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object:Finnegans Wake
class:James Joyce
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wiki:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnegans_Wake


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Finnegans Wake
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--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



--- QUOTES [2 / 2 - 30 / 30] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   1 Robert Anton Wilson
   1 James Joyce

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   2 Roger Ebert

   2 Robert Anton Wilson

   2 Philip Kitcher

   2 Lorena Franco


1:Quotations every day of the year. ~ James Joyce, Finnegans Wake ,
2:And that reminded me--as everything in the universe does--of Finnegans Wake. Now, I'm sure in an educated audience like this, you're all thoroughly familiar with Finnegans Wake, and I don't have to explain its deep structure or its polylinguistic meanings. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Finnegans Wake, several ~ Paula McLain
2:Quotations every day of the year. ~ James Joyce, Finnegans Wake,
3:The first thing to say about Finnegans Wake is that it is, in an important sense, unreadable. ~ Seamus Deane
4:I think the pattern of my essays is, A funny thing happened to me on my way through Finnegans Wake. ~ Leslie Fiedler
5:The current tax code is harder to understand than Bob Dylan reading Finnegans Wake in a wind tunnel. ~ Dennis Miller
6:I've always said that I learned the English I know through two sources -- Marvel Comics and Finnegans Wake. ~ Umberto Eco
7:Nothing short of divine vision or a new cure for the clapp can possibly be worth all the circumambient peripherization. [on Finnegans Wake] ~ Ezra Pound
8:Throughout Finnegans Wake Joyce specifies the Tower of Babel as the tower of Sleep, that is, the tower of the witless assumption, or what Bacon calls the reign of the Idols. ~ Marshall McLuhan
9:I later spent a year studying Finnegans Wake with Norman O. Brown, an exercise in masturbatory obscurantism that Bryan would never have undertaken—and he had an eye for genre fiction, including westerns, that I lacked. ~ William Finnegan
10:You have to distinguish between things that seemed odd when they were new but are now quite familiar, such as Ibsen and Wagner, and things that seemed crazy when they were new and seem crazy now, like 'Finnegans Wake' and Picasso. ~ Philip Larkin
11:Observing her youth, her automatic radiance, he said, “‘I feel as old as yonder elm.’”
“From Finnegans Wake,” Kathy said happily. “When the old washerwomen at dusk are merging into trees and rocks.”
“You’ve read Finnegans Wake?” he asked, surprised. ~ Philip K Dick
12:And that reminded me--as everything in the universe does--of Finnegans Wake. Now, I'm sure in an educated audience like this, you're all thoroughly familiar with Finnegans Wake, and I don't have to explain its deep structure or its polylinguistic meanings. ~ Robert Anton Wilson
13:And that reminded me--as everything in the universe does--of Finnegans Wake. Now, I'm sure in an educated audience like this, you're all thoroughly familiar with Finnegans Wake, and I don't have to explain its deep structure or its polylinguistic meanings. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
14:For anyone who conceives literature in terms of plurality of perspectives, Finnegans Wake has to be the apogee. For, as we are told, every word in it has three score and ten "toptypsical" meanings - an exaggeration, of course, but an important reminder to readers who like their fiction definite. ~ Philip Kitcher
15:James Joyce, in his novel Finnegans Wake, in 1939, punned on the word “Hindoo” (as the British used to spell it), joking that it came from the names of two Irishmen, Hin-nessy and Doo-ley: “This is the hindoo Shimar Shin between the dooley boy and the hinnessy.”30 Even Joyce knew that the word was not native to India. ~ Wendy Doniger
16:in 1963 because he liked the sound of the sentence “Three quarks for Muster Mark” in James Joyce's Finnegans Wake. As for “Muster Mark, ”three quarks are needed to form a proton or a neutron. The electric charges of quarks are fractional (+/-1/3 or +−2/3) because their sum must equal the charge of a proton (+1) or a neutron (0). ~ Matthieu Ricard
17:I once read somewhere that Sean Connery left school at the age of 13 and later went on to read Proust and Finnegans Wake and I keep expecting to meet an enthusiastic school leaver on the train, the type of person who only ever reads something because it is marvellous (and so hated school). Unfortunately the enthusiastic school leavers are all minding their own business. ~ Helen DeWitt
18:My books are a subject of much discussion. They pour from shelves onto tables, chairs and the floor, and Chaz observes that I haven't read many of them and I never will. You just never know. One day I may - need is the word I use - to read Finnegans Wake, the Icelandic sagas, Churchill's history of the Second World War, the complete Tintin in French, 47 novels by Simenon, and By Love Possessed. ~ Roger Ebert
19:My books are a subject of much discussion. They pour from shelves onto tables, chairs and the floor, and Chaz observes that I haven’t read many of them and I never will. You just never know. One day I may — need is the word I use — to read Finnegans Wake, the Icelandic sagas, Churchill’s history of the Second World War, the complete Tintin in French, 47 novels by Simenon, and By Love Possessed. ~ Roger Ebert
20:Both Ulysses and Finnegans Wake are inexhaustible. They are celebrations of the ordinary, compelling reactions to philosophical elitism about "the good life". I hope to examine both of them further, doing more justice to Joycean comedy than I did in my "invitation" to the Wake, and trying to understand how the extraordinary stylistic innovations, particularly the proliferation of narrative forms, enable Joyce to "see life foully" from a vast number of sides. ~ Philip Kitcher
21:I think [James] Joyce sometimes enjoyed misleading his readers. He said to me that history was like that parlor game where someone whispers something to the person next to him, who repeats it not very distinctly to the next person, and so on until, by the time the last person hears it, it comes out completely transformed. Of course, as he explained to me, the meaning in Finnegans Wake is obscure because it is a 'nightpiece.' I think, too, that, like the author's sight, the work is often blurred. ~ Sylvia Beach
22:If an artwork never gets any attention from anybody, then obviously it's got problems. If it gains attention from a very small elite, then it's presumably doing something. Finnegans Wake gets a lot of attention from certain people who become passionate about it, who are usually very good readers in general. Although - I often talk about costs and benefits - it seems to me the costs of reading Finnegans Wake are not worth the benefits, however many there may be. And it's the same with the more arcane among poets, Zukofsky and so on. ~ Brian Boyd
23:Sometimes Joyce is hilarious. I read Finnegans Wake after graduate school and I had the great good fortune of reading it without any help. I don't know if I read it right, but it was hilarious! I laughed constantly! I didn't know what was going on for whole blocks but it didn't matter because I wasn't going to be graded on it. I think the reason why everyone still has so much fun with Shakespeare is because he didn't have any literary critic. He was just doing it; and there were no reviews except for people throwing stuff on stage. He could just do it. ~ Toni Morrison
24:And then, Joyce's experiments with language in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. And Korzybski's Science and Sanity, which encouraged me in my Joycean tendency to suspect that language is full of traps and it's the job of the writer to find his way around the traps in language and not just fall into them. I think there are two types of writers--those who are aware of the traps in language and try to avoid them--not always successfully. We're not all geniuses, we make mistakes. And the second type is those who aren't aware of the traps and fall into them on one page after another. Tucker was aware of that too--the traps in language. So Nietzsche, Tucker, Joyce, and Korzybski have all influenced me to look at language in a peculiar way. I see language as a means of human liberation, potentially--and the main mechanism of human slavery most of the time. It depends on how you use language. ~ Robert Anton Wilson
25:the most elementary material constituent, atoms consist of a nucleus, containing protons and neutrons, that is surrounded by a swarm of orbiting electrons. For a while many physicists thought that protons, neutrons, and electrons were the Greeks' "atoms." But in 1968 experimenters at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, making use of the increased capacity of technology to probe the microscopic depths of matter, found that protons and neutrons are not fundamental, either. Instead they showed that each consists of three smaller particles, called quarks—a whimsical name taken from a passage in James Joyce's Finnegans Wake by the theoretical physicist Murray Gell-Mann, who previously had surmised their existence. The experimenters confirmed that quarks themselves come in two varieties, which were named, a bit less creatively, up and down. A proton consists of two up-quarks and a down-quark; a neutron consists of two down-quarks and an up-quark. ~ Brian Greene
26:But there exist other, different, methods of infolding-obliquity, compression, and the Seven Types of Ambiguity-a modest estimate of Empson's. The later Joyce, for instance, makes one realize why the German word for writing poetry is 'dichten'- to condense (certainly more poetical than 'composing', i.e. 'putting together'; but perhaps less poetical than the Hungarian kolteni-to hatch). Freud actually believed that to condense or compress several meanings or allusions into a word or phrase was the essence of poetry. It is certainly an essential ingredient with Joyce; almost every word in the great monologues in Finnegans Wake is overcharged with allusions and implications. To revert to an earlier metaphor, economy demands that the stepping stones of the narrative should be spaced wide enough apart to require a significant effort from the reader; Joyce makes him feel like a runner in a marathon race with hurdles every other step and aggravated by a mile-long row of hieroglyphs which he must decipher. Joyce would perhaps be the perfect writer-of the perfect reader existed. ~ Arthur Koestler
27:In 1963, when I assigned the name "quark" to the fundamental constituents of the nucleon, I had the sound first, without the spelling, which could have been "kwork." Then, in one of my occasional perusals of Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce, I came across the word "quark" in the phrase "Three quarks for Muster Mark." Since "quark" (meaning, for one thing, the cry of a gull) was clearly intended to rhyme with "Mark," as well as "bark" and other such words, I had to find an excuse to pronounce it as "kwork." But the book represents the dreams of a publican named Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker. Words in the text are typically drawn from several sources at once, like the "portmanteau words" in Through the Looking Glass. From time to time, phrases occur in the book that are partially determined by calls for drinks at the bar. I argued, therefore, that perhaps one of the multiple sources of the cry "Three quarks for Muster Mark" might be "Three quarts for Mister Mark," in which case the pronunciation "kwork" would not be totally unjustified. In any case, the number three fitted perfectly the way quarks occur in nature. ~ Murray Gell Mann
28:Nota de la autora ​La librería ficticia Le club de minuit que aparece en la novela, está inspirada en la mítica y mundialmente conocida Shakespeare & Company. La historia del que fue el refugio literario de Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald o James Joyce, se remonta al año 1919 en una localización distinta a la actual, la Rue de la Bûcherie, que se ha utilizado también en esta historia. Todo empezó cuando la librera y editora Sylvia Beach abrió la primera librería Shakespeare & Company en la Rue de l’Odéon y tuvo que cerrarla en 1941, en plena ocupación alemana en París, cuando un oficial nazi entró, intentando comprar una copia de Finnegans Wake, obra de ficción cómica de James Joyce. La librera se negó a vendérselo con la excusa de que era la única copia que tenía y que pertenecía a su colección personal. Dos semanas más tarde, el alemán regresó para anoticiarla de que todos sus bienes eran confiscados. Los libros desaparecieron de los estantes al cabo de unas horas. Años más tarde, en 1951, la librería reabrió con otro dueño, George Whitman, y Shakespeare & Company, tal y como la conocemos hoy en día en el 37 de la Rue de la Bûcherie, no solo es un emblema en la ciudad de París, sino también una atracción turística que ocupa seis pisos y tiene café propio. Nada que ver con la olvidada y ficticia Le club de minuit, cuyo interior también he inventado, ya que no tiene nada que ver con la librería real y actual que tuve la suerte de visitar hace unos años. ​Por otro lado, el George Whitman de Le club de minuit solo tiene en común con el auténtico George Whitman (Nueva Jersey, 1913 – París, 2011) su nombre, alguna frase y la palabra Tumbleweeds que me ha gustado añadir a esta intensa trama. Sylvia Beach en la primera librería Shakespeare & Company (1919-1941) George Whitman en su librería Shakespeare & Company ~ Lorena Franco
29:Nota de la autora ​La librería ficticia Le club de minuit que aparece en la novela, está inspirada en la mítica y mundialmente conocida Shakespeare & Company. La historia del que fue el refugio literario de Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald o James Joyce, se remonta al año 1919 en una localización distinta a la actual, la Rue de la Bûcherie, que se ha utilizado también en esta historia. Todo empezó cuando la librera y editora Sylvia Beach abrió la primera librería Shakespeare & Company en la Rue de l’Odéon y tuvo que cerrarla en 1941, en plena ocupación alemana en París, cuando un oficial nazi entró, intentando comprar una copia de Finnegans Wake, obra de ficción cómica de James Joyce. La librera se negó a vendérselo con la excusa de que era la única copia que tenía y que pertenecía a su colección personal. Dos semanas más tarde, el alemán regresó para anoticiarla de que todos sus bienes eran confiscados. Los libros desaparecieron de los estantes al cabo de unas horas. Años más tarde, en 1951, la librería reabrió con otro dueño, George Whitman, y Shakespeare & Company, tal y como la conocemos hoy en día en el 37 de la Rue de la Bûcherie, no solo es un emblema en la ciudad de París, sino también una atracción turística que ocupa seis pisos y tiene café propio. Nada que ver con la olvidada y ficticia Le club de minuit, cuyo interior también he inventado, ya que no tiene nada que ver con la librería real y actual que tuve la suerte de visitar hace unos años. ​Por otro lado, el George Whitman de Le club de minuit solo tiene en común con el auténtico George Whitman (Nueva Jersey, 1913 ��� París, 2011) su nombre, alguna frase y la palabra Tumbleweeds que me ha gustado añadir a esta intensa trama. Sylvia Beach en la primera librería Shakespeare & Company (1919-1941) George Whitman en su librería Shakespeare & Company ~ Lorena Franco
30:You will encounter resentful, sneering non-readers who will look at you from their beery, leery eyes, as they might some form of sub-hominid anomaly, bookimus maximus. You will encounter redditters, youtubers, blogspotters, wordpressers, twitterers, and facebookers with wired-open eyes who will shout at from you from their crazy hectoring mouths about the liberal poison of literature. You will encounter the gamers with their twitching fingers who will look upon you as a character to lock crosshairs on and blow to smithereens. You will encounter the stoners and pill-poppers who will ignore you, and ask you if you have read Jack Keroauc’s On the Road, and if you haven’t, will lecture you for two hours on that novel and refuse to acknowledge any other books written by anyone ever. You will encounter the provincial retirees, who have spent a year reading War & Peace, who strike the attitude that completing that novel is a greater achievement than the thousands of books you have read, even though they lost themselves constantly throughout the book and hated the whole experience. You will encounter the self-obsessed students whose radical interpretations of Agnes Grey and The Idiot are the most important utterance anyone anywhere has ever made with their mouths, while ignoring the thousands of novels you have read. You will encounter the parents and siblings who take every literary reference you make back to the several books they enjoyed reading as a child, and then redirect the conversation to what TV shows they have been watching. You will encounter the teachers and lecturers, for whom any text not on their syllabus is a waste of time, and look upon you as a wayward student in need of their salvation. You will encounter the travellers and backpackers who will take pity on you for wasting your life, then tell you about the Paulo Coelho they read while hostelling across Europe en route to their spiritual pilgrimage to New Delhi. You will encounter the hard-working moaners who will tell you they are too busy working for a living to sit and read all day, and when they come home from a hard day’s toil, they don’t want to sit and read pretentious rubbish. You will encounter the voracious readers who loathe competition, and who will challenge you to a literary duel, rather than engage you in friendly conversation about your latest reading. You will encounter the slack intellectuals who will immediately ask you if you have read Finnegans Wake, and when you say you have, will ask if you if you understood every line, and when you say of course not, will make some point that generally alludes to you being a halfwit. Fuck those fuckers. ~ M J Nicholls

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