classes ::: book, cwsa, Sri_Aurobindo, Integral_Yoga,
children :::
branches :::
see also :::

Instances - Classes - See Also - Object in Names
Definitions - Quotes - Chapters


object:Letters On Poetry And Art
media class:book
collection class:cwsa
author class:Sri Aurobindo
subject class:Integral Yoga

PART ONE - POETRY AND ITS CREATION
Section I - The Sources of Poetry
Poetic Creation
1.1.1.01 - Three Elements of Poetic Creation
1.1.1.02 - Creation by the Word
1.1.1.03 - Creative Power and the Human Instrument
1.1.1.04 - Joy of Poetic Creation
1.1.1.05 - Essence of Inspiration
1.1.1.06 - Inspiration and Effort
1.1.1.07 - Aspiration, Opening, Recognition
1.1.1.08 - Self-criticism
1.1.1.09 - Correction by Second Inspiration

Sources of Inspiration
1.1.2.01 - Sources of Inspiration and Variety
1.1.2.02 - Poetry of the Material or Physical Consciousness

Overhead Poetry (1.1.3.x)
Examples of Overhead Poetry (1.1.4.x)

Section II - The Poetry of the Spirit
Psychic, Mystic and Spiritual Poetry
1.2.1.03 - Psychic and Esoteric Poetry
1.2.1.04 - Mystic Poetry
1.2.1.06 - Symbolism and Allegory
1.2.1.11 - Mystic Poetry and Spiritual Poetry
1.2.1.12 - Spiritual Poetry

Poet, Yogi, Rishi, Prophet, Genius
1.2.2.01 - The Poet, the Yogi and the Rishi
1.2.2.06 - Genius

The Poet and the Poem (1.2.3.x)

Section III - Poetic Technique
Technique, Inspiration, Artistry (1.3.1.x)
Rhythm (1.3.2.x)
English Metres (1.3.3.x)
Greek and Latin Classical Metres
Quantitative Metre in English and Bengali
Metrical Experiments in Bengali
Rhyme
English Poetic Forms
- The Ode
- Poem and Song
Substance, Style, Diction
Grades of Perfection in Poetic Style
Examples of Grades of Perfection in Poetic Style

Section IV - Translation
Translation: Theory
Translation: Practice
1.4.2.02 - The English Bible

PART TWO - ON HIS OWN AND OTHERS' POETRY
Section I - On His Poetry and Poetic Method
Inspiration, Effort, Development
2.1.1.04 - Reading, Yogic Force and the Development of Style

Early Poetic Influences
On Early Translations and Poems
On Poems Published in Ahana and Other Poems
Metrical Experiments
On Some Poems Written during the 1930s

On Savitri
2.1.7.05 - On the Inspiration and Writing of the Poem
2.1.7.06 - On the Characters of the Poem
2.1.7.07 - On the Verse and Structure of the Poem
2.1.7.08 - Comments on Specific Lines and Passages of the Poem

Comments on Some Remarks by a Critic
On the Publication of His Poetry

Section II - On Poets and Poetry
Great Poets of the World
2.2.1.01 - The World's Greatest Poets

Remarks on Individual Poets
2.2.2.01 - The Author of the Bhagavad Gita
2.2.2.03 - Virgil

Comments on Some Examples of Western Poetry (up to 1900)
Twentieth-Century Poetry
Comments on Examples of Twentieth-Century Poetry
Indian Poetry in English

Poets of the Ashram
2.2.7.01 - Some General Remarks

Comments on the Work of Poets of the Ashram

Philosophers, Intellectuals, Novelists and Musicians
2.2.9.02 - Plato
2.2.9.03 - Aristotle
2.2.9.04 - Plotinus

Comments on Some Passages of Prose

Section III - Practical Guidance for Aspiring Writers
Guidance in Writing Poetry
2.3.1.01 - Three Essentials for Writing Poetry
2.3.1.06 - Opening to the Force
2.3.1.08 - The Necessity and Nature of Inspiration
2.3.1.09 - Inspiration and Understanding
2.3.1.10 - Inspiration and Effort
2.3.1.13 - Inspiration during Sleep
2.3.1.15 - Writing and Concentration
2.3.1.20 - Aspiration
2.3.1.52 - The Ode
2.3.1.54 - An Epic Line

Guidance in Writing Prose
Remarks on English Pronunciation
Remarks on English Usage
Remarks on Bengali Usage

PART THREE - LITERATURE, ART, BEAUTY AND YOGA
Section I - Appreciation of Poetry and the Arts
Appreciation of Poetry
Appreciation of the Arts in General
Comparison of the Arts
Appreciation of Music

Section II - On the Visual Arts
General Remarks on the Visual Arts
Problems of the Painter
Painting in the Ashram

Section III - Beauty and Its Appreciation
General Remarks on Beauty
Appreciation of Beauty

Section IV - Literature, Art, Music and the Practice of Yoga
Literature and Yoga

2.4.1.01 - Poetry and Sadhana
3.4.1.05 - Fiction-Writing and Sadhana
2.4.1.06 - Reading and Sadhana
3.4.1.07 - Reading and Real Knowledge
3.4.1.08 - Novel-Reading and Sadhana
3.4.1.11 - Language-Study and Yoga

Painting, Music, Dance and Yoga
3.4.2.04 - Dance and Sadhana

Appendixes
  Appendix I: The Problem of the Hexameter
  Appendix II: An Answer to a Criticism
  Appendix III: Remarks on a Review



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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [0]

TOPICS


AUTH


BOOKS


CHAPTERS

1.1.1.01_-_Three_Elements_of_Poetic_Creation
1.1.1.02_-_Creation_by_the_Word
1.1.1.03_-_Creative_Power_and_the_Human_Instrument
1.1.1.04_-_Joy_of_Poetic_Creation
1.1.1.05_-_Essence_of_Inspiration
1.1.1.06_-_Inspiration_and_Effort
1.1.1.07_-_Aspiration,_Opening,_Recognition
1.1.1.08_-_Self-criticism
1.1.1.09_-_Correction_by_Second_Inspiration
1.1.2.01_-_Sources_of_Inspiration_and_Variety
1.1.2.02_-_Poetry_of_the_Material_or_Physical_Consciousness
1.2.1.03_-_Psychic_and_Esoteric_Poetry
1.2.1.04_-_Mystic_Poetry
1.2.1.06_-_Symbolism_and_Allegory
1.2.1.11_-_Mystic_Poetry_and_Spiritual_Poetry
1.2.1.12_-_Spiritual_Poetry
1.2.2.01_-_The_Poet,_the_Yogi_and_the_Rishi
1.2.2.06_-_Genius
1.4.2.02_-_The_English_Bible
2.1.1.04_-_Reading,_Yogic_Force_and_the_Development_of_Style
2.1.7.05_-_On_the_Inspiration_and_Writing_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.06_-_On_the_Characters_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.07_-_On_the_Verse_and_Structure_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.2.1.01_-_The_World's_Greatest_Poets
2.2.2.01_-_The_Author_of_the_Bhagavad_Gita
2.2.2.03_-_Virgil
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.2.9.02_-_Plato
2.2.9.03_-_Aristotle
2.2.9.04_-_Plotinus
2.3.1.01_-_Three_Essentials_for_Writing_Poetry
2.3.1.06_-_Opening_to_the_Force
2.3.1.08_-_The_Necessity_and_Nature_of_Inspiration
2.3.1.09_-_Inspiration_and_Understanding
2.3.1.10_-_Inspiration_and_Effort
2.3.1.13_-_Inspiration_during_Sleep
2.3.1.15_-_Writing_and_Concentration
2.3.1.20_-_Aspiration
2.3.1.52_-_The_Ode
2.3.1.54_-_An_Epic_Line
3.4.1.01_-_Poetry_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.05_-_Fiction-Writing_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.06_-_Reading_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.07_-_Reading_and_Real_Knowledge
3.4.1.08_-_Novel-Reading_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.11_-_Language-Study_and_Yoga
3.4.2.04_-_Dance_and_Sadhana

--- PRIMARY CLASS


--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [0]


Letters On Poetry And Art
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



--- QUOTES [18 / 18 - 19 / 19] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   18 Sri Aurobindo

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   19 Sri Aurobindo

1:We think according to what we are. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Bertrand Russell,
2:It is vision that sees Truth, not logic. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Bertrand Russell,
3:A dry and strong or even austere logic is not a key to Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Bertrand Russell,
4:But within there is a soul and above there is Grace. 'This is all you know or need to know' ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art ,
5:The English Bible is a translation, but it ranks among the finest pieces of literature in the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art ,
6:Logic can serve any turn proposed to it by the mind’s preferences. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Bertrand Russell,
7:A mistake must always be acknowledged and corrected. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
8:One must first be conscious before one can be ignorant. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
9:It is the true more than the new that the poet is after. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
10:A new kind of poetry demands a new mentality in the recipient as well as in the writer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
11:I have never heard of a Yogin who got the peace of God and turned away from it as something poor, neutral and pallid, rushing back to cakes and ale. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art ,
12:Silence, the nurse of the Almighty’s power,The omnipotent hush, womb of the immortal Word. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
13:If you want only the very greatest, none of these can enter - only Vyasa and Sophocles. Vyasa could very well claim a place beside Valmiki, Sophocles beside Aeschylus. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art Great Poets of the World,
14:Truth is wider, greater than her forms.A thousand icons they have made of herAnd find her in the idols they adore;But she remains herself and infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Comments on Specific Lines and Passages of the Poem,
15:All we have acquired soon loses worth,An old disvalued credit in Time’s bank,Imperfection’s cheque drawn on the Inconscient. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Hexameters,
16:Paul Brunton in his book A Search in Secret Egypt repeatedly speaks of Atlantis. I always thought that belief in Atlantis was only an imagination of the Theosophists. Is there any truth in the belief?Atlantis is not an imagination. Plato heard of this submerged continent from Egyptian sources and geologists are also agreed that such a submersion was one of the great facts of earth history. 22 June 1936 ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art ,
17:I mean by the Higher Mind a first plane of spiritual [consciousness] where one becomes constantly and closely aware of the Self, the One everywhere and knows and sees things habitually with that awareness; but it is still very much on the mind level although highly spiritual in its essential substance; and its instrumentation is through an elevated thought-power and comprehensive mental sight-not illumined by any of the intenser upper lights but as if in a large strong and clear daylight. It acts as an intermediate state between the Truth-Light above and the human mind; communicating the higher knowledge in a form that the Mind intensified, broadened, made spiritually supple, can receive without being blinded or dazzled by a Truth beyond it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art game test3,
18:1st row Homer, Shakespeare, Valmiki2nd row Dante, Kalidasa, Aeschylus, Virgil, Milton3rd row Goethe...I am not prepared to classify all the poets in the universe - it was the front bench or benches you asked for. By others I meant poets like Lucretius, Euripides, Calderon, Corneille, Hugo. Euripides (Medea, Bacchae and other plays) is a greater poet than Racine whom you want to put in the first ranks. If you want only the very greatest, none of these can enter - only Vyasa and Sophocles. Vyasa could very well claim a place beside Valmiki, Sophocles beside Aeschylus. The rest, if you like, you can send into the third row with Goethe, but it is something of a promotion about which one can feel some qualms. Spenser too, if you like; it is difficult to draw a line.Shelley, Keats and Wordsworth have not been brought into consideration although their best work is as fine poetry as any written, but they have written nothing on a larger scale which would place them among the greatest creators. If Keats had finished Hyperion (without spoiling it), if Shelley had lived, or if Wordsworth had not petered out like a motor car with insufficient petrol, it might be different, but we have to take things as they are. As it is, all began magnificently, but none of them finished, and what work they did, except a few lyrics, sonnets, short pieces and narratives, is often flawed and unequal. If they had to be admitted, what about at least fifty others in Europe and Asia? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:We think according to what we are. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, Russell, Eddington, Jeans,
2:It is vision that sees Truth, not logic. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, Russell, Eddington, Jeans,
3:A dry and strong or even austere logic is not a key to Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, Russell, Eddington, Jeans,
4:Logic can serve any turn proposed to it by the mind’s preferences. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, Russell, Eddington, Jeans,
5:But within there is a soul and above there is Grace. 'This is all you know or need to know'
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art, [T5],
6:The English Bible is a translation, but it ranks among the finest pieces of literature in the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art,
7:A mistake must always be acknowledged and corrected. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
8:One must first be conscious before one can be ignorant. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
9:It is the true more than the new that the poet is after. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
10:A new kind of poetry demands a new mentality in the recipient as well as in the writer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
11:Silence, the nurse of the Almighty’s power,
The omnipotent hush, womb of the immortal Word. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, General Comments on some Criticisms of the Poem,
12:I have never heard of a Yogin who got the peace of God and turned away from it as something poor, neutral and pallid, rushing back to cakes and ale.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art,
13:If you want only the very greatest, none of these can enter - only Vyasa and Sophocles. Vyasa could very well claim a place beside Valmiki, Sophocles beside Aeschylus.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art, Great Poets of the World, 369,
14:Truth is wider, greater than her forms.
A thousand icons they have made of her
And find her in the idols they adore;
But she remains herself and infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, Comments on Specific Lines and Passages of the Poem,
15:All we have acquired soon loses worth,
An old disvalued credit in Time’s bank,
Imperfection’s cheque drawn on the Inconscient. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King: The Yoga of the Spirit’s Freedom and Greatness
Time's bank
Though Time is immortal,
Mortal his works are and ways and the anguish ends like the rapture. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art, Hexameters, Alcaics, Sapphics,
16:Paul Brunton in his book A Search in Secret Egypt repeatedly speaks of Atlantis. I always thought that belief in Atlantis was only an imagination of the Theosophists. Is there any truth in the belief?

Atlantis is not an imagination. Plato heard of this submerged continent from Egyptian sources and geologists are also agreed that such a submersion was one of the great facts of earth history. 22 June 1936 ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art,
17:It is not a question of making a few changes in individual lines, that is a very minor problem; the real finality only comes when all is felt as a perfect whole, no line jarring with or falling away from the level of the whole though some may rise above it and also all the parts in their proper place making the right harmony. It is an inner feeling that has to decide that and my inner feeling is not as satisfied in that respect with parts of the third section as it is with the first two. Unfortunately the mind can't arrange these things, one has to wait till the absolutely right thing comes in a sort of receptive self-opening and calling-down condition. Hence the months. 20 November 1936 ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art,
18:I mean by the Higher Mind a first plane of spiritual [consciousness] where one becomes constantly and closely aware of the Self, the One everywhere and knows and sees things habitually with that awareness; but it is still very much on the mind level although highly spiritual in its essential substance; and its instrumentation is through an elevated thought-power and comprehensive mental sight-not illumined by any of the intenser upper lights but as if in a large strong and clear daylight. It acts as an intermediate state between the Truth-Light above and the human mind; communicating the higher knowledge in a form that the Mind intensified, broadened, made spiritually supple, can receive without being blinded or dazzled by a Truth beyond it.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art, [9:342],
19:1st row Homer, Shakespeare, Valmiki
2nd row Dante, Kalidasa, Aeschylus, Virgil, Milton
3rd row Goethe
...
I am not prepared to classify all the poets in the universe - it was the front bench or benches you asked for. By others I meant poets like Lucretius, Euripides, Calderon, Corneille, Hugo. Euripides (Medea, Bacchae and other plays) is a greater poet than Racine whom you want to put in the first ranks. If you want only the very greatest, none of these can enter - only Vyasa and Sophocles. Vyasa could very well claim a place beside Valmiki, Sophocles beside Aeschylus. The rest, if you like, you can send into the third row with Goethe, but it is something of a promotion about which one can feel some qualms. Spenser too, if you like; it is difficult to draw a line.

Shelley, Keats and Wordsworth have not been brought into consideration although their best work is as fine poetry as any written, but they have written nothing on a larger scale which would place them among the greatest creators. If Keats had finished Hyperion (without spoiling it), if Shelley had lived, or if Wordsworth had not petered out like a motor car with insufficient petrol, it might be different, but we have to take things as they are. As it is, all began magnificently, but none of them finished, and what work they did, except a few lyrics, sonnets, short pieces and narratives, is often flawed and unequal. If they had to be admitted, what about at least fifty others in Europe and Asia? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



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