God’s mercy? Where’s God? How can I believe, how can anyone believe in this God of Mercy? ~ Elie Wiesel,
973:An abstruse subject, I should conceive,’ said Mr. Pickwick. ‘Very, Sir,’ responded Pott, looking intensely sage. ‘He CRAMMED for it, to use a technical but expressive term; he read up for the subject, at my desire, in the “Encyclopaedia Britannica.” ’ ‘Indeed!’ said Mr. Pickwick; ‘I was not aware that that valuable work contained any information respecting Chinese metaphysics.’ ‘He read, Sir,’ rejoined Pott, laying his hand on Mr. Pickwick’s knee, and looking round with a smile of intellectual superiority —‘he read for metaphysics under the letter M, and for China under the letter C, and combined his information, Sir! ~ Charles Dickens,
974:Trotzdem hat jedes Buch neben seiner abstrakten, anonymen Bestimmung, die Öffentlichkeit heißt, einen bekannten Leser, eine oder mehrere Personen, an die man das Buch schreibt, weil das die einzige Art und Weise ist, wie man etwas zum Ausdruck bringen kann, was man sagen, enthüllen möchte, oder weil man etwas geben möchte, was man auf keine andere Art und Weise geben kann, oder weil dies das Beste ist, was man zu geben hat.

"Dabei ist es gar nicht mal so wichtig, ob der bekannte Leser das Buch auch tatsächlich liest", sage ich zu Ischa, "es ist eher die Vorstellung von der Person, die du beim Schreiben benötigst. ~ Connie Palmen,
975:So," dark Susurre said quietly, "if you follow the curve... in a way your Damon did die to save Fell's Church from another massacre like the one on that Japanease island. He kept saying that was what he'd come to the Nether World to do. Do you not think he would be satisfied? At peace?"
"At PEACE?!" Stefan spat bitterly, and Sage growled.
"Woman," you obviously have never met Damon Salvatore before." The tone in his voice--more resonant, more threatening somehow--made Elena finally break off her staredown with the red-haired Idola. She turned and looked--
--and saw the enormous room filled with Sage's outspread wings. ~ L J Smith,
976:It was John Kenneth Galbraith, the hyperliterate economic sage, who coined the phrase “conventional wisdom.” He did not consider it a compliment. “We associate truth with convenience,” he wrote, “with what most closely accords with self-interest and personal well-being or promises best to avoid awkward effort or unwelcome dislocation of life. We also find highly acceptable what contributes most to self-esteem.” Economic and social behaviors, Galbraith continued, “are complex, and to comprehend their character is mentally tiring. Therefore we adhere, as though to a raft, to those ideas which represent our understanding.” So ~ Steven D Levitt,
977:bring us back again into right and eternal relationship with Himself. This required that our sins be disposed of satisfactorily, that a full reconciliation be effected and the way opened for us to return again into conscious communion with God and to live again in the Presence as before. Then by His prevenient working within us He moves us to return. This first comes to our notice when our restless hearts feel a yearning for the Presence of God and we say within ourselves, "I will arise and go to my Father." That is the first step, and as the Chinese sage Lao-tze has said, "The journey of a thousand miles begins with a first step. ~ A W Tozer,
978:Sage. The sage in the pot had the same name as the wild plant that grew prolifically in New Mexico, on the Navajo Nation and throughout the Southwest. She knew the culinary sage in the kitchen was cousin to peppermint, catnip, and oregano—all characterized by square stems and aromatic leaves. The sagebrush outside had daisies, asters, and ragweed in its close family ties. Same name, but different genetics. Then she thought of the new FBI person, Sage Johnson. Were her parents thinking of sagebrush or cooking when they named her? Or did they expect that she’d be a wise woman, a different sort of sage. The name made her curious. ~ Anne Hillerman,
979:Richard, you’ve started eight different companies in eight different industries and taken all of them to a billion dollars. That’s huge. If you could summarize in one sentence how you did it, what would you say?” Richard didn’t blink. He answered immediately like a wise, kind sage. Here’s what he said: It’s all about finding and hiring people smarter than you, getting them to join your business and giving them good work, then getting out of the way and trusting them. You have to get out of the way so you can focus on the bigger vision. That’s important, but here is the main thing: You must make them see their work as a mission. ~ Vishen Lakhiani,
980:... ich kann kein Volk mir denken, das zerißner wäre, wie die Deutschen. Handwerker siehst du, aber keine Menschen, Priester, aber keine Menschen, Herrn und Knechte, Jungenudn gesetzte Leute, aber keine Menschen - ist das nicht wie ein Schlachtfeld, wo Hände und Arme und Gleider zerstückelt untereinander liegen ... ? Ein jeder treibt das Seine, wirst du sagen, und ich sage es auch. Nur muß er es mit ganzer Seele treiben, muß nicht jede Kraft in sich ersticken, wenn sie nicht gerade sich zu seinem Titel paßt ... und ist er in ein Fach gedrückt, wo gar der Geist nicht leben darf, so stoß ers mit Verachtung weg und lerne pflügen! ~ Friedrich H lderlin,
981:The Price To Peace
LONG since I taught my spirit to obey
The Sage's great commandment - to forget ­
And so to lose life's bitterness and fret
And taste its sweetness; and I went my way
Eluding joy and sorrow, grave and gay,
And lived exempt, my being always set
Upon the striking hour, without regret,
Secure, refreshed, remote from yesterday.
But oh my friend, my love, my very dear,
My practised wisdom is a curse to me;
I do forget, and when you are not near
It is, by Heaven, as if you ceased to be;
And I would buy with agony and fear
One hour, one little hour of memory.
~ Alice Duer Miller,
982:To sainted Nárad, prince of those Whose lore in words of wisdom flows. Whose constant care and chief delight Were Scripture and ascetic rite, The good Válmíki, first and best [pg 002] Of hermit saints, these words addressed:9 “In all this world, I pray thee, who Is virtuous, heroic, true? Firm in his vows, of grateful mind, To every creature good and kind? Bounteous, and holy, just, and wise, Alone most fair to all men's eyes? Devoid of envy, firm, and sage, Whose tranquil soul ne'er yields to rage? Whom, when his warrior wrath is high, Do Gods embattled fear and fly? Whose noble might and gentle skill The triple world can guard from ill? ~ Valmiki,
983:If I could talk and teach, I might be a sage, but I am only a ferryman, and my task is to ferry people across this river. I have ferried many across, thousands, and for all of them my river has been nothing but a hindrance in their travels. They traveled for money and business, to weddings and on pilgrimages, and the river was in their way, and the ferryman was there to get them swiftly across that hindrance. But for a few among the thousands, a very few, four or five, the river was no hindrance, They heard its voice, they listened to it, and the river became sacred for them, as it is for me. Let us now retire for the night, Siddhartha. ~ Hermann Hesse,
984:The natural desire of the human mind is to become special - to become special in the ways of the world, to have many degrees, to have much political power, to have money, wealth - to be special.

The mind is always ready to go on some ego trip. And if you are fed up with the world, then again the ego starts finding new ways and new means to enhance itself - it becomes spiritual. You become a great mahatma, a great sage, a great scholar, a man of knowledge, a man of renunciation; again you are special.

Unless the desire to be special disappears, you will never be special. Unless you relax into your ordinariness, you will never relax. ~ Osho,
985:They walked on with him until they came to a dirty shop window in a dirty street, which was made almost opaque by the steam of hot meats, vegetables, and puddings. But glimpses were to be caught of a roast leg of pork bursting into tears of sage and onion in a metal reservoir full of gravy, of an unctuous piece of roast beef and blisterous Yorkshire pudding, bubbling hot in a similar receptacle, of a stuffed fillet of veal in rapid cut, of a ham in a perspiration with the pace it was going at, of a shallow tank of baked potatoes glued together by their own richness, of a truss or two of boiled greens, and other substantial delicacies. ~ Charles Dickens,
986:I don't suppose," I said, once we were in the car, "that she just gave you the job based on looks alone?"
Adrian had been staring off but now flashed me a big smile. "Why, Sage, you sweet talker."
"Thats not what I meant! What happened?"
He shrugged. "I told the truth."
"Adrian!"
"I'm serious. She asked me what my greatest strength was. I said getting along with people."
"Thats not bad," I admitted.
"Then she asked what my greatest weakness was. And I said, 'Where should I start?'"
"Adrian!"
"Stop saying my name like that. I told her the truth. By the time I was on the fourth one, she told me I could go. ~ Richelle Mead,
987:I feel like this is totally a moment for Perry and Dex, considering they’ve been to Hell and back (again, literally) and seem to understand each other on this basic, soulmate kind of level. I guess it’s kind of inspiring to see a couple such as Dawn and Sage still together, considering they seem to have gone through something similar. True love binds. Of course that makes me have a tiny pity party for myself, complete with festive hat, confetti, and party horn that makes a pathetic little toot, since I also seem to be damned with these afflictions and yet I’m still alone. Finding someone who understands me seems pretty much impossible. That ~ Karina Halle,
988:¡Ese vocabulario, queridos! Qué os parece esto: uno de vosotros ha guardado un secreto toda su vida, y lo sigue haciendo en estos momentos. Uno de vosotros es un asesino; y no estoy hablando de un vampiro, ni de eutanasia ni nada por el estilo. Y luego está la cuestión de la verdadera identidad de Sage... ¡Buena suerte con vuestra investigación ahí! A uno de vosotros ya le han borrado la memoria... y no me refiero a Damon o a Stefan. ¿Y qué hay del misterioso beso robado? Y luego está la cuestión de lo sucedido en la noche del motel, que parece que nadie excepto Elena puede recordar. Podríais preguntarle algo sobre sus teorías respecto a Camelot. ~ L J Smith,
989:Yes, I’ll be glad.” And she said suddenly, “There are some times, Joseph, when the love for people is strong and warm like a sorrow.”
He looked quickly at her in astonishment at her statement of his own thought. “How did you think that, dear?”
“I don’t know. Why?”
“Because I was thinking it at that moment — and there are times when the people and the hills and the earth, all, everything except the stars, are one, and the love of them all is strong like a sadness.”
“Not the stars, then?”
“No, never the stars. The stars are always strangers — sometimes evil, but always strangers. Smell the sage, Elizabeth. It’s good to be getting home. ~ John Steinbeck,
990:Picasso’s quote at the head of this chapter is just about half right. Computers are not useless, but they’re still machines for generating answers, not posing interesting new questions. That ability still seems to be uniquely human, and still highly valuable. We predict that people who are good at idea creation will continue to have a comparative advantage over digital labor for some time to come, and will find themselves in demand. In other words, we believe that employers now and for some time to come will, when looking for talent, follow the advice attributed to the Enlightenment sage Voltaire: “Judge a man by his questions, not his answers.”6 ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
991:I am not here to answer your questions. To answer would imply that we conceded some slight possibility of truth to your assertions of innocence, and we do not concede that. Truth is something which is to be had from us, not from you. Ours is the most remarkable government in the history of mankind; because we, and only we, have accepted as a working principle what every sage has taught and every government has feigned to accept: the power of the truth. And because we do, we rule as no other government has ever ruled. You have often asked me what your crime is, why we detain you. It is because we know you are lying—do you understand what I am telling you? ~ Gene Wolfe,
992:We’d save up a penny or two, bring them down here, and set them on the tracks. When a train comes, it flattens out that penny, leaving it thin as paper and shaped long, like an egg. But it happens so fast, you can’t see where the train sends that penny flying… We’d look all around, in the sage brush and the prickly pear cactus, until we found them.. And you know what?”

He stopped walking and turned to gaze at me now. “We always found them closer than we thought.”

“After we’d looked all over Creation, we’d find them somewhere near the tracks, after all.”

He said, “Sometimes you do find what you’re looking for closer than you think. ~ Ann Howard Creel,
993:The genius of men like Newton and Einstein lies in that: they ask transparent, innocent questions which turn out to have catastrophic answers. The poet William Cowper called Newton a ‘childlike sage’ for that quality, and the description perfectly hits the air of surprise at the world that Einstein carried in his face. Whether he talked about riding a beam of light or falling through space, Einstein was always full of beautiful, simple illustrations of such principles, and I shall take a leaf out of his book. I go to the bottom of the clocktower, and get into the tram he used to take every day on his way to work as a clerk in the Swiss Patent Office. The ~ Jacob Bronowski,
994:And so on this rainbow day, with storms all around them, and blue sky above, they rode only as far as the valley. But from there, before they turned to go back, the monuments appeared close, and they loomed grandly with the background of purple bank and creamy cloud and shafts of golden lightning. They seemed like sentinels — guardians of a great and beautiful love born under their lofty heights, in the lonely silence of day, in the star-thrown shadow of night. They were like that love. And they held Lucy and Slone, calling every day, giving a nameless and tranquil content, binding them true to love, true to the sage and the open, true to that wild upland home. ~ Zane Grey,
995:The church smelled of sage and urine. Beer cans and magazines dotted the concrete floor, filthy from the sand blown through the broken walls, and faded by time. Pike guessed the urine smell was left by animals. The man with the lank hair was standing beside a lean man with the intelligent eyes of a businessman and a mouth cut into a permanent frown. A cordovan briefcase sat on the ground by the door. Pike wondered which owned the briefcase and which was the girl’s father. He positioned himself away from the windows. Bud nodded toward the man with the lank hair. “Joe, this is Conner Barkley. Mr. Barkley, Joe Pike.” Barkley squeezed out an uncomfortable smile. ~ Robert Crais,
996:Enraged against a quondam friend,
To Wisdom once proud Fortune said
"I'll give thee treasures without end,
If thou wilt be my friend instead."

"My choicest gifts to him I gave,
And ever blest him with my smile;
And yet he ceases not to crave,
And calls me ****rd all the while."

"Come, sister, let us friendship vow!
So take the money, nothing loth;
Why always labor at the plough?
Here is enough I'm sure for both!"

Sage wisdom laughed,the prudent elf!
And wiped her brow, with moisture hot:
"There runs thy friend to hang himself,
Be reconciledI need thee not!"

~ Friedrich Schiller, Fortune And Wisdom
,
997:I wanted to puke, and from the intense paint stench that was assaulting my nasal passages. Sage wanted Gaberot, Not Tucker, not Joe, but Gabe. It was all too gross to contemplate. So of course my brain couldn't stop contemplating it.
Sage and Gabe-rot sitting in the tree K-I-S-S-I-N-G!
We worked in silence for a few minutes while I fumed. How could she grill me about Gabe when she was already dating Mr.Perfect? If only Daniel were here to hear all of this instead of sitting back at SDH oblivious.
"So are you and Gabe, like close?" Sage asked.
Ugh!
"Very close," I said, tilting my head to one side,"Incestuous,actually. He's a fabulous kisser. ~ Kieran Scott,
998:Den Mann nenne mir, Muse, den vielgewandten, der gar viel umgetrieben
wurde, nachdem er Trojas heilige Stadt zerstörte. Von vielen Menschen sah er
die Städte und lernte kennen ihre Sinnesart; viel auch erlitt er Schmerzen auf
dem Meer in seinem Gemüte, während er sein Leben zu gewinnen suchte wie
auch die Heimkehr der Gefährten. Jedoch er rettete auch so nicht die Gefährten,
so sehr er es begehrte. Selber nämlich durch ihre eignen Freveltaten verdarben
sie, die Toren, die die Rinder des Sohns der Höhe, Helios, verzehrten. Der aber
nahm ihnen den Tag der Heimkehr. Davon – du magst beginnen, wo es sein mag
– Göttin, Tochter des Zeus! sage auch uns! ~ Homer,
999:PERFECT VIRTUE PRODUCES NOTHING, because it needs nothing. Production comes out of desire, production comes because you are imperfect. You create something as a substitute because you feel unfulfilled. When you are absolutely fulfilled, why should you create, how can you create? Then you yourself have become the glory of creation, then the inner being itself is so perfect, nothing is needed.
PERFECT VIRTUE PRODUCES NOTHING. If the world is virtuous, all utilitarian goals will be lost. If the world is really virtuous there will be play and no production. Then the whole thing will just become a game. You enjoy it, but you don’t need it. A perfect sage is absolutely useless. ~ Osho,
1000:The hell with your secrets,” shouted Bonnie.

“Language, language! How about this: One of you has kept a secret all
their life, and is doing so even now. One of you is a murderer—and I am
not speaking of a vampire, or a mercy killing, or anything like that. And
then there is the question of the true identity of Sage—good luck on your
research there!One of you has already had their memory erased—and I don’t mean
Damon or Stefan. And what about the secret, stolen kiss? And then there is
the question of what happened the night of the motel, that it seems that nobody
but Elena can recall. You might ask her sometime about her theories about
Camelot. ~ L J Smith,
1001:Turn to philosophy, therefore, with all your soul, sit at her feet, cherish her; a great distance will then begin to separate you from other men. You will be far ahead of all mortals, and even the gods will not be far ahead of you. Do you ask what will be the difference between yourself and the gods? They will live longer. But, by my faith, it is the sign of a great artist to have confined a full likeness to the limits of a miniature. The wise man's life spreads out to him over as large a surface as does all eternity to a god. There is one point in which the sage has an advantage over the god; for a god is freed from terrors by the bounty of nature, the wise man by his own bounty. ~ Seneca,
1002:Septimus had no need to untie Spit Fyre as the dragon had already chewed his way through the rope. They followed Aunt Zelda and Jenna out the side door at the foot of the turret and down to the Palace Gate. Aunt Zelda kept up a brisk pace. Showing a surprising knowledge of the Castle’s narrow alleyways and sideslips, she hurtled along. Oncoming pedestrians were taken aback at the sight of the large patchwork tent approaching them at full speed. They flattened themselves against the walls, and, as the tent passed by with the Princess, the ExtraOrdinary Apprentice and a feral-looking boy with bandaged hands—not to mention a dragon—in its wake, people rubbed their eyes in disbelief. ~ Angie Sage,
1003:The Sage
Foreguarded and unfevered and serene,
Back to the perilous gates of Truth he went—
Back to fierce wisdom and the Orient,
To the Dawn that is, that shall be, and has been:
Previsioned of the madness and the mean,
He stood where Asia, crowned with ravishment,
The curtain of Love’s inner shrine had rent,
And after had gone scarred by the Unseen.
There at his touch there was a treasure chest,
And in it was a gleam, but not of gold;
And on it, like a flame, these words were scrolled:
“I keep the mintage of Eternity.
Who comes to take one coin may take the rest,
And all may come—but not without the key.”
~ Edwin Arlington Robinson,
1004:So, Zoe told me today that—” “Wait. Are you going to talk like that?”
I glanced down and realized he was referring to the fact that my shirt was sitting on the floor beside me. “My bra’s still on. What’s the problem?”
“The problem is that I’m distracted. Very distracted. If you want my undivided attention and wisdom, you’d better put the shirt back on.”
I smiled and scooted over to him. “Why, Adrian Ivashkov, are you admitting weakness?” I reached out to touch his cheek, and he caught my wrist with a fierceness that was surprisingly provocative.
“Of course. I never claimed strength in the face of your charms, Sage. I’m just an ordinary man. Now put the shirt back on. ~ Richelle Mead,
1005:All That Matters
When all that matters shall be written down
And the long record of our years is told,
Where sham, like flesh, must perish and grow cold;
When the tomb closes on our fair renown
And priest and layman, sage and motleyed clown
Must quit the places which they dearly hold,
What to our credit shall we find enscrolled?
And what shall be the jewels of our crown?
I fancy we shall hear to our surprise
Some little deeds of kindness, long forgot,
Telling our glory, and the brave and wise
Deeds which we boasted often, mentioned not.
God gave us life not just to buy and sell,
And all that matters is to live it well.
~ Edgar Albert Guest,
1006:He thought about Daniel and Lucinda.
They had embodied love for so long, as far as
the fallen angels were concerned. He wished they were beside him now, playing the role of the happy couple offering sage advice to their
suffering friend.Fight for her, they would tell him. Even
when it seems like all is lost, do not give up
the fight for love. How had Luce and Daniel done it for so
long? It took a strength Cam wasn’t sure he
had. The pain when she refused him—and, so far, almost all she did was refuse him—was staggering. And yet he went for it again and again and again. Why? To save her. To help her. Because he
loved her. Because if he gave up… He could not give up. ~ Lauren Kate,
1007:The kitchen. La cucina, the true mother country, this warm cave of the good witch deep in the desolate land of loneliness, with pots of sweet potions bubbling over the fire, a cavern of magic herbs, rosemary and thyme and sage and oregano, balm of lotus that brought sanity to lunatics, peace to the troubled, joy to the joyless, this small twenty-by-twenty world, the altar a kitchen range, the magic circle a checkered tablecloth where the children fed, the old children, lured back to their beginnings, the taste of mother's milk still haunting their memories, fragrance in the nostrils, eyes brightening, the wicked world receding as the old mother witch sheltered her brood from the wolves outside. ~ John Fante,
1008:If you recognize the genuineness of the testimony of Mary and Joanna, and realize that they became apostles, bearing witness to the risen Jesus, you have to recognize certain facts about the historical Jesus. He did not just present himself as a great teacher, a wise sage, a miracle worker, an exorcist. This inner circle knew better than that, and they were faithful to say so after the fact. The Jesus about whom the earliest disciples bore witness was and is the real Jesus of history and faith. The impact crater in the lives of these disciples, male and female, matches up with the impression Jesus deliberately left on these persons, as we will see in more detail as we turn now to Peter. ~ Ben Witherington III,
1009:If heaven loved not the wine,
A Wine Star would not be in heaven;
If earth loved not the wine,
The Wine Spring would not be on the earth.
Since heaven and earth love the wine,
Need a tippling mortal be ashamed?
The transparent wine, I hear,
Has the soothing virtue of a sage,
While the turgid is rich, they say,
As the fertile mind of the wise.
Both the sage and the wise were drinkers,
Why seek for peers among gods and goblins?
Three cups open the grand door to bliss;
Take a jugful, the universe is yours.
Such is the rapture of the wine,
That the sober shall never inherit.

by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

~ Li Bai, A Vindication
,
1010:Jusqu'à présent, lecteur, suivant l'antique usage,
Je te disais bonjour à la première page.
Mon livre, cette fois, se ferme moins gaiement ;
En vérité, ce siècle est un mauvais moment.

Tout s'en va, les plaisirs et les moeurs d'un autre âge,
Les rois, les dieux vaincus, le hasard triomphant,
Rosafinde et Suzon qui me trouvent trop sage,
Lamartine vieilli qui me traite en enfant.

La politique, hélas ! voilà notre misère.
Mes meilleurs ennemis me conseillent d'en faire.
Être rouge ce soir, blanc demain, ma foi, non.

Je veux, quand on m'a lu, qu'on puisse me relire.
Si deux noms, par hasard, s'embrouillent sur ma lyre,
Ce ne sera jamais que Ninette ou Ninon. ~ Alfred de Musset,
1011:Nous avons pénétré dans cette communauté toute pleine de ces vieilles pratiques qui semblent si nouvelles aujourd'hui. C'est le jardin fermé. Hortus conclusus. Nous avons parlé de ce lieu singulier avec détail, mais avec respect, autant du moins que le respect et le détail sont conciliables. Nous ne comprenons pas tout, mais nous n'insultons rien. Nous sommes à égale distance de l'hosanna de Joseph de Maistre qui aboutit à sacrer le bourreau et du ricanement de Voltaire qui va jusqu'à railler le crucifix. Illogisme de Voltaire, soit dit en passant; car Voltaire eût défendu Jésus comme il défendait Calas; et, pour ceux-là mêmes qui nient les incarnations surhumaines, que représente le crucifix? Le sage assassiné. ~ Victor Hugo,
1012:Sea Canaries
The small white whales in packs of pods
keep their pacts with us, the fated beasts.
They wail their songs and the water wavers,
and we who signed them waive our rights
to have them. Here is where they belong,
all right, and here is where I leave them:
their pale, bountiful bodies to the sea.
I see a pail of fish and I would rather
feed on palm wood than palm one up
to shed it to those seabirds. To bate the brink
of bygone beauty, I bring no bait. A thatch shed
on the shore would keep me closer. O idol
of the gulls and wingèd seagirls and idle guitar
players, paddle deep and far off from my kind
who peddle our wares like love-me-kindly petals.
~ C.J. Sage,
1013:Palgolak was a god of knowledge. ... He was an amiable, pleasant deity, a sage whose existence was entirely devoted to the collection, categorization, and dissemination of information. ... Palgolak's library ... did not lend books, but it did allow readers in at any time of the day or night, and there were very, very few books it did not allow access to. The Palgolaki were proselytizers, holding that everything known by a worshipper was immediately known by Palgolak, which was why they were religiously charged to read voraciously. But their mission was only secondarily for the glory of Palgolak, and primarily for the glory of knowledge, which was why they were sworn to admit all who wished to enter into their library. ~ China Mi ville,
1014:The sage of Nazareth may satisfy those who have never faced the problem of evil in their own lives; but to talk about an ideal to those who are under the thralldom of sin is a cruel mockery. Yet if Jesus was merely a man like the rest of men, then an ideal is all that we have in Him. Far more is needed by a sinful world. It is small comfort to be told that there was goodness in the world, when what we need is goodness triumphant over sin. But goodness triumphant over sin involves an entrance of the creative power of God, and that creative power of God is manifested by the miracles. Without the miracles, the New Testament might be easier to believe. But the thing that would be believed would be entirely different from ~ J Gresham Machen,
1015:I’ve just been visiting (second visit) a chap called Krishnamurti,fn105 who used to be very famous (and beautiful – he’s still beautiful age ninety-one) some time ago. He is an Indian sage, discovered as a child by the theosophists (as the ‘destined one’ etc.) and transported to Europe. In India he is a god. He teaches a kind of anti-religious quasi-mystical good way of life. I was asked to have a (videotaped for the faithful) discussion with him, which though producing little clarity interested me a lot. How very very serious human beings are in their deep assumptions about morals, mind etc. etc. (Obvious idea, but I find I lose it from time to time!) I think he is a remarkable being, though I don’t like all his talk. […] ~ Iris Murdoch,
1016:For the Communist Party, the return of class presented an opportunity: the Party came to believe that co-opting those with property would buttress it against agitation toward democracy. Officials took to quoting the ancient sage Mencius, who said, “Those with a constant livelihood have a constant heart, those lacking a constant livelihood lack a constant heart.” But relying on prosperity to ensure a “constant heart” posed a problem that would grow into the Chinese Communist Party’s essential paradox: How could the heirs of Marx and Lenin, the rulers of the People’s Republic, who had risen to power denouncing bourgeois values and inequality, baldly embrace the new moneyed class? How could it retain its ideological claim to rule? ~ Evan Osnos,
1017:But popular power is not merely ignorant. It is inevitably impure since it is anomos. Popular power harkens only to its interests and desires. It is violent: it imposes its will on everyone. It is murderous. And in a privileged fashion, it kills the sage, as the one who occupies the place where the laws speak.

Popular power is criminal in essence — criminal in relation to what, since it expresses the will of all? It is criminal in relation to nomos, to the law as foundation of the city's existence. Popular power is crime against the very nature of the city.

The sage as pure keeper of knowledge and nomos therefore has to protect the city against itself and prohibit it from governing itself. ~ Michel Foucault,
1018:Several pallets had been pulled to the middle of the open space and stacked two high with a large blanket over them. The implication stunned her – it was so unexpected, so unlike what she believed about him – her mind only registered denial.
She heard Ash bolt the door and remove his leather jacket, felt his hands on her shoulders as he turned her around to face him. He stroked her cheek with one hand while the other reached for his belt. “My sweet, innocent Sage,” he whispered, and still her thoughts could gain no traction.
There was the snap of a release from his belt, and though she continued to meet his eyes, she saw a sheathed dagger in the hand he raised between them.
“Tonight I must teach you how to kill a man. ~ Erin Beaty,
1019:It was as Frank said: the Sparrow Sisters Nursery had quite a reputation. Sally told Henry about the Nursery that was now a landmark in the town. The plants that grew in tidy rows, the orchids that swayed delicately in the beautiful glass greenhouses, and the herbs and vegetables sown in knot gardens around the land were much in demand. Sorrel had planted a dense little Shakespeare garden as a tribute to her reading habits. The lavender, rosemary, roses and honeysuckle, clematis and pansies, creeping thyme and sage were not for sale in that garden, but Sorrel would re-create versions of it for clients whose big houses on the water needed the stamp of culture, even if their owners had little idea what their lovely gardens meant. ~ Ellen Herrick,
1020:Weil ich sage: Deutschland den Deutschen und den brauchbaren Ausländern? Deshalb bin ich schon ein Rassist?'
Er wendet sich an mich. 'Sie als Deutscher, denken Sie dasselbe über mich?'
'Äh. Nein', sage ich. 'Für mich sind Sie eher wie der tragische Held in Sophokles' bekanntestem Theaterstück.'
Kurz schweigt der Mann.
'So. Ach. Hm. Nun ja', sagt er dann. 'Genau. Ein tragischer Held. So sehe ich mich auch manchmal. Na gut.'
Er stempelt ein Fragezeichen in den Pass des Kängurus.
'Dann gehen Sie mal. Aber nehmen Sie bitte ihr Maskottchen mit.'
'König Ödipus', flüstert das Känguru, als ich die Tür des Büros hinter mir zuziehe. 'Chapeau! Du hast ihn gerade auf extremst subtile einen Motherfucker genannt, Alter! ~ Marc Uwe Kling,
1021:When water is still, it is like a mirror, reflecting the beard and the eyebrows. It gives the accuracy of the water-level, and the philosopher makes it his model. And if water thus derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind? The mind of the Sage being in repose becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.22 [59a]   The fluidity of water is not the result of any effort on the part of the water, but is its natural property. And the virtue of the perfect man is such that even without cultivation there is nothing which can withdraw from his sway. Heaven is naturally high, the earth is naturally solid, the sun and moon are naturally bright. Do they cultivate these attributes?23 [63b] ~ Alan W Watts,
1022:In late August and early September, just after the first fall rain, hundreds of male tarantulas emerge from holes in the ground. They skitter through mint-scented mountain sage in search of burrows delicately draped in silk, where females are ready to mate. Visitors armed with flashlights flock to the mountain around sunset or just after dark, the best time to see the tarantulas. Bats wheel over gray pines and live oaks. Great horned owls hoot solemnly. Beams from flashlights weaving across trails sometimes catch a piece of earth that’s moving; closer inspection reveals the scuttling of saucer-size tarantulas. The male tarantulas never return to their holes. They mate as much as they can and then die, from starvation or cold. ~ Michelle McNamara,
1023:Of all things, herself seemed to herself the centre,--a small, forgotten atom of life, a spark of soul emitted inadvertent from the great creative source, and now burning unmarked to waste in the heart of a black hollow. She asked, was she thus to burn out and perish, her living light doing no good, never seen, never needed,--a star in an else starless firmament,--which nor shepherd, nor wanderer, nor sage, nor priest, tracked as a guide, or read as a prophecy? Could this be, she demanded, when the flame of her intelligence burned so vivid; when her life beat so true, and real, and potent; when something within her stirred disquieted, and restlessly asserted a God-given strength, for which she insisted she should find exercise? ~ Charlotte Bront,
1024:The Bone Keeper presides over the festival. She rules the lowest level of the Lowerworld where she keeps watch over the bones. They say she has a skull for a face,wears a skirt made of serpents,and her mouth is extra wide in order to feed off the stars during the day.And yet,despite my numerous journeys to the Lowerworld,I have yet to run into her.But maybe you will, nieta,who knows?"
"A skull faec,a snake skirt,and a steady diet of stars?" I shake my head and balk. "No thanks.I'd prefer to avoid her if it's okay with you."
"You don't always get the journey you want, nieta. Though you always get the journey you need," she says-yet another sage statement in a collection of many.
"You paraphrasing Mick Jagger now? ~ Alyson Noel,
1025:Contrary to Expectation. A wise man, the wonder of his age, taught his disciples from a seemingly inexhaustible store of wisdom. He attributed all his knowledge to a thick tome which was kept in a place of honour in his room. The sage would allow nobody to open the volume. When he died, those who had surrounded him, regarding themselves as his heirs, ran to open the book, anxious to possess what it contained. They were surprised, confused and disappointed when they found that there was writing on only one page. They became even more bewildered and then annoyed when they tried to penetrate the meaning of the phrase which met their eyes. It was: 'When you realise the difference between the container and the content, you will have knowledge. ~ Idries Shah,
1026:story of the young boy who travelled far from his home to study under a great teacher. When he met the wise old man, his first question was, 'How long will it take me before I am as wise as you?' "The response came swiftly, 'Five years.' "'This is a very long time,' the boy replied. 'How about if I work twice as hard?' '"Then it will take ten,' said the master. '"Ten! That's far too long. How about if I studied all day and well into the night, every night?' '"Fifteen years,' said the sage. "'I don't understand,' replied the boy. 'Every time I promise to devote more energy to my goal, you tell me that it will take longer. Why?' '"The answer is simple. With one eye fixed on the destination, there is only one left to guide you along the journey ~ Anonymous,
1027:Peruse this bit of sage advice from the essayist and publisher Elbert Hubbard....
Whenever you go out-of-doors, draw the chin in, carry the crown of the head high, and fill the lungs to the utmost; drink in the sunshine; greet your friends with a smile, and put soul into every hand clasp. Do not fear being misunderstood and do not waste a minute thinking about your enemies. Try to fix firmly in your mind what you would like to do; and then, without veering off direction, you will move straight to the goal. Keep your mind on the great and splendid things you would like to do, and then, as the days go gliding away, you will find yourself unconsciously seizing upon the opportunities that are required for the fulfillment of your desire.... ~ Dale Carnegie,
1028:Beautiful surroundings, the society of learned men, the charm of noble women, the graces of art, could not make up for the loss of those light-hearted mornings of the desert, for that wind that made one a boy again. He had noticed that this peculiar quality in the air of new countries vanished after they were tamed by man and made to bear harvests. Parts of Texas and Kansas that he had first known as open range had since been made into rich farming districts, and the air had quite lost that lightness, that dry, aromatic odour. The moisture of plowed land, the heaviness of labour and growth and grain-bearing, utterly destroyed it; one could breathe that only on the bright edges of the world, on the great grass plains or the sage-brush desert. ~ Willa Cather,
1029:Were you acquainted with Theo?” Cassandra asked.
“A little.”
“Did you like him?” she surprised him by asking.
“I’m afraid not,” he said. “We brawled on more than one occasion.”
“That’s what boys do,” Pandora said.
“Only bullies and lackwits,” Cassandra told her. Realizing she had inadvertently insulted Devon, she sent him an ingenuous glance. “Except for you, my lord.”
A relaxed grin crossed his mouth. “In my case, I’m afraid the description is not inaccurate.”
“The Ravenel temper,” Pandora said with a sage nod, and whispered theatrically, “we have it too.”
“Our older sister Helen is the only one who doesn’t,” Cassandra added.
“Nothing provokes her,” Pandora said. “We’ve tried ever so often, but it never works. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
1030:Hi," she said. The gloomy interior of the car lit up with a warm green glow and the scent of sage filled the air. Virginia rubbed her forefinger and thumb together, and in the mirror, Josh saw a tiny ball of green energy appear. She flicked the ball at the motorcyclist.
"You missed!" Dee snapped.
"Here,let me..."
"Patience,Doctor,patience," Virginia said.
The rubber on the bike's front tire abruptly crumbled to black powder. Spokes collapsed, the wheel buckled and the bike careered across the road, the front forks scraping a shower of sparks from the concrete. Then the bike hit the low restraining wall on the bay side of the road and the rider was catapulted over it, disappearing without a sound.
"Subtle,as always, Virginia," Dee said. ~ Michael Scott,
1031:The House Of Socrates
FOR Socrates a House was built,
Of but inferiour Size;
Not highly Arch'd, nor Carv'd, nor Gilt;
The Man, 'tis said, was Wise.
But Mob despis'd the little Cell,
That struck them with no Fear;
Whilst Others thought, there should not dwell
So great a Person there.
How shou'd a due Recourse be made
To One, so much Admir'd?
Where shou'd the spacious Cloth be laid,
Or where the Guests retir'd?
Believe me, quoth the list'ning Sage,
'Twas not to save the Charge;
That in this over-building Age,
My House was not more large.
But this for faithful Friends, and kind,
Was only meant by me;
Who fear that what too streight you find,
Must yet contracted be.
~ Anne Kingsmill Finch,
1032:There is an old lady who lives on the moon. You can see her spinning thread on her spinning wheel. Her isolation and distance from the world has made her a sage. She weaves stories. She knows every wanderer who crosses the sea grass meadows, she knows every woman who uses her blackened blue hands to grind grain in the hand mill, she is friends with the little girl who got lost in the corn fields and was never found, and she knows the story of the boy who played flute on the little hill when his lambs slept. Grandmother said that if I had been a good girl the moon lady would weave for me a magical blanket and every stitch will be made from a moment of my life, a forgotten moment, a memory. Every stitch would be special. It would be made especially for me. ~ Kanza Javed,
1033:Enoch strutted before the throne. He lifted his chin high in thought. He then spoke like a scribe would speak to his students. “This Accuser has laden his argument with so much emotional invective and blind hatred that one can only wonder where he received his credentials. I am not aware of any apkallu wisdom sage on earth or in heaven who teaches insulting, appeals to pity, appeals to force, and popular sentiment, false dilemmas, slippery slopes, equivocation and question begging as actual legal strategy.” That was good, thought Enoch. He did not hear the expected chuckles from the divine witnesses. But then again, they did follow strict rules of sobriety in trials. All his years of being an apkallu were bearing fruit in him now. It was as if it were all ~ Brian Godawa,
1034:Maxi’s Tart (Lady Honey de Shera’s special tart recipe for Maximus who was, in fact, a finicky eater as a child. Guaranteed to make all future knights very happy with full tummies)   4 Tbsp. butter, melted  1/2 tsp. salt  pinch saffron  6 eggs  1/2 medium onion, coarsely chopped  1/2 lb. soft cheese, grated  1/2 cup currants   1 Tbsp. honey  1 tsp. parsley  1 tsp. sage  1 tsp. hyssop (this is an herb with a minty-ish taste) 1 tsp. powder douce (equal parts ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves) Grind saffron with salt, mix with butter, and set aside. Place onions into boiling beef broth and cook until just tender and drain. Beat eggs and combine with saffron-butter, onions, and remaining ingredients, pour into pastry shell, and bake at 350°F for one hour. ~ Kathryn Le Veque,
1035:Cilantro: eat half a cup a day of this herb as-is, sprinkled on salads, or in a smoothie. Parsley: eat a quarter cup a day of this herb as-is, sprinkled on salads, or in a smoothie. Zeolite: buy this mineralized clay in liquid form. Spirulina (preferably from Hawaii): if it’s in powder form (which is best for removal of metals from the gut), mix one teaspoon daily into water or a smoothie. Garlic: eat two fresh cloves a day. Sage: eat two tablespoons a day. L-glutamine: if it’s in powder form (which is preferable for removal of metals from the gut), mix one teaspoon daily into water or a smoothie. Plantain leaf: brew this herb to make tea and drink a cup a day. Red clover blossom: brew two tablespoons of these flower blossoms to make two cups of tea a day. ~ Anthony William,
1036:Action and Non-Action

The non-action of the wise man is not inaction.
It is not studied. It is not shaken by anything.
The sage is quiet because he is not moved,
Not because he wills to be quiet . . .

From emptiness comes the unconditioned,
From this the conditioned, the individual things.
So from the sage's emptiness, stillness arises;
From stillness, action. From action, attainment.
From their stillness comes their non-action, which is also action
And is, therefore, their attainment.
For stillness is joy. Joy is free from care
Fruitful in long years.

Joy does all things without concern:
For emptiness, stillness, tranquility, tastelessness,
Silence, and non-action
Are the root of all things. ~ Thomas Merton,
1037:If a man approaches a fact in the world around him with a judgment arising from his previous experiences, he shuts himself off by this judgment from the quiet, complete effect which this fact can have on him. The learner must be able each moment to make himself a perfectly empty vessel into which the new world flows. Knowledge is received only in those moments in which every judgment, every criticism coming from ourselves, is silent. For example, when we meet a person, the question is not at all whether we are wiser than he. Even the most unreasoning child has something to reveal to the greatest sage. And if he approach the child with his prejudgment, be it ever so wise, he pushes his wisdom like a dulled glass in front of what the child ought to reveal to him. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
1038:Even to speak to a very well-known person is always an action that is in some respects new. The person to whom you speak— her costume, her physiognomy, the subject of the discourse—all that changes. " One never bathes twice in the same water," said the old sage. The universe changes incessantly, and whatever be the apparent identity of the circumstances in which we are placed, there is always a change, either without or within ourselves; a change which demands a new adaptation on our part, a new effort. Since the future is never the exact repetition of the past, a conscious act is never completely automatic. We must always make some effort, invent, even exert, our will somewhat, to perform the most habitual act; and when Marcelle's will goes down to a degree reall}?^ ~ Anonymous,
1039:Fawn Ghazal
Inside a snowy blanket which put the trees to sleep,
I heard a fawn.
Out past the window's ice coat in the morning, I
found a sleeping fawn.
There are men in yellow kitchens watching hands of
brown-eyed women
while men in orange jackets dream in secret, of
capturing a fawn.
When I was younger I was taught, but have forgotten,
sweet timidity.
When I am older I will learn, by necessity, the
light-footedness of fawns.
Someone left a lily on my doorstep, eggshell white
with speckled leaves;
the card of introduction said the flower's name was
Fawn.
Sages wonder if it's possible for men to turn to
animals.
I wonder if they've pondered the agility of fawns.
Submitted by Joe Shields
~ C.J. Sage,
1040:6:1 Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of others. Ancient speakers and writers would sometimes state a thesis and then develop it with illustrations; Jesus illustrates this thesis with examples from charity (vv. 2–4), prayer (vv. 5–15), and fasting (vv. 16–18). Because sages offered riddles and statements meant to provoke thought rather than systematic outlines of their beliefs, some of a sage’s statements could appear to be in tension with some of his other statements. Jesus provokes thought in the tension between 5:16 and the command here in v. 1: the difference is whom one seeks to honor. (Note that the Greek term translated “honored” in v. 2 is the same Greek term translated “glorify” in 5:16.) 6:2 Truly I tell you. See note on 5:18. Givers did not ~ Anonymous,
1041:And yet everyone goes toward one and the same
thing, at least everyone strives for one and the same thing, from the sage to the
last robber, only by different paths. This is an old truth, but what is new here is
this: I cannot get very confused. Because I saw the truth, I saw and I know that
people can be beautiful and happy without losing the ability to live on earth. I will
not and cannot believe that evil is the normal condition of people. And they all
laugh merely at this belief of mine. But how can I not believe: I saw the truth -
it’s not that my mind invented it, but I saw it, I saw it, and its living image filled
my soul for all time. I saw it in such fulfilled wholeness that I cannot believe it is
impossible for people to have it. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
1042:The Chinese sage Mencius made the analogy between morality and food 2,300 years ago when he wrote that “moral principles please our minds as beef and mutton and pork please our mouths.”4 In this chapter and the next two, I’ll develop the analogy that the righteous mind is like a tongue with six taste receptors. In this analogy, morality is like cuisine: it’s a cultural construction, influenced by accidents of environment and history, but it’s not so flexible that anything goes. You can’t have a cuisine based on tree bark, nor can you have one based primarily on bitter tastes. Cuisines vary, but they all must please tongues equipped with the same five taste receptors.5 Moral matrices vary, but they all must please righteous minds equipped with the same six social receptors. ~ Jonathan Haidt,
1043:Between the sky and the egg-shaped, egg-smooth granite boulder that floats out in the middle of the meadow’s widest field, everything has its own green: cattails, willow leaves, the flip side of an aspen leaf, the gray-green sage, the yellow-green native pasture, the loden timber, all circling around, with that boulder at the center, as if the meadow were a green ear held up to listen to the sky’s blue, and there is an axis drawn between the boulder and the sun. Elsewhere on the mountain, most of the green stays locked in pines, the prairie is scorched yellow. But Lyle’s meadow is a hemorrhage of green, and a green clockwork of waterways and grasses, held up to the sky in its ring of ridges, held up for the sky to listen, too. The granite boulder is only there to hold it down. ~ James Galvin,
1044:The banquet proceeded. The first course, a mince of olives, shrimp and onions baked in oyster shells with cheese and parsley was followed by a soup of tunny, cockles and winkles simmered in white wine with leeks and dill. Then, in order, came a service of broiled quail stuffed with morels, served on slices of good white bread, with side dishes of green peas; artichokes cooked in wine and butter, with a salad of garden greens; then tripes and sausages with pickled cabbage; then a noble saddle of venison glazed with cherry sauce and served with barley first simmered in broth, then fried with garlic and sage; then honey-cakes, nuts and oranges; and all the while the goblets flowed full with noble Voluspa and San Sue from Watershade, along with the tart green muscat wine of Dascinet. ~ Jack Vance,
1045:If you went twenty-four hours without cigarettes, I'd drink a can of pop. Regular pop. The whole can."
Isaw the glimmer of Adrian's earlier smile returning. "You would not."
"I totally would."
"Half a can would put you into a coma."
Sonya frowned. "Are you diabetic?" she asked me.
"No," said Adrian, "but Sage is convinced one extraneous calorie will make her go from super skinny to just regular skinny. Tragedy."
"Hey," I said. "You think it’d be a tragedy to go an hour without a cigarette."
"Don’t question my steel resolve, Sage. I went without one for two hours today."
"Show me twenty-four, and then I’ll be impressed."
He gave me a look of mock surprise. "You mean you aren’t already? And here I thought you were dazzled from the moment you met me. ~ Richelle Mead,
1046:BEET HUMMUS 3-4 large beets, preferably red 2 sprigs thyme 1 tsp. rubbed sage 3 Tbsp. olive oil, divided 6 cloves garlic, chopped and divided Juice from 1 lemon 1 Tbsp. tahini 1 (15 oz.) can Northern beans Salt, to taste Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Skin the beets with a vegetable peeler and chop into quarters. Place on a roasting sheet with the thyme, sage, a tablespoon of oil and about › of the chopped garlic. Cover with foil and roast until soft, about 40 minutes. Place the roasted beets in a food processor along with the remaining garlic and olive oil, as well as the lemon juice. Pulse until pureed and add the tahini, beans and a hearty pinch of salt. Pulse to combine, and then taste. Add additional salt, lemon juice or garlic to taste. Makes about 3 cups. Serve with sliced baguette. ~ Anonymous,
1047:So what does all this mean if you desperately want to persuade someone who doesn’t want to be persuaded?

The first step is to appreciate that your opponent’s opinion is likely based less on fact and logic than on ideology and herd thinking. If you were to suggest this to his face, he would of course deny it. He is operating from a set of biases he cannot even see. As the behavioral sage Daniel Kahneman has written: “We can be blind to the obvious, and we are also blind to our blindness.” Few of us are immune to this blind spot. That goes for you, and that goes for the two of us as well. And so, as the basketball legend-cum-philosopher Kareem Abdul-Jabbar once put it, “It’s easier to jump out of a plane—hopefully with a parachute—than it is to change your mind about an opinion. ~ Steven D Levitt,
1048:Despair could never touch a morning like this.
The air was cool, and smelled of sage. It had the clarity that comes to Southern California only after a Santa Ana wind has blown all haze and history out to sea — air like telescopic glass, so that the snowcapped San Gabriela seemed near enough to touch, though they were forty miles away. The flanks of the blue foothills revealed the etching of every ravine, and beneath the foothills, stretching to the sea, the broad coastal plain seemed nothing but treetops: groves of orange, avocado, lemon, olive; windbreaks of eucalyptus and palm; ornamentals of a thousand different varieties, both natural and genetically engineered. It was as if the whole plain were a garden run riot, with the dawn sun flushing the landscape every shade of green. ~ Kim Stanley Robinson,
1049:I can't tell you how many times over the years people tried to give me soy cheese and tempeh fake-meat, and other ickiness and pass it off as yummy. I'm sorry but no, you cannot make vegetable protein taste like bacon, no matter how much salt and liquid smoke you put in it! I wanted to celebrate good food, prepared in ways that make it good for you, which is surprisingly easy to do if you know the basics. If you use exceptional products that have inherent natural goodness, you don't need to swamp them in butter or cream to make them taste good." For dinner we'd had grilled skirt steaks, spicy Thai sesame noodles from my friend Doug's recipe, braised cauliflower, and for dessert, poached pears and Greek yogurt with lavender flowers and black sage honey. Filling, balanced, nutritionally sound. ~ Stacey Ballis,
1050:The Cattle Country
Up the dusk-enfolded prairie,
Foot-falls, soft and sly,
Velvet cushioned, wild and wary,
Then--the coyote's cry.
Rush of hoofs, and roar and rattle,
Beasts of blood and breed,
Twenty thousand frightened cattle,
Then--the wild stampede.
Pliant lasso circling wider
In the frenzied flight-Loping horse and cursing rider,
Plunging through the night.
Rim of dawn the darkness losing
Trail of blackened soil;
Perfume of the sage brush oozing
On the air like oil.
Foothills to the Rockies lifting
Brown, and blue, and green,
Warm Alberta sunlight drifting
Over leagues between.
That's the country of the ranges,
Plain and prairie land,
And the God who never changes
Holds it in His hand.
~ Emily Pauline Johnson,
1051:Netanyahu concludes: “We agree with that clear-sighted scholar who said, unreservedly, in plain language: ‘Anti-Semitism was born in Egypt.’” His book shows that motivating the Inquisition in Spain was not hostility to Jewish religion but rage against the superior effectiveness and ascendancy of Jews outperforming established clerics as Christians. “New Christians,” mostly Jewish, were taking over the Spanish church by being more learned, eloquent, devout, resourceful, and charismatic than Christian leaders. As Netanyahu writes, “The struggle against the Jews was essentially motivated by social and economic, rather than religious considerations . . .” For all their sage observations, Prager and Telushkin miss the heart of the matter, which is Jewish intellectual and entrepreneurial superiority. ~ George Gilder,
1052:If there is any intelligence guiding this universe, philosophy wishes to know and understand it and reverently work with it; if there is none, philosophy wishes to know that also, and face it without fear. If the stars are but transient coagulations of haphazard nebulae, if life is a colloidal accident, impersonally permanent and individually fleeting, if man is only a compound of chemicals, destined to disintegrate and utterly disappear, if the creative ecstasy of art, and the gentle wisdom of the sage, and the willing martyrdom of saints are but bright incidents in the protoplasmic pullulation of the earth, and death is the answer to every problem and the destiny of every soul--then philosophy will face that too, and try to find within that narrowed circle some significance and nobility for man. ~ Will Durant,
1053:Let me be accursed. Let me be vile and base, only let me kiss the hem of the veil in which my God is shrouded. Though I may be following the devil, I am Thy son, O Lord, and I love Thee, and I feel the joy without which the world cannot stand. Joy everlasting fostereth The soul of all creation, It is her secret ferment fires The cup of life with flame. 'Tis at her beck the grass hath turned Each blade towards the light And solar systems have evolved From chaos and dark night, Filling the realms of boundless space Beyond the sage's sight. At bounteous Nature's kindly breast, All things that breathe drink Joy, And birds and beasts and creeping things All follow where She leads. Her gifts to man are friends in need, The wreath, the foaming must, To angels- vision of God's throne, To insects- sensual lust. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
1054:However mean your life is, meet and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. It is not so bad as you are. It looks poorest when you are richest. The fault-finder will find faults even in paradise. Love your life, poor as it is. You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poorhouse. The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man’s abode; the snow melts before its doors as early in the spring. Cultivate property like a garden herb, like sage. Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. Turn the old; return to them. Things do not change; we change. Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts… Superfluous wealth can buy superfluities only. Money is not required to buy one necessary of the soul. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1055:Tous les grands divertissement sont dangereux [...]; mais entre tous ceux que le monde a inventés, il n'y en a point qui soit plus à craindre que la comedie. C'est une représentation si naturelle et si délicate des passions, qu'elle les émeut et les fait naitre dans notre coeur, et surtout celle de l'amour; principalement lorsqu'on le représente fort chaste et fort honnete. Car plus il parait innocent aux ames innocentes, plus elles sont capables d'en etre touchées; sa violence plait a notre amour-propre, qui forme un desir de causer les memes effets, que l'on voit si bien représentes; et l'on se fait en meme temps une conscience fondée sur l'honneteté des sentiments qu'on y voit, qui otent la crainte des ames pures, qui s'imaginent que ce n'est pas blesser la pureté, d'aimer d'un amour qui leur semble si sage. ~ Blaise Pascal,
1056:And then . . . we’re going to get in my car.”

I waited for him to elaborate on a destination. “And?”

He gently kissed the nape of my neck. “What do you think?”

I couldn’t help a small gasp of delight. “Oh, wow.”

“I know, right? I was racking my brain for the best present ever, and then I realized that nothing was going to rock your world more than you and me in your favorite place in the entire world.”

I swallowed. “I’m kind of embarrassed at how excited I am about that.” Never had I guessed my love of cars would play a role in my sex life. Eddie was right. Something had happened to me.

“It’s okay, Sage. We’ve all got our turn-ons.”

“You kind of ruined the surprise, though.”

“Nah. It’s part of the gift: you getting to think about it for the next three days. ~ Richelle Mead,
1057:11:29 Take my yoke . . . find rest. Only the poorest people would use a yoke to pull their loads. When used figuratively, a yoke represented slavery or submission; Jewish teachers spoke of bearing the yoke of God’s kingdom, through the yoke of the law. Only God would call the yoke of the kingdom or of the law “my yoke.” A sage before Jesus’ era said, “Come near me, you who are unlearned . . . Get wisdom, put your neck under her yoke . . . Look with your eyes: I have labored only a little and I have found for myself great rest” (Sirach 51:23–27). Jesus evokes such words, but whereas the earlier sage referred to wisdom’s yoke, Jesus speaks of his own. Those who turned back to God’s ways would find rest for their souls (Jer 6:16). Jesus’ understanding of rest (v. 28) clearly differs from that of the Pharisees (12:1–14). ~ Anonymous,
1058:    The river and sea can be kings of                          the hundred valley streams                because they are good at lying below them. For this reason,     They can be kings of the hundred valley streams. For this reason, too,     If the sage wants to be above the people,                in his words, he must put himself below them;     If he wishes to be before the people,                in his person, he must stand behind them. Therefore,     He is situated in front of the people,                but they are not offended;     He is situated above the people,                but they do not consider him a burden.     All under heaven happily push him forward without                          wearying.     Is this not because he is without contention? Therefore,     No one under heaven can contend with him. ~ Victor H Mair,
1059:To J.W.
Set not thy foot on graves;
Hear what wine and roses say;
The mountain chase, the summer waves,
The crowded town, thy feet may well delay.

Set not thy foot on graves;
Nor seek to unwind the shroud
Which charitable time
And nature have allowed
To wrap the errors of a sage sublime.

Set not thy foot on graves;
Care not to strip the dead
Of his sad ornament;
His myrrh, and wine, and rings,
His sheet of lead,
And trophies buried;
Go get them where he earned them when alive,
As resolutely dig or dive.

Life is too short to waste
The critic bite or cynic bark,
Quarrel, or reprimand;
'Twill soon be dark;
Up! mind thine own aim, and
God speed the mark.
by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, To J.W.
,
1060:It comes out from no source, it goes back in through no aperture. It has reality yet no place where it resides; it has duration yet no beginning or end. Something emerges, though through no aperture - this refers to the fact that it has reality. It has reality yet there is no place where it resides - this refers to the dimension of space. It has duration but no beginning or end - this refers to the dimension of time. There is life, there is death, there is a coming out, there is a going back in - yet in the coming out and going back its form is never seen. This is called the Heavenly Gate. The Heavenly Gate is nonbeing. The ten thousand things come forth from nonbeing. Being cannot create being out of being; inevitably it must come forth from nonbeing. Nonbeing is absolute nonbeing, and it is here that the sage hides himself. ~ Zhuangzi,
1061:For the primo piatto, the chef had chosen to serve a dish he called gnocchi- small dumplings made with potato flour. It was an unusual dish as potatoes were a rarity from the New World and largely unknown. The gnocchi were simply dressed in browned butter and sage and then dusted with freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano. It was a plain presentation with no garnish, and it was accompanied by a white table wine of no special distinction.
My mouth watered as I carried the gnocchi up to the dining room. I'd tasted one dumpling in the kitchen, and I loved the earthy flavor as well as the way it resisted when I sank my teeth in. The butter and sage coated my mouth so that the taste lasted even after I swallowed. I liked the way it felt in my stomach, solid and nourishing, and I looked forward to learning how to make it. ~ Elle Newmark,
1062:I hacked an old Crock-Pot and turned it into a sous vide machine, and did a turkey breast, and then seared the skin on the stovetop, so it is totally crispy, but the meat is BEYOND juicy. And the stuffing is a combination of homemade corn bread, homemade buttermilk biscuits, and brioche, with sage and thyme and celery and onion and shallot. And I tried the Robuchon Pommes Puree, and thought that there was no way to put THAT much butter into that much potato, but holy moley is it amazeballs! And I did a butternut squash soup with fried ginger and almond cake with apple compote." All the bustle has roused Volnay, who wanders over to greet Benji, and receives a dog biscuit for her trouble from Eloise.
"Honey, breathe a little," I say, laughing.
"It's just... I... I mean... THANKSGIVING!" he says, which cracks us all up. ~ Stacey Ballis,
1063:The two thought themselves alone. But all the while, one watched with the night-wide eyes of love. While they paced the pebbled paths between the silent flowers’ spiked arrays, sage Thyme spied upon each pale sigh, peeping between bloom and leaf. And while they sat side by side and hand in hand on the stained stone bench beneath the spreading wisteria, Thyme watched unwinking from the midnight face of the mute sundial. And while they lay lazy on the soft grass, swearing the sweet oaths of love and longing, and whispering as they parted that though long lives might pass like a night and the New Sun sunder the centuries, yet never should they ever part, Thyme crept and cried, counting seconds that spilled with the sand from the hourglass, and scenting the soft breezes that cooled the child’s burning cheek with his sad spice. The ~ Gene Wolfe,
1064:Who in this world can understand what Mother Kali really is? The six systems of philosophy remain powerless to describe Her. She is the inmost awareness of the sage who realizes that Consciousness alone exists. She is the life blossoming within the creatures of the universe. Both macrocosm and microcosm are lost within Mother's Womb. Now can you sense how indescribable She is? The yogi meditates upon Her in the six subtle nerve centers as She sports with delight through the lotus wilderness of the pristine human body, playing with Her Consort, Shiva, the Great Swan. When anyone attempts to know Her, the singer of this song laughs. Can you swim across a shoreless ocean? Yet the child in me still reaches out to touch the moon. [1146.jpg] -- from Great Swan: Meetings with Ramakrishna, by Lex Hixon

~ Ramprasad, Who in this world
,
1065:I hate wise men because they are lazy, cowardly, and prudent. To the philosophers' equanimity, which makes them indifferent to both pleasure and pain, I prefer devouring passions. The sage knows neither the tragedy of passion, nor the fear of death, nor risk and enthusiasm, nor barbaric, grotesque, or sublime heroism. He talks in proverbs and gives advice. He does not live, feel, desire, wait for anything. He levels down all the incongruities of life and then suffers the consequences. So much more complex is the man who suffers from limitless anxiety. The wise man's life is empty and sterile, for it is free from contradiction and despair. An existence full of irreconcilable contradictions is so much richer and creative. The wise man's resignation springs from inner void, not inner fire. I would rather die of fire than of void. ~ Emil M Cioran,
1066:But how shall an Occidental mind ever understand the Orient? Eight
years of study and travel have only made this, too, more evident that not
even a lifetime of devoted scholarship would suffice to initiate a Western
student into the subtle character and secret lore of the East. Every chap-
ter, every paragraph in this book will offend or amuse some patriotic or
esoteric soul: the orthodox Jew will need all his ancient patience to forgive
the pages on Yahveh; the metaphysical Hindu will mourn this superficial
scratching of Indian philosophy; and the Chinese or Japanese sage will
smile indulgently at these brief and inadequate selections from the wealth
of Far Eastern literature and thought. Some of the errors in the chapter on
Judea have been corrected by Professor Harry Wolf son of Harvard; ~ Will Durant,
1067:Sage, I distinctly remember every part of that night. You didn’t seem that unwilling. You were practically on top of me.”
“I don’t really remember the details,” I lied.
He moved his hand from my neck and rested a fingertip on my lips. “But I’ll stick to just kissing these if it makes you feel better. No mark.” He started to lean toward me, and I jerked away.
“You will not! It’s wrong.”
“What, kissing you, or kissing you in Pies and Stuff?”
“Both,” I said, feeling my cheeks burn. “If you’re going to attempt something inappropriate—something you said you wouldn’t do anymore—then you could at least pick a better place.”
He laughed softly, and the look in his eyes confused me further. “Okay,” he said. “The next time I kiss you, I promise it’ll be in a more romantic place.”
“I—what? No! You shouldn’t try at all! ~ Richelle Mead,
1068:One of the first things I discovered was that Paul did not write all the letters attributed to him in the New Testament. Only seven of them are judged by scholars to be authentic: 1 Thessalonians, Galatians, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Philippians, Philemon, and Romans. The rest—Colossians, Ephesians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 and 2 Timothy, and Titus, known as the Deutero-Pauline letters—were written in his name after his death, some as late as the second century. These were not forgeries in our sense; it was common in the ancient world to write under the pseudonym of an admired sage or philosopher. These posthumous epistles tried to rein Paul in and make his radical teachings more acceptable to the Greco-Roman world. It was these later writers who insisted that women be subservient to their husbands and that slaves must obey their masters. ~ Karen Armstrong,
1069:A Tardy Apology
You ask me, friend,
Why I don't send
The long since due-and-paid-for numbers;
Why, songless, I
As drunken lie
Abandoned to Lethean slumbers.
Long time ago
(As well you know)
I started in upon that carmen;
My work was vain,-But why complain?
When gods forbid, how helpless are men!
Some ages back,
The sage Anack
Courted a frisky Samian body,
Singing her praise
In metered phrase
As flowing as his bowls of toddy.
Till I was hoarse
Might I discourse
Upon the cruelties of Venus;
'T were waste of time
As well of rhyme,
For you've been there yourself, Maecenas!
Perfect your bliss
If some fair miss
Love you yourself and _not_ your minae;
I, fortune's sport,
All vainly court
The beauteous, polyandrous Phryne!
~ Eugene Field,
1070:11. The Ultimate Boon:The gods and goddesses then are to be understood as embodiments and custodians of the elixir of Imperishable Being but not themselves the Ultimate in its primary state. What the hero seeks through his intercourse with them is therefore not finally themselves, but their grace, i.e., the power of their sustaining substance. This miraculous energy-substance and this alone is the Imperishable; the names and forms of the deities who everywhere embody, dispense, and represent it come and go. This is the miraculous energy of the thunderbolts of Zeus, Yahweh, and the Supreme Buddha, the fertility of the rain of Viracocha, the virtue announced by the bell rung in the Mass at the consecration, and the light of the ultimate illumination of the saint and sage. Its guardians dare release it only to the duly proven. ~ Joseph Campbell,
1071:You wanna know if I'm religious? I sure haven't made a dent in the pew, but boy do I thank God. For ever morning I get to wake up and my coffee's hot and your mom's right there next to me at the breakfast table. I thank God I get to work this ranch for a living instead of having to put on a necktie and commute to some office. I get to smell sage and pinon instead of traffic exhaust. Somebody or something made a beautiful place in this ugly world, and saw fit to put me right in the middle of it. Now, whether there's some old fella with a beard floating on a cloud up there or just some...cosmic energy or whatnot, I got no idea. But whatever God is, wherever He lives, I thank Him because, I tell you what, I can look back on every minute of it, good and bad, and I can tell you that I've had one hell of a life. Pardon my French" -Walter ~ Meagan Brothers,
1072:Die Gründe, sich zu empören, sind heutzutage oft nicht klar auszumachen – die Welt ist zu komplex geworden. Wer befiehlt, wer entscheidet? Es ist nicht immer leicht, zwischen all den Einflüssen zu unterscheiden, denen wir ausgesetzt sind. Wir haben es nicht mehr nur mit einer kleinen Oberschicht zu tun, deren Tun und Treiben wir ohne weiteres verstehen. Die Welt ist groß, wir spüren die Interdependenzen, leben in Kreuz- und Querverbindungen wie noch nie. Um wahrzunehmen, dass es in dieser Welt auch unerträglich zugeht, muss man genau hinsehen, muss man suchen. Ich sage den Jungen: Wenn ihr sucht, werdet ihr finden. „Ohne mich“ ist das Schlimmste, was man sich und der Welt antun kann. Den „Ohne mich“-Typen ist eines der absolut konstitutiven Merkmale des Menschen abhanden gekommen: die Fähigkeit zur Empörung und damit zum Engagement. ~ St phane Hessel,
1073:Reading is a sage way to bump up against life. Reading may be an escape, but it is not an escape from my own life and problems.  It is an escape from the narrow boundaries of being only me. Reading in some wonderful ways helps me find out who I am. When she was a young girl Patricia MacLachlan's mother encouraged her to "read a book and find out who you are." And it is true that in some ways reading defines me as it refines me. Reading enlarges my vision of the world; it helps me understand someone who is different from me. It makes me bigger on the inside. We tend to see the world from our own perspective; it is good to see it from the eyes of others. Good literature helps me understand who I am in relation to what others experience. Far from being an escape from reality, good literature is a window into reality. I read to feel life. ~ Gladys M Hunt,
1074:According to the Stoics therefore a man is free if his desires are not thwarted. However, if we only desire what is within our control, then we can never be frustrated, and our freedom is guaranteed regardless of circumstances. By contrast, if we desire things which are potentially outside our control, then we become slaves to fortune and to our passions. Perhaps worse, if someone else controls what we desire, then we effectively become enslaved to that person. The Stoics liked to discuss examples of wise men defying tyrants. The majority of people can be controlled by tyrants who may be able to threaten their lives or seize their property, the things they desire to keep. However, the perfect Sage views these as ‘indifferent’, and so the tyrant can lay his hands on nothing that the Sage desires, nor expose him to anything he fears. ~ Donald J Robertson,
1075:In the life of an individual man, virtue is the sole good; such things as health, happiness, possessions, are of no account. Since virtue resides in the will, everything really good or bad in a man's life depends only upon himself. He may become poor, but what of it? He can still be virtuous. A tyrant may put him in prison, but he can still persevere in living in harmony with Nature. He may be sentenced to death, but he can die nobly, like Socrates. Other men have power only over externals; virtue, which alone is truly good, rests entirely with the individual. Therefore every man has perfect freedom, provided he emancipates himself from mundane desires. It is only through false judgments that such desires prevail; the sage whose judgments are true is master of his fate in all that he values, since no outside force can deprive him of virtue. ~ Anonymous,
1076:The sage of Nazareth may satisfy those who have never faced the problem of evil in their own lives; but to talk about an ideal to those who are under the thralldom of sin is a cruel mockery. Yet if Jesus was merely a man like the rest of men, then an ideal is all that we have in Him. Far more is needed by a sinful world. It is small comfort to be told that there was goodness in the world, when what we need is goodness triumphant over sin. But goodness triumphant over sin involves an entrance of the creative power of God, and that creative power of God is manifested by the miracles. Without the miracles, the New Testament might be easier to believe. But the thing that would be believed would be entirely different from that which presents itself to us now. Without the miracles we should have a teacher; with the miracles we have a Savior. ~ J Gresham Machen,
1077:Once on a time, La Mancha's knight, they say,
A certain bard encount'ring on the way,
Discours'd in terms as just, with looks as sage,
As e'er could Dennis of the Grecian stage;
Concluding all were desp'rate sots and fools,
Who durst depart from Aristotle's rules.
Our author, happy in a judge so nice,
Produc'd his play, and begg'd the knight's advice,
Made him observe the subject and the plot,
The manners, passions, unities, what not?
All which, exact to rule, were brought about,
Were but a combat in the lists left out.
"What! leave the combat out?" exclaims the knight;
"Yes, or we must renounce the Stagirite."
"Not so by Heav'n" (he answers in a rage)
"Knights, squires, and steeds, must enter on the stage."
So vast a throng the stage can ne'er contain.
"Then build a new, or act it in a plain. ~ Alexander Pope,
1078:Success and failure? No known address. This or that goes on, depending on the other. And who can say if Milord Shao was happier ruling a city, or sacked, his excellent melon patch? Hot, cold, summer, winter: don't they alternate? Mayn't a man's way wander on just so? Yes, those who "get there" know their opportunities... have learned to untie the knots of knowledge. But was it the notable or the notorious that our Sage spoke of? The latter he called opportunists. Those who get there, doubtless, know doubt nor care no more. Yet, doubt you not, nor do dead generals, who plotted carefully at what seemed opportune, and knew naught, right or wrong. If, of a sudden, you're offered fine wine, let the sun sink. Enjoy it. [2275.jpg] -- from The Shambhala Anthology of Chinese Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Tao Chien, Success and failure? No known address
,
1079:The Egret Floating
I was suddenly back in bristles
when I saw the egret floating,
a stretched spline thrown down
or just knocked off. The threat
was to crack my code,
that back and forth convention
of the highway. From that throne
of all-leaned-back, the chute
was dropping.
Now a huge, drowsy brood
of snowies spangles the cove;
now the self falls absent from the car.
An unbroken seed-head.
Shoots tossed outward. A solar
system. To build planets here,
one forms galactically internal legalese.
The willows go mass-hysterical,
dragging their bodies down.
There is a teeter, and talk somewhere
of legal easement, and then a flush
of waves. Then it’s time
to stirrup in and lean.
I am racing along. I am in the current.
I am knee-deep not stirring up the water.
~ C.J. Sage,
1080:The allure of unthinking animal bliss is powerful; it always calls to us, in the same way as the edge of a cliff or the waves of the ocean: Jump. It is a necessary part of our natures, full of delight and danger in equal measure. Yet to the mind trained in language, taught to spy subtleties and take joy in them, such crude, baser matters can pale after a while. But there lies grave peril also: The propensity to empathize with pain expressed in words encourages a poet to avoid the real thing, and a too-passionate love of books can mew one in a cloister, putting up walls where there should be free range. I decided long ago—to keep myself sane amongst the illiterate and unthinking—that there would be poetry in my life. But there would also be fucking. I would have them both, but follow the sage advice of modern beer commercials and enjoy responsibly. ~ Kevin Hearne,
1081:She keeps walking, so I keep following, making our way down a stone path that leads to a set of tiered gardens. It is magical back here, garden after garden, the first filled with herbs like Mama grows, rosemary and lavender and mint and sage. Beyond that is a rose garden. There must be fifty rosebushes in it, all with different-colored blooms. We keep walking, down to the third tier, where there are tended beds like Daddy's vegetable patch in our backyard.
"Look at this," Keisha says. She stands beside row upon row of little green plants with thick green leaves. She kneels beside one of them and pulls back a leaf. There are small red strawberries growing underneath. She picks one and hands it to me. I've never eaten a strawberry that tastes like this before. It's so rich, with juice like honey. It's nothing like the ones Mama buys at Kroger. ~ Susan Rebecca White,
1082:Then tell me,” I said, “O, Wise Arrow, most dear to all manner of trees, how do we get to the Cave of Trophonius? And how do Meg and I survive?” The arrow’s fletching rippled. THOU SHALT TAKE A CAR. “That’s it?” LEAVEST THOU WELL BEFORE DAWN. ’TIS A COUNTER-COMMUTE, AYE, BUT THERE SHALL BE CONSTRUCTION ON HIGHWAY THIRTY-SEVEN. EXPECTEST THOU TO TRAVEL ONE HOUR AND FORTY-TWO MINUTES. I narrowed my eyes. “Are you somehow…checking Google Maps?” A long pause. OF COURSE NOT. FIE UPON YOU. AS FOR HOW THOU SHALT SURVIVE, ASK ME THIS ANON, WHEN THOU REACHEST THY DESTINATION. “Meaning you need time to research the Cave of Trophonius on Wikipedia?” I SHALL SAY NO MORE TO YOU, BASE VILLAIN! THOU ART NOT WORTHY OF MY SAGE ADVICE! “I’m not worthy?” I picked up the arrow and shook it. “You’re no help at all, you useless piece of—!” “Apollo?” Calypso stood in the doorway. ~ Rick Riordan,
1083:Kleine Pause, damit ich die nächsten Worte, die mir, nicht einzeln, doch in ihrer Abfolge, aus gewissen, persönlichen Gründen heilig sind, mit dem entsprechenden Raum sprechen kann:
Manchmal, sage ich, bin ich von Liebe und Hingabe ganz erfüllt. So ganz und gar, dass ich fast aufhöre, ich zu sein. Meine Sehnsucht, sie zu sehen und zu verstehen, ist so groß, dass ich mir wünsche, die Luft zwischen ihnen zu sein, dass sie mich einatmen und ich eins mit ihnen werde bis hinunter in die letzte Zelle. Ein anderes Mal bin ich wiederum so überschwemmt von Ekel, wenn ich sie vor mir sehe, diese Kadavermünder, wie sie essen und trinken und reden, und alles in ihnen wird zu Morast und Lüge, und ich fühle, wenn ich mir das noch einen Augenblick länger ansehen und anhören muss, werde ich auf das nächstbeste Gesicht so lange einprügeln, bis nichts mehr davon übrig ist. ~ Ter zia Mora,
1084:Man muß alt werden [...] und Geld genug haben, seine Erfahrungen bezahlen zu können. Jedes Bonmot, das ich sage, kostet mir eine Börse voll Gold; eine halbe Million meines Privatvermögens ist durch meine Hände gegangen, um das zu lernen, was ich jetzt weiß, nicht allein das ganze Vermögen meines Vaters, sondern auch mein Gehalt und mein bedeutendes literarisches Einkommen seit mehr als funfzig Jahren. Außerdem habe ich anderthalb Millionen zu großen Zwecken von fürstlichen Personen ausgeben sehen, denen ich nahe
verbunden war und an deren Schritten, Gelingen und Mißlingen ich teilnahm.

Es ist nicht genug, daß man Talent habe, es gehört mehr dazu, um gescheit zu werden; man muß auch in großen Verhältnissen leben und Gelegenheit haben, den spielenden Figuren der Zeit in die Karten zu sehen und selber zu Gewinn und Verlust mitzuspielen. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1085:Saint, Revolutionist
Saint, revolutionist,
God and sage know well,
That there is a place
Where that much-rung bell,
The well-beloved body,
And its sensitive face
Must be sacrificed.
There is, it seems, in this
A something meaningless,
Hanging without support
And yet too dear to touch,
That life should seek its end
Where no will can descend,
Facing a gun to see
Long actuality.
What is this that is
The good of nothingness,
The death of Socrates
And that strange man on the cross
Seeking out all loss?
For men love life until
It shames both face and will.
Neither in hell nor heaven
Is the answer given,
Both are a servant's pay:
But they wish to know
how far the will can go,
Lest their infinite play
And their desires be
Shadow and mockery.
~ Delmore Schwartz,
1086:The Prophetess
While men keep going to Delphi
To learn about the hidden future,
I should have been a hill
By the roadside covered with snow.
On the branch of a tree where leaves
Wither in the heat of the burning Troy,
I should have been a bird
With the spring crushed in the parched throat.
By the side of the master sage
Who drank from the cup filled with hemlock,
I should have been a night
Cursed by his disciples filled with grief.
I should have been the fate
Endorsed by the master who welcomed the grief.
As the centuries gallop by in a chain,
Their hoofs beating hard,
I should have been the cross
Carried by Poulose to Corinth.
As the end of the era collapses and falls
Somewhere on the Byzantine highway,
I should have been a palm-leaf note
Wrapped up in a dirty rag.
~ Ayyappa Paniker,
1087:Do that which consists in taking no action;
Pursue that which is not meddlesome;
Savor that which has no flavor.

Make the small big and the few many;
Do good to him who has done you an injury.

Lay plans for the accomplishment of the difficult before it becomes difficult;
Make something big by starting with it when small.

Difficult things in the word must needs have their beginnings in the easy;
Big things must needs have their beginnings in the small.

Therefore it is because the sage never attempts to be great that he succeeds in becoming great.

One who makes promises rashly rarely keeps good faith;
One who is in the habit of considering things easy meets with frequent difficulties.

Therefore even the sage treats some things as difficult.
That is why in the end no difficulties can get the better of him. ~ Lao Tzu,
1088:Once inside the hedge, the garden, though sleeping for the winter, nevertheless seemed to glimmer with hidden life. A winding flagstone path made its leisurely way to the door of the house, lined on both sides with tufts of sage, thyme, rosemary, and lavender, grayed with cold. In place of grass, the earth on either side of the path was a riot of plants in varying stages of hibernation and decay. To this side, the dried stalks of full-grown asparagus rustled together. In the far corner, their roots sunk into the wood of the house, an array of nightshades — tomato plants, dried and brown, the gnarled tangles of henbane and moonshade lying in wait for spring. The webbed vines overhead cast the garden in long blue shadow, blurred at the corners, hard to make out, and yet strangely the air inside the garden was not as bitingly cold as it was in the outside world. ~ Katherine Howe,
1089:The Sloth
Her back is an ecosystem,
algaeic and wrapped
beneath a canopy’s sun.
Arms forever up and out
above her head—she is
this tall. No height,
no dangers below,
will blanch the beast;
she sees no fear.
A fall will seldom kill her.
Nun ordained to pliancy,
she’s slowness made devotion.
The monkeys run
right by her, skitter-shows
their onus; harpy hawks
with sudden plucks
plunge, their hunger flown.
It is true she cannot walk
—when basic need or poor luck
grounds her, she’ll have to
pull herself along the muck
of forest floor. So she hangs,
even after life, from branches,
fool-like, face to sky,
her backward-growing
coat a woolish habit.
Even at the tops
of trees, she blends in.
She is cool, and shy seeming;
10
Her cry’s a sure ai, ai.
~ C.J. Sage,
1090:He had visited his family the evening before, eaten dinner with Renee and Chris, his grandson, in the pretence that everything was ordinary, but in fact to service his end-game ruse. He was going over the mountains, he'd said, to hunt for quail in willow canyons, he had no particular canyons in mind, he intended to return on Thursday evening, though possibly, if the hunting was good, he would return on Friday or Saturday. The lie was open-ended so that his family wouldn't start worrying until he'd been dead for as long as a week - so none would miss or seek him where he rotted silently in the sage. Ben imagined how it might be otherwise, his cancer a pestilent force in their lives, or a pall descending over them like ice, just as they'd begun to emerge from the pall of Rachel's death. The last thing they needed was for Ben to tell hem of his terminal colon cancer. ~ David Guterson,
1091:Heed the words of Gautama Buddha, spoken 2,600 years ago: “Do not believe in what you have heard; do not believe in traditions because they have been handed down for many generations; do not believe anything because it is rumored and spoken of by many; do not believe merely because the written statements of some old sage are produced; do not believe in conjectures; do not believe in that as a truth to which you have become attached by habit; do not believe merely on the authority of your teachers and elders. After observation and analysis, when it agrees with reason and is conducive to the good and benefit of one and all, then accept it and live up to it.”1 Remember, nothing within the spirit realm can harm you as long as you maintain control and authority over your life. You should use your relationship with the spirit realm only to supplement—not substitute—your life. In ~ Ted Andrews,
1092:Not that we must resort to indifference, of course, which neither Stoic sage nor Buddhist monk would for a moment countenance: compassion and benevolence to others, indeed to all other forms of life, must remain the highest ethical imperative of our behaviour. But passion is not acceptable in the home of the wise man, and familial ties, when they become too binding, must be loosened. Which is why, like the Greek sage, the Buddhist monk lives, as much as possible, in a condition of solitude. (The word ‘monk’ derives from the Greek monos, meaning ‘alone’.) It is truly in solitude that wisdom can bloom, uncompromised by the difficulties associated with all forms of attachment. It is impossible, in effect, to have a wife or husband, children or friends without becoming in some degree attached to them. We must free ourselves of these ties if we wish to overcome the fear of death. ~ Luc Ferry,
1093:The Stoic Sage is the hypothetical ideal of a perfect ‘wise man’ (sophos or phronimos in Greek; homo sapiens in Latin!). The word is often capitalized because it indicates something abstract rather than a real person. The Sage is supremely virtuous, a perfect human being, and the closest mortal approximation to Zeus. He is a completely good person, who lives a completely good and ‘smoothly flowing’ life of total serenity, he has attained perfect Happiness and fulfilment (eudaimonia). He lives in total harmony with himself, the rest of mankind, and Nature as a whole, because he follows reason and accepts his fate graciously, insofar as it is beyond his control. He has risen above irrational desires and emotions, to achieve peace of mind. Though he prefers to live as long as it is appropriate, and enjoys the ‘festival’ of life, he is completely unafraid of his own death. ~ Donald J Robertson,
1094:Trapnel wanted, among other things, to be a writer, a dandy, a lover, a comrade, an eccentric, a sage, a virtuoso, a good chap, a man of honour, a hard case, a spendthrift, an opportunist, a raisonneur; to be very rich, to be very poor, to possess a thousand mistresses, to win the heart of one love to whom he was ever faithful, to be on the best of terms with all men, to avenge savagely the lightest affront, to live to a hundred full of years and honour, to die young and unknown but recognized the following day as the most neglected genius of the age. Each of these ambitions had something to recommend it from one angle or another, with the possible exception of being poor - the only aim Trapnel achieved with unqualified mastery - and even being poor, as Trapnel himself asserted, gave the right to speak categorically when poverty was discussed by people like Evadne Clapham. ~ Anthony Powell,
1095:Although there has perhaps never been a perfect mortal Sage, the Stoics believed that there was always at least one perfect immortal being: the god Zeus. The Stoic Zeus has perfect reason and virtue, like the Sage, and so the Stoics often refer to contemplating his perspective on human affairs because ‘in everything one says and does one must act as an imitator of God’ (Discourses, 2.14). Whether or not we believe in God, though, we might view their comments the basis of a kind of psychological exercise. Hercules, the favoured son of Zeus, was also revered by the Cynics and Stoics as a mythic hero and role-model. The ideal Sage is therefore godlike, a mortal having progressed so far that his wisdom and eudaimonia equal that of Zeus. The aspiring Stoic tries to make progress towards perfect wisdom by regularly contemplating the Sage and emulating his thoughts and actions. ~ Donald J Robertson,
1096:Humanity is an organism, inherently rejecting all that is deleterious, that is, wrong, and absorbing after trial what is beneficial, that is, right. If so disposed, the Architect of the Universe, we must assume, might have made the world and man perfect, free from evil and from pain, as angels in heaven are thought to be; but although this was not done, man has been given the power of advancement rather than of retrogression. The Old and New Testaments remain, like other sacred writings of other lands, of value as records of the past and for such good lessons as they inculcate. Like the ancient writers of the Bible our thoughts should rest upon this life and our duties here. "To perform the duties of this world well, troubling not about another, is the prime wisdom," says Confucius, great sage and teacher. The next world and its duties we shall consider when we are placed in it. ~ Andrew Carnegie,
1097:For it is a mad world and it will get madder if we allow the minorities, be they dwarf or giant, orangutan or dolphin, nuclear-head or water conservationalist, pro-computerologist or Neo-Luddite, simpleton or sage, to interfere with aesthetics. The real world is the playing ground for each and every group, to make or unmake laws. But the tip of the nose of my book or stories or poems is where their rights end and my territorial imperatives begin, run and rule. If Mormons do not like my plays, let them write their own. If the Irish hate my Dublin stories, let them rent typewriters. If teachers and grammar school editors find my jawbreaker sentences shatter their mushmilk teeth, let them eat stale cake dunked in weak tea of their own ungodly manufacture. If the Chicano intellectuals wish to re-cut my "Wonderful Ice Cream Suit" so it shapes "Zoot," may the belt unravel and the pants fall. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1098:She's an Alchemist," continued Nathan. "Not a chauffeur. There's a big difference." Actually, there were days at Amberwood I doubted that. "Come, Miss Sage. If you've wasted your day driving my son here, the least I can do is buy you lunch."
I shot a panicked look at Adrian. It wasn't panicked because I was afraid of being with Moroi. I'd long since gotten used to these sorts of situations. What I was unsure of was if Adrian really wanted me around for his family reunion. That hadn't been part of the plan. Also, I wasn't sure that I really wanted to be around for said reunion either.
"Dad-" Adrian attempted.
"I insist," said Nathan crisply. "Pay attention and learn common courtesy." He turned and began walking away, assuming we'd follow. We did.
"Should I find a reason to leave?" I whispered to Adrian.
"Not when he uses his 'I insist' voice," came the muttered response. ~ Richelle Mead,
1099:Once I asked Maharajji how it is possible for a man to remember God all the time. He told me the story of Narada (the celestial sage) and the butcher: Vishnu (one of the aspects of God) was always praising the butcher and Narada wondered why, since the butcher was always occupied and Narada spent twenty-four hours a day praising Vishnu. Vishnu gave Narada the task of carrying a bowl of oil, full to the brim, up to the top of a mountain, without spilling a drop. The task completed, Vishnu asked how many times Narada remembered Vishnu. Narada asked how that would be possible, since he had to concentrate on carrying the bowl and climbing the mountain. Vishnu sent Narada to the butcher and the butcher said that as he works he is always remembering God. Maharajji said then, “Whatever outer work you must do, do it; but train your mind in such a way that in your subconscious mind you remember God. ~ Ram Dass,
1100:Was she conscious of her talent? Hardly. If asked about her cooking, Grandma would look down at her hands which some glorious instinct sent on journeys to be gloved in flour, or to plumb disencumbered turkeys, wrist-deep in search of their animal souls. Her gray eyes blinked from spectacles warped by forty years of oven blasts and blinded with strewing of pepper and sage, so she sometimes flung cornstarch over steaks, amazingly tender, succulent steaks! And sometimes dropped apricots into meat loaves, cross-pollinated meats, herbs, fruits, vegetables with no prejudice, no tolerance for recipe or formula, save that at the final moment of delivery, mouths watered, blood thundered in response. Her hands then, like the hands of Great-grandma before her, were Grandma's mystery, delight, and life. She looked at them in astonishment, but let them live their life in the way they must absolutely lead it. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1101:Man is timid and apologetic; he is no longer upright; he dares not say "I think," "I am," but quotes some saint or sage. He is ashamed before the blade of grass or the blowing rose. These roses under my window make no reference to former roses or to better ones; they are for what they are; they exist with God to-day. There is no time to them. There is simply the rose; it is perfect in every moment of its existence. Before a leaf-bud has burst, its whole life acts; in the full-blown flower there is no more; in the leafless root there is no less. Its nature is satisfied, and it satisfies nature, in all moments alike. But man postpones or remembers; he does not live in the present, but with reverted eye laments the past, or, heedless of the riches that surround him, stands on tiptoe to foresee the future. He cannot be happy and strong until he too lives with nature in the present, above time. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1102:The Pigtail
There lived a sage in days of yore,
And he a handsome pigtail wore;
But wondered much, and sorrowed more,
Because it hung behind him.
He mused upon this curious case,
And swore he’d change the pigtail’s place,
And have it hanging at his face,
Not dangling there behind him.
Says he, “The mystery I’ve found;
I’ll turn me round.” He turned him round,
But still it hung behind him.
Then round, and round, and out, and in,
All day the puzzled sage did spin;
In vain—it mattered not a pin—
The pigtail hung behind him.
And right, and left, and round about,
And up, and down, and in, and out
He turned. But still the pigtail stout
Hung steadily behind him.
And though his efforts never slack,
And though he twist, and whirl, and tack,
Alas! still faithful to his back
The pigtail hangs behind him!
~ Adelbert Von Chamisso,
1103:Alexander Rostov was neither scientist nor sage; but at the age of sixty-four he was wise enough to know that life does not proceed by leaps and bounds. It unfolds. At any given moment, it is the manifestation of a thousand transitions. Our faculties wax and wane, our experiences accumulate, and our opinions evolve- if not glacially, then at least gradually. Such that the events of an average day are as likely to transform who we are as a pinch of pepper is to transform a stew. And yet, for the Count, when the doors to Anna's bedroom opened and Sofia stepped forward in her gown, at that very moment she crossed the threshold into adulthood. On one side of that divide was a girl of five or ten or twenty with a quiet demeanor and a whimsical imagination who relied upon him for companionship and counsel; while on the other side was a young woman of discernment and grace who need rely on no one but herself. ~ Amor Towles,
1104:/Farsi Lost in myself I reappeared I know not where a drop that rose from the sea and fell and dissolved again; a shadow that stretched itself out at dawn, when the sun reached noon I disappeared. I have no news of my coming or passing away-- the whole thing happened quicker than a breath; ask no questions of the moth. In the candle flame of his face I have forgotten all the answers. In the way of love there must be knowledge and ignorance so I have become both a dullard and a sage; one must be an eye and yet not see so I am blind and yet I still perceive, Dust be on my head if I can say where I in bewilderment have wandered: Attar watched his heart transcend both worlds and under its shadow now is gone mad with love. [1501.jpg] -- from The Drunken Universe: An Anthology of Persian Sufi Poetry, Translated by Peter Lamborn Wilson / Translated by Nasrollah Pourjavady

~ Farid ud-Din Attar, The Dullard Sage
,
1105:I love brief habits and consider them an inestimable means for getting to know many things…My nature is designed entirely for brief habits…I always believe that here is something that will give me lasting satisfaction—brief habits, too, have this faith of passion, this faith in eternity—and that I am to be envied for having found and recognized it…But one day its time is up; the good thing parts from me, not as something that has come to nauseate me but peacefully and sated with me as I am with it—as if we had reason to be grateful to each other as we shook hands to say farewell. Even then something new is waiting at the door, along with my faith—this indestructible fool and sage!—that this new discovery will be just right, and that this will be the last time. That is what happens to me with dishes, ideas, human beings, cities, poems, music, doctrines, ways of arranging the day, and life styles. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1106:If,” answered Mejnour, “before one property of herbalism was known to them, a stranger had visited a wandering tribe, — if he had told the savages that the herbs, which every day they trampled underfoot, were endowed with the most potent virtues; that one would restore to health a brother on the verge of death; that another would paralyze into idiocy their wisest sage; that a third would strike lifeless to the dust their most stalwart champion; that tears and laughter, vigor and disease, madness and reason, wakefulness and sleep, existence and dissolution, were coiled up in those unregarded leaves, — would they not have held him a sorcerer or a liar? To half the virtues of the vegetable world mankind are yet in the darkness of the savages I have supposed. There are faculties within us with which certain herbs have affinity, and over which they have power. The moly of the ancients was not all a fable. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton,
1107:The Indians are the Italians of Asia", Didier pronounced with a sage and mischievous grin. "It can be said, certainly, with equal justice, that the Italians are the Indians of Europe, but you do understand me, I think. There is so much Italian in the Indians, and so much Indians in the Italians. They are both people of the Madonna - they demand a goddess, even if the religion does not provide one. Every man in both countries is a singer when he is happy, and every woman is a dancer when she walks to the shop at the corner. For them, food is music inside the body, and music is food inside the heart. The Language of India and the language of Italy, they make every man a poet, and make something beautiful from every banalite. They are nations where love - amore, pyaar - makes a cavalier of a Borsalino on a street corner, and makes a princess of a peasant girl, if only for the second that her eyes meet yours. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
1108:They heard the front door shut. They suddenly noticed that Edna was not with them anymore. She had gotten up and must have left their chambers. Enoch called out, “Edna?” No one answered him. “That is strange,” said Enoch. “She has never done that before.” Methuselah guessed that his mother believed the prophecy, more than the “sage” who had received it. She was probably making preparations to leave the city, preparations that included Methuselah’s young friend, the other Edna, and her parents. She had discussed the possibility with her son in the past. “She is warning others,” he surmised. “What others?” challenged Enoch. “Edna and her parents?” offered Methuselah. “How does she know about this girl of yours?” “She is not my ‘girl,’ father,” said Methuselah. “I have told mother all about her. She knows we are close, and she is going to help them. She will go after Edna’s parents first, to bring them to the palace. ~ Brian Godawa,
1109:Less than ten minutes after they left the stream, Loretta began to nod and felt herself slumping. She jerked upright and blinked. Hunter tightened his arm around her and slipped a hand under her right knee to lift her leg over the horse’s head. Gathering her against his chest, he cradled her crosswise in front of him.
“Sleep, nei mah-tao-yo, sleep.”
His deep voice sifted through the exhaustion that clouded her mind. Nei mah-tao-yo. She had no idea what it meant, but it sounded so soft the way he said it--like an endearment. The hollow of his shoulder made a perfect resting place. She leaned into him, her cheek against his warm skin. He smelled of sage, smoke, and leather, earthy smells that were becoming familiar and somehow comforting. As she drifted into blackness, she no longer thought of him as an Indian, just a man. A wonderfully sturdy man who could hold her comfortably while she slept. ~ Catherine Anderson,
1110:Bridge Ghazal
My love and I reside upon the belly of a bridge
with heartbeats of the sky?--the drums upon the bridge.
I've heard of songs that rise at night from pitch black oceans.
I've heard the strums of lyrics made by four hands on a bridge.
My love and I do landscapes for the gardens of the sea.
At night we sleep as seedlings at the center of its bridge.
Once I saw a Sufi breathe in seabirds, and send them out again.
I've seen people bearing blindfolds near the entrance of a bridge.
My love's old love, he says, had tried to douse him in a moat.
He grew gills to save himself and hid beneath a drawbridge.
The masters speak of magic at the middle of the rings
where Yes and No chase each other round the props of any bridge.
My love's new love, some say, makes far too much of things
as fundamental, elemental, as the structure of a bridge.
Anonymous submission.
~ C.J. Sage,
1111:Because Jewish thinking took many forms in different parts of the ancient world, it is valuable to be more precise in this case. Whereas Jewish people who liked apocalyptic literature would particularly appreciate Revelation, Jews in the Diaspora would appreciate Hebrews, and groups such as the Essenes might appreciate John’s Gospel, Matthew often moves in a more “rabbinic” world. That is, the views and arguments of teachers and interpreters of the law, who came to be called rabbis, are very relevant to Matthew’s Gospel. Most of the sources from which we know rabbinic thought are later, but they offer numerous parallels to Matthew’s ways of handling Scripture and intimate understanding of Pharisaic debates with Jesus (e.g., see notes on 19:3; 23:25–26). Because Jesus was himself a sage and engaged in discussion, and often debate, with Pharisaic teachers, Matthew continues to engage a world within which Jesus himself moved. ◆ ~ Anonymous,
1112:Die before your Death...’ IT IS ALSO narrated that once Moulana said to his son: ‘If the people ask you what is your Path, then reply “My Path is to eat very little, nay, my Path is ‘to die’, that is, to be annihilated into the radiance of the Divine”.’ And then he related a story of a Dervish who, approaching a house, asked for some water to drink. A very beautiful girl appeared at the door and handed an empty utensil to the man; but the dervish said: ‘I want some water to drink.’ The girl asked him to go away, saying, ‘I have given you your reply, for a Dervish is not one who eats the whole day and sleeps the whole night; but the real pious one is he who sleeps hungry many a night and eats nothing during the day.’ Another Persian sage has said: ‘Eating is to preserve life, not living only to eat and yet eat more.’ Moulana said that the Dervish, after that encounter with the girl, never ate during the day until his last hour. ~ Idries Shah,
1113:LOW-HISTAMINE SUBSTITUTES Instead of . . . Choose . . . Refined sugar Maple sugar or maple syrup Vinegar-based salad dressing Olive oil with sea salt Cheese Macadamia-nut butter Wheat Rice, oats, or corn (yeast-free) Coffee Chamomile tea Alcohol Smoothies Pepper or chili Seasoning with sea salt and oregano, garlic, sage, or rosemary Wheat cereal Oatmeal with maple syrup Wheat pasta Brown-rice pasta or brown rice Processed milks that contain pesticides, carrageenan, and other additives Macadamia milk (in a blender, blend macadamia nuts or macadamia-nut butter with water; oat milk and rice milk are also healthful and low in histamine, provided they are free of preservatives, carrageenan, and other additives) Spinach or arugula Kale or other lettuces Eggplant Squash A candy bar A brown-rice cake with maple syrup and macadamia-nut butter Canned soups Fresh vegetable soup, made with filtered water, pureed vegetables, garlic, and salt ~ Doreen Virtue,
1114:SCARBOROUGH FAIR, or, THE LOVER'S PROMISE

(Lucy:)
Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
Always he'll be a true love of mine

Tell him I've made him a magical shirt
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Without any seam or needlework
Always he'll be a true love of mine

(Zach:)
Tell her she's found me an acre of land
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Between the salt water and the sea strand
That makes her a true love of mine

Tell her she's plowed it with just a goat's horn
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
She's sowed it all over with one grain of corn
Yes, she is a true love of mine
And her daughter forever a daughter of mine

(Together:)
Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Remember us to all who live there
Ours will be true love for all time ~ Nancy Werlin,
1115:Really, Sage? A date?"
I sighed. "Yes, Adrian. A date."
A real date. Not, like, doing homework together," he added. "I mean like where you go out to a movie or something. And a movie that's not part of a school assignment. Or about something boring."
"A real date." I figured I wouldn't give him the specifics on the Shakespheare play.
"What's the lucky guy's name?"
"Brayden."
There was a pause. "Brayden? That his real name?"
"Why are you asking if everything's real? You think I'd make any of this up?"
"No, no," Adrian assured me. "That what's so ynbelievable about it. Is he cute?"
I glanced at the clock. It was time for me to meet my study group. "Gee, maybe I should just send you a picture to review?"
"Yes, please. And a full background check and life history."
"I have to go. Why do you care so much anyway?" I finally asked in exasperation.
His answer took a long time, which was uncharacteristic. ~ Richelle Mead,
1116:Why?" He asked. " because it was the closest I could get to doing this."
He reached out and pulled me to him, one hand on my waist and the other behind my neck. He tipped my head up and lowered his lips on mine. I closed my eyes and melted as my whole body was consumed in that kiss. I was nothing. I was everything. Chills ran over my skin, and fire burnt inside me. His body pressed closer to mine, and I wrapped my arms around his neck. His lips were warmer and softer than anything I could have imagined, yet fierce and powerful at the same time. Mine responded hungrily, and I tightened my hold on him. His fingers slid down the back of my neck, tracing its shape, and every place they touched was electric.
But perhaps the best part of all that was that I, Sydney Katherine Sage, guilty of constantly analyzing the world around me, well, I stopped thinking.
And it was glorious.
At least, it was until I started thinking again. ~ Richelle Mead,
1117:Mr. Wesley Jones’s Barbecue Mop This is my adaptation of a barbecue mop innovated by Mr. Wesley Jones, a barbecue master interviewed by the WPA, and who cooked during antebellum slavery. ½ stick butter, unsalted 1 large yellow or white onion, well chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup apple cider vinegar ½ cup water 1 tbsp kosher salt 1 tsp coarse black pepper     1 pod long red cayenne pepper, or 1 tsp red pepper flakes 1 tsp dried rubbed sage     1 tsp dried basil leaves, or 1 tbsp minced fresh basil ½ tsp crushed coriander seed     ¼ cup dark brown sugar or 4 tbsp molasses (not blackstrap) Melt butter in a large saucepan. Add onion and garlic and sauté on medium heat until translucent. Turn heat down slightly and add vinegar, water, and the salt and spices. Allow to cook gently for about thirty minutes to an hour. To be used as a light mop sauce or glaze during the last 15 to 30 minutes of barbecuing and as a dip for cooked meat. ~ Michael W Twitty,
1118:Why, Uruvi always wondered, would Queen Madri consign herself to the flames, when no queen before her had joined their husband in the funeral pyre? Moreover, why would the mother of tiny, helpless six-month-old twins, Nakul and Sahadeva, kill herself and leave them orphaned and under the care of her husband’s first wife? It was strange. Had Madri, too, been mortally wounded like her husband, King Pandu, when they had been attacked? Had she been able to talk to Kunti before she died? Had Shakuni played up the curse of the sage to his advantage after all? If he could instigate Duryodhana to burn the Pandavas and the Queen Mother in the lac palace, he would not have any qualms in murdering King Pandu too. The only person who probably knew the truth was Kunti—but she was an evasive lady who knew how to keep her secrets. Uruvi recalled how she had pestered her on her wedding day about whether she had any regrets, but had got nothing out of her. ~ Kavita Kan,
1119:WHERE ONCE THE WATERS ON YOUR FACE


Where once the waters of your face
Spun to my screws, your dry ghost blows,
The dead turns up its eye;
Where once the mermen through your ice
Pushed up their hair, the dry wind steers
Through salt and root and roe.

Where once your green knots sank their splice
Into the tided cord, there goes
The green unraveller,
His scissors oiled, his knife hung loose
To cut the channels at their source
And lay the wet fruits low.

Invisible, your clocking tides
Break on the lovebeds of the weeds;
The weed of love’s left dry;
There round about your stones the shades
Of children go who, from their voids,
Cry to the dolphined sea.

Dry as a tomb, your coloured lids
Shall not be latched while magic glides
Sage on the earth and sky;
There shall be corals in your beds,
There shall be serpents in your tides,
Till all our sea-faiths die. ~ Dylan Thomas,
1120:Integrity Integrity is the ability to listen to a place inside oneself that doesn't change, even though the life that carries it may change. —RABBI JONATHAN OMER-MAN Much of our journey throughout this book has been about discovering that place inside and cultivating the ability to listen to it, while having compassion for the life that carries it. It moves me to share the story of a troubled man who, exhausted from his suffering and confusion, asked a sage for help. The sage looked deeply into the troubled man and with compassion offered him a choice: “You may have either a map or a boat.” After looking at the many pilgrims about him, all of whom seemed equally troubled, the confused man said, “I'll take the boat.” The sage kissed him on the forehead and said, “Go then. You are the boat. Life is the sea.” As we have discovered so many times, we have everything we need within us. This ability to listen inside is our oldest oar. You are the boat. ~ Mark Nepo,
1121:Apology
If men should ask, Despoina, why I tell
Of nothing glad nor noble in my verse
To lighten hearts beneath this present curse
And build a heaven of dreams in real hell,
Go you to them and speak among them thus:
“There were no greater grief than to recall,
Down in the rotting grave where the lithe worms crawl,
Green fields above that smiled so sweet to us.”
Is it good to tell old tales of Troynovant
Or praises of dead heroes, tried and sage,
Or sing the queens of unforgotten age,
Brynhild and Maeve and virgin Bradamant?
How should I sing of them? Can it be good
To think of glory now, when all is done,
And all our labour underneath the sun
Has brought us this-and not the thing we would?
All these were rosy visions of the night,
The loveliness and wisdom feigned of old.
But now we wake. The East is pale and cold,
No hope is in the dawn, and no delight.
~ Clive Staples Lewis,
1122:- Bardamu, qu'il me fait alors gravement et un peu triste, nos pères nous valaient bien, n'en dis pas de mal !...
- T'as raison, Arthur, pour ça t'as raison ! Haineux et dociles, violés, volés, étripés et couillons toujours, ils nous valaient bien ! Tu peux le dire ! Nous ne changeons pas ! Ni de chaussettes, ni de maîtres, ni d'opinions, ou bien si tard, que ça n'en vaut plus la peine. On est nés fidèles, on en crève nous autres ! Soldats gratuits, héros pour tout le monde et singes parlants, mots qui souffrent, on est nous les mignons du Roi Misère. C'est lui qui nous possède ! Quand on est pas sage, il serre... On a ses doigts autour du cou, toujours, ça gêne pour parler, faut faire bien attention si on tient à pouvoir manger... Pour des riens, il vous étrangle... C'est pas une vie...
- Il y a l'amour, Bardamu !
- Arthur, l'amour c'est l'infini mis à la portée des caniches et j'ai ma dignité moi ! que je lui réponds. ~ Louis Ferdinand C line,
1123:Just as famous, if not more so, is the ancient Asian sage Sun Tsu, author of The Art of War. Sun Tsu is a much easier and quicker read than Clausewitz, full of short pieces of advice, from the tactical to the strategic, that have been quoted and applied far beyond the military, often in the world of business. The adage most frequently attributed to Sun Tsu—“know your enemy if you wish to win”—is actually a misquotation. It is indeed good to know your enemy if you wish to win, but Sun Tsu’s recipe for ultimate victory begins with knowing yourself—why you are going to war, what you are fighting for. You may have studied the culture and ways of your foe for years and be intimately familiar with his thinking, but first you must be able to answer the questions, What do I represent? What am I prepared to risk blood and treasure for, and why exactly am I going to war? If you cannot answer these questions, then you should not be going to war at all. ~ Sebastian Gorka,
1124:She appreciated her own reflection- she looked less than a tenth of her earthly age- but knew the years were bound to catch up. There had been a time or two when she had put a glamour on herself, to reverse those years, to remember and even to capture the attention of a young man so she could make the kind of vigorous love she had enjoyed before. But she wouldn't have tried to keep up the glamour permanently, or to create the violent kind of spells that she could have to remain in a state of perpetual youth. The crone cannot be a sage or wisewoman until she reaches beyond the shallow confines of her skin. Children of the earth must also change, like the seasons do. Autumn had seen herself in all these transitions: the tentative buds of spring; the heavy sensuality of summer. And now, like the fall, she was colorful and majestic but right on the verge of winter, to be stripped down to what was really important, the bare branches of what was true. ~ Amy S Foster,
1125:Where Once The Waters Of Your Face
Where once the waters of your face
Spun to my screws, your dry ghost blows,
The dead turns up its eye;
Where once the mermen through your ice
Pushed up their hair, the dry wind steers
Through salt and root and roe.
Where once your green knots sank their splice
Into the tided cord, there goes
The green unraveller,
His scissors oiled, his knife hung loose
To cut the channels at their source
And lay the wet fruits low.
Invisible, your clocking tides
Break on the lovebeds of the weeds;
The weed of love's left dry;
There round about your stones the shades
Of children go who, from their voids,
Cry to the dolphined sea.
Dry as a tomb, your coloured lids
Shall not be latched while magic glides
Sage on the earth and sky;
There shall be corals in your beds
There shall be serpents in your tides,
Till all our sea-faiths die.
~ Dylan Thomas,
1126:Markandeya Purana along with Bhagavat Purana is considered to be quite a celebrated work. Ranked seventh in the list of Puranas, probably one of the oldest works, its recitation is believed to free one from taints of sin. Named after the sage Markandeya, who acquired its knowledge from Brahma, the creator, its narration starts with sage Jaimini (author of Mimamsa sutras) approaching the wise birds (Dronaputras appearing as birds residing in the Himalayas) to get answers at the behest of Markandeya. Initially the Purana gets answers to the five basic questions: How was Vishnu born as a mortal? How Draupadi became the wife of five Pandavas? Why did Balabadra undertake the penance (pilgrimage) for having committed brahmanicide (killing of Brahmins) and why were the children of Draupadi destroyed so unceremoniously? These questions cover the whole gamut of ancient history, logic, morality, astronomy and so forth. ~ B.K. Chaturvedi (2004), in Markandeya Purana, Preface,
1127:Turn your thoughts now, and lift up your thoughts to a devout and joyous contemplation on sage Vyasa and Vasishtha, on Narda and Valmiki. Contemplate on the glorious Lord Buddha, Jesus the Christ, prophet Mohammed, the noble Zoroaster (Zarathushtra), Lord Mahavira, the holy Guru Nanak. Think of the great saints and sages of all ages, like Yajnavalkya, Dattatreya, Sulabha and Gargi, Anasooya and Sabari, Lord Gauranga, Mirabai, Saint Theresa and Francis of Assisi. Remember St. Augustine, Jallaludin Rumi, Kabir, Tukaram, Ramdas, Ramakrishna Paramhamsa, Vivekananda and Rama Tirtha. Adore in thy heart the sacred memory of Mahatma Gandhi, sage Ramana Maharishi, Aurobindo Ghosh, Gurudev Sivananda and Swami Ramdas. They verily are the inspirers of humanity towards a life of purity, goodness and godliness. Their lives, their lofty examples, their great teachings constitute the real wealth and greatest treasure of mankind today.
   ~ Sri Chidananda, Advices On Spiritual Living,
1128:Peripetia, Or Flowers For Everyone
How difficult it is to love the stupid
in ourselves, not to mention the shortcomings
of others. Each time I stumble from
a pair of platform shoes, how clumsiness
surprises! I'm astonished - even worse,
appalled - every time a shiny SUV
insists on jumping out in front of me.
How slow I am to understand the obvious!
I'm going outside now to gather calla lilies.
How strange it might be if I still had the brains
of a twenty-something Ph.D.-in-training.
The red ones I've been growing. And memory,
what a laugh, stuck between experience
and precognition - middle of a road
where no one wants to be. What a load
of magic beans that is. I mean, that is, disdain
for the middle of the road, not the precognition.
I know I won't remember what I said tomorrow.
Now I'm up a tree, climbed it with thorough
joie de vivre. Tell me, did you ever get the lilies?
~ C.J. Sage,
1129:THE dreamers are the saviours of the world. As the visible world is sustained by the invisible, so men, through all their trials and sins and sordid vocations, are nourished by the beautiful visions of their solitary dreamers. Humanity cannot forget its dreamers; it cannot let their ideals fade and die; it lives in them; it knows them as they realities which it shall one day see and know. Composer, sculptor, painter, poet, prophet, sage, these are the makers of the after-world, the architects of heaven. The world is beautiful because they have lived; without them, labouring humanity would perish. He who cherishes a beautiful vision, a lofty ideal in his heart, will one day realize it. Columbus cherished a vision of another world, and he discovered it; Copernicus fostered the vision of a multiplicity of worlds and a wider universe, and he revealed it; Buddha beheld the vision of a spiritual world of stainless beauty and perfect peace, and he entered into it. ~ James Allen,
1130:I'm to have dinner with some people from the bookshop, which is as posh as the motel, at six, then read at seven-thirty. I will have to watch my mouth. Some sarcastic remark about gentrification is almost bound to slip out. Even though the topography is right, this doesn't even look like Vermont. Not a cow in sight, not a single shack held together with staples and Masonite. Where are my people? The ones who used to go to Canada automatically at age 18 and get all their teeth pulled out, a standard right of passage. The ones who believe you can't be an alcoholic if you drink nothing but beer. The ones who know how to roast a haunch of venison with onions and garlic and sage and mustard (and where to find the haunch in July). The ones who buy their clothes at rummage and their cars at the junkyard. The ones who used to be me. Here I am on my balcony with a finger or two of cognac, a cigar, and a laptop computer, wearing my black jeans and my Reeboks. God, it's awful. ~ Hayden Carruth,
1131:The Reproof
Mamma heard me with scorn and pride
A wretched beggar-boy deride.
'Do you not know,' said I, 'how mean
It is to be thus begging seen?
If for a week I were not fed,
I'm sure I would not beg my bread.'
And then away she saw me stalk
With a most self-important walk.
But meeting her upon the stairs,
All these my consequential airs
Were changed to an entreating look.
'Give me,' said I, 'the pocket-book,
Mamma, you promised I should have.'
The pocket-book to me she gave;
After reproof and counsel sage
She bade me write in the first page
This naughty action all in rhyme;
No food to have until the time,
In writing fair and neatly worded,
The unfeeling fact I had recorded.
Slow I compose, and slow I write;
And now I feel keen hunger bite.
My mother's pardon I entreat,
And beg she'll give me food to eat.
Dry bread would be received with joy
By her repentant beggar-boy.
~ Charles Lamb,
1132:He smelled the odor of the pine boughs under him, the piney smell of the crushed needles and the sharper odor of the resinous sap from the cut limbs. ... This is the smell I love. This and fresh-cut clover, the crushed sage as you ride after cattle, wood-smoke and the burning leaves of autumn. That must be the odor of nostalgia, the smell of the smoke from the piles of raked leaves burning in the streets in the fall in Missoula. Which would you rather smell? Sweet grass the Indians used in their baskets? Smoked leather? The odor of the ground in the spring after rain? The smell of the sea as you walk through the gorse on a headland in Galicia? Or the wind from the land as you come in toward Cuba in the dark? That was the odor of cactus flowers, mimosa and the sea-grape shrubs. Or would you rather smell frying bacon in the morning when you are hungry? Or coffee in the morning? Or a Jonathan apple as you bit into it? Or a cider mill in the grinding, or bread fresh from the oven? ~ Ernest Hemingway,
1133:Tel J’etais Autrefois
Tel j'étais autrefois et tel je suis encor.
Quand ma main imprudente a tari mon trésor,
Ou la nuit, accourant au sortir de la table,
Si Laure m'a fermé le seuil inexorable,
Je regagne mon toit. Là, lecteur studieux,
Content et sans désirs, je rends grâces aux dieux.
Je crie: O soins de l'homme, inquiétudes vaines!
Oh! que de vide, hélas! dans les choses humaines!
Faut-il ainsi poursuivre au hasard emportés
Et l'argent et l'amour, aveugles déités!
Mais si Plutus revient, de sa source dorée,
Conduire dans mes mains quelque veine égarée;
A mes signes, du fond de son appartement,
Si ma blanche voisine a souri mollement:
Adieu les grands discours, et le volume antique,
Et le sage Lycée, et l'auguste Portique;
Et reviennent en foule et soupirs et billets,
Soins de plaire, parfums et fêtes et banquets,
Et longs regards d'amour et molles élégies,
Et jusques au matin amoureuses orgies.
~ Andre Marie de Chenier,
1134:Par un matin de dimanche, quand nous entendons bourdonner les vieilles cloches, nous nous demandons: mais est-ce possible? Tout cela pour un Juif crucifié il y a deux mille ans et qui disait être le fils de Dieu - encore qu'il n'y ait pas de preuve de cette affirmation. Un dieu qui engendre avec une femme mortelle. Un sage qui recommande de ne plus travailler, de ne plus rendre la justice, mais de guetter les signes de la fin du monde imminente. Une justice qui accepte de prendre un innocent comme victime suppléante. Un maître qui ordonne à ses disciples de boire son sang. Des prières pour obtenir des miracles. Des péchés commis contre un dieu, expiés par un dieu. La peur d'un au-delà dont la mort est la porte. La figure de la croix pour symbole, à une époque qui ne sait plus rien de la fonction ni de l'ignominie de la croix. Quel frisson d'horreur nous vient de tout cela, comme un souffle exhalé par le sépulcre d'un passé sans fond? Qui peut croire que l'on croie encore à une chose pareille? ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1135:Crisis Counselor
She was a coat of arms
seasoned for the job -- tough
and polished like tortoise shell.
When the women were tougher,
she'd tuck her advice-giving head
back against the executive chair,
let them try to fluff bent feathers,
watch them falling to their feet.
Then, her little turtle arms
would stretch out across the desk;
try to float a form -a restraining order, maybe
a list of early warning signs -but they'd keep on sleeping, sleep
hard through the sessions she'd spend
blowing on plastic ships, paper sails
rarely reaching port, and they would cry
like little children watching helpless,
dazed as she sunk their dreamboats,
sat on them, no coming up for air.
And perhaps she'd think of the little turtles
we'd kept confined to bathtubs as kids,
or of the public safety commercials
telling mother how, if she turned her back,
we could fall to sleep, slide and drown
in barely an inch of sitting water.
~ C.J. Sage,
1136:Le langage de la Croix, en effet, est folie pour ceux qui se perdent,
mais pour ceux qui se sauvent, pour nous, il est puissance de Dieu.

Car il est écrit : « Je détruirai la sagesse des sages,
j'anéantirai l'intelligence des intelligents. »

Où est-il le sage ? Où est-il l'homme cultivé ? Où est-il le raisonneur de ce siècle ?
Dieu n'a-t-il pas frappé de folie la sagesse du monde ?

Puisqu'en effet le monde, par le moyen de la sagesse,
n'a point reconnu Dieu dans la sagesse de Dieu,
c'est par la folie du message qu'il a plu à Dieu de sauver les croyants.

Tandis que les Juifs demandent des signes et que les Grecs sont en quête de sagesse,
nous prêchons, nous, un Christ crucifié, scandale pour les Juifs et folie pour les païens,
mais pour ceux qui sont appelés, Juifs comme Grecs, c'est le Christ,
puissance de Dieu et sagesse de Dieu. Car ce qui est folie de Dieu est plus sage que
les humains, et ce qui est faiblesse de Dieu est plus fort que les humains. ~ Anonymous,
1137:Reden wir über Schmerz. Schmerz ist eine Form von Energie. Er kann erzeugt werden wie Elektrizität. Er kann fließen wie Strom. Er kann gleichmäßig sein oder pulsierend. Er kann stark und überwältigend sein, oder schwach und störend. Schmerz kann einen Mann zum Reden bringen. Was viele Menschen nicht wissen - Schmerz kann einen Mann zum Nachdenken bringen. Er kann einen Menschen nach seinem Abbild formen. Er kann ihn zu dem machen, was er selbst ist. Ich kenne den Schmerz. Ich habe ihn verstanden. Er hat mich Dinge gelehrt. Zum Beispiel, dass die Menschen ihn fürchten. Zugleich können sie viel mehr Schmerzen ertragen, als sie glauben. Wenn ich dir beispielsweise sage, dass ich dir eine Nadel in den Arm ramme, wirst du Angst bekommen. Wenn ich es tatsächlich tue, wird der Schmerz unerträglich sein. Aber wenn ich es wieder tue, und wieder und wieder, jede Stunde, ein ganzes Jahr lang, wirst du dich daran gewöhnen. Es wird dir niemals gefallen, doch du fürchtest dich auch nicht mehr davor. Genau darum geht es. ~ Cody McFadyen,
1138:Garnish soft comfort foods with crunchy crumbs, toasted nuts, or crisp bits of bacon to make things interesting. Serve rich meats with bright, acidic sauces and clean-tasting blanched or raw vegetables. Serve mouth-drying starches with mouthwatering sauces, and recognize that a well-dressed, juicy salad can serve as both a side dish and a sauce. On the other hand, pair simply cooked meats, such as grilled steak or poached chicken, with roasted, sautéed, or fried vegetables glazed with Maillard’s dark lacquer. Let the seasons inspire you; foods that are in season together naturally complement one another on the plate. For example, corn, beans, and squash grow as companions in the field, then the three sisters find their way together into succotash. Tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini, and basil become ratatouille, tian, or caponata depending on where you are on the Mediterranean coast. Sage, a hardy winter herb, is a natural complement to winter squash because its leaves—and its flavor—stand up to the cold of winter. ~ Samin Nosrat,
1139:You must find a place on a woman's body and live there.
In the dark, the noise far away, Sam ran his hands over Calliope's body and the world of work and worry seemed to move away. He found two depressions at the bottom of her back where sunlight collected, and he lived there, out of the wind and noise. He grew old there, died and ascended to the Great Spirit, found heaven in her cheek on his chest, the warm wind of her breath across his stomach carried sweet grass and sage, and... In another lifetime he had lived on the soft skin under her right breast, his lips riding light over the ridge and valley of every rib, shuffling through downy, dew damp hairs like a child dancing through autumn leaves. In the mountain of her breast, he fasted at the medicine wheel of her aureole, received a vision that he and she were steam people, mingled wet with no skin seperating them. And there he lived, happy. She followed, traveled, lived with him and in him as he was in her. They lived lifetimes and slept and dreamed together. It was swell. ~ Christopher Moore,
1140:while people go on chatting about a million and one things
I mostly sit and observe with ascended understandings
as they bring up the topic of death and of a person dying
I listen quietly while often accidentally smiling
at the absurdity of anybody ever believing in death
I don't mean to be insensitive towards a body's last breath
a higher Reality laid bare, bodily expiration is of no account
with this revelation incalculable life fears we surmount
the Sage is notorious for finding strange things funny
giggling at horrors and ridiculous events not so sunny
sometimes a straight face is merely for show
but spy the glint in his eye about a truth you don’t know
an unfounded assumption is that we only live once
not a Mystic throughout history has avowed this occurrence
Christian ones may not have mentioned being reborn again
they also didn't deny it—their teaching was kept plain
just as the Buddha intentionally avoided the God concept
ultimately not essential, under the rug reincarnation is swept ~ Jarett Sabirsh,
1141:Mark came home late one frozen Sunday carrying a bag of small, silver fish. They were smelts, locally known as icefish. He’d brought them at the store in the next town south, across from which a little village had sprung up on the ice of the lake, a collection of shacks with holes drilled in and around them. I’d seen the men going from the shore to the shacks on snowmobiles, six-packs of beer strapped on behind them like a half dozen miniature passengers. “Sit and rest,” Mark said. “I’m cooking.” He sautéed minced onion in our homemade butter, added a little handful of crushed, dried sage, and when the onion was translucent, he sprinkled n flour to make a roux, which he loosened with beer, in honor of the fishermen. He added cubed carrot, celery root, potato, and some stock, and then the fish, cut into pieces, and when they were all cooked through he poured in a whole morning milking’s worth of Delia’s yellow cream. Icefish chowder, rich and warm, eaten while sitting in Mark’s lap, my feet so close to the woodstove that steam came off my damp socks. ~ Kristin Kimball,
1142:»Und Sie, Herr Hyazinth, [...] sind Sie etwa kein Freund von der katholischen Religion?«

»Ich bin ein Freund davon, und bin auch wieder kein Freund davon«, antwortete jener mit bedenklichem Kopfwiegen.
»Es ist eine gute Religion für einen vornehmen Baron, der den ganzen Tag müßig gehen kann, und für einen Kunstkenner; aber es ist keine Religion für einen Hamburger [...]. Ich sehe das Pläsier nicht ein, es ist eine Religion als wenn der liebe Gott, Gott bewahre, eben gestorben wäre, und es riecht dabei nach Weihrauch, wie bei einem Leichenbegängnis, und dabei brummt eine so traurige Begräbnismusik, daß man die Melancholik bekömmt – ich sage Ihnen, es ist keine Religion für einen Hamburger.«

»Aber, Herr Hyazinth, wie gefällt Ihnen denn die
protestantische Religion?«

»Die ist mir wieder zu vernünftig, Herr Doktor, und
gäbe es in der protestantischen Kirche keine Orgel,
so wäre sie gar keine Religion. Unter uns gesagt, diese Religion schadet nichts und ist so rein wie ein Glas Wasser, aber, sie hilft auch nichts.[...]« ~ Heinrich Heine,
1143:Und glaube mir nur, Freund Höllenlärm! Die grössten Ereignisse – das sind nicht unsre lautesten, sondern unsre stillsten Stunden.
Nicht um die Erfinder von neuem Lärme: um die Erfinder von neuen Werthen dreht sich die Welt; unhörbar dreht sie sich.
Und gesteh es nur! Wenig war immer nur geschehn, wenn dein Lärm und Rauch sich verzog. Was liegt daran, dass eine Stadt zur Mumie wurde, und eine Bildsäule im Schlamme liegt!
Und diess Wort sage ich noch den Umstürzern von Bildsäulen. Das ist wohl die grösste Thorheit, Salz in's Meer und Bildsäulen in den Schlamm zu werfen. Im Schlamme eurer Verachtung lag die Bildsäule: aber das ist gerade ihr Gesetz, dass ihr aus der Verachtung wieder Leben und lebende Schönheit wächst!
Mit göttlicheren Zügen steht sie nun auf und leidendverführerisch; und wahrlich! sie wird euch noch Dank sagen, dass ihr sie umstürztet, ihr Umstürzer!
Diesen Rath aber rathe ich Königen und Kirchen und Allem, was alters- und tugendschwach ist – lasst euch nur umstürzen! Dass ihr wieder zum Leben kommt, und zu euch – die Tugend! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1144:She tsked so that he would know she found him stupid without coming right out and saying so. “Okay, I said I was sorry. That he was right and I’m sorry.” “After he cleaned your clock, I assume....” “Well, yeah. After.” “Men.” “We’re usually on the same team,” he pointed out. “When there’s not a woman between you.” “I’m getting that.” “You know, there’s this little rule about opinions. They’re only good when someone actually asks you for them.” “He did say something about how I could just shut the fuck up.” “There you go. Who’d figure Preacher for sage advice?” He made a face at her and put the ice back against his face. He winced. “Hurts, huh?” “Damn, that boy’s got an arm.” “You’re welcome to sit over here and hide out for as long as you want, but sooner or later you’re going to have to kiss and make up. Aren’t you at the bar today so he can go over to see the judge?” “Yeah. But I was going to give him time to cool down a little. I’m going to need at least one eye to see out of.” “Oh, I think if Preacher had more in mind for you, he’d have already delivered it.” A ~ Robyn Carr,
1145:The poet is the sayer, the namer, and represents beauty. He is a sovereign, and stands on the centre. For the world is not painted, or adorned, but is from the beginning beautiful; and God has not made some beautiful things, but Beauty is the creator of the universe. Therefore the poet is not any permissive potentate, but is emperor in his own right. Criticism is infested with a cant of materialism, which assumes that manual skill and activity is the first merit of all men, and disparages such as say and do not, overlooking the fact, that some men, namely, poets, are natural sayers, sent into the world to the end of expression, and confounds them with those whose province is action, but who quit it to imitate the sayers. The poet does not wait for the hero or the sage, but, as they act and think primarily, so he writes primarily what will and must be spoken, reckoning the others, though primaries also, yet, in respect to him, secondaries and servants; as sitters or models in the studio of a painter, or as assistants who bring building materials to an architect. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1146:You can’t have a relationship with someone hoping they’ll change. You have to be willing to commit to them as they are, with no expectations. And if they happen to choose to change at some point along the way, then that’s just a bonus. Words start tumbling out of her mouth, concluding with her desire to move in and start a family with me. It sends a chill up my spine, because this is exactly what I want with Ingrid if things work out between us. “You want to move in, stay with me forever, and start a family together?” “Yes,” she says, her eyes widening with equal parts sincerity and supplication. I picture what the future would actually be like with Sage: I imagine us married and raising children—until one day when she feels trapped again, she runs away to Fiji without warning, leaving me to explain to the kids that Mommy left to search for herself and I don’t know when she’s coming back. The winds of ambivalence will continue blowing her back to me and away again, back and away, back and away. They say that love is blind, but it’s trauma that’s blind. Love sees what is. ~ Neil Strauss,
1147:Stuck
I'm up against it day by day,
My ignorance is distressing;
The things I don't know on the way
I'm busily confessing.
Time was I used to think I knew
Some useful bits of knowledge
And could be sure of one or two
Real facts I'd gleaned in college.
But I'm unfitted for the task
Of answering things my boy can ask.
Now, who can answer queries queer
That four-year-olds can think up?
And tell in simple phrase and clear
Why fishes do not drink up
The water in the streams and lakes,
Or where the wind is going,
And tell exactly how God makes
The roses that are growing?
I'm sure I cannot satisfy
Each little when, and how, and why.
Had I the wisdom of a sage
Possessed of all the learning
That can be gleaned from printed page
From bookworm's closest turning,
That eager knowledge-seeking lad
That questions me so gayly
Could still go round and boast he had
With queries floored me daily.
He'll stick, I'll bet, in less than five
Brief minutes any man alive.
~ Edgar Albert Guest,
1148:Man is made of thought, of will and of love: he can think truth or error, he can will good or evil, he can love beauty or ugliness. Now thought of the true — or knowledge of the real — demands on the one hand willing of the good and on the other love of the beautiful, hence virtue, for virtue is none other than beauty of soul; that is why the Greeks, who were aesthetes as well as thinkers, included virtue within philosophy. Without beauty of soul, all willing is sterile, it is petty and closes itself to grace; and in an analogous manner: without effort of will, all spiritual thought ultimately remains superficial and ineffectual and leads to pretension. Virtue coincides with a sensibility proportioned — or conformed — to the Truth, and that is why the soul of the sage soars above things and thereby above itself, if one may put it thus; whence the disinterestedness, nobleness and generosity of great souls. Quite clearly, the consciousness of metaphysical principles cannot go hand in hand with moral pettiness, such as ambition and hypocrisy : "Be ye perfect even as your Father in Heaven is perfect. ~ Frithjof Schuon,
1149:Ay Me, Ay Me, I Sigh The Scythe A-Field
Ay me, ay me, I sigh to see the scythe a-field;
Down goeth the grass, soon wrought to wither'd hay:
Ay me, alas! ay me, alas, that beauty needs must yield,
And princes pass, as grass doth fade away.
Ay me, ay me, that life can not have lasting leave,
Nor gold take hold of everlasting joy:
Ay me, alas! ay me, alas, that time hath talents to receive,
And yet no time can make a suer stay.
Ay me, ay me, that wit can not have wished choice,
Nor wish can win that will desires to see:
Ay me, alas! ay me, alas, that mirth can promise no rejoice,
Nor study tell what afterward shall be.
Ay me, ay me, that no sure staff is given to age,
Nor age can give sure wit that youth will take:
Ay me, alas! ay me, alas, that no counsel wise and sage
Will shun the show that all doth mar and make.
Ay me, ay me, come, Time, shear on and shake thy hay,
It is no boot to balk thy bitter blows:
Ay me, alas! ay me, alas, come, Time, take everything away,
For all is thine, be it good or bad, that grows.
~ Anonymous Americas,
1150:But thou shalt leave it all behind thee! It shall not cumber thy steps, as thou treadest along the forest-path; neither shalt thou freight the ship with it, if thou prefer to cross the sea. Leave this wreck and ruin here where it hath happened! Meddle no more with it! Begin all anew! Hast thou exhausted possibility in the failure of this one trial? Not so! The future is yet full of trial and success. There is happiness to be enjoyed! There is good to be done! Exchange this false life of thine for a true one. Be, if thy spirit summons thee to such a mission, the teacher and apostle of the red men. Or,—as is more thy nature,—be a scholar and a sage among the wisest and the most renowned of the cultivated world. Preach! Write! Act! Do any thing, save to lie down and die! Give up this name of Arthur Dimmesdale, and make thyself another, and a high one, such as thou canst wear without fear or shame. Why shouldst thou tarry so much as one other day in the torments that have so gnawed into thy life!—that have made thee feeble to will and to do!—that will leave thee powerless even to repent! Up, and away! ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne,
1151:His words reminded me of something else I’d meant to bring up when he got back to town, something that had taken a very low priority. “Your coat—you never took it back after the wedding. It’s in my car.”
He waved dismissively “Keep it. I’ve got others.”
“What am I going to do with a wool coat?” I asked. “Especially here in Palm Springs?”
“Sleep with it,” he suggested. “Think of me.”
I put my hands on my hips and tried to stare him down, which wasn’t easy since he was so tall. That, and because his words suddenly returned me to the disorienting feeling I’d had sitting on his bed. “You said you weren’t going to bring up any romantic stuff around me.”
“Was that romantic?” he asked. “I was just making the suggestion, since the coat’s so heavy and warm. I figured you’d think of me since it was such a nice gesture. And yet, once again, you’re the one who finds romantic subtext in everything I say.”
“I do not. You know that’s not what I meant.”
He shook his head in mock sympathy. “I tell you, Sage. Sometimes I think I’m the one who needs to take out the restraining order on you.”
“Adrian! ~ Richelle Mead,
1152:When we hear the ancient bells growling on a Sunday morning we ask ourselves: Is it really possible! This, for a jew, crucified two thousand years ago, who said he was God's son? The proof of such a claim is lacking. Certainly the Christian religion is an antiquity projected into our times from remote prehistory; and the fact that the claim is believed - whereas one is otherwise so strict in examining pretensions - is perhaps the most ancient piece of this heritage. A god who begets children with a mortal woman; a sage who bids men work no more, have no more courts, but look for the signs of the impending end of the world; a justice that accepts the innocent as a vicarious sacrifice; someone who orders his disciples to drink his blood; prayers for miraculous interventions; sins perpetrated against a god, atoned for by a god; fear of a beyond to which death is the portal; the form of the cross as a symbol in a time that no longer knows the function and ignominy of the cross -- how ghoulishly all this touches us, as if from the tomb of a primeval past! Can one believe that such things are still believed? ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1153:At this juncture, the entire planet is locked, figuratively, in a room with the sociocultural equivalent of Hannibal Lecter. An individual of consummate taste and refinement, imbued with indelible grace and charm, he distracts his victims with the brilliance of his intellect, even while honing his blade. He is thus able to dine alone upon their livers, his feast invariably candlelit, accompanied by lofty music and a fine wine. Over and over the ritual is repeated, always hidden, always denied in order that it may be continued. So perfect is Lecter's pathology that, from the depths of his scorn for the inferiors upon whom he feeds, he advances himself as their sage and therapist, he who is incomparably endowed with the ability to explain their innermost meanings, he professes to be their savior. His success depends upon being embraced and exalted by those upon whom he preys. Ultimately, so long as Lecter is able to retain his mask of omnipotent gentility, he can never be stopped. The spirit of Hannibal Lecter is thus at the core of an expansionist European 'civilization' which has reached out to engulf the planet. ~ Ward Churchill,
1154:A girl and a boy, sitting lazily cross-legged under a pale green willow, picking at the grass. She is lying with her head in his lap, long red hair fanned against his knee. Her skin is not my unnatural red but like honeyed cream. She grins up at him, his eyes the color of an evergreen forest, of dragonfly wings, his corn-gold, too-long hair falling over his forehead. And she laughs. When she does her back, her throat arches slightly, and he blushes. He smells of wheat fields and fallen autumn apples soft against the earth, and it is a smell she knows like her own. Under the filmy reed-curtain of the old willow tree, they hold hands and talk quietly, shoes discarded like peach pits. The sun is low in the sky, warm and orange-gold on their young faces, their strong white smiles and freshly washed hair. The light spills onto their shoulders like water from a well. There are sharp-smelling rosemary branches braided into her hair, with their little blue blossoms, and the oil is on their brown fingers. The boy whispers something in the girl’s ear, and she closes her eyes, lashes smoking cheekbones like bundles of sage. ~ Catherynne M Valente,
1155:The Philosopher, The Young Man, And His Statue
A Fond Athenian Mother brought
A Sculptor to indulge her Thought,
And carve her Only Son;
Who to such strange perfection wrought,
That every Eye the Statue caught
Nor ought was left undone.
A youthful Smile adorn'd the Face,
The polish gave that Smile a Grace;
And through the Marble reigns
(Which well the Artist's Skill cou'd trace,
And in their due Positions place)
A Thread of purple Veins.
The Parasites about it came,
(Whose Praises were too large to name)
And to each other said;
The Man so well had reach'd his Aim,
Th' Original cou'd o'er it claim
Only a native Red.
Mean while a Sage, amidst the Croud,
Thus, with a Precept wise and loud,
Check'd the Vain-glorious Boy;
By telling him, who now grew proud,
That tho' with Beauty 'twas endow'd,
The Figure was a Toy:
Of no Advantage to the State,
'Twou'd neither combate, nor debate,
But idly stand alone;
Bids him beware, whilst Men create
In Stone thus his Resemblance great,
He proves not like the Stone.
~ Anne Kingsmill Finch,
1156:Why would you do that? Why would you act like you didn’t know how to drive?”
“Isn’t it obvious, Sage? No, of course it isn’t. I did it so I’d have a reason to be around you—one I knew you couldn’t refuse.”
“But… why? Why would you want to do that?”
“Why?” he asked. “Because it was the closest I could get to doing this.”
He reached out and pulled me to him, one hand on my waist and the other behind my neck. He tipped my head up and lowered his lips to mine. I closed my eyes and melted as my whole body was consumed in that kiss. I was nothing. I was everything. Chills ran over my skin, and fire burned inside me. His body pressed closer to mine, and I wrapped my arms around his neck. His lips were warmer and softer than anything I could have ever imagined, yet fierce and powerful at the same time. Mine responded hungrily, and I tightened my hold on him. His fingers slid down the back of my neck, tracing its shape, and every place they touched was electric. But perhaps the best part of all was that I, Sydney Katherine Sage, guilty of
constantly analyzing the world around me, well, I stopped thinking.
And it was glorious. ~ Richelle Mead,
1157:Hubbard And Pelletier
TWO long-haired friends at table sat
And sipped some old Sauterne,
And each one sought throughout the chat
The other's tricks to learn.
'I see some dandruff on your coat,'
To Elbert whispered Roy;
Said Elbert, clearing out his throat:
'That's genius, my boy.'
'A goodly crop of hair you own,'
To Roy, then quoth the sage:
'Mine had not quite so bushy grown
When I was at your age.
I like the way you brush it back,
'Tis pleasing to the eye,
But one thing I perceive you lack,
And that's a flowing tie.'
'Why wear you such an awful thing?'
Then questioned Roy the Fra;
'Because it is distinguishing,
And men know who you are.
The hair and tie have marked me well,'
In confidence he spake,
'And Elbert Hubbard all can tell
Where'er my way I take.'
Not far from where this famous pair
Were chatting, sat a crowd:
Said one: 'That's Elbert Hubbard there!'
The voice was fairly loud.
'Which one?' exclaimed another then,
In still a higher pitch.
'The long-haired one,' he said again.
Said he: 'I know, but which?'
~ Edgar Albert Guest,
1158:Ahead, a house sits close to the road: a small, single-story place painted mint green. Ivy grows up one corner and onto the roof, the green tendrils swaying like a girl's hair let loose from a braid. In front there's a full and busy vegetable garden, with plants jostling for real estate and bees making a steady, low, collective hum. It reminds me of the aunties' gardens, and my nonna's when I was a kid. Tomato plants twist gently skywards, their lazy stems tied to stakes. Leafy heads of herbs- dark parsley, fine-fuzzed purple sage, bright basil that the caterpillars love to punch holes in. Rows and rows of asparagus. Whoever lives here must work in the garden a lot. It's wild but abundant, and I know it takes a special vigilance to maintain a garden of this size.
The light wind lifts the hair from my neck and brings the smell of tomato stalks. The scent, green and full of promise, brings to mind a childhood memory- playing in Aunty Rosa's yard as Papa speaks with a cousin, someone from Italy. I am imagining families of fairies living in the berry bushes: making their clothes from spiderweb silk, flitting with wings that glimmer pink and green like dragonflies'. ~ Hannah Tunnicliffe,
1159:Ballades Iii - Of Blue China
THERE’S a joy without canker or cark,
There ’s a pleasure eternally new,
’T is to gloat on the glaze and the mark
Of china that ’s ancient and blue;
Unchipp’d, all the centuries through
It has pass’d, since the chime of it rang,
And they fashion’d it, figure and hue,
In the reign of the Emperor Hwang.
These dragons (their tails, you remark,
Into bunches of gillyflowers grew),—
When Noah came out of the ark,
Did these lie in wait for his crew?
They snorted, they snapp’d, and they slew,
They were mighty of fin and of fang,
And their portraits Celestials drew
In the reign of the Emperor Hwang.
Here ’s a pot with a cot in a park,
In a park where the peach-blossoms blew,
Where the lovers eloped in the dark,
Lived, died, and were changed into two
Bright birds that eternally flew
Through the boughs of the may, as they sang;
’T is a tale was undoubtedly true
In the reign of the Emperor Hwang.
ENVOY
Come, snarl at my ecstasies, do,
Kind critic; your “tongue has a tang,”
But—a sage never heeded a shrew
In the reign of the Emperor Hwang.
~ Andrew Lang,
1160:And yet, you didn’t bother telling me yourself,” I snapped, still outraged. “I couldn’t! They made me promise not to.” Somehow, his betrayal hurt worse than all the others. I had come to trust him implicitly. How could he do this to me? “No one believed I’d be able to talk the Warriors down, so everyone just made contingency plans without me.” Never mind that I Hadn’t been able to talk them down. “Someone should have told me. You should have told me.” There was legitimate pain and regret in his voice. “I’m telling you, I wanted to. But I was trapped. You of all people should know what it’s like being caught between groups, Sage. Besides, don’t you remember what I said just before you got in the car with Trey?” I did actually. Almost word for word. No matter what happens, I want you to know that I never doubted what you’re going to do. It’s smart, and it’s brave. I slouched further into my seat and felt like I was on the verge of tears. Adrian was right. I did know what it was like to have your loyalty stretched between different groups. I understood the position he’d been in. It was just, some selfish part of me wished that I’d been the one his loyalty has been strongest to. ~ Richelle Mead,
1161:So in the library there are also books containing falsehoods. ...”

“Monsters exist because they are part of the divine plan, and in the horrible features of those same monsters the power of the Creator is revealed. And by divine plan, too, there exist also books by wizards, the cabalas of the Jews, the fables of pagan poets, the lies of the infidels. It was the firm and holy conviction of those who founded the abbey and sustained it over the centuries that even in books of falsehood, to the eyes of the sage reader, a pale reflection of the divine wisdom can shine. And therefore the library is a vessel of these, too. But for this very reason, you understand, it cannot be visited by just anyone. And furthermore,” the abbot added, as if to apologize for the weakness of this last argument, “a book is a fragile creature, it suffers the wear of time, it fears rodents, the elements, clumsy hands. If for a hundred and a hundred years everyone had been able freely to handle our codices, the majority of them would no longer exist. So the librarian protects them not only against mankind but also against nature, and devotes his life to this war with the forces of oblivion, the enemy of truth. ~ Umberto Eco,
1162:They climbed out of the pit to find a banquet awaiting them. A long table, four high-backed Untan-style chairs, a candelabra in the centre bearing four thick-stemmed beeswax candles, the golden light flickering down on silver plates heaped with Malazan delicacies. Oily santos fish from the shoals off Kartool, baked with butter and spices in clay; strips of marinated venison, smelling of almonds in the northern D'avorian style; grouse from the Seti plains stuffed with bull-berries and sage; baked gourds and fillets of snake from Dal Hon; assorted braised vegetables and four bottles of wine: a Malaz Island white from the Paran Estates, warmed rice wine from Itko Kan, a fullbodied red from Gris, and the orange-tinted belack wine from the Napan Isles.
Kalam stood staring at the bounteous apparition, as Stormy, with a grunt, walked over, boots puffing in the dust, and sat down in one of the chairs, reaching for the Grisian red.
'Well,' Quick Ben said, dusting himself off, 'this is nice. Who's the fourth chair for, you think?'
Kalam looked up at the looming bulk of the sky keep. 'I'd rather not think about that.'
Snorting sounds from Stormy as he launched into the venison strips. ~ Steven Erikson,
1163:Eternity
--- The year has run
Its round of seasons, has fulfilled its course,
Absolved its destined period, and is borne,
Silent and swift, to that devouring gulf,
Their womb and grave, where seasons, months and years,
Revolving periods of uncounted time,
All merge, and are forgotten.—Thou alone,
In thy deep bosom burying all the past,
Still art; and still from thine exhaustless store
New periods spring, Eternity.—Thy name
Or glad, or fearful, we pronounce, as thoughts
Wandering in darkness shape thee. Thou strange being,
Which art and must be, yet which contradict'st
All sense, all reasoning,—thou, who never wast
Less than thyself, and who still art thyself
Entire, though the deep draught which Time has taken
Equals thy present store—No line can reach
To thy unfathomed depths. The reasoning sage
Who can dissect a sunbeam, count the stars,
And measure distant worlds, is here a child,
And, humbled, drops his calculating pen.
On and still onward flows the ceaseless tide,
And wrecks of empires and of worlds are borne
Like atoms on its bosom.—Still thou art
And he who does inhabit thee.
~ Anna Laetitia Barbauld,
1164:The High-Heeled Boots
He stands upon the city street, keen-eyed, and brown of face,
He seems to bring a breath of air from some broad prairie space;
He’s perched upon a pair of heels that fit the stirrup’s curve,
That meet the bucking bronco’s plunge and counteract each swerve;
And of all the chaps with whom the gods are ever in cahoots
Give me the cattle-puncher in the high-heeled boots.
He brings a hint of wider skies, of ranges that are vast,
Of manful vigils in the days when sweeps the wintry blast;
All out of step with things in town, he sees the crowd surge by;
The sage is in his nostrils still — he hears the gaunt wolf cry;
He rides as Alexander rode — the bell rings when he shoots —
The gallant cattle-puncher in the high-heeled boots.
He is the last of that old guard defending Cattle Land,
Those knights who jousted for the cause — blood brothers of the brand;
But now they’ve fenced the water-hole, they’re harrowing the plain,
They’re changing all the sagebrush flats to fields of waving grain;
The cowmen will be gone, they say, and there are no recruits —
Good-bye, brave cattle-puncher in the high-heeled boots!
~ Arthur Chapman,
1165:I have spoken of the rich years when the rainfall was plentiful. But there were dry youeras too, and they put a terror on the valley. The water came in a thirty-year cycle. There would be five or six wet and wonderful years when there might be nineteen to twenty-five inches of rain, and the land would shout with grass. Then would come six or seven pretty good years of twelve to sixten inches of rain. And then the dry yars would come, and sometimes thre would be only seven or eight inches of rain. The land dried up and the grasses headed out miserably a few inches high and great bare scabby places appeared in the valley. The live oaks got a crusty look and the sage-brush was gray. The land cracked and the springs dried up and the cattle listlessly nibbled dry twigs. Then the farmers and the ranchers would be filled with disgust for the Salinas Valley. The cows would grow thin and sometimes starve to death. People would have to haul water in barrels to their farms just for drinking. Some families would sell out for nearly nothing and move away. And it never failed that during the dry years the people forgot about the rich years, and during the wet years they lost all memory of the dry years. It was always that way. ~ John Steinbeck,
1166:I have spoken of the rich years when the rainfall was plentiful. But there were dry years too, and they put a terror on the valley. The water came in a thirty-year cycle. There would be five or six wet and wonderful years when there might be nineteen to twenty-five inches of rain, and the land would shout with grass. Then would come six or seven pretty good years of twelve to sixteen inches of rain. And then the dry years would come, and sometimes there would be only seven or eight inches of rain. The land dried up and the grasses headed out miserably a few inches high and great bare scabby places appeared in the valley. The live oaks got a crusty look and the sage-brush was gray. The land cracked and the springs dried up and the cattle listlessly nibbled dry twigs. Then the farmers and the ranchers would be filled with disgust for the Salinas Valley. The cows would grow thin and sometimes starve to death. People would have to haul water in barrels to their farms just for drinking. Some families would sell out for nearly nothing and move away. And it never failed that during the dry years the people forgot about the rich years, and during the wet years they lost all memory of the dry years. It was always that way. ~ John Steinbeck,
1167:It is easy to maintain a situation while it is still secure;
It is easy to deal with a situation before symptoms develop;
It is easy to break a thing when it is yet brittle;
It is easy to dissolve a thing when it is yet minute.

Deal with a thing while it is still nothing;
Keep a thing in order before disorder sets in.

A tree that can fill the span of a man's arms
Grows from a downy tip;
A terrace nine storeys high
Rises from hodfuls of earth;
A journey of a thousand miles
Starts from beneath one's feet.

Whoever does anything to it will ruin it;
Whoever lays hold of it will lose it.

Therefore the sage, because he does nothing, never ruins anything;
And, because he does not lay hold of anything, loses nothing.

In their enterprises the people
Always ruin them when on the verge of success.
Be as careful at the end as at the beginning
And there will be no ruined enterprises.

Therefore the sage desires not to desire
And does not value goods which are hard to come by;
Learns to be without learning
And makes good the mistakes of the multitude
In order to help the myriad creatures to be natural and to refrain from daring to act. ~ Lao Tzu,
1168:The Child World
The child world is a wondrous world,
For there the flags of hate are furled,
And there the imps of wickedness
Cause neither sorrow nor distress.
And there is never strife for gold,
There petty gossip's never told,
There all is joy and wondrous mirth,
The child earth is a glorious earth.
The land of childhood is aglow
With smiles, and there pink roses grow
Upon the cheeks of boys and girls;
The golden rod is yellow curls,
And eyes of brown and eyes of blue
Are daisies and the violets, too;
And warm and true is every hand
That clings to yours in Childhood Land.
Who owns a spot on childhood's globe
Envies no king his ermine robe;
Envies no sage his manners wise,—
His world is rich with glad surprise,
The quaintest of all speech he hears,
The truest smiles, the sweetest tears
Are his possessions every day
However troubled be his way.
Who knows the joys of Childhood Land,
The pressure of a tiny hand,
The joy that's in a babe's caress,
The soft embrace of happiness,
The sweet good-nights, the shouts of glee
That greet the morning lustily,
Has riches, those who childless live
To know, would all their fortunes give.
~ Edgar Albert Guest,
1169:Simon, mark well my words! Wives are the devil ­ and I know!'
`In truth,' Alan sighed, `I am the only wise one amongst us all.'
`Art a silly lad!' Fulk rumbled, and cast him an affectionate
though fiery glance.
`Alan speaks sooth for once,' Simon said, and placed his finger on Margaret's indignant lips. He had her in his arms again, and like a needle to the magnet, Jeanne had drawn near to her Geoffrey. `For Alan throughout hath known that needs must I fall, and at Margot's feet.'
`Ah, and he knew that I loved thee, even before I knew it myself,' Margaret cried. `Methinks he hath worked very quietly to bring about our happiness. And yet he will not seek his own.'
`I observe thy folly,' he said, `and know mine own wisdom. That is happiness.'
Jeanne looked at Geoffrey, and a smile passed between them, of boundless conceit. Margaret stole her hand into Simon's, smiling also. Not one of them answered Alan, and he laughed,
leaning on his father's shoulder, and surveying his two friends with soft, satisfied eyes.
`Are my sage words beneath contempt?' he asked.
`Ay,' Simon answered simply, and looked down into Margaret's face for a long moment. A deep breath he drew, and glanced again at Alan. `Beneath contempt,' said Simon the Coldheart. ~ Georgette Heyer,
1170:The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
1171:They were properly mad in the Shakespearean sense, talking sense when you least expected it. In North London, where councillors once voted to change the name of the area to Nirvana, it is not unusual to walk the streets and be suddenly confronted by sage words from the chalkfaced, blue-lipped, or eyebrowless. From across the street or from the other end of a tube carriage they will use their schizophrenic talent for seeing connections in the random (for discerning the whole world in a grain of sand, for deriving narrative from nothing) to riddle you, to rhyme you, to strip you down, to tell you who you are and where you’re going (usually Baker Street—the great majority of modernday seers travel the Metropolitan Line) and why. But as a city we are not appreciative of these people. Our gut instinct is that they intend to embarrass us, that they’re out to shame us somehow as they lurch down the train aisle, bulbous-eyed and with carbuncled nose, preparing to ask us, inevitably, what we are looking at. What the fuck we are looking at. As a kind of preemptive defense mechanism, Londoners have learned not to look, never to look, to avoid eyes at all times so that the dreaded question “What you looking at?” and its pitiful, gutless, useless answer —“Nothing”—might be avoided. ~ Zadie Smith,
1172:The boy himself was in the grip of his impulse, without knowing what was happening to him. He was not performing a dance he already knew, a dance he had practiced before. This was no familiar rite of celebrating sun and morning that he had long ago invented. Only later would he realize that his dance and his transported state in general were only partly caused by the mountain air, the sun, the dawn, his sense of freedom. They were also a response to the change awaiting him, the new chapter in his young life that had come in the friendly and awe-inspiring form of the Magister. In that morning hour many elements conspired in the soul of young Tito to shape his destiny and distinguish this hour above a thousand others as a high, a festive, a consecrated time. Without knowing what he was doing, asking no questions, he obeyed the command of this ecstatic moment, danced his worship, prayed to the sun, professed with devout movements and gestures his joy, his faith in life, his piety and reverence, both proudly and submissively offered up in the dance his devout soul as a sacrifice to the sun and the gods, and no less to the man he admired and feared, the sage and musician, the Master of the magic Game who had come to him from mysterious realms, his future teacher and friend. ~ Hermann Hesse,
1173:When he is sitting quiet, thinking about his sins, or is absent-minded or unapprehensive of danger, his majestic ears project above him conspicuously; but the breaking of a twig will scare him nearly to death, and then he tilts his ears back gently and starts for home. All you can see, then, for the next minute, is his long gray form stretched out straight and "streaking it" through the low sage-brush, head erect, eyes right, and ears just canted a little to the rear, but showing you where the animal is, all the time, the same as if he carried a jib. Now and then he makes a marvelous spring with his long legs, high over the stunted sage-brush, and scores a leap that would make a horse envious. Presently he comes down to a long, graceful "lope," and shortly he mysteriously disappears. He has crouched behind a sage-bush, and will sit there and listen and tremble until you get within six feet of him, when he will get under way again. But one must shoot at this creature once, if he wishes to see him throw his heart into his heels, and do the best he knows how. He is frightened clear through, now, and he lays his long ears down on his back, straightens himself out like a yard-stick every spring he makes, and scatters miles behind him with an easy indifference that is enchanting. ~ Mark Twain,
1174:Siddhartha now also realized why he had struggled in vain with this Self when he was a Brahmin and an ascetic. Too much knowledge had hindered him; too many holy verses, too many sacrificial rites, too much mortification of the flesh, too much doing and striving. He had been full of arrogance; he had always been the cleverest, the most eager—always a step ahead of the others, always the learned and intellectual one, always the priest or the sage. His Self had crawled into this priesthood, into this arrogance, into this intellectuality. It sat there tightly and grew, while he thought he was destroying it by fasting and penitence. Now he understood it and realized that the inward voice had been right, that no teacher could have brought him salvation. That was why he had to go into the world, to lose himself in power, women and money; that was why he had to be a merchant, a dice player, a drinker and a man of property, until the priest and Samana in him were dead. That was why he had to undergo those horrible years, suffer nausea, learn the lesson of the madness of an empty, futile life till the end, till he reached bitter despair, so that Siddhartha the pleasure-monger and Siddhartha the man of property could die. He had died and a new Siddhartha had awakened from his sleep. ~ Hermann Hesse,
1175:Sailor And Shade
SAILOR
You, who have compassed land and sea,
Now all unburied lie;
All vain your store of human lore,
For you were doomed to die.
The sire of Pelops likewise fell,-Jove's honored mortal guest;
So king and sage of every age
At last lie down to rest.
Plutonian shades enfold the ghost
Of that majestic one
Who taught as truth that he, forsooth,
Had once been Pentheus' son;
Believe who may, he's passed away,
And what he did is done.
A last night comes alike to all;
One path we all must tread,
Through sore disease or stormy seas
Or fields with corpses red.
Whate'er our deeds, that pathway leads
To regions of the dead.
SHADE
The fickle twin Illyrian gales
Overwhelmed me on the wave;
But you that live, I pray you give
My bleaching bones a grave!
Oh, then when cruel tempests rage
You all unharmed shall be;
Jove's mighty hand shall guard by land
And Neptune's on the sea.
Perchance you fear to do what may
Bring evil to your race?
Oh, rather fear that like me here
You'll lack a burial place.
So, though you be in proper haste,
262
Bide long enough, I pray,
To give me, friend, what boon shall send
My soul upon its way!
~ Eugene Field,
1176:Political Economy
'I beg you to note,' said a Man to a Goose,
As he plucked from her bosom the plumage all loose,
'That pillows and cushions of feathers and beds
As warm as maids' hearts and as soft as their heads,
Increase of life's comforts the general sum
Which raises the standard of living.' 'Come, come,'
The Goose said, impatiently, 'tell me or cease,
How that is of any advantage to geese.'
'What, what!' said the man-'you are very obtuse!
Consumption no profit to those who produce?
No good to accrue to Supply from a grand
Progressive expansion, all round, of Demand?
Luxurious habits no benefit bring
To those who purvey the luxurious thing?
Consider, I pray you, my friend, how the growth
Of luxury promises-' 'Promises,' quoth
The sufferer, 'what?-to what course is it pledged
To pay me for being so often defledged?'
'Accustomed'-this notion the plucker expressed
As he ripped out a handful of down from her breast
'To one kind of luxury, people soon yearn
For others and ever for others in turn;
And the man who to-night on your feathers will rest,
His mutton or bacon or beef to digest,
His hunger to-morrow will wish to assuage
By dining on goose with a dressing of sage.'
~ Ambrose Bierce,
1177:The chief guide which must direct us in the choice of a profession is the welfare of mankind and our own perfection. It should not be thought that these two interests could be in conflict, that one would have to destroy the other; on the contrary, man's nature is so constituted that he can attain his own perfection only by working for the perfection, for the good, of his fellow men.

If he works only for himself, he may perhaps become a famous man of learning, a great sage, an excellent poet, but he can never be a perfect, truly great man.

History calls those men the greatest who have ennobled themselves by working for the common good; experience acclaims as happiest the man who has made the greatest number of people happy; religion itself teaches us that the ideal being whom all strive to copy sacrificed himself for the sake of mankind, and who would dare to set at nought such judgments?

If we have chosen the position in life in which we can most of all work for mankind, no burdens can bow us down, because they are sacrifices for the benefit of all; then we shall experience no petty, limited, selfish joy, but our happiness will belong to millions, our deeds will live on quietly but perpetually at work, and over our ashes will be shed the hot tears of noble people. ~ Karl Marx,
1178:Misdemeanor Mushrooms Preheat oven to 325 degrees F., rack in the middle position   This recipe is from Bill Jessup, Charlie Jessup’s cousin and he’s a detective. Charlie says he calls these “Misdemeanor Mushrooms,” because they’re so good they ought to be illegal.   2 pounds pork sausage 3 cloves of finely chopped garlic 2 Tablespoons ground sage 8-ounce package cream cheese 1 Tablespoon parsley 1 ounce Marsala wine (optional) 1 pound medium to large mushrooms Parmesan cheese (to sprinkle)   In a large, non-stick skillet, combine sausage, garlic and sage. Sauté until sausage is browned and garlic is translucent. Drain fat from skillet and add softened, cubed cream cheese and parsley. Simmer for 10 minutes, stir in the wine (if you want to use it,) remove from heat, and cover. Wash mushrooms. Remove stems and set caps aside. Chop the stems very fine and stir into the sausage/ cheese mixture. Brush caps with melted butter and arrange cap-down on a non-stick baking sheet. (Bill says if you shave just a bit from the bottom of the cap to make them flat, they’ll sit on the pan a lot better.) Fill each cap with a heaping mound of warm sausage mixture and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake in a 325-degree F. oven for 15 minutes. Yield: Serves 15 to 20 people as an appetizer (unless Charlie ~ Joanne Fluke,
1179:Everything has its "that," everything has its "this." From the point of view of "that" you cannot see it, but through understanding you can know it. So I say, "that" comes out of "this" and "this" depends on "that" - which is to say that "this" and "that" give birth to each other. But where there is birth there must be death; where there is death there must be birth. Where there is acceptability there must be unacceptability; where there is unacceptability there must be acceptability. Where there is recognition of right there must be recognition of wrong; where there is recognition of wrong there must be recognition of right. Therefore the sage does not proceed in such a way, but illuminates all in the light of Heaven. He too recognizes a "this," but a "this" which is also "that," a "that" which is also "this." His "that" has both a right and a wrong in it; his "this" too has both a right and a wrong in it. So, in fact, does he still have a "this" and "that"? Or does he in fact no longer have a "this" and "that"? A state in which "this" and "that" no longer find their opposites is called the hinge of the Way. When the hinge is fitted into the socket, it can respond endlessly. Its right then is a single endlessness and its wrong too is a single endlessness. So, I say, the best thing to use is clarity. ~ Zhuangzi,
1180:I placed the tubes of paint on the palette and selected a small canvas. I prepared the palette with an assortment of colors, then closed my eyes, remembering the way the moors had looked when I rode into town with Lord Livingston. He'd been so different on that drive into the village before he left for London. Had that been the side of him that Lady Anna had fallen in love with? I dipped my brush into the black paint and then mixed in some white until I'd created the right shade of gray, then touched the brush to the canvas. I loved the feeling of the paintbrush in my hand. He'd been kind to buy me the art supplies, but I remembered how he'd behaved in the dining room and at other times before that. 'How could he be so cruel, so unfeeling?'
Once I'd painted the clouds, I moved on to the hills, mixing a sage green color for the grass and then dotting the foreground with a bit of lavender to simulate the heather. I stepped back from the canvas and frowned. It needed something else. But what? I looked out the window to the orchard.
The Middlebury Pink. 'Who took the page from Lady Anna's book? Lord Livingston?' I dabbed my brush into the brown paint and created the structure of the tree. Next I dotted the branches with its heart-shaped leaves and large, white, saucer-size blossoms with pink tips. ~ Sarah Jio,
1181:How do I know that the love of life is not a delusion? Or that the fear of death is not like a young person running away from home and unable to find his way back? The Lady Li Chi was the daughter of a border warden, Ai. When the state of Chin captured her, she wept until she had drenched her robes; then she came to the King’s palace, shared the King’s bed, ate his food, and repented of her tears. How do I know whether the dead now repent for their former clinging to life? ‘Come the morning, those who dream of the drunken feast may weep and moan; when the morning comes, those who dream of weeping and moaning go hunting in the fields. When they dream, they don’t know it is a dream. Indeed, in their dreams they may think they are interpreting dreams, only when they awake do they know it was a dream. Eventually there comes the day of reckoning and awakening, and then we shall know that it was all a great dream. Only fools think that they are now awake and that they really know what is going on, playing the prince and then playing the servant. What fools! The Master and you are both living in a dream. When I say a dream, I am also dreaming. This very saying is a deception. If after ten thousand years we could once meet a truly great sage, one who understands, it would seem as if it had only been a morning. ~ Zhuangzi,
1182:O Delices D’amour!
O délices d'amour! et toi, molle paresse,
Vous aurez donc usé mon oisive jeunesse!
Les belles sont partout. Pour chercher les beaux-arts,
Des Alpes vainement j'ai franchi les remparts;
Rome d'amours en foule assiège mon asile,
Sage vieillesse, accours! Ô déesse tranquille,
De ma jeune saison éteins ces feux brûlants,
Sage vieillesse! Heureux qui, dès ses premiers ans,
A senti de son sang, dans ses veines stagnantes,
Couler d'un pas égal les ondes languissantes;
Dont les désirs jamais n'ont troublé la raison;
Pour qui les yeux n'ont point de suave poison;
Au sein de qui jamais une absente perdue
N'a laissé l'aiguillon d'une trop belle vue;
Qui, s'il regarde et loue un front si gracieux,
Ne le voit plus, sitôt qu'il n'est plus sous ses yeux!
Doux et cruels tyrans, brillantes héroïnes,
Femmes, de ma mémoire habitantes divines,
Fantômes enchanteurs, cessez de m'égarer.
O mon coeur! ô mes sens! laissez-moi respirer.
Laissez-moi dans la paix de l'ombre solitaire
Travailler à loisir quelque oeuvre noble et fière
Qui, sur l'amas des temps propre à se maintenir,
Me recommande aux yeux des âges à venir.
Mais, non! j'implore en vain un repos favorable;
Je t'appartiens, Amour, Amour inexorable!
~ Andre Marie de Chenier,
1183:However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. It is not so bad as you are. It looks poorest when you are richest. The fault-finder will find faults even in paradise. Love your life, poor as it is. You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poor-house. The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the alms-house as brightly as from the rich man’s abode; the snow melts before its door as early in the spring. I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace. The town’s poor seem to me often to live the most independent lives of any. May be they are simply great enough to receive without misgiving. Most think that they are above being supported by the town; but it oftener happens that they are not above supporting themselves by dishonest means, which should be more disreputable. Cultivate poverty like a garden herb, like sage. Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. Turn the old; return to them. Things do not change; we change. Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. God will see that you do not want society. If I were confined to a corner of a garret all my days, like a spider, the world would be just as large to me while I had my thoughts about me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1184:A Father's Wish
What do I want my boy to be?
Oft is the question asked of me,
And oft I ask it of myselfWhat corner, niche or post or shelf
In the great hall of life would I
Select for him to occupy?
Statesman or writer, poet, sage
Or toiler for a weekly wage,
Artist or artisan? Oh, what
Is to become his future lot?
For him I do not dare to plan;
I only hope he'll be a man.
I leave it free for him to choose
The tools of life which he shall use,
Brush, pen or chisel, lathe or wrench,
The desk of commerce or the bench,
And pray that when he makes his choice
In each day's task he shall rejoice.
I know somewhere there is a need
For him to labor and succeed;
Somewhere, if he be clean and true,
Loyal and honest through and through,
He shall be fit for any clan,
And so I hope he'll be a man.
I would not build my hope or ask
That he shall do some certain task,
Or bend his will to suit my own;
He shall select his post alone.
Life needs a thousand kinds of men,
Toilers and masters of the pen,
Doctors, mechanics, sturdy hands
To do the work which it commands,
And wheresoe'er he's pleased to go,
Honor and triumph he may know.
Therefore I must do all I can
To teach my boy to be a man.
31
~ Edgar Albert Guest,
1185:Brock
One voice, one people, one in heart
And soul and feeling and desire.
Re-light the smouldering martial fire
And sound the mute trumpet! Strike the lyre!
The hero dead cannot expire:
The dead still play their part.
Raise high the monumental stone!
A nation's fealty is theirs,
And we are the rejoicing heirs,
The honoured sons of sires whose cares
We take upon us unawares
As freely as our own.
We boast not of the victory,
But render homage, deep and just,
To his–to their–immortal dust,
Who proved so worthy of their trust;
No lofty pile nor sculptured bust
Can herald their degree.
No tongue can blazon forth their fame–
The cheers that stir the sacred hill
Are but mere promptings of the will
That conquered them, that conquers still;
And generations yet shall thrill
At Brock's remembered name.
Some souls are the Hesperides
Heaven sends to guard the golden age,
Illumining the historic page
With record of their pilgrimage.
True martyr, hero, poet, sage,–
And he was one of these.
Each in his lofty sphere, sublime,
Sits crowned above the common throng:
Wrestling with some pythonic wrong
In prayer, in thunders, thought or song,
16
Briareus-limbed, they sweep along,
The Typhons of the time.
~ Charles Sangster,
1186:The Soldiers Of The Plough
NO maiden dream, nor fancy theme,
Brown Labour's muse would sing;
Her stately mien and russet sheen
Demand a stronger wing.
Long ages since, the sage, the prince,
The man of lordly brow,
All honour gave that army brave,
The Soldiers of the Plough.
Kind Heaven speed the plough,
And bless the hands that guide it!
God gives the seed–
The bread we need,
Man's labour must provide it.
In every land, the toiling hand
Is blest as it deserves;
Not so the race who, in disgrace,
From honest labour swerves.
From fairest bowers bring rarest flowers
To deck the swarthy brow
Of him whose toil improves the soil,–
The Soldier of the Plough.
Kind Heaven speed the plough,
And bless the hands that guide it!
God gives the seed–
The bread we need,
Man's labour must provide it.
Blest is his lot, in hall or cot,
Who lives as Nature wills,
Who pours his corn from Ceres' horn,
And quaffs his native rills;
No breeze that sweeps trade's stormy deeps
Can touch his golden prow.
Their foes are few, their lives are true,
The Soldiers of the Plough.
Kind Heaven speed the plough,
And bless the hands that guide it!
God gives the seed–
168
The bread we need,
Man's labour must provide it.
~ Charles Sangster,
1187:Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow,
Lethe's weed and Hermes' feather;
Come to-day, and come to-morrow,
I do love you both together!
I love to mark sad faces in fair weather;
And hear a merry laugh amid the thunder;
Fair and foul I love together.
Meadows sweet where flames are under,
And a giggle at a wonder;
Visage sage at pantomine;
Funeral, and steeple-chime;
Infant playing with a skull;
Morning fair, and shipwreck'd hull;
Nightshade with the woodbine kissing;
Serpents in red roses hissing;
Cleopatra regal-dress'd
With the aspic at her breast;
Dancing music, music sad,
Both together, sane and mad;
Muses bright and muses pale;
Sombre Saturn, Momus hale;--
Laugh and sigh, and laugh again;
Oh the sweetness of the pain!
Muses bright, and muses pale,
Bare your faces of the veil;
Let me see; and let me write
Of the day, and of the night -
Both together: - let me slake
All my thirst for sweet heart-ache!
Let my bower be of yew,
Interwreath'd with myrtles new;
Pines and lime-trees full in bloom,
And my couch a low grass-tomb.
'This is the fourth of the undated fragments at the end of Volume I of the Life, Letters &c. (1848).' ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
~ Milton.
,
1188:The Canary In His Cage
SING away, ay, sing away,
Merry little bird,
Always gayest of the gay,
Though a woodland roundelay
You ne'er sung nor heard;
Though your life from youth to age
Passes in a narrow cage.
Near the window wild birds fly,
Trees are waving round:
Fair things everywhere you spy
Through the glass pane's mystery,
Your small life's small bound:
Nothing hinders your desire
But a little gilded wire.
Like a human soul you seem
Shut in golden bars:
Placed amidst earth's sunshine-stream,
Singing to the morning beam,
Dreaming 'neath the stars:
Seeing all life's pleasures clear,-But they never can come near.
Never! Sing, bird-poet mine,
As most poets do;-Guessing by an instinct fine
At some happiness divine
Which they never knew.
Lonely in a prison bright
Hymning for the world's delight.
Yet, my birdie, you're content
In your tiny cage:
Not a carol thence is sent
But for happiness is meant-Wisdom pure as sage:
Teaching, the true poet's part
Is to sing with merry heart.
163
So, lie down thou peevish pen,
Eyes, shake off all tears;
And my wee bird, sing again:
I'll translate your song to men
In these future years.
'Howsoe'er thy lot's assigned,
Bear it with a cheerful mind.'
~ Dinah Maria Mulock Craik,
1189:The rapid growth of Message- combined with an outpouring of florists offering consultations in the language of flowers to the streams of brides Marlena and I turned away- caused a subtle but concrete shift in the Bay Area flower industry. Marlena reported that peony, marigold, and lavender lingered in their plastic buckets at the flower market while tulips, lilac, and passionflower sold out before the sun rose. For the first time anyone could remember, jonquil became available long after its natural bloom season had ended. By the end of July, bold brides carried ceramic bowls of strawberries or fragrant clusters of fennel, and no one questioned their aesthetics but rather marveled at the simplicity of their desire.
If the trajectory continued, I realized, Message would alter the quantities of anger, grief, and mistrust growing in the earth on a massive scale. Farmers would uproot fields of foxglove to plant yarrow, the soft clusters of pink, yellow, and cream the cure to a broken heart. The prices of sage, ranunculus, and stock would steadily increase. Plum trees would be planted for the sole purpose of harvesting their delicate, clustered blossoms and sunflowers would fall permanently out of fashion, disappearing from flower stands, craft stores, and country kitchens. Thistle would be cleared compulsively from empty lots and overgrown gardens. ~ Vanessa Diffenbaugh,
1190:The Unknown God
To learned Athens, led by fame,
As once the man of Tarsus came,
With pity and surprise
Midst idol altars as he stood,
O'er sculptured marble, brass and wood,
He rolled his awful eyes.
But one, apart, his notice caught,
That seemed with higher meaning fraught,
Graved on the wounded stone;
Nor form nor name was there expressed;
Deep reverence filled the musing breast,
Perusing, “To the God unknown.”
Age after age has rolled away,
Altars and thrones have felt decay,
Sages and saints have risen;
And, like a giant roused from sleep,
Man has explored the pathless deep,
And lightnings snatched from heaven.
And many a shrine in dust is laid,
Where kneeling nations homage paid,
By rock, or fount, or grove:
Ephesian Dian sees no more
Her workmen fuse the silver ore,
Nor Capitolian Jove.
E'en Salem's hallowed courts have ceased
With solemn pomps her tribes to feast,
No more the victim bleeds;
To censers filled with rare perfumes,
And vestments from Egyptian looms,
A purer rite succeeds.
Yet still, where'er presumptuous man
His Maker's essence strives to scan,
And lifts his feeble hands,
Though saint and sage their powers unite,
To fathom that abyss of light,
Ah! still that altar stands.
149
~ Anna Laetitia Barbauld,
1191:Signor Renzo's lodge stood on a grassy knoll near the crest of the hill. It was a modest place, just a low stone hut, before which stretched a woven ceiling of vines. My dinner was cooked on an open fire by the table. This was no banquet, but what the cook called a pique-nique, a meal for hunters to take outdoors. After Renzo had chosen two fat ducklings from his larder, he spitted them over the fire. Then he made a dish of buttery rice crowned with speckled discs of truffle that tasted powerfully of God's own earth.
'Come sit with me,' I begged, for I did not like him to wait on me. So together we sat beneath the vines as I savored each morsel and guessed at the subtle flavorings. 'Wild garlic?' I asked, and he lifted his brows in surprise as he ate. 'And a herb,' I added, 'sage?'
'For a woman, you have excellent taste.'
For a woman, indeed! I made a play of stabbing him with my knife. It was most pleasant to eat our pique-nique and drink the red wine, which they make so strong in that region that they call it black or nero. I asked him to speak of himself, and between a trial of little dishes of wild leaves, chestnut fritters, and raisin cake, Signor Renzo told me he was born in the city and had worked at a pastry's cook shop as a boy, where he soon discovered that good foods mixed with ingenious hands made people happy and free with their purses. ~ Martine Bailey,
1192:THE ELFIN KNIGHT

Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
She must be a true love of mine

Tell her she'll sleep in a goose-feather bed
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Tell her I sear she'll have nothing to dread
She must be a true love of mine

Tell her tomorrow her answer make known
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
What e'er she may say I'll not leave her alone
She must be a true love of mine

Her answer came in a week and a day
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
I'm sorry good sir, I must answer thee nay
I'll not be a true love of thine

From the sting of my curse she can never be free
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Unless she unravels my riddlings three
She will be a true love of mine

Tell her to make me a magical shirt
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Without any seam or needlework
Else she'll be a true love of mine

Tell her to find me an acre of land
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Between the salt water and the sea strand
Else she'll be a true love of mine

Tell her to plow it with just a goat's horn
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
And sow it all over with one grain of corn
Else she'll be a true love of mine
And her daughters forever possessions of mine ~ Nancy Werlin,
1193:TO LAYLAH EIGHT-AND-TWENTY

Lamp of living loveliness,
Maid miraculously male,
Rapture of thine own excess
Blushing through the velvet veil
Where the olive cheeks aglow
Shadow-soften into snow,
Breasts like Bacchanals afloat
Under the proudly phallic throat!
Be thou to my pilgrimage
Light, and laughter sweet and sage,
Till the darkling day expire
Of my life in thy caress,
Thou my frenzy and my fire,
Lamp of living loveliness!

Thou the ruler of the rod
That beneath thy clasp extends
To the galaxies of God
From the gulph where ocean ends,
Cave of dragon, ruby rose,
Heart of hell, garden-close,
Hyacinth petal sweet to smell,
Split-hoof of the glad gazelle,
Be thou mine as I am thine,
As the vine's ensigns entwine
At the sacring of the sun,
Thou the even and I the odd
Being and becoming one
On the abacus of God!

Thou the sacred snake that rears
Death, a jewelled crest across
The enchantment of the years,
All my love that is my loss.
Life and death, two and one,
Hate and love, moon and sun,
Light and darkness, never swerve
From the norm, note the nerve,
Name the name, exceed the excess
Of thy lamp of loveliness,
Living snake of lazy love,
Ithyphallic that uprears
Its Palladium above
The enchantment of the years!

~ Aleister Crowley, Colophon
,
1194:Es geht die alte Sage, dass König Midas lange Zeit nach dem weisen Silen, dem Begleiter des Dionysus, im Walde gejagt habe, ohne ihn zu fangen. Als er ihm endlich in die Hände gefallen ist, fragt der König, was für den Menschen das Allerbeste und Allervorzüglichste sei. Starr und unbeweglich schweigt der Dämon; bis er, durch den König gezwungen, endlich unter gellem Lachen in diese Worte ausbricht: `Elendes Eintagsgeschlecht, des Zufalls Kinder und der Mühsal, was zwingst du mich dir zu sagen, was nicht zu hören für dich das Erspriesslichste ist? Das Allerbeste ist für dich gänzlich unerreichbar: nicht geboren zu sein, nicht zu sein, nichts zu sein. Das Zweitbeste aber ist für dich - bald zu sterben.

According to the old story, King Midas had long hunted wise Silenus, Dionysus' companion, without catching him. When Silenus had finally fallen into his clutches, the king asked him what was the best and most desirable thing of all for mankind. The daemon stood still, stiff and motionless, until at last, forced by the king, he gave a shrill laugh and spoke these words: 'Miserable, ephemeral race, children of hazard and hardship, why do you force me to say what it would be much more fruitful for you not to hear? The best of all things is something entirely outside your grasp: not to be born, not to be, to be nothing. But the second-best thing for you — is to die soon. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1195:author class:Shankara
English version by Swami Prabhavananda and Christopher Isherwood Who is thy wife? Who is thy son? The ways of this world are strange indeed. Whose are thou? Whence art thou come? Vast is thy ignorance, my beloved. Therefore ponder these things and worship the Lord. Behold the folly of Man: In childhood busy with his toys, In youth bewitched by love, In age bowed down with cares -- And always unmindful of the Lord! The hours fly, the seasons roll, life ebbs, But the breeze of hope blows continually in his heart. Birth brings death, death brings rebirth: This evil needs no proof. Where then O Man, is thy happiness? This life trembles in the balance Like water on a lotus-leaf -- And yet the sage can show us, in an instant, How to bridge this sea of change. When the body is wrinkled, when the hair turns gray, When the gums are toothless, and the old man's staff Shakes like a reed beneath his weight, The cup of his desire is still full. Thy son may bring thee suffering, Thy wealth is no assurance of heaven: Therefore be not vain of thy wealth, Or of thy family, or of thy youth -- All are fleeting, all must change. Know this and be free. Enter the joy of the Lord. Seek neither peace nor strife With kith or kin, with friend or foe. O beloved, if thou would attain freedom, be equal unto all.

~ Shattering of Illusion (Moha Mudgaram from The Crest Jewel of Discrimination)
,
1196:You are old, Father William,’ the young man said, ‘And your hair has become very white; And yet you incessantly stand on your head — Do you think, at your age, it is right?’ ‘In my youth,’ Father William replied to his son, ‘I feared it might injure the brain; But, now that I’m perfectly sure I have none, Why, I do it again and again.’ ‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘as I mentioned before, And have grown most uncommonly fat; Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door — Pray, what is the reason of that?’ ‘In my youth,’ said the sage, as he shook his grey locks, ‘I kept all my limbs very supple By the use of this ointment — one shilling the box — Allow me to sell you a couple?’ ‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘and your jaws are too weak For anything tougher than suet; Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak — Pray how did you manage to do it?’ ‘In my youth,’ said his father, ‘I took to the law, And argued each case with my wife; And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw, Has lasted the rest of my life.’ ‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘one would hardly suppose That your eye was as steady as ever; Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose — What made you so awfully clever?’ ‘I have answered three questions, and that is enough,’ Said his father; ‘don’t give yourself airs! Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff? Be off, or I’ll kick you down stairs! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1197:A young man came to a sage one day and asked, "Sire, what must I do to become wise?" The sage vouchsafed no answer. The youth after repeating his question a number of times, with a like result, at last left him, to return the next day with the same question. Again no answer was given and the youth returned on the third day, still repeat- ing his question, "Sire, what must I do to become wise?" Finally the'sage turned and went down to a near-by river. He entered the water, bidding the youth follow him. Upon arriving at a sufficient depth the sage took the young man by the shoulders and held him under the water, despite his struggles to free himself. At last, however, he released him and when the youth had regained his breath the sage questioned him: "Son, when you were under the water what did you most desire?" "The youth answered without hesitation, "Air, air! I wanted air!" "Would you not rather have had riches, pleasure, power or love, my son? Did you not think of any of these?" queried the sage. "No, sire! I wanted air and thought only of air," came the instant response. "Then," said the sage, "to become wise you must desire wisdom with as great intensity as you just now desired air. You must struggle for it, to the exclusion of every other aim in life. It must be your one and only aspiration, by day and by night. If you seek wisdom with that fervor, my son, you will surely beeome wise. ~ Max Heindel,
1198:The World’s Justice
If the sudden tidings came
That on some far, foreign coast,
Buried ages long from fame,
Had been found a remnant lost
Of that hoary race who dwelt
By the golden Nile divine,
Spake the Pharaoh's tongue and knelt
At the moon-crowned Isis' shrineHow at reverend Egypt's feet,
Pilgrims from all lands would meet!
If the sudden news were known,
That anigh the desert-place
Where once blossomed Babylon,
Scions of a mighty race
Still survived, of giant build,
Huntsmen, warriors, priest and sage,
Whose ancestral fame had filled,
Trumpet-tongued, the earlier age,
How at old Assyria's feet
Pilgrims from all lands would meet!
Yet when Egypt's self was young,
And Assyria's bloom unworn,
Ere the mythic Homer sung,
Ere the gods of Greece were born,
Lived the nation of one God,
Priests of freedom, sons of Shem,
Never quelled by yoke or rod,
Founders of JerusalemIs there one abides to-day,
Seeker of dead cities, say!
Answer, now as then, THEY ARE;
Scattered broadcast o'er the lands,
Knit in spirit nigh and far,
With indissoluble bands.
Half the world adores their God,
They the living law proclaim,
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And their guerdon is-the rod,
Stripes and scourgings, death and shame.
Still on Israel's head forlorn,
Every nation heaps its scorn.
~ Emma Lazarus,
1199:The classic recipes are goat, lamb, vegetable, and/or chicken biriyani. But when I was in New Orleans, at this restaurant, they served Louisiana barbecue shrimp, which was simply delicious. When I asked the waiter what was in the shrimp sauce, he rattled off a number of spices (rosemary, thyme, basil, oregano, et cetera) and so, I went with memory.
I marinated the raw prawns in mashed garlic, rosemary, basil, oregano, thyme, sage, paprika, black pepper, white pepper, cayenne, and onion powder, along with a dash of Worcestershire s