classes ::: subject,
children :::
branches ::: Cybernetics

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:Cybernetics
class:subject
CONCEPTS
  Concepts studied by cyberneticists include, but are not limited to: learning, cognition, adaptation, social control, emergence, convergence, communication, efficiency, efficacy, and connectivity. In cybernetics these concepts (otherwise already objects of study in other disciplines such as biology and engineering) are abstracted from the context of the specific organism or device.
HUMAN CYBERNETICS
  input loops
  output loops (movements)
    movement value
  diagnostics
--- TECHNOLOGICAL INTEGRATION
--- POTENTIAL PROJECTS:
  8 BIT COMPUTER
    what parts do I need, this project should get its own page. if it doesnt have one already  
  motion detector + camera for room door.
  glove for controlling computer?
  bracer cyberdeck
    firstly for daily Savitri read / listen
    logging, Savitri but also other things. anything and everything. instantly
    (requires a screen)
  ROBOT / ROBOTICS
    wheels
    camera

--- its relation to videogames, feedback that way
CYBERNETICS INSPIRATION
DESC - WIKI:
  Cybernetics is a transdisciplinary approach for exploring regulatory systems-their structures, constraints, and possibilities. Norbert Wiener defined cybernetics in 1948 as "the scientific study of control and communication in the animal and the machine." In other words, it is the scientific study of how humans, animals and machines control and communicate with each other.
Norbert Weiner
Kevin Warwick
CONCEPTS
  feedback loop
see also ::: hardware
  Robotics
  arduino
  electronics
  movements

  videogames

link:http://pespmc1.vub.ac.be/DEFAULT.php


questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or via the comments below
or join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



--- OBJECT INSTANCES [4]


How_cybernetics_connects_computing,_counterculture,_and_design
neural_net
Norbert_Wiener
The_cyborgs_and_cybernetics_syllabus

--- PRIMARY CLASS


subject

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [1]


Cybernetics
How cybernetics connects computing, counterculture, and design
The cyborgs and cybernetics syllabus
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, Savitri (extended toc), the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


cybernetics
/si:`b*-net'iks/ The study of control and
communication in living and man-made systems.
The term was first proposed by {Norbert Wiener} in the book
referenced below. Originally, cybernetics drew upon
electrical engineering, mathematics, biology, neurophysiology,
anthropology, and psychology to study and describe actions,
feedback, and response in systems of all kinds. It aims to
understand the similarities and differences in internal
workings of organic and machine processes and, by formulating
abstract concepts common to all systems, to understand their
behaviour.
Modern "second-order cybernetics" places emphasis on how the
process of constructing models of the systems is influenced by
those very systems, hence an elegant definition - "applied
epistemology".
Related recent developments (often referred to as {sciences of
complexity}) that are distinguished as separate disciplines
are {artificial intelligence}, {neural networks}, {systems
theory}, and {chaos theory}, but the boundaries between those
and cybernetics proper are not precise.
See also {robot}.
{The Cybernetics Society (http://cybsoc.org)} of the UK.
{American Society for Cybernetics
(http://asc-cybernetics.org/)}.
{IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society
(http://isye.gatech.edu/ieee-smc/)}.
{International project "Principia Cybernetica"
(http://pespmc1.vub.ac.be/DEFAULT.php)}.
["Cybernetics, or control and communication in the animal and the
machine", N. Wiener, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1948]
(2002-01-01)

cybernetics ::: (robotics) /si:`b*-net'iks/ The study of control and communication in living and man-made systems.The term was first proposed by Norbert Wiener in the book referenced below. Originally, cybernetics drew upon electrical engineering, mathematics, biology, processes and, by formulating abstract concepts common to all systems, to understand their behaviour.Modern second-order cybernetics places emphasis on how the process of constructing models of the systems is influenced by those very systems, hence an elegant definition - applied epistemology.Related recent developments (often referred to as sciences of complexity) that are distinguished as separate disciplines are artificial intelligence, neural networks, systems theory, and chaos theory, but the boundaries between those and cybernetics proper are not precise.See also robot. of the UK. . . .Usenet newsgroup: .[Cybernetics, or control and communication in the animal and the machine, N. Wiener, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1948](2002-01-01)

Cybernetics - the science of communication and control theory that is concerned especially with the comparative study of automatic control systems (as the nervous system and brain and mechanical-electrical communication systems). See /r/cybernetics


--- QUOTES [6 / 6 - 90 / 90] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 Robert Anton Wilson
   1 Richard Brautigan
   1 Norbert Wiener
   1 Mage 20th Anniversary Edition
   1

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   10 Douglas Adams
   7 Jaron Lanier
   5 Marissa Meyer
   3 Walter Jon Williams
   3 Terence McKenna
   3 Heinz von Foerster
   3 Charlie Jane Anders
   3 Anonymous
   2 Tom Robbins
   2 Stanis aw Lem
   2 Richard Brautigan
   2 Maxwell Maltz
   2 Kevin Kelly
   2 David Brin
   2 Anthony Stafford Beer
   2 Adrian Tchaikovsky

1:Practice is the act of rehearsing a behavior over and over, or engaging in an activity again and again, for the purpose of improving or mastering it, as in the phrase practice makes perfect. ~ ,
2:I like to think (it has to be!) of a cybernetic ecology where we are free of our labors and joined back to nature, returned to our mammal brothers and sisters, and all watched over by machines of loving grace. ~ Richard Brautigan,
3:A bit of Prime, a bit of Matter, and a fair understanding of Life installs cybernetic devices and allows them to function; a blend of Forces and Prime conjures fire, wind, and light. With Correspondence alone, a skilled mage can step from one place to another without passing through the intervening space; add Time, and she can see past events in a distant place as well; add Forces, and she could project the images she sees upon a wall; use Matter and Correspondence instead, and she could open a door in one place, open another door in the next, and step between two doors that had not existed - and could not have existed - until that moment. ~ Mage 20th Anniversary Edition,
4:At every stage of technique since Daedalus or Hero of Alexandria, the ability of the artificer to produce a working simulacrum of a living organism has always intrigued people. This desire to produce and to study automata has always been expressed in terms of the living technique of the age. In the days of magic, we have the bizarre and sinister concept of Golem, that figure of clay into which the Rabbi of Prague breathed life with the blasphemy of the Ineffable Name of God. In the time of Newton, the automaton becomes the clockwork music box, with the little effigies pirouetting stiffly on top. In the nineteenth century, the automaton is a glorified heat engine, burning some combustible fuel instead of the glycogen of the human muscles. Finally, the present automaton opens doors by means of photocells, or points guns to the place at which a radar beam picks up an airplane, or computes the solution of a differential equation. ~ Norbert Wiener, Cybernetics or control and communication in the animal and the machine 1961,
5:reading ::: Self-Help Reading List: James Allen As a Man Thinketh (1904) Marcus Aurelius Meditations (2nd Century) The Bhagavad-Gita The Bible Robert Bly Iron John (1990) Boethius The Consolation of Philosophy (6thC) Alain de Botton How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997) William Bridges Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes (1980) David Brooks The Road to Character (2015) Brené Brown Daring Greatly (2012) David D Burns The New Mood Therapy (1980) Joseph Campbell (with Bill Moyers) The Power of Myth (1988) Richard Carlson Don't Sweat The Small Stuff (1997) Dale Carnegie How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936) Deepak Chopra The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success (1994) Clayton Christensen How Will You Measure Your Life? (2012) Paulo Coelho The Alchemist (1988) Stephen Covey The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (1989) Mihaly Cziksentmihalyi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1991) The Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler The Art of Happiness (1999) The Dhammapada (Buddha's teachings) Charles Duhigg The Power of Habit (2011) Wayne Dyer Real Magic (1992) Ralph Waldo Emerson Self-Reliance (1841) Clarissa Pinkola Estes Women Who Run With The Wolves (1996) Viktor Frankl Man's Search For Meaning (1959) Benjamin Franklin Autobiography (1790) Shakti Gawain Creative Visualization (1982) Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence (1995) John Gray Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus (1992) Louise Hay You Can Heal Your Life (1984) James Hillman The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling (1996) Susan Jeffers Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway (1987) Richard Koch The 80/20 Principle (1998) Marie Kondo The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (2014) Ellen Langer Mindfulness: Choice and Control in Everyday Life (1989) Lao-Tzu Tao-te Ching (The Way of Power) Maxwell Maltz Psycho-Cybernetics (1960) Abraham Maslow Motivation and Personality (1954) Thomas Moore Care of the Soul (1992) Joseph Murphy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind (1963) Norman Vincent Peale The Power of Positive Thinking (1952) M Scott Peck The Road Less Traveled (1990) Anthony Robbins Awaken The Giant Within (1991) Florence Scovell-Shinn The Game of Life and How To Play It (1923) Martin Seligman Learned Optimism (1991) Samuel Smiles Self-Help (1859) Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man (1955) Henry David Thoreau Walden (1854) Marianne Williamson A Return To Love (1993) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Self-Help ,
6:For instance, a popular game with California occultists-I do not know its inventor-involves a Magic Room, much like the Pleasure Dome discussed earlier except that this Magic Room contains an Omniscient Computer. To play this game, you simply "astrally project" into the Magic Room. Do not ask what "astral projection" means, and do not assume it is metaphysical (and therefore either impossible, if you are a materialist, or very difficult, if you are a mystic). Just assume this is a gedankenexperiment, a "mind game." Project yourself, in imagination, into this Magic Room and visualize vividly the Omniscient Computer, using the details you need to make such a super-information-processor real to your fantasy. You do not need any knowledge of programming to handle this astral computer. It exists early in the next century; you are getting to use it by a species of time-travel, if that metaphor is amusing and helpful to you. It is so built that it responds immediately to human brain-waves, "reading" them and decoding their meaning. (Crude prototypes of such computers already exist.) So, when you are in this magic room, you can ask this Computer anything, just by thinking of what you want to know. It will read your thought, and project into your brain, by a laser ray, the correct answer. There is one slight problem. The computer is very sensitive to all brain-waves. If you have any doubts, it registers them as negative commands, meaning "Do not answer my question." So, the way to use it is to start simply, with "easy" questions. Ask it to dig out of the archives the name of your second-grade teacher. (Almost everybody remembers the name of their first grade teacher-imprint vulnerability again-but that of the second grade teacher tends to get lost.) When the computer has dug out the name of your second grade teacher, try it on a harder question, but not one that is too hard. It is very easy to sabotage this machine, but you don't want to sabotage it during these experiments. You want to see how well it can be made to perform. It is wise to ask only one question at a time, since it requires concentration to keep this magic computer real on the field of your perception. Do not exhaust your capacities for imagination and visualization on your first trial runs. After a few trivial experiments of the second-grade-teacher variety, you can try more interesting programs. Take a person toward whom you have negative feelings, such as anger, disappointment, feeling-of-betrayal, jealousy or whatever interferes with the smooth, tranquil operation of your own bio-computer. Ask the Magic Computer to explain that other person to you; to translate you into their reality-tunnel long enough for you to understand how events seem to them. Especially, ask how you seem to them. This computer will do that job for you; but be prepared for some shocks which might be disagreeable at first. This super-brain can also perform exegesis on ideas that seem obscure, paradoxical or enigmatic to us. For instance, early experiments with this computer can very profitably turn on asking it to explain some of the propositions in this book which may seem inexplicable or perversely wrong-headed to you, such as "We are all greater artists than we realize" or "What the Thinker thinks, the Prover proves" or "mind and its contents are functionally identical." This computer is much more powerful and scientifically advanced than the rapture-machine in the neurosomatic circuit. It has total access to all the earlier, primitive circuits, and overrules any of them. That is, if you put a meta-programming instruction into this computer; it will relay it downward to the old circuits and cancel contradictory programs left over from the past. For instance, try feeding it on such meta-programming instructions as: 1. I am at cause over my body. 2. I am at cause over my imagination. 3.1 am at cause over my future. 4. My mind abounds with beauty and power. 5.1 like people, and people like me. Remember that this computer is only a few decades ahead of present technology, so it cannot "understand" your commands if you harbor any doubts about them. Doubts tell it not to perform. Work always from what you can believe in, extending the area of belief only as results encourage you to try for more dramatic transformations of your past reality-tunnels. This represents cybernetic consciousness; the programmer becoming self-programmer, self-metaprogrammer, meta-metaprogrammer, etc. Just as the emotional compulsions of the second circuit seem primitive, mechanical and, ultimately, silly to the neurosomatic consciousness, so, too, the reality maps of the third circuit become comic, relativistic, game-like to the metaprogrammer. "Whatever you say it is, it isn't, " Korzybski, the semanticist, repeated endlessly in his seminars, trying to make clear that third-circuit semantic maps are not the territories they represent; that we can always make maps of our maps, revisions of our revisions, meta-selves of our selves. "Neti, neti" (not that, not that), Hindu teachers traditionally say when asked what "God" is or what "Reality" is. Yogis, mathematicians and musicians seem more inclined to develop meta-programming consciousness than most of humanity. Korzybski even claimed that the use of mathematical scripts is an aid to developing this circuit, for as soon as you think of your mind as mind 1, and the mind which contemplates that mind as mind2 and the mind which contemplates mind2 contemplating mind 1 as mind3, you are well on your way to meta-programming awareness. Alice in Wonderland is a masterful guide to the metaprogramming circuit (written by one of the founders of mathematical logic) and Aleister Crowley soberly urged its study upon all students of yoga. ~ Robert Anton Wilson, Prometheus Rising ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Cybernetics is NOT the banana. ~ Heinz von Foerster,
2:Express the psychedelic with the cybernetic. Turn on, tune in and boot up. ~ Timothy Leary,
3:The cybernetic operation?” “No, the sex change.” The doctor’s smile faltered. ~ Marissa Meyer,
4:If you can remember, worry, or tie your shoe, you can succeed with Psycho-Cybernetics! ~ Maxwell Maltz,
5:If cybernetics is the science of control, management is the profession of control. ~ Anthony Stafford Beer,
6:Because what else does one ask even a broken cybernetic deity but, Why are we here? ~ Adrian Tchaikovsky,
7:The cybernetic operation?"
"No, the sex change."
The doctor's smile faltered.
"I'm joking. ~ Marissa Meyer,
8:Should one name one central concept, a first principle, of cybernetics, it would be circularity. ~ Heinz von Foerster,
9:First-order cybernetics is the science of observed systems; Second-order cybernetics is the science of observing systems. ~ Heinz von Foerster,
10:Use the word 'cybernetics', Norbert, because nobody knows what it means. This will always put you at an advantage in arguments. ~ Claude Shannon,
11:The famous balance of nature is the most extraordinary of all cybernetic systems. Left to itself, it is always self-regulated. ~ Joseph Wood Krutch,
12:A cyborg is a cybernetic organism, a hybrid of machine and organism, a creature of social reality as well as a creature of fiction. ~ Donna J Haraway,
13:he could come up with a better idea than anything proposed by all the scientists, the cyberneticians and strategists, with all their computers? ~ Stanis aw Lem,
14:ONE DAY THE Singularity would elevate humans to cybernetic superbeings, and maybe then people would say what they meant. Probably not, though. ~ Charlie Jane Anders,
15:ONE DAY THE Singularity would elevate humans to cybernetic superbeings, and maybe then people would say what they meant. Probably not, though. * ~ Charlie Jane Anders,
16:One day the Singularity would elevate humans to cybernetic superbeings, and maybe then people would say what they meant.
Probably not, though. ~ Charlie Jane Anders,
17:The cybernetics phase of cognitive science produced an amazing array of concrete results, in addition to its long-term (often underground) influence ~ Francisco Varela,
18:I think the cybernetic matrix is a tremendous tool for feminizing, and radicalizing, and psychedelicizing the social matrix. I see computers as entirely feminine. ~ Terence McKenna,
19:Man is about to be deprived of a great pole - work routine. The nightmare of capitalist society is unemployment; the nightmare of cybernetic society will be employment. ~ John Fowles,
20:[This legendary Amazonian substance is] a cybernetic transdimentional medium of some sort that is generated out of the mysteries of the physiology of the human body. ~ Terence McKenna,
21:We have changed. We are no longer, as I said, bipedal monkeys. We are instead a kind of cybernetic coral reef of organic components and inorganic technological components. ~ Terence McKenna,
22:Some of the fantasy objects arising from cybernetic totalism (like the noosphere, which is a supposed global brain formed by the sum of all the human brains connected through the ~ Jaron Lanier,
23:What does it mean that you are there and we are here? Is there meaning or is it random chance? Because what else does one ask even a broken cybernetic deity but, Why are we here? ~ Adrian Tchaikovsky,
24:The social system tends to be dominated by images... especially of the future, which act cybernetically, constantly guided by perceived divergences between the real and the ideal. ~ Kenneth E Boulding,
25:A new generation of Sirius Cybernetics Corporation robots and computers, with the new GPP feature.’” “GPP feature?” said Arthur. “What’s that?” “Oh, it says Genuine People Personalities. ~ Douglas Adams,
26:If one does all these things to a human being, what is left is no longer precisely a human being. It is a man plus large elements of hardware.

The man has become a cybernetic organism: a cyborg. ~ Frederik Pohl,
27:Spouting quotes from Mao, Castro, and Che Guevara, which are as germane to our highly technological, computerized, cybernetic, nuclearpowered, mass media society as a stagecoach on a jet runway at Kennedy airport. ~ Saul Alinsky,
28:The Nutri-Matic was designed and manufactured by the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation whose complaints department now covers all the major landmasses of the first three planets in the Sirius Tau Star system. Arthur ~ Douglas Adams,
29:The panzer, she decides, is a place only a junkie could love. A cozy cybernetic womb of masculine scent, soft blinking lights, the studs that feed one's addiction. Whatever Cowboy's is, she doesn't want to know. ~ Walter Jon Williams,
30:The Encyclopaedia Galactica defines a robot as a mechanical apparatus designed to do the work of a man. The marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation defines a robot as ‘Your Plastic Pal Who’s Fun To Be With’. ~ Douglas Adams,
31:We imagine "pure" cybernetic systems, but we can prove only that we know how to build fairly dysfunctional ones. We kid ourselves when we think we understand something, even a computer, merely because we can model or digitize it. ~ Jaron Lanier,
32:The Frenchman Jean-PaulSartre ... had a dialectical mind good as a machine for cybernetics, immense in its way, he could peel a nuance like an onion, but he had no sense of evil, the anguish of God, and the possible existence of Satan. ~ Norman Mailer,
33:I don’t know. I don’t actually remember anything from before the surgery.” His eyebrows rose, his blue eyes sucking in all the light of the room. “The cybernetic operation?” “No, the sex change.” The doctor’s smile faltered. “I’m joking. ~ Marissa Meyer,
34:I like to think
(it has to be!)
of a cybernetic ecology
where we are free of our labors
and joined back to nature,
returned to our mammal
brothers and sisters,
and all watched over
by machines of loving grace. ~ Richard Brautigan,
35:@philosophytweet Perhaps there is a thinking which is more sober-minded than the incessant frenzy of rationalization and the intoxicating quality of cybernetics. One might aver that it is precisely this intoxication that is extremely irrational. ~ Heidegger,
36:Something of the previous state, however, survives every change. This is called in the language of cybernetics (which took it form the language of machines) feedback, the advantages of learning from experience and of having developed reflexes. ~ Guy Davenport,
37:I wrote the first book, Harvest of Stars, and as I was writing it, I saw that certain implications had barely been touched on... It's perfectly obvious that two completely revolutionary things are going on, with cybernetics, and biological science. ~ Poul Anderson,
38:I don't know. I don't actually remember anything from before the surgery."

His eyebrows rose, his blue eyes sucking in all the light of the room. "The cybernetic opetation?"

"No, the sex change."

The doctor's smile faltered.

"I'm joking. ~ Marissa Meyer,
39:Real life is physical. Give me books instead. Give me the invisibility of the contents of books, the thoughts, the ideas, the images. Let me become part of a book. . . . an intertextual being: a book cyborg, or, considering that books aren't cybernetic, perhaps a bibliorg. ~ Scarlett Thomas,
40:You can be happy now as well as every single day you are working toward achieving your goals. When you discover happiness along the way—instead of expecting that you can only be happy once you’ve achieved a goal— then you’ve already fulfilled the promise of Psycho-Cybernetics. ~ Maxwell Maltz,
41:With the subsequent strong support from cybernetics , the concepts of systems thinking and systems theory became integral parts of the established scientific language, and led to numerous new methodologies and applications -- systems engineering, systems analysis, systems dynamics, and so on. ~ Fritjof Capra,
42:The future science of government should be called 'la cybernétique' (1843) Coining the French word to mean 'the art of governing,' from the Greek (Kybernetes = navigator or steersman), subsequently adopted as cybernetics by Norbert Weiner for the field of control and communication theory. ~ Andre Marie Ampere,
43:In Lovelock's view the earth was a 'super-organism,' a cybernetic feedback system that 'seeks an optimal physical and chemical environment for life on this planet.' At the suggestion of his neighbor, author and screenwriter William Goldman, he called the system Gaia after the ancient Greek Earth goddess. ~ Steven Kotler,
44:Strong privacy advocates—especially those promoting encryption and anonymity—may deny that this phenomenon is a direct physical corollary of their message, so I will let the reader decide whether a philosophy that relies on cybernetic gates, walls, and coded locks is any different in its underlying basis—fear. ~ David Brin,
45:Do I believe there is an international conspiracy created by intergalactic lizards to keep us all addicted to television, promote the brainwashing elements of antibacterial soaps, and support the still-alive head of JFK in drawing Excalibur and waging the last noble war against the minions of a cybernetic Walt Disney? ~ Dennis Liggio,
46:Were there many sick people in Europe that you recall? Any notable outbreaks in your province?"
"I don't know. I don't actually remember anything before the surgery."
His eyebrows rose, his blue eyes sucking in all the light of the room. "The cybernetic operation?"
"No, the sex change."
The doctor's smile faltered.
"I'm joking. ~ Marissa Meyer,
47:The GPS unit became almost equally obstreperous, though, over Richard’s unauthorized route change, until they finally passed over some invisible cybernetic watershed between two possible ways of getting to their destination, and it changed its fickle little mind and began calmly telling him which way to proceed as if this had been its idea all along. ~ Neal Stephenson,
48:According to the science of cybernetics, which deals with the topic of control in every kind of system (mechanical, electronic, biological, human, economic, and so on), there is a natural law that governs the capacity of a control system to work. It says that the control must be capable of generating as much "variety" as the situation to be controlled. ~ Anthony Stafford Beer,
49:Some of the fantasy objects arising from cybernetic totalism (like the noosphere, which is a supposed global brain formed by the sum of all the human brains connected through the
internet) happen to motivate infelicitous technological designs.
For instance, designs that celebrate the noosphere tend to energize the inner troll, or bad actor, within humans. ~ Jaron Lanier,
50:The old slogan 'truth is stranger than fiction,' that still corresponded to the surrealist phase of this estheticization of life, is obsolete. There is no more fiction that life could possibly confront, even victoriously-it is reality itself that disappears utterly in the game of reality-radical disenchantment, the cool and cybernetic phase following the hot stage of fantasy. ~ Jean Baudrillard,
51:By the 1980s, the wristwatch had become, as York University humanities professor Douglas Freake dubs it, “perhaps the most important cybernetic device in contemporary industrialized societies.” We were cyborgs of time. And slaves, too, as critics pointed out. Wristwatches may have made us more efficient, but as humanists had long fretted, perhaps total efficiency is a creepy goal for everyday life. ~ Anonymous,
52:The ship had always been vast and intricate, its topology as unfathomable as the abandoned subway system of a deserted metropolis. It had been a ship haunted by many ghosts, not all of which were necessarily cybernetic or imaginary. Winds had sighed up and down its kilometres of empty corridors. It was infested with rats, stalked by machines and madmen. It had moods and fevers, like an old house. ~ Alastair Reynolds,
53:The Encyclopedia Galactica defines a robot as a mechanical apparatus designed to do the work of a man. The marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation defines a robot as "Your Plastic Pal Who's Fun to Be With. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy defines the marketing devision of the Sirius Cybernetic Corporation as "a bunch of mindless jerks who'll be the first against the wall when the revolution comes, ~ Douglas Adams,
54:The Encyclopedia Galactica defines a robot as a mechanical apparatus designed to do the work of a man. The marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation defines a robot as "Your Plastic Pal Who's Fun to Be With. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy defines the marketing devision of the Sirius Cybernetic Corporation as "a bunch of mindless jerks who'll be the first against the wall when the revolution comes. ~ Douglas Adams,
55:West had woken up something inside of me. I never felt more alive than I did when I was with West. West pushed me to be more. More human and yet more cybernetic at the same time. West could go anywhere with me. He could nearly match me step for step on scouting duties, could hunt with me.

But I still didnt fully trust him. West kept too many secrets, had lied to me too many times. And he almost seemed to like to make me angry. ~ Keary Taylor,
56:That idea of the state as a ship and its ruler as the helmsman or captain is a very old one in European culture. It is frequently used by Cicero, and indeed our word ‘governor’ comes from the Latin for ‘helmsman’ – gubernator. Even more enticingly, the root of gubernator is the Greek kubernetes, which is also the origin of our word ‘cybernetics’; so the notions of ruling, steering and robotics all coincide in our language – and in this galleon. ~ Neil MacGregor,
57:One word was floating around in stories about hackings of one sort or another: “cyber.” The word had its roots in “cybernetics,” a term dating back to the mid-nineteenth century, describing the closed loops of information systems. But in its present-day context of computer networks, the term stemmed from William Gibson’s 1984 science-fiction novel, Neuromancer, a wild and eerily prescient tale of murder and mayhem in the virtual world of “cyberspace. ~ Fred Kaplan,
58:To many of us now, computers, silicon chips, data processing, cybernetics, and all the other innovations of the dawning high technology age are as mystifying as the workings of the combustion engine must have been when that first Model T rattled down Main Street, U.S.A. But as surely as America's pioneer spirit made us the industrial giant of the 20th century, the same pioneer spirit today is opening up on another vast front of opportunity, the frontier of high technology. ~ Ronald Reagan,
59:Information wants to be free.' So goes the saying. Stewart Brand, the founder of the Whole Earth Catalog, seems to have said it first.I say that information doesn't deserve to be free.Cybernetic totalists love to think of the stuff as if it were alive and had its own ideas and ambitions. But what if information is inanimate? What if it's even less than inanimate, a mere artifact of human thought? What if only humans are real, and information is not?...Information is alienated experience. ~ Jaron Lanier,
60:We shall have to stop thinking of technology as something invulnerable that is merely used by humans, and view it as part of a greater cybernetic ecology all around us. The key distinction in an environment is not between ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’, but between semantic and dynamic: intention and behaviour. Biology has already drawn these lines, and through us, it will integrate the inanimate with the animate in information systems, until we no longer see a pertinent difference between the two. ~ Mark Burgess,
61:Information wants to be free.' So goes the saying. Stewart Brand, the founder of the Whole Earth Catalog, seems to have said it first.

I say that information doesn't deserve to be free.

Cybernetic totalists love to think of the stuff as if it were alive and had its own ideas and ambitions. But what if information is inanimate? What if it's even less than inanimate, a mere artifact of human thought? What if only humans are real, and information is not?

...

Information is alienated experience. ~ Jaron Lanier,
62:As a practical matter I’ve learned to seek the minimum amount of technology for myself that will create the maximum amount of choices for myself and others. The cybernetician Heinz von Foerster called this approach the Ethical Imperative, and he put it this way: “Always act to increase the number of choices.” The way we can use technologies to increase choices for others is by encouraging science, innovation, education, literacies, and pluralism. In my own experience this principle has never failed: In any game, increase your options. ~ Kevin Kelly,
63:As a practical matter I’ve learned to seek the minimum amount of technology for myself that will create the maximum amount of choices for myself and others. The cybernetician Heinz von Foerster called this approach the Ethical Imperative, and he put it this way: “Always act to increase the number of choices.” The way we can use technologies to increase choices for others is by encouraging science, innovation, education, literacies, and pluralism. In my own experience this principle has never failed: In any game, increase your options.       ~ Kevin Kelly,
64:In his seminal book Antifragile, Nassim Nicholas Taleb shows how the linear model is wrong (or, at best, misleading) in everything from cybernetics, to derivatives, to medicine, to the jet engine. In each case history reveals that these innovations emerged as a consequence of a similar process utilized by the biologists at Unilever, and became encoded in heuristics (rules of thumb) and practical know-how. The problems were often too complex to solve theoretically, or via a blueprint, or in the seminar room. They were solved by failing, learning, and failing again. ~ Matthew Syed,
65:The Encyclopedia Galactica defines a robot as a mechanical apparatus designed to do the work of a man. The marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation defines a robot as “Your Plastic Pal Who’s Fun to Be With.” The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy defines the marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation as “a bunch of mindless jerks who’ll be the first against the wall when the revolution comes,” with a footnote to the effect that the editors would welcome applications from anyone interested in taking over the post of robotics correspondent. ~ Douglas Adams,
66:The transpersonal experiences revealing the Earth as an intelligent, conscious entity are corroborated by scientific evidence. Gregory Bateson, who created a brilliant synthesis of cybernetics, information and systems theory, the theory of evolution, anthropology, and psychology came to the conclusion that it was logically inevitable to assume that mental processes occurred at all levels in any system or natural phenomenon of sufficient complexity. He believed that mental processes are present in cells, organs, tissues, organisms, animal and human groups, eco-systems, and even the earth and universe as a whole. ~ Stanislav Grof,
67:If New Orleans is not fully in the mainstream of culture, neither is it fully in the mainstream of time. Lacking a well-defined present, it lives somewhere between its past and its future, as if uncertain whether to advance or to retreat. Perhaps it is its perpetual ambivalence that is its secret charm. Somewhere between Preservation Hall and the Superdome, between voodoo and cybernetics, New Orleans listens eagerly to the seductive promises of the future but keeps at least one foot firmly planted in its history, and in the end, conforms, like an artist, not to the world but to its own inner being--ever mindful of its personal style. ~ Tom Robbins,
68:I like to think (and
the sooner the better!)
of a cybernetic meadow
where mammels and computers
live together in mutually
programming harmony
like pure water
touching clear sky.

I like to think
(right now, please!)
of a cybernetic forest
filled with pines and electronics
where deer stroll peacefully
past computers
as if they were flowers
with spinning blossoms.
I like to think
(it has to be!)
of a cybernetic ecology
where we are free of our labors
and joined back to nature,
returned to our mammal
brothers and sisters,
and all watched over
by machines of loving grace. ~ Richard Brautigan,
69:Computer cores made if liquid crystal that can re-form itself into any configuration, creating the ultimate efficiency for any particular piece of cybernetic business that needs doing, shifting from storage of data to moving it to analyzing it and the altering to a form most efficient for acting on the analysis.Hearts that can make minds, from little bits if brightness in Cowboy's skull that let him move his panzer, to large models that create working analogs of the human brain, the vast artificial intelligences that keep things moving smoothly for the Orbitals and the governments of the planet.

All in miniature potential, here in the cardboard box. ~ Walter Jon Williams,
70:Computer cores made of liquid crystal that can re-form itself into any configuration, creating the ultimate efficiency for any particular piece of cybernetic business that needs doing, shifting from storage of data to moving it to analyzing it and the altering to a form most efficient for acting on the analysis. Hearts that can make minds, from little bits if brightness in Cowboy's skull that let him move his panzer, to large models that create working analogs of the human brain, the vast artificial intelligences that keep things moving smoothly for the Orbitals and the governments of the planet.

All in miniature potential, here in the cardboard box. ~ Walter Jon Williams,
71:Walking in circles Dr. Jan Souman, of the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, studied what happens to us when we have no map, no compass, no way to determine landmarks. I’m not talking about a metaphor—he researched what happens to people lost in the woods or stumbling around the Sahara, with no north star, no setting sun to guide them. It turns out we walk in circles. Try as we might to walk in a straight line, to get out of the forest or the desert, we end up back where we started. Our instincts aren’t enough. In the words of Dr. Souman, “Don’t trust your senses because even though you might think you are walking in a straight line when you’re not.” Human nature is to need a map. If you’re brave enough to draw one, people will follow. ~ Seth Godin,
72:Over the years, as I listened to the engineering give-and-take over the question of artificial life-forms, I kept coming up against something obdurate inside myself, some stubborn resistance to the definition of “life” that was being promulgated. It seemed to me too reductive of what we are, too mechanistic. Even if I could not quite get myself to believe in God or the soul or the Tao or some other metaphor for the ineffable spark of life, still, as I sat there high in the balcony of the Stanford lecture hall, listening to the cyberneticists’ claims to be on the path toward the creation of a sentient being, I found myself muttering, No, that’s not right, we’re not just mechanisms, you’re missing something, there’s something else, something more. But then I had to ask myself: What else could there be? ~ Ellen Ullman,
73:Share and Enjoy' is the company motto of the hugely successful Sirius Cybernetics Corporation Complaints Division, which now covers the major land masses of three medium-sized planets and is the only part of the Corporation to have shown a consistent profit in recent years.
The motto stands-- or rather stood-- in three mile high illuminated letters near the Complaints Department spaceport on Eadrax. Unfortunately its weight was such that shortly after it was erected, the ground beneath the letters caved in and they dropped for nearly half their length through the offices of many talented young Complaints executives-- now deceased.
The protruding upper halves of the letters now appear, in the local language, to read "Go stick your head in a pig," and are no longer illuminated, except at times of special celebration. ~ Douglas Adams,
74:He had found a Nutri-Matic machine which had provided him with a plastic cup filled with a liquid that was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea. The way it functioned was very interesting. When the Drink button was pressed it made an instant but highly detailed examination of the subject’s taste buds, a spectroscopic analysis of the subject’s metabolism and then sent tiny experimental signals down the neural pathways to the taste centers of the subject’s brain to see what was likely to go down well. However, no one knew quite why it did this because it invariable delivered a cupful of liquid that was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea. The Nutri-Matic was designed and manufactured by the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation whose complaint department now covers all the major landmasses of the first three planets in the Sirius Tau Star system. ~ Douglas Adams,
75:The Encyclopedia Galactica defines a robot as a mechanical apparatus designed to do the work of a man. The marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation defines a robot as “Your Plastic Pal Who’s Fun to Be With.” The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy defines the marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation as “a bunch of mindless jerks who’ll be the first against the wall when the revolution comes,” with a footnote to the effect that the editors would welcome applications from anyone interested in taking over the post of robotics correspondent. Curiously enough, an edition of the Encyclopedia Galactica that had the good fortune to fall through a time warp from a thousand years in the future defined the marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation as “a bunch of mindless jerks who were the first against the wall when the revolution came. ~ Douglas Adams,
76:Norbert Wiener,” Tillingford said. “You recall his work in cybernetics. And, even more important, Enrico Destini’s work in the field of theophonics.” “What’s that?” Tillingford raised an eyebrow. “You are a specialist, my boy. Communication between man and God, of course. Using Wiener’s work, and using the invaluable material of Shannon and Weaver, Destini was able to set up the first really adequate system of communication between Earth and Heaven in 1946. Of course, he had the use of all that equipment from the War Against the Pagan Hordes, those damned Wotan-Worshiping, Oak-Tree-Praising Huns.” “You mean the—Nazis?” “I’m familiar with that term. That’s sociologist jargon, isn’t it? And that Denier of the Prophet, that Anti-Bab. They say he’s still alive down in Argentina. Found the elixir of eternal youth or something. He made that pact with the devil in 1939, you remember. Or was that before your time? But you know about it—it’s history.” “I ~ Philip K Dick,
77:When we are looking for an enemy, we often start by projecting ourselves on an abstract scene, within which the world has disappeared. Let us ask ourselves the same question, but starting from the neighbourhood where we live, from the company where we work, from the professional sector we are familiar with. Then the answer is clear; then the front lines can be distinctly seen, and who is on what side can easily be determined. This is because the question of the confrontation, the properly political question, only makes sense in a given world, in a substantial world. For those who are nowhere, cybernetic philosophers or metropolitan hipsters, the political question never makes sense. It refuses itself to them and leaves them walking backward into abstraction. And that is the price to pay for so much superficiality. As compensation, they will prefer to juggle with some great folkloric significance, to give themselves some post-Maoist or post-situationist thrills.Or, perhaps they will accommodate their nothingness with the last glosses of the ultra-left logorrhoea ~ Anonymous,
78:It seems that there is no unit-animal-which can be scientifically used to account for the facts known to modern cyberneticists. The only unit that can be used is animal-in-environment. What I am suggesting is that the mystics got there before Dr.Ashby, that the "unification" with God or the universe mentioned in all religious literature and in reports of acid trippers and some pot and hashish smokers is precisely the shift of attention from the conscious ego to the previously unconscious organism-environment feedback network. Does this seem an extravagant thought? All mystics have talked about the "unreality" of the ego; are they not trying to say exactly what Dr.Ashby has said? Many speak also, for that matter, of the unreality of space and time, and Einstein was modest enough to acknowledge that they seemed to be talking about the same facts he had noted mathematically. 'You are part of something larger than yourself, something which space and time do not restrict' is what every mystic, in essence, and this is just what Dr.Ashby's homeostat illustrates. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
79:In a stunning 1971 paper, Twenty Things to Do with a Computer, Seymour Papert and Logo co-creator Cynthia Solomon proposed educative computer-based projects for kids. They included composing music, controlling puppets, programming, movie making, mathematical modeling, and a host of other projects that schools should aspire to more than 40 years later. Papert and Solomon also made the case for 1:1 computing and stressed the three game changers discussed later in this book. The school computer should have a large number of output ports to allow the computer to switch lights on and off, start tape recorders, actuate slide projectors and start and stop all manner of little machines. There should also be input ports to allow signals to be sent to the computer. In our image of a school computation laboratory, an important role is played by numerous “controller ports” which allow any student to plug any device into the computer… The laboratory will have a supply of motors, solenoids, relays, sense devices of various kids, etc. Using them, the students will be able to invent and build an endless variety of cybernetic systems. ~ Anonymous,
80:He [Karl Deutsch] recommended abandoning the old concept that power was sovereign, which had too long been the essence of politics. To govern would become a rational coordination of the flows of information and decisions that circulate through the social body. Three conditions would need to be met, he said: an ensemble of 'capturers' would have to be installed so that no information originating from the “subjects” would be lost; information handling by correlation and association; and a proximity to every living community. The cybernetic modernization of power and the expired forms of social authority thus can be seen as the visible production of what Adam Smith called the “invisible hand,” which until then had served as the mystical keystone of liberal experimentation. The communications system would be the nerve system of societies, the source and destination of all power. The cybernetic hypothesis thus expresses no more or less than the politics of the “end of politics.” It represents at the same time both a paradigm and a technique of government. Its study shows that the police is not just an organ of power, but also a way of thinking. ~ Tiqqun,
81:What if one were to want to hunt for these hidden presences? You can’t just rummage around like you’re at a yard sale. You have to listen. You have to pay attention. There are certain things you can’t look at directly. You need to trick them into revealing themselves. That’s what we’re doing with Walter, Jaz. We’re juxtaposing things, listening for echoes. It’s not some silly cybernetic dream of command and control, modeling the whole world so you can predict the outcome. It’s certainly not a theory of everything. I don’t have a theory of any kind. What I have is far more profound.’

‘What’s that?’

‘A sense of humor.’

Jaz looked at him, trying to find a clue in his gaunt face, in the clear gray eyes watching him with such - what? Amusement? Condescension? There was something about the man which brought on a sort of hermeneutic despair. He was a forest of signs.

‘We’re hunting for jokes.’ Bachman spoke slowly, as if to a child. ‘Parapraxes. Cosmic slips of the tongue. They’re the key to the locked door. They’ll help us discover it.’

‘Discover what?’

‘The face of God. What else would we be looking for? ~ Hari Kunzru,
82:The intentions of the cybernetic totalist tribe are good. They are simply following a path that was blazed in earlier times by well-meaning Freudians and Marxists - and I don't mean that in a pejorative way. I'm thinking of the earliest incarnations of Marxism, for instance, before
Stalinism and Maoism killed millions.

Movements associated with Freud and Marx both claimed foundations in rationality and the scientific understanding of the world. Both perceived themselves to be at war with the weird, manipulative fantasies of religions. And yet both invented their own fantasies that were just as weird.

The same thing is happening again. A self-proclaimed materialist movement that attempts to base itself on science starts to look like a religion rather quickly. It soon presents its own eschatology and its own revelations about what is really going on - portentous events that no one but the initiated can appreciate. The Singularity and the noosphere, the idea that a collective consciousness emerges from all the users on the web, echo Marxist social determinism and Freud's calculus of perversions. We rush ahead of skeptical, scientific inquiry at our peril, just like the Marxists and Freudians. ~ Jaron Lanier,
83:Modern elevators are strange and complex entities. The ancient electric winch and “maximum-capacity-eight-persons" jobs bear as much relation to a Sirius Cybernetics Corporation Happy Vertical People Transporter as a packet of mixed nuts does to the entire west wing of the Sirian State Mental Hospital.
This is because they operate on the curious principle of “defocused temporal perception.” In other words they have the capacity to see dimly into the immediate future, which enables the elevator to be on the right floor to pick you up even before you knew you wanted it, thus eliminating all the tedious chatting, relaxing and making friends that people were previously forced to do while waiting for elevators.
Not unnaturally, many elevators imbued with intelligence and precognition became terribly frustrated with the mindless business of going up and down, up and down, experimented briefly with the notion of going sideways, as a sort of existential protest, demanded participation in the decision-making process and finally took to squatting in basements sulking.
An impoverished hitchhiker visiting any planets in the Sirius star system these days can pick up easy money working as a counselor for neurotic elevators. ~ Douglas Adams,
84:Thank you, for creating this vast and flexible playground. Thank you for creating one of the twentieth century's most popular myths, a gift that has brought billions of happy viewing hours at a critical time in world history, a time when perhaps, we need more than ever to blieve in honor, sacrifice, heart, and that special magic called life itself.
As long as I live I will never forget The Moment when Luke Skywalker flew so desperately into the Death Star's trench, John William's score soaring magnificently, and the audience overwhelmed by Industrial Light and Magic's mind-bending inaugural. At that pulse-pounding moment, a moment when it seemed the individual human being could have no point or purpose, no meaning in a universe so vast and cybernetic, we heard Obi-Wan Kenobi whisper that we should trust our feelings.
The Force flows through us. It controls us. We control it. Life creates it. It is more powerful than any Death Star.
Hundreds of millions of people said yes, and sighed, and applauded, and went home or turned off their videos feeling just a little more empowered than they did before the lights went down and the Twentieth Century-Fox fanfare came up.
No small feat.
May the Force be with you, Mr. Lucas.
And with us all. Always". ~ Steven Barnes,
85:There are a dozen different ways of delivering destruction in impersonal wholesale, via ships and missiles of one sort or another, catastrophes so widespread, so unselective, that the war is over because that nation or planet has ceased to exist. What we do is entirely different. We make war as personal as a punch in the nose. We can be selective, applying precisely the required amount of pressure at the specified point at a designated time . . . .
We are the boys who go to a particular place, at H-hour, occupy a designated terrain, stand on it, dig the enemy out of their holes, force them then and there to surrender or die. We're the bloody infantry, the doughboy, the duckfoot, the foot soldier who goes where the enemy is and takes him on in person. We've been doing it, with changes in weapons but very little change in our trade, at least since the time five thousand years ago when the foot sloggers of Sargon the Great forced the Sumerians to cry "Uncle!"
Maybe they'll be able to do without us someday. Maybe some mad enius with myopia, a bulging forehead, and a cybernetic mind will devise a weapon that can go down a hole, pick out the opposition, adn force it to surrender or die--without killing that gang of your own people they've got imprisoned down there. I wouldn't know; I'm not a genius, I'm an M.I. In the meantime, until they build a machine to replace us, my mates can handle that job--and I might be some help on it, too. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
86:He approached the great glass barrier dividing the room, and the speaker at the end of the table. "Cyclops?" he whispered, stepping closer, clearing his tight throat, "Cyclops, it's me, Gordon."
The glow in the pearly lens was subdued. But the row of little lights still flashed--a complex pattern that repeated over and over like an urgent message from a distant ship in some lost code--ever, hypnotically, the same.
Gordon felt a frantic dread rise within him, as when, during his boyhood, he had encountered his grandfather lying perfectly still on the porch swing, and feared to find that the beloved old man had died.
The pattern of lights repeated, over and over.
Gordon wondered. How many people would recall, after the hell of the last seventeen years, that the parity displays of a great supercomputer never repeated themselves? Gordon remembered a cyberneticist friend telling him the patterns of light were like snowflakes, none ever the same as any other.
"Cyclops," he said evenly, "Answer me! I demand you answer--in the name of decency! In the name of the United St--"
He stopped. He couldn't bring himself to meet this lie with another. Here, the only living mind he would fool would be himself.
The room was warmer than it had seemed during his interview. He looked for, and found, the little vents through which cool air could be directed at a visitor seated in the guest chair, giving an impression of great cold just beyond the glass wall.
"Dry ice," he muttered, "to fool the citizens of Oz. ~ David Brin,
87:The Enlightenment emphasized ways of learning that weren’t subservient to human power hierarchies. Instead, Enlightenment thinking celebrates evidence-based scientific method and reasoning. The cultures of sciences and engineering used to embrace Enlightenment epistemology, but now they have been overridden by horribly regressive BUMMER epistemology. You probably know the word “meme” as meaning a BUMMER posting that can go viral. But originally, “meme” suggested a philosophy of thought and meaning. The term was coined by the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins. Dawkins proposed memes as units of culture that compete and are either passed along or not, according to a pseudo-Darwinian selection process. Thus some fashions, ideas, and habits take hold, while others become extinct. The concept of memes provides a way of framing everything non-nerds do—the whole of humanities, culture, arts, and politics—as similar instances of meme competition, mere subroutines of a higher-level algorithm that nerds can master. When the internet took of, Dawkins’s ideas were in vogue, because they flattered techies. There was a ubiquitous genre of internet appreciation from the very beginning in which someone would point out the viral spread of a meme and admire how cute that was. The genre exists to this day. Memes started out as a way of expressing solidarity with a philosophy I used to call cybernetic totalism that still underlies BUMMER. Memes might seem to amplify what you are saying, but that is always an illusion. You might launch an infectious meme about a political figure, and you might be making a great point, but in the larger picture, you are reinforcing the idea that virality is truth. Your point will be undone by whatever other point is more viral. That is by design. The architects of BUMMER were meme believers. ~ Jaron Lanier,
88:Certainly not! I didn't build a machine to solve ridiculous crossword puzzles! That's hack work, not Great Art! Just give it a topic, any topic, as difficult as you like..."
Klapaucius thought, and thought some more. Finally he nodded and said:
"Very well. Let's have a love poem, lyrical, pastoral, and expressed in the language of pure mathematics. Tensor algebra mainly, with a little topology and higher calculus, if need be. But with feeling, you understand, and in the cybernetic spirit."
"Love and tensor algebra?" Have you taken leave of your senses?" Trurl began, but stopped, for his electronic bard was already declaiming:

Come, let us hasten to a higher plane,
Where dyads tread the fairy fields of Venn,
Their indices bedecked from one to n,
Commingled in an endless Markov chain!

Come, every frustum longs to be a cone,
And every vector dreams of matrices.
Hark to the gentle gradient of the breeze:
It whispers of a more ergodic zone.

In Reimann, Hilbert or in Banach space
Let superscripts and subscripts go their ways.
Our asymptotes no longer out of phase,
We shall encounter, counting, face to face.

I'll grant thee random access to my heart,
Thou'lt tell me all the constants of thy love;
And so we two shall all love's lemmas prove,
And in bound partition never part.

For what did Cauchy know, or Christoffel,
Or Fourier, or any Boole or Euler,
Wielding their compasses, their pens and rulers,
Of thy supernal sinusoidal spell?

Cancel me not--for what then shall remain?
Abscissas, some mantissas, modules, modes,
A root or two, a torus and a node:
The inverse of my verse, a null domain.

Ellipse of bliss, converge, O lips divine!
The product of our scalars is defined!
Cyberiad draws nigh, and the skew mind
Cuts capers like a happy haversine.

I see the eigenvalue in thine eye,
I hear the tender tensor in thy sigh.
Bernoulli would have been content to die,
Had he but known such a^2 cos 2 phi! ~ Stanis aw Lem,
89:Ultimately, the roast turkey must be regarded as a monument to Boomer's love.

Look at it now, plump and glossy, floating across Idaho as if it were a mammoth, mutated seed pod. Hear how it backfires as it passes the silver mines, perhaps in tribute to the origin of the knives and forks of splendid sterling that a roast turkey and a roast turkey alone possesses the charisma to draw forth into festivity from dark cupboards.

See how it glides through the potato fields, familiarly at home among potatoes but with an air of expectation, as if waiting for the flood of gravy.

The roast turkey carries with it, in its chubby hold, a sizable portion of our primitive and pagan luggage.

Primitive and pagan? Us? We of the laser, we of the microchip, we of the Union Theological Seminary and Time magazine? Of course. At least twice a year, do not millions upon millions of us cybernetic Christians and fax machine Jews participate in a ritual, a highly stylized ceremony that takes place around a large dead bird?

And is not this animal sacrificed, as in days of yore, to catch the attention of a divine spirit, to show gratitude for blessings bestowed, and to petition for blessings coveted?

The turkey, slain, slowly cooked over our gas or electric fires, is the central figure at our holy feast. It is the totem animal that brings our tribe together.

And because it is an awkward, intractable creature, the serving of it establishes and reinforces the tribal hierarchy. There are but two legs, two wings, a certain amount of white meat, a given quantity of dark. Who gets which piece; who, in fact, slices the bird and distributes its limbs and organs, underscores quite emphatically the rank of each member in the gathering.

Consider that the legs of this bird are called 'drumsticks,' after the ritual objects employed to extract the music from the most aboriginal and sacred of instruments. Our ancestors, kept their drums in public, but the sticks, being more actively magical, usually were stored in places known only to the shaman, the medicine man, the high priest, of the Wise Old Woman. The wing of the fowl gives symbolic flight to the soul, but with the drumstick is evoked the best of the pulse of the heart of the universe.

Few of us nowadays participate in the actual hunting and killing of the turkey, but almost all of us watch, frequently with deep emotion, the reenactment of those events. We watch it on TV sets immediately before the communal meal. For what are footballs if not metaphorical turkeys, flying up and down a meadow? And what is a touchdown if not a kill, achieved by one or the other of two opposing tribes? To our applause, great young hungers from Alabama or Notre Dame slay the bird. Then, the Wise Old Woman, in the guise of Grandma, calls us to the table, where we, pretending to be no longer primitive, systematically rip the bird asunder.

Was Boomer Petaway aware of the totemic implications when, to impress his beloved, he fabricated an outsize Thanksgiving centerpiece? No, not consciously. If and when the last veil dropped, he might comprehend what he had wrought. For the present, however, he was as ignorant as Can o' Beans, Spoon, and Dirty Sock were, before Painted Stick and Conch Shell drew their attention to similar affairs.

Nevertheless, it was Boomer who piloted the gobble-stilled butterball across Idaho, who negotiated it through the natural carving knives of the Sawtooth Mountains, who once or twice parked it in wilderness rest stops, causing adjacent flora to assume the appearance of parsley. ~ Tom Robbins,
90:Let us fool ourselves no longer. At the very moment Western nations, threw off the ancient regime of absolute government, operating under a once-divine king, they were restoring this same system in a far more effective form in their technology, reintroducing coercions of a military character no less strict in the organization of a factory than in that of the new drilled, uniformed, and regimented army. During the transitional stages of the last two centuries, the ultimate tendency of this system might b e in doubt, for in many areas there were strong democratic reactions; but with the knitting together of a scientific ideology, itself liberated from theological restrictions or humanistic purposes, authoritarian technics found an instrument at hand that h as now given it absolute command of physical energies of cosmic dimensions. The inventors of nuclear bombs, space rockets, and computers are the pyramid builders of our own age: psychologically inflated by a similar myth of unqualified power, boasting through their science of their increasing omnipotence, if not omniscience, moved by obsessions and compulsions no less irrational than those of earlier absolute systems: particularly the notion that the system itself must be expanded, at whatever eventual co st to life.

Through mechanization, automation, cybernetic direction, this authoritarian technics has at last successfully overcome its most serious weakness: its original dependence upon resistant, sometimes actively disobedient servomechanisms, still human enough to harbor purposes that do not always coincide with those of the system.

Like the earliest form of authoritarian technics, this new technology is marvellously dynamic and productive: its power in every form tends to increase without limits, in quantities that defy assimilation and defeat control, whether we are thinking of the output of scientific knowledge or of industrial assembly lines. To maximize energy, speed, or automation, without reference to the complex conditions that sustain organic life, have become ends in themselves. As with the earliest forms of authoritarian technics, the weight of effort, if one is to judge by national budgets, is toward absolute instruments of destruction, designed for absolutely irrational purposes whose chief by-product would be the mutilation or extermination of the human race. Even Ashurbanipal and Genghis Khan performed their gory operations under normal human limits.

The center of authority in this new system is no longer a visible personality, an all-powerful king: even in totalitarian dictatorships the center now lies in the system itself, invisible but omnipresent: all its human components, even the technical and managerial elite, even the sacred priesthood of science, who alone have access to the secret knowledge by means of which total control is now swiftly being effected, are themselves trapped by the very perfection of the organization they have invented. Like the Pharoahs of the Pyramid Age, these servants of the system identify its goods with their own kind of well-being: as with the divine king, their praise of the system is an act of self-worship; and again like the king, they are in the grip of an irrational compulsion to extend their means of control and expand the scope of their authority. In this new systems-centered collective, this Pentagon of power, there is no visible presence who issues commands: unlike job's God, the new deities cannot be confronted, still less defied. Under the pretext of saving labor, the ultimate end of this technics is to displace life, or rather, to transfer the attributes of life to the machine and the mechanical collective, allowing only so much of the organism to remain as may be controlled and manipulated. ~ Lewis Mumford,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



4







1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature, #Sex Ecology Spirituality, #Ken Wilber, #Philosophy
  
  But, and this is very telling, development can take a cynical turn at this stage. Instead of being the principle lending unity and integrity to experience and behavior, the self is simply identified with experience and behavior. In the cynical behavioristic turn of this stage, "the person is a Cybernetic system guided to fulfillment of its material wants.
  
  --
  
  The world is seen as a great relativistic Cybernetic system, so "holistic" that it leaves no room for the actual subject in the objective network. The self therefore hovers above reality, disengaged, disenchanted, disembodied. It is "close to a solipsistic position": hyperagency cut off from all communions. And this, as we have seen, is essentially the fundamental Enlightenment paradigm: a perfectly holistic world that leaves a perfectly atomistic self.8
  

3-5_Full_Circle, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  This seminar is designed first of all to provide an orientation to a newly developed, simplified approach to establishing functional communications bridgeheads between the social, biological and physical sciences, and the humanities and fine arts.
  To this end, the techniques of traditional specialization are extended to the task of assembling the basic data of the traditional sciences into a master or meta-scientific model. Analogous concepts and processes in different fields--e.g., a generalized form of the Cybernetic process--are used as common denominators of all. The model serves as an intellectual road map to help the specialist in any field identify, reach, and interpret facts, principles, and processes which are especially relevant in other fields.
  The other principal purpose of the seminar is to apply this unified conception of science to the task of attacking systematically the major educational, social, political, and technical problems of our day.
  --
  Being an economist who had already developed a broad economizing model for interpreting the universe of organized energy before meeting Mr. Haskell two years ago, I have blended his model into the economizing framework. A brief sketch of that master model will set the stage for describing the nature and importance of the task of developing a meta-language of the sciences, and for describing the particular approach we are developing at the SCSC Center for I-D Creativity.
  3. ECO-Cybernetic COACTION THEORY
  The synthesizing model of knowledge developed at the SCSC Center for I-D Creativity prior to the important link-up with Mr. Haskell's Cybernetic coaction model is being called "eco-Cybernetics." Eco-Cybernetics fits the Cybernetic communications apparatus into the broader framework of the generic means-ends or economizing process. By linking functionally the Cybernetic flows of information with the economizing tasks of selecting aims, setting priorities, devising strategies, and identifying criteria for evaluation, it is possible to develop a more functional and simpler synthesis of knowledge in all disciplines. Thus we have a symbiotic, mutually-reinforcing relationship between Cybernetic and economizing principles. Whereas Cybernetics provides a basis for describing the patterns of inter-actions among the components of a system (and its environment), economizing principles provide a partial basis for explaining these patterns-why they emerge, what they are likely to lead to, and what alternative courses of action are available.
  All of these economizing-Cybernetic processes take place within the context of general ecology which includes human as well as natural ecology. Hence, the scope and purpose of general ecology are combined with generalized versions of the decision-making, economizing process of economics and the information control processes of Cybernetics.
  Several unique features of Mr. Haskell's coaction Cybernetics make it superior to traditional Cybernetics for our purposes. First, this coaction Cybernetics is much broader in scope than is traditional Cybernetics. It might be called Cybernetics, "sub-Cybernetics," and "supra-Cybernetics." Cybernetics is the middle link in a chain of evolution from such sub-Cybernetic (closed) systems as atoms and the "Cybernetic-plus" systems such as human societies which have communications capabilities and operating characteristics which keep them from being considered to be Cybernetic systems in traditional circles.
  Second, by interpreting Mendeleev's Periodic Table in "Cybernetic" terms, and then developing the Cybernetic counterpart of that table in each of several other disciplines, Mr. Haskell has been able not only to show the inter-relatedness of the various disciplines but also to express many of the key relationships in geometric terms. To think that the way may have been opened to express human values geometrically and in a way that can be related geometrically to other "values" is indeed remarkable.
  A third unique and helpful feature of this coaction Cybernetic model should be mentioned. That is the fact that it preserves the basic content and structure of each of the traditional sciences while adding the dimensions of general pattern and order, responsiveness and coordination. It mainly adds a specially "coded," conceptual lens for viewing the various sciences, and a more functional and operational way for approaching the various disciplines so as to interrelate them meaningfully and to convert more facts into usable knowledge.
  This third unique feature may prove to be quite important in minimizing the amount and difficulty of changes a one-field specialist will need to encounter in up-dating his work. The specialist is not asked to forget what he knows and begin again, but rather to reorient his image of his field.
  --
  Generalized forms of such economic principles as comparative advantage, diminishing returns and alternative cost are assumed to have just as much to do with the structure and functioning of an ant colony or a biological cell as they do with the operation of a business firm.
  Likewise, such Cybernetic concepts as input, output, sensor, controller, effector and feedback are assumed to have just as much to do with the operation of an economic market as they do with the functioning of the human nervous system or an engineering quality control process.
  
  --
  This is why our seminar students who answered your questionnaire found "Assembly of the Sciences" on the average 3.76 times as meaningful, relevant, and useful as the average graduate and undergraduate course they had taken.
  This American execution of the Royal Society's second objective is possibly more important than reaching the moon. It facilitates and improves education here, and potentially around the world, three or four times over right at the start. It makes possible the inter-disciplinary research essential to the successful management of our complex system of ecosystems. It permits, as shown in your conference, the restatement of ancient religious truths in modern Cybernetic terms. And it successfully transfers political controversies from the barricade to the blackboard, as also demonstrated in practice elsewhere.
  Unified science not only vitalizes education and research, but redirects dangerous religious and ideological cold wars into warm teamwork.
  --
  FIGURE III-3
  Another part of the challenge inheres in the global political setting in which both scientific research and education take place. Our national aspiration to send men to Mars and return them safely could be considered within this context. Because of the great economic and engineering capabilities required, we, as a nation, might do well to consider teaming up with the Soviet Union for this venture. We know that the Russians are quite advanced in the development and application of broad-gaged Cybernetic and other broad systems models to political, scientific, and economic ventures.
  In view of these considerations, along with the extremely important capabilities of unified science models, might there be something this group gathered here might be able to do to dramatize the potentials for global progress, which might result from concerted cooperative action to launch some form of this mental space vehicle? Could we, for example, initiate action leading toward a dramatic proposal that the governments of the USA and the USSR jointly appoint a global task force for exploring the possibilities of joint exploration of both physical and intellectual space?
  --
  5. This section is adapted largely from J. W. Clark, "Quantum Leaps in Education," CONNECTICUT INDUSTRY (Vol. 47, No. 5), May, 1969.
  6. The general nature and content of this eco-Cybernetic model are described in J. W. and J. S. Clark, eds., Systems Education Patterns on the Drawing Boards far the Future, Kazanjian Economics Foundation, 1969, chapters 6 and 7. Another article which provides additional background information is J. W. Clark, "Facing the Crisis of Intellectual Poverty," Speech Journal, Spring, 1968 (scheduled to be reprinted in a forthcoming issue of The Journal of Creative Behavior) .
  7. Transactions of the New York Academy of Sciences, January, 1968.
  --
  A small web-of-life was mapped in Figure II-14. We progress now to map part of the similar, but higher and more subtile web-of-mind.
  The first step is to map famous and familiar territory: the Cybernetic structure of a stable and growing human ecosystem, translating its traditional terms into Unified Science's general and orderable terms, and setting our course by what Heisenberg calls our compass: our relationship with the central order.
  This order, abstracted from the whole System-hierarchy, is System-theoretic in nature. It is thus, as Northrop advocates, deductively formulated and operationally verifiable. The second step will then be to map a previously bewildering detail within the bigger map. Namely, the exploratory "voyages" being made by some American colleges and universities whose destinations, this map and compass predict, will prove disastrous. By such prediction--and by computer simulation which this mapping permits and which, if opportunity to do so were provided, would be faster and cheaper--we might prevent irreversible destruction.
  The big map represents the territory described by three explorers whose discoveries supplement each other and coincide with the central order described in Chapter II. Arnold Toynbee's Study of History,7 Digby Baltzell's "Protestant Establishment--Aristocracy and Caste in America",15 and Lloyd Warner and associates Yankee City Series.9 Using the characteristic numbers set forth in the Periodic Table of Human Cultures, the following map outlines the Cybernetic structure of human cultures.
  Its principles are precisely the same as those displayed by the preceding members of the Systems-hierarchy. (That is why we say that the universe is deeply simple.) Yet their human manifestation has important new characteristics. (That's why we say that the universe is richly strange.)
  The strategic principle of all Cybernetic systems is that the structure of the controller must correspond to the structure of the work component on one hand, and to the system's environment, structure on the other, relating them to each other in such ways that the system survives.
  Nobody, as a rule, disputes this statement. But when I point out the implication--to survive, its controlling Minority must see the world as a Systems-hierarchy and think in terms of Unified Science--someone usually retorts that no Minority in the world sees and thinks in these terms. This springs the trap: someone else then points out that this is true, and that consequently every industrial culture in the world is breaking down and disintegrating! If anyone objects, a few well known statistics clinch the point.
  --
  Toynbee's famous terms Minority and Majority are obviously here in use. When their coactions are predominantly negative, he distinguishes the two kinds of Majority as Internal Proletariat and External Proletariat. When their coactions with the Minority are positive, he still recognizes these categories, but calls the External Proletariat by relatively neutral names such as (for ancient Greece and Rome) Barbarians. Yet I think he would recognize and approve of the set I have called External Majority.17
  Baltzell fully recognizes the Minority, which he calls the Establishment. He calls it Aristocracy when it is coacting positively, and Caste when coacting negatively with the Majority. He distinguishes both of the necessary kinds of Cybernetic relations: the authoritative, which maintains the Minority's control; and the liberal-democratic which keeps open its communication with the Majority. Baltzell also recognizes the Majority. He constantly shows important distinctions between the Inner Majority (those belonging to the same race and nationality as the Minority) and the External Majority (those belonging to nationalities and races difl'erent from Minority's). Though he does not name the latter as a set, I am persuaded that he would probably agree to the validity of this recognition.l8
  Continuing, now, to discuss our map, Lloyd Warner recognized the leadership and control function of the two highest Strata of Yankee City; also, several work and followership functions of the first four Strata. He showed that the control and leadership function had been unequivocal one and two generations before the study was made, as Baltzell shows it to have been throughout the United States-not as clear as it had been under America's Founding Fathers, but still indisputable. Warner showed two different changes going on simultaneously: decline of control itself, and negativization of coaction between controller and work component.
  --
  Controlling Strata hide this schizm of the soul from themselves because its recognition puts creative leadership out of the question, and they don't want to know it. They try to hide it from the Majority by means of the second change disclosed by Warner's studys: they increase the social distance between them and the Majority. Thereby, however, they transform their aristocracy into caste, and change their coaction from creative leadership ( + , + ) into predation ( - , +). With this, the society's "rhythm of disintegration"7 gets under way. See Yankee City, Volume IV, The Strike.22
  The point is this: the breakdown of Yankee City's Cybernetic structure--the decline of clear distinctions between work component and controller--is not a peculiarity of the United States, but a well known symptom of systemic breakdown generally. The basic and essential distinction between controller and work component had been clear under the nation's Founders;23 its breakdown had been foreseen by de Tocqueville early in the l9th century;24 and his prediction had reached a fairly advanced state of fulfilment when Warner and his associates studied Yankee City, and Baltzell studied America. I firmly believe Lloyd Warner would, if he were living, concur with this diagnosis.25
  As for the External Majority, Warner and Lunt discussed a part of it in their chapter on "The Ethnic Minorities of Yankee City".9 Moreover, the entire Volume V of the Series is devoted to this part of the External Majority.26 Beyond this, however, Warner was a traditional anthropologist: he studied Period I peoples (Lower Hunters) and other sub-literate peoples in isolation from the Lower Industrial system, rather than as its External Majority. (He had to do this because these essential data were vanishing fast, and could never be retrieved, once they were gone!) He would though, I believe, have assented readily to this concept, which grows more obvious with each passing year.27
  --
  Formulation of Effective University Social Structure.
  When a complex mechanism has complexly deteriorated and broken down, the first thing the repair engineer needs to see is the blueprint of the system when it was new, and working correctly. For, as Abraham Lincoln said of the damaged social system whose controller he was trying to restore, "If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could better judge what to do, and how to do it." A breakdown can be made only relative to the condition of "normality." Figure IV-5 gives us this "base line" for Lower Industrial civilization, formulated deductively. Relative to this "blue print" of the normal Lower Industrial system, we can now map the structure of the "normal," "correctly" (Cybernetically) working university.
  The structure of the university's widespread current breakdown, actively engineered by social technologists who have misconstrued human kind's genetico-psycho-social structure, can then be understood much better. It is, of course, widely sensed without the benefit of maps. Sensing, however, is what the patient does. Curing is quite another thing: it begins with understanding of "where we are, and whither we are tending;" from there it sets its course.
  The following map represents an ideal which administrations and trustees of top colleges in Britain, the United States and the U.S.S.R. have striven to approximate. When a complex mechanism has complexly deteriorated and broken down, the first thing the repair engineer needs to see is the blueprint of the system when it was new, and working correctly. For, as Abraham Lincoln said of the damaged social system whose controller he was trying to restore, "If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could better judge what to do, and how to do it." A breakdown can be made only relative to the condition of "normality." Figure IV-5 gives us this "base line" for Lower Industrial civilization, formulated deductively. Relative to this "blue print" of the normal Lower Industrial system, we can now map the structure of the "normal," "correctly" (Cybernetically) working university.
  The structure of the university's widespread current breakdown, actively engineered by social technologists who have misconstrued human kind's genetico-psycho-social structure, can then be understood much better. It is, of course, widely sensed without the benefit of maps. Sensing, however, is what the patient does. Curing is quite another thing: it begins with understanding of "where we are, and whither we are tending;" from there it sets its course.
  --
  FIGURE IV-6 A web-of-mind: Academic institution for the transformation of top genotypic potentials into phenotypic actualities.
  This university's objective is to train the highest possible proportion of the innately ablest young people for the most responsible positions, and to weld them into the efl'ectively operating (Cybernetic) controller of the nation's, and thereby to some extent the world's destiny. All of its faculty therefore belong to the Lower Industrial civilization (Period 6 at the base of their characteristic number); they all have the highest inborn (genotypic) potential (6 at the top).
  The main student body (85%) have the same Period and Stratum as the faculty. Only their ontogenetic development stages are different: Sub-strata 3 and 4. This faculty develops these students optimally; and these students' consequent creative performance--especially when they have become part of society's controlling structure--raises faculty success, increases this faculty's reputation and rewards. Their coaction is thus strongly symbiotic ( +, + ) .
  --
  FIGURE IV-7 A web-of-mind: Non-academic institution for the transformation of top genotypic potentials into phenotypic actualities. The "real" world: a school of hard knocks.
  Its education must therefore be constantly brought "down from the gallery of spectators and analysts into the arena with the contenders." This education is essential training for the exacting, hard-nosed task of governing a country. Many of America's Founders combined the two kinds of education mapped in Figures IV-6 and IV-7. As a result, they ran the country in a Cybernetically feasible way.23 Few modern American students, on the other hand, now get either kind of education. As a result "there has developed in this country," as Walter Lipmann pointed out long ago, "a functional derangement of the relationship between the mass of the people and the government".19 This derangement will presently be specified and mapped.
  But first, a report on the combination of these two complementary aspects of a Minority's education by the Soviet Government. This report was made in 1967 to the New York Chapter of the Society for General Research by a well known personage who had just returned from an extremely friendly visit to the U.S.S.R. The meeting was held at the New York Academy of Sciences under my chairmanship, and I paraphrase my notes.
  --
  This is as far as I paraphrase my notes. It should, however, be pointed out parenthetically that these students' sporadic attendance at public institutions also serves the important function of veiling their strategic schools' existence. This veiling is not arbitrary: the Majority people--as Figures IV-2, IV-3, and IV-4 indicate--having lower abstraction ceilings, are more or less aphasic and agnosic to the Minority's highest and most important levels of abstraction. They do not clearly understand the culture's need for such exclusive schools. So, if they knew of these schools' existence, they would demand open admission to them, breaking them down to the Majority's lower ceilings, as diagrammed below. This would, in time, bring to the Soviet Union what Lippmann calls the "functional derangement between the mass of the people [Majority] and the government [Minority] ."
  To prevent this, and yet maintain such special schooling openly, the authorities would be obliged to explain and massively advocate the Cybernetically efFective relation between Majority and Minority. But this would seriously hamper their currently successful disorganization of education abroad, not to mention openly contradicting their promise of "classless" society some day in the Soviet Union. Both of these unacceptable alternatives have been avoided by keeping secret the existence of Soviet schools for Philosopher Kings.
  How, then, could the public disclosure of them in the present book be countered? Two ways present themselves: these schools' existence could be denied, and this description be denounced as fabrication. That would however be quite useless since, as the authorities know, this disclosure can be backed by much more detailed evidence, including first hand accounts.
  --
  The Opposite Derangements of Government.
  Our model of Leibniz's Universal Characteristic can now be applied to rational settlement of the major reciprocal political questions of our century: the breakdown of working democracies, on one hand by egalitarian democracy, and on the other hand by dictatorial autocracy. Walter Lippmann has analysed what has been happening quite effectively; that is to say, Cybernetically. A few short excerpts from his famous book, with the appropriate interpolations, will complete the large and dynamic map of Industrial civilization outlined above. The consequences of open (blind) university admission policy on one hand and of the development of well matched key-lock colleges, universities, trade-schools etc. on the other hand will then become much clearer than before, making prediction possible. We will conclude by verifying our prediction in terms of a concrete case: New York's City College.
  "The more I have brooded upon the events which I have lived through myself," Lippmann wrote in 1955, "the more astounding and significant does it seem that the decline of power and influence and self confidence of Western democracies has been so steep and so sudden. [It has been steeper yet in the years since he wrote this presage.] We have fallen far in a short space of time... What we have seen is not only decay--though much of the old structure was dissolving--but something which can be called an historic catastrophe."19,30 p.15.
  And what is this catastrophe? "In the effort to understand the malady of democratic government," Lippmann replies some forty pages later on, "I have dwelt upon the underlying duality of functions: governing, that is, the administration of the laws [which Cyberneticians call control] and representing the living persons who are governed, who must pay, who must work and, it may be, die for the acts of the government (which we call feedback to the controller from the output of the work component]. I attribute the democratic disaster of the twentieth century to the derangement of these primary (Cybernetic] functions.
  "The power of the executive [the controller) has been enfeebled, often to the verge of impotence, by the pressures of the representative assembly and of mass opinions [the work component). This derangement of the governing power has forced the democratic states to commit disastrous and, it could be, fatal mistakes. It has also transformed the assemblies in most, perhaps not in all, democratic states from defenders of local and personal rights (of the two components) into boss-ridden oligarchies [lower level, predatory controllers], threatening the security, the solvency, and the liberties of the state [the social system as a whole]."19 pp. 54-55.
  Lippmann now states the systems-theoretic meaning of democratic constitutions: "In the traditions of Western society, civilized government is founded on the assumption that the two powers [controller and work component] exercising the two [Cybernetic] functions will be in balance-that they will check, restrain, compensate; complement, inform and vitalize each other."
  His diagnosis, stated in the same non-scientific language is, that "In this century, the balance of the two powers has been seriously upset. Two great streams of evolution have converged upon the modern democracies to devitalize, to enfeeble, and to eviscerate the executive [control] power."
  There is another stream which Lippmann discusses later on, but which precedes and underlies the ones he describes here: the stream of specializations which has eroded the West's awareness of the Cybernetic nature and operation of their psycho-political systems, making its statesmen and political scientists helpless to understand the catastrophe, and prone to increase it by their very efforts at correction.
  "One [great stream]," Lippmann continues, "is the enormous expansion of public expenditure, chiefly for war and reconstruction; this has augmented the power of the assemblies [representing the work component] which vote the appropriations on which the executive depends. The other development which has acted to enfeeble the executive power [controller] is the growing incapacity of the large majority of the democratic peoples to believe in intangible realities. This has stripped the government of that imponderable authority which is derived from traditional, immemorial usage, consecration, veneration, prescription, prestige, heredity, hierarchy."19 pp. 54-56.
  --
  The parts of Unified Science are mutually illuminating, reciprocally correcting, and Circle expanding. Among these parts is the microcosm: the mentalities of all the human Periods and Strata, from naked Hunters and Gatherers in dry Australian deserts to space-suited, computer-guided astronauts on the airless moon. Unified Science conveys to each of these microcosms, and internalizes within it, the macrocosm's verifiable and compelling natural and moral law.34
  In the light of this Full Circle, the above-mapped 19th century American and 20th century Soviet webs-of-mind gain meaning and permit prediction. For in both of these cultures the distinction between controller and work component, Minority and Majority, is clear, and their ordination is Cybernetically correct. Each of these systems had, or has, a public philosophy at the time in question which accords with the central order in regard to the superordination of controller over work component. Unified Science permits us to formulate the problem of open and selective admissions and to predict the outcomes of these alternative solutions as follows:
  
  --
  What are these changes in curriculum and classroom styles? They involve a lowering of abstraction ceilings and of vocabulary levels; a lowering of the essential training for which the College was established, and which every Industrial civilization's Minority has got to have if their culture is to survive, let alone to advance.
  That these changes are hated is natural. And they are hated not just by professors, but by the qualified students of both Minority and Majority, whom they prevent from receiving the high-level training for which they have the inborn capacity, and which they must get if they are to fill the leadership vacuum, correct the system's Cybernetic derangement, and halt our society's catastrophic decline.47
  These "changes in curriculum and classroom style"--this decline in the level of thought and education--will rapidly change this institution's reputation in the same direction. Its academic degrees will decline in competitive value, and the coactions between the majority of open admissions students (mapped at the outer ends of this web-of-mind), and the rest of the students, the faculty, and the community will consequently become objectively negative. They will become so, regardless of what they appear to be subjectively to those who gladly sacrifice time, effort, money and reputation in the hope of benefiting the slightly above average Majority, but who in reality damage far more of them than they help.48
  --
  Bergson has already stated the [illegitimate] specialist's inclination to conceive of his subject matter in terms of his method rather than the other way around. [But] he had not pointed out in any detail . . . the various slights of hand [read unconscious mistakes) which turn abstractions from processes into factorial [empirical] entities assumed to partake in the process as such. . . Where the statistical method is used, not for its legitimate end of clarifying the structure of large bodies of relevant data but of predicting the structure of human events to come, [illegitimate] specialistic attitudes are characterized by an inclination to reduce events to mere occurrences, focusing on their comparative numbers without questioning the basis of comparison used, remaining blind to the specific event-nature of each, and never inquiring into those elemental processes behind them-revelation of which would invalidate the cherished technique from the start.51
  He then touches upon the heart of the danger in which illegitimate specialists involve our culture; the self perpetuating Cybernetic structure displayed in Figure IV-10, which Mr. Stafford Beer has called the meta-threat: "The circularity of the method, a closed system inaccessible to any such observations as would interfere with its own premises..." The specialist's conscious input comes from his own non-systemic field. His detector screens out inputs from the rest of the system of which he is studying a part; and from other functionally related ones. His conscious (subjective] output goes to his own traditional field, though his objective outputs may go disastrously to others as what he calls "side effects." These are, however, screened out by his detector, preventing him from becoming aware of and correcting his mistakes; also, from listening to or understanding those who try to point them out. We shall return to these figures in Chapter V.
  FIGURE IV-10 The unorganized specialist--unassemblable product of the multiversity.
  --
  
  The New University. Stafford Beer affirms that "The fresh design of a meta-system, exerting meta-controls, is the only solution to our problem. The problem is for Cybernetics to discover, and to make abundantly clear to the world, what meta-systems truly are. . ." In fact, he says, "We should create a meta-system to handle the meta-threat."53,54
  Our Council has been working hard at this for twenty-odd years, and I a good deal longer. Let's first look at the over-all structure of the New University which we propose; and at its strategic products, the generalist and the organized specialist. Then we can analyze its internal structure, the meta-theory and meta-language which make these products possible.
  --
  If these resources are granted, not only the solutions above, but those to scores of other problems called for in Clash of Culture will emerge cumulatively, and will transform this culture clash into constructive orientation: in terms of Figure IV-11 it will change the multiversity's ad hoc improvisation into rational assembly of "Compatible background theories, coherently mapped into the Periodic coordinate system," resulting in "A single, dynamic, holistic, evolving discipline: the Public Philosophy. This is, and will become more clearly, the Public Philosophy of the Space Age."34
  Figure IV-11 is a detail-less plan at whose center is a merely synoptic indication of the New University's controller, the New University Council. The point however is, as Stafford Beer emphasizes with heavy type, that PLANNING IS HOMOLOGOUS WITH ORGANIZATION.53 It takes a Cybernetic system like the New University, conducted by generalists and organized specialists (Figure VI-12 below), to grasp and deal with whole Cybernetic systems. To understand Cybernetic systems requires systems-theoretically structured minds and institutions of higher learning. (Hence the invisibility of Unified Science to otherwise excellent scientists.)
  What Figure IV-11 shows is such an institution's work component (on the left), its controller (in the center), and its output (on the right). Now let us diagram its output in detail: generalists and organized specialists. (The organized specialist differs from the generalist only in this: one of his input channels is strongly emphasized and articulated.) Since the result of the Council's planning, generalists and organized specialists, is isomorphic (Stafford Beer's "homologous") with the Council's structure, it follows that the Council must consist of organized specialists and generalists.60
  --
  This is what George C. Lodge calls the new ideology.61 For it includes ecology, and opens the way to its formulation as part of the universal order. And ecology, as Lodge affirms, "has dramatized as no body of knowledge ever has before [but Unified Science has much better since] that everything is related to everything else. It deals a body blow to the individualistic, atomistic view of man espoused by Hobbes and Locke and compels us to concentrate on man as a part of an organic social system, a community, a circle of interrelated facts and elements which are physical and psychological, rational and irrational, technological and spiritual, a circle which in truth is global in scope."52
  Herewith, our Lower Industrial civilization has come full circle to where it transmutes up to the Higher Industrial Period, or dies. The empirical, inductive, pragmatic mode of thought which shattered the Medieval Circle of Perfection gives rise in the New University to a single, coherent background theory: Industrial civilization's Circle of Perfectibility, the Generalists' and Organized Specialists' consensus. Leibniz' prediction that Unified Science would include ethics, politics, and jurisprudence flows inevitably from his prophetic understanding of the world; his vision of it as what now is called a Cybernetic system.58 For the highest degree of automatization is the highest form of organization: the control of power by values. Lodge calls this "the philosophical transformation about which we have no choice--it is happening and there is no going backward."
  
  --
  26. Warner, W. Lloyd and Leo Srole, The Social Systems of American Ethnic Groups, Yale Univ. Press; Oxford Univ. Press, 1949.
  27. The writer was raised in a missionary family which had, for two generations, oscillated back and forth between the U.S.A. and the Black Sea. They had become citizens of the Atlantic Community long before anyone recognized its existence. The diverse value-systems of the Minority, Inner Majority and Outer Majority; of the various social Strata within these; of the ethnic nationalities comprising these Cybernetic system-components; and of the social scientists who study them are set forth in Edward Haskell's Lance-A Novel about Multi-Cultural Men (John Day, New York, 1941).
  28. Padover, Saul K., ed., Thomas Jefferson on Democracy, New American Library, New York, 1946, p. 82.
  --
  53. Beer, Stafford, "The Liberty Machine," Futures, Dec. 1971.
  54. Stafford Beer has been Head of the Department of Operations Research and Cybernetics, The United Steel Companies Limited. He is now President of the Operational Research Society, and Visiting Professor of Cybernetics at Manchester University. This and following quotations are taken from his keynote address to the Conference on the Environment, American Society for Cybernetics, Washington, D.C., October, 1970.
  55. Some people, who have not yet grasped the cumulative nature of the System-hierarchy, call it Post-Industrial, or Post-Technological culture. The term Post, however, implies that in it, industry or technology have ended. This is not, and cannot possibly be the case. Industry must exist, but be controlled, and thus modified, by the new Public Philosophy. Hence the term Higher Industrial Culture.
  --
  What Nietzsche has called `sovereign becoming' is upon us and theory, far from having where to stand beyond it, is chained to its chariot, in harness before it or dragged in its tracks-which, it is hard to tell in the dust of the race, and sure it is only that not theory is the charioteer (Hans Jonas)2.
  We now do have a theory that stands beyond the theory described by Jonas, theory generated by the one-field disciplines. This theory, which stands for Unified Science, represents Nietzsche's "sovereign becoming" itself, and does so Cybernetically (see Figure V-1 overleaf).
  FIGURE V-1 The one-field sciences' reciprocal development of deductive theory and inductive observation and experimentation.--Rightward arrows represent feedforths; leftward arrows, feedbacks.3
  --
  The condition for Jonas' two different forms of knowledge to coexist and further each other is that they be mutually compatible, and that both be amenable to empirical verification or disproof. Both of these conditions are fulfilled by Unified Science, an assertion which is sure to be put to adequate tests.
  It has, in fact, been tested constantly during the thirty-odd years of its development. During this time, Unified Science has itself undergone the Cybernetic kind of development diagrammed in Figure V-1. Its nature, however, has determined the direction of its development: this direction has consisted in the kinds of change that physical compasses have displayed: the Periodic coordinate system has become ever more precise, versatile, reliable, and widely applicable. For where the nature and purpose of an instrument is normative--as it is in compasses, whether physical or moral--increase of normativity is the built-in direction of the instrument's development. By the same token, where a theory's nature and purpose is the discovery and refinement of relationships sub specie localis, as are those of the one-field sciences (Figures IV-9, 10), its built-in mode of development is an increase of analytical detail, and its cosmic direction is unascertainable except relative to a normative frame of reference.
  "In its positive aspect", Jonas out, "good will is for the good and must therefore be informed by a conception of what is good . . . If there is a knowledge of it, not [one field) science can supply it. Mere benevolence cannot replace it--nor even love, if love without reverence; and whence can reverence come except from a knowledge of what is to be revered?" Then comes the paralyzing portent of despair: "But even if a guiding knowledge of the good, that is, true philosophy were available, it might well find its counsel to be of no avail against the self generated dynamics of science in use." p. 197.2
  --
  Class cooperation (n.) Symbiosis (q.v.) between a civilization's Majority or work component (q.v.) and its Minority or controller (q.v.). This coaction (q.v.) is essential to a culture's genesis, stability and upward (Omega-ward, q.v.) development. The normal condition of Apollonian cultures; e.g. the Pueblo Indians or modern Switzerland. (See Figure V-4). A condition termed "impossible" by Marxist theory, because the negative value-bias (q.v.) of its formal structure makes it (subjectively) "impossible". C.f. Front, vertical; "Classless" society; contrast with Class conflict; Front, horizontal.
  Classless" society (n.) Marxist concept of a "future state of society" in which Majority or work component (q.v.) and Minority or controller (q.v.) are affirmed to "disappear". This concept, which contradicts systems theory and Cybernetics and has no empirical support, was substituted for the concept of class cooperation (q.v.) because the negative value-bias (q.v.) of Marxist theory precludes the concept of class cooperation or symbiosis (q.v.). "Classless" society therefore is always said to exist in the "future". Existing socialist societies are necessarily governed by a controlling class. (See Milovan Djilas' New Class.) But since the possibility of class cooperation is precluded by the incorrect structure of Marxist theory (see Chapter V), this controller is given another name: "Vanguard of the Proletariat". Workers who revolt against this controller, called Leftists, are especially strong in France.
  Coaction (n.) Any of the nine theoretically possible types of relation between a system's work component and controller in regard to any given activity or goal (Tel). Coaction is defined as the direction of any given system's radius vector. C.f. Coaction compass; Value, moral.Goaction (n.) Any of the nine theoretically possible types of relation between a system's work component and controller in regard to any given activity or goal (Tel). Coaction is defined as the direction of any given system's radius vector. C.f. Coaction compass; Value, moral.
  --
  Control (n.) The converse of function in the systemic and mathematical sense (q.v.). E.g. If R = f ( ) then has or is the control of R: = c ( R ). Control is to "Dominate, command; hold in check (oneself, one's anger); check, verify". Concise Oxford Dictionary, 1942. Human control may occur through wisdom, persuasion, deception, conviction, the ballot, or physical force. It is displayed by the Minority (q.v.), whether Capitalist, Communist, fascist, Social Capitalist (q.v.), or other. C.f. Controller; Moral force.
  Controller (n.) The component in a Cybernetic system which reacts to a change in the output, providing a signal that alters the output toward the system's established goal. The more strategic entity in an ordinated relationship (q.v.) between the two basic components of Cybernetic systems, the less strategic being its work component. C.f. Control, Ordination, Work component, Strategicity.
  Coordinate system Coordinates are numbered points on a straight line or axis. A coordinate system can be one-dimensional, e.g. the (spurious) political "spectrum"; two-dimensional, e.g. rectangularly crossed X and Y axes; three-dimensional, e.g. rectangularly crossed X, Y and Z axes; and so on to n-dimensional. C.f. Periodic coordinate system.
  Cultural (adj.) (human). C.f. Abiotic, Biotic.
  Cybernetics (n.) The science of behavior, communication, control and organization (q.v.) in organisms, machines, societies and other systems. Its salient characteristic is feedback or retroaction (q.v.).
  Devolution (n.) Degenerative development, gradual or sudden, toward a lower level of organization; geometrically, in the direction of Alpha (in the Periodic coordinate system). C.f. Breakdown, Disintegration.
  --
  Ectropy (n.) (Term coined by W. V. Quine, 1969.) Increasing organization. In Greek, ectropy means turning out. Increasing ectropy is represented in Periodic geometry (q.v.) by the coaction cardioid's (q.v.) turning out of the referencezero circle (q.v.). (See also Entropy, Atropy.)
  Effector, Constancy A Cybernetic system which holds close to a norm or constant goal. C.f. Tendency Effector.
  Pierre de Latil Thinking by Machine--A Study of Cybernetics. Saunders, London, 1968.
  Effector, Tendency A Cybernetic system which tends away from its norm toward a maximum or a minimum, e.g. an atomic bomb. C.f. Effector, constancy.
  Pierre de Latil Thinking by Machine--A Study of Cybernetics. Saunders, London, 1968.
  Empire, natural (coined term) A member of the system-hierarchy of empirical systems (Fig. II-1b) consisting of ("containing") all lower members of the hierarchy plus an emerged controller. Each natural Empire or Major Period (q.v.) bears the name of its highest major Stratum (q.v.) or natural kingdom (q.v.). Thus, the natural Empire of man is his ecosystem, the solar system.
  --
  Moral force The capacity to direct or orient a system's coactions (q.v.) or quality (q.v.), thereby to control its properties (q.v.) C.f. Moral Law, Periodic Law, General.
  Moral Law The general law of which Mendelee'v Periodic Law is the special atomic case. Traditionally, "As ye plant, so shall ye reap." Cybernetically, "The properties of systems are functions of coaction," (q.v.). C.f. Moral force, Quality, Quantity.
  Noise (n.) As used in information theory: impurities in a signal (q.v.), including fouling (q.v.), which diminish or eliminate its information (q.v.).
  --
  Periodic coordinate system The coordinate system of Unified Science. (See Chapters I and II). Obtained by generalization of the Periodic Table of chemical elements. The coordinate system into which all Periodic Tables (q.v.) can be mapped hierarchically.
  Periodic geometry The geometry related to the coordinate systems of unified science and represented by the Periodic, the Alpha and the Inverted Periodic coordinate systems (q.v.). Generated by combining Cybernetic with geometric principles.
  Periodic Law, chemical The properties of the chemical elements are Periodic functions of their atomic numbers. (D. I. Mendeleev, 1869). A special case of the General Periodic Law (q.v.).
  --
  System, closed A non-existent theoretical system which receives no inputs (q.v.) and emits no outputs (q.v.). C.f. System, open.
  System, Empirical Any concrete instance of the general system (q.v.), especially in which controller and work component (q.v.) are Cybernetically related (q.v.); in which space-time boundaries are discernable, into which more inputs, and out of which outputs of energy or information (q.v.).
  System, general (Defined by Haskell and Cassidy ca. 1950) A space-time region bounded by clear but not complete breaks of interdependence; the non-breaks consisting of inputs and outputs, and the inter-dependence consisting of causal and retroactive sequences between the system's basic components: work component and controller (q.v.).
  --
  Web of mind (coined term) The mental relationships, especially coactions (q.v.), among members of an institution or culture. (See Figures IV-5, IV-6.). C.f. Web of life.
  Work Component The large and powerful component of a Cybernetic system whose operation is influenced by the governor or controller. The less strategic entity in an ordinated relationship (q.v.).
  Work Component The large and powerful component of a Cybernetic system whose operation is influenced by the governor or controller. The less strategic entity in an ordinated relationship (q.v.). In the Periodic coordinate system (q.v.), the work component is mapped on the X axis. C.f. Controller, ordination, strategicity.
  Zero, scalar (coined term) Synonym of reference zero, q.v.

class, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
     4 determiner
     4 Cybernetics
     4 C S Lewis

The_Act_of_Creation_text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  appropriate to the wet software that lives inside the skull. After a decade of
  Cybernetics you might think the translation from one of these languages into the
  other would be fairly simple, but that was not the case. The relation between
  --
  
  To p. 634. Cyberneticists have discussed at length models which are supposed
  to be capable of this feat. But they have no bearing on the question of awareness.

change font "color":
change "background-color":
change "font-family": 44673 site hits