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object:God is
object:Tat Sat
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author class:Sri Aurobindo
word class:bigram


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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [0]


--- PRIMARY CLASS


God
quotes
string

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [0]


1.04 - GOD IN THE WORLD
1.19 - GOD IS NOT MOCKED
2.08 - God in Power of Becoming
God is
God is the answer to every question.
To see God is to be God. He alone is.
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--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


God In its widest sense, the origin and root of all that is. Absolute Being may be regarded perhaps as one equivalent expression, but even Being itself may be regarded as a condition or attribute, and beyond it we must therefore postulate Be-ness. The idea of a root or origin sometimes connotes supreme power and governance; but such conception of a rootless root or infinite origin does not exist, for whatever is, or has been, or ever will be, must ultimately spring from the womb of boundless infinitude, and we can speak only of a power and governance in connection with the subordinate or minor — however supernal or sublime they may be — which spring forth from the Boundless in virtually infinite numbers through beginningless and endless duration.

God in human affairs; the use of “angel of Yah¬


--- QUOTES [240 / 240 - 500 / 13144] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   87 Sri Aurobindo
   16 Sri Ramakrishna
   14 Swami Vivekananda
   11 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   10 The Mother
   9 Meister Eckhart
   4 Thomas Keating
   4 C S Lewis
   4 Anonymous
   4 Aleister Crowley
   3 Soren Kierkegaard
   3 Saint Teresa of Avila
   3 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   3 Hazrat Inayat Khan
   2 Voltaire
   2 Saint John of the Cross
   2 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   2 Peter J Carroll
   2 Ken Wilber
   2 Jordan Peterson
   2 John
   2 Emanuel Swedenborg
   2 Carl Jung
   2 Blaise Pascal
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   1 _Ibn_Arabi.php">and there is nothing in the existent realm that is not a lover
   1 William Blake
   1 Werner Heisenberg
   1 Waking Life
   1 Vincent van Gogh
   1 Venerable Bede
   1 Thomas Merton
   1 The Urantia Papers
   1 Sri Ramama Maharshi
   1 Sri Chinmoy
   1 Saul Williams
   1 Satprem
   1 Saint Vincent de Paul
   1 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   1 Saint Teresa of Calcutta
   1 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
   1 Saint Anselm of Canterbury
   1 Russell Kirk
   1 Robert Heinlein
   1 Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange
   1 Ram Dass
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   1 Rabindranath Tagore
   1 Paul Washer
   1 Oscar Wilde
   1 Martin Heidegger
   1 Maimonides
   1 Mahatma Gandhi
   1 Joseph Cambpell
   1 John of the Cross
   1 Jalaluddin Rumi
   1 Ibn Arabi
   1 Hermes
   1 G K Chesterton
   1 George Bernard Shaw
   1 Friedrich Nietzsche
   1 Francis H Cook
   1 Epictetus
   1 Edward Edinger
   1 Beethoven
   1 Baruch Spinoza
   1 Alan Watts.
   1 Abu Hamid al-Ghazali

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   16 Anonymous
   10 Mahatma Gandhi
   8 Max Lucado
   7 C S Lewis
   6 Albert Einstein
   5 Victor Hugo
   5 Tony Evans
   5 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   5 R C Sproul
   4 Plato
   4 Leo Tolstoy
   3 Swami Vivekananda
   3 Saint Augustine
   3 Rumi
   3 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   3 Rajneesh
   3 Mother Teresa
   3 Meister Eckhart
   3 Marianne Williamson
   3 Lysa TerKeurst
   3 John Piper
   3 George MacDonald
   3 Friedrich Nietzsche
   3 D H Lawrence
   3 Desmond Tutu
   3 Carl Jung
   2 Yann Martel
   2 Woody Allen
   2 William Paul Young
   2 Wallace Stevens
   2 Thomas Merton
   2 Thiruman Archunan
   2 Samuel Beckett
   2 Robert Barron
   2 Rob Bell
   2 R Buckminster Fuller
   2 Paulo Coelho
   2 Osho
   2 Neal A Maxwell
   2 Napoleon Bonaparte
   2 Mike Dooley
   2 Malcolm X
   2 Ludwig Feuerbach
   2 LeCrae
   2 Juvenal
   2 Joyce Meyer
   2 John Newton
   2 John Calvin
   2 Joel Osteen
   2 Jack Kerouac
   2 Herman Melville
   2 Henry Blackaby
   2 Gordon B Hinckley
   2 George Herbert
   2 George Bernard Shaw
   2 Francis Chan
   2 Euripides
   2 Elie Wiesel
   2 Eckhart Tolle
   2 Dwight L Moody
   2 Desiderius Erasmus
   2 David Platt
   2 Christopher Pike
   2 Charles Bukowski
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   2 Carl Sagan
   2 Bob Dylan
   2 Billy Graham
   2 Baruch Spinoza
   2 Ann Voskamp

1:God is Love. ~ John,
2:God is Light. ~ John,
3:To forget God is a waste of Time. ~ ,
4:God is greater than God. ~ Meister Eckhart,
5:God is all and all is God. ~ Meister Eckhart,
6:We are, because God is. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
7:Called or not, God is always there. ~ Carl Jung,
8:God is at home. We are in the far country. ~ Meister Eckhart,
9:God is a dark night to man in this life. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
10:To see God is the one goal. Power is not the goal. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
11:You want to see God in all, but not in yourself? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
12:Abidance in God is the only true posture. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talk 234,
13:God is the answer to every question. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
14:You must overcome death by finding God in it. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
15:The feeling remains that God is on the journey, too. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
16:It's better to see God in everything than to try to figure it out. ~ Ram Dass,
17:To believe in God is impossible not to believe in Him is absurd. ~ Voltaire,
18:God is our refuge and our strength, an ever-present help in trouble. ~ Anonymous,
19:The thought of God is Divine Favor! He is by nature Grace. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
20:God is a circle whose center is everywhere and circumference nowhere. ~ Voltaire,
21:Tell me what occupies your mind and I will tell you who your God is. ~ Paul Washer,
22:However softly we speak, God is near enough to hear us. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
23:The knowledge of God is received in divine silence. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
24:I always think that the best way to know God is to love many things. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
25:God is a being than which nothing greater can be conceived. ~ Saint Anselm of Canterbury,
26:God is our name for the last generalization to which we can arrive. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
27:God is inexhaustibly attainable in the totality of our action. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
28:He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love. ~ Anonymous, The Bible John 4:8,
29:To see God is to be God. He alone is. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Maharshis Gospel ,
30:You must certainly think of God if you want to see God all round you. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
31:Settle yourself in solitude, and you will come upon God in yourself. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
32:Whoever wants God intensely, finds Him. Go and verify it in your own life. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
33:I sometimes think that God in creating man somewhat overestimated his ability. ~ Oscar Wilde,
34:Every child comes with the message that God is not yet discouraged of man. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
35:God is fond of His devotees. He runs after the devotee as the cow after the calf. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
36:I was no longer the centre of my life and therefore I could see God in everything. ~ Venerable Bede,
37:Ecclesiastes shows that man without God is in total ignorance and inevitable misery. ~ Blaise Pascal,
38:In fact, it is more correct to say that Truth is God, than to say that God is Truth. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
39:God is at once impersonal and personal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.04 - The Secret of Secrets,
40:God is love and beauty as well as purity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Religion as the Law of Life,
41:God is to be worshiped as the one Beloved, dearer than everything in this and the next life. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
42:What is God? God is the perfection that we must aspire to realise. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
43:God is more truly imagined than expressed, and He exists more truly than He is imagined. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
44:To see everything in God and to see God in everything normally takes a lifetime of practice. ~ Thomas Keating,
45:One should constantly repeat the name of God. The name of God is highly effective in the Kaliyuga. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
46:The supreme faith is that which sees God in all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.12 - The Way and the Bhakta,
47:My idea of God is not a divine idea. It has to be shattered time after time. He shatters it Himself. ~ C S Lewis,
48:One has sometimes to deny God in order to find him. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Spiritual Aim and Life,
49:To love is to be transformed into what we love. To love God is therefore to be transformed into God. ~ John of the Cross,
50:God is the one stable and eternal Reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad: Brahman Oneness of God and the World,
51:The profession of love to God which is insufficient to restrain from disobedience to God is a lie. ~ Abu Hamid al-Ghazali,
52:God creates everything out of nothing. And everything which God is to use, he first reduces to nothing ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
53:God is a hard master and will not be served by halves. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Wheat and the Chaff,
54:When everything goes wrong, one must know how to remember that God is all-powerful. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
55:God is identical with His attributes, so that it may be said that He is the knowledge, the knower, and the known. ~ Maimonides,
56:I know by myself how incomprehensible God is, seeing I cannot comprehend the parts of my own being. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
57:The growth of the god in man is man’s proper business. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
58:God in man is the whole revelation and the whole of religion. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Glory of God in Man,
59:My God is love and sweetly suffers all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 09.02 - The Journey in Eternal Night and the Voice of the Darkness,
60:In every being and object God dwells concealed and discoverable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.08 - God in Power of Becoming,
61:God is not knowledge, but the cause of Knowledge; He is not mind, but the cause of mind; He is not Light, but the cause of Light. ~ Hermes,
62:To fix the mind on God is very difficult, in the beginning, unless one practices meditation in solitude. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
63:252. I have failed, thou sayest. Say rather that God is circling about towards His object. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human 3.1.10 - Karma,
64:An opulent beauty of passionate differenceThe recurring beat that moments God in Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
65:God is Beauty and Delight hidden in the variation of his masks and forms. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Beauty,
66:The great rule of life is to have no schemes but one unalterable purpose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Glory of God in Man,
67:God is always God, but the views which people and nations may take of him vary. No higher view is known than that of love. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
68:God to the soul that sees is the path and God is the goal of his journey. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
69:To see all things as oneself and to see all things in God and God in all things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.12 - The Way of Equality,
70:Science is a light within a limited room, not the sun which illumines the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Glory of God in Man,
71:Your trust in God is sufficient to save you from rebirths. Cast all burden on Him. Have faith and that will save you. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks 2020-08-30,
72:Force and Love united and both illumined by Knowledge fulfil God in the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda 2 - Other Hymns to Agni,
73:Time and Space that are the conceptual movement and extension of the Godhead in us. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.08 - God in Power of Becoming,
74:Delight of the heart in God is the whole constituent and essence of true Bhakti. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
75:God in thy victory, God in thy defeat, God in thy very death & torture, - God who will not be defeated & who cannot die. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad ,
76:God is pouring out his wrath upon the nations that acknowledge him not, upon the kingdoms that call not upon his name. ~ Anonymous, The Bible Psalm 78:3-4,
77:If in thirst you drink water from a cup, you see God in it. Those who are not in love with God will see only their own faces in it. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
78:What is God? God is the perfection that we must aspire to realise. 8 November 1969 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II "The Divine" and "Man" [17],
79:The first gulp from the glass of natural sciences will turn you into an atheist, but at the bottom of the glass God is waiting for you. ~ Werner Heisenberg,
80:Don't think you can frighten me by telling me that I am alone. France is alone. God is alone. And the loneliness of God is His strength. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
81:I am one with God in my being and yet I can have relations with Him in my experience. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.03 - The Eternal and the Individual,
82:If you seek God with your whole heart, then you may be assured that Grace of God is also seeking you. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Conscious Immortality Ch 7,
83:The Son of God is also the Son of Man and both elements are necessary to the complete Christhood. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
84:Where there is Isness, there God is. Creation is the giving of isness from God. And that is why God becomes where any creature expresses God. ~ Meister Eckhart,
85:Man is all Imagination. God is Man and exists in us and we in Him... The Eternal Body of Man is the Imagination, that is, God, Himself ~ William Blake, Laocoon ,
86:A blind god is not destiny’s architect;A conscious power has drawn the plan of life, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
87:The love of God is an infinite and absolute feeling which does not admit of any rational limitation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Reason and Religion,
88:Despise no one, try to see God in all and the Self in all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest To Motilal Roy,
89:He who sees God in all, will serve freely God in all with the service of love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Conditions for the Coming of a Spiritual Age,
90:The wisdom and love of God in turning our evil into His good does not absolve us of our moral responsibility. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
91:To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek him the greatest adventure; to find him, the greatest human achievement. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
92:God is not remote from us. He is at the point of my pen, my (pick) shovel, my paint brush, my (sewing) needle - and my heart and thoughts. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
93:God is the ever active providence, by whose power systems after systems are being evolved out of chaos, made to run for a time and again destroyed. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
94:Our lives are useful only in proportion as they help others by example or action or tend to fulfil God in man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
95:Our lives are useful only in proportion as they help others by example or action or tend to fulfil God in man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
96:God is a great & cruel Torturer because He loves. You do not understand this, because you have not seen & played with Krishna. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
97:Whoever has once felt the glory of God within him can never again believe that the intellect is supreme. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Glory of God in Man,
98:God is not to be reached by the weak. Never be weak. You have infinite strength within you. How else will you conquer anything? How else will you come to God? ~ Swami Vivekananda,
99:God is cruel and not cruel. He is all being and not being at the same time. Hence He is all contradictions. Nature also is nothing but a mass of contradictions. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
100:I am as sure as I live that nothing is so near to me as God. God is nearer to me than I am to myself; my existence depends on the nearness and the presence of God. ~ Meister Eckhart,
101:Even though it be true that the conception of God is absolute help, it is also the only help which is absolutely capable of revealing to man his own helplessness. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
102:The ultimate knowledge is that which perceives and accepts God in the universe as well as beyond the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.02 - The Three Steps of Nature,
103:Humanity is not the highest godhead; God is more than humanity; but in humanity too we have to find and to serve him. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga Materialism,
104:The soul that lives in God is more perfect than the soul that lives only in outward mind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India A Rationalistic Critic on Indian Culture - III,
105:Man insists continually on making God in his own image instead of seeking to make himself more and more in the image of God, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 3.1.15 - Rebirth,
106:The eye through which I see God is the same eye through which God sees me; my eye and God's eye are one eye, one seeing, one knowing, one love. ~ Meister Eckhart, Sermons of Meister Eckhart ,
107:Have faith in Guru, in his teachings, and in the surety that you can get free. Think day and night that this universe is zero, only God is. Have intense desire to get free. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
108:The new God laughs at imitation and discipleship. He needs no imitators and no pupils. He forces men through himself. The God is his own follower in man. He imitates himself” ~ Carl Jung, Red Book ,
109:None but God is loved in the existent things. It is He who is manifest within every beloved to the eye of every lover ~ and there is nothing in the existent realm that is not a lover ~ Ibn Arabi,
110:All that is real in me is God; all that is real in God is I. The gulf between God and me is thus bridged. Thus by knowing God, we find that the kingdom of heaven is within us. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
111:His failure is not failure whom God leads; ... It knows its steps, its way is inevitable, And how shall the end be vain when God is guide? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
112:O Sun-Word, thou shalt raise the earth-soul to LightAnd bring down God into the lives of men; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
113:If one cannot believe in God it does not matter. I suppose he believes in himself, in his own existence. Let him find out the source from which he came. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day by Day 22-3-46,
114:Renunciation of ego, acceptance of God in life is the Yoga I teach,—no other renunciation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest To Motilal Roy,
115:Knowledge leads to unity, but ignorance to diversity. So long as God seems to be outside and far away, there is ignorance. But when God is realised within, that is true knowledge. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
116:Wisdom leads to Unity, but Ignorance to Separation. So long as God seems to be outside and far away, there is ignorance. But when God is realized Within, that is True Knowledge. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
117:God is very merciful to those whom He sees struggling heart and soul for spiritual realization. But remain idle, without any struggle, and you will see that His grace will never come. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
118:Whatever the brain may plan, the heart knows first and whoever can go beyond the brain to the heart, will hear the voice of the Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Glory of God in Man,
119:373. Shall I accept death or shall I turn and wrestle with him and conquer? That shall be as God in me chooses. For whether I live or die, I am always. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human 3.1.10 - Karma,
120:Everything good or true that the angels inspire in us is God's, so God is constantly talking to us. He talks very differently, though, to one person than to another. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg, Secrets of Heaven ,
121:The divine Self in things is the sustaining Spirit of the present, the withdrawing Spirit of the past, the creative Spirit of the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.08 - God in Power of Becoming,
122:You are facing God and God is facing you. Your divinity will make you feel that two Gods are facing each other and conversing. But eventually you will merge into the God that you are now facing. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
123:The whole world is one. The knower in the stone and the knower in myself are one; I am He. It is God in me, God in the stone. The knowledge in me and the knowledge in the stone are one; I am that. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
124:Already God is near, the Truth is close:Because the dark atheist body knows him not,Must the sage deny the Light, the seer his soul? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
125:The seed of Godhead sleeps in mortal hearts,The flower of Godhead grows on the world-tree:All shall discover God in self and things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
126:I believe that a triangle, if it could speak, would say that God is eminently triangular, and a circle that the divine nature is eminently circular; and thus would every one ascribe his own attributes to God. ~ Baruch Spinoza,
127:The truth is that you cannot attain God if you have even a trace of desire. Subtle is the way of dharma. If you are trying to thread a needle, you will not succeed if the thread has even a slight fiber sticking out. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
128:Yet is the opposite truth also wholly true that if thou canst see all God in a little pale unsightly and scentless flower, not God entirely; he who knows Krishna only, knows not even Krishna. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
129:God is immaterial, and for this reason transcends every conception. Since He is invisible He can have no form. But from what we observe in His work we may conclude that He is eternal, omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent. ~ Beethoven,
130:"I must attain God in this very life; yea, in three days I must find Him; nay, with a single utterance of His name I will draw Him to me" - with such violent Love the devotee can attract the Lord and realize Him quickly. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
131:Was there ever a more horrible blasphemy than the statement that all the knowledge of God is confined to this or that book? How dare men call God infinite, and yet try to compress Him within the covers of a little book! ~ Swami Vivekananda,
132:A man can reach God if he follows one path rightly. Then he can learn about all the other paths. A devotee can know everything when God's grace descends on him. If you but realize Him, you will be able to know all about Him. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
133:When we receive with an entire and perfect resignation the afflictions which God sends us they become for us favors and benefits; because conformity to the will of God is a gain far superior to all temporal advantages. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
134:... the more one needs God the more perfect he is. To need God is nothing to be ashamed of but is perfection itself. It is the saddest thing in the world if a human being goes through life without discovering that he needs God! ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
135:You see many stars in the sky at night, but not when the sun rises. Can you therefore say that there are no stars in the heavens during the day? Because you cannot find God in the days of your ignorance, say not that there is no God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
136:But for the god in their breasts unsatisfied, but for his spurringsSoon would the hero turn beast and the sage reel back to the savage;Man from his difficult heights would recoil and be mud in the earth-mud. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
137:We are bidden to 'put on Christ', to become like God. That is, whether we like it or not, God intends to give us what we need, not what we now think we want. Once more, we are embarrassed by the intolerable compliment, by too much love, not too little. ~ C S Lewis,
138:This world was not built with random bricks of Chance,A blind god is not destiny’s architect;A conscious power has drawn the plan of life,There is a meaning in each curve and line. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
139:358. Men hunt after petty successes and trivial masteries from which they fall back into exhaustion and weakness; meanwhile all the infinite force of God in the universe waits vainly to place itself at their disposal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human 3.1.10 - Karma,
140:It is not that Christ is superior to Allah, not that Allah is everything and Brahma is nothing, but it is the same one whom you call either Brahma or Allah, or Almighty, or by a hundred other names. The names are different but God is one and the same. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
141:One should not use the name of God artificially and superficially without feeling.To use the name of God one must call upon Him and surrender to Him unreservedly.After such surrender the name of God is constantly with the man. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks 426,
142:Out and alas! earth’s greatest are earth and they fail in the testing,Conquered by sorrow and doubt, fate’s hammerers, fires of her furnace.God in their souls they renounce and submit to their clay and its promptings. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
143:God is, or He is not. But to which side shall we incline? Reason can decide nothing here. There is an infinite chaos which separated us. A game is being played at the extremity of this infinite distance where heads or tails will turn up. What will you wager? ~ Blaise Pascal,
144:To heal the evils and mistakes of SpaceAnd change the tragedy of the ignorant worldInto a Divine Comedy of joyAnd the laughter and the rapture of God’s bliss.The Mother of God is mother of our souls ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.6.12 - The Mother of God,
145:God is one the paths to reach him (religions) are many - just as different rivers, originating in different mountains, traverse different paths, flowing straight or crooked, and at last join the ocean. He is the one Lord of all, the one Soul of all souls. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
146:You see many stars in the sky at night, but not when the sun rises. Can you therefore say that there are no stars in the heavens during the day? Because you cannot find God in the days of your ignorance, say not that there is no God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, Sayings of Ramakrishna ,
147:Only a god can save us. The only possibility available to us is that by thinking and poeticizing we prepare a readiness for the appearance of a god, or for the absence of a god in [our] decline, insofar as in view of the absent god we are in a state of decline ~ Martin Heidegger,
148:Only were safe who kept God in their hearts: Courage their armour, faith their sword, they must walk, The hand ready to smite, the eye to scout, Casting a javelin regard in front, Heroes and soldiers of the army of Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
149:SLEIGHT OF MIND IN DEMONOLOGY A surprise addition. "Liber Boomerang"A god ignored is a demon born.Think you to hypertrophy some selves at the expense of others?That which is denied gains power, and seeks strange and unexpected forms of manifestation. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Kaos ,
150:Beware of confining yourself to a particular belief and denying all else, for much good would elude you - indeed, the knowledge of reality would elude you. Be in yourself a matter for all forms of belief, for God is too vast and tremendous to be restricted to one belief rather than another. ~ Ibn Arabi,
151:But for the god in their breasts unsatisfied, but for his spurringsSoon would the hero turn beast and the sage reel back to the savage;Man from his difficult heights would recoil and be mud in the earth-mud.This by pain we prevent; we compel his ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
152:As St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) taught, whatever we say about God is more unlike God than saying nothing. If we do say something, it can only be a pointer toward the Mystery that can never be articulated in words. All that words can do is point in the direction of the Mystery. ~ Thomas Keating, On Prayer ,
153:For just as the first general precepts of the law of nature are self-evident to one in possession of natural reason, and have no need of promulgation, so also that of believing in God is primary and self-evident to one who has faith: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
154:In the silence of the heart God speaks. If you face God in prayer and silence, God will speak to you. Then you will know that you are nothing. It is only when you realize your nothingness, your emptiness, that God can fill you with Himself. Souls of prayer are souls of great silence. ~ Saint Teresa of Calcutta,
155:fruits of the sacrifice ::: The soul knows that it does not give itself to God in vain; claiming nothing, it yet receives the infinite riches of the divine Power and Presence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,
156:In the work of Transformation, who is the slowest to do his part, man or God? I replied, - Man finds that God is too slow to answer his prayers. God finds that man is too slow to receive His influence. But for the Truth-Consciousness all is going on as it ought to go. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III ,
157:If God is Love, He is, by definition, something more than mere kindness. And it appears, from all the records, that though He has often rebuked us and condemned us, He has never regarded us with contempt. He has paid us the intolerable compliment of loving us, in the deepest, most tragic, most inexorable sense. ~ C S Lewis,
158:God is our wise and perfect friend, because he knows when to smite and when to fondle; when to slay us no less then when to save and to succour... There must be faith in the love and wisdom of God,... working out all for our good even when it is apparently veiled in evil. ~ Sri Aurobindo, 1984 Ashram Diary July 3 and Augst 22,
159:A DEVOTEE: "Sir, how can one see God?"MASTER: "Can you ever see God if you do not direct your whole mind toward Him? The Bhagavata speaks about Sukadeva. When he walked about he looked like a soldier with fixed bayonet. His gaze did not wander; it had only one goal and that was God. This is the meaning of yoga. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
160:God is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnibenevolent - it says so right here on the label. If you have a mind capable of believing all three of these attributes simultaneously, I have a wonderful bargain for you. No checks, please. Cash and in small bills. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
161:In the world of my knowledge and my ignoranceWhere God is unseen and only is heard a NameAnd knowledge is trapped in the boundaries of mindAnd life is hauled in the drag-net of desireAnd Matter hides the soul from its own sight, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
162:Bhagavan: God is of course necessary, for most people. They can go on with one, till they find out that they and God are not different.The Swami continued, "In actual practice, sadhakas, even sincere ones, sometimes become dejected and lose faith in God. How to restore their faith? What should we do for them?" ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day by Day ,
163:Almost certainly God is not in time. His life does not consist of moments one following another...Ten-thirty-- and every other moment from the beginning of the world--is always Present for Him. If you like to put it this way, He has all eternity in which to listen to the split second of prayer put up by a pilot as his plane crashes in flames. ~ C S Lewis,
164:Nor does he achieve his destiny as the individual Man for the sake of the individual soul alone,—a lonely salvation is not his complete ideal,—but for the world also or rather for God in the world, for God in all as well as above all and not for God solely and separately in one. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Ideal Law of Social Development,
165:The great and secret message of the experiential mystics the world over is that, with the eye of contemplation, Spirit can be seen. With the eye of contemplation, the great Within radiantly unfolds. And in all cases, the eye with which you see God is the same eye with which God sees you: the eye of contemplation. ~ Ken Wilber, Marriage of Sense and Soul p. 174,
166:Our purpose in Yoga is to exile the limited outward-looking ego and enthrone God in its place as the ruling Inhabitant of the nature. And this means, first, to disinherit desire and no longer accept the enjoyment of desire as the ruling human motive. The ... ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,
167:WILL, KNOWLEDGE and love are the three divine powers in human nature and the life of man, and they point to the three paths by which the human soul rises to the divine. The integrality of them, the union of man with God in all the three, must therefore, as we have seen, be the foundation of an integral Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.01 - Love and the Triple Path,
168:God has made different religions to suit different aspirants, times, and countries. All doctrines are only so many paths; but a path is by no means God himself. Indeed, one can reach God if one follows any of the paths with whole-hearted devotion...One may eat a cake with icing either straight or sidewise. It will taste sweet either way. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna ,
169:541 - Canst thou see God in thy torturer and slayer even in thy moment of death or thy hours of torture? Canst thou see Him in that which thou art slaying, see and love even while thou slayest? Thou hast thy hand on the supreme knowledge. How shall he attain to Krishna who has never worshipped Kali? All is the Divine and the Divine alone exists. ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms ,
170:The striking discoveries of contemporary science are continually telling us new things about how material creation came to be and how it continues to evolve. Although we do not have all the answers, we are clearly going in a direction that transcends the cosmology in which the great world religions came into existence. Our vision, understanding, and our attitudes about God inevitably must change. ~ Thomas Keating,
171:God is, but man's conceptions of God are reflections in his own mentality, sometimes of the Divine, sometimes of other Beings and powers and they are what his mentality can make of the suggestions that come to him, generally very partial and imperfect so long as they are still mental, so long as he has not arrived at a higher and truer, a spiritual or mystic knowledge.. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I ,
172:The soul of man is the spark of God. Though this spark is limited on the earth, still God is all-powerful; and by teaching the prayer 'Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven', the Master has given a key to every soul who repeats this prayer; a key to open that door behind which is the secret of that almighty power and perfect wisdom which raises the soul above all limitations. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
173:secondly, what the nature of God is. Whatever that nature is discovered to be, the man who would please and obey Him must strive with all his might to be made like unto him. If the Divine is faithful, he also must be faithful; if free, he also must be free; if beneficent, he also must be beneficent; if magnanimous, he also must be magnanimous. Thus as an imitator of God must he follow Him in every deed and word. ~ Epictetus,
174:UB 1:4.1. The infinity of the perfection of God is such that it eternally constitutes him mystery. And the greatest of all the unfathomable mysteries of God is the phenomenon of the divine indwelling of mortal minds. The manner in which the Universal Father sojourns with the creatures of time is the most profound of all universe mysteries; the divine presence in the mind of man is the mystery of mysteries. ~ The Urantia Papers,
175:You should not imagine that your reason can evolve to the extent of understanding God. Rather, if God is to shine divinely within you, your natural light cannot assist this process but must become a pure nothingness, going out of itself. Only then can God enter with his light, bringing back with him all that you have renounced and a thousand times more, including a new form which contains all things in itself. ~ Meister Eckhart,
176:As it gradually dawns on people, one by one, that the transformation of God is not just an interesting idea but is a living reality, it may begin to function as a new myth. Whoever recognizes this myth as his own personal reality will put his life in the service of this process. Such an individual offers himself as a vessel for the [continuing] incarnation of deity and thereby promotes the on-going transformation of God by giving Him human manifestation. ~ Edward Edinger,
177:Our sense by its incapacity has invented darkness. In truth there is nothing but Light, only it is a power of light either above or below our poor human vision's limited range.For do not imagine that light is created by the Suns. The Suns are only physical concentrations of Light, but the splendour they concentrate for us is self-born and everywhere.God is everywhere and wherever God is, there is Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
178:In India the mother is the center of the family and our highest ideal. She is to us the representative of God, as God is the mother of the universe. It was a female sage who first found the unity of God, and laid down this doctrine in one of the first hy mns of the Vedas. Our God is both personal and absolute, the absolute is male, the personal, female. And thus it comes that we now say: 'The first manifestation of God is the hand that rocks the cradle'. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
179:St. Teresa of Avila wrote: 'All difficulties in prayer can be traced to one cause: praying as if God were absent.' This is the conviction that we bring with us from early childhood and apply to everyday life and to our lives in general. It gets stronger as we grow up, unless we are touched by the Gospel and begin the spiritual journey. This journey is a process of dismantling the monumental illusion that God is distant or absent. ~ Thomas Keating, Fruits & Gifts of the Spirit ,
180:In Bahaí belief, the Holy Spirit is the conduit through which the wisdom of God becomes directly associated with his messenger, and it has been described variously in different religions such as the burning bush to Moses, the sacred fire to Zoroaster, the dove to Jesus, the angel Gabriel to Muhammad, and the Maid of Heaven to Bahaullah.[14] The Bahaí view rejects the idea that the Holy Spirit is a partner to God in the Godhead, but rather is the pure essence of Gods attributes ~ ,
181:All was found there the Unique has dreamed and made Tinging with ceaseless rapture and surprise And an opulent beauty of passionate difference The recurring beat that moments God in Time. Only was missing the sole timeless Word That carries eternity in its lonely sound, The Idea self-luminous key to all ideas, The integer of the Spirit's perfect sum That equates the unequal All to the equal One, The single sign interpreting every sign, The absolute index to the Absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
182:To live, to love are signs of infinite things, Love is a glory from eternity's spheres. Abased, disfigured, mocked by baser mights That steal his name and shape and ecstasy, He is still the Godhead by which all can change. A mystery wakes in our inconscient stuff, A bliss is born that can remake our life. Love dwells in us like an unopened flower Awaiting a rapid moment of the soul, Or he roams in his charmed sleep mid thoughts and things; The child-god is at play, he seeks himself ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
183:The life of God is above the past, the present, and the future; it is measured by the single instant of immobile eternity... [However] forgetfulness of God leaves us in this banal and horizontal view of things on the line of time which passes; the contemplation of God is like a vertical view of things which pass, and of their bond with God who does not pass. To be immersed in time, is to forget the value of time, that is to say, its relation to eternity. ~ Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, The Three Ages of the Interior Life: Prelude of Eternal Life ,
184:God is the one goal of all our passions and emotions. If you want to be angry, be angry with Him. Chide your Beloved, chide your Friend. Whom else can you safely chide? Mortal man will not patiently put up with your anger; there will be a reaction. If you are angry with me I am sure quickly to react, because I cannot patiently put up with your anger. Say unto the Beloved, "Why do You not come to me; why do You leave me thus alone?" Where is there any enjoyment but in Him? What enjoyment can there be in little clods of earth? ~ Swami Vivekananda,
185:But you must remember one thing. One cannot see God sporting as man unless one has had the vision of Him. Do you know the sign of one who has God-vision? Such a man acquires the nature of a child. Why a child? Because God is like a child. So he who sees God becomes like a child.God-vision is necessary. Now the question is, how can one get it? Intense renunciation is the means. A man should have such intense yearning for God that he can say, 'O Father of the universe, am I outside Your universe? Won't You be kind to me, You wretch? ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
186:This Magical Will is the wand in your hand by which the Great Work is accomplished, by which the Daughter is not merely set upon the throne of the Mother, but assumed into the Highest.<God is called the Father, the Pure Soul is called the Mother, the Holy Guardian Angel is called the Son, and the Natural Soul is called the Daughter. The Son purifies the Daughter by wedding her; she thus becomes the Mother, the uniting of whom with the Father absorbs all into the Crown. ~ Aleister Crowley, Book 4 ,
187:God is, is the first seed of Yoga. It is Tat Sat of the Vedanta. I am, is the second seed. It is So'ham of the Upanishads. God is infinite self-existence, self-conscious force of existence, self-diffused or self-concentrated delight of existence; I too am that infinite self-existence, self-consciousness, self-force, self-delight; this is the double third seed. It is Sachchidananda of the worldwide transcendental conclusion of all human thinking. Self-knowledge is the foundation of the complete Yoga. Affirm in yourselves self-knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
188:We ought not to have or let ourselves be satisfied with any thought of God. When the thought goes, our God goes with it. No, what we want is a real (subsistent) God who far transcends the thoughts of men and creatures. This God does not disappear unless we turn our back on him of our own accord. He who has God thus, in reality, has gotten God divinely; to him God is apparent in all things. Everything smacks to him of God; everywhere God's image stares him in the face. God is gleaming in him all the time. In him there is riddance and return; the vision of his God is ever present to his mind. ~ Meister Eckhart,
189:Arjuna and Krishna, this human and this divine, stand together not as seers in the peaceful hermitage of meditation, but as fighter and holder of the reins in the midst of the hurtling shafts, in the chariot of battle. The Teacher of the Gita is therefore not only the God in man who unveils himself in the word of knowledge, but the God in man who moves our whole world of action, by and for whom all our humanity exists and struggles and labours, towards whom all human life travels and progresses. He is the secret Master of works and sacrifice and the Friend of the human peoples. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita ,
190:Only, all is directed to the one aim, directed towards God, filled with the idea of the divine, infinite, universal existence so that the outward-going, sensuous, pragmatical preoccupation of the lower knowledge with phenomena and forms is replaced by the one divine preoccupation. After attainment the same character remains. The Yogin continues to know and see God in the finite and be a channel of God-consciousness and God-action in the world; therefore the knowledge of the world and the enlarging and uplifting of all that appertains to life comes within his scope. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 517,
191:2. What should be the object or ideas for meditation? Whatever is most consonant with your nature and highest aspirations. But if you ask me for an absolute answer, then I must say that Brahman is always the best object for meditation or contemplation and the idea on which the mind should fix is that of God in all, all in God and all as God. It does not matter essentially whether it is the Impersonal or the Personal God, or subjectively, the One Self. But this is the idea I have found the best, because it is the highest and embraces all other truths, whether truths of this world or of the other worlds or beyond all phenomenal existence, - 'All this is the Brahman.' ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes ,
192:Lila is by no means the last word. Passing through all these states, I said to the Divine Mother: 'Mother, in these states there is separation. Give me a state where there is no separation.' Then I remained for some time absorbed in the Indivisible Satchidananda. I removed the pictures of the gods and goddesses from my room. I began to perceive God in all beings. Formal worship dropped away. You see that bel-tree. I used to go there to pluck its leaves. One day, as I plucked a leaf, a bit of the bark came off. I round the tree full of Consciousness. I felt grieved because I had hurt the tree. One day I tried to pluck some durva grass, but I found I couldn't do it very well. Then I forced myself to pluck it. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
193:Have you ever lost yourself in a kiss? I mean pure psychedelic inebriation. Not just lustful petting but transcendental metamorphosis when you became aware that the greatness of this being was breathing into you. Licking the sides and corners of your mouth, like sealing a thousand fleshy envelopes filled with the essence of your passionate being and then opened by the same mouth and delivered back to you, over and over again - the first kiss of the rest of your life. A kiss that confirms that the universe is aligned, that the worlds greatest resource is love, and maybe even that God is a woman. With or without a belief in God, all kisses are metaphors decipherable by allocations of time, circumstance, and understanding ~ Saul Williams,
194:If you want to identify me, ask me not where I live, or what I like to eat, or how I comb my hair, but ask me what I am living for, in detail, ask me what I think is keeping me from living fully for the thing I want to live for . . . To be grateful is to recognize the Love of God in everything He has given us - and He has given us everything. Every breath we draw is a gift of His love, every moment of existence is a grace, for it brings with it immense graces from Him.Gratitude therefore takes nothing for granted, is never unresponsive, is constantly awakening to new wonder and to praise of the goodness of God. For the grateful person knows that God is good, not by hearsay but by experience. And that is what makes all the difference. ~ Thomas Merton,
195:18. Of the devotees, who is the greatest?He who gives himself up to the Self that is God is the most excellent devotee. Giving one's self up to God means remaining constantly in the Self without giving room for the rise of any thoughts other than that of the Self. Whatever burdens are thrown on God, He bears them. Since the supreme power of God makes all things move, why should we, without submitting ourselves to it, constantly worry ourselves with thoughts as to what should be done and how, and what should not be done and how not? We know that the train carries all loads, so after getting on it why should we carry our small luggage on our head to our discomfort, instead of putting it down in the train and feeling at ease? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Who am I ,
196:Invitation:::With wind and the weather beating round meUp to the hill and the moorland I go.Who will come with me? Who will climb with me?Wade through the brook and tramp through the snow?Not in the petty circle of citiesCramped by your doors and your walls I dwell;Over me God is blue in the welkin,Against me the wind and the storm rebel.I sport with solitude here in my regions,Of misadventure have made me a friend.Who would live largely? Who would live freely?Here to the wind-swept uplands ascend.I am the Lord of tempest and mountain,I am the Spirit of freedom and pride.Stark must he be and a kinsman to dangerWho shares my kingdom and walks at my side. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems ,
197:Q:How shall I realise God?M.: God is an unknown entity. Moreover He is external. Whereas, the Self is always with you and it is you. Why do you leave out what is intimate and go in for what is external?D.: What is this Self again?M.: The Self is known to everyone but not clearly. You always exist. The Be-ing is the Self. 'I am' is the name of God. Of all the definitions of God, none is indeed so well put as the Biblical statement "I AM THAT I AM" in EXODUS (Chap. 3). There are other statements, such as Brahmaivaham, Aham Brahmasmi and Soham. But none is so direct as the name JEHOVAH = I AM. The Absolute Being is what is - It is the Self. It is God. Knowing the Self, God is known. In fact God is none other than the Self. ~ Sri Ramama Maharshi, Collected Works ,
198:203. God and Nature are like a boy and girl at play and in love. They hide and run from each other when glimpsed so that they may be sought after and chased and captured.Man is God hiding himself from Nature so that he may possess her by struggle, insistence, violence and surprise. God is universal and transcendent Man hiding himself from his own individuality in the human being.The animal is Man disguised in a hairy skin and upon four legs; the worm is Man writhing and crawling towards the evolution of his Manhood. Even crude forms of Matter are Man in his inchoate body. All things are Man, the Purusha.For what do we mean by Man? An uncreated and indestructible soul that has housed itself in a mind and body made of its own elements. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Thoughts And Aphorisms ,
199:Only, in all he sees God, sees the supreme reality, and his motive of work is to help mankind towards the knowledge of God and the possession of the supreme reality. He sees God through the data of science, God through the conclusions of philosophy, God through the forms of Beauty and the forms of Good, God in all the activities of life, God in the past of the world and its effects, in the present and its tendencies, in the future and its great progression. Into any or all of these he can bring his illumined vision and his liberated power of the spirit. The lower knowledge has been the step from which he has risen to the higher; the higher illumines for him the lower and makes it part of itself, even if only its lower fringe and most external radiation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.25 - The Higher and the Lower Knowledge,
200:To know that you are God is another way of saying that you feel completely with this universe. You feel profoundly rooted in it and connected with it. You feel, in other words, that the whole energy, which expresses itself in the galaxies, is intimate. It is not something to which you are a stranger, but it is that with which you, whatever it is, are intimately bound up. That in your seeing, your hearing, your talking, your thinking, your moving, you express that which it is that moves the sun and other stars. And if you don't know that, if you don't feel that, well naturally you feel alien, you feel a stranger in the world. And if you feel a stranger you feel hostile, and therefore you start to bulldoze things about, to beat it up and to try to make the world submit to your will, and you become a real troublemaker. ~ Alan Watts.,
201:Because children have abounding vitality,because they are in spirit fierce and free,therefore they want things repeated and unchanged.They always say, "Do it again";and the grown-up person does it againuntil he is nearly dead.For grown-up people are not strong enoughto exult in monotony.But perhaps God is strong enoughto exult in monotony.It is possible that God says every morning,"Do it again"to the sun; and every evening,"Do it again" to the moon.It may not be automatic necessitythat makes all daisies alike;it may be that God makes every daisy separately,but has never got tired of making them.It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy;for we have sinned and grown old,and our Father is younger than we." ~ G K Chesterton, Orthodoxy ,
202:So it is that when Dante had taken the last step in his spiritual adventure, and came before the ultimate symbolic vision of the Triune God in the Celestial Rose, he had still one more illumination to experience, even beyond the forms of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. "Bernard," he writes, "made a sign to me, and smiled, that I should look upward; but I was already, of myself, such as he wished; for my sight, becoming pure, was entering more and more, through the radiance of the lofty Light which in Itself is true. Thenceforward my vision was greater than our speech, which yields to such a sight, and the memory yields to such excess. [167] [167] "Paradiso," XXXIII, 49-57 (translation by Norton, op. cit., Vol. Ill, pp. 253-254, by permission of Houghton Mifflin Company, publishers). ~ Joseph Cambpell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces The Ultimate Boon,
203:Far away in the heavenly abode of the great god Indra, there is a wonderful net which has been hung by some cunning artificer in such a manner that it stretches out infinitely in all directions. In accordance with the extravagant tastes of deities, the artificer has hung a single glittering jewel in each eye of the net, and since the net itself is infinite in dimension, the jewels are infinite in number. There hang the jewels, glittering like stars in the first magnitude, a wonderful sight to behold. If we now arbitrarily select one of these jewels for inspection and look closely at it, we will discover that in its polished surface there are reflected all the other jewels in the net, infinite in number. Not only that, but each of the jewels reflected in this one jewel is also reflecting all the other jewels, so that there is an infinite reflecting process occurring. ~ Francis H Cook,
204:And the first of the adepts covered His shame with a cloth, walking backwards, and was white. And the second of the adepts covered his shame with a cloth, walking sideways, and was yellow. And the third of the adepts made a mock of His nakedness, walking forwards, and was black. And these are the three great schools of the Magi, who are also the three Magi that journeyed unto Bethlehem; and because thou hast not wisdom, thou shalt not know which school prevaileth, or if the three schools be not one.* 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ This doctrine of the Three Schools is of extreme interest. Roughly, it may be said that the White is the Pure Mystic, whose attitude to God is one of reverence. The Yellow School conceals the Mysteries indeed, but examines them as it goes along. The Black School is that of pure Scepticism. We are now ready to study the philosophical bases of these three Schools. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears? 43?,
205:But if in passing from one domain to another we renounce what has already been given us from eagerness for our new attainment, if in reaching the mental life we cast away or belittle the physical life which is our basis, or if we reject the mental and physical in our attraction to the spiritual, we do not fulfil God integrally, nor satisfy the conditions of His selfmanifestation. We do not become perfect, but only shift the field of our imperfection or atmost attain a limited altitude. However high we may climb, even though it be to the Non-Being itself, we climb ill if we forget our base. Not to abandon the lower to itself, but to transfigure it in the light of the higher to which we have attained, is true divinity of nature. Brahman is integral and unifies many states of consciousness at a time; we also, manifesting the nature of Brahman, should become integral and all-embracing. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
206:In medieval times, the learned man, the teacher was a servant of God wholly, and of God only. His freedom was sanctioned by an authority more than human...The academy was regarded almost as a part of the natural and unalterable order of things. ... They were Guardians of the Word, fulfilling a sacred function and so secure in their right. Far from repressing free discussion, this "framework of certain key assumptions of Christian doctrine" encouraged disputation of a heat and intensity almost unknown in universities nowadays. ...They were free from external interference and free from a stifling internal conformity because the whole purpose of the universities was the search after an enduring truth, besides which worldly aggrandizement was as nothing. They were free because they agreed on this one thing if, on nothing else, fear of God is the beginning of wisdom. ~ Russell Kirk, Academic Freedom: An Essay in Definition ,
207:There is only one thing painful in the beginning to a raw or turbid part of the surface nature; it is the indispensable discipline demanded, the denial necessary for the merging of the incomplete ego. But for that there can be a speedy and enormous compensation in the discovery of a real greater or ultimate completeness in others, in all things, in the cosmic oneness, in the freedom of the transcendent Self and Spirit, in the rapture of the touch of the Divine. Our sacrifice is not a giving without any return or any fruitful acceptance from the other side; it is an interchange between the embodied soul and conscious Nature in us and the eternal Spirit. For even though no return is demanded, yet there is the knowledge deep within us that a marvellous return is inevitable. The soul knows that it does not give itself to God in vain; claiming nothing, it yet receives the infinite riches of the divine Power and Presence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,
208:Sails across the sea of life in the twinkling of an eye.' One attains the vision of God if Mahamaya steps aside from the door. Mahamaya's grace is necessary: hence the worship of Sakti. You see, God is near us, but it is not possible to know Him because Mahamaya stands between. Rama, Lakshmana, and Sita were walking along. Rama walked ahead, Sita in the middle, and Lakshmana last. Lakshmana was only two and a half cubits away from Rama, but he couldn't see Rama because Sita - Mahamaya - was in the way."While worshipping God, one should assume a definite attitude. I have three attitudes: the attitude of a child, the attitude or a maidservant, and the attitude of a friend. For a long time I regarded myself as a maidservant and a woman companion of God; at that time I used to wear skirts and ornaments, like a woman. The attitude of a child is very good."The attitude of a 'hero' is not good. Some people cherish it. They regard themselves as Purusha and woman as Prakriti; they want to propitiate woman through intercourse with her. But this method often causes disaster. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
209:[invocation] Let us describe the magical method of identification. The symbolic form of the god is first studied with as much care as an artist would bestow upon his model, so that a perfectly clear and unshakeable mental picture of the god is presented to the mind. Similarly, the attributes of the god are enshrined in speech, and such speeches are committed perfectly to memory. The invocation will then begin with a prayer to the god, commemorating his physical attributes, always with profound understanding of their real meaning. In the second part of the invocation, the voice of the god is heard, and His characteristic utterance is recited. In the third portion of the invocation the Magician asserts the identity of himself with the god. In the fourth portion the god is again invoked, but as if by Himself, as if it were the utterance of the will of the god that He should manifest in the Magician. At the conclusion of this, the original object of the invocation is stated. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
210:To know, possess and be the divine being in an animal and egoistic consciousness, to convert our twilit or obscure physical men- tality into the plenary supramental illumination, to build peace and a self-existent bliss where there is only a stress of transitory satisfactions besieged by physical pain and emotional suffering, to establish an infinite freedom in a world which presents itself as a group of mechanical necessities, to discover and realise the immortal life in a body subjected to death and constant mutation, - this is offered to us as the manifestation of God in Matter and the goal of Nature in her terrestrial evolution. To the ordinary material intellect which takes its present organisation of consciousness for the limit of its possibilities, the direct contradiction of the unrealised ideals with the realised fact is a final argument against their validity. But if we take a more deliberate view of the world's workings, that direct opposition appears rather as part of Nature's profoundest method and the seal of her completest sanction. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.01,
211:If we regard the Powers of the Reality as so many Godheads, we can say that the Overmind releases a million Godheads into action, each empowered to create its own world, each world capable of relation, communication and interplay with the others.There are in the Veda different formulations of the nature of the Gods: it is said they are all one Existence to which the sages give different names; yet each God is worshipped as if he by himself is that Existence, one who is all the other Gods together or contains them in his being; and yet again each is a separate Deity acting sometimes in unison with companion deities, sometimes separately, sometimes even in apparent opposition to other Godheads of the same Existence. In the Supermind all this would be held together as a harmonised play of the one Existence; in the Overmind each of these three conditions could be a separate action or basis of action and have its own principle of development and consequences and yet each keep the power to combine with the others in a more composite harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Supermind Mind and the Overmind Maya,
212:all is the method of God's workings; all life is Yoga ::: Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognize in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of the might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in Nature, in the other it becomes swift and self-conscious and the instrument confesses the hand of the Master. All life is a Yoga of Nature seeking to manifest God within itself. Yoga marks the stage at which this effort becomes capable of self-awareness and there for right completion in the individual. It is a gathering up and concentration of the movements dispersed and loosely combined in the lower evolution. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Conditions of the Synthesis [47],
213:I have loved in life and I have been loved.I have drunk the bowl of poison from the hands of love as nectar, and have been raised above life's joy and sorrow.My heart, aflame in love, set afire every heart that came in touch with it.My heart has been rent and joined again; My heart has been broken and again made whole; My heart has been wounded and healed again; A thousand deaths my heart has died, and thanks be to love, it lives yet.I went through hell and saw there love's raging fire, and I entered heaven illumined with the light of love.I wept in love and made all weep with me; I mourned in love and pierced the hearts of men; And when my fiery glance fell on the rocks, the rocks burst forth as volcanoes.The whole world sank in the flood caused by my one tear; With my deep sigh the earth trembled, and when I cried aloud the name of my beloved, I shook the throne of God in heaven.I bowed my head low in humility, and on my knees I begged of love, "Disclose to me, I pray thee, O love, thy secret."She took me gently by my arms and lifted me above the earth, and spoke softly in my ear, "My dear one, thou thyself art love, art lover, and thyself art the beloved whom thou hast adored. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
214:If we are religious-minded, perhaps we will see the gods who inhabit this world. Beings, forces, sounds, lights, and rhythms are just so many true forms of the same indefinable, but not unknowable, Essence we call God; we have spoken of God, and made temples, laws or poems to try to capture the one little pulsation filling us with sunshine, but it is free as the wind on foam-flecked shores. We may also enter the world of music, which in fact is not different from the others but a special extension of this same, great inexpressible Vibration. If once, only once, even for a few moments in a lifetime, we can hear that Music, that Joy singing above, we will know what Beethoven and Bach heard; we will know what God is because we will have heard God. We will probably not say anything grandiose; we will just know that That exists, whereupon all the suffering in the world will seem redeemed. At the extreme summit of the overmind, there only remain great waves of multi-hued light, says the Mother, the play of spiritual forces, which later translate - sometimes much later - into new ideas, social changes, or earthly events, after crossing one by one all the layers of consciousness and suffering a considerable distortion and loss of light... ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure Of Consciousness ,
215:Why God sometimes allows people who are genuinely good to be hindered in the good that they do. God, who is faithful, allows his friends to fall frequently into weakness only in order to remove from them any prop on which they might lean. For a loving person it would be a great joy to be able to achieve many great feats, whether keeping vigils, fasting, performing other ascetical practices or doing major, difficult and unusual works. For them this is a great joy, support and source of hope so that their works become a prop and a support upon which they can lean. But it is precisely this which our Lord wishes to take from them so that he alone will be their help and support. This he does solely on account of his pure goodness and mercy, for God is prompted to act only by his goodness, and in no way do our works serve to make God give us anything or do anything for us. Our Lord wishes his friends to be freed from such an attitude, and thus he removes their support from them so that they must henceforth find their support only in him. For he desires to give them great gifts, solely on account of his goodness, and he shall be their comfort and support while they discover themselves to be and regard themselves as being a pure nothingness in all the great gifts of God. The more essentially and simply the mind rests on God and is sustained by him, the more deeply we are established in God and the more receptive we are to him in all his precious gifts - for human kind should build on God alone. ~ Meister Eckhart,
216:These are the conditions of our effort and they point to an ideal which can be expressed in these or in equivalent formulae. To live in God and not in the ego; to move, vastly founded, not in the little egoistic consciousness, but in the consciousness of the All-Soul and the Transcendent. To be perfectly equal in all happenings and to all beings, and to see and feel them as one with oneself and one with the Divine; to feel all in oneself and all in God; to feel God in all, oneself in all. To act in God and not in the ego. And here, first, not to choose action by reference to personal needs and standards, but in obedience to the dictates of the living highest Truth above us. Next, as soon as we are sufficiently founded in the spiritual consciousness, not to act any longer by our separate will or movement, but more and more to allow action to happen and develop under the impulsion and guidance of a divine Will that surpasses us. And last, the supreme result, to be exalted into an identity in knowledge, force, consciousness, act, joy of existence with the Divine Shakti; to feel a dynamic movement not dominated by mortal desire and vital instinct and impulse and illusive mental free-will, but luminously conceived and evolved in an immortal self-delight and an infinite self-knowledge. For this is the action that comes by a conscious subjection and merging of the natural man into the divine Self and eternal Spirit; it is the Spirit that for ever transcends and guides this world-Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Divine Works,
217:What is that work and result, if not a self-involution of Consciousness in form and a self-evolution out of form so as to actualise some mighty possibility in the universe which it has created? And what is its will in Man if not a will to unending Life, to unbounded Knowledge, to unfettered Power? Science itself begins to dream of the physical conquest of death, expresses an insatiable thirst for knowledge, is working out something like a terrestrial omnipotence for humanity. Space and Time are contracting to the vanishing-point in its works, and it strives in a hundred ways to make man the master of circumstance and so lighten the fetters of causality. The idea of limit, of the impossible begins to grow a little shadowy and it appears instead that whatever man constantly wills, he must in the end be able to do; for the consciousness in the race eventually finds the means. It is not in the individual that this omnipotence expresses itself, but the collective Will of mankind that works out with the individual as a means. And yet when we look more deeply, it is not any conscious Will of the collectivity, but a superconscious Might that uses the individual as a centre and means, the collectivity as a condition and field. What is this but the God in man, the infinite Identity, the multitudinous Unity, the Omniscient, the Omnipotent, who having made man in His own image, with the ego as a centre of working, with the race, the collective Narayana, the visvamanava as the mould and circumscription, seeks to express in them some image of the unity, omniscience, omnipotence which are the self-conception of the Divine? ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
218:[God is] The Hindu discipline of spirituality provides for this need of the soul by the conceptions of the Ishta Devata, the Avatar and the Guru. By the Ishta Devata, the chosen deity, is meant, - not some inferior Power, but a name and form of the transcendent and universal Godhead. Almost all religions either have as their base or make use of some such name and form of the Divine. Its necessity for the human soul is evident. God is the All and more than the All. But that which is more than the All, how shall man conceive? And even the All is at first too hard for him; for he himself in his active consciousness is a limited and selective formation and can open himself only to that which is in harmony with his limited nature. There are things in the All which are too hard for his comprehension or seem too terrible to his sensitive emotions and cowering sensations. Or, simply, he cannot conceive as the Divine, cannot approach or cannot recognise something that is too much out of the circle of his ignorant or partial conceptions. It is necessary for him to conceive God in his own image or in some form that is beyond himself but consonant with his highest tendencies and seizable by his feelings or his intelligence. Otherwise it would be difficult for him to come into contact and communion with the Divine. Even then his nature calls for a human intermediary so that he may feel the Divine in something entirely close to his own humanity and sensible in a human influence and example. This call is satisfied by the Divine manifest in a human appearance, the Incarnation, the Avatar - Krishna, Christ, Buddha. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.01 - The Four Aids,
219:THE PSYCHOLOGY OF YOGA Initial Definitions and Descriptions Yoga has four powers and objects, purity, liberty, beatitude and perfection. Whosoever has consummated these four mightinesses in the being of the transcendental, universal, lilamaya and individual God is the complete and absolute Yogin. All manifestations of God are manifestations of the absolute Parabrahman. The Absolute Parabrahman is unknowable to us, not because It is the nothingness of all that we are, for rather whatever we are in truth or in seeming is nothing but Parabrahman, but because It is pre-existent & supra-existent to even the highest & purest methods and the most potent & illimitable instruments of which soul in the body is capable. In Parabrahman knowledge ceases to be knowledge and becomes an inexpressible identity. Become Parabrahman, if thou wilt and if That will suffer thee, but strive not to know It; for thou shalt not succeed with these instruments and in this body. In reality thou art Parabrahman already and ever wast and ever will be. To become Parabrahman in any other sense, thou must depart utterly out of world manifestation and out even of world transcendence. Why shouldst thou hunger after departure from manifestation as if the world were an evil? Has not That manifested itself in thee & in the world and art thou wiser & purer & better than the Absolute, O mind-deceived soul in the mortal? When That withdraws thee, then thy going hence is inevitable; until Its force is laid on thee, thy going is impossible, cry thy mind never so fiercely & wailingly for departure. Therefore neither desire nor shun the world, but seek the bliss & purity & freedom & greatness of God in whatsoever state or experience or environment. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
220:What is the most useful idea to spread and what is the best example to set?The question can be considered in two ways, a very general one applicable to the whole earth, and another specific one which concerns our present social environment.From the general point of view, it seems to me that the most useful idea to spread is twofold:1) Man carries within himself perfect power, perfect wisdom and perfect knowledge, and if he wants to possess them, he must discover them in the depth of his being, by introspection and concentration.2) These divine qualities are identical at the centre, at the heart of all beings; this implies the essential unity of all, and all the consequences of solidarity and fraternity that follow from it.The best example to give would be the unalloyed serenity and immutably peaceful happiness which belong to one who knows how to live integrally this thought of the One God in all.From the point of view of our present environment, here is the idea which, it seems to me, it is most useful to spread:True progressive evolution, an evolution which can lead man to his rightful happiness, does not lie in any external means, material improvement or social change. Only a deep and inner process of individual self-perfection can make for real progress and completely transform the present state of things, and change suffering and misery into a serene and lasting contentment.Consequently, the best example is one that shows the first stage of individual self-perfection which makes possible all the rest, the first victory to be won over the egoistic personality: disinterestedness.At a time when all rush upon money as the means to sat- isfy their innumerable cravings, one who remains indifferent to wealth and acts, not for the sake of gain, but solely to follow a disinterested ideal, is probably setting the example which is most useful at present. ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago Volume-2,
221:And for the same reason, because that which we are seeking through beauty is in the end that which we are seeking through religion, the Absolute, the Divine. The search for beauty is only in its beginning a satisfaction in the beauty of form, the beauty which appeals to the physical senses and the vital impressions, impulsions, desires. It is only in the middle a satisfaction in the beauty of the ideas seized, the emotions aroused, the perception of perfect process and harmonious combination. Behind them the soul of beauty in us desires the contact, the revelation, the uplifting delight of an absolute beauty in all things which it feels to be present, but which neither the senses and instincts by themselves can give, though they may be its channels, - for it is suprasensuous, - nor the reason and intelligence, though they too are a channel, - for it is suprarational, supra-intellectual, - but to which through all these veils the soul itself seeks to arrive. When it can get the touch of this universal, absolute beauty, this soul of beauty, this sense of its revelation in any slightest or greatest thing, the beauty of a flower, a form, the beauty and power of a character, an action, an event, a human life, an idea, a stroke of the brush or the chisel or a scintillation of the mind, the colours of a sunset or the grandeur of the tempest, it is then that the sense of beauty in us is really, powerfully, entirely satisfied. It is in truth seeking, as in religion, for the Divine, the All-Beautiful in man, in nature, in life, in thought, in art; for God is Beauty and Delight hidden in the variation of his masks and forms. When, fulfilled in our growing sense and knowledge of beauty and delight in beauty and our power for beauty, we are able to identify ourselves in soul with this Absolute and Divine in all the forms and activities of the world and shape an image of our inner and our outer life in the highest image we can perceive and embody of the All-Beautiful, then the aesthetic being in us who was born for this end, has fulfilled himself and risen to his divine consummation. To find highest beauty is to find God; to reveal, to embody, to create, as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle 144,
222:But now thou askest me how thou mayest destroy this naked knowing and feeling of thine own being. For peradventure thou thinkest that if it were destroyed, all other hindrances were destroyed ; and if thou thinkest thus, thou thinkest right truly. But to this I answer thee and I say, that without a full special grace full freely given by God, and also a full according ableness on thy part to receive this grace, this naked knowing and feeling of thy being may in nowise be destroyed. And this ableness is nought else but a strong and a deep ghostly sorrow. ... All men have matter of sorrow; but most specially he feeleth matter of sorrow that knoweth and feeleth that he is. All other sorrows in comparison to this be but as it were game to earnest. For he may make sorrow earnestly that knoweth and feeleth not only what he is, but that he is. And whoso felt never this sorrow, let him make sorrow; for he hath never yet felt perfect sorrow. This sorrow, when it is had, cleanseth the soul, not only of sin, but also of pain that it hath deserved for sin ; and also it maketh a soul able to receive that joy, the which reave th from a man all knowing and feeling of his being. This sorrow, if it be truly conceived, is full of holy desire; and else a man might never in this life abide it or bear it. For were it not that a soul were somewhat fed with a manner of comfort by his right working, he should not be able to bear that pain that he hath by the knowing and feeling of his being. For as oft as he would have a true knowing and a feeling of his God in purity of spirit (as it may be here), and then feeleth that he may not for he findeth evermore his knowing and his feeling as it were occupied and filled with a foul stinking lump of himself, the which must always be hated and despised and forsaken, if he shall be God's perfect disciple, taught by Himself in the mount of perfection so oft he goeth nigh mad for sorrow. . . . This sorrow and this desire must every soul have and feel in itself (either in this manner or in another), as God vouchsafed! to teach his ghostly disciples according to his good will and their according ableness in body and in soul, in degree and disposition, ere the time be that they may perfectly be oned unto God in perfect charity such as may be had here, if God vouchsafed!. ~ Anonymous, The Cloud Of Unknowing ,
223:they are acting all the while in the spirit of rajasic ahaṅkara, persuade themselves that God is working through them and they have no part in the action. This is because they are satisfied with the mere intellectual assent to the idea without waiting for the whole system and life to be full of it. A continual remembrance of God in others and renunciation of individual eagerness (spr.ha) are needed and a careful watching of our inner activities until God by the full light of self-knowledge, jñanadı̄pena bhasvata, dispels all further chance of self-delusion. The danger of tamogun.a is twofold, first, when the Purusha thinks, identifying himself with the tamas in him, "I am weak, sinful, miserable, ignorant, good-for-nothing, inferior to this man and inferior to that man, adhama, what will God do through me?" - as if God were limited by the temporary capacities or incapacities of his instruments and it were not true that he can make the dumb to talk and the lame to cross the hills, mūkaṁ karoti vacalaṁ paṅguṁ laṅghayate girim, - and again when the sadhak tastes the relief, the tremendous relief of a negative santi and, feeling himself delivered from all troubles and in possession of peace, turns away from life and action and becomes attached to the peace and ease of inaction. Remember always that you too are Brahman and the divine Shakti is working in you; reach out always to the realisation of God's omnipotence and his delight in the Lila. He bids Arjuna work lokasaṅgraharthaya, for keeping the world together, for he does not wish the world to sink back into Prakriti, but insists on your acting as he acts, "These worlds would be overpowered by tamas and sink into Prakriti if I did not do actions." To be attached to inaction is to give up our action not to God but to our tamasic ahaṅkara. The danger of the sattvagun.a is when the sadhak becomes attached to any one-sided conclusion of his reason, to some particular kriya or movement of the sadhana, to the joy of any particular siddhi of the yoga, perhaps the sense of purity or the possession of some particular power or the Ananda of the contact with God or the sense of freedom and hungers after it, becomes attached to that only and would have nothing else. Remember that the yoga is not for yourself; for these things, though they are part of the siddhi, are not the object of the siddhi, for you have decided at the beginning to make no claim upon God but take what he gives you freely and, as for the Ananda, the selfless soul will even forego the joy of God's presence, ... ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga ,
224:INVOCATION The ultimate invocation, that of Kia, cannot be performed. The paradox is that as Kia has no dualized qualities, there are no attributes by which to invoke it. To give it one quality is merely to deny it another. As an observant dualistic being once said: I am that I am not. Nevertheless, the magician may need to make some rearrangements or additions to what he is. Metamorphosis may be pursued by seeking that which one is not, and transcending both in mutual annihilation. Alternatively, the process of invocation may be seen as adding to the magician's psyche any elements which are missing. It is true that the mind must be finally surrendered as one enters fully into Chaos, but a complete and balanced psychocosm is more easily surrendered. The magical process of shuffling beliefs and desires attendant upon the process of invocation also demonstrates that one's dominant obsessions or personality are quite arbitrary, and hence more easily banished. There are many maps of the mind (psychocosms), most of which are inconsistent, contradictory, and based on highly fanciful theories. Many use the symbology of god forms, for all mythology embodies a psychology. A complete mythic pantheon resumes all of man's mental characteristics. Magicians will often use a pagan pantheon of gods as the basis for invoking some particular insight or ability, as these myths provide the most explicit and developed formulation of the particular idea's extant. However it is possible to use almost anything from the archetypes of the collective unconscious to the elemental qualities of alchemy. If the magician taps a deep enough level of power, these forms may manifest with sufficient force to convince the mind of the objective existence of the god. Yet the aim of invocation is temporary possession by the god, communication from the god, and manifestation of the god's magical powers, rather than the formation of religious cults. The actual method of invocation may be described as a total immersion in the qualities pertaining to the desired form. One invokes in every conceivable way. The magician first programs himself into identity with the god by arranging all his experiences to coincide with its nature. In the most elaborate form of ritual he may surround himself with the sounds, smells, colors, instruments, memories, numbers, symbols, music, and poetry suggestive of the god or quality. Secondly he unites his life force to the god image with which he has united his mind. This is accomplished with techniques from the gnosis. Figure 5 shows some examples of maps of the mind. Following are some suggestions for practical ritual invocation. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
225:"O Death, thou lookst on an unfinished worldAssailed by thee and of its road unsure,Peopled by imperfect minds and ignorant lives,And sayest God is not and all is vain.How shall the child already be the man?Because he is infant, shall he never grow?Because he is ignorant, shall he never learn?In a small fragile seed a great tree lurks,In a tiny gene a thinking being is shut;A little element in a little sperm,It grows and is a conqueror and a sage.Then wilt thou spew out, Death, God's mystic truth,Deny the occult spiritual miracle?Still wilt thou say there is no spirit, no God?A mute material Nature wakes and sees;She has invented speech, unveiled a will.Something there waits beyond towards which she strives,Something surrounds her into which she grows:To uncover the spirit, to change back into God,To exceed herself is her transcendent task.In God concealed the world began to be,Tardily it travels towards manifest God:Our imperfection towards perfection toils,The body is the chrysalis of a soul:The infinite holds the finite in its arms,Time travels towards revealed eternity.A miracle structure of the eternal Mage,Matter its mystery hides from its own eyes,A scripture written out in cryptic signs,An occult document of the All-Wonderful's art.All here bears witness to his secret might,In all we feel his presence and his power.A blaze of his sovereign glory is the sun,A glory is the gold and glimmering moon,A glory is his dream of purple sky.A march of his greatness are the wheeling stars.His laughter of beauty breaks out in green trees,His moments of beauty triumph in a flower;The blue sea's chant, the rivulet's wandering voiceAre murmurs falling from the Eternal's harp.This world is God fulfilled in outwardness.His ways challenge our reason and our sense;By blind brute movements of an ignorant Force,By means we slight as small, obscure or base,A greatness founded upon little things,He has built a world in the unknowing Void.His forms he has massed from infinitesimal dust;His marvels are built from insignificant things.If mind is crippled, life untaught and crude,If brutal masks are there and evil acts,They are incidents of his vast and varied plot,His great and dangerous drama's needed steps;He makes with these and all his passion-play,A play and yet no play but the deep schemeOf a transcendent Wisdom finding waysTo meet her Lord in the shadow and the Night:Above her is the vigil of the stars;Watched by a solitary InfinitudeShe embodies in dumb Matter the Divine,In symbol minds and lives the Absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
226:What do we understand by the term "chance"? Chance can only be the opposite of order and harmony. There is only one true harmony and that is the supramental - the reign of Truth, the expression of the Divine Law. In the Supermind, therefore, chance has no place. But in the lower Nature the supreme Truth is obscured: hence there is an absence of that divine unity of purpose and action which alone can constitute order. Lacking this unity, the domain of lower Nature is governed by what we may call chance - that is to say, it is a field in which various conflicting forces intermix, having no single definite aim. Whatever arises out of such a rushing together of forces is a result of confusion, dissonance and falsehood - a product of chance. Chance is not merely a conception to cover our ignorance of the causes at work; it is a description of the uncertain mele ́e of the lower Nature which lacks the calm one-pointedness of the divine Truth. The world has forgotten its divine origin and become an arena of egoistic energies; but it is still possible for it to open to the Truth, call it down by its aspiration and bring about a change in the whirl of chance. What men regard as a mechanical sequence of events, owing to their own mental associations, experiences and generalisations, is really manipulated by subtle agencies each of which tries to get its own will done. The world has got so subjected to these undivine agencies that the victory of the Truth cannot be won except by fighting for it. It has no right to it: it has to gain it by disowning the falsehood and the perversion, an important part of which is the facile notion that, since all things owe their final origin to the Divine, all their immediate activities also proceed directly from it. The fact is that here in the lower Nature the Divine is veiled by a cosmic Ignorance and what takes place does not proceed directly from the divine knowledge. That everything is equally the will of God is a very convenient suggestion of the hostile influences which would have the creation stick as tightly as possible to the disorder and ugliness to which it has been reduced. So what is to be done, you ask? Well, call down the Light, open yourselves to the power of Transformation. Innumerable times the divine peace has been given to you and as often you have lost it - because something in you refuses to surrender its petty egoistic routine. If you are not always vigilant, your nature will return to its old unregenerate habits even after it has been filled with the descending Truth. It is the struggle between the old and the new that forms the crux of the Yoga; but if you are bent on being faithful to the supreme Law and Order revealed to you, the parts of your being belonging to the domain of chance will, however slowly, be converted and divinised. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 ,
227:The madman.- Have you not heard of that madman who lit a lantern in the bright morning hours, ran to the market place. and cried incessantly: "I seek God! I seek God!" -As many of those who did not believe in God were standing around just then, he provoked much laughter. Has he got lost? asked one. Did he lose his way like a child? asked another. Or is he hiding? Is he afraid of us? Has he gone on a voyage? emigrated? -Thus they yelled and laughed. The madman jumped into their midst and pierced them with his eyes. "Whither is God?" he cried; "I will tell you. We have killed him-you and I. All of us are his murderers. But how did we do this? How could we drink up the sea? Who gave us the sponge to wipe away the entire horizon? What were we doing when we unchained this earth from its sun? Whither is it moving now? Whither are we moving? Away from all suns? Are we not plunging continually? Backward, sideward. forward. in all directions? be there still any up or down? Are we not straying as through an infinite nothing? Do we not feel the breath of empty space? Has it not become colder? Is not night continually closing in on us? Do we not need to light lanterns in the morning? Do we hear nothing as yet of the noise of the gravediggers who are burying God? Do we smell nothing as yet of the divine decomposition? Gods, too. decompose. God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. "How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers? What was holiest and mightiest of all that the world has yet owned has bled to death under our knives: who will wipe this blood off us? What water is there for us to clean ourselves? What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we have to invent? Is not the greatness of this deed too great for us? Must we ourselves not become gods simply to appear worthy of it? There has never been a greater deed; and whoever is born after us-for the sake of this deed he will belong to a higher history than all history hitherto." Here the madman fell silent and looked again at his listeners; and they, too, were silent and stared at him in astonishment. At last he threw his lantern on the ground, and it broke into pieces and went out. "I have come too early," he said then: "my time is not yet. This tremendous event is still on its way, still wandering; it has not yet reached the ears of men. Lightning and thunder require time; the light of the stars requires time; deeds, though done, still require time to be seen and heard. This deed is still more distant from them than the most distant stars-and yet they have done it themselves... It has been related further that on the same day the madman forced his way into several churches and there struck up his reqttiem aeternam deo. Led out and called to account, he is said always to have replied nothing but: "What after all are these churches now if they are not the tombs and sepulchers of God? ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science trans. Kaufmann,
228:Sweet Mother, there's a flower you have named "The Creative Word".Yes.What does that mean?It is the word which creates.There are all kinds of old traditions, old Hindu traditions, old Chaldean traditions in which the Divine, in the form of the Creator, that is, in His aspect as Creator, pronounces a word which has the power to create. So it is this... And it is the origin of the mantra. The mantra is the spoken word which has a creative power. An invocation is made and there is an answer to the invocation; or one makes a prayer and the prayer is granted. This is the Word, the Word which, in its sound... it is not only the idea, it is in the sound that there's a power of creation. It is the origin, you see, of the mantra.In Indian mythology the creator God is Brahma, and I think that it was precisely his power which has been symbolised by this flower, "The Creative Word". And when one is in contact with it, the words spoken have a power of evocation or creation or formation or transformation; the words... sound always has a power; it has much more power than men think. It may be a good power and it may be a bad power. It creates vibrations which have an undeniable effect. It is not so much the idea as the sound; the idea too has its own power, but in its own domain - whereas the sound has a power in the material world.I think I have explained this to you once; I told you, for example, that words spoken casually, usually without any re- flection and without attaching any importance to them, can be used to do something very good. I think I spoke to you about "Bonjour", "Good Day", didn't I? When people meet and say "Bonjour", they do so mechanically and without thinking. But if you put a will into it, an aspiration to indeed wish someone a good day, well, there is a way of saying "Good Day" which is very effective, much more effective than if simply meeting someone you thought: "Ah! I hope he has a good day", without saying anything. If with this hope in your thought you say to him in a certain way, "Good Day", you make it more concrete and more effective.It's the same thing, by the way, with curses, or when one gets angry and says bad things to people. This can do them as much harm - more harm sometimes - than if you were to give them a slap. With very sensitive people it can put their stomach out of order or give them palpitation, because you put into it an evil force which has a power of destruction.It is not at all ineffective to speak. Naturally it depends a great deal on each one's inner power. People who have no strength and no consciousness can't do very much - unless they employ material means. But to the extent that you are strong, especially when you have a powerful vital, you must have a great control on what you say, otherwise you can do much harm. Without wanting to, without knowing it; through ignorance.Anything? No? Nothing?Another question?... Everything's over? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 347-349,
229:[desire and its divine form:] Into all our endeavour upward the lower element of desire will at first naturally enter. For what the enlightened will sees as the thing to be done and pursues as the crown to be conquered, what the heart embraces as the one thing delightful, that in us which feels itself limited and opposed and, because it is limited, craves and struggles, will seek with the troubled passion of an egoistic desire. This craving life-force or desire-soul in us has to be accepted at first, but only in order that it may be transformed. Even from the very beginning it has to be taught to renounce all other desires and concentrate itself on the passion for the Divine. This capital point gained, it has to be aught to desire, not for its own separate sake, but for God in the world and for the Divine in ourselves; it has to fix itself upon no personal spiritual gain, though of all possible spiritual gains we are sure, but on the great work to be done in us and others, on the high coming manifestation which is to be the glorious fulfilment of the Divine in the world, on the Truth that has to be sought and lived and enthroned for eveR But last, most difficult for it, more difficult than to seek with the right object, it has to be taught to seek in the right manner; for it must learn to desire, not in its own egoistic way, but in the way of the Divine. It must insist no longer, as the strong separative will always insists, on its own manner of fulfilment, its own dream of possession, its own idea of the right and the desirable; it must yearn to fulfil a larger and greater Will and consent to wait upon a less interested and ignorant guidance. Thus trained, Desire, that great unquiet harasser and troubler of man and cause of every kind of stumbling, will become fit to be transformed into its divine counterpart. For desire and passion too have their divine forms; there is a pure ecstasy of the soul's seeking beyond all craving and grief, there is a Will of Ananda that sits glorified in the possession of the supreme beatitudes. When once the object of concentration has possessed and is possessed by the three master instruments, the thought, the heart and the will,-a consummation fully possible only when the desire-soul in us has submitted to the Divine Law,-the perfection of mind and life and body can be effectively fulfilled in our transmuted nature. This will be done, not for the personal satisfaction of the ego, but that the whole may constitute a fit temple for the Divine Presence, a faultless instrument for the divine work. For that work can be truly performed only when the instrument, consecrated and perfected, has grown fit for a selfless action,-and that will be when personal desire and egoism are abolished, but not the liberated individual. Even when the little ego has been abolished, the true spiritual Person can still remain and God's will and work and delight in him and the spiritual use of his perfection and fulfilment. Our works will then be divine and done divinely; our mind and life and will, devoted to the Divine, will be used to help fulfil in others and in the world that which has been first realised in ourselves,- all that we can manifest of the embodied Unity, Love, Freedom, Strength, Power, Splendour, immortal Joy which is the goal of the Spirit's terrestrial adventure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Self-Consecration [83],
230:We have now completed our view of the path of Knowledge and seen to what it leads. First, the end of Yoga of Knowledge is God-possession, it is to possess God and be possessed by him through consciousness, through identification, through reflection of the divine Reality. But not merely in some abstraction away from our present existence, but here also; therefore to possess the Divine in himself, the Divine in the world, the Divine within, the Divine in all things and all beings. It is to possess oneness with God and through that to possess also oneness with the universal, with the cosmos and all existences; therefore to possess the infinite diversity also in the oneness, but on the basis of oneness and not on the basis of division. It is to possess God in his personality and his impersonality; in his purity free from qualities and in his infinite qualities; in time and beyond time; in his action and in his silence; in the finite and in the infinite. It is to possess him not only in pure self, but in all self; not only in self, but in Nature; not only in spirit, but in supermind, mind, life and body; to possess him with the spirit, with the mind, with the vital and the physical consciousness; and it is again for all these to be possessed by him, so that our whole being is one with him, full of him, governed and driven by him. It is, since God is oneness, for our physical consciousness to be one with the soul and the nature of the material universe; for our life, to be one with all life; for our mind, to be one with the universal mind; for our spirit, to be identified with the universal spirit. It is to merge in him in the absolute and find him in all relations. Secondly, it is to put on the divine being and the divine nature. And since God is Sachchidananda, it is to raise our being into the divine being, our consciousness into the divine consciousness, our energy into the divine energy, our delight of existence into the divine delight of being. And it is not only to lift ourselves into this higher consciousness, but to widen into it in all our being, because it is to be found on all the planes of our existence and in all our members, so that our mental, vital, physical existence shall become full of the divine nature. Our intelligent mentality is to become a play of the divine knowledge-will, our mental soul-life a play of the divine love and delight, our vitality a play of the divine life, our physical being a mould of the divine substance. This God-action in us is to be realised by an opening of ourselves to the divine gnosis and divine Ananda and, in its fullness, by an ascent into and a permanent dwelling in the gnosis and the Ananda. For though we live physically on the material plane and in normal outwardgoing life the mind and soul are preoccupied with material existence, this externality of our being is not a binding limitation. We can raise our internal consciousness from plane to plane of the relations of Purusha with prakriti, and even become, instead of the mental being dominated by the physical soul and nature, the gnostic being or the bliss-self and assume the gnostic or the bliss nature. And by this raising of the inner life we can transform our whole outward-going existence; instead of a life dominated by matter we shall then have a life dominated by spirit with all its circumstances moulded and determined by the purity of being, the consciousness infinite even in the finite, the divine energy, the divine joy and bliss of the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Integral Knowledge,
231:There's an idea in Christianity of the image of God as a Trinity. There's the element of the Father, there's the element of the Son, and there's the element of the Holy Spirit. It's something like the spirit of tradition, human beings as the living incarnation of that tradition, and the spirit in people that makes relationship with the spirit and individuals possible. I'm going to bounce my way quickly through some of the classical, metaphorical attributes of God, so that we kind of have a cloud of notions about what we're talking about, when we return to Genesis 1 and talk about the God who spoke chaos into Being.There's a fatherly aspect, so here's what God as a father is like. You can enter into a covenant with it, so you can make a bargain with it. Now, you think about that. Money is like that, because money is a bargain you make with the future. We structured our world so that you can negotiate with the future. I don't think that we would have got to the point where we could do that without having this idea to begin with. You can act as if the future's a reality; there's a spirit of tradition that enables you to act as if the future is something that can be bargained with. That's why you make sacrifices. The sacrifices were acted out for a very long period of time, and now they're psychological. We know that you can sacrifice something valuable in the present and expect that you're negotiating with something that's representing the transcendent future. That's an amazing human discovery. No other creature can do that; to act as if the future is real; to know that you can bargain with reality itself, and that you can do it successfully. It's unbelievable.It responds to sacrifice. It answers prayers. I'm not saying that any of this is true, by the way. I'm just saying what the cloud of ideas represents. It punishes and rewards. It judges and forgives. It's not nature. One of the things weird about the Judeo-Christian tradition is that God and nature are not the same thing, at all. Whatever God is, partially manifest in this logos, is something that stands outside of nature. I think that's something like consciousness as abstracted from the natural world. It built Eden for mankind and then banished us for disobedience. It's too powerful to be touched. It granted free will. Distance from it is hell. Distance from it is death. It reveals itself in dogma and in mystical experience, and it's the law. That's sort of like the fatherly aspect.The son-like aspect. It speaks chaos into order. It slays dragons and feeds people with the remains. It finds gold. It rescues virgins. It is the body and blood of Christ. It is a tragic victim, scapegoat, and eternally triumphant redeemer simultaneously. It cares for the outcast. It dies and is reborn. It is the king of kings and hero of heroes. It's not the state, but is both the fulfillment and critic of the state. It dwells in the perfect house. It is aiming at paradise or heaven. It can rescue from hell. It cares for the outcast. It is the foundation and the cornerstone that was rejected. It is the spirit of the law.The spirit-like aspect. It's akin to the human soul. It's the prophetic voice. It's the still, small voice of conscience. It's the spoken truth. It's called forth by music. It is the enemy of deceit, arrogance, and resentment. It is the water of life. It burns without consuming. It's a blinding light.That's a very well-developed set of poetic metaphors. These are all...what would you say...glimpses of the transcendent ideal. That's the right way of thinking about it. They're glimpses of the transcendent ideal, and all of them have a specific meaning. In part, what we're going to do is go over that meaning, as we continue with this series. What we've got now is a brief description, at least, of what this is. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series 1,
232:STAGE TWO: THE CHONYID The Chonyid is the period of the appearance of the peaceful and wrathful deities-that is to say, the subtle realm, the Sambhogakaya. When the Clear Light of the causal realm is resisted and contracted against, then that Reality is transformed into the primordial seed forms of the peaceful deities (ishtadevas of the subtle sphere), and these in turn, if resisted and denied, are transformed into the wrathful deities. The peaceful deities appear first: through seven successive substages, there appear various forms of the tathagatas, dakinis, and vidyadharas, all accompanied by the most dazzlingly brilliant colors and aweinspiring suprahuman sounds. One after another, the divine visions, lights, and subtle luminous sounds cascade through awareness. They are presented, given, to the individual openly, freely, fully, and completely: visions of God in almost painful intensity and brilliance. How the individual handles these divine visions and sounds (nada) is of the utmost significance, because each divine scenario is accompanied by a much less intense vision, by a region of relative dullness and blunted illuminations. These concomitant dull and blunted visions represent the first glimmerings of the world of samsara, of the six realms of egoic grasping, of the dim world of duality and fragmentation and primitive forms of low-level unity. According to the Thotrol. most individuals simply recoil in the face of these divine illuminations- they contract into less intense and more manageable forms of experience. Fleeing divine illumination, they glide towards the fragmented-and thus less intense-realm of duality and multiplicity. But it's not just that they recoil against divinity-it is that they are attracted to the lower realms, drawn to them, and find satisfaction in them. The Thotrol says they are actually "attracted to the impure lights." As we have put it, these lower realms are substitute gratifications. The individual thinks that they are just what he wants, these lower realms of denseness. But just because these realms are indeed dimmer and less intense, they eventually prove to be worlds without bliss, without illumination, shot through with pain and suffering. How ironic: as a substitute for God, individuals create and latch onto Hell, known as samsara, maya, dismay. In Christian theology it is said that the flames of Hell are God's love (Agape) denied. Thus the message is repeated over and over again in the Chonyid stage: abide in the lights of the Five Wisdoms and subtle tathagatas, look not at the duller lights of samsara. of the six realms, of safe illusions and egoic dullness. As but one example: Thereupon, because of the power of bad karma, the glorious blue light of the Wisdom of the Dharmadhatu will produce in thee fear and terror, and thou wilt wish to flee from it. Thou wilt begat a fondness for the dull white light of the devas [one of the lower realms]. At this stage, thou must not be awed by the divine blue light which will appear shining, dazzling, and glorious; and be not startled by it. That is the light of the Tathagata called the Light of the Wisdom of the Dharmadhatu. Be not fond of the dull white light of the devas. Be not attached to it; be not weak. If thou be attached to it, thou wilt wander into the abodes of the devas and be drawn into the whirl of the Six Lokas. The point is this: ''If thou are frightened by the pure radiances of Wisdom and attracted by the impure lights of the Six Lokas [lower realms], then thou wilt assume a body in any of the Six Lokas and suffer samsaric miseries; and thou wilt never be emancipated from the Ocean of Samsara, wherein thou wilt be whirled round and round and made to taste the sufferings thereof." But here is what is happening: in effect, we are seeing the primal and original form of the Atman project in its negative and contracting aspects. In this second stage (the Chonyid), there is already some sort of boundary in awareness, there is already some sort of subject-object duality superimposed upon the original Wholeness and Oneness of the Chikhai Dharmakaya. So now there is boundary-and wherever there is boundary, there is the Atman project. ~ Ken Wilber, The Atman Project 129,
233:The ancient Mesopotamians and the ancient Egyptians had some very interesting, dramatic ideas about that. For example-very briefly-there was a deity known as Marduk. Marduk was a Mesopotamian deity, and imagine this is sort of what happened. As an empire grew out of the post-ice age-15,000 years ago, 10,000 years ago-all these tribes came together. These tribes each had their own deity-their own image of the ideal. But then they started to occupy the same territory. One tribe had God A, and one tribe had God B, and one could wipe the other one out, and then it would just be God A, who wins. That's not so good, because maybe you want to trade with those people, or maybe you don't want to lose half your population in a war. So then you have to have an argument about whose God is going to take priority-which ideal is going to take priority.What seems to happen is represented in mythology as a battle of the gods in celestial space. From a practical perspective, it's more like an ongoing dialog. You believe this; I believe this. You believe that; I believe this. How are we going to meld that together? You take God A, and you take God B, and maybe what you do is extract God C from them, and you say, 'God C now has the attributes of A and B.' And then some other tribes come in, and C takes them over, too. Take Marduk, for example. He has 50 different names, at least in part, of the subordinate gods-that represented the tribes that came together to make the civilization. That's part of the process by which that abstracted ideal is abstracted. You think, 'this is important, and it works, because your tribe is alive, and so we'll take the best of both, if we can manage it, and extract out something, that's even more abstract, that covers both of us.'I'll give you a couple of Marduk's interesting features. He has eyes all the way around his head. He's elected by all the other gods to be king God. That's the first thing. That's quite cool. They elect him because they're facing a terrible threat-sort of like a flood and a monster combined. Marduk basically says that, if they elect him top God, he'll go out and stop the flood monster, and they won't all get wiped out. It's a serious threat. It's chaos itself making its comeback. All the gods agree, and Marduk is the new manifestation. He's got eyes all the way around his head, and he speaks magic words. When he fights, he fights this deity called Tiamat. We need to know that, because the word 'Tiamat' is associated with the word 'tehom.' Tehom is the chaos that God makes order out of at the beginning of time in Genesis, so it's linked very tightly to this story. Marduk, with his eyes and his capacity to speak magic words, goes out and confronts Tiamat, who's like this watery sea dragon. It's a classic Saint George story: go out and wreak havoc on the dragon. He cuts her into pieces, and he makes the world out of her pieces. That's the world that human beings live in.The Mesopotamian emperor acted out Marduk. He was allowed to be emperor insofar as he was a good Marduk. That meant that he had eyes all the way around his head, and he could speak magic; he could speak properly. We are starting to understand, at that point, the essence of leadership. Because what's leadership? It's the capacity to see what the hell's in front of your face, and maybe in every direction, and maybe the capacity to use your language properly to transform chaos into order. God only knows how long it took the Mesopotamians to figure that out. The best they could do was dramatize it, but it's staggeringly brilliant. It's by no means obvious, and this chaos is a very strange thing. This is a chaos that God wrestled with at the beginning of time.Chaos is half psychological and half real. There's no other way to really describe it. Chaos is what you encounter when you're blown into pieces and thrown into deep confusion-when your world falls apart, when your dreams die, when you're betrayed. It's the chaos that emerges, and the chaos is everything it wants, and it's too much for you. That's for sure. It pulls you down into the underworld, and that's where the dragons are. All you've got at that point is your capacity to bloody well keep your eyes open, and to speak as carefully and as clearly as you can. Maybe, if you're lucky, you'll get through it that way and come out the other side. It's taken people a very long time to figure that out, and it looks, to me, that the idea is erected on the platform of our ancient ancestors, maybe tens of millions of years ago, because we seem to represent that which disturbs us deeply using the same system that we used to represent serpentile, or other, carnivorous predators. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series 1,
234:A God's LabourI have gathered my dreams in a silver air Between the gold and the blueAnd wrapped them softly and left them there, My jewelled dreams of you.I had hoped to build a rainbow bridge Marrying the soil to the skyAnd sow in this dancing planet midge The moods of infinity.But too bright were our heavens, too far away, Too frail their ethereal stuff;Too splendid and sudden our light could not stay; The roots were not deep enough.He who would bring the heavens here Must descend himself into clayAnd the burden of earthly nature bear And tread the dolorous way.Coercing my godhead I have come down Here on the sordid earth,Ignorant, labouring, human grown Twixt the gates of death and birth.I have been digging deep and long Mid a horror of filth and mireA bed for the golden river's song, A home for the deathless fire.I have laboured and suffered in Matter's night To bring the fire to man;But the hate of hell and human spite Are my meed since the world began.For man's mind is the dupe of his animal self; Hoping its lusts to win,He harbours within him a grisly Elf Enamoured of sorrow and sin.The grey Elf shudders from heaven's flame And from all things glad and pure;Only by pleasure and passion and pain His drama can endure.All around is darkness and strife; For the lamps that men call sunsAre but halfway gleams on this stumbling life Cast by the Undying Ones.Man lights his little torches of hope That lead to a failing edge;A fragment of Truth is his widest scope, An inn his pilgrimage.The Truth of truths men fear and deny, The Light of lights they refuse;To ignorant gods they lift their cry Or a demon altar choose.All that was found must again be sought, Each enemy slain revives,Each battle for ever is fought and refought Through vistas of fruitless lives.My gaping wounds are a thousand and one And the Titan kings assail,But I dare not rest till my task is done And wrought the eternal will.How they mock and sneer, both devils and men! "Thy hope is Chimera's headPainting the sky with its fiery stain; Thou shalt fall and thy work lie dead."Who art thou that babblest of heavenly ease And joy and golden roomTo us who are waifs on inconscient seas And bound to life's iron doom?"This earth is ours, a field of Night For our petty flickering fires.How shall it brook the sacred Light Or suffer a god's desires?"Come, let us slay him and end his course! Then shall our hearts have releaseFrom the burden and call of his glory and force And the curb of his wide white peace."But the god is there in my mortal breast Who wrestles with error and fateAnd tramples a road through mire and waste For the nameless Immaculate.A voice cried, "Go where none have gone! Dig deeper, deeper yetTill thou reach the grim foundation stone And knock at the keyless gate."I saw that a falsehood was planted deep At the very root of thingsWhere the grey Sphinx guards God's riddle sleep On the Dragon's outspread wings.I left the surface gauds of mind And life's unsatisfied seasAnd plunged through the body's alleys blind To the nether mysteries.I have delved through the dumb Earth's dreadful heart And heard her black mass' bell.I have seen the source whence her agonies part And the inner reason of hell.Above me the dragon murmurs moan And the goblin voices flit;I have pierced the Void where Thought was born, I have walked in the bottomless pit.On a desperate stair my feet have trod Armoured with boundless peace,Bringing the fires of the splendour of God Into the human abyss.He who I am was with me still; All veils are breaking now.I have heard His voice and borne His will On my vast untroubled brow.The gulf twixt the depths and the heights is bridged And the golden waters pourDown the sapphire mountain rainbow-ridged And glimmer from shore to shore.Heaven's fire is lit in the breast of the earth And the undying suns here burn;Through a wonder cleft in the bounds of birth The incarnate spirits yearnLike flames to the kingdoms of Truth and Bliss: Down a gold-red stairway wendThe radiant children of Paradise Clarioning darkness' end.A little more and the new life's doors Shall be carved in silver lightWith its aureate roof and mosaic floors In a great world bare and bright.I shall leave my dreams in their argent air, For in a raiment of gold and blueThere shall move on the earth embodied and fair The living truth of you. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems A God's Labour,
235:CHAPTER XIIIOF THE BANISHINGS: AND OF THE PURIFICATIONS.Cleanliness is next to Godliness, and had better come first. Purity means singleness. God is one. The wand is not a wand if it has something sticking to it which is not an essential part of itself. If you wish to invoke Venus, you do not succeed if there are traces of Saturn mixed up with it.That is a mere logical commonplace: in magick one must go much farther than this. One finds one's analogy in electricity. If insulation is imperfect, the whole current goes back to earth. It is useless to plead that in all those miles of wire there is only one-hundredth of an inch unprotected. It is no good building a ship if the water can enter, through however small a hole.That first task of the Magician in every ceremony is therefore to render his Circle absolutely impregnable. If one littlest thought intrude upon the mind of the Mystic, his concentration is absolutely destroyed; and his consciousness remains on exactly the same level as the Stockbroker's. Even the smallest baby is incompatible with the virginity of its mother. If you leave even a single spirit within the circle, the effect of the conjuration will be entirely absorbed by it.> {101}The Magician must therefore take the utmost care in the matter of purification, "firstly", of himself, "secondly", of his instruments, "thirdly", of the place of working. Ancient Magicians recommended a preliminary purification of from three days to many months. During this period of training they took the utmost pains with diet. They avoided animal food, lest the elemental spirit of the animal should get into their atmosphere. They practised sexual abstinence, lest they should be influenced in any way by the spirit of the wife. Even in regard to the excrements of the body they were equally careful; in trimming the hair and nails, they ceremonially destroyed> the severed portion. They fasted, so that the body itself might destroy anything extraneous to the bare necessity of its existence. They purified the mind by special prayers and conservations. They avoided the contamination of social intercourse, especially the conjugal kind; and their servitors were disciples specially chosen and consecrated for the work.In modern times our superior understanding of the essentials of this process enables us to dispense to some extent with its external rigours; but the internal purification must be even more carefully performed. We may eat meat, provided that in doing so we affirm that we eat it in order to strengthen us for the special purpose of our proposed invocation.> {102}By thus avoiding those actions which might excite the comment of our neighbours we avoid the graver dangers of falling into spiritual pride.We have understood the saying: "To the pure all things are pure", and we have learnt how to act up to it. We can analyse the mind far more acutely than could the ancients, and we can therefore distinguish the real and right feeling from its imitations. A man may eat meat from self-indulgence, or in order to avoid the dangers of asceticism. We must constantly examine ourselves, and assure ourselves that every action is really subservient to the One Purpose.It is ceremonially desirable to seal and affirm this mental purity by Ritual, and accordingly the first operation in any actual ceremony is bathing and robing, with appropriate words. The bath signifies the removal of all things extraneous to antagonistic to the one thought. The putting on of the robe is the positive side of the same operation. It is the assumption of the fame of mind suitable to that one thought.A similar operation takes place in the preparation of every instrument, as has been seen in the Chapter devoted to that subject. In the preparation of theplace of working, the same considerations apply. We first remove from that place all objects; and we then put into it those objects, and only those {103} objects, which are necessary. During many days we occupy ourselves in this process of cleansing and consecration; and this again is confirmed in the actual ceremony.The cleansed and consecrated Magician takes his cleansed and consecrated instruments into that cleansed and consecrated place, and there proceeds to repeat that double ceremony in the ceremony itself, which has these same two main parts. The first part of every ceremony is the banishing; the second, the invoking. The same formula is repeated even in the ceremony of banishing itself, for in the banishing ritual of the pentagram we not only command the demons to depart, but invoke the Archangels and their hosts to act as guardians of the Circle during our pre-occupation with the ceremony proper.In more elaborate ceremonies it is usual to banish everything by name. Each element, each planet, and each sign, perhaps even the Sephiroth themselves; all are removed, including the very one which we wished to invoke, for that force ... ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
236:What are these operations? They are not mere psychological self-analysis and self-observation. Such analysis, such observation are, like the process of right thought, of immense value and practically indispensable. They may even, if rightly pursued, lead to a right thought of considerable power and effectivity. Like intellectual discrimination by the process of meditative thought they will have an effect of purification; they will lead to self-knowledge of a certain kind and to the setting right of the disorders of the soul and the heart and even of the disorders of the understanding. Self-knowledge of all kinds is on the straight path to the knowledge of the real Self. The Upanishad tells us that the Self-existent has so set the doors of the soul that they turn outwards and most men look outward into the appearances of things; only the rare soul that is ripe for a calm thought and steady wisdom turns its eye inward, sees the Self and attains to immortality. To this turning of the eye inward psychological self-observation and analysis is a great and effective introduction.We can look into the inward of ourselves more easily than we can look into the inward of things external to us because there, in things outside us, we are in the first place embarrassed by the form and secondly we have no natural previous experience of that in them which is other than their physical substance. A purified or tranquillised mind may reflect or a powerful concentration may discover God in the world, the Self in Nature even before it is realised in ourselves, but this is rare and difficult. (2) And it is only in ourselves that we can observe and know the process of the Self in its becoming and follow the process by which it draws back into self-being. Therefore the ancient counsel, know thyself, will always stand as the first word that directs us towards the knowledge. Still, psychological self-knowledge is only the experience of the modes of the Self, it is not the realisation of the Self in its pure being. The status of knowledge, then, which Yoga envisages is not merely an intellectual conception or clear discrimination of the truth, nor is it an enlightened psychological experience of the modes of our being. It is a "realisation", in the full sense of the word; it is the making real to ourselves and in ourselves of the Self, the transcendent and universal Divine, and it is the subsequent impossibility of viewing the modes of being except in the light of that Self and in their true aspect as its flux of becoming under the psychical and physical conditions of our world-existence. This realisation consists of three successive movements, internal vision, complete internal experience and identity. This internal vision, dr.s.t.i, the power so highly valued by the ancient sages, the power which made a man a Rishi or Kavi and no longer a mere thinker, is a sort of light in the soul by which things unseen become as evident and real to it-to the soul and not merely to the intellect-as do things seen to the physical eye. In the physical world there are always two forms of knowledge, the direct and the indirect, pratyaks.a, of that which is present to the eyes, and paroks.a, of that which is remote from and beyond our vision. When the object is beyond our vision, we are necessarily obliged to arrive at an idea of it by inference, imagination, analogy, by hearing the descriptions of others who have seen it or by studying pictorial or other representations of it if these are available. By putting together all these aids we can indeed arrive at a more or less adequate idea or suggestive image of the object, but we do not realise the thing itself; it is not yet to us the grasped reality, but only our conceptual representation of a reality. But once we have seen it with the eyes,-for no other sense is adequate,-we possess, we realise; it is there secure in our satisfied being, part of ourselves in knowledge. Precisely the same rule holds good of psychical things and of he Self. We may hear clear and luminous teachings about the Self from philosophers or teachers or from ancient writings; we may by thought, inference, imagination, analogy or by any other available means attempt to form a mental figure or conception of it; we may hold firmly that conception in our mind and fix it by an entire and exclusive concentration;3 but we have not yet realised it, we have not seen God. It is only when after long and persistent concentration or by other means the veil of the mind is rent or swept aside, only when a flood of light breaks over the awakened mentality, jyotirmaya brahman, and conception gives place to a knowledge-vision in which the Self is as present, real, concrete as a physical object to the physical eye, that we possess in knowledge; for we have seen. After that revelation, whatever fadings of the light, whatever periods of darkness may afflict the soul, it can never irretrievably lose what it has once held. The experience is inevitably renewed and must become more frequent till it is constant; when and how soon depends on the devotion and persistence with which we insist on the path and besiege by our will or our love the hidden Deity. (2) And it is only in ourselves that we can observe and know the 2 In one respect, however, it is easier, because in external things we are not so much hampered by the sense of the limited ego as in ourselves; one obstacle to the realisation of God is therefore removed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge,
237:To what gods shall the sacrifice be offered? Who shall be invoked to manifest and protect in the human being this increasing godhead?Agni first, for without him the sacrificial flame cannot burn on the altar of the soul. That flame of Agni is the seven-tongued power of the Will, a Force of God instinct with Knowledge. This conscious and forceful will is the immortal guest in our mortality, a pure priest and a divine worker, the mediator between earth and heaven. It carries what we offer to the higher Powers and brings back in return their force and light and joy into our humanity.Indra, the Puissant next, who is the power of pure Existence self-manifested as the Divine Mind. As Agni is one pole of Force instinct with knowledge that sends its current upward from earth to heaven, so Indra is the other pole of Light instinct with force which descends from heaven to earth. He comes down into our world as the Hero with the shining horses and slays darkness and division with his lightnings, pours down the life-giving heavenly waters, finds in the trace of the hound, Intuition, the lost or hidden illuminations, makes the Sun of Truth mount high in the heaven of our mentality.Surya, the Sun, is the master of that supreme Truth, - truth of being, truth of knowledge, truth of process and act and movement and functioning. He is therefore the creator or rather the manifester of all things - for creation is out-bringing, expression by the Truth and Will - and the father, fosterer, enlightener of our souls. The illuminations we seek are the herds of this Sun who comes to us in the track of the divine Dawn and releases and reveals in us night-hidden world after world up to the highest Beatitude.Of that beatitude Soma is the representative deity. The wine of his ecstasy is concealed in the growths of earth, in the waters of existence; even here in our physical being are his immortalising juices and they have to be pressed out and offered to all the gods; for in that strength these shall increase and conquer.Each of these primary deities has others associated with him who fulfil functions that arise from his own. For if the truth of Surya is to be established firmly in our mortal nature, there are previous conditions that are indispensable; a vast purity and clear wideness destructive of all sin and crooked falsehood, - and this is Varuna; a luminous power of love and comprehension leading and forming into harmony all our thoughts, acts and impulses, - this is Mitra; an immortal puissance of clear-discerning aspiration and endeavour, - this is Aryaman; a happy spontaneity of the right enjoyment of all things dispelling the evil dream of sin and error and suffering, - this is Bhaga. These four are powers of the Truth of Surya. For the whole bliss of Soma to be established perfectly in our nature a happy and enlightened and unmaimed condition of mind, vitality and body are necessary. This condition is given to us by the twin Ashwins; wedded to the daughter of Light, drinkers of honey, bringers of perfect satisfactions, healers of maim and malady they occupy our parts of knowledge and parts of action and prepare our mental, vital and physical being for an easy and victorious ascension.Indra, the Divine Mind, as the shaper of mental forms has for his assistants, his artisans, the Ribhus, human powers who by the work of sacrifice and their brilliant ascension to the high dwelling-place of the Sun have attained to immortality and help mankind to repeat their achievement. They shape by the mind Indra's horses, the chariot of the Ashwins, the weapons of the Gods, all the means of the journey and the battle. But as giver of the Light of Truth and as Vritra-slayer Indra is aided by the Maruts, who are powers of will and nervous or vital Force that have attained to the light of thought and the voice of self-expression. They are behind all thought and speech as its impellers and they battle towards the Light, Truth and Bliss of the supreme Consciousness.There are also female energies; for the Deva is both Male and Female and the gods also are either activising souls or passively executive and methodising energies. Aditi, infinite Mother of the Gods, comes first; and there are besides five powers of the Truthconsciousness, - Mahi or Bharati, the vast Word that brings us all things out of the divine source; Ila, the strong primal word of the Truth who gives us its active vision; Saraswati, its streaming current and the word of its inspiration; Sarama, the Intuition, hound of heaven who descends into the cavern of the subconscient and finds there the concealed illuminations; Dakshina, whose function is to discern rightly, dispose the action and the offering and distribute in the sacrifice to each godhead its portion. Each god, too, has his female energy. All this action and struggle and ascension is supported by Heaven our Father and Earth our Mother Parents of the Gods, who sustain respectively the purely mental and psychic and the physical consciousness. Their large and free scope is the condition of our achievement. Vayu, master of life, links them together by the mid-air, the region of vital force. And there are other deities, - Parjanya, giver of the rain of heaven; Dadhikravan, the divine war-horse, a power of Agni; the mystic Dragon of the Foundations; Trita Aptya who on the third plane of existence consummates our triple being; and more besides.The development of all these godheads is necessary to our perfection. And that perfection must be attained on all our levels, - in the wideness of earth, our physical being and consciousness; in the full force of vital speed and action and enjoyment and nervous vibration, typified as the Horse which must be brought forward to upbear our endeavour; in the perfect gladness of the heart of emotion and a brilliant heat and clarity of the mind throughout our intellectual and psychical being; in the coming of the supramental Light, the Dawn and the Sun and the shining Mother of the herds, to transform all our existence; for so comes to us the possession of the Truth, by the Truth the admirable surge of the Bliss, in the Bliss infinite Consciousness of absolute being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire 1.02 - The Doctrine of the Mystics,
238:Chapter 18 - Trapped in a Dream(A guy is playing a pinball machine, seemingly the same guy who rode with him in the back of the boat car. This part is played by Richard Linklater, aka, the director.)Hey, man.Hey.Weren't you in a boat car? You know, the guy, the guy with the hat? He gave me a ride in his car, or boat thing, and you were in the back seat with me?I mean, I'm not saying that you don't know what you're talking about, but I don't know what you're talking about.No, you see, you guys let me off at this really specific spot that you gave him directions to let me off at, I get out, and end up getting hit by a car, but then, I just woke up because I was dreaming, and later than that, I found out that I was still dreaming, dreaming that I'd woken up.Oh yeah, those are called false awakenings. I used to have those all the time.Yeah, but I'm still in it now. I, I can't get out of it. It's been going on forever, I keep waking up, but, but I'm just waking up into another dream. I'm starting to get creeped out, too. Like I'm talking to dead people. This woman on TV's telling me about how death is this dreamtime that exists outside of life. I mean, (desperate sigh) I'm starting to think that I'm dead.I'm gonna tell you about a dream I once had. I know that's, when someone says that, then usually you're in for a very boring next few minutes, and you might be, but it sounds like, you know, what else are you going to do, right? Anyway, I read this essay by Philip K. Dick.What, you read it in your dream?No, no. I read it before the dream. It was the preamble to the dream. It was about that book, um Flow My Tears the Policeman Said. You know that one?Uh, yeah yeah, he won an award for that one.Right, right. That's the one he wrote really fast. It just like flowed right out of him. He felt he was sort of channeling it, or something. But anyway, about four years after it was published, he was at this party, and he met this woman who had the same name as the woman character in the book. And she had a boyfriend with the same name as the boyfriend character in the book, and she was having an affair with this guy, the chief of police, and he had the same name as the chief of police in his book. So she's telling him all of this stuff from her life, and everything she's saying is right out of his book. So that's totally freaking him out, but, what can he do?And then shortly after that, he was going to mail a letter, and he saw this kind of, um, you know, dangerous, shady looking guy standing by his car, but instead of avoiding him, which he says he would have usually done, he just walked right up to him and said, "Can I help you?" And the guy said, "Yeah. I, I ran out of gas." So he pulls out his wallet, and he hands him some money, which he says he never would have done, and then he gets home and thinks, wait a second, this guy, you know, he can't get to a gas station, he's out of gas. So he gets back in his car, he goes and finds the guy, takes him to the gas station, and as he's pulling up at the gas station, he realizes, "Hey, this is in my book too. This exact station, this exact guy. Everything."So this whole episode is kind of creepy, right? And he's telling his priest about it, you know, describing how he wrote this book, and then four years later all these things happened to him. And as he's telling it to him, the priest says, "That's the Book of Acts. You're describing the Book of Acts." And he's like, "I've never read the Book of Acts." So he, you know, goes home and reads the Book of Acts, and it's like uncanny. Even the characters' names are the same as in the Bible. And the Book of Acts takes place in 50 A.D., when it was written, supposedly. So Philip K. Dick had this theory that time was an illusion and that we were all actually in 50 A.D., and the reason he had written this book was that he had somehow momentarily punctured through this illusion, this veil of time, and what he had seen there was what was going on in the Book of Acts.And he was really into Gnosticism, and this idea that this demiurge, or demon, had created this illusion of time to make us forget that Christ was about to return, and the kingdom of God was about to arrive. And that we're all in 50 A.D., and there's someone trying to make us forget that God is imminent. And that's what time is. That's what all of history is. It's just this kind of continuous, you know, daydream, or distraction.And so I read that, and I was like, well that's weird. And than that night I had a dream and there was this guy in the dream who was supposed to be a psychic. But I was skeptical. I was like, you know, he's not really a psychic, you know I'm thinking to myself. And then suddenly I start floating, like levitating, up to the ceiling. And as I almost go through the roof, I'm like, "Okay, Mr. Psychic. I believe you. You're a psychic. Put me down please." And I float down, and as my feet touch the ground, the psychic turns into this woman in a green dress. And this woman is Lady Gregory.Now Lady Gregory was Yeats' patron, this, you know, Irish person. And though I'd never seen her image, I was just sure that this was the face of Lady Gregory. So we're walking along, and Lady Gregory turns to me and says, "Let me explain to you the nature of the universe. Now Philip K. Dick is right about time, but he's wrong that it's 50 A.D. Actually, there's only one instant, and it's right now, and it's eternity. And it's an instant in which God is posing a question, and that question is basically, 'Do you want to, you know, be one with eternity? Do you want to be in heaven?' And we're all saying, 'No thank you. Not just yet.' And so time is actually just this constant saying 'No' to God's invitation. I mean that's what time is. I mean, and it's no more 50 A.D. than it's two thousand and one. And there's just this one instant, and that's what we're always in."And then she tells me that actually this is the narrative of everyone's life. That, you know, behind the phenomenal difference, there is but one story, and that's the story of moving from the "no" to the "yes." All of life is like, "No thank you. No thank you. No thank you." then ultimately it's, "Yes, I give in. Yes, I accept. Yes, I embrace." I mean, that's the journey. I mean, everyone gets to the "yes" in the end, right?Right.So we continue walking, and my dog runs over to me. And so I'm petting him, really happy to see him, you know, he's been dead for years. So I'm petting him and I realize there's this kind of gross oozing stuff coming out of his stomach. And I look over at Lady Gregory, and she sort of coughs. She's like [cough] [cough] "Oh, excuse me." And there's vomit, like dribbling down her chin, and it smells really bad. And I think, "Well, wait a second, that's not just the smell of vomit," which is, doesn't smell very good, "that's the smell of like dead person vomit." You know, so it's like doubly foul. And then I realize I'm actually in the land of the dead, and everyone around me is dead. My dog had been dead for over ten years, Lady Gregory had been dead a lot longer than that. When I finally woke up, I was like, whoa, that wasn't a dream, that was a visitation to this real place, the land of the dead.So what happened? I mean how did you finally get out of it?Oh man. It was just like one of those like life altering experiences. I mean I could never really look at the world the same way again, after that.Yeah, but I mean like how did you, how did you finally get out of the dream? See, that's my problem. I'm like trapped. I keep, I keep thinking that I'm waking up, but I'm still in a dream. It seems like it's going on forever. I can't get out of it, and I want to wake up for real. How do you really wake up?I don't know, I don't know. I'm not very good at that anymore. But, um, if that's what you're thinking, I mean you, you probably should. I mean, you know if you can wake up, you should, because you know someday, you know, you won't be able to. So just, um ... But it's easy. You know. Just, just wake up. ~ Waking Life,
239:[The Gods and Their Worlds] [...] According to traditions and occult schools, all these zones of realities, these planes of realities have got different names; they have been classified in a different way, but there is an essential analogy, and if you go back far enough into the traditions, you see only the words changing according to the country and the language. Even now, the experiences of Western occultists and those of Eastern occultists offer great similarities. All who set out on the discovery of these invisible worlds and make a report of what they saw, give a very similar description, whether they be from here or there; they use different words, but the experience is very similar and the handling of forces is the same. This knowledge of the occult worlds is based on the existence of subtle bodies and of subtle worlds corresponding to those bodies. They are what the psychological method calls "states of consciousness", but these states of consciousness really correspond to worlds. The occult procedure consists then in being aware of these various inner states of being or subtle bodies and in becoming sufficiently a master of them so as to be able to go out of them successively, one after another. There is indeed a whole scale of subtleties, increasing or decreasing according to the direction in which you go, and the occult procedure consists in going out of a denser body into a subtler body and so on again, up to the most ethereal regions. You go, by successive exteriorisations, into bodies or worlds more and more subtle. It is somewhat as if every time you passed into another dimension. The fourth dimension of the physicists is nothing but the scientific transcription of an occult knowledge. To give another image, one can say that the physical body is at the centre - it is the most material, the densest and also the smallest - and the inner bodies, more subtle, overflow more and more the central physical body; they pass through it, extending themselves farther and farther, like water evaporating from a porous vase and forming a kind of steam all around. And the greater the subtlety, the more the extension tends to unite with that of the universe: one ends by universalising oneself. And it is altogether a concrete process which gives an objective experience of invisible worlds and even enables one to act in these worlds. There are, then, only a very small number of people in the West who know that these gods are not merely subjective and imaginary - more or less wildly imaginary - but that they correspond to a universal truth. All these regions, all these domains are filled with beings who exist, each in its own domain, and if you are awake and conscious on a particular plane - for instance, if on going out of a more material body you awake on some higher plane, you have the same relation with the things and people of that plane as you had with the things and people of the material world. That is to say, there exists an entirely objective relation that has nothing to do with the idea you may have of these things. Naturally, the resemblance is greater and greater as you approach the physical world, the material world, and there even comes a time when the one region has a direct action upon the other. In any case, in what Sri Aurobindo calls the overmental worlds, you will find a concrete reality absolutely independent of your personal experience; you go back there and again find the same things, with the differences that have occurred during your absence. And you have relations with those beings that are identical with the relations you have with physical beings, with this difference that the relation is more plastic, supple and direct - for example, there is the capacity to change the external form, the visible form, according to the inner state you are in. But you can make an appointment with someone and be at the appointed place and find the same being again, with certain differences that have come about during your absence; it is entirely concrete with results entirely concrete. One must have at least a little of this experience in order to understand these things. Otherwise, those who are convinced that all this is mere human imagination and mental formation, who believe that these gods have such and such a form because men have thought them to be like that, and that they have certain defects and certain qualities because men have thought them to be like that - all those who say that God is made in the image of man and that he exists only in human thought, all these will not understand; to them this will appear absolutely ridiculous, madness. One must have lived a little, touched the subject a little, to know how very concrete the thing is. Naturally, children know a good deal if they have not been spoilt. There are so many children who return every night to the same place and continue to live the life they have begun there. When these faculties are not spoilt with age, you can keep them with you. At a time when I was especially interested in dreams, I could return exactly to a place and continue a work that I had begun: supervise something, for example, set something in order, a work of organisation or of discovery, of exploration. You go until you reach a certain spot, as you would go in life, then you take a rest, then you return and begin again - you begin the work at the place where you left off and you continue it. And you perceive that there are things which are quite independent of you, in the sense that changes of which you are not at all the author, have taken place automatically during your absence. But for this, you must live these experiences yourself, you must see them yourself, live them with sufficient sincerity and spontaneity in order to see that they are independent of any mental formation. For you can do the opposite also, and deepen the study of the action of mental formation upon events. This is very interesting, but it is another domain. And this study makes you very careful, very prudent, because you become aware of how far you can delude yourself. So you must study both, the dream and the occult reality, in order to see what is the essential difference between the two. The one depends upon us; the other exists in itself; entirely independent of the thought that we have of it. When you have worked in that domain, you recognise in fact that once a subject has been studied and something has been learnt mentally, it gives a special colour to the experience; the experience may be quite spontaneous and sincere, but the simple fact that the subject was known and studied lends a particular quality. Whereas if you had learnt nothing about the question, if you knew nothing at all, the transcription would be completely spontaneous and sincere when the experience came; it would be more or less adequate, but it would not be the outcome of a previous mental formation. Naturally, this occult knowledge or this experience is not very frequent in the world, because in those who do not have a developed inner life, there are veritable gaps between the external consciousness and the inmost consciousness; the linking states of being are missing and they have to be constructed. So when people enter there for the first time, they are bewildered, they have the impression they have fallen into the night, into nothingness, into non-being! I had a Danish friend, a painter, who was like that. He wanted me to teach him how to go out of the body; he used to have interesting dreams and thought that it would be worth the trouble to go there consciously. So I made him "go out" - but it was a frightful thing! When he was dreaming, a part of his mind still remained conscious, active, and a kind of link existed between this active part and his external being; then he remembered some of his dreams, but it was a very partial phenomenon. And to go out of one's body means to pass gradually through all the states of being, if one does the thing systematically. Well, already in the subtle physical, one is almost de-individualised, and when one goes farther, there remains nothing, for nothing is formed or individualised. Thus, when people are asked to meditate or told to go within, to enter into themselves, they are in agony - naturally! They have the impression that they are vanishing. And with reason: there is nothing, no consciousness! These things that appear to us quite natural and evident, are, for people who know nothing, wild imagination. If, for example, you transplant these experiences or this knowledge to the West, well, unless you have been frequenting the circles of occultists, they stare at you with open eyes. And when you have turned your back, they hasten to say, "These people are cranks!" Now to come back to the gods and conclude. It must be said that all those beings who have never had an earthly existence - gods or demons, invisible beings and powers - do not possess what the Divine has put into man: the psychic being. And this psychic being gives to man true love, charity, compassion, a deep kindness, which compensate for all his external defects. In the gods there is no fault because they live according to their own nature, spontaneously and without constraint: as gods, it is their manner of being. But if you take a higher point of view, if you have a higher vision, a vision of the whole, you see that they lack certain qualities that are exclusively human. By his capacity of love and self-giving, man can have as much power as the gods and even more, when he is not egoistic, when he has surmounted his egoism. If he fulfils the required condition, man is nearer to the Supreme than the gods are. He can be nearer. He is not so automatically, but he has the power to be so, the potentiality. If human love manifested itself without mixture, it would be all-powerful. Unfortunately, in human love there is as much love of oneself as of the one loved; it is not a love that makes you forget yourself. - 4 November 1958 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III 355
,
240:The Supreme Discovery IF WE want to progress integrally, we must build within our conscious being a strong and pure mental synthesis which can serve us as a protection against temptations from outside, as a landmark to prevent us from going astray, as a beacon to light our way across the moving ocean of life. Each individual should build up this mental synthesis according to his own tendencies and affinities and aspirations. But if we want it to be truly living and luminous, it must be centred on the idea that is the intellectual representation symbolising That which is at the centre of our being, That which is our life and our light. This idea, expressed in sublime words, has been taught in various forms by all the great Instructors in all lands and all ages. The Self of each one and the great universal Self are one. Since all that is exists from all eternity in its essence and principle, why make a distinction between the being and its origin, between ourselves and what we place at the beginning? The ancient traditions rightly said: "Our origin and ourselves, our God and ourselves are one." And this oneness should not be understood merely as a more or less close and intimate relationship of union, but as a true identity. Thus, when a man who seeks the Divine attempts to reascend by degrees towards the inaccessible, he forgets that all his knowledge and all his intuition cannot take him one step forward in this infinite; neither does he know that what he wants to attain, what he believes to be so far from him, is within him. For how could he know anything of the origin until he becomes conscious of this origin in himself? It is by understanding himself, by learning to know himself, that he can make the supreme discovery and cry out in wonder like the patriarch in the Bible, "The house of God is here and I knew it not." That is why we must express that sublime thought, creatrix of the material worlds, and make known to all the word that fills the heavens and the earth, "I am in all things and all beings."When all shall know this, the promised day of great transfigurations will be at hand. When in each atom of Matter men shall recognise the indwelling thought of God, when in each living creature they shall perceive some hint of a gesture of God, when each man can see God in his brother, then dawn will break, dispelling the darkness, the falsehood, the ignorance, the error and suffering that weigh upon all Nature. For, "all Nature suffers and laments as she awaits the revelation of the Sons of God." This indeed is the central thought epitomising all others, the thought which should be ever present to our remembrance as the sun that illumines all life. That is why I remind you of it today. For if we follow our path bearing this thought in our hearts like the rarest jewel, the most precious treasure, if we allow it to do its work of illumination and transfiguration within us, we shall know that it lives in the centre of all beings and all things, and in it we shall feel the marvellous oneness of the universe. Then we shall understand the vanity and childishness of our meagre satisfactions, our foolish quarrels, our petty passions, our blind indignations. We shall see the dissolution of our little faults, the crumbling of the last entrenchments of our limited personality and our obtuse egoism. We shall feel ourselves being swept along by this sublime current of true spirituality which will deliver us from our narrow limits and bounds. The individual Self and the universal Self are one; in every world, in every being, in every thing, in every atom is the Divine Presence, and man's mission is to manifest it. In order to do that, he must become conscious of this Divine Presence within him. Some individuals must undergo a real apprenticeship in order to achieve this: their egoistic being is too all-absorbing, too rigid, too conservative, and their struggles against it are long and painful. Others, on the contrary, who are more impersonal, more plastic, more spiritualised, come easily into contact with the inexhaustible divine source of their being.But let us not forget that they too should devote themselves daily, constantly, to a methodical effort of adaptation and transformation, so that nothing within them may ever again obscure the radiance of that pure light. But how greatly the standpoint changes once we attain this deeper consciousness! How understanding widens, how compassion grows! On this a sage has said: "I would like each one of us to come to the point where he perceives the inner God who dwells even in the vilest of human beings; instead of condemning him we would say, 'Arise, O resplendent Being, thou who art ever pure, who knowest neither birth nor death; arise, Almighty One, and manifest thy nature.'" Let us live by this beautiful utterance and we shall see everything around us transformed as if by miracle. This is the attitude of true, conscious and discerning love, the love which knows how to see behind appearances, understand in spite of words, and which, amid all obstacles, is in constant communion with the depths. What value have our impulses and our desires, our anguish and our violence, our sufferings and our struggles, all these inner vicissitudes unduly dramatised by our unruly imagination - what value do they have before this great, this sublime and divine love bending over us from the innermost depths of our being, bearing with our weaknesses, rectifying our errors, healing our wounds, bathing our whole being with its regenerating streams? For the inner Godhead never imposes herself, she neither demands nor threatens; she offers and gives herself, conceals and forgets herself in the heart of all beings and things; she never accuses, she neither judges nor curses nor condemns, but works unceasingly to perfect without constraint, to mend without reproach, to encourage without impatience, to enrich each one with all the wealth he can receive; she is the mother whose love bears fruit and nourishes, guards and protects, counsels and consoles; because she understands everything, she can endure everything, excuse and pardon everything, hope and prepare for everything; bearing everything within herself, she owns nothing that does not belong to all, and because she reigns over all, she is the servant of all; that is why all, great and small, who want to be kings with her and gods in her, become, like her, not despots but servitors among their brethren. How beautiful is this humble role of servant, the role of all who have been revealers and heralds of the God who is within all, of the Divine Love that animates all things.... And until we can follow their example and become true servants even as they, let us allow ourselves to be penetrated and transformed by this Divine Love; let us offer Him, without reserve, this marvellous instrument, our physical organism. He shall make it yield its utmost on every plane of activity. To achieve this total self-consecration, all means are good, all methods have their value. The one thing needful is to persevere in our will to attain this goal. For then everything we study, every action we perform, every human being we meet, all come to bring us an indication, a help, a light to guide us on the path. Before I close, I shall add a few pages for those who have already made apparently fruitless efforts, for those who have encountered the pitfalls on the way and seen the measure of their weakness, for those who are in danger of losing their self-confidence and courage. These pages, intended to rekindle hope in the hearts of those who suffer, were written by a spiritual worker at a time when ordeals of every kind were sweeping down on him like purifying flames. You who are weary, downcast and bruised, you who fall, who think perhaps that you are defeated, hear the voice of a friend. He knows your sorrows, he has shared them, he has suffered like you from the ills of the earth; like you he has crossed many deserts under the burden of the day, he has known thirst and hunger, solitude and abandonment, and the cruellest of all wants, the destitution of the heart. Alas! he has known too the hours of doubt, the errors, the faults, the failings, every weakness. But he tells you: Courage! Hearken to the lesson that the rising sun brings to the earth with its first rays each morning. It is a lesson of hope, a message of solace. You who weep, who suffer and tremble, who dare not expect an end to your ills, an issue to your pangs, behold: there is no night without dawn and the day is about to break when darkness is thickest; there is no mist that the sun does not dispel, no cloud that it does not gild, no tear that it will not dry one day, no storm that is not followed by its shining triumphant bow; there is no snow that it does not melt, nor winter that it does not change into radiant spring. And for you too, there is no affliction which does not bring its measure of glory, no distress which cannot be transformed into joy, nor defeat into victory, nor downfall into higher ascension, nor solitude into radiating centre of life, nor discord into harmony - sometimes it is a misunderstanding between two minds that compels two hearts to open to mutual communion; lastly, there is no infinite weakness that cannot be changed into strength. And it is even in supreme weakness that almightiness chooses to reveal itself! Listen, my little child, you who today feel so broken, so fallen perhaps, who have nothing left, nothing to cover your misery and foster your pride: never before have you been so great! How close to the summits is he who awakens in the depths, for the deeper the abyss, the more the heights reveal themselves! Do you not know this, that the most sublime forces of the vasts seek to array themselves in the most opaque veils of Matter? Oh, the sublime nuptials of sovereign love with the obscurest plasticities, of the shadow's yearning with the most royal light! If ordeal or fault has cast you down, if you have sunk into the nether depths of suffering, do not grieve - for there indeed the divine love and the supreme blessing can reach you! Because you have passed through the crucible of purifying sorrows, the glorious ascents are yours. You are in the wilderness: then listen to the voices of the silence. The clamour of flattering words and outer applause has gladdened your ears, but the voices of the silence will gladden your soul and awaken within you the echo of the depths, the chant of divine harmonies! You are walking in the depths of night: then gather the priceless treasures of the night. In bright sunshine, the ways of intelligence are lit, but in the white luminosities of the night lie the hidden paths of perfection, the secret of spiritual riches. You are being stripped of everything: that is the way towards plenitude. When you have nothing left, everything will be given to you. Because for those who are sincere and true, from the worst always comes the best. Every grain that is sown in the earth produces a thousand. Every wing-beat of sorrow can be a soaring towards glory. And when the adversary pursues man relentlessly, everything he does to destroy him only makes him greater. Hear the story of the worlds, look: the great enemy seems to triumph. He casts the beings of light into the night, and the night is filled with stars. He rages against the cosmic working, he assails the integrity of the empire of the sphere, shatters its harmony, divides and subdivides it, scatters its dust to the four winds of infinity, and lo! the dust is changed into a golden seed, fertilising the infinite and peopling it with worlds which now gravitate around their eternal centre in the larger orbit of space - so that even division creates a richer and deeper unity, and by multiplying the surfaces of the material universe, enlarges the empire that it set out to destroy. Beautiful indeed was the song of the primordial sphere cradled in the bosom of immensity, but how much more beautiful and triumphant is the symphony of the constellations, the music of the spheres, the immense choir that fills the heavens with an eternal hymn of victory! Hear again: no state was ever more precarious than that of man when he was separated on earth from his divine origin. Above him stretched the hostile borders of the usurper, and at his horizon's gates watched jailers armed with flaming swords. Then, since he could climb no more to the source of life, the source arose within him; since he could no more receive the light from above, the light shone forth at the very centre of his being; since he could commune no more with the transcendent love, that love offered itself in a holocaust and chose each terrestrial being, each human self as its dwelling-place and sanctuary. That is how, in this despised and desolate but fruitful and blessed Matter, each atom contains a divine thought, each being carries within him the Divine Inhabitant. And if no being in all the universe is as frail as man, neither is any as divine as he! In truth, in truth, in humiliation lies the cradle of glory! 28 April 1912 ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago The Supreme Discovery,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Everyone's God is One. ~ Sai Baba,
2:God I love rainbows. ~ John Green,
3:God is dead ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
4:My God is rock'n'roll. ~ Lou Reed,
5:The god is the beautiful. ~ Plato,
6:God is a verb ~ William Paul Young,
7:God is dead. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
8:God is in the details! ~ Anonymous,
9:None but God is wise. ~ Pythagoras,
10:Remember who God is. ~ Renee Swope,
11:God is faithful. ~ Jefferson Bethke,
12:God is in the details. ~ Kevin Kwan,
13:God is in the truth. ~ Carol Tavris,
14:Thank God in an atheist. ~ Mal Peet,
15:God is all and all is God. ~ Eckhart,
16:God is a verb ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
17:God is man idealized. ~ Amiri Baraka,
18:God is found by those, ~ Bulleh Shah,
19:God is love” (I John 4:8) ~ Anonymous,
20:God in heaven has dominion ~ Euripides,
21:God is not a Christian. ~ Desmond Tutu,
22:God is not a diversion. ~ Desmond Tutu,
23:Only God is awesome. ~ Shane Claiborne,
24:A day to God is a thousand years, ~ RZA,
25:Bidden or not, God is here. ~ Ami McKay,
26:God is enough for them. ~ Blaise Pascal,
27:I THINK I JUST MET GOD I ~ Bob Odenkirk,
28:Thank God I'm an atheist. ~ Luis Bunuel,
29:Thank God I'm an atheist! ~ Luis Bu uel,
30:God is thy law, thou mine. ~ John Milton,
31:God is within you. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
32:My god is transgendered. ~ Krista Bremer,
33:No god is that spiteful. ~ Chris Dietzel,
34:Thank God I'm not a Jungian. ~ Carl Jung,
35:The act of God injures no one. ~ Juvenal,
36:God is in the details. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
37:God is the creator of all things. ~ Kelis,
38:God is the same everywhere. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
39:I say God is the ultimate. ~ Donald Trump,
40:Oh my God I am so cool. ~ Charlize Theron,
41:God is greater than God. ~ Meister Eckhart,
42:God is just a statistics. ~ Marilyn Manson,
43:God is the perfect poet. ~ Robert Browning,
44:God is truth and light his shadow. ~ Plato,
45:I know God is my vindicator. ~ Joel Osteen,
46:Listen! God is talking back! ~ Mike Dooley,
47:One with God is a majority. ~ Billy Graham,
48:Sleep in peace, God is awake ~ Victor Hugo,
49:The word of God is my vow. ~ Pittacus Lore,
50:God is the sum of all that is ~ Mike Dooley,
51:Invited or not, God is present. ~ Carl Jung,
52:My God is better than your God ~ Boy George,
53:Sleep in Peace, God is awake. ~ Victor Hugo,
54:God is a thing that thinks. ~ Baruch Spinoza,
55:God is creativity, not a Creator. ~ Rajneesh,
56:God is God, and I'm not. ~ Stephen Mansfield,
57:God is like a shitty girlfriend. ~ Louis C K,
58:God is love. Yes or no? No. ~ Samuel Beckett,
59:God is not a dead equation! ~ Muhammad Iqbal,
60:God is the mirror of man. ~ Ludwig Feuerbach,
61:Man is a god in ruins. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
62:Nearness to God is common to us all, ~ Rumi,
63:We are, because God is. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
64:Where sanity is there God is. ~ D H Lawrence,
65:Bidden or unbidden, God is present. ~ Erasmus,
66:Clearly, God is a Democrat. ~ Patrick Caddell,
67:Cold or not, God is Present ~ Haruki Murakami,
68:God is bigger than people think. ~ Jimmy Dean,
69:God is the opposite of Rodin. ~ Robert Walser,
70:Our God is a forgiving God. ~ George H W Bush,
71:[She bites God in the wrist] ~ Antonin Artaud,
72:Trust that God is in our corner. ~ Max Lucado,
73:with my God I can scale any wall. ~ Anonymous,
74:Your God is too Small ~ John Bertram Phillips,
75:A man is a god in ruins. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
76:By the grace of god I feel you. ~ Truth Devour,
77:God is a name we give to love. ~ Nancy Pickard,
78:God is God because he remembers. ~ Elie Wiesel,
79:God is love? Not bloody likely. ~ Edward Abbey,
80:God is only mocked by believers. ~ Anne Sexton,
81:Man made God in his own image. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
82:The grace of God is courtesy. ~ Hilaire Belloc,
83:To see God is to be God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
84:We are artists, because God is. ~ Peter Kreeft,
85:Where there is peace, God is. ~ George Herbert,
86:By the grace of God I am what I am ~ Mark Dever,
87:Called or not, God is always there. ~ Carl Jung,
88:God in his harmony has equal ends ~ Victor Hugo,
89:God is a luxury I can't afford. ~ Martin Landau,
90:God is not afraid of new things. ~ Pope Francis,
91:God is predictably unpredictable. ~ R T Kendall,
92:God is the nest we build together. ~ Gene Wolfe,
93:just put the fear of God in them. ~ Neil Gaiman,
94:Thank God I have done my duty. ~ Horatio Nelson,
95:The Kingdom of God is Within You, ~ Leo Tolstoy,
96:The Kingdom of God is Within You. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
97:To seek God is a lifelong pursuit. ~ R C Sproul,
98:Where love is, there God is also. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
99:You work for God Incorporated. ~ Iyanla Vanzant,
100:All that is not God is death. ~ George MacDonald,
101:God improvises. Man systematizes. ~ Mason Cooley,
102:God is a hacker, not an engineer ~ Francis Crick,
103:God is both Just and the Justifier. ~ R C Sproul,
104:God is dead and I am his replacement. ~ J D Robb,
105:God is good and I am always loved. ~ Ann Voskamp,
106:God is on the side of the winner. ~ Neil Strauss,
107:I fear nothing for God is with me! ~ Joan of Arc,
108:If God is anonymous, let it be. ~ Santosh Kalwar,
109:Man made God in his own image... ~ Eckhart Tolle,
110:Man's word is God in man. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
111:One man with God is a majority. ~ Brother Andrew,
112:The Grace of God is in courtesy’; ~ Evelyn Waugh,
113:You will never go where God is not. ~ Max Lucado,
114:Bach is Bach just as God is God. ~ Hector Berlioz,
115:God is always at war with sin ~ G Campbell Morgan,
116:God is an idea, the devil is us. ~ Joe R Lansdale,
117:God is a verb, not a noun. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
118:God is either cruel or incompetent. ~ Woody Allen,
119:God is in everything and everybody. ~ Silas House,
120:God is in the details. ~ Ludwig Mies van der Rohe,
121:God is just a name for our wonder. ~ Nadeem Aslam,
122:God is never late, we're just impatient. ~ LeCrae,
123:God is the collective ego of the world ~ Rajneesh,
124:Go to sleep in peace. God is awake. ~ Victor Hugo,
125:Honor is the presence of God in man. ~ Pat Conroy,
126:If God is male, then the male is God. ~ Mary Daly,
127:I know God is working so I smile! ~ Kirk Franklin,
128:No god is absent where prudence dwells. ~ Juvenal,
129:Not to enjoy God is to dishonor Him. ~ John Piper,
130:One must see God in everyone. ~ Catherine Laboure,
131:The only way to know god is to become god. ~ Osho,
132:We don't get to decide who God is. ~ Francis Chan,
133:We don’t get to decide who God is. ~ Francis Chan,
134:Whoever possesses God is happy. ~ Saint Augustine,
135:Your God is altogether too human. ~ Martin Luther,
136:But I'm Crazy. I swear to God I am. ~ J D Salinger,
137:For me, I believe in God, God is real. ~ Spike Lee,
138:God in his goodness sent the grapes ~ Walter Scott,
139:God is a creator, not a law giver. ~ Norman Mailer,
140:God is always at work around you. ~ Henry Blackaby,
141:God is always the last resource. ~ Alexandre Dumas,
142:God is bigger than the Christian faith. ~ Rob Bell,
143:God is more powerful than disease. ~ Dee Henderson,
144:God is with me, helping me. ~ Norman Vincent Peale,
145:In worship, God imparts himself to us. ~ C S Lewis,
146:Life Isn’t Fair, but God Is Faithful ~ Joyce Meyer,
147:My god is narrative filmmaking. ~ Darren Aronofsky,
148:Only God is perfect. Men are not. ~ Sister Souljah,
149:The awe of God is wisdom. ~ Abraham Joshua Heschel,
150:The impotence of God is infinite. ~ Anatole France,
151:There is no place where God is not. ~ Maya Angelou,
152:Where love is, there God is also. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
153:God is clever, but not dishonest. ~ Albert Einstein,
154:God is more lasting than the white man. ~ Malcolm X,
155:God is never early and never late. ~ David Jeremiah,
156:God is not described in equations. ~ Sean M Carroll,
157:God is on the side of the oppressed. ~ Desmond Tutu,
158:God is silent. The devil whispers… ~ Donato Carrisi,
159:God is the creature, not the creator. ~ Dan Simmons,
160:GOD is watching us, from a Distance. ~ Bette Midler,
161:I am the writer, but God is the author. ~ C S Lewis,
162:Your god is too small for my universe. ~ Carl Sagan,
163:But by the grace of God I am what I am ~ John Newton,
164:God is either everything, or He is nothing. ~ Bill W,
165:God is just another artist, like me. ~ Salvador Dali,
166:God is love, but get it in writing. ~ Gypsy Rose Lee,
167:God is never late, but rarely early. ~ Mother Teresa,
168:God is no other than the Self. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
169:God is one whole; we are the parts. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
170:I believe that God is very real. ~ John Shelby Spong,
171:If God is for us, who can be against us? ~ Anonymous,
172:Man created God in his own image. ~ Ludwig Feuerbach,
173:See the Face of God in everyone. ~ Catherine Laboure,
174:The best of it all is, God is with us. ~ John Wesley,
175:The Bible is the voice of God in print. ~ Tony Evans,
176:The Word of God is like a lamp to guide us. ~ Origen,
177:Treat everyone you meet like God in drag. ~ Ram Dass,
178:Yeah, where’s God in all of this? ~ K Victoria Chase,
179:A comprehended god is no god. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
180:A man with God is always in the majority. ~ John Knox,
181:Boredom is why God invented books. ~ Julie Schumacher,
182:Finding God in All Things. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
183:God is a politician; so is the devil. ~ Carrie Nation,
184:God is a scientist, not a magician. ~ Albert Einstein,
185:God is at work, even in our storms. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
186:God is in me or else is not at all. ~ Wallace Stevens,
187:God is not dead-He is merely unemployed. ~ Walt Kelly,
188:God is not in strength but in truth. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
189:God is pure, and the same to all. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
190:God is the shield of the nonviolent. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
191:Good days. Bad days. God is in all days. ~ Max Lucado,
192:HEB12.29 For our God is a consuming fire. ~ Anonymous,
193:If God is not sovereign, God is not God. ~ R C Sproul,
194:if God is not sovereign, God is not God. ~ R C Sproul,
195:I know I shouldn't, but God I want you ~ Kendall Ryan,
196:I said all along that God is in control. ~ Tony Dungy,
197:Knowing the Self, God is known. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
198:Man makes god in his own image. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
199:She received it as a god is received, ~ Pauline R age,
200:Thank god I’m gay! It’s so liberating! ~ Edward Field,
201:All but God is changing day by day. ~ Charles Kingsley,
202:As God is my witness, he is broken in half! ~ Jim Ross,
203:Fear not because God is with you. ~ Pio of Pietrelcina,
204:God is easy to please but hard to satisfy. ~ C S Lewis,
205:God is here. We are loved. It is enough. ~ Kate Bowler,
206:God is, if I may say it, very unscrupulous ~ C S Lewis,
207:God is love so all God does is loving. ~ Scot McKnight,
208:God is not mean, but he is dangerous. ~ Dallas Willard,
209:God is strongest when we are weakest. ~ Janice Cantore,
210:God is the designer of the family. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
211:God is too big for just one religion. ~ Michael Franti,
212:In the desert, the only god is a well. ~ Vera Nazarian,
213:Joy is God in the marrow of our bones. ~ Eugenia Price,
214:Trusting God is a decision, not a feeling. ~ Dan Walsh,
215:Without living Truth, God is nowhere. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
216:You know my God. My God is called love ~ Mother Teresa,
217:God is a fountain flowing into itself. ~ Pope Dionysius,
218:God is a lonely place without steak. ~ Charles Bukowski,
219:God is always good and I am always loved. ~ Ann Voskamp,
220:God is always the upholder of justice. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
221:God is a verb. —Buckminster Fuller ~ William Paul Young,
222:God is a witness that cannot be sworn. ~ Samuel Beckett,
223:God is best known in not knowing him. ~ Saint Augustine,
224:God is directing every one of your steps. ~ Joel Osteen,
225:God is easy to please, but hard to satisfy. ~ C S Lewis,
226:God is for men, and religion for women. ~ Joseph Conrad,
227:God is God. His name doesn't matter. ~ Christopher Pike,
228:God is God. His name doesn’t matter. ~ Christopher Pike,
229:God is good all the time. Every time. ~ Russell Wilson,
230:God is not only true, but Truth itself. ~ Pope Leo XIII,
231:God is the composer; you are the song. ~ Steve Maraboli,
232:God is the poetic genius in each of us. ~ William Blake,
233:Happy is that people whose God is the Lord. ~ Anonymous,
234:In the universe there is nothing which God is not. ~ id,
235:Lucifer is God in the public school system ~ Vinnie Paz,
236:My God is love and sweetly suffers all. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
237:No synonym for God is so perfect as Beauty. ~ John Muir,
238:Thank God I found the GOOD in goodbye ~ Beyonce Knowles,
239:Thank God I'm not too cool for a seatbelt. ~ Kanye West,
240:The blame is his who chooses: God is blameless. ~ Plato,
241:The true word of God is written in our heart. ~ KRS One,
242:To me, God is like this happy bus driver. ~ Jerry Stahl,
243:We are not the end of the gospel; God is. ~ David Platt,
244:All that God is, will supply your need. ~ Thomas Goodwin,
245:and don't you know that God is Pooh Bear? ~ Jack Kerouac,
246:Bidden or unbidden, God is present. ~ Desiderius Erasmus,
247:God in the safe and Ford on the shelves. ~ Aldous Huxley,
248:God is all the good stuff. God equals love. ~ Amy Harmon,
249:God is a placebo for your own mortality. ~ Robert Barron,
250:God is dead but my hair is perfect. ~ Bernard Henri Levy,
251:God is in the questions, not the answers. ~ Iimani David,
252:God is joy, God is ecstasy, and God is love. ~ Anonymous,
253:God is not a symbol of goodness; ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
254:God is not averse to deceit in a holy cause. ~ Aeschylus,
255:God is subtle but he is not malicious. ~ Albert Einstein,
256:God is the one who chooses our rulers ~ Katherine Harris,
257:God is the pain of the fear of death ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
258:If God is a crutch, then atheism is a coma. ~ Brad Stine,
259:Reason is the shadow cast by God; God is the sun. ~ Rumi,
260:The God I believe in isn't short on cash, mister. ~ Bono,
261:The pursuit of joy in God is not optional. ~ John Piper,
262:To a good spender God is the Treasurer. ~ George Herbert,
263:We are a mirror to show god it's cruelty. ~ Steve Aylett,
264:After all, God is God because he remembers. ~ Elie Wiesel,
265:Each man creates god in his own image. ~ Mordecai Richler,
266:For indeed, the kingdom of God is within you. ~ Anonymous,
267:God is an experience of supreme love. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
268:God is an iron... and that's a hot one. ~ Spider Robinson,
269:God is cruel. Sometimes he makes you live. ~ Stephen King,
270:[God is] everything in the creative force. ~ Marie Forleo,
271:God is good, there is no devil but fear. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
272:God is in the tiger as well as in the lamb. ~ John Updike,
273:God is not a watchmaker. God is a pimp. ~ Anthony Capella,
274:God is not He who is, but That which is. ~ Baruch Spinoza,
275:God isn't dead - he's just missing in action. ~ Phil Ochs,
276:God is the pain of the fear of death ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
277:God is to be trusted in the use of means. ~ Matthew Henry,
278:God is what you do, not what you believe in. ~ Tim Winton,
279:I believe that there is God in all of us ~ Michael Landon,
280:My faith in God is such that I am not afraid. ~ Malcolm X,
281:that "one with God is a majority. ~ Florence Scovel Shinn,
282:THE WORD OF GOD IS THE CREATION WE BEHOLD: ~ Thomas Paine,
283:Where the Spirit of God is, there is liberty. ~ Anonymous,
284:With God in the Joy of Beauty and Youth ~ Barbara La Marr,
285:Friends given by God in mercy and in love; ~ Robert Pollok,
286:God is definitely out of the closet. ~ Marianne Williamson,
287:God is even kinder than you think. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
288:God is only a great imaginative experience. ~ D H Lawrence,
289:If God is dead, then man is dead too. ~ William Lane Craig,
290:Men to whom God is dead worship one another. ~ Harry Crews,
291:...music is the living God in our bosoms. ~ Richard Wagner,
292:Nature is to zoos as God is to churches. ~ Margaret Atwood,
293:Our God Is Alive and Well. Sorry About Yours. ~ Carl Sagan,
294:p If God is for us, who can be [9] against us? ~ Anonymous,
295:The kingdom of God is for the broken hearted ~ Fred Rogers,
296:The peace of God is the goal of the Course ~ Gary R Renard,
297:We abide in God insofar as we do not sin. ~ Venerable Bede,
298:You never get bored with God in action. ~ Loren Cunningham,
299:A god in the hand is worth two on Olympus. ~ Jillian Hunter,
300:Around here, we're as happy as God in France. ~ Herman Koch,
301:Faith in God includes faith in His timing. ~ Neal A Maxwell,
302:Faith is acting like God is telling the truth. ~ Tony Evans,
303:God invented concubinage, Satan marriage. ~ Francis Picabia,
304:God is a friend to the poor orphan child. ~ Charlotte Bront,
305:God is big enough to meet us anywhere. A ~ Elizabeth Esther,
306:God is fucking stealing souls again! ~ Stephen Adly Guirgis,
307:God is nearer to us than our own spirit ~ Julian of Norwich,
308:God is not confined by what you can imagine. ~ Louie Giglio,
309:God is silent. Now if only man would shut up. ~ Woody Allen,
310:God is the explanation of all things. ~ Edwin Hubbel Chapin,
311:I am a great Sinner and God is a great Savior ~ John Newton,
312:If God is for us, who can be against us? ~ Paul the Apostle,
313:If God is on our side, he'll stop the next war. ~ Bob Dylan,
314:If the answer is simple, God is speaking. ~ Albert Einstein,
315:Life is a lease and God is the landlord. ~ Sarah Strohmeyer,
316:Love is the epiphany of God in our poverty. ~ Thomas Merton,
317:Prayer gets us in on what God is doing. ~ Eugene H Peterson,
318:Say what you like: God is just, after all. ~ Oliver P tzsch,
319:The mark of a man of God is God upon the man. ~ Paul Washer,
320:The one thing that hinders God is our unbelief. ~ F B Meyer,
321:The presence of God is the finest of rewards. ~ Yann Martel,
322:You will find God in the church of your choice. ~ Bob Dylan,
323:Could she trust God in such a painful thing? ~ Susan Sleeman,
324:faith is acting as if God is telling the truth. ~ Tony Evans,
325:God is a concept by which we measure our pain. ~ John Lennon,
326:God is a tender pervert, and the angels are voyeurs. ~ Momus,
327:God is at home. We are in the far country. ~ Meister Eckhart,
328:God is even in a single parent household. ~ Karen Salmansohn,
329:God is faithful even when his children are not. ~ Max Lucado,
330:God is liberal of color; so should man be. ~ Herman Melville,
331:God is Man's greatest invention ~ Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar,
332:God is sovereign. His grace cannot be tamed. ~ R Kent Hughes,
333:God is the absolute truth... ~ Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel,
334:I definitely feel I do have God in my corner. ~ Chuck Norris,
335:I doubt not God is good, well-meaning, kind ~ Countee Cullen,
336:I will not fail: God is always victorious. ~ James MacDonald,
337:Just because you are idle, don’t assume God is. ~ Max Lucado,
338:Right now, God is working all around you. ~ Henry T Blackaby,
339:To love God is to cooperate with His grace. ~ Lysa TerKeurst,
340:We cannot really know God if we do not pray. ~ Mother Teresa,
341:35Whoever does the will of God is My true family. ~ Anonymous,
342:A perfect God is the creation of a conceited man ~ Joyce Cary,
343:Either God is real or he isn't; I'm ok with that. ~ Anonymous,
344:Faith in God includes Faith in God's timing. ~ Neal A Maxwell,
345:Food should be raw, just the way God intended it! ~ Carol Alt,
346:God is a twelve year old boy with Asperger's. ~ Eugene Mirman,
347:God is in you as the ocean is in the wave. ~ Eric Butterworth,
348:God is just like Jesus – exactly like him! ~ George MacDonald,
349:God is not a franchise of the Republican Party. ~ Dick Durbin,
350:God is not an objective correlative reality. ~ Frederick Lenz,
351:God is not repetitive; His creativity is infinite. ~ Rajneesh,
352:God is the creator of all good plot twists! ~ Shannon L Alder,
353:God is the only Friend for the Soul on the Way to God. ~ Rumi,
354:God is top predator in the pyramid of food chain. ~ Toba Beta,
355:Humankind's ladder to God is a ladder of deeds. ~ Sholem Asch,
356:If God is your partner, make your plans BIG! ~ Dwight L Moody,
357:Is there a God? No. God is a verb, not a noun. ~ Micky Dolenz,
358:I think God is the most fantastic designer. ~ Roberto Cavalli,
359:I will say, just being here, God is good, man. ~ Derrick Rose,
360:Love is a discovery, God is an invention. ~ Thiruman Archunan,
361:Love is a discovery. God is an invention. ~ Thiruman Archunan,
362:The last story: God is everything, God is good. ~ Byron Katie,
363:True knowledge of God is born out of obedience. ~ John Calvin,
364:We created god in our own image and likeness! ~ George Carlin,
365:We must always remember that God is Love. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
366:Glasgow Rangers. God I loved playing for them ~ Paul Gascoigne,
367:God is absence. God is the solitude of man. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
368:God is a scandal, - a profitable scandal. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
369:God is easy to please, but hard to satisfy. ~ George MacDonald,
370:God is not bothered by your persistence. Keep asking. ~ LeCrae,
371:God is not good, or else he could do better. ~ Meister Eckhart,
372:God is not outside this earthly case of ours. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
373:God is not the author of all things, but of good only. ~ Plato,
374:God is only a great imaginative experience.
~ D H Lawrence,
375:God is only God when he is acting as such. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
376:God is silent. Everything comes out of silence. ~ Mother Meera,
377:God is the source. Everything else is a resource. ~ Tony Evans,
378:God is too large to be housed under one roof. ~ Roger Williams,
379:God is with us, and His power is around us. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
380:God is with us, not beyond us, in suffering. ~ Christian Wiman,
381:Heal yourselves, doctors; by God I live. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
382:Let every man come to God in his own way. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
383:Mark it down. You will never go where God is not. ~ Max Lucado,
384:One of the faces of God is the face of a woman. ~ Paulo Coelho,
385:The greatest fear comes when God is a stranger. ~ Billy Graham,
386:The servant of God in the ministery of the beautiful ~ Unknown,
387:What a comfort to know that God is a poet. ~ Rachel Held Evans,
388:Whatever you love more than God is your idol. ~ Dwight L Moody,
389:communion with God in the middle of bags of flour ~ Yann Martel,
390:conviction that God is good and that everything ~ Philip Yancey,
391:For right is right, since God is God. ~ Frederick William Faber,
392:God is bad, truth is a cheat, and life is a joke. ~ Jack London,
393:God is everywhere! the God who framed ~ Samuel Taylor Coleridge,
394:God is gracious to some very peculiar people. ~ Wallace Stevens,
395:God is love and if you are ready, he always is. ~ Lenny Kravitz,
396:God is near whether you sense His presence or not. ~ Max Lucado,
397:God is on the side of the big battalions. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
398:God is on the side of the heaviest cannon. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
399:God is on the side with the best artillery ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
400:God is the love that moves the sun and stars. ~ Dante Alighieri,
401:God is the water, and you are the faucet. ~ Marianne Williamson,
402:I always wanted to play a Greek god in something. ~ Kellan Lutz,
403:I can rest in the fact that God is in control. ~ Lysa TerKeurst,
404:I’d never leave you. God I’d never leave you. ~ Charlotte Stein,
405:If God is your problem, only God is your solution. ~ Tony Evans,
406:It pains me to speak of God in the third person. ~ Martin Buber,
407:Nature is a volume of which God is the author. ~ William Harvey,
408:Our God is in the heavens; he does all that he pleases. ~ David,
409:She'd left God in the dust quite some time ago. ~ Denise Hunter,
410:The holiness of God is traumatic to unholy people. ~ R C Sproul,
411:The main thing I need to know about God is I'm not. ~ Anonymous,
412:To comedians and humorists, God is laugh. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
413:A God in the hand is worth two in the bush. ~ Frederick Buechner,
414:For the kingdom of God is not in word, but in power. ~ Anonymous,
415:God is always near us. Always for us. Always in us. ~ Max Lucado,
416:God is always on the side of the heaviest battalions. ~ Voltaire,
417:God is an awesome mathematician and physicist. ~ Francis Collins,
418:God is for you and has a great plan for your life. ~ Joyce Meyer,
419:God is gone up on high with a triumphant noise. ~ Charles Wesley,
420:God is never in a hurry, but he is always on time. ~ Rick Warren,
421:God is not an optional extra, He's an absolute must! ~ C S Lewis,
422:God is playing my guitar, I am with God when I play. ~ Link Wray,
423:God is Unity, but always works in variety. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
424:God is voluptuous and delicious. — Meister Eckhart ~ Matthew Fox,
425:If god is truly god, he is perfect, lacking nothing. ~ Euripides,
426:Invoked or not invoked, the god is present. ~ Desiderius Erasmus,
427:No pit is so deep that God is not deeper still ~ Corrie ten Boom,
428:O Lord have mercy on me, to God I commend my soul. ~ Anne Boleyn,
429:One must be God in order to understand God. ~ Antoine the Healer,
430:Perhaps God is not dead; perhaps God himself is mad. ~ R D Laing,
431:Thank God I am not God! Thank God I am not God! ~ Allen Ginsberg,
432:The finding of God is the coming to one's own self. ~ Meher Baba,
433:The Kingdom of God is within you and all around you. ~ Anonymous,
434:The surest sign that God is alive in you is joy. ~ Robert Barron,
435:The will of God is single and totally one in Him. ~ William Ames,
436:Though God may be Love, God is Truth above all. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
437:To be loved by God is the highest relationship. ~ Henry Blackaby,
438:To love God is to cooperate with His grace. And ~ Lysa TerKeurst,
439:We have nothing to fear, because God is sovereign. ~ David Platt,
440:We need to return to the simplicity that God is love. ~ Rob Bell,
441:When the solution is simple, God is answering. ~ Albert Einstein,
442:All true knowledge of God is born out of obedience. ~ John Calvin,
443:God is able to do more than man can understand. ~ Thomas a Kempis,
444:God is actually inside. He lives in our hearts. ~ George Harrison,
445:God is a Republican, and Santa Claus is a Democrat. ~ H L Mencken,
446:God is behind everything, but everything hides God. ~ Victor Hugo,
447:God is defined by Jesus but not confined to Jesus. ~ Huston Smith,
448:God is near you, is with you, is inside you. ~ Seneca the Younger,
449:God isn't exactly hanging out with me these days. ~ Jenny B Jones,
450:God is simple, everything else is complex ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
451:God is sufficient in all ages for His church. ~ John Nelson Darby,
452:God is the food our spirits were designed to feed on. ~ C S Lewis,
453:Happy are the people whose God is the LORD! ~ John F MacArthur Jr,
454:If you want to know where God is, ask a drunk. ~ Charles Bukowski,
455:I have second thoughts. Maybe God is malicious. ~ Albert Einstein,
456:I prefer to think that God is not dead, just drunk. ~ John Huston,
457:Prayer is the way the life of God is nourished. ~ Oswald Chambers,
458:The highest God and the innermost God is one God. ~ Ernest Holmes,
459:The ideal of man is to see God in everything. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
460:The mercy of God is infinite and unconditional. ~ David R Hawkins,
461:The reign of God is his reign over all things. ~ Lesslie Newbigin,
462:The rich and the poor have met, God is their light. ~ John Ruskin,
463:To those whose God is honor; only disgrace is a sin. ~ David Hare,
464:What you do in secret tells you who your God is. ~ Timothy Keller,
465:8 He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love. ~ Anonymous,
466:A beautiful god is the most noble product of Man. ~ Franz Hartmann,
467:All plenty which is not my God is poverty to me. ~ Saint Augustine,
468:And your God is nothing but a teddy bear for grown-ups. You ~ Osho,
469:An honest God is the noblest work of man. ~ Robert Green Ingersoll,
470:Anything you say from your heart to God is a prayer. ~ Anne Lamott,
471:Atheists think the devil is just a silly as God is. ~ Hemant Mehta,
472:Because you cannot see him, God is everywhere. ~ Yasunari Kawabata,
473:Beware of the man whose God is in the skies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
474:God illumines the mind and shines within it. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
475:God is a dark night to man in this life. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
476:God is always present in love and in suffering. ~ Nadia Bolz Weber,
477:God is always with the strongest battalions. ~ Frederick The Great,
478:God is an Indian giver who gives only occasionally. ~ Jack Kerouac,
479:God is in his Heaven and the first night was a wow. ~ John le Carr,
480:God Is, Lucifer is a devil, and there is a Hell. ~ E A Bucchianeri,
481:God is merciful in what He sometimes lets us forget. ~ Chaim Potok,
482:God is not a killjoy; he just opposes what kills joy. ~ John Piper,
483:God is not a person. God is an eternal principle. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
484:God is real by any name you chose, or none at all. ~ Deepak Chopra,
485:God is the Creator; Satan is the counterfeiter. ~ Edwin Louis Cole,
486:God is the electricity and we are the lamps. ~ Marianne Williamson,
487:God is the shortest distance from zero to infinity. ~ Alfred Jarry,
488:Identity apart from God is inherently unstable. ~ Timothy J Keller,
489:If God is your world, what have you to fear? ~ Emma Curtis Hopkins,
490:I'm after a snake and please God I'll scotch it. ~ Adam Hochschild,
491:Satyagraha is search for Truth, and God is Truth. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
492:Thank God in advance for what's already yours. ~ Denzel Washington,
493:The best form to see God in... is in every form ~ Neem Karoli Baba,
494:the first road to God is prayer, the second is joy. ~ Paulo Coelho,
495:The Glory of God is a human being fully alive. ~ Irenaeus of Lyons,
496:The reason for our loving God is God. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
497:To be unknown to God is entirely too much privacy. ~ Thomas Merton,
498:All that we do without offering it to God is wasted. ~ John Vianney,
499:Any God I ever found in church, I brought in myself. ~ Alice Walker,
500:But God is everywhere; Tarshish he never reached. ~ Herman Melville,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



100

   32 Philosophy
   19 Yoga
   19 Occultism
   15 Integral Yoga
   8 Christianity
   5 Hinduism
   1 Kabbalah


   43 Sri Aurobindo
   27 Aldous Huxley
   21 Sri Ramakrishna
   18 Aleister Crowley
   17 Swami Vivekananda
   11 The Mother
   9 Satprem
   7 Saint Teresa of Avila
   7 Carl Jung
   6 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   6 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   5 Friedrich Nietzsche
   4 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   4 Patanjali
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta


   27 The Perennial Philosophy
   25 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   24 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   21 Essays On The Gita
   20 Savitri
   15 The Life Divine
   14 Essays Divine And Human
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   11 Liber ABA
   10 Talks
   10 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   9 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   9 Magick Without Tears
   9 Isha Upanishad
   8 Collected Poems
   8 Bhakti-Yoga
   7 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   7 The Bible
   7 Dark Night of the Soul
   7 Aion
   6 The Way of Perfection
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 The Interior Castle or The Mansions
   5 Raja-Yoga
   5 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   4 Twilight of the Idols
   4 The Secret Of The Veda
   4 The Red Book Liber Novus
   4 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   2 Words Of The Mother III
   2 Words Of The Mother II
   2 Walden
   2 The Divine Comedy
   2 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   2 Kena and Other Upanishads
   2 God Exists
   2 Book of Certitude
   2 Amrita Gita
   2 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah


0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  That which Nature has evolved for us and has firmly founded is the bodily life. She has effected a certain combination and harmony of the two inferior but most fundamentally necessary elements of our action and progress upon earth, -
  Matter, which, however the too ethereally spiritual may despise it, is our foundation and the first condition of all our energies and realisations, and the Life-Energy which is our means of existence in a material body and the basis there even of our mental and spiritual activities. She has successfully achieved a certain stability of her constant material movement which is at once sufficiently steady and durable and sufficiently pliable and mutable to provide a fit dwelling-place and instrument for the progressively manifesting God in humanity. This is what is meant by the fable in the Aitareya Upanishad which tells us that the gods rejected the animal forms successively offered to them by the Divine Self and only when man was produced, cried out, "This indeed is perfectly made," and consented to enter in. She has effected also a working compromise between the inertia of matter and the active Life that lives in and feeds on it, by which not only is vital existence sustained, but the fullest developments of mentality are rendered possible. This equilibrium constitutes the basic status of Nature in man and is termed in the language of Yoga his gross body composed
  
  --
  
  The ultimate knowledge is that which perceives and accepts God in the universe as well as beyond the universe; the integral Yoga is that which, having found the Transcendent, can return upon the universe and possess it, retaining the power freely to descend
  

0.04_-_1951-1954, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  But it is the very imperfection of the incarnate god that makes the perfection of those about him indispensable. If the God incarnate realized the perfection needed for the progress to be made, this progress would not be conditioned by the state of the surrounding matter. However, interdependence is doubtlessly absolute in this world of utmost objectification, and a certain degree of perfection in the general manifestation is indispensable before a higher degree of perfection can be realized in the divine, incarnate being. It is the need for a certain perfection in the environment that drives human beings to progress; it is the insufficiency of this progress, whatever it may be, that impels the divine being to intensify his effort for progress in his own body. Thus both movements for progress are simultaneous and complementary.
  

0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognise in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in
  Nature, in the other it becomes swift and self-conscious and the instrument confesses the hand of the Master. All life is a Yoga of Nature seeking to manifest God within itself. Yoga marks the stage at which this effort becomes capable of self-awareness and therefore of right completion in the individual. It is a gathering up and concentration of the movements dispersed and loosely combined in the lower evolution.

01.02_-_The_Issue, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
    This truth broke in in a triumph of fire;
    A victory was won for God in man,
    The deity revealed its hidden face.

01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
    Even in this rigid realm, Mind can be king:
    The logic of its demiGod idea
    In the leap of a transitional moment brings

02.01_-_The_World-Stair, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
    And an opulent beauty of passionate difference
    The recurring beat that moments God in Time.
    Only was missing the sole timeless Word

02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  A camouflage of the Inconscient's need
  To release the glory of God in Nature's mud.
  His sight, spiritual in embodying orbs,

02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  As if unaware of the eternal tie,
  Her will is to shut God into her works
  And keep him as her cherished prisoner

02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
    The position of a dead remembered star.
    Only were safe who kept God in their hearts:
    Courage their armour, faith their sword, they must walk,

03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  And Thought potent no more sank large and pale
  Like a tired God into mysterious seas.
  The robes of mortal thinking were cast down
  --
  None was apart, none lived for himself alone,
  Each lived for God in him and God in all,
  Each soleness inexpressibly held the whole.

03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  It knows its steps, its way is inevitable,
  And how shall the end be vain when God is guide?
  However man's mind may tire or fail his flesh,
  --
  Accomplishing the fate of transient things,
  A God in the figure of the arisen beast,
  He raised his brow of conquest to the heavens

05.02_-_Satyavan, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Or he roams in his charmed sleep mid thoughts and things;
  The child-God is at play, he seeks himself
  In many hearts and minds and living forms:

06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  The flower of Godhead grows on the world-tree:
  All shall discover God in self and things.
  
  --
  459
  A blind God is not destiny's architect;
  A conscious power has drawn the plan of life,

07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  He lives on the sweet honey of solitude:
  A nameless God in an unapproachable fane,
  In the secret adytum of his inmost soul

07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Make iron velvet, water unbreakable stone,
  Like God in his astuce of artist skill,
  Mould from one primal plasm protean forms,
  --
  
  What God imperfect left, I will complete,
  Out of a tangled mind and half-made soul
  --
  
  If God is at work, his secrets I have found.
  

07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  A deep concordat between Truth and Life:
  A camp of God is pitched in human time.
  

07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Life was his drama and the Vast a stage,
  The universe was his body, God its soul.
  
  --
  
  She was Time and the dreams of God in Time;
  She was Space and the wideness of his days.

09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  The mortal woman to the dreadful Lord:
  "Who is this God imagined by thy night,
  Contemptuously creating worlds disdained,
  --
  
  My God is will and triumphs in his paths,
  My God is love and sweetly suffers all.
  

10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  In the issueless circling of thy human life,
  Searching for thy soul and thinking God is here.
  

10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Peopled by imperfect minds and ignorant lives,
  And sayest God is not and all is vain.
  
  --
  A huge caprice self-bound by iron laws,
  And shut God into an enigmatic world:
  She lulled the Omniscient into nescient sleep,
  --
  Or chilling the heart with dry ironic smile,
  A cynic stamping out the God in man;
  A darkness wallows in the paths of Time
  --
  Mine is a heart that worshipped, though forsaken,
  The image of the God its love adored;
  I have burned in flame to travel in his steps.

10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Truth comes not there but only the thought of Truth,
  God is not there but only the name of God.
  
  --
  Or who forbid his kiss on the sleeping soul?
  Already God is near, the Truth is close:
  Because the dark atheist body knows him not,

1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  Jalal-uddin Rumi, in terms of a scientific metaphor: The astrolabe of the mysteries of
  God is love.
  

1.00c_-_INTRODUCTION, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  take the upward bend again, and go back to the original
  source, which is God. Man comes from God in the
  beginning, in the middle he becomes man, and in the end he

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Sri Ramakrishna felt an unquenchable desire to enjoy God in various ways. For his meditation he built a place in the northern wooded section of the temple garden. With Hriday's help he planted there five sacred trees. The spot, known as the Panchavati, became the scene of many of his visions.
  
  --
  
  One day Haladhri upset Sri Ramakrishna with the statement that God is incomprehensible to the human mind. Sri Ramakrishna has described the great moment of doubt when he wondered whether his visions had really misled him: "With sobs I prayed to the Mother, 'Canst Thou have the heart to deceive me like this because I am a fool?' A stream of tears flowed from my eyes. Shortly afterwards I saw a volume of mist rising from the floor and filling the space before me. In the midst of it there appeared a face with flowing beard, calm, highly expressive, and fair. Fixing its gaze steadily upon me, it said solemnly, 'Remain in Bhva-mukha, on the threshold of relative consciousness.' This it repeated three times and then it gently disappeared in the mist, which itself dissolved. This vision reassured me."
  
  --
  
  Two famous pundits of the time were invited: Vaishnavcharan, the leader of the Vaishnava society, and Gauri. The first to arrive was Vaishnavcharan, with a distinguished company of scholars and devotees. The Brhmani, like a proud mother, proclaimed her view before him and supported it with quotations from the scriptures. As the pundits discussed the deep theological question, Sri Ramakrishna, perfectly indifferent to everything happening around him, sat in their midst like a child, immersed in his own thoughts, sometimes smiling, sometimes chewing a pinch of spices from a pouch, or again saying to Vaishnavcharan with a nudge: "Look here. Sometimes I feel like this, too." Presently Vaishnavcharan arose to declare himself in total agreement with the view of the Brhmani. He declared that Sri Ramakrishna had undoubtedly experienced Mah-bhva and that this was the certain sign of the rare manifestation of God in a man. The people assembled there, especially the officers of the temple garden, were struck dumb. Sri Ramakrishna said to Mathur, like a boy: "Just fancy, he too says so! Well, I am glad to learn that, after all, it is not a disease."
  
  --
  
  To develop the devotee's love for God, Vaishnavism humanises God. God is to be regarded as the devotee's Parent, Master, Friend, Child, Husband, or Sweetheart, each succeeding relationship representing an intensification of love. These Bhvs, or attitudes toward God, are known as nta, Dsya, Sakhya, Vtsalya, and Madhur. The rishis of the Veds, Hanumn, the cowherd boys of Vrindvan, Rm's mother Kausalya, and Rdhika, Krishna's sweetheart, exhibited, respectively, the most perfect examples of these forms. In the ascending scale the glories of God are gradually forgotten and the devotee realizes more and more the intimacy of divine communion. Finally he regards himself as the mistress of his Beloved, and no artificial barrier remains to separate him from his Ideal. No social or moral obligation can bind to the earth his soaring spirit. He experiences perfect union with the Godhead. Unlike the Vedantist, who strives to transcend all varieties of the subject-object relationship, a devotee of the Vaishnava path wishes to retain both his own individuality and the personality of God. To him God is not an intangible Absolute, but the Purushottama, the Supreme Person.
  
  --
  
  Now one with Rdh, he manifested the great ecstatic love, the Mah-bhva which had found in her its fullest expression. Later Sri Ramakrishna said: "The manifestation in the same individual of the nineteen different kinds of emotion for God is called, in the books on bhakti, Mah-bhva. An ordinary man takes a whole lifetime to express even a single one of these. But in this body [meaning himself] there has been a complete manifestation of all nineteen."
  
  --
  
  The Changeless undergoes change. The sinless Pure Soul, hypnotised by Its own My, experiences the joys of heaven and the pains of hell. But these experiences based on the duality of the subject-object relationship are unreal. Even the vision of a Personal God is, ultimately speaking, as illusory as the experience of any other object. Man attains his liberation, therefore, by piercing the veil of My and rediscovering his total identity with Brahman. Knowing himself to be one with the Universal Spirit, he realizes ineffable Peace. Only then does he go beyond the fiction of birth and death; only then does he become immortal. And this is the ultimate goal of all religions - to dehypnotize the soul now hypnotized by its own ignorance.
  
  --
  
  Whereupon Mathur had to yield. On another occasion, two years later, Sri Ramakrishna showed a similar sentiment for the poor and needy. He accompanied Mathur on a tour to one of the latter's estates at the time of the collection of rents. For two years the harvests had failed and the tenants were in a state of extreme poverty. The Master asked Mathur to remit their rents, distribute help to them, and in addition give the hungry people a sumptuous feast. When Mathur grumbled, the Master said: "You are only the steward of the Divine Mother. They are the Mother's tenants. You must spend the Mother's money. When they are suffering, how can you refuse to help them? You must help them." Again Mathur had to give in. Sri Ramakrishna's sympathy for the poor sprang from his perception of God in all created beings. His sentiment was not that of the humanist or philanthropist. To him the service of man was the same as the worship of God.
  
  --
  
  Devi received was: "God is everybody's Beloved, just as the moon is dear to every child.
  
  --
  
  First, he was an Incarnation of God, a specially commissioned person, whose spiritual experiences were for the benefit of humanity. Whereas it takes an ordinary man a whole life's struggle to realize one or two phases of God, he had in a few years realized God in all His phases.
  
  --
  
  It broadened their religious views and kindled in their hearts the yearning for God-realization; it made them understand and appreciate the rituals and symbols of Hindu religion, convinced them of the manifestation of God in diverse forms, and deepened their thoughts about the harmony of religions. The Master, too, was impressed by the sincerity of many of the, Brhmo devotees. He told them about his own realizations and explained to them the essence of his teachings, such as the necessity of renunciation, sincerity in the pursuit of one's own course of discipline, faith in God, the performance of one's duties without thought of results, and discrimination between the Real and the unreal.
  
  --
  
  He could not properly estimate the result of the impact of Western education on Indian culture. He was a Hindu of the Hindus, renunciation being to him the only means to the realization of God in life. From the Brahmos he learnt that the new generation of India made a compromise between God and the world. Educated young men were influenced more by the Western philosophers than by their own prophets. But Sri Ramakrishna was not dismayed, for he saw in this, too, the hand of God. And though he expounded to the Brahmos all his ideas about God and austere religious disciplines, yet he bade them accept from his teachings only as much as suited their tastes and temperaments.
  
  --
  
  When at times Narendra's sharp words distressed him, the Divine Mother Herself would console him, saying: "Why do you listen to him? In a few days he will believe your every word." He could hardly bear Narendra's absences. Often he would weep bitterly for the sight of him. Sometimes Narendra would find the Master's love embarrassing; and one day he sharply scolded him, warning him that such infatuation would soon draw him down to the level of its object. The Master was distressed and prayed to the Divine Mother. Then he said to Narendra: "You rogue, I won't listen to you any more. Mother says that I love you because I see God in you, and the day I no longer see God in you I shall not be able to bear even the sight of you."
  
  --
  
  This was a very rich and significant experience for Narendra. It taught him that akti, the Divine Power, cannot be ignored in the world and that in the relative plane the need of worshipping a Personal God is imperative. Sri Ramakrishna was overjoyed with the conversion. The next day, sitting almost on Narendra's lap, he said to a devotee, pointing first to himself, then to Narendra: "I see I am this, and again that. Really I feel no difference. A stick floating in the Ganges seems to divide the water; but in reality the water is one. Do you see my point? Well, whatever is, is the Mother - isn't that so?" In later years Narendra would say: "Sri Ramakrishna was the only person who, from the time he met me, believed in me uniformly throughout. Even my mother and brothers did not. It was his unwavering trust and love for me that bound me to him for ever. He alone knew how to love. Worldly people only make a show of love for selfish ends."
  
  --
  
  arat's soul longed for the all-embracing realization of the Godhead. When the Master inquired whether there was any particular form of God he wished to see, the boy replied that he would like to see God in all the living beings of the world. "But", the Master demurred, "that is the last word in realization. One cannot have it at the very outset."
  
  --
  
  The grace of God is required. Mere personal effort is futile. A man is a tiny creature after all, with very limited powers. But he can achieve the impossible if he prays to God for His grace." Whereupon the Master sang a song in praise of grace. Hari was profoundly moved and shed tears. Later in life Hari achieved a wonderful synthesis of the ideals of the Personal God and the Impersonal Truth.
  
  --
  
  One day, in January 1884, the Master was going toward the pine-grove when he went into a trance. He was alone. There was no one to support him or guide his footsteps. He fell to the ground and dislocated a bone in his left arm. This accident had a significant influence on his mind, the natural inclination of which was to soar above the consciousness of the body. The acute pain in the arm forced his mind to dwell on the body and on the world outside. But he saw even in this a divine purpose; for, with his mind compelled to dwell on the physical plane, he realized more than ever that he was an instrument in the hand of the Divine Mother, who had a mission to fulfil through his human body and mind. He also distinctly found that in the phenomenal world God manifests Himself, in an inscrutable way, through diverse human beings, both good and evil. Thus he would speak of God in the guise of the wicked, God in the guise of the pious, God in the guise of the hypocrite, God in the guise of the lewd. He began to take a special delight in watching the divine play in the relative world. Sometimes the sweet human relationship with God would appear to him more appealing than the all-effacing Knowledge of Brahman. Many a time he would pray: "Mother, don't make me unconscious through the Knowledge of Brahman. Don't give me Brahmajnna, Mother.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  The Master, who divined the mood of desperation in M, his resolve to take leave of this 'play-field of deception', put new faith and hope into him by his gracious words of assurance: "God forbid! Why should you take leave of this world? Do you not feel blessed by discovering your Guru? By His grace, what is beyond all imagination or dreams can be easily achieved!" At these words the clouds of despair moved away from the horizon of M.'s mind, and the sunshine of a new hope revealed to him fresh vistas of meaning in life. Referring to this phase of his life, M. used to say, "Behold! where is the resolve to end life, and where, the discovery of God! That is, sorrow should be looked upon as a friend of man. God is all good." ( Ibid P.33.)
  

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  Thou speakest false! By God! What thou dost possess is naught but husks which We have left to thee as bones are left to dogs. By the righteousness of the one true God! Were anyone to wash the feet of all mankind, and were he to worship God in the forests, valleys, and mountains, upon high hills and lofty peaks, to leave no rock or tree, no clod of earth, but was a witness to his worship-yet, should the fragrance of My good pleasure not be inhaled from him, his works would never be acceptable unto God. Thus hath it been decreed by Him Who is the Lord of all. How many a man hath secluded himself in the climes of India, denied himself the things that God hath decreed as lawful, imposed upon himself austerities and mortifications, and hath not been remembered by God, the Revealer of Verses. Make not your deeds as snares wherewith to entrap the object of your aspiration, and deprive not yourselves of this Ultimate Objective for which have ever yearned all such as have drawn nigh unto God. Say: The very life of all deeds is My good pleasure, and all things depend upon Mine acceptance. Read ye the Tablets that ye may know what hath been purposed in the Books of God, the All-Glorious, the Ever-Bounteous. He who attaineth to My love hath title to a throne of gold, to sit thereon in honour over all the world; he who is deprived thereof, though he sit upon the dust, that dust would seek refuge with God, the Lord of all Religions.
  
  --
  
  Whoso layeth claim to a Revelation direct from God, ere the expiration of a full thousand years, such a man is assuredly a lying impostor. We pray God that He may graciously assist him to retract and repudiate such claim. Should he repent, God will, no doubt, forgive him. If, however, he persisteth in his error, God will, assuredly, send down one who will deal mercilessly with him. Terrible, indeed, is God in punishing! Whosoever interpreteth this verse otherwise than its obvious meaning is deprived of the Spirit of God and of His mercy which encompasseth all created things. Fear God, and follow not your idle fancies. Nay, rather, follow the bidding of your Lord, the Almighty, the All-Wise. Erelong shall clamorous voices be raised in most lands. Shun them, O My people, and follow not the iniquitous and evil-hearted. This is that of which We gave you forewarning when We were dwelling in Iraq, then later while in the Land of Mystery, and now from this Resplendent Spot.
  
  --
  
  This is the Day in which He Who held converse with God hath attained the light of the Ancient of Days, and quaffed the pure waters of reunion from this Cup that hath caused the seas to swell. Say: By the one true God! Sinai is circling round the Dayspring of Revelation, while from the heights of the Kingdom the Voice of the Spirit of God is heard proclaiming: "Bestir yourselves, ye proud ones of the earth, and hasten ye unto Him." Carmel hath, in this Day, hastened in longing adoration to attain His court, whilst from the heart of Zion there cometh the cry: "The promise is fulfilled. That which had been announced in the holy Writ of God, the Most Exalted, the Almighty, the Best-Beloved, is made manifest."
  
  --
  
  Unto everyone hath been enjoined the writing of a will. The testator should head this document with the adornment of the Most Great Name, bear witness therein unto the oneness of God in the Dayspring of His Revelation, and make mention, as he may wish, of that which is praiseworthy, so that it may be a testimony for him in the kingdoms of Revelation and Creation and a treasure with his Lord, the Supreme Protector, the Faithful.
  
  --
  
  Say: True liberty consisteth in man's submission unto My commandments, little as ye know it. Were men to observe that which We have sent down unto them from the Heaven of Revelation, they would, of a certainty, attain unto perfect liberty. Happy is the man that hath apprehended the Purpose of God in whatever He hath revealed from the Heaven of His Will that pervadeth all created things. Say: The liberty that profiteth you is to be found nowhere except in complete servitude unto God, the Eternal Truth. Whoso hath tasted of its sweetness will refuse to barter it for all the dominion of earth and heaven.
  
  --
  
  O peoples of the world! Give ear unto the call of Him Who is the Lord of Names, Who proclaimeth unto you from His habitation in the Most Great Prison: "Verily, no God is there but Me, the Powerful, the Mighty, the All-Subduing, the Most Exalted, the Omniscient, the All-Wise." In truth, there is no God but Him, the Omnipotent Ruler of the worlds. Were it His Will, He would, through but a single word proceeding from His presence, lay hold on all mankind. Beware lest ye hesitate in your acceptance of this Cause-a Cause before which the Concourse on high and the dwellers of the Cities of Names have bowed down. Fear God, and be not of those who are shut out as by a veil. Burn ye away the veils with the fire of My love, and dispel ye the mists of vain imaginings by the power of this Name through which We have subdued the entire creation.
  
  --
  
  Whoever hath been transported by the rapture born of adoration for My Name, the Most Compassionate, will recite the verses of God in such wise as to captivate the hearts of those yet wrapped in slumber. Well is it with him who hath quaffed the Mystic Wine of everlasting life from the utterance of his merciful Lord in My Name-a Name through which every lofty and majestic mountain hath been reduced to dust.
  
  --
  
  Beware lest aught that hath been revealed in the Bayan should keep you from your Lord, the Most Compassionate. God is My witness that the Bayan was sent down for no other purpose than to celebrate My praise, did ye but know! In it the pure in heart will find only the fragrance of My love, only My Name that overshadoweth all that seeth and is seen. Say: Turn ye, O people, unto that which hath proceeded from My Most Exalted Pen. Should ye inhale therefrom the fragrance of God, set not yourselves against Him, nor deny yourselves a portion of His gracious favour and His manifold bestowals. Thus doth your Lord admonish you; He, verily, is the Counsellor, the Omniscient.
  
  --
  
  Whatsoever ye understand not in the Bayan, ask it of God, your Lord and the Lord of your forefathers. Should He so desire, He will expound for you that which is revealed therein, and disclose to you the pearls of Divine knowledge and wisdom that lie concealed within the ocean of its words. He, verily, is supreme over all names; no God is there but Him, the Help in Peril, the Self-Subsisting.
  
  --
  
  Let him that seeketh, attain it; and as to him that hath refused to seek it-verily, God is Self-Sufficient, above any need of His creatures.
  
  --
  
  Say: This is the infallible Balance which the Hand of God is holding, in which all who are in the heavens and all who are on the earth are weighed, and their fate determined, if ye be of them that believe and recognize this truth. Say: This is the Most Great Testimony, by which the validity of every proof throughout the ages hath been established, would that ye might be assured thereof. Say: Through it the poor have been enriched, the learned enlightened, and the seekers enabled to ascend unto the presence of God. Beware lest ye make it a cause of dissension amongst you. Be ye as firmly settled as the immovable mountain in the Cause of your Lord, the Mighty, the Loving.
  
  --
  Say: O source of perversion! Abandon thy wilful blindness, and speak forth the truth amidst the people. I swear by God that I have wept for thee to see thee following thy selfish passions and renouncing Him Who fashioned thee and brought thee into being. Call to mind the tender mercy of thy Lord, and remember how We nurtured thee by day and by night for service to the Cause. Fear God, and be thou of the truly repentant. Granted that the people were confused about thy station, is it conceivable that thou thyself art similarly confused? Tremble before thy Lord and recall the days when thou didst stand before Our throne, and didst write down the verses that We dictated unto
   thee-verses sent down by God, the Omnipotent Protector, the Lord of might and power. Beware lest the fire of thy presumptuousness debar thee from attaining to God's Holy Court. Turn unto Him, and fear not because of thy deeds. He, in truth, forgiveth whomsoever He desireth as a bounty on His part; no God is there but Him, the Ever-Forgiving, the All-Bounteous.
  

1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  The Mohammedan insists that God is, and did really send Gabriel with messages for Mohammed: but all others contradict him. And from the nature of the case proof is impossible.
  

1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Fiction
  
    But the supreme meaning is the path) the way and the bridge to what is to come. That is the God yet to come. It is not the coming God himself but his image which appears in the supreme meaning 7. God is an image) and those who worship him must worship him in the images of the supreme meaning.
  
  --
    6. The Draft continues: then one whom I did not know, but who evidently had such knowledge, said to me: What a strange task you have! You must disclose your innermost and lowermost. /This I resisted since I hated nothing more than that which seemed to me unchaste and insolent (p. I).
    7. In Transformations and Symbols of the Libido (1912), Jung interpreted God as a symbol of the libido (CW B, III). In his subsequent work, Jung laid great emphasis on the distinction between the God image and the metaphysical existence of God (cf passages added to the revised retitled
    1952 edition, Symbols ofTraniformation, CW 5, 95).

1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  although he was quite unimpressed with religion, as is evident from the account he gives of his "conversion." Predictably, Clergyman Drewett's mother had undertaken the task of saving the souls of the three heretic children, or at least that of the youngest one, whom she took one day to a meeting of "nonconformist" ministers. After the prayers were over, wrote Sri Aurobindo, nearly all dispersed, but devout people remained a little longer, and it was at that time that conversions were made. I was feeling completely bored. Then a minister approached me and asked me some questions. (I was about ten at that time.) I did not give any reply. Then they all shouted, "He is saved, he is saved," and began to pray for me and offer thanks to God.6 Sri Aurobindo, the seer, was never to become a religious man,
  not even in India, and he often emphasized that religion and spirituality are not necessarily synonymous: True theocracy, he would write later, is the kingdom of God in man and not the kingdom of a Pope, a priesthood or a sacerdotal class.7
  When he began his life in London, at the age of twelve, Sri Aurobindo knew Latin and French thoroughly. The headmaster of St.

1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle, #The Interior Castle or The Mansions, #Saint Teresa of Avila, #Christianity
  
  5.: I feel sure that vexation at thinking that during our life on earth God can bestow these graces on the souls of others shows a want of humility and charity for one's neighbour, for why should we not feel glad at a brother's receiving divine favours which do not deprive us of our own share? Should we not rather rejoice at His Majesty's thus manifesting His greatness wherever He chooses?8' Sometimes our Lord acts thus solely for the sake of showing His power, as He declared when the Apostles questioned whether the blind man whom He cured had been suffering for his own or his parents' sins.9' God does not bestow soul speaks of that sovereign grace of God in taking it into the house of His love, which is the union or transformation of love in God . . . The cellar is the highest degree of love to which the soul can attain in this life, and is therefore said to be the inner. It follows from this that there are other cellars not so interior; that is, the degrees of love by which souls reach to this, the last. These cellars are seven in number, and the soul has entered them all when it has in perfection the seven gifts of the Holy Ghost, so far as it is possible for it. . . . Many souls reach and enter the first cellar, each according to the perfection of its love, but the last and inmost cellar is entered by few in this world, because therein is wrought the perfect union with God, the union of the spiritual marriage.' A Spiritual Canticle, stanza xxvi. 1-3. Concept. ch. vi. (Minor Works of St. Teresa.) these favours on certain souls because they are more holy than others who do not receive them, but to manifest His greatness, as in the case of St. Paul and St. Mary Magdalen, and that we may glorify Him in His creatures.
  

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  A man who has at length found something to do will not need to get a new suit to do it in; for him the old will do, that has lain dusty in the garret for an indeterminate period. Old shoes will serve a hero longer than they have served his valet,if a hero ever has a valet,bare feet are older than shoes, and he can make them do. Only they who go to soires and legislative halls must have new coats, coats to change as often as the man changes in them. But if my jacket and trousers, my hat and shoes, are fit to worship God in, they will do; will they not? Who ever saw his old clothes,his old coat, actually worn out, resolved into its primitive elements, so that it was not a deed of charity to bestow it on some poor boy, by him perchance to be bestowed on some poorer still, or shall we say richer, who could do with less? I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes. If there is not a new man, how can the new clothes be made to fit? If you have any enterprise before you, try it in your old clothes. All men want, not something to _do with_, but something to _do_, or rather something to _be_. Perhaps we should never procure a new suit, however ragged or dirty the old, until we have so conducted, so enterprised or sailed in some way, that we feel like new men in the old, and that to retain it would be like keeping new wine in old bottles. Our moulting season, like that of the fowls, must be a crisis in our lives. The loon retires to solitary ponds to spend it. Thus also the snake casts its slough, and the caterpillar its wormy coat, by an internal industry and expansion; for clothes are but our outmost cuticle and mortal coil. Otherwise we shall be found sailing under false colors, and be inevitably cashiered at last by our own opinion, as well as that of mankind.
  

1.01_-_Foreward, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The Gods, the powers of Light and Truth are powers and names
  of the One, each God is himself all the Gods or carries them in
  him: there is the one Truth, tat satyam,17 and one bliss to which

1.01_-_On_Love, #unset, #H. P. Lovecraft, #unset
  
  When you love you should not say, God is in my heart, but rather, I am in the heart of God.
  

1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  any need to create. Secondly, it says the theory of God is an
  unnecessary one; nature explains all. What is the use of any
  --
  question; they do not raise it at all. Yet you will find that they
  arrive at God in a peculiar fashion of their own. They say:
  
  --
  world was never without them, and no knowledge can come
  without them. God is the Teacher of all teachers, because
  these teachers, however great they may have been gods or
  angels were all bound and limited by time, and God is not
  limited by time. These are the two peculiar distinctions of the
  --
  the thing signified. The commentator says the manifesting
  word of God is Om. Why does he emphasise this? There are
  hundreds of words for God. One thought is connected with a
  --
  adjectives, to make it Personal, or Impersonal, or Absolute
  God. So with the words for God in every other language; their
  signification is very small. This word Om, however, has

1.01_-_Sets_down_the_first_line_and_begins_to_treat_of_the_imperfections_of_beginners., #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  
  2. It must be known, then, that the soul, after it has been definitely converted to the service of God, is, as a rule, spiritually nurtured and caressed by God, even as is the tender child by its loving mother, who warms it with the heat of her bosom and nurtures it with sweet milk and soft and pleasant food, and carries it and caresses it in her arms; but, as the child grows bigger, the mother gradually ceases caressing it, and, hiding her tender love, puts bitter aloes upon her sweet breast, sets down the child from her arms and makes it walk upon its feet, so that it may lose the habits of a child and betake itself to more important and substantial occupations. The loving mother is like the grace of God, for, as soon as the soul is regenerated by its new warmth and fervour for the service of God, He treats it in the same way; He makes it to find spiritual milk, sweet and delectable, in all the things of God, without any labour of its own, and also great pleasure in spiritual exercises, for here God is giving to it the breast of His tender love, even as to a tender child.
  

1.01_-_Soul_and_God, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Fiction
  
  The spirit of this time of course allowed me to believe in my reason. He let me see myself in the image of a leader with ripe thoughts. But the spirit of the depths teaches me that I am a servant, in fact the servant of a child: This dictum was repugnant to me and I hated it. But I had to recognize and accept that my soul is a child and that my God in my soul is a child. 57
  
  If you are boys, your God is a woman.
  
  If you are women, your God is a boy.
  
  If you are men, your God is a maiden.
  
  The God is where you are not.
  
  --
  
  Prosperous and woeful are those whose God is developed!
  Prosperous and woeful are those whose God is a child!
  
  --
  60
  My God is a child, so wonder not that the spirit of this time in me is incensed to mockery and scorn. There will be no one who will laugh at me as I laughed at myself.
  

1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  The more God is in all things, the more He is outside them. The more He is within, the more without.
  
  --
  
  Though God is everywhere present, yet He is only present to thee in the deepest and most central part of thy soul. The natural senses cannot possess God or unite thee to Him; nay, thy inward faculties of understanding, will and memory can only reach after God, but cannot be the place of his habitation in thee. But there is a root or depth of thee from whence all these faculties come forth, as lines from a centre, or as branches from the body of the tree. This depth is called the centre, the fund or bottom of the soul. This depth is the unity, the eternityI had almost said the infinityof thy soul; for it is so infinite that nothing can satisfy it or give it rest but the infinity of God.
  
  --
  
  The man who wishes to know the That which is thou may set to work in any one of three ways. He may begin by looking inwards into his own particular thou and, by a process of dying to selfself in reasoning, self in willing, self in feelingcome at last to a knowledge of the Self, the Kingdom of God that is within. Or else he may begin with the thous existing outside himself, and may try to realize their essential unity with God and, through God, with one another and with his own being. Or, finally (and this is doubtless the best way), he may seek to approach the ultimate That both from within and from without, so that he comes to realize God experimentally as at once the principle of his own thou and of all other thous, animate and inanimate. The completely illuminated human being knows, with Law, that God is present in the deepest and most central part of his own soul; but he is also and at the same time one of those who, in the words of Plotinus,
  
  --
  
  I am not competent, nor is this the place to discuss the doctrinal differences between Buddhism and Hinduism. Let it suffice to point out that, when he insisted that human beings are by nature non-Atman, the Buddha was evidently speaking about the personal self and not the universal Self. The Brahman controversialists, who appear in certain of the Pali scriptures, never so much as mention the Vedanta doctrine of the identity of Atman and Godhead and the non-identity of ego and Atman. What they maintain and Gautama denies is the substantial nature and eternal persistence of the individual psyche. As an unintelligent man seeks for the abode of music in the body of the lute, so does he look for a soul within the skandhas (the material and psychic aggregates, of which the individual mind-body is composed). About the existence of the Atman that is Brahman, as about most other metaphysical matters, the Buddha declines to speak, on the ground that such discussions do not tend to edification or spiritual progress among the members of a monastic order, such as he had founded. But though it has its dangers, though it may become the most absorbing, because the most serious and noblest, of distractions, metaphysical thinking is unavoidable and finally necessary. Even the Hinayanists found this, and the later Mahayanists were to develop, in connection with the practice of their religion, a splendid and imposing system of cosmological, ethical and psychological thought. This system was based upon the postulates of a strict idealism and professed to dispense with the idea of God. But moral and spiritual experience was too strong for philosophical theory, and under the inspiration of direct experience, the writers of the Mahayana sutras found themselves using all their ingenuity to explain why the Tathagata and the Bodhisattvas display an infinite charity towards beings that do not really exist. At the same time they stretched the framework of subjective idealism so as to make room for Universal Mind; qualified the idea of soullessness with the doctrine that, if purified, the individual mind can identify itself with the Universal Mind or Buddha-womb; and, while maintaining godlessness, asserted that this realizable Universal Mind is the inner consciousness of the eternal Buddha and that the Buddha-mind is associated with a great compassionate heart which desires the liberation of every sentient being and bestows divine grace on all who make a serious effort to achieve mans final end. In a word, despite their inauspicious vocabulary, the best of the Mahayana sutras contain an authentic formulation of the Perennial Philosophya formulation which in some respects (as we shall see when we come to the section, God in the World) is more complete than any other.
  
  In India, as in Persia, Mohammedan thought came to be enriched by the doctrine that God is immanent as well as transcendent, while to Mohammedan practice were added the moral disciplines and spiritual exercises, by means of which the soul is prepared for contemplation or the unitive knowledge of the Godhead. It is a significant historical fact that the poet-saint Kabir is claimed as a co-religionist both by Moslems and Hindus. The politics of those whose goal is beyond time are always pacific; it is the idolaters of past and future, of reactionary memory and Utopian dream, who do the persecuting and make the wars.
  
  --
  
  There is a spirit in the soul, untouched by time and flesh, flowing from the Spirit, remaining in the Spirit, itself wholly spiritual. In this principle is God, ever verdant, ever flowering in all the joy and glory of His actual Self. Sometimes I have called this principle the Tabernacle of the soul, sometimes a spiritual Light, anon I say it is a Spark. But now I say that it is more exalted over this and that than the heavens are exalted above the earth. So now I name it in a nobler fashion It is free of all names and void of all forms. It is one and simple, as God is one and simple, and no man can in any wise behold it.
  

1.01_-_The_Four_Aids, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  25:But while it is difficult for man to believe in something unseen within himself, it is easy for him to believe in something which he can image as extraneous to himself. The spiritual progress of most human beings demands an extraneous support, an object of faith outside us. It needs an external image of God; or it needs a human representative, -- Incarnation, Prophet or Guru; or it demands both and receives them. For according to the need of the human soul the Divine manifests himself as deity, as human divine or in simple humanity, -- using that thick disguise, which so successfully conceals the Godhead, for a means of transmission of his guidance.
  26:The Hindu discipline of spirituality provides for this need of the soul by the conceptions of the Ishta Devata, the Avatar and the Gum. By the Ishta Devata, the chosen deity, is meant, -- not some inferior Power, but a name and form of the transcendent and universal Godhead. Almost all religions either have as their base or make use of some such name and form of the Divine. Its necessity for the human soul is evident. God is the All and more than the All. But that which is more than the All, how shall man conceive? And even the All is at first too hard for him; for he himself in his active consciousness is a limited and selective formation and can open himself only to that which is in harmony with his limited nature. There are things in the All which are too hard for his comprehension or seem too terrible to his sensitive emotions and cowering sensations. Or, simply, he cannot conceive as the Divine, cannot approach or cannot recognise something that is too much out of the circle of his ignorant or partial conceptions. It is necessary for him to conceive God in his own image or at some form that is beyond himself but consonant with his highest tendencies and seizable by his feelings or his intelligence. Otherwise it would be difficult for him to come into contact and communion with the Divine.
  27:Even then his nature calls for a human intermediary so that he may feel the Divine in something entirely close to his own humanity and sensible in a human influence and example. This call is satisfied by the Divine manifest in a human appearance, the Incarnation, the Avatar-Krishna, Christ, Buddha. Or if this is too hard for him to conceive, the Divine represents himself through a less marvellous intermediary, -- Prophet or Teacher. For many who cannot conceive or are unwilling to accept the Divine Man, are ready to open themselves to the supreme man, terming him not incarnation but world-teacher or divine representative.

1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  2:These persistent ideals of the race are at once the contradiction of its normal experience and the affirmation of higher and deeper experiences which are abnormal to humanity and only to be attained, in their organised entirety, by a revolutionary individual effort or an evolutionary general progression. To know, possess and be the divine being in an animal and egoistic consciousness, to convert our twilit or obscure physical mentality into the plenary supramental illumination, to build peace and a self-existent bliss where there is only a stress of transitory satisfactions besieged by physical pain and emotional suffering, to establish an infinite freedom in a world which presents itself as a group of mechanical necessities, to discover and realise the immortal life in a body subjected to death and constant mutation, - this is offered to us as the manifestation of God in Matter and the goal of Nature in her terrestrial evolution. To the ordinary material intellect which takes its present organisation of consciousness for the limit of its possibilities, the direct contradiction of the unrealised ideals with the realised fact is a final argument against their validity. But if we take a more deliberate view of the world's workings, that direct opposition appears rather as part of Nature's profoundest method and the seal of her completest sanction.
  

1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  This is the faith in which the Karmayogin puts its hand to the work and will persist in it, refusing to be discouraged by difficulties however immense and apparently insuperable. We believe that God is with us and in that faith we shall conquer. We believe that humanity needs us and it is the love and service of humanity, of our country, of the race, of our
  

1.02.2.1_-_Brahman_Oneness_of_God_and_the_World, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  "ONE UNMOVING"
  God is the one stable and eternal Reality. He is One because
  there is nothing else, since all existence and non-existence are

1.02.2.2_-_Self-Realisation, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  the pure Self and the Non-Becoming and yet to enjoy by means
  of all things in the manifestation God in the universe through a
  free and illuminated self-identification with Sachchidananda in

1.02.3.1_-_The_Lord, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  a Personal God. Personality is generally conceived as identical
  with individuality and the vulgar idea of a Personal God is a
  magnified individual like man in His nature but yet different,
  --
  not admit that this is the real nature of the Ishwara.
  God is Sachchidananda. He manifests Himself as infinite
  existence of which the essentiality is consciousness, of which

1.02.4.2_-_Action_and_the_Divine_Will, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  in the formative energy which takes shape in them. But their
  presiding God is not the Life-principle; it is the Will. Will is
  Kratu, the effective power behind the act. It is of the nature
  --
  And the nature of the two united is an illuminated Devotion
  which accepts, aspires to and fulfils God in the human existence.
  3 Atmavan.

1.02.9_-_Conclusion_and_Summary, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  in their mentality and formal becoming. If the mind (Manishi) absorbs itself in God as the formal becoming (Paribhu)
  and separates itself from God in the true Idea (Kavi), then
  it loses Vidya, the knowledge of the One, and has only the

1.02_-_Karmayoga, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  There have been others in the past which have powerfully influenced the national mind and there is no reason why there should not be a yet more perfect synthesis in the future. It is such a synthesis, embracing all life and action in its scope, that the teachings of Sri Ramakrishna and Vivekananda have been preparing. What is dimly beginning now is a repetition on a wider stage of what happened once before in India, more rapidly but to smaller issues, when the Buddha lived and taught his philosophy and ethics to the Aryan nations. Then as now a mighty spirit, it matters not whether Avatar or Vibhuti, the full expression of God in man or a great outpouring of the divine energy, came down among men and brought into their daily life and practice the force and impulse of utter spirituality. And this time it is the full light and not a noble part, unlike Buddhism which, expressing Vedantic morality, yet ignored a fundamental reality of Vedanta and was therefore expelled from its prime seat and cradle. The material result was then what it will be now, a great political, moral and social revolution which made India
  

1.02_-_Karma_Yoga, #Amrita Gita, #Swami Sivananda Saraswati, #Hinduism
  
  5. See God in every face. Behold the Lord in all creatures.
  

1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  ignorant on our part. Not everyone who identies themselves with a particular religion has the same views or practices in the same way. Christian mystics and born-again Christians may have very different views of who or what
  God is. Some people who consider themselves Buddhists may pray to Tara as
  if she were an external God, while some Christians may see God as emptiness

1.02_-_On_the_Service_of_the_Soul, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Fiction
  
  Your God is a child, so long as you are not childlike. Is the child order, meaning? Or disorder, caprice? Disorder and meaninglessness are the mother of order and meaning. Order and meaning are things that have become and are no longer becoming.
  
  --
  
  You are afraid to open the door? I too was afraid, since we had forgotten that God is terrible. Christ taught: God is love. 66 But you should know that love is also terrible.
  
  --
  
  66. The :first letter of John: God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in him (I
  John 4:16)

1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  schoolboy fights and debating societies. By surrendering
  the fruits of work to God is to take to ourselves neither credit
  nor blame, but to give both up to the Lord, and be at peace.

1.02_-_Self-Consecration, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  21:Into all our endeavour upward the lower element of desire will at first naturally enter. For what the enlightened will sees as the thing to be done and pursues as the crown to be conquered, what the heart embraces as the one thing delightful, that in us which feels itself limited and opposed and, because it is limited, craves and struggles, will seek with the troubled passion of an egoistic desire. This craving life-force or desire-soul in us has to be accepted at first, but only in order that it may be transformed. Even from the very beginning it has to be taught to renounce all other desires and concentrate itself on the passion for the Divine. This capital point gained, it has to be taught to desire, not for its own separate sake, but for God in the world and for the Divine in ourselves; it has to fix itself upon no personal spiritual gain, though of all possible spiritual gains we are sure, but on the great work to be done in us and others, on the high coming manifestation which is to be the glorious fulfilment of the Divine in the world, on the Truth that has to be sought and lived and enthroned for ever. But last, most difficult for it, more difficult than to seek with the right object, it has to be taught to seek in the right manner; for it must learn to desire, not in its own egoistic way, but in the way of the Divine. It must insist no longer, as the strong separative will always insists, on its own manner of fulfilment, its own dream of possession, its own idea of the right and desirable; it must yearn to fulfil a larger and greater Will and consent to wait upon a less interested and ignorant guidance. Thus trained, Desire, that great unquiet harasser and troubler of man and cause of every kind of stumbling, will become fit to be transformed into its divine counterpart. For desire and passion too have their divine forms; there is a pure ecstasy of the soul's seeking beyond all craving and grief, there is a Will of Ananda that sits glorified in the possession of the supreme beatitudes.
  

1.02_-_The_Descent._Dante's_Protest_and_Virgil's_Appeal._The_Intercession_of_the_Three_Ladies_Benedight., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  Of the rest, no; because they are not fearful.
  God in his mercy such created me
  That misery of yours attains me not,

1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Very obviously a great body of the profoundest teaching cannot be built round an ordinary occurrence which has no gulfs of deep suggestion and hazardous difficulty behind its superficial and outward aspects and can be governed well enough by the ordinary everyday standards of thought and action. There are indeed three things in the Gita which are spiritually significant, almost symbolic, typical of the profoundest relations and problems of the spiritual life and of human existence at its roots; they are the divine personality of the Teacher, his characteristic relations with his disciple and the occasion of his teaching. The teacher is God himself descended into humanity; the disciple is the first, as we might say in modern language, the representative man of his age, closest friend and chosen instrument of the
  Avatar, his protagonist in an immense work and struggle the secret purpose of which is unknown to the actors in it, known only to the incarnate Godhead who guides it all from behind the veil of his unfathomable mind of knowledge; the occasion is the violent crisis of that work and struggle at the moment when the anguish and moral difficulty and blind violence of its apparent movements forces itself with the shock of a visible revelation on the mind of its representative man and raises the whole question of the meaning of God in the world and the goal and drift and sense of human life and conduct.
  
  --
  
  The Vaishnava form of Vedantism which has laid most stress upon this conception expresses the relation of God in man to man in God by the double figure of Nara-Narayana, associated historically with the origin of a religious school very similar in its doctrines to the teaching of the Gita. Nara is the human soul which, eternal companion of the Divine, finds itself only when it awakens to that companionship and begins, as the Gita would say, to live in God. Narayana is the divine Soul always present in our humanity, the secret guide, friend and helper of the human being, the "Lord who abides within the heart of creatures" of the Gita; when within us the veil of that secret sanctuary is withdrawn and man speaks face to face with God, hears the divine voice, receives the divine light, acts in the divine power, then becomes possible the supreme uplifting of the embodied human conscious-being into the unborn and eternal. He becomes capable of that dwelling in God and giving up of his whole consciousness into the Divine which the Gita upholds as the best or highest secret of things, uttamam rahasyam. When
  1
  --
  15
   this eternal divine Consciousness always present in every human being, this God in man, takes possession partly4 or wholly of the human consciousness and becomes in visible human shape the guide, teacher, leader of the world, not as those who living in their humanity yet feel something of the power or light or love of the divine Gnosis informing and conducting them, but out of that divine Gnosis itself, direct from its central force and plenitude, then we have the manifest Avatar. The inner Divinity is the eternal Avatar in man; the human manifestation is its sign and development in the external world.
  
  --
  Master of all and on the Godhead secret in man. It is this internal divinity who is meant when the Gita speaks of the doer of violent
  Asuric austerities troubling the God within or of the sin of those who despise the Divine lodged in the human body or of the same Godhead destroying our ignorance by the blazing lamp of knowledge. It is then the eternal Avatar, this God in man, the divine Consciousness always present in the human being who manifested in a visible form speaks to the human soul in the Gita, illumines the meaning of life and the secret of divine action and gives it the light of the divine knowledge and guidance and the assuring and fortifying word of the Master of existence in the hour when it comes face to face with the painful mystery of the world. This is what the Indian religious consciousness seeks to make near to itself in whatever form, whether in the symbolic human image it enshrines in its temples or in the worship of its
  Avatars or in the devotion to the human Guru through whom the voice of the one world-Teacher makes itself heard. Through these it strives to awaken to that inner voice, unveil that form of the Formless and stand face to face with that manifest divine
  --
  Upanishad, in the twin figures of Nara and Narayana, the seers who do tapasya together for the knowledge. But in all three it is the idea of the divine knowledge in which, as the Gita says, all action culminates that is in view; here it is instead the action which leads to that knowledge and in which the divine Knower figures himself. Arjuna and Krishna, this human and this divine, stand together not as seers in the peaceful hermitage of meditation, but as fighter and holder of the reins in the clamorous field, in the midst of the hurtling shafts, in the chariot of battle. The
  Teacher of the Gita is therefore not only the God in man who unveils himself in the word of knowledge, but the God in man who moves our whole world of action, by and for whom all our humanity exists and struggles and labours, towards whom all human life travels and progresses. He is the secret Master of works and sacrifice and the Friend of the human peoples.
  

1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Agni first, for without him the sacrificial flame cannot burn on the altar of the soul. That flame of Agni is the seven-tongued power of the Will, a Force of God instinct with Knowledge. This conscious and forceful will is the immortal guest in our mortality, a pure priest and a divine worker, the mediator between earth and heaven. It carries what we offer to the higher Powers and brings back in return their force and light and joy into our humanity.
  

1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  and that he needs to love what he himself understands of God at his own level and particular stage of inner development, and Peter's way is not John's. That everyone should love a crucified god, for instance,
  seems unnatural to the average Indian, who will bow respectfully before Christ (with as much spontaneous reverence as before his own image of God), but who will see also the face of God in the laughter of Krishna, the terror of Kali, the sweetness of Saraswati, and in the thousands upon thousands of other gods who dance, multicolored and mustachioed, mirthful or terrifying, illuminated or compassionate, on the deliriously carved towers of Indian temples. A God who cannot smile could not have created this humorous universe,13 said Sri Aurobindo. All is His face, all is His play, terrible or beautiful, as many-faceted as our world itself. For this country so teeming with 13
  
  --
  neuroses of an unbalanced society: we must implicate ourselves.
  Indeed, if we brought as much sincerity, meticulousness, and perseverance to the study of the inner world as we do to the study of our books, we would go fast and far the West also has surprises in store for us but it must first get rid of its preconceptions (Columbus did not draw the map of America before leaving Palos). These simple truths may be worth repeating, for the West seems to be caught between two falsehoods: the overly serious falsehood of the spiritualists, who have already settled the question of God in a few infallible paragraphs, and the not-serious-enough falsehood of the rudimentary occultists and psychics, who have reduced the invisible to a sort of freak-show of the imagination. India, wisely, refers us to our own direct experience and to experimental methods. Sri Aurobindo would soon put this fundamental lesson of experimental spirituality into practice.
  But what kind of men, what human substance, was he going to find in that India he did not know? Once we have set aside the exotic facade and the bizarre (to us) customs that amuse and intrigue tourists,
  --
  Those who have made some progress with Christianity do not want to give it up, and carry it on their backs; those who have made some progress with Buddhism do not want to leave it, and carry it on their backs. This weighs you down and slows you terribly. Once you have passed through a stage, drop it; let it go! And move on! Yes, there is an eternal law, but it is eternally young and eternally progressive.
  Although India was also able to appreciate that God is the Eternal Iconoclast in his cosmic march, she did not always have the strength to withstand her own wisdom. The vast invisible that pervades this country was to extract from it a double ransom, both human and spiritual; human, because these people, saturated with the Beyond,
  conscious of the Great Cosmic Game and the inner dimensions in which our little surface lives are just points, periodically flowering and soon re-engulfed, came to neglect the material world inertia,
  --
  perhaps because his being combined the finest Western tradition and the profound spiritual yearning of the East. East and West, he said,
  have two ways of looking at life which are opposite sides of one reality. Between the pragmatic truth on which the vital thought of modern Europe enamoured of the vigour of life, all the dance of God in Nature, puts so vehement and exclusive a stress and the eternal immutable Truth to which the Indian mind enamoured of calm and poise loves to turn with an equal passion for an exclusive finding,
  there is no such divorce and quarrel as is now declared by the partisan mind, the separating reason, the absorbing passion of an exclusive will of realisation. The one eternal immutable Truth is the Spirit and without the Spirit the pragmatic truth of a self-creating universe would have no origin or foundation; it would be barren of significance, empty of inner guidance, lost in its end, a fire-work display shooting up into the void only to fall away and perish in midair. But neither is the pragmatic truth a dream of the non-existent, an illusion or a long lapse into some futile delirium of creative imagination; that would be to make the eternal Spirit a drunkard or a dreamer, the fool of his own gigantic self-hallucinations. The truths of universal existence are of two kinds, truths of the spirit which are themselves eternal and immutable, and these are the great things that cast themselves out into becoming and there constantly realize their powers and significances, and the play of the consciousness with them, the discords, the musical variations, soundings of possibility,

1.02_-_The_Human_Soul, #The Interior Castle or The Mansions, #Saint Teresa of Avila, #Christianity
  
  4.: O souls, redeemed by the Blood of Jesus Christ, take these things to heart; have mercy on yourselves! If you realize your pitiable condition, how can you refrain from trying to remove the darkness from the crystal of your souls? Remember, if death should take you now, you would never again enjoy the light of this Sun. O Jesus! how sad a sight must be a soul deprived of light! What a terrible state the chambers of this castle are in! How disorderly must be the senses-the inhabitants of the castle-the powers of the soul its magistrates, governors, and stewards-blind and uncontrolled as they are! In short, as the soil in which the tree is now planted is in the devil's domain, how can its fruit be anything but evil? A man of great spiritual insight once told me he was not so much surprised at such a soul's wicked deeds as astonished that it did not commit even worse sins. May God in His mercy keep us from such great evil, for nothing in this life merits the name of evil in comparison with this, which delivers us over to evil which is eternal.
  

1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  Finally there is an incarnation of God in a human being, who possesses the same qualities of character as the personal God, but who exhibits them under the limitations necessarily imposed by confinement within a material body born into the world at a given moment of time. For Christians there has been and, ex hypodiesi, can be but one such divine incarnation; for Indians there can be and have been many. In Christendom as well as in the East, contemplatives who follow the path of devotion conceive of, and indeed directly perceive the incarnation as a constantly renewed fact of experience. Christ is for ever being begotten within the soul by the Father, and the play of Krishna is the pseudo-historical symbol of an everlasting truth of psychology and metaphysicsthe fact that, in relation to God, the personal soul is always feminine and passive.
  
  --
  
  Some idea of the inexhaustible richness of the divine nature can be obtained by analysing, word by word, the invocation with which the Lords Prayer beginsOur Father who art in heaven. God is oursours in the same intimate sense that our consciousness and life are ours. But as well as immanently ours, God is also transcendently the personal Father, who loves his creatures and to whom love and allegiance are owed by them in return. Our Father who art: when we come to consider the verb in isolation, we perceive that the immanent-transcendent personal God is also the immanent-transcendent One, the essence and principle of all existence. And finally Gods being is in heaven; the divine nature is other than, and incommensurable with, the nature of the creatures in whom God is immanent. That is why we can attain to the unitive knowledge of God only when we become in some measure Godlike, only when we permit Gods kingdom to come by making our own creaturely kingdom go.
  
  God may be worshipped and contemplated in any of his aspects. But to persist in worshipping only one aspect to the exclusion of all the rest is to run into grave spiritual peril. Thus, if we approach God with the preconceived idea that He is exclusively the personal, transcendental, all-powerful ruler of the world, we run the risk of becoming entangled in a religion of rites, propitiatory sacrifices (sometimes of the most horrible nature) and legalistic observances. Inevitably so; for if God is an unapproachable potentate out there, giving mysterious orders, this kind of religion is entirely appropriate to the cosmic situation. The best that can be said for ritualistic legalism is that it improves conduct. It does little, however, to alter character and nothing of itself to modify consciousness.
  
  Things are a great deal better when the transcendent, omnipotent personal God is regarded as also a loving Father. The sincere worship of such a God changes character as well as conduct, and does something to modify consciousness. But the complete transformation of consciousness, which is enlightenment, deliverance, salvation, comes only when God is thought of as the Perennial Philosophy affirms Him to beimmanent as well as transcendent, supra-personal as well as personaland when religious practices are adapted to this conception.
  
  When God is regarded as exclusively immanent, legalism and external practices are abandoned and there is a concentration on the Inner Light. The dangers now are quietism and antinomianism, a partial modification of consciousness that is useless or even harmful, because it is not accompanied by the transformation of character which is the necessary prerequisite of a total, complete and spiritually fruitful transformation of consciousness.
  
  --
  
  Who is God? I can think of no better answer than, He who is. Nothing is more appropriate to the eternity which God is. If you call God good, or great, or blessed, or wise, or anything else of this sort, it is included in these words, namely, He is.
  
  --
  
  When I came out of the Godhead into multiplicity, then all things proclaimed, There is a God (the personal Creator). Now this cannot make me blessed, for hereby I realize myself as creature. But in the breaking through I am more than all creatures; I am neither God nor creature; I am that which I was and shall remain, now and for ever more. There I receive a thrust which carries me above all angels. By this thrust I become so rich that God is not sufficient for me, in so far as He is only God in his divine works. For in thus breaking through, I perceive what God and I are in common. There I am what I was. There I neither increase or decrease. For there I am the immovable which moves all things. Here man has won again what he is eternally and ever shall be. Here God is received into the soul.
  
  --
  
  Analogously, God in time is grounded in the eternal now of the modeless Godhead. It is in the Godhead that things, lives and minds have their being; it is through God that they have their becominga becoming whose goal and purpose is to return to the eternity of the Ground.
  
  --
  
  Like St. Augustine, Eckhart was to some extent the victim of his own literary talents. Le style cest Ihomme. No doubt. But the converse is also partly true. Lhomme cest le style. Because we have a gift for writing in a certain way, we find ourselves, in some sort, becoming our way of writing. We mould ourselves in the likeness of our particular brand of eloquence. Eckhart was one of the inventors of German prose, and he was tempted by his new-found mastery of forceful expression to commit himself to extreme positionsto be doctrinally the image of his powerful and over-emphatic sentences. A statement like the foregoing would lead one to believe that he despised what the Vedantists call the lower knowledge of Brahman, not as the Absolute Ground of all things, but as the personal God. In reality he, like the Vedantists, accepts the lower knowledge as genuine knowledge and regards devotion to the personal God as the best preparation for the unitive knowledge of the Godhead. Another point to remember is that the attributeless Godhead of Vedanta, of Mahayana Buddhism, of Christian and Sufi mysticism is the Ground of all the qualities possessed by the personal God and the Incarnation. God is not good, I am good, says Eckhart in his violent and excessive way. What he really meant was, I am just humanly good; God is supereminently good; the Godhead is, and his isness (istigkeit, in Eckharts German) contains goodness, love, wisdom and all the rest in their essence and principle. In consequence, the Godhead is never, for the exponent of the Perennial Philosophy, the mere Absolute of academic metaphysics, but something more purely perfect, more reverently to be adored than even the personal God or his human incarnationa Being towards whom it is possible to feel the most intense devotion and in relation to whom it is necessary (if one is to come to that unitive knowledge which is mans final end) to practise a discipline more arduous and unremitting than any imposed by ecclesiastical authority.
  
  --
  
  The holy light of faith is so pure that, compared with it, particular lights are but impurities; and even ideas of the saints, of the Blessed Virgin, and the sight of Jesus Christ in his humanity are impediments in the way of the sight of God in His purity.
  
  --
  
  What Eckhart describes as the pure One, the absolute not-God in whom we must sink from nothingness to nothingness is called in Mahayana Buddhism the Clear Light of the Void. What follows is part of a formula addressed by the Tibetan priest to a person in the act of death.
  
  --
  
  So far, then, as a fully adequate expression of the Perennial Philosophy is concerned, there exists a problem in semantics that is finally insoluble. The fact is one which must be steadily borne in mind by all who read its formulations. Only in this way shall we be able to understand even remotely what is being talked about. Consider, for example, those negative definitions of the transcendent and immanent Ground of being. In statements such as Eckharts, God is equated with nothing. And in a certain sense the equation is exact; for God is certainly no thing. In the phrase used by Scotus Erigena God is not a what; He is a That. In other words, the Ground can be denoted as being there, but not defined as having qualities. This means that discursive knowledge about the Ground is not merely, like all inferential knowledge, a thing at one remove, or even at several removes, from the reality of immediate acquaintance; it is and, because of the very nature of our language and our standard patterns of thought, it must be, paradoxical knowledge. Direct knowledge of the Ground cannot be had except by union, and union can be achieved only by the annihilation of the self-regarding ego, which is the barrier separating the thou from the That.
  

1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  18:Matter expresses itself eventually as a formulation of some unknown Force. Life, too, that yet unfathomed mystery, begins to reveal itself as an obscure energy of sensibility imprisoned in its material formulation; and when the dividing ignorance is cured which gives us the sense of a gulf between Life and Matter, it is difficult to suppose that Mind, Life and Matter will be found to be anything else than one Energy triply formulated, the triple world of the Vedic seers. Nor will the conception then be able to endure of a brute material Force as the mother of Mind. The Energy that creates the world can be nothing else than a Will, and Will is only consciousness applying itself to a work and a result.
  19:What is that work and result, if not a self-involution of Consciousness in form and a self-evolution out of form so as to actualise some mighty possibility in the universe which it has created? And what is its will in Man if not a will to unending Life, to unbounded Knowledge, to unfettered Power? Science itself begins to dream of the physical conquest of death, expresses an insatiable thirst for knowledge, is working out something like a terrestrial omnipotence for humanity. Space and Time are contracting to the vanishing-point in its works, and it strives in a hundred ways to make man the master of circumstance and so lighten the fetters of causality. The idea of limit, of the impossible begins to grow a little shadowy and it appears instead that whatever man constantly wills, he must in the end be able to do; for the consciousness in the race eventually finds the means. It is not in the individual that this omnipotence expresses itself, but the collective Will of mankind that works out with the individual as a means. And yet when we look more deeply, it is not any conscious Will of the collectivity, but a superconscious Might that uses the individual as a centre and means, the collectivity as a condition and field. What is this but the God in man, the infinite Identity, the multitudinous Unity, the Omniscient, the Omnipotent, who having made man in His own image, with the ego as a centre of working, with the race, the collective Narayana,7 the visvamanava8 as the mould and circumscription, seeks to express in them some image of the unity, omniscience, omnipotence which are the self-conception of the Divine? "That which is immortal in mortals is a God and established inwardly as an energy working out in our divine powers."9 It is this vast cosmic impulse which the modern world, without quite knowing its own aim, yet serves in all its activities and labours subconsciously to fulfil.
  20:But there is always a limit and an encumbrance, - the limit of the material field in the Knowledge, the encumbrance of the material machinery in the Power. But here also the latest trend is highly significant of a freer future. As the outposts of scientific Knowledge come more and more to be set on the borders that divide the material from the immaterial, so also the highest achievements of practical Science are those which tend to simplify and reduce to the vanishing-point the machinery by which the greatest effects are produced. Wireless telegraphy is Nature's exterior sign and pretext for a new orientation. The sensible physical means for the intermediate transmission of the physical force is removed; it is only preserved at the points of impulsion and reception. Eventually even these must disappear; for when the laws and forces of the supraphysical are studied with the right starting-point, the means will infallibly be found for Mind directly to seize on the physical energy and speed it accurately upon its errand. There, once we bring ourselves to recognise it, lie the gates that open upon the enormous vistas of the future.

1.03_-_Of_some_imperfections_which_some_of_these_souls_are_apt_to_have,_with_respect_to_the_second_capital_sin,_which_is_avarice,_in_the_spiritual_sense, #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  in so far as it can, on its own account, to the end that it may purge and perfect itself,
  and thus may merit being taken by God into that Divine care wherein it becomes
  healed of all things that it was unable of itself to cure. Because, however greatly the

1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  This sorrow, if it be truly conceived, is full of holy desire; and else a man might never in this life abide it or bear it. For were it not that a soul were somewhat fed with a manner of comfort by his right working, he should not be able to bear that pain that he hath by the knowing and feeling of his being. For as oft as he would have a true knowing and a feeling of his God in purity of spirit (as it may be here), and then feeleth that he may notfor he findeth evermore his knowing and his feeling as it were occupied and filled with a foul stinking lump of himself, the which must always be hated and despised and forsaken, if he shall be Gods perfect disciple, taught by Himself in the mount of perfctionso oft he goeth nigh mad for sorrow.
  
  --
  
  This sorrow and this desire must every soul have and feel in itself (either in this manner or in another), as God vouchsafeth to teach his ghostly disciples according to his good will and their according ableness in body and in soul, in degree and disposition, ere the time be that they may perfectly be oned unto God in perfect charitysuch as may be had here, if God vouchsafeth.
  
  --
  
  What is the nature of this stinking lump of selfness or personality, which has to be so passionately repented of and so completely died to, before there can be any true knowing of God in purity of spirit? The most meagre and non-committal hypodiesis is that of Hume. Mankind, he says, are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity and are in a perpetual flux and movement. An almost identical answer is given by the Buddhists, whose doctrine of anatta is the denial of any permanent soul, existing behind the flux of experience and the various psycho-physical skandhas (closely corresponding to Humes bundles), which constitute the more enduring elements of personality. Hume and the Buddhists give a sufficiently realistic description of selfness in action; but they fail to explain how or why the bundles ever became bundles. Did their constituent atoms of experience come together of their own accord? And, if so, why, or by what means, and within what kind of a non-spatial universe? To give a plausible answer to these questions in terms of anatta is so difficult that we are forced to abandon the doctrine in favour of the notion that, behind the flux and within the bundles, there exists some kind of permanent soul, by which experience is organized and which in turn makes use of that organized experience to become a particular and unique personality. This is the view of the orthodox Hinduism, from which Buddhist thought parted company, and of almost all European thought from before the time of Aristotle to the present day. But whereas most contemporary thinkers make an attempt to describe human nature in terms of a dichotomy of interacting psyche and physique, or an inseparable wholeness of these two elements within particular embothed selves, all the exponents of the Perennial Philosophy make, in one form or another, the affirmation that man is a kind of trinity composed of body, psyche and spirit. Selfness or personality is a product of the first two elements. The third element (that quidquid increatum et increabile, as Eckhart called it) is akin to, or even identical with, the divine Spirit that is the Ground of all being. Mans final end, the purpose of his existence, is to love, know and be united with the immanent and transcendent Godhead. And this identification of self with spiritual not-self can be achieved only by dying to selfness and living to spirit.
  
  --
  
  The seed of God is in us. Given an intelligent and hard-working farmer, it will thrive and grow up to God, whose seed it is; and accordingly its fruits will be God-nature. Pear seeds grow into pear trees, nut seeds into nut trees, and God seed into God.
  
  --
  
  next chapter: 1.04 - God iN THE WORLD
  

1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  15. QUESTION: Concerning the remembrance of God in the Mashriqu'l-Adhkar "at the hour of dawn". ANSWER: Although the words "at the hour of dawn" are used in the Book of God, it is acceptable to God at the earliest dawn of day, between dawn and sunrise, or even up to two hours after sunrise.
  
  --
  
  ANSWER: If there are several residences, the finest and noblest of these dwellings is the one intended, the remainder being distributed amongst the whole body of the heirs like any other form of property. Any heir, from whichever category of inheritors, who is outside the Faith of God is accounted as non-existent and doth not inherit.
  
  --
  
  ANSWER: The ordinance of God is that real estate which hath ceased to yield income, that is, +F1 Adrianople from which no profit accrueth, is not liable to payment of Huquq. He, verily, is the Ruler, the Munificent.
  

1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  91
   ego and to enthrone God in its place as the ruling Inhabitant of the nature. And this means, first, to disinherit desire and no longer accept the enjoyment of desire as the ruling human motive. The spiritual life will draw its sustenance not from desire but from a pure and selfless spiritual delight of essential existence. And not only the vital nature in us whose stamp is desire, but the mental being too must undergo a new birth and a transfiguring change. Our divided, egoistic, limited and ignorant thought and intelligence must disappear; in its place there must stream in the catholic and faultless play of a shadowless divine illumination which shall culminate in the end in a natural self-existent Truth-consciousness free from groping half-truth and stumbling error. Our confused and embarrassed ego-centred small-motived will and action must cease and make room for the total working of a swiftly powerful, lucidly automatic, divinely moved and guided unfallen Force. There must be implanted and activised in all our doings a supreme, impersonal, unfaltering and unstumbling will in spontaneous and untroubled unison with the will of the Divine. The unsatisfying surface play of our feeble egoistic emotions must be ousted and there must be revealed instead a secret deep and vast psychic heart within that waits behind them for its hour; all our feelings, impelled by this inner heart in which dwells the Divine, will be transmuted into calm and intense movements of a twin passion of divine
  Love and manifold Ananda. This is the definition of a divine humanity or a supramental race. This, not an exaggerated or even a sublimated energy of human intellect and action, is the type of the superman whom we are called to evolve by our Yoga.
  --
  
  Even for those whose first natural movement is a consecration, a surrender and a resultant entire transformation of the thinking mind and its knowledge, or a total consecration, surrender and transformation of the heart and its emotions, the consecration of works is a needed element in that change. Otherwise, although they may find God in other-life, they will not be
  
  --
  To be perfectly equal in all happenings and to all beings, and to see and feel them as one with oneself and one with the
  Divine; to feel all in oneself and all in God; to feel God in all, oneself in all.
  

1.03_-_The_Divine_and_Man, #Words Of The Mother II, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  What is God?
  God is the perfection that we must aspire to realise.
  

1.03_-_The_Sephiros, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  Dionysius is another God in the category of 6, because of his youth and gracious form, combining effeminate softness and beauty, or because of his cultivation of the vine which, ceremonially used in the Eleusinian mysteries, produced a spiritual intoxication analogous to the mystical state. It may be, too, because Dionysius is said to have transformed himself into a lion, which is the sacred animal of Tipharas, being the king of wild beasts, and regality has always been depicted in the form of the lion. Astrological reasons may explain this parallelism for 0 Sol is exalted in the zodiacal sign of SL Leo, the Lion, which was considered to be a creative symbol of the fierce mien of the midsummer sun.
  
  --
  
  The Hindu God is Hanuman, represented by an Ape or
  Monkey. Blavatsky gives at great length, in The Secret
  --
  
  Its Egyptian God is Shu, who was the God of Space, represented as lifting up Nuit, the Queen of Heaven, from off the body of Seb, the Earth. Its Hindu equivalent is
  Ganesha, the elephant God who breaks down all obstacles, and supports the universe while himself standing on a tortoise. Diana was the Goddess of Light and in the

1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Fiction
  
  But who can withstand fear when the divine intoxication and madness comes to him? Love, soul, and God are beautiful and terrible. The ancients brought over some of the beauty of God into this world, and this world became so beautiful that it appeared to the spirit of the time to be fulfillment, and better than the bosom of the Godhead. The frightfulness and cruelty of the world lay under wraps and in the depths of our hearts. If the spirit of the depths seizes you, you will feel the cruelty and cry out in torment. The spirit of the depths is pregnant with ice, fire, and death. You are right to fear the spirit of the depths, as he is full of horror.
  

1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  object:1.04 - God iN THE WORLD
  class:chapter
  --
  
  God in the World
  
  --
  
  All creatures have existed eternally in the divine essence, as in their exemplar. So far as they conform to the divine idea, all beings were, before their creation, one thing with the essence of God. (God creates into time what was and is in eternity.) Eternally, all creatures are God in God So far as they are in God, they are the same life, the same essence, the same power, the same One, and nothing less.
  
  --
  
  The image of God is found essentially and personally in all mankind. Each possesses it whole, entire and undivided, and all together not more than one alone. In this way we are all one, intimately united in our eternal image, which is the image of God and the source in us of all our life. Our created essence and our life are attached to it without mediation as to their eternal cause.
  
  --
  
  The all too Protestant satirist forgot that God is in the hog trough no less than in the conventionally sacred image. Lift the stone and you will find me, affirms the best known of the Oxyrhinchus Logia of Jesus, cleave the wood, and I am there. Those who have personally and immediately realized the truth of this saying and, along with it, the truth of Brahmanisms That art thou are wholly delivered.
  
  --
  
  To its heights we can always come. For those of us who are still splashing about in the lower ooze, the phrase has a rather ironical ring. Nevertheless, in the light of even the most distant acquaintance with the heights and the fulness, it is possible to understand what its author means. To discover the Kingdom of God exclusively within oneself is easier than to discover it, not only there, but also in the outer world of minds and things and living creatures. It is easier because the heights within reveal themselves to those who are ready to exclude from their purview all that lies without. And though this exclusion may be a painful and mortificatory process, the fact remains that it is less arduous than the process of inclusion, by which we come to know the fulness as well as the heights of spiritual life. Where there is exclusive concentration on the heights within, temptations and distractions are avoided and there is a general denial and suppression. But when the hope is to know God inclusivelyto realize the divine Ground in the world as well as in the soul, temptations and distractions must not be avoided, but submitted to and used as opportunities for advance; there must be no suppression of outward-turning activities, but a transformation of them so that they become sacramental. Mortification becomes more searching and more subtle; there is need of unsleeping awareness and, on the levels of thought, feeling and conduct, the constant exercise of something like an artists tact and taste.
  
  --
  
  Natures intent is neither food, nor drink nor clothing, nor comfort, nor anything else from which God is left out. Whether you like it or not, whether you know it or not, secretly Nature seeks and hunts and tries to ferret out the track in which God may be found.
  
  --
  
  Any flea as it is in God is nobler than the highest of the angels in himself.
  
  --
  
  Till your spirit filleth the whole world, and the stars are your jewels; till you are as familiar with the ways of God in all ages as with your walk and table; till you are intimately acquainted with that shady nothing out of which the world was made; till you love men so as to desire their happiness with a thirst equal to the zeal of your own; till you delight in God for being good to all; you never enjoy the world. Till you more feel it than your private estate, and are more present in the hemisphere, considering the glories and the beauties there, than in your own house; till you remember how lately you were made, and how wonderful it was when you came into it; and more rejoice in the palace of your glory than if it had been made today morning.
  
  --
  
  The world is a mirror of Infinite Beauty, yet no man sees it. It is a Temple of Majesty, yet no man regards it. It is a region of Light and Peace, did not men disquiet it. It is the Paradise of God. It is more to man since he is fallen than it was before. It is the place of Angels and the Gate of Heaven. When Jacob waked out of his dream, he said, God is here, and I wist it not. How dreadful is this place! This is none other than the House of God and the Gate of Heaven.
  
  --
  
  That Nirvana and Samsara are one is a fact about the nature of the universe; but it is a fact which cannot be fully realized or directly experienced, except by souls far advanced in spirituality. For ordinary, nice, unregenerate people to accept this truth by hearsay, and to act upon it in practice, is merely to court disaster. All the dismal story of antinomianism is there to warn us of what happens when men and women make practical applications of a merely intellectual and unrealized theory that all is God and God is all. And hardly less depressing than the spectacle of antinomianism is that of the earnestly respectable well-rounded life of good citizens who do their best to live sacramentally, but dont in fact have any direct acquaintance with that for which the sacramental activity really stands. Dr. Oman, in his The Natural and the Supernatural, writes at length on the theme that reconciliation to the evanescent is revelation of the eternal; and in a recent volume, Science, Religion and the Future, Canon Raven applauds Dr. Oman for having stated the principles of a theology, in which there could be no ultimate antithesis between nature and grace, science and religion, in which, indeed, the worlds of the scientist and the theologian are seen to be one and the same. All this is in full accord with Taoism and Zen Buddhism and with such Christian teachings as St. Augustines Ama et fac quod vis and Father Lallemants advice to theocentric contemplatives to go out and act in the world, since their actions are the only ones capable of doing any real good to the world. But what neither Dr. Oman nor Canon Raven makes sufficiently clear is that nature and grace, Samsara and Nirvana, perpetual perishing and eternity, are really and experientially one only to persons who have fulfilled certain conditions. Fac quod vis in the temporal worldbut only when you have learnt the infinitely difficult art of loving God with all your mind and heart and your neighbor as yourself. If you havent learnt this lesson, you will either be an antinomian eccentric or criminal or else a respectable well-rounded-lifer, who has left himself no time to understand either nature or grace. The Gospels are perfectly clear about the process by which, and by which alone, a man may gain the right to live in the world as though he were at home in it: he must make a total denial of selfhood, submit to a complete and absolute mortification. At one period of his career, Jesus himself seems to have undertaken austerities, not merely of the mind, but of the body. There is the record of his forty days fast and his statement, evidently drawn from personal experience, that some demons cannot be cast out except by those who have fasted much as well as prayed. (The Cur dArs, whose knowledge of miracles and corporal penance was based on personal experience, insists on the close correlation between severe bodily austerities and the power to get petitionary prayer answered in ways that are sometimes supernormal.) The Pharisees reproached Jesus because he came eating and drinking, and associated with publicans and sinners; they ignored, or were unaware of, the fact that this apparently worldly prophet had at one time rivalled the physical austerities of John the Baptist and was practising the spiritual mortifications which he consistently preached. The pattern of Jesus life is essentially similar to that of the ideal sage, whose career is traced in the Oxherding Pictures, so popular among Zen Buddhists. The wild ox, symbolizing the unregenerate self, is caught, made to change its direction, then tamed and gradually transformed from black to white. Regeneration goes so far that for a time the ox is completely lost, so that nothing remains to be pictured but the full-orbed moon, symbolizing Mind, Suchness, the Ground. But this is not the final stage. In the end, the herdsman comes back to the world of men, riding on the back of his ox. Because he now loves, loves to the extent of being identified with the divine object of his love, he can do what he likes; for what he likes is what the Nature of Things likes. He is found in company with wine-bibbers and butchers; he and they are all converted into Buddhas. For him, there is complete reconciliation to the evanescent and, through that reconciliation, revelation of the eternal. But for nice ordinary unregenerate people the only reconciliation to the evanescent is that of indulged passions, of distractions submitted to and enjoyed. To tell such persons that evanescence and eternity are the same, and not immediately to qualify the statement, is positively fatalfor, in practice, they are not the same except to the saint; and there is no record that anybody ever came to sanctity, who did not, at the outset of his or her career, behave as if evanescence and eternity, nature and grace, were profoundly different and in many respects incompatible. As always, the path of spirituality is a knife-edge between abysses. On one side is the danger of mere rejection and escape, on the other the danger of mere acceptance and the enjoyment of things which should only be used as instruments or symbols. The versified caption which accompanies the last of the Oxherding Pictures runs as follows.
  
  --
  
  It is in the Indian and Far Eastern formulations of the Perennial Philosophy that this subject is most systematically treated. What is prescribed is a process of conscious discrimination between the personal self and the Self that is identical with Brahman, between the individual ego and the Buddha-womb or Universal Mind. The result of this discrimination is a more or less sudden and complete revulsion of consciousness, and the realization of a state of no-mind, which may be described as the freedom from perceptual and intellectual attachment to the ego-principle. This state of no-mind exists, as it were, on a knife-edge between the carelessness of the average sensual man and the strained over-eagerness of the zealot for salvation. To achieve it, one must walk delicately and, to maintain it, must learn to combine the most intense alertness with a tranquil and self-denying passivity, the most indomitable determination with a perfect submission to the leadings of the spirit. When no-mind is sought after by a mind, says Huang Po, that is making it a particular object of thought. There is only testimony of silence; it goes beyond thinking. In other words, we, as separate individuals, must not try to think it, but rather permit ourselves to be thought by it. Similarly, in the Diamond Sutra we read that if a Bodhisattva, in his attempt to realize Suchness, retains the thought of an ego, a person, a separate being, or a soul, he is no longer a Bodhisattva. Al Ghazzali, the philosopher of Sufism, also stresses the need for intellectual humbleness and docility. If the thought that he is effaced from self occurs to one who is in fana (a term roughly corresponding to Zens no-mind, or mushin), that is a defect. The highest state is to be effaced from effacement. There is an ecstatic effacement-from-effacement in the interior heights of the Atman-Brahman; and there is another, more comprehensive effacement-from-effacement, not only in the inner heights, but also in and through the world, in the waking, everyday knowledge of God in his fulness.
  
  --
  
  The doctrine that God is in the world has an important practical corollarythe sacredness of Nature, and the sinfulness and folly of mans overweening efforts to be her master rather than her intelligently docile collaborator. Sub-human lives and even things are to be treated with respect and understanding, not brutally oppressed to serve our human ends.
  

1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  Suppose I have made the three kinds of Karma, good, bad,
  and mixed; and suppose I die and become a God in heaven; the
  desires in a god body are not the same as the desires in a

1.04_-_Of_other_imperfections_which_these_beginners_are_apt_to_have_with_respect_to_the_third_sin,_which_is_luxury., #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  
  7. Some of these persons make friendships of a spiritual kind with others, which oftentimes arise from luxury and not from spirituality; this may be known to be the case when the remembrance of that friendship causes not the remembrance and love of God to grow, but occasions remorse of conscience. For, when the friendship is purely spiritual, the love of God grows with it; and the more the soul remembers it, the more it remembers the love of God, and the greater the desire it has for God; so that, as the one grows, the other grows also. For the spirit of God has this property, that it increases good by adding to it more good, inasmuch as there is likeness and conformity between them. But, when this love arises from the vice of sensuality aforementioned, it produces the contrary effects; for the more the one grows, the more the other decreases, and the remembrance of it likewise. If that sensual love grows, it will at once be observed that the soul's love of God is becoming colder, and that it is forgetting Him as it remembers that love; there comes to it, too, a certain remorse of conscience. And, on the other hand, if the love of God grows in the soul, that other love becomes cold and is forgotten; for, as the two are contrary to one another, not only does the one not aid the other, but the one which predominates quenches and confounds the other, and becomes strengthened in itself, as the philosophers say. Wherefore Our Saviour said in the Gospel: 'That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.'38
  

1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism, #Words Of The Mother III, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  (About an article entitled Religion in the New Age)
  I have read the article it is all right. I have made only one change in the last page, where you write since it will be the age of God (God is still too religious) I have put of the ONE
   because it will truly be the age of Unity.

1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Sakya State, or would direct a Ramakrishna to become a Pundit in a vernacular school and disinterestedly teach little boys their lessons, or bind down a Vivekananda to support his family and for that to follow dispassionately the law or medicine or journalism. The Gita does not teach the disinterested performance of duties but the following of the divine life, the abandonment of all dharmas, sarvadharman, to take refuge in the Supreme alone, and the divine activity of a Buddha, a Ramakrishna, a
  Vivekananda is perfectly in consonance with this teaching. Nay, although the Gita prefers action to inaction, it does not rule out the renunciation of works, but accepts it as one of the ways to the Divine. If that can only be attained by renouncing works and life and all duties and the call is strong within us, then into the bonfire they must go, and there is no help for it. The call of God is imperative and cannot be weighed against any other considerations.
  

1.04_-_The_Paths, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  The Greek God is Themis, who, in the Homeric poems, is the personification of abstract law, custom, and equity, whence she is described as reigning in the assemblies of men, and convening the assembly of the Gods on Mount
  Olympus. Its Egyptian God bears out the idea of Justice for she is Maat, the Goddess of Truth, who in the Book of the Dead appears in the judgment scene of the weighing of the heart of the deceased. Nemesis, too, is a correspon- dence, as she measured out to mortals happiness and misery ; and here, too, is the Hindu concept of Yama, the personification of death and Hell where men had to expiate their evil deeds.
  --
  The correspondences again appear to follow the astrolo- gical interpretation, which is n\ Scorpio, the reptile fabled to sting itself to death. $ Mars rules Scorpio, and its Greek
  God is, therefore, Mars ; its Roman God Ares. Apep, the
  Egyptian God, an immense serpent, is attributed here.

1.04_-_The_Self, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  cause of its lack of subjective feeling- tone- represented in a
  dream only by a subsidiary attribute, as when a God is repre-
  sented by his theriomorphic attribute, etc. Conversely, the idea

1.05_-_Bhakti_Yoga, #Amrita Gita, #Swami Sivananda Saraswati, #Hinduism
  
  1. God is love. Love is God. God is nectar. God is Prema.
  
  --
  
  28. A realised Bhakta is free from lust, egoism, mine-ness, hatred, jealousy, greed. He is full of humility, compassion and kindness. He sees God in all beings, in all objects. He has equal vision and a balanced mind.
  

1.05_-_CHARITY, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  He that loveth not knoweth not God, for God is love.
  
  --
  
  The astrolabe of the mysteries of God is love.
  
  --
  
  Here on earth the love of God is better than the knowledge of God, while it is better to know inferior things than to love them. By knowing them we raise them, in a way, to our intelligence, whereas by loving them, we stoop towards them and may become subservient to them, as the miser to his gold.
  
  --
  
  By a kind of philological accident (which is probably no accident at all, but one of the more subtle expressions of mans deep-seated will to ignorance and spiritual darkness), the word charity has come, in modern English, to be synonymous with almsgiving, and is almost never used in its original sense, as signifying the highest and most divine form of love. Owing to this impoverishment of our, at the best of times, very inadequate vocabulary of psychological and spiritual terms, the word love has had to assume an added burden. God is love, we repeat glibly, and that we must love our neighbours as ourselves; but love, unfortunately, stands for everything from what happens when, on the screen, two close-ups rapturously collide to what happens when a John Woolman or a Peter Claver feels a concern about Negro slaves, because they are temples of the Holy Spiritfrom what happens when crowds shout and sing and wave flags in the Sport-Palast or the Red Square to what happens when a solitary contemplative becomes absorbed in the prayer of simple regard. Ambiguity in vocabulary leads to confusion of thought; and, in this matter of love, confusion of thought admirably serves the purpose of an unregenerate and divided human nature that is determined to make the best of both worldsto say that it is serving God, while in fact it is serving Mammon, Mars or Priapus.
  
  Systematically or in brief aphorism and parable, the masters of the spiritual life have described the nature of true charity and have distinguished it from the other, lower forms of love. Let us consider its principal characteristics in order. First, charity is disinterested, seeking no reward, nor allowing itself to be diminished by any return of evil for its good. God is to be loved for Himself, not for his gifts, and persons and things are to be loved for Gods sake, because they are temples of the Holy Ghost. Moreover, since charity is disinterested, it must of necessity be universal.
  
  --
  
  Let everyone understand that real love of God does not consist in tear-shedding, nor in that sweetness and tenderness for which usually we long, just because they console us, but in serving God in justice, fortitude of soul and humility.
  
  --
  
  In other words, the highest form of the love of God is an immediate spiritual intuition, by which knower, known and knowledge are made one. The means to, and earlier stages of, this supreme love-knowledge of Spirit by spirit are described by Shankara in the preceding verses of his philosophical poem, and consist in acts of a will directed towards the denial of selfness in thought, feeling and action, towards desirelessness and non-attachment or (to use the corresponding Christian term) holy indifference, towards a cheerful acceptance of affliction, without self-pity and without thought of returning evil for evil, and finally towards unsleeping and one-pointed mindfulness of the Godhead who is at once transcendent and, because transcendent, immanent in every soul.
  

1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  was still a pure image of God, of which Tertullian (d. 222) says:
  "And this therefore is to be considered as the image of God in
  man, that the human spirit has the same motions and senses as
  --
  
  4 'H paaiXela rov 6eov ivrbs vfiwv toriv (The kingdom of God is within you [or
  "among you"]). "The kingdom of God cometh not with observation: neither shall
  --
  (Migne, P.G., vol. 12, col. 107): "Imago autem Dei invisibilis salvator" (But the
  image of the invisible God is the saviour).
  
  --
  poralis, et incorruptus atque immortalis" (But that which is made after the image
  and similitude of God is our inner man, invisible, incorporeal, incorrupt, and
  immortal).
  --
  aliquid ubi imago Dei est, mentem scilicet atque rationem" (Therefore we under-
  stand that we have something in which the image of God is, namely mind and
  reason). Sermo XC, 10 (Migne, P.L., vol. 38, col. 566): "Veritas quaeritur in Dei
  --
  ing-kindness, and gird thyself with thy graciousness, and may
  thy goodness and gentleness come before thee." 68 God is prop-
  erly exhorted to remember his good qualities. There is even a
  --
  grossest and heaviest because of its impurity. In these three
  emanations or manifestations of the non-existent God it is not
  hard to see the trichotomy of spirit, soul, and body (irvev/m#cov,

1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  7. Men deeply meditating aspire to thee that the godheads may
  come to them; mortals they aspire to the God in the sacrifice.
  
  --
  t^ 46
  46. Let the mortal who would serve with his works the God in
  the advent, aspire bringing his offering to the Fire in the Rite

1.05_-_MORALITY_AS_THE_ENEMY_OF_NATURE, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  superior desires of life and takes God as the enemy of life. The saint
  in whom God is well pleased, is the ideal eunuch. Life terminates where
  the "Kingdom of God" begins.

1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  God is love, and only he who has known God as love can be a teacher of godliness and God to man.
  

1.05_-_Solitude, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  I have a great deal of company in my house; especially in the morning, when nobody calls. Let me suggest a few comparisons, that some one may convey an idea of my situation. I am no more lonely than the loon in the pond that laughs so loud, or than Walden Pond itself. What company has that lonely lake, I pray? And yet it has not the blue devils, but the blue angels in it, in the azure tint of its waters. The sun is alone, except in thick weather, when there sometimes appear to be two, but one is a mock sun. God is alone,but the devil, he is far from being alone; he sees a great deal of company; he is legion. I am no more lonely than a single mullein or dandelion in a pasture, or a bean leaf, or sorrel, or a horse-fly, or a bumble-bee. I am no more lonely than the Mill Brook, or a weathercock, or the north star, or the south wind, or an April shower, or a January thaw, or the first spider in a new house.
  

1.05_-_The_Destiny_of_the_Individual, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  7:We will guard ourselves also against the excessive importance that the mind attaches to particular points of view at which it arrives in its more powerful expansions and transitions. The perception of the spiritualised mind that the universe is an unreal dream can have no more absolute a value to us than the perception of the materialised mind that God and the Beyond are an illusory idea. In the one case the mind, habituated only to the evidence of the senses and associating reality with corporeal fact, is either unaccustomed to use other means of knowledge or unable to extend the notion of reality to a supraphysical experience. In the other case the same mind, passing beyond to the overwhelming experience of an incorporeal reality, simply transfers the same inability and the same consequent sense of dream or hallucination to the experience of the senses. But we perceive also the truth that these two conceptions disfigure. It is true that for this world of form in which we are set for our selfrealisation, nothing is entirely valid until it has possessed itself of our physical consciousness and manifested on the lowest levels in harmony with its manifestation on the highest summits. It is equally true that form and matter asserting themselves as a selfexistent reality are an illusion of Ignorance. Form and matter can be valid only as shape and substance of manifestation for the incorporeal and immaterial. They are in their nature an act of divine consciousness, in their aim the representation of a status of the Spirit.
  8:In other words, if Brahman has entered into form and represented Its being in material substance, it can only be to enjoy self-manifestation in the figures of relative and phenomenal consciousness. Brahman is in this world to represent Itself in the values of Life. Life exists in Brahman in order to discover Brahman in itself. Therefore man's importance in the world is that he gives to it that development of consciousness in which its transfiguration by a perfect self-discovery becomes possible. To fulfil God in life is man's manhood. He starts from the animal vitality and its activities, but a divine existence is his objective.
  9:But as in Thought, so in Life, the true rule of self-realisation is a progressive comprehension. Brahman expresses Itself in many successive forms of consciousness, successive in their relation even if coexistent in being or coeval in Time, and Life in its self-unfolding must also rise to ever-new provinces of its own being. But if in passing from one domain to another we renounce what has already been given us from eagerness for our new attainment, if in reaching the mental life we cast away or belittle the physical life which is our basis, or if we reject the mental and physical in our attraction to the spiritual, we do not fulfil God integrally, nor satisfy the conditions of His selfmanifestation. We do not become perfect, but only shift the field of our imperfection or at most attain a limited altitude. However high we may climb, even though it be to the Non-Being itself, we climb ill if we forget our base. Not to abandon the lower to itself, but to transfigure it in the light of the higher to which we have attained, is true divinity of nature. Brahman is integral and unifies many states of consciousness at a time; we also, manifesting the nature of Brahman, should become integral and all-embracing.
  10:Besides the recoil from the physical life, there is another exaggeration of the ascetic impulse which this ideal of an integral manifestation corrects. The nodus of Life is the relation between three general forms of consciousness, the individual, the universal and the transcendent or supracosmic. In the ordinary distribution of life's activities the individual regards himself as a separate being included in the universe and both as dependent upon that which transcends alike the universe and the individual. It is to this Transcendence that we give currently the name of God, who thus becomes to our conceptions not so much supracosmic as extra-cosmic. The belittling and degradation of both the individual and the universe is a natural consequence of this division: the cessation of both cosmos and individual by the attainment of the Transcendence would be logically its supreme conclusion.

1.05_-_The_Universe_The_0_=_2_Equation, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
    Therefore you can have an infinite number of gods, individual and equal though diverse, each one supreme and utterly indestructible. This is also the only explanation of how a "Perfect Being" could create a world in which war, evil, etc., exist. God is only an appearance, because (like "good") it cannot affect the substance itself, but only multiply its combinations. This is something the same as mystic monotheism; but all parts of himself, so that their interplay is false. If we presuppose many elements, their interplay is natural.
  

1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth, #The Secret Of The Veda, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  "Let him come, a god with the gods." The emphasis given to the idea of divinity by this repetition, devo devebhir, becomes intelligible when we recall the standing description of Agni as the God in human beings, the immortal in mortals, the divine guest. We may give the full psychological sense by translating,
  "Let him come, a divine power with the divine powers." For in the external sense of the Veda the Gods are universal powers of physical Nature personified; in any inner sense they must be universal powers of Nature in her subjective activities, Will,

1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  All the different steps in Yoga are intended to bring us scientifically to the superconscious state, or Samadhi. Furthermore, this is a most vital point to understand, that inspiration is as much in every man's nature as it was in that of the ancient prophets. These prophets were not unique; they were men as you or I. They were great Yogis. They had gained this superconsciousness, and you and I can get the same. They were not peculiar people. The very fact that one man ever reached that state, proves that it is possible for every man to do so. Not only is it possible, but every man must, eventually, get to that state, and that is religion. Experience is the only teacher we have. We may talk and reason all our lives, but we shall not understand a word of truth, until we experience it ourselves. You cannot hope to make a man a surgeon by simply giving him a few books. You cannot satisfy my curiosity to see a country by showing me a map; I must have actual experience. Maps can only create curiosity in us to get more perfect knowledge. Beyond that, they have no value whatever. Clinging to books only degenerates the human mind. Was there ever a more horrible blasphemy than the statement that all the knowledge of God is confined to this or that book? How dare men call God infinite, and yet try to compress Him within the covers of a little book! Millions of people have been killed because they did not believe what the books said, because they would not see all the knowledge of God within the covers of a book. Of course this killing and murdering has gone by, but the world is still tremendously bound up in a belief in books.
  
  --
  
  This meditative state is the highest state of existence. So long as there is desire, no real happiness can come. It is only the contemplative, witness-like study of objects that brings to us real enjoyment and happiness. The animal has its happiness in the senses, the man in his intellect, and the God in spiritual contemplation. It is only to the soul that has attained to this contemplative state that the world really becomes beautiful. To him who desires nothing, and does not mix himself up with them, the manifold changes of nature are one panorama of beauty and sublimity.
  

1.06_-_Incarnate_Teachers_and_Incarnation, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  No man can really see God except through these human manifestations. If we try to see God otherwise, we make for ourselves a hideous caricature of Him and believe the caricature to be no worse than the original. There is a story of an ignorant man who was asked to make an image of the God Shiva, and who, after days of hard struggle, manufactured only the image of a monkey. So whenever we try to think of God as He is in His absolute perfection, we invariably meet with the most miserable failure, because as long as we are men, we cannot conceive Him as anything higher than man. The time will come when we shall transcend our human nature and know Him as He is; but as long as we are men, we must worship Him in man and as man. Talk as you may, try as you may, you cannot think of God except as a man. You may deliver great intellectual discourses on God and on all things under the sun, become great rationalists and prove to your satisfaction that all these accounts of the Avataras of God as man are nonsense. But let us come for a moment to practical common sense. What is there behind this kind of remarkable intellect? Zero, nothing, simply so much froth. When next you hear a man delivering a great intellectual lecture against this worship of the Avataras of God, get hold of him and ask what his idea of God is, what he understands by "omnipotence", "omnipresence", and all similar terms, beyond the spelling of the words. He really means nothing by them; he cannot formulate as their meaning any idea unaffected by his own human nature; he is no better off in this matter than the man in the street who has not read a single book. That man in the street, however, is quiet and does not disturb the peace of the world, while this big talker creates disturbance and misery among mankind.
  
  --
  
  Here, too, as in all other cases, the two extremes meet. The extreme of ignorance and the other extreme of knowledge neither of these go through acts of worship. The human brute does not worship because of his ignorance, and the Jivanmuktas (free souls) do not worship because they have realised God in themselves. Being between these two poles of existence, if any one tells you that he is not going to worship God as man, take kindly care of that man; he is, not to use any harsher term, an irresponsible talker; his religion is for unsound and empty brains.
  

1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  As to their nature, considered in themselves, they have nothing of goodness or holiness, nor are any real part of our sanctification, they are not the true food or nourishment of the Divine Life in our souls, they have no quickening, sanctifying power in them; their only worth consists in this, that they remove the impediments of holiness, break down that which stands between God and us, and make way for the quickening, sanctifying spirit of God to operate on our souls, which operation of God is the one only thing that can raise the Divine Life in the soul, or help it to the smallest degree of real holiness or spiritual life. Hence we may learn the reason why many people not only lose the benefit, but are even the worse for all their mortifications. It is because they mistake the whole nature and worth of them. They practice them for their own sakes, as things good in themselves; they think them to be real parts of holiness, and so rest in them and look no further, but grow full of self-esteem and self-admiration for their own progress in them. This makes them self-sufficient, morose, severe judges of all those that fall short of their mortifications. And thus their self-denials do only that for them which indulgences do for other people: they withstand and hinder the operation of God upon their souls, and instead of being really self-denials, they strengthen and keep up the kingdom of self.
  
  --
  
  The fitting disposition for union with God is not that the soul should understand, feel, taste or imagine anything on the subject of the nature of God, or any other thing whatever, but should remain in that pureness and love which is perfect resignation and complete detachment from all things for God alone.
  
  --
  
  It is by losing the egocentric life that we save the hitherto latent and undiscovered life which, in the spiritual part of our being, we share with the divine Ground. This new-found life is more abundant than the other, and of a different and higher kind. Its possession is liberation into the eternal, and liberation is beatitude. Necessarily so; for the Brahman, who is one with the Atman, is not only Being and Knowledge, but also Bliss, and, after Love and Peace, the final fruit of the Spirit is Joy. Mortification is painful, but that pain is one of the pre-conditions of blessedness. This fact of spiritual experience is sometimes obscured by the language in which it is described. Thus, when Christ says that the Kingdom of Heaven cannot be entered except by those who are as little children, we are apt to forget (so touching are the images evoked by the simple phrase) that a man cannot become childlike unless he chooses to undertake the most strenuous and searching course of self-denial. In practice the command to become as little children is identical with the command to lose ones life. As Traherne makes clear in the beautiful passage quoted in the section on God in the World, one cannot know created Nature in all its essentially sacred beauty, unless one first unlearns the dirty devices of adult humanity. Seen through the dung-coloured spectacles of self-interest, the universe looks singularly like a dung-heap; and as, through long wearing, the spectacles have grown on to the eyeballs, the process of cleansing the doors of perception is often, at any rate in the earlier stages of the spiritual life, painfully like a surgical operation. Later on, it is true, even self naughting may be suffused with the joy of the Spirit. On this point the following passage from the fourteenth-century Scale of Perfection is illuminating.
  
  --
  
  In Trahernes vocabulary felicity means beatitude, which is identical in practice with liberation, which, in its turn, is the unitive knowledge of God in the heights within and in the fulness without as well as within.
  
  --
  
  Happy is the man who, by continually effacing all images and through introversion and the lifting up of his mind to God, at last forgets and leaves behind all such hindrances. For by such means only, he operates inwardly, with his naked, pure, simple intellect and affections, about the most pure and simple object, God. Therefore see that thy whole exercise about God within thee may depend wholly and only on that naked intellect, affection and will. For indeed, this exercise cannot be discharged by any bodily organ, or by the external senses, but only by that which constitutes the essence of manunderstanding and love. If, therefore, thou desirest a safe stair and short path to arrive at the end of true bliss, then, with an intent mind, earnestly desire and aspire after continual cleanness of heart and purity of mind. Add to this a constant calm and tranquillity of the senses, and a recollecting of the affections of the heart, continually fixing them above. Work to simplify the heart, that being immovable and at peace from any invading vain phantasms, thou mayest always stand fast in the Lord within thee, to that degree as if thy soul had already entered the always present now of eternitythat is, the state of the deity. To mount to God is to enter into oneself. For he who so mounts and enters and goes above and beyond himself, he truly mounts up to God. The mind must then raise itself above itself and say, He who above all I need is above all I know. And so carried into the darkness of the mind, gathering itself into that all-sufficient good, it learns to stay at home and with its whole affection it cleaves and becomes habitually fixed in the supreme good within. Thus continue, until thou becomest immutable and dost arrive at that true life which is God Himself, perpetually, without any vicissitude of space or time, reposing in that inward quiet and secret mansion of the deity.
  
  --
  
  The third step is that, ceasing from a restless self-contemplation, the soul begins to dwell upon God instead, and by degrees forgets itself in Him. It becomes full of Him and ceases to feed upon self. Such a soul is not blinded to its own faults or indifferent to its own errors; it is more conscious of them than ever, and increased light shows them in plainer form, but this self-knowledge comes from God, and therefore it is not restless or uneasy.
  
  --
  
  Mortification may be regarded, in this context, as the process of study, by which we learn at last to have unstudied reactions to eventsreactions in harmony with Tao, Suchness, the Will of God. Those who have made themselves docile to the divine Nature of Things, those who respond to circumstances, not with craving and aversion, but with the love that permits them to do spontaneously what they like; those who can truthfully say, Not I, but God in mesuch men and women are compared by the exponents of the Perennial Philosophy to children, to fools and simpletons, even sometimes, as in the following passage, to drunkards.
  

1.06_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_gluttony., #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  
  8. These persons have many other imperfections which arise hence, of which in time the Lord heals them by means of temptations, aridities and other trials, all of which are part of the dark night. All these I will not treat further here, lest I become too lengthy; I will only say that spiritual temperance and sobriety lead to another and a very different temper, which is that of mortification, fear and submission in all things. It thus becomes clear that the perfection and worth of things consist not in the multitude and the pleasantness of one's actions, but in being able to deny oneself in them; this such persons must endeavour to compass, in so far as they may, until God is pleased to purify them indeed, by bringing them52 into the dark night, to arrive at which I am hastening on with my account of these imperfections.
  

1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  Everything valuable is instinct--and consequently easy, necessary,
  free. Exertion is an objection, the God is characteristically different
  from the hero (in my language: light feet are the first attribute of

1.06_-_The_Greatness_of_the_Individual, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  N ALL movements, in every great mass of human action it is the Spirit of the Time, that which Europe calls the
  Zeitgeist and India Kala, who expresses himself. The very names are deeply significant. Kali, the Mother of all and destroyer of all, is the Shakti that works in secret in the heart of humanity manifesting herself in the perpetual surge of men, institutions and movements, Mahakala the Spirit within whose energy goes abroad in her and moulds the progress of the world and the destiny of the nations. His is the impetus which fulfils itself in Time, and once there is movement, impetus from the Spirit within, Time and the Mother take charge of it, prepare, ripen and fulfil. When the Zeitgeist, God in
  Time, moves in a settled direction, then all the forces of the world are called in to swell the established current towards the purpose decreed. That which consciously helps, swells it, but that which hinders swells it still more, and like a wave on the windswept Ocean, now rising, now falling, now high on the crest of victory and increase, now down in the troughs of discouragement and defeat, the impulse from the hidden Source sweeps onward to its preordained fulfilment. Man may help or man may resist, but the Zeitgeist works, shapes, overbears, insists.

1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  of an ass. 31 Tertullian is referring to these rumours when he says:
  "You are under the delusion that our God is an ass's head," and
  that "we do homage only to an ass." 32 As we have indicated, the

1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  * [AC14] This doctrine of the Three Schools is of extreme interest. Roughly, it may be said that the White is the Pure Mystic, whose attitude to God is one of reverence. The Yellow School conceals the Mysteries indeed, but examines them as it goes along. The Black School is that of pure Scepticism.[9]
  

1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government, #Words Of The Mother III, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  *
  People say, God is the friend of the poor, but it seems wrong and false. God is the friend of the rich. We do not know what place we have.
  

1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha, #The Blue Cliff Records, #Yuanwu Keqin, #Zen
  Yen said, "Good words, but I'm afraid you misunderstood. Can
  you say something more for me?" Tse said, "The Fire God is in
  the province of fire; he is seeking fire with fire. Likewise, I am

1.07_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_envy_and_sloth., #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
   they think that that wherein they find not their own will and pleasure is not the will of God; and that, on the other hand, when they themselves find satisfaction,
  God is satisfied. Thus they measure God by themselves and not themselves by God, acting quite contrarily to that which He Himself taught in the Gospel, saying: That he who should lose his will for His sake, the same should gain it; and he who should desire to gain it, the same should lose it.55
  4. These persons likewise find it irksome when they are commanded to do that wherein they take no pleasure. Because they aim at spiritual sweetness and consolation, they are too weak to have the fortitude and bear the trials of perfection.56 They resemble those who are softly nurtured and who run fretfully away from everything that is hard, and take offense at the Cross, wherein consist the delights of the spirit. The more spiritual a thing is, the more irksome they find it, for, as they seek to go about spiritual matters with complete freedom and according to the inclination of their will, it causes them great sorrow and repugnance to enter upon the narrow way, which, says Christ, is the way of life.57

1.07_-_Raja-Yoga_in_Brief, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  The following are helps to success in Yoga and are called Niyama or regular habits and observances; Tapas, austerity; Svdhyya, study; Santosha, contentment; Shaucha, purity; Ishvara-pranidhna, worshipping God. Fasting, or in other ways controlling the body, is called physical Tapas. Repeating the Vedas and other Mantras, by which the Sattva material in the body is purified, is called study, Svadhyaya. There are three sorts of repetitions of these Mantras. One is called the verbal, another semi-verbal, and the third mental. The verbal or audible is the lowest, and the inaudible is the highest of all. The repetition which is loud is the verbal; the next one is where only the lips move, but no sound is heard. The inaudible repetition of the Mantra, accompanied with the thinking of its meaning, is called the "mental repetition," and is the highest. The sages have said that there are two sorts of purification, external and internal. The purification of the body by water, earth, or other materials is the external purification, as bathing etc. Purification of the mind by truth, and by all the other virtues, is what is called internal purification. Both are necessary. It is not sufficient that a man should be internally pure and externally dirty. When both are not attainable the internal purity is the better, but no one will be a Yogi until he has both. Worship of God is by praise, by thought, by devotion.
  

1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  15:In primitive societies the individual life is submitted to rigid and immobile communal custom and rule; this is the ancient and would-be eternal law of the human pack that tries always to masquerade as the everlasting decree of the Imperishable, es.a dharmah. sanatanah.. And the ideal is not dead in the human mind; the most recent trend of human progress is to establish an enlarged and sumptuous edition of this ancient turn of collective living towards the enslavement of the human spirit. There is here a serious danger to the integral development of a greater truth upon earth and a greater life. For the desires and free seekings of the individual, however egoistic, however false or perverted they may be in their immediate form, contain in their obscure shell the seed of a development necessary to the whole; his searchings and stumblings have behind them a force that has to be kept and transmuted into the image of the divine ideal. That force needs to be enlightened and trained but must not be suppressed or harnessed exclusively to society's heavy cartwheels. Individualism is as necessary to the final perfection as the power behind the group-spirit; the stifling of the individual may well be the stifling of the God in man. And in the present balance of humanity there is seldom any real danger of exaggerated individualism breaking up the social integer. There is continually a danger that the exaggerated pressure of the social mass by its heavy unenlightened mechanical weight may suppress or unduly discourage the free development of the individual spirit. For man in the individual can be more easily enlightened, conscious, open to clear influences; man in the mass is still obscure, halfconscious, ruled by universal forces that escape its mastery and its knowledge.
  

1.07_-_The_Ego_and_the_Dualities, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  0:The soul seated on the same tree of Nature is absorbed and deluded and has sorrow because it is not the Lord, but when it sees and is in union with that other self and greatness of it which is the Lord, then sorrow passes away from it. Swetaswatara Upanishad.1
  1:IF ALL is in truth Sachchidananda, death, suffering, evil, limitation can only be the creations, positive in practical effect, negative in essence, of a distorting consciousness which has fallen from the total and unifying knowledge of itself into some error of division and partial experience. This is the fall of man typified in the poetic parable of the Hebrew Genesis. That fall is his deviation from the full and pure acceptance of God and himself, or rather of God in himself, into a dividing consciousness which brings with it all the train of the dualities, life and death, good and evil, joy and pain, completeness and want, the fruit of a divided being. This is the fruit which Adam and Eve, Purusha and Prakriti, the soul tempted by Nature, have eaten. The redemption comes by the recovery of the universal in the individual and of the spiritual term in the physical consciousness. Then alone the soul in Nature can be allowed to partake of the fruit of the tree of life and be as the Divine and live for ever. For then only can the purpose of its descent into material consciousness be accomplished, when the knowledge of good and evil, joy and suffering, life and death has been accomplished through the recovery by the human soul of a higher knowledge which reconciles and identifies these opposites in the universal and transforms their divisions into the image of the divine Unity.
  2:To Sachchidananda extended in all things in widest commonalty and impartial universality, death, suffering, evil and limitation can only be at the most reverse terms, shadow-forms of their luminous opposites. As these things are felt by us, they are notes of a discord. They formulate separation where there should be a unity, miscomprehension where there should be an understanding, an attempt to arrive at independent harmonies where there should be a self-adaptation to the orchestral whole. All totality, even if it be only in one scheme of the universal vibrations, even if it be only a totality of the physical consciousness without possession of all that is in movement beyond and behind, must be to that extent a reversion to harmony and a reconciliation of jarring opposites. On the other hand, to Sachchidananda transcendent of the forms of the universe the dual terms themselves, even so understood, can no longer be justly applicable. Transcendence transfigures; it does not reconcile, but rather transmutes opposites into something surpassing them that effaces their oppositions.
  --
  15:Into later Vedanta there crept and arrived at fixity the idea that the limited ego is not only the cause of the dualities, but the essential condition for the existence of the universe. By getting rid of the ignorance of the ego and its resultant limitations we do indeed eliminate the dualities, but we eliminate along with them our existence in the cosmic movement. Thus we return to the essentially evil and illusory nature of human existence and the vanity of all effort after perfection in the life of the world. A relative good linked always to its opposite is all that here we can seek. But if we adhere to the larger and profounder idea that the ego is only an intermediate representation of something beyond itself, we escape from this consequence and are able to apply Vedanta to fulfilment of life and not only to the escape from life. The essential cause and condition of universal existence is the Lord, Ishwara or Purusha, manifesting and occupying individual and universal forms. The limited ego is only an intermediate phenomenon of consciousness necessary for a certain line of development. Following this line the individual can arrive at that which is beyond himself, that which he represents, and can yet continue to represent it, no longer as an obscured and limited ego, but as a centre of the Divine and of the universal consciousness embracing, utilising and transforming into harmony with the Divine all individual determinations.
  16:We have then the manifestation of the divine Conscious Being in the totality of physical Nature as the foundation of human existence in the material universe. We have the emergence of that Conscious Being in an involved and inevitably evolving Life, Mind and Supermind as the condition of our activities; for it is this evolution which has enabled man to appear in Matter and it is this evolution which will enable him progressively to manifest God in the body, - the universal Incarnation. We have in egoistic formation the intermediate and decisive factor which allows the One to emerge as the conscious Many out of that indeterminate totality general, obscure and formless which we call the subconscient, - hr.dya samudra, the ocean heart in things of the Rig Veda. We have the dualities of life and death, joy and sorrow, pleasure and pain, truth and error, good and evil as the first formations of egoistic consciousness, the natural and inevitable outcome of its attempt to realise unity in an artificial construction of itself exclusive of the total truth, good, life and delight of being in the universe. We have the dissolution of this egoistic construction by the self-opening of the individual to the universe and to God as the means of that supreme fulfilment to which egoistic life is only a prelude even as animal life was only a prelude to the human. We have the realisation of the All in the individual by the transformation of the limited ego into a conscious centre of the divine unity and freedom as the term at which the fulfilment arrives. And we have the outflowing of the infinite and absolute Existence, Truth, Good and Delight of being on the Many in the world as the divine result towards which the cycles of our evolution move. This is the supreme birth which maternal Nature holds in herself; of this she strives to be delivered.
  

1.07_-_TRUTH, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  IN RELIGIOUS literature the word truth is used indiscriminately in at least three distinct and very different senses. Thus, it is sometimes treated as a synonym for fact, as when it is affirmed that God is Truthmeaning that He is the primordial Reality. But this is clearly not the meaning of the word in such a phrase as worshipping God in spirit and in truth. Here, it is obvious, truth signifies direct apprehension of spiritual Fact, as opposed to second-hand knowledge about Reality, formulated in sentences and accepted on authority or because an argument from previously granted postulates was logically convincing. And finally there is the more ordinary meaning of the word, as in such a sentence as, This statement is the truth, where we mean to assert that the verbal symbols of which the statement is composed correspond to the facts to which it refers. When Eckhart writes that whatever thou sayest of God is untrue, he is not affirming that all theological statements are false. Insofar as there can be any correspondence between human symbols and divine Fact, some theological statements are as true as it is possible for us to make them. Himself a theologian, Eckhart would certainly have admitted this. But besides being a theologian, Eckhart was a mystic. And being a mystic, he understood very vividly what the modern semanticist is so busily (and, also, so unsuccessfully) trying to drum into contemporary mindsnamely, that words are not the same as things and that a knowledge of words about facts is in no sense equivalent to a direct and immediate apprehension of the facts themselves. What Eckhart actually asserts is this: whatever one may say about God can never in any circumstances be the truth in the first two meanings of that much abused and ambiguous word. By implication St. Thomas Aquinas was saying exactly the same thing when, after his experience of infused contemplation, he refused to go on with his theological work, declaring that everything he had written up to that time was as mere straw compared with the immediate knowledge, which had been vouchsafed to him. Two hundred years earlier, in Bagdad, the great Mohammedan theologian, Al Ghazzali, had similarly turned from the consideration of truths about God to the contemplation and direct apprehension of Truth-the-Fact, from the purely intellectual discipline of the philosophers to the moral and spiritual discipline of the Sufis.
  
  --
  
  To find or know God in reality by any outward proofs, or by anything but by God Himself made manifest and self-evident in you, will never be your case either here or hereafter. For neither God, nor heaven, nor hell, nor the devil, nor the flesh, can be any otherwise knowable in you or by you but by their own existence and manifestation in you. And all pretended knowledge of any of these things, beyond and without this self-evident sensibility of their birth within you, is only such knowledge of them as the blind man hath of the light that hath never entered into him.
  
  --
  
  A person who gives assent to untrue dogma, or who pays all his attention and allegiance to one true dogma in a comprehensive system, while neglecting the others (as many Christians concentrate exclusively on the humanity of the Second Person of the Trinity and ignore the Father and the Holy Ghost), runs the risk of limiting in advance his direct apprehension of Reality. In religion as in natural science, experience is determined only by experience. It is fatal to prejudge it, to compel it to fit the mould imposed by a theory which either does not correspond to the facts at all, or corresponds to only some of the facts. Do not strive to seek after the true, writes a Zen master, only cease to cherish opinions. There is only one way to cure the results of belief in a false or incomplete theology and it is the same as the only known way of passing from belief in even the truest theology to knowledge or primordial Factselflessness, docility, openness to the datum of Eternity. Opinions are things which we make and can therefore understand, formulate and argue about. But to rest in the consideration of objects perceptible to the sense or comprehended by the understanding is to be content, in the words of St. John of the Cross, with what is less than God. Unitive knowledge of God is possible only to those who have ceased to cherish opinionseven opinions that are as true as it is possible for verbalized abstractions to be.
  
  --
  
  Beauty is truth, truth, beauty. But unfortunately Keats failed to specify in which of its principal meanings he was using the word truth. Some critics have assumed that he was using it in the third of the senses listed at the opening of this section, and have therefore dismissed the aphorism as nonsensical. Zn + H2SO4 = ZnSO4 + H2. This is a truth in the third sense of the wordand, manifestly, this truth is not identical with beauty. But no less manifestly Keats was not talking about this kind of truth. He was using the word primarily in its first sense, as a synonym for fact, and secondarily with the significance attached to it in the Johannine phrase, to worship God in truth. His sentence, therefore, carries two meanings. Beauty is the Primordial Fact, and the Primordial Fact is Beauty, the principle of all particular beauties; and Beauty is an immediate experience, and this immediate experience is identical with Beauty-as-Principle, Beauty-as-Primordial-Fact. The first of these statements is fully in accord with the doctrines of the Perennial Philosophy. Among the trinities in which the ineffable One makes itself manifest is the trinity of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful. We perceive beauty in the harmonious intervals between the parts of a whole. In this context the divine Ground might be paradoxically denned as Pure Interval, independent of what is separated and harmonized within the totality.
  
  --
  
  The experience of beauty is pure, self-manifested, compounded equally of joy and consciousness, free from admixture of any other perception, the very twin brother of mystical experience, and the very life of it is super-sensuous wonder It is enjoyed by those who are competent thereto, in identity, just as the form of God is itself the joy with which it is recognized.
  
  --
  
  Reason is the shadow cast by God; God is the sun.
  

1.08_-_Introduction_to_Patanjalis_Yoga_Aphorisms, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  Now the question arises: Is going back to God the higher state, or not? The philosophers of the Yoga school emphatically answer that it is. They say that man's present state is a degeneration. There is not one religion on the face of the earth which says that man is an improvement. The idea is that his beginning is perfect and pure, that he degenerates until he cannot degenerate further, and that there must come a time when he shoots upward again to complete the circle. The circle must be described. However low he may go, he must ultimately take the upward bend and go back to the original source, which is God. Man comes from God in the beginning, in the middle he becomes man, and in the end he goes back to God. This is the method of putting it in the dualistic form. The monistic form is that man is God, and goes back to Him again. If our present state is the higher one, then why is there so much horror and misery, and why is there an end to it? If this is the higher state, why does it end? That which corrupts and degenerates cannot be the highest state. Why should it be so diabolical, so unsatisfying? It is only excusable, inasmuch as through it we are taking a higher groove; we have to pass through it in order to become regenerate again. Put a seed into the ground and it disintegrates, dissolves after a time, and out of that dissolution comes the splendid tree. Every soul must disintegrate to become God. So it follows that the sooner we get out of this state we call "man" the better for us. Is it by committing suicide that we get out of this state? Not at all. That will be making it worse. Torturing ourselves, or condemning the world, is not the way to get out. We have to pass through the Slough of Despond, and the sooner we are through, the better. It must always be remembered that man-state is not the highest state.
  

1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine, #Sex Ecology Spirituality, #Ken Wilber, #Philosophy
  Nature is a symbol of spirit. . . . Before the revelations of the Soul, time, space and nature shrink away. . . . In the hour of vision there is nothing that can be called gratitude, nor properly joy. The Soul raised over passion beholds identity and eternal causation, perceives the self-existence of Truth and Right, and calms itself with knowing that all things go well. Vast spaces of nature, the Atlantic Ocean, the South Sea; long intervals of time, years, centuries, are of no account. . . .
  Let us stun and astonish the intruding rabble of men and books and institutions by a simple declaration of the divine fact. Bid the intruders take the shoes from off their feet, for God is here within. Let our simplicity judge them, and our docility to our own law demonstrate the poverty of Nature beside our native riches.13
  It is, in fact, according to Emerson, an allegiance to the senses and nature, in itself, that blinds us to the interior intuition of the Over-Soul and the God within and beyond:
  --
  The first three stages deal with the ordinary mind or ego, "unregenerate" in the gross, manifest world of thought and sense. In the first Mansion, that of Humility, the ego is still in love with the creatures and comforts outside the Castle, and must begin a long and searching discipline in order to turn within. In the second Mansion (the Practice of Prayer), intellectual study, edification, and good company strengthen the desire and capacity to interiorize and not merely scatter and disperse the self in exterior distractions. In the Mansion of Exemplary Life, the third stage, discipline and ethics are firmly set as a foundation of all that is to follow (very similar to the Buddhist notion that sila, or moral discipline, is the foundation of dhyana, or meditation, and prajna, or spiritual insight). These are all natural (or personal) developments.
  In the fourth mansion, a supernatural (or transpersonal) grace enters the scene with the Prayer of Recollection and the Prayer of Quiet (which Teresa differentiates by their bodily effects). In both, there is a calming and slowing of gross-oriented faculties (memory, thoughts, senses) and a consequent opening to deeper, more interior spaces with correlative "graces," which Teresa calls, at this stage, "spiritual consolations" (because they are consoling to the self, not yet transcending of the self). On the other hand, it is also as if the soul itself is actually beginning to emerge at this stage: "The senses and all external things seem gradually to lose their hold, while the soul, on the other hand, regains its lost control." And this carries a glimmer of the truth to come, "namely, that God is within us."26
  In the fifth mansion, via the Prayer of Union, a Spiritual Betrothal occurs, where the soul first directly emerges and intuits Spirit residing in the deepest interior of its own heart (the psychic). I say "emerge," because even if the soul was previously present in the depths, it now comes to the fore.
  And this occurs in one particularly significant transformation, according to Teresa. The individual experiences, for the first time, a complete cessation27 of all faculties, and in that pure absorption, the self tastes its primordial union with God (or what Teresa also calls Uncreate Spirit). "For as long as such a soul is in this state, it can neither see nor hear nor understand: the period is always short [at this early stage]. God implants Himself in the interior of that soul in such a way that, when it returns to itself, it cannot possibly doubt that God has been in it and it has been in God."28
  And here Teresa uses perhaps her most famous metaphor. Prior to this transformative absorption, the unregenerate self (or ego) is, says Teresa, like a silkworm. But one taste of union (literally, just a single experience of this, she says, however brief), and the self is changed forever. One taste of absorption in Uncreate Spirit, and the worm emerges a butterfly. As we might put it, the ego dies and the soul emerges. ("All mean egotism vanishes; the currents of Universal Being circulate through me; I am part or parcel of God.") Teresa:
  --
  This dissociation of "natural" and "supernatural," and a praying, a begging, for the latter to miraculously intervene in the former, Emerson calls "meanness and theft," a vicious craving for commodities:
  In what prayers do men allow themselves! Prayer looks abroad and asks for some foreign addition to come through some foreign virtue, and loses itself in endless mazes of natural and supernatural, and mediatorial and miraculous. Prayer that craves a particular commodity is vicious. [True] Prayer is the contemplation of the facts of life from the highest point of view. It is the soliloquy of a beholding and jubilant soul. It is the spirit of God pronouncing his works good. As soon as the man is at one with God, he will not beg. But prayer as a means to effect a private end is meanness and theft. It supposes dualism and not a unity in nature and consciousness.39 God's "supernatural" intervention in "nature": this bears no relation to the contemplative view of the psychic and subtle stages. God or Spirit is not set apart from nature, but rather is the Ground of nature, and indeed of all manifestation-as Teresa puts it, "God is in all things by presence and power and essence." "Supernatural," in this usage, simply means that the natural union of Spirit with all things becomes a conscious realization in some, and that conscious realization is called supernatural, not because the union is present only in them and not in nature, but because they are directly realizing it. Teresa's spiritual friend and collaborator, the extraordinary John of the Cross, explains it thus:
  This union between God and creatures always exists. By it He conserves their being so that if the union would end they would cease to exist [Spirit as Ground of Being]. Consequently, in discussing union with God, we are not discussing the substantial union which is always existing, but the union and transformation of the soul in God. This transformation is supernatural, the other natural.40
  --
  This Godhead (or what Eckhart also calls "God beyond God") is radically free of any finite or created thing, whether of matter or nature or mind or visions or Soul or God. Eckhart refers to this completely transcendental, free, or unmanifest state by words such as "Abyss," "unborn," "formless," "primordial origin," "emptiness," "nothingness."
  Empty yourself of everything. That is to say, empty yourself of your ego [or any sort of separate-self sense, soul, or oversoul] and empty yourself of all things and of all that you are in yourself and consider yourself as what you are in God. God is a being beyond being and a nothingness beyond being. Therefore, be still and do not flinch from this emptiness.46
  This "emptiness" is not a theory. Even less is it "poetry" (which I have often heard). Nor is it a philosophical suggestion. It is a direct apprehension (direct "experience" is not quite right, since it is free of the duality of subject and object, and since it never enters the stream of time and thus is never "experiential" in any typical sense)-free of thoughts, free of dualities, free of time and temporal succession:
  I speak therefore of a Godhead from which as yet nothing emanates and nothing moves or is thought about.
  Even if the soul were to see God insofar as he is God or insofar as God can be imagined or insofar as he is a thought, this same insufficiency would be there. But when all images of the soul are taken away and the soul [is] only the single One, then the pure being of the soul finds resting in itself the pure, formless Being of the divine. . . .
  Neither space nor time touch this place. Nothing so much hinders the soul's understanding of God as time and space. Time and space are parts of the whole, but God is one. So if the soul is to recognize God, it must do so beyond space and time. For God is neither this nor that ["neti, neti"] in the way of the manifold things of earth, since God is one. If the soul wants to know God, it cannot do so in time. For so long as the soul is conscious of time or space or any other [object], it cannot know God.
  Know then that all our perfection and all our bliss depend on the fact that the individual goes through and beyond all creation and all temporality and all being, and enters the foundation that is without foundation.
  --
  Emptiness, the pure opening or clearing in which all objects, experiences, things and events arise, but which itself merely abides). Anything seen is just more objects, more finite things, more creatures, more images or concepts or visions, which is exactly what it is not.
  It is free of all names and barren of all forms, totally free and void, just as God is void and free in himself. It is totally one and simple, just as God is one and simple, so that we can in no manner gaze upon it [see it as an object; it is the Seer, not anything seen; and the Seer is pure Emptiness, out of which seen objects emerge].
  There the "means" is silent, for neither a creature nor an image can enter there. The soul knows in that place neither action nor knowledge. It is not aware in that place of any kind of image, either from itself or from any other creature.
  --
  Like Eckhart, Sri Ramana Maharshi, India's greatest modern sage, begins by merely giving us some verbal pointers and information about the Self and its relation to God (and Godhead). But he will soon, we will see, go beyond mere chatter and point directly to the unknown and unknowing Source. So here he speaks in "positive" terms, before drawing us into Divine Ignorance.
  The Self is known to everyone but not clearly. The Being is the Self. "I am" is the name of God. Of all the definitions of God, none is indeed so well put as the Biblical statement I AM THAT I AM. The Absolute Being is what is-It is the Self. It is God. Knowing the Self, God is known. In fact, God is none other than the Self.50
  And here Ramana clearly means "Godhead," as he himself often pointed out: "Creation is by the entire Godhead breaking into God and Nature."51
  --
  Therefore, if all creatures are asleep in you, you can perceive what God works in you [as Godhead].
  Second: "Concern yourself with all things." This has three meanings. That means, first, seize God in all things, for God is in all things.
  The second meaning is: "Love your neighbor as yourself." If you love one human being more than another, that is wrong. If you love your father and mother and yourself more than another human being, that is wrong.
  And if you love your own happiness more than another's, that is also wrong.
  The third meaning is this: Love God in all things equally. For God is equally near to all creatures. And among all these creatures God does not love any one more than any other. God is all and is one. All things become nothing but God [Nondual].59
  When all things are nothing but God, there are then no things, and no God, but only this.

1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  the Lord" (Zech. 4 : 10). The Lamb stands with the seven angels before God's
  throne, as Satan did with the sons of God (Job 1 : 6), so that God is described
  under the aspect of Ezekiel's vision and is thought of in Yahwistic terms- an

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